Science.gov

Sample records for block protein interactions

  1. The nature of protein interactions governing globular protein-polymer block copolymer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher N; Kim, Minkyu; Thomas, Carla S; Chang, Dongsook; Sanoja, Gabriel E; Okwara, Chimdimma U; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-04-14

    The effects of protein surface potential on the self-assembly of protein-polymer block copolymers are investigated in globular proteins with controlled shape through two approaches: comparison of self-assembly of mCherry-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) bioconjugates with structurally homologous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-PNIPAM bioconjugates, and mutants of mCherry with altered electrostatic patchiness. Despite large changes in amino acid sequence, the temperature-concentration phase diagrams of EGFP-PNIPAM and mCherry-PNIPAM conjugates have similar phase transition concentrations. Both materials form identical phases at two different coil fractions below the PNIPAM thermal transition temperature and in the bulk. However, at temperatures above the thermoresponsive transition, mCherry conjugates form hexagonal phases at high concentrations while EGFP conjugates form a disordered micellar phase. At lower concentration, mCherry shows a two-phase region while EGFP forms homogeneous disordered micellar structures, reflecting the effect of changes in micellar stability. Conjugates of four mCherry variants with changes to their electrostatic surface patchiness also showed minimal change in phase behavior, suggesting that surface patchiness has only a small effect on the self-assembly process. Measurements of protein/polymer miscibility, second virial coefficients, and zeta potential show that these coarse-grained interactions are similar between mCherry and EGFP, indicating that coarse-grained interactions largely capture the relevant physics for soluble, monomeric globular protein-polymer conjugate self-assembly.

  2. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C.C.; Topisirovic, I.; Djavani, M.; Borden, K.L.B.; Damonte, E.B.; Salvato, M.S.

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  3. Cyclosporine inhibits flavivirus replication through blocking the interaction between host cyclophilins and viral NS5 protein.

    PubMed

    Qing, Min; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Zou, Gang; Robida, John M; Yuan, Zhiming; Tang, Hengli; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2009-08-01

    Although flaviviruses cause significant human diseases, no effective therapy is currently available. Host factors essential for viral replication are potential targets for antiviral development. Here we report that cyclophilins (CyPs), a family of cellular peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases), play a role in flavivirus replication. Huh-7.5 cells with knockdown of different isoforms of CyP were less efficient than parental cells in supporting flavivirus replication, including West Nile virus (WNV), dengue virus, and yellow fever virus. The low viral replication in CyP A (CyPA) knockdown cells could be rescued by trans supplying of a wild-type CyPA but not by trans supplying of a mutant CyPA (defective in the PPIase activity), indicating that the isomerase activity of CyPA is critical for viral replication. Immunoprecipitation and biochemical pulldown analyses showed that CyPA interacts with WNV genomic RNA and viral NS5 protein in the replication complex. Furthermore, antiviral experiments demonstrated that cyclosporine (Cs; an 11-amino-acid cyclic peptide known to block the PPIase activity of CyPA) inhibits flavivirus replication in cell culture at nontoxic concentrations. Time-of-addition and transient replicon results indicated that Cs inhibits flavivirus at the step of viral RNA synthesis. Biochemical analysis showed that Cs directly blocks the interaction between CyPA and WNV NS5 protein. Our results suggest that host CyPA is a component of flavivirus replication complex and could be targeted for potential antiviral development.

  4. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  5. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation-dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel C; Hammill, Jared T; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C; Goktug, Asli N; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A; Cannon, Joe R; Shelat, Anang A; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R; Alpi, Arno F; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Harper, J Wade; Schulman, Brenda A; Guy, R Kip

    2017-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ∼80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation-dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide-binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2-E3 ligases.

  6. RVMAB: Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Average Blocks to Predict the Interactions of Proteins from Protein Sequences.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Yong; You, Zhu-Hong; Meng, Fan-Rong; Xu, Shu-Juan; Wang, Yin

    2016-05-18

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play essential roles in most cellular processes. Knowledge of PPIs is becoming increasingly more important, which has prompted the development of technologies that are capable of discovering large-scale PPIs. Although many high-throughput biological technologies have been proposed to detect PPIs, there are unavoidable shortcomings, including cost, time intensity, and inherently high false positive and false negative rates. For the sake of these reasons, in silico methods are attracting much attention due to their good performances in predicting PPIs. In this paper, we propose a novel computational method known as RVM-AB that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model and Average Blocks (AB) to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the AB feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) based classifier. We performed five-fold cross-validation experiments on yeast and Helicobacter pylori datasets, and achieved very high accuracies of 92.98% and 95.58% respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. In addition, we also obtained good prediction accuracies of 88.31%, 89.46%, 91.08%, 91.55%, and 94.81% on other five independent datasets C. elegans, M. musculus, H. sapiens, H. pylori, and E. coli for cross-species prediction. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier on the yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-AB method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool. To facilitate extensive studies for future proteomics research, we developed a freely

  7. Quantifying ERK2-protein interactions by fluorescence anisotropy: PEA-15 inhibits ERK2 by blocking the binding of DEJL domains.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Kari; Rainey, Mark A; Dalby, Kevin N

    2005-12-30

    While mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways constitute highly regulated networks of protein-protein interactions, little quantitative information for these interactions is available. Here we highlight recent fluorescence anisotropy binding studies that focus on the interactions of ERK1 and ERK2 with PEA-15 (antiapoptotic phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kDa), a small protein that sequesters ERK2 in the cytoplasm. The regulation of ERK2 by PEA-15 is appraised in the light of a simple equilibrium-binding model for reversible ERK2 nucleoplasmic-cytoplasmic shuttling, which elaborates on the theory of Burack and Shaw (J. Biol. Chem. 280, 3832-3837; 2005). Also highlighted is the recent observation that the peptide N-QKGKPRDLELPLSPSL-C, derived from the docking site for ERK/JNK and LEL (DEJL) in Elk-1, displaces PEA-15 from ERK2. It is proposed that the C-terminus of PEA-15 ((121)LXLXXXXKK(129)) is a reverse DEJL domain [which has a general consensus of R/K-phi(A)-X(3/4)-phi(B), where phi(A) and phi(B) are hydrophobic residues (Leu, Ile, or Val)], which mediates one arm of a bidentate PEA-15 interaction with ERK2. The notion that PEA-15 is a potent inhibitor of many ERK2-mediated phosphorylations, by virtue of its ability to block ERK2-DEJL domain interactions, is proposed.

  8. Virtual screening and selection of drug-like compounds to block noggin interaction with bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shaila; Metpally, Raghu Prasad Rao; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B

    2010-04-01

    Noggin is a major natural extracellular antagonist to bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) which binds to BMPs and blocks binding of them to BMP-specific receptors and thus negatively regulates BMP-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) signal through heteromeric protein complexes composed of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. Preventing the BMP-2/noggin interaction will preserve free BMP-2 and enhance the efficacy of BMP-2 to induce bone formation. This work is an attempt to use the current understanding of BMP-2, and its interaction with its receptors and antagonist to design an inhibitor of BMP-2/noggin interaction with the goal of lowering the dose of BMP-2 required in clinical applications. The crystal structure of the BMP-7/noggin complex, the BMP-2/BMP receptor IA ectodomain complex and the extracellular domain of BMP receptor II monomer are known. We modeled the BMP-2 based on the structure of its homologue BMP-7 and its binding complex with noggin. We also modeled a complex of BMP-2/BMPRIA/BMPRII by modeling BMPRII and replacing ActRIIB in the BMP-2/BMPRIA/ActRIIB complex. We then identified the binding region of noggin with BMP-2 and the receptors with BMP-2. From the analysis of structures of these complexes and modeling we identified the key amino acids present in the entire interacting surfaces among these proteins that play important physiological role in the regulation of cell differentiation and bone metabolism. By in silico screening we selected and ranked several compounds that have high theoretical scores to bind to noggin to block BMP-noggin interaction.

  9. Blocking the Interactions between Calcium-Bound S100A12 Protein and the V Domain of RAGE Using Tranilast

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jian Wei; Fu, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor in the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in several inflammatory processes. RAGE induces cellular signaling pathways upon binding with various ligands, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), β-amyloids, and S100 proteins. The solution structure of S100A12 and the V ligand-binding region of RAGE have been reported previously. Using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to conduct 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) titration experiments, we identified and mapped the binding interface between S100A12 and the V domain of RAGE. The NMR chemical shift data were used as the constraints for the High Ambiguity Driven biomolecular DOCKing (HADDOCK) calculation to generate a structural model of the S100A12–V domain complex. In addition, tranilast (an anti-allergic drug) showed strong interaction with S100A12 in the 1H–15N HSQC titration, fluorescence experiments, and WST-1 assay. The results also indicated that tranilast was located at the binding site between S100A12 and the V domain, blocking interaction between these two proteins. Our results provide the mechanistic details for a structural model and reveal a potential precursor for an inhibitor for pro-inflammatory diseases, which could be useful for the development of new drugs. PMID:27598566

  10. Targeting Multiple Conformations Leads to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the uPAR·uPA Protein-Protein Interaction that Block Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, May; Wang, Fang; Jo, Inha; Knabe, W. Eric; Wilson, Sarah M.; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Li, Jing; Sledge, George; Khanna, Rajesh; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of the urokinase receptor (uPAR) with its binding partners including the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) at the cell surface triggers a series of proteolytic and signaling events that promote invasion and metastasis. Here, we report the discovery of a small molecule (IPR-456) and its derivatives that inhibit the tight uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. IPR-456 was discovered by virtual screening against multiple conformations of uPAR sampled from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Biochemical characterization reveal that the compound binds to uPAR with sub-micromolar affinity (Kd = 310 nM) and inhibits the tight protein-protein interaction with an IC50 of 10 μM. Free energy calculations based on explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations suggested the importance of a carboxylate moiety on IPR-456, which was confirmed by the activity of several derivatives including IPR-803. Immunofluorescence imaging showed that IPR-456 inhibited uPA binding to uPAR of breast MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with an IC50 of 8 μM. The compounds blocked MDA-MB-231 cell invasion, but IPR-456 showed little effect on MDA-MB-231 migration, and no effect on adhesion, suggesting that uPAR mediates these processes through its other binding partners. PMID:21875078

  11. Cell-to-cell movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus: I. Heterologous complementation experiments provide evidence for specific interactions among the triple gene block proteins.

    PubMed

    Lauber, E; Bleykasten-Grosshans, C; Erhardt, M; Bouzoubaa, S; Jonard, G; Richards, K E; Guilley, H

    1998-07-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) requires three proteins encoded by a triple gene block (TGB) on viral RNA 2. A BNYVV RNA 3-derived replicon was used to express movement proteins to functionally substitute for the BNYVV TGB proteins was tested by coinoculation of TGB-defective BNYVV with the various replicons to Chenopodium quinoa. Trans-heterocomplementation was successful with the movement protein (P30) of tobacco mosaic virus but not with the tubule-forming movement proteins of alfalfa mosaic virus and grapevine fanleaf virus. Trans-complementation of BNYVV movement was also observed when all three TGB proteins of the distantly related peanut clump virus were supplied together but not when they were substituted for their BNYVV counterparts one by one. When P30 was used to drive BNYVV movement in trans, accumulation of the first TGB protein of BNYVV was adversely affected by null mutations in the second and third TGB proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that highly specific interactions among cognate TGB proteins are important for their function and/or stability in planta.

  12. Induction of Androgen Formation in the Male by a TAT-VDAC1 Fusion Peptide Blocking 14-3-3ɛ Protein Adaptor and Mitochondrial VDAC1 Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B; Fan, Jinjiang; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-01-01

    Low testosterone (T), a major cause of male hypogonadism and infertility, is linked to mood changes, fatigue, osteoporosis, reduced bone-mass index, and aging. The treatment of choice, T replacement therapy, has been linked with increased risk for prostate cancer and luteinizing hormone (LH) suppression, and shown to lead to infertility, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity. Alternate methods to induce T with lower side effects are desirable. In search of the mechanisms regulating T synthesis in the testes, we identified the 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor as a negative regulator of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis begins in mitochondria. 14-3-3ɛ interacts with the outer mitochondrial membrane voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein, forming a scaffold that limits the availability of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. We report the development of a tool able to induce endogenous T formation. Peptides able to penetrate testes conjugated to 14-3-3ɛ site of interaction with VDAC1 blocked 14-3-3ɛ-VDAC1 interactions while at the same time increased VDAC1-translocator protein (18 kDa) interactions that induced steroid formation in rat testes, leading to increased serum T levels. These peptides rescued intratesticular and serum T formation in adult male rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, which dampened LH and T production. PMID:24947306

  13. Induction of androgen formation in the male by a TAT-VDAC1 fusion peptide blocking 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor and mitochondrial VDAC1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B; Fan, Jinjiang; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-10-01

    Low testosterone (T), a major cause of male hypogonadism and infertility, is linked to mood changes, fatigue, osteoporosis, reduced bone-mass index, and aging. The treatment of choice, T replacement therapy, has been linked with increased risk for prostate cancer and luteinizing hormone (LH) suppression, and shown to lead to infertility, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity. Alternate methods to induce T with lower side effects are desirable. In search of the mechanisms regulating T synthesis in the testes, we identified the 14-3-3ɛ protein adaptor as a negative regulator of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis begins in mitochondria. 14-3-3ɛ interacts with the outer mitochondrial membrane voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein, forming a scaffold that limits the availability of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. We report the development of a tool able to induce endogenous T formation. Peptides able to penetrate testes conjugated to 14-3-3ɛ site of interaction with VDAC1 blocked 14-3-3ɛ-VDAC1 interactions while at the same time increased VDAC1-translocator protein (18 kDa) interactions that induced steroid formation in rat testes, leading to increased serum T levels. These peptides rescued intratesticular and serum T formation in adult male rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, which dampened LH and T production.

  14. Heartland virus NSs protein disrupts host defenses by blocking the TBK1 kinase-IRF3 transcription factor interaction and signaling required for interferon induction.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yun-Jia; Feng, Kuan; Min, Yuan-Qin; Deng, Fei; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2017-10-06

    Heartland virus (HRTV) is a pathogenic phlebovirus related to the severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), another phlebovirus causing life-threatening disease in humans. Previous findings have suggested that SFTSV can antagonize the host interferon (IFN) system via viral nonstructural protein (NSs)-mediated sequestration of antiviral signaling proteins into NSs-induced inclusion bodies. However, whether and how HRTV counteracts the host innate immunity is unknown. Here, we report that HRTV NSs (HNSs) also antagonizes IFN and cytokine induction and bolsters viral replication, although no noticeable inclusion body formation was observed in HNSs-expressing cells. Furthermore, HNSs inhibited the virus-triggered activation of IFN-β promoter by specifically targeting the IFN-stimulated response element but not the NF-κB response element. Consistently, HNSs blocked the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, an IFN-stimulated response element-activating transcription factor). Reporter gene assays next showed that HNSs blockades the antiviral signaling mediated by RIG-I-like receptors likely at the level of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). Indeed, HNSs strongly interacts with TBK1 as indicated by confocal microscopy and pulldown analyses, and we also noted that the scaffold dimerization domain of TBK1 is required for the TBK1-HNSs interaction. Finally, pulldown assays demonstrated that HNSs expression dose-dependently diminishes a TBK1-IRF3 interaction, further explaining the mechanism for HNSs function. Collectively, these data suggest that HNSs, an antagonist of host innate immunity, interacts with TBK1 and thereby hinders the association of TBK1 with its substrate IRF3, thus blocking IRF3 activation and transcriptional induction of the cellular antiviral responses. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using 1H-15N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27226584

  16. Tranilast Blocks the Interaction between the Protein S100A11 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) V Domain and Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Kai; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-07-01

    The human S100 calcium-binding protein A11 (S100A11) is a member of the S100 protein family. Once S100A11 proteins bind to calcium ions at EF-hand motifs, S100A11 changes its conformation, promoting interaction with target proteins. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) consists of three extracellular domains, including the V domain, C1 domain, and C2 domain. In this case, the V domain is the target for mutant S100A11 (mS100A11) binding. RAGE binds to the ligands, resulting in cell proliferation, cell growth, and several signal transduction cascades. We used NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to demonstrate the interactions between mS100A11and RAGE V domain. The tranilast molecule is a drug used for treating allergic disorders. We discovered that the RAGE V domain and tranilast would interact with mS100A11 by using (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR titrations. According to the results, we obtained two binary complex models from the HADDOCK program, S100A11-RAGE V domain and S100A11-tranilast, respectively. We overlapped two binary complex models with the same orientation of S100A11 homodimer and demonstrated that tranilast would block the binding site between S100A11 and the RAGE V domain. We further utilized a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay to confirm this result. We think that the results will be potentially useful in the development of new anti-cancer drugs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. MIBSA: Multi Interacting Blocks for Slope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattola, Giuseppe; Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; di Prisco, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    As it is well known, the slope instabilities have very important consequences in terms of human lives and activities. So predicting the evolution in time and space of slope mass movements becomes fundamental. This is even more relevant when we consider that the triggering mechanisms are a rising ground water level and the occurrence of earthquakes. Therefore, seasonal rainfall has a direct influence on the triggering of large rock and earthslide with a composite failure surface and causing differential behaviors within the sliding mass. In this contribution, a model describing the slope mass by means of an array of blocks that move on a prefixed failure surface, is defined. A shear band located at the base of each block, whose behavior is modelled via a viscous plastic model based on the Perzyna's approach, controls the slip velocity of the block. The motion of the blocks is obtained by solving the second balance equation in which the normal and tangential interaction forces are obtained by a specific interaction model. The model has been implemented in an original code and it is used to perform a parametric analysis that describes the effects of block interactions under a transient ground water oscillation. The numerical results confirm that the normal and tangential interactions between blocks can inhibit or induce the slope movements. The model is tested against some real case studies. This model is under development to add the dynamic effects generated by earthquake shaking.

  18. Responsive block copolymer photonics triggered by protein-polyelectrolyte coacervation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yin; Tang, Shengchang; Thomas, Edwin L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-11-25

    Ionic interactions between proteins and polyelectrolytes are demonstrated as a method to trigger responsive transitions in block copolymer (BCP) photonic gels containing one neutral hydrophobic block and one cationic hydrophilic block. Poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) blocks in lamellar poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) block copolymer thin films are quaternized with primary bromides to yield swollen gels that show strong reflectivity peaks in the visible range; exposure to aqueous solutions of various proteins alters the swelling ratios of the quaternized P2VP (QP2VP) gel layers in the PS-QP2VP materials due to the ionic interactions between proteins and the polyelectrolyte. Parameters such as charge density, hydrophobicity, and cross-link density of the QP2VP gel layers as well as the charge and size of the proteins play significant roles on the photonic responses of the BCP gels. Differences in the size and pH-dependent charge of proteins provide a basis for fingerprinting proteins based on their temporal and equilibrium photonic response. The results demonstrate that the BCP gels and their photonic effect provide a robust and visually interpretable method to differentiate different proteins.

  19. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Tina, K. G.; Bhadra, R.; Srinivasan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic–aromatic interactions, aromatic–sulphur interactions and cation–π interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar–apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside. PMID:17584791

  20. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    PubMed

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside.

  1. Nanopatterning of recombinant proteins and viruses using block copolymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresce, Arthur Von Wald

    The study of interfaces is important in understanding biological interactions, including cellular signaling and virus infection. This thesis is an original effort to examine the interaction between a block copolymer and both a protein and a virus. Block copolymers intrinsically form nanometer-scale structures over large areas without expensive processing, making them ideal for the synthesis of the nanopatterned surfaces used in this study. The geometry of these nanostructures can be easily tuned for different applications by altering the block ratio and composition of the block copolymer. Block copolymers can be used for controlled uptake of metal ions, where one block selectively binds metal ions while the other does not. 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid is synthesized through ring-opening metathesis polymerization. It formed spherical domains with spheres approximately 30 nm in diameter, and these spheres were then subsequently loaded with nickel ion. This norbornene block copolymer was tested for its ability to bind histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (hisGFP), and it was found that the nickel-loaded copolymer was able to retain hisGFP through chelation between the histidine tag and the metal-containing portions of the copolymer surface. Poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS/P4VP) was also loaded with nickel, forming a cylindrical microstructure. The binding of Tobacco mosaic virus and Tobacco necrosis virus was tested through Tween 20 detergent washes. Electron microscopy allowed for observation of both block copolymer nanostructures and virus particles. Results showed that Tween washes could not remove bound Tobacco mosaic virus from the surface of PS/P4VP. It was also seen that the size and tunability of block copolymers and the lack of processing needed to attain different structures makes them attractive for many applications, including microfluidic devices, surfaces to influence cellular signaling and growth, and as a nanopatterning surface for

  2. The nuclear localization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor TIP is blocked by its interaction with the coat protein of Turnip crinkle virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Tao; Qu Feng; Morris, T. Jack . E-mail: jmorris@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-01-20

    We have previously reported that TIP, an Arabidopsis protein, interacts with the coat protein (CP) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) in yeast cells and that this interaction correlated with the resistance response in the TCV-resistant Arabidopsis ecotype Dijon-17. TIP was also able to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast cells, suggesting that it is likely a transcription factor. We have now verified the physical interaction between TIP and TCV CP in vitro and showed that CP mutants unable to interact with TIP in yeast cells bind TIP with much lower affinity in vitro. Secondly, we have performed gel shift experiments demonstrating that TIP does not bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The subcellular localization of TIP was also investigated by transiently expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TIP in Nicotiana benthamiana plant cells, which showed that GFP-tagged TIP localizes primarily to nuclei. Significantly, co-expression of TCVCP and GFP-TIP prevented the nuclear localization of TIP. Together, these results suggest that TIP might be a transcription factor involved in regulating the defense response of Arabidopsis to TCV and that its normal role is compromised by interaction with the invading viral CP.

  3. A short survey on protein blocks

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Agarwal, Garima; Mahajan, Swapnil; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Offmann, Bernard; Cadet, Frédéric; Bornot, Aurélie; Tyagi, Manoj; Valadié, Hélène; Schneider, Bohdan; Etchebest, Catherine; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; De Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2010-01-01

    Protein structures are classically described in terms of secondary structures. Even if the regular secondary structures have relevant physical meaning, their recognition from atomic coordinates has some important limitations such as uncertainties in the assignment of boundaries of helical and β-strand regions. Further, on an average about 50% of all residues are assigned to an irregular state, i.e., the coil. Thus different research teams have focused on abstracting conformation of protein backbone in the localized short stretches. Using different geometric measures, local stretches in protein structures are clustered in a chosen number of states. A prototype representative of the local structures in each cluster is generally defined. These libraries of local structures prototypes are named as “structural alphabets”. We have developed a structural alphabet, named Protein Blocks, not only to approximate the protein structure, but also to predict them from sequence. Since its development, we and other teams have explored numerous new research fields using this structural alphabet. We review here some of the most interesting applications. PMID:21731588

  4. Proteins mediating DNA loops effectively block transcription.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Zsuzsanna; Yan, Yan; Kovari, Daniel T; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2017-07-01

    Loops are ubiquitous topological elements formed when proteins simultaneously bind to two noncontiguous DNA sites. While a loop-mediating protein may regulate initiation at a promoter, the presence of the protein at the other site may be an obstacle for RNA polymerases (RNAP) transcribing a different gene. To test whether a DNA loop alters the extent to which a protein blocks transcription, the lac repressor (LacI) was used. The outcome of in vitro transcription along templates containing two LacI operators separated by 400 bp in the presence of LacI concentrations that produced both looped and unlooped molecules was visualized with scanning force microscopy (SFM). An analysis of transcription elongation complexes, moving for 60 s at an average of 10 nt/s on unlooped DNA templates, revealed that they more often surpassed LacI bound to the lower affinity O2 operator than to the highest affinity Os operator. However, this difference was abrogated in looped DNA molecules where LacI became a strong roadblock independently of the affinity of the operator. Recordings of transcription elongation complexes, using magnetic tweezers, confirmed that they halted for several minutes upon encountering a LacI bound to a single operator. The average pause lifetime is compatible with RNAP waiting for LacI dissociation, however, the LacI open conformation visualized in the SFM images also suggests that LacI could straddle RNAP to let it pass. Independently of the mechanism by which RNAP bypasses the LacI roadblock, the data indicate that an obstacle with looped topology more effectively interferes with transcription. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  5. Multiple block grid generation in the interactive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Chawner, John R.; Fouts, Chris L.

    1990-06-01

    Concepts employed in grid generation codes to speed up the process of obtaining a CFD solution are reviewed, including the use of multiple blocks and interactive graphics. The GRIDGEN interactive, multiple block grid generation codes, are presented as an example of grid generation software that employs these techniques. The features of a hypothetical ideal interactive multiple block grid generation code are identified through a brief discussion of existing technology.

  6. A Nonlinear Multi-Scale Interaction Model for Atmospheric Blocking: The Eddy-Blocking Matching Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dehai; Cha, Jing; Zhong, Linhao; Dai, Aiguo

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear multi-scale interaction (NMI) model is used to propose an eddy-blocking matching (EBM) mechanism to account for how synoptic eddies reinforce or suppress a blocking flow. It is shown that the spatial structure of the eddy vorticity forcing (EVF) arising from upstream synoptic eddies determines whether an incipient block can grow into a meandering blocking flow through its interaction with the transient synoptic eddies from the west. Under certain conditions, the EVF exhibits a low-frequency oscillation on timescales of 2-3 weeks. During the EVF phase with a negative-over- positive dipole structure, a blocking event can be resonantly excited through the transport of eddy energy into the incipient block by the EVF. As the EVF changes into an opposite phase, the blocking decays. The NMI model produces life cycles of blocking events that resemble observations. Moreover, it is shown that the eddy north-south straining is a response of the eddies to a dipole- or Ω-type block. In our model, as in observations, two synoptic anticyclones (cyclones) can attract and merge with one another as the blocking intensifies, but only when the feedback of the blocking on the eddies is included. Thus, we attribute the eddy straining and associated vortex interaction to the feedback of the intensified blocking on synoptic eddies. The results illustrate the concomitant nature of the eddy deformation, whose role as a PV source for the blocking flow becomes important only during the mature stage of a block. Our EBM mechanism suggests that an incipient block flow is amplified (or suppressed) under certain conditions by the EVF coming from the upstream of the blocking region.

  7. Interactive protein manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  8. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  9. Individual N-Glycans Added at Intervals along the Stalk of the Nipah Virus G Protein Prevent Fusion but Do Not Block the Interaction with the Homologous F Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiyun; Biering, Scott B.; Mirza, Anne M.; Grasseschi, Brittany A.; Mahon, Paul J.; Lee, Benhur; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2013-01-01

    The promotion of membrane fusion by most paramyxoviruses requires an interaction between the viral attachment and fusion (F) proteins to enable receptor binding by the former to trigger the activation of the latter for fusion. Numerous studies demonstrate that the F-interactive sites on the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) proteins reside entirely within the stalk regions of those proteins. Indeed, stalk residues of NDV HN and MV H that likely mediate the F interaction have been identified. However, despite extensive efforts, the F-interactive site(s) on the Nipah virus (NiV) G attachment glycoprotein has not been identified. In this study, we have introduced individual N-linked glycosylation sites at several positions spaced at intervals along the stalk of the NiV G protein. Five of the seven introduced sites are utilized as established by a retardation of electrophoretic mobility. Despite surface expression, ephrinB2 binding, and oligomerization comparable to those of the wild-type protein, four of the five added N-glycans completely eliminate the ability of the G protein to complement the homologous F protein in the promotion of fusion. The most membrane-proximal added N-glycan reduces fusion by 80%. However, unlike similar NDV HN and MV H mutants, the NiV G glycosylation stalk mutants retain the ability to bind F, indicating that the fusion deficiency of these mutants is not due to prevention of the G-F interaction. These findings suggest that the G-F interaction is not mediated entirely by the stalk domain of G and may be more complex than that of HN/H-F. PMID:23283956

  10. INTERACT: an object oriented protein-protein interaction database.

    PubMed

    Eilbeck, K; Brass, A; Paton, N; Hodgman, C

    1999-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions provide vital information concerning the function of proteins, complexes and networks. Currently there is no widely accepted repository of this interaction information. Our aim is to provide a single database with the necessary architecture to fully store, query and analyse interaction data. An object oriented database has been created which provides scientists with a resource for examining existing protein-protein interactions and inferring possible interactions from the data stored. It also provides a basis for examining networks of interacting proteins, via analysis of the data stored. The database contains over a thousand interactions. k.eilbeck@stud.man.ac.uk

  11. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  12. Vortex-Vortex Interactions for the Maintenance of Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, A.; Itoh, H.

    2012-12-01

    A new eddy-feedback mechanism, the Selective Absorption Mechanism (SAM), is proposed to explain block maintenance. According to this mechanism, which is based on vortex-vortex interactions (i.e., the interactions between a blocking anticyclone and synoptic eddies with the same polarity), a blocking anticyclone actively and selectively absorbs synoptic anticyclones (strictly, air parcels with low potential vorticity). The blocking anticyclone, which is thus supplied with low potential vorticity of the synoptic anticyclones, can subsist for a prolonged period, withstanding dissipation. The SAM was verified in a case study through trajectory analysis. Ten actual cases of blocking were examined. Trajectories were calculated by tracing parcels originating from synoptic anticyclones and cyclones located upstream of the blocking. Parcels starting from anticyclones were attracted to and absorbed by the blocking anticyclone, whereas parcels from cyclones were repelled by the blocking anticyclone and attracted to the blocking cyclone, if one was present. Numerical experiments are also performed. The experiments were based on the nonlinear equivalent-barotropic potential vorticity equation, with varying conditions with respect to the shape and amplitude of blocking, the characteristics of stormtracks (displacement and strength), and the characteristics of background zonal flow, to investigate whether the SAM is adoptable to real situations. The experiments indicate that the SAM effectively maintains blocking, independently of the above conditions. By applying a channel model on a beta-plane, numerical experiments were conducted using a uniform background westerly with a jet. Results show that the presence of a jet promotes the effectiveness of the SAM. Two spherical model experiments were also performed. In an idealized model, the SAM was as effective as the beta-plane model in explaining the maintenance of blocking. Moreover, a quantitative experiment showed that the SAM

  13. Tracking protein aggregate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Jason C; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils share a structural motif consisting of highly ordered β-sheets aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis.1, 2 At each fibril end, β-sheets provide a template for recruiting and converting monomers.3 Different amyloid fibrils often co-occur in the same individual, yet whether a protein aggregate aids or inhibits the assembly of a heterologous protein is unclear. In prion disease, diverse prion aggregate structures, known as strains, are thought to be the basis of disparate disease phenotypes in the same species expressing identical prion protein sequences.4–7 Here we explore the interactions reported to occur when two distinct prion strains occur together in the central nervous system. PMID:21597336

  14. Carotenoid-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George; Helliwell, John R.

    Chapter 5 shows that the aggregation of carotenoid molecules can have a profound effect on their properties and hence their functioning in biological systems. Another important influence is the interaction between carotenoids and other molecules. The way that interactions of carotenoids with lipid bilayers influence the structure and properties of membranes and membrane-asociated processes is discussed in Chapter 10, and the aggregation of carotenoid molecules within the bilayers in Chapter 5. Of particular importance, though, are interactions between carotenoids and proteins. These allow the hydrophobic carotenoids to be transported, to exist, and to function in an aqueous environment. In some cases they may modify strongly the light-absorption properties and hence the colour and photochemistry of the carotenoids.

  15. Ionic Interactions for Aqueous Templating of Biofunctional Molecules in Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley; Kim, Bokyung; Lam, Christopher; Stewart-Sloan, Charlotte; Gkikas, Emmanouil

    2013-03-01

    The use of ionic interactions to direct both biomolecular templating and block copolymer self-assembly into nanopatterned films with only aqueous processing conditions is demonstrated using block copolymers containing both thermally responsive and pH responsive blocks. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization is employed to synthesize diblock copolymers with one neutral thermoresponsive and one polycationic block and the pH-dependnent complexation between model proteins or biomimetic J-aggregating chromophores and the polycationic block is demonstrated. Spin casting is used to prepare nanostructured films from the protein-block copolymer and chromophore-block copolymer coacervates. After film formation, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the thermoresponsive block allows the nanomaterial to be effectively immobilized in aqueous environments at physiological temperatures, enabling use of the materials for biomolecule immobilization and controlled release. In the case of protein nanotemplating, the ionic environment in which the protein is confined enables the majority of the protein (80%) to retain its activity, even after having been dehydrated in vacuum and confined in the thin film.

  16. Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum malaria from complex infections in the Peruvian Amazon using quantitative PCR of the merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2): in vitro dynamics reveal density-dependent interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zervos, Thomas M.; Hernandez, Jean N.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Branch, Oralee H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The majority of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates are defined as complex infections because they contain multiple genetically distinct clones. Studying interactions between clones in complex infections in vivo and in vitro could elucidate important phenomena in malaria infection, transmission and treatment. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the P. falciparum merozoite surface protein 1, block 2 (PfMSP1-B2), we provide a sensitive and efficient genotyping method. This is important for epidemiological studies because it makes it possible to study genotype-specific growth dynamics. We compared 3 PfMSP1-B2 genotyping methods by analysing 79 field isolates from the Peruvian Amazon. In vivo observations from other studies using these techniques led to the hypothesis that clones within complex infections interact. By co-culturing clones with different PfMSP1-B2 genotypes, and measuring parasitaemia using qPCR, we found that suppression of clonal expansion was a factor of the collective density of all clones present in a culture. PfMSP1-B2 qPCR enabled us to find in vitro evidence for parasite-parasite interactions and could facilitate future investigations of growth trends in naturally occurring complex infections. PMID:22339946

  17. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  19. Protein-Protein Interactions in Virus-Host Systems.

    PubMed

    Brito, Anderson F; Pinney, John W

    2017-01-01

    To study virus-host protein interactions, knowledge about viral and host protein architectures and repertoires, their particular evolutionary mechanisms, and information on relevant sources of biological data is essential. The purpose of this review article is to provide a thorough overview about these aspects. Protein domains are basic units defining protein interactions, and the uniqueness of viral domain repertoires, their mode of evolution, and their roles during viral infection make viruses interesting models of study. Mutations at protein interfaces can reduce or increase their binding affinities by changing protein electrostatics and structural properties. During the course of a viral infection, both pathogen and cellular proteins are constantly competing for binding partners. Endogenous interfaces mediating intraspecific interactions-viral-viral or host-host interactions-are constantly targeted and inhibited by exogenous interfaces mediating viral-host interactions. From a biomedical perspective, blocking such interactions is the main mechanism underlying antiviral therapies. Some proteins are able to bind multiple partners, and their modes of interaction define how fast these "hub proteins" evolve. "Party hubs" have multiple interfaces; they establish simultaneous/stable (domain-domain) interactions, and tend to evolve slowly. On the other hand, "date hubs" have few interfaces; they establish transient/weak (domain-motif) interactions by means of short linear peptides (15 or fewer residues), and can evolve faster. Viral infections are mediated by several protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which can be represented as networks (protein interaction networks, PINs), with proteins being depicted as nodes, and their interactions as edges. It has been suggested that viral proteins tend to establish interactions with more central and highly connected host proteins. In an evolutionary arms race, viral and host proteins are constantly changing their interface

  20. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  1. Highly specific protein-protein interactions, evolution and negative design.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2004-12-01

    We consider highly specific protein-protein interactions in proteomes of simple model proteins. We are inspired by the work of Zarrinpar et al (2003 Nature 426 676). They took a binding domain in a signalling pathway in yeast and replaced it with domains of the same class but from different organisms. They found that the probability of a protein binding to a protein from the proteome of a different organism is rather high, around one half. We calculate the probability of a model protein from one proteome binding to the protein of a different proteome. These proteomes are obtained by sampling the space of functional proteomes uniformly. In agreement with Zarrinpar et al we find that the probability of a protein binding a protein from another proteome is rather high, of order one tenth. Our results, together with those of Zarrinpar et al, suggest that designing, say, a peptide to block or reconstitute a single signalling pathway, without affecting any other pathways, requires knowledge of all the partners of the class of binding domains the peptide is designed to mimic. This knowledge is required to use negative design to explicitly design out interactions of the peptide with proteins other than its target. We also found that patches that are required to bind with high specificity evolve more slowly than those that are required only to not bind to any other patch. This is consistent with some analysis of sequence data for proteins engaged in highly specific interactions.

  2. Discovering interacting domains and motifs in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ng, See-Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Many important biological processes, such as the signaling pathways, require protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are designed for fast response to stimuli. These interactions are usually transient, easily formed, and disrupted, yet specific. Many of these transient interactions involve the binding of a protein domain to a short stretch (3-10) of amino acid residues, which can be characterized by a sequence pattern, i.e., a short linear motif (SLiM). We call these interacting domains and motifs domain-SLiM interactions. Existing methods have focused on discovering SLiMs in the interacting proteins' sequence data. With the recent increase in protein structures, we have a new opportunity to detect SLiMs directly from the proteins' 3D structures instead of their linear sequences. In this chapter, we describe a computational method called SLiMDIet to directly detect SLiMs on domain interfaces extracted from 3D structures of PPIs. SLiMDIet comprises two steps: (1) interaction interfaces belonging to the same domain are extracted and grouped together using structural clustering and (2) the extracted interaction interfaces in each cluster are structurally aligned to extract the corresponding SLiM. Using SLiMDIet, de novo SLiMs interacting with protein domains can be computationally detected from structurally clustered domain-SLiM interactions for PFAM domains which have available 3D structures in the PDB database.

  3. Principles of nanostructure design with protein building blocks.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Zheng, Jie; Zanuy, David; Haspel, Nurit; Wolfson, Haim; Alemán, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-07-01

    Currently there is increasing interest in nanostructures and their design. Nanostructure design involves the ability to predictably manipulate the properties of the self-assembly of autonomous units. Autonomous units have preferred conformational states. The units can be synthetic material science-based or derived from functional biological macromolecules. Autonomous biological building blocks with available structures provide an extremely rich and useful resource for design. For proteins, the structural databases contain large libraries of protein molecules and their building blocks with a range of shapes, surfaces, and chemical properties. The introduction of engineered synthetic residues or short peptides into these can expand the available chemical space and enhance the desired properties. Here we focus on the principles of nanostructure design with protein building blocks.

  4. Tight knots in proteins: can they block the mitochondrial pores?

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. In the present article, I briefly review the experimental and numerical studies of tight knots in proteins, with a particular emphasis on the estimates of the size of these knots. Next, I discuss the process of protein translocation through the mitochondrial pores and report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of knotted protein translocation, which show how the knot can indeed block the pore.

  5. Multi-block poloxamer surfactants suppress aggregation of denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Smith, Catherine M; Makinen, Marvin W; Lee, Raphael C

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of elastic light scattering, we have compared the capacity of the multi-block, surfactant copolymers Poloxamer 108 (P108), Poloxamer 188 (P188), and Tetronic 1107 (T1107), of average molecular weight 4700, 8400, and 15,000, respectively, with that of polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight 8000) to suppress aggregation of heat-denatured hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). We also compared the capacity of P188 to that of PEG to suppress aggregation of carboxypeptidase A denatured in the presence of trifluoroethanol and to facilitate recovery of catalytic activity. In contrast to the multi-block copolymers, PEG had no effect in inhibiting aggregation of HEWL or of carboxypeptidase A with the recovery of catalytic activity. At very high polymer:protein ratios (>or=10:1), PEG increased aggregation of heat-denatured HEWL and BSA, consistent with its known properties to promote macromolecular crowding and crystallization of proteins. At a polymer:protein ratio of 2:1, the tetra-block copolymer T1107 was the most effective of the three surfactant copolymers, completely suppressing aggregation of heat-denatured HEWL. At a T1107:BSA ratio of 10:1, the poloxamer suppressed aggregation of heat-denatured BSA by 50% compared to that observed in the absence of the polymer. We showed that the extent of suppression of aggregation of heat-denatured proteins by multi-block surfactant copolymers is dependent on the size of the protein and the copolymer:protein molar ratio. We also concluded that at least one of the tertiary nitrogens in the ethylene-1,2-diamine structural core of the T1107 copolymer is protonated, and that this electrostatic factor underlies its capacity to suppress aggregation of denatured proteins more effectively than nonionic, multi-block poloxamers. These results indicate that amphiphilic, surfactant, multi-block copolymers are efficient as additives to suppress aggregation and to facilitate refolding of denatured

  6. Detecting protein-protein interactions using Renilla luciferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Kisailus, Adam E; Peck, Jeremy W

    2002-11-01

    We have developed a novel system designated the luciferase assay for protein detection (LAPD) to study protein-protein interactions. This method involves two protein fusions, a soluble reporter fusion and a fusion for immobilizing the target protein. The soluble reporter is an N-terminal Renilla luciferase fusion protein that exhibits high Renilla luciferase activity. Crude cleared lysates from transfected Cos1 cells that express the Renilla luciferase fusion protein can be used in binding assays with immobilized target proteins. Following incubation and washing, target-bound Renilla luciferase fusion proteins produce light from the coelenterazine substrate, indicating an interaction between the two proteins of interest. As proof of the principle, we reproduced known, transient protein-protein interactions between the Cdc42 GTPase and its effector proteins. GTPase Renilla fusion proteins produced in Cos1 cells were tested with immobilized recombinant GST-N-WASP and CEP5 effector proteins. Using this assay, we could detect specific interactions of Cdc42 with these effector proteins in approximately 50 min. The specificity of these interactions was demonstrated by showing that they were GTPase-specific and GTP-dependent and not seen with other unrelated target proteins. These results suggest that the LAPD method, which is both rapid and sensitive, may have research and practical applications.

  7. Designed, Helical Protein Nanotubes with Variable Diameters from a Single Building Block.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Jeffrey D; Smith, Sarah J; Carr, Jessica R; Tezcan, F Akif

    2015-08-26

    Due to their structural and mechanical properties, 1D helical protein assemblies represent highly attractive design targets for biomolecular engineering and protein design. Here we present a designed, tetrameric protein building block, Zn8R4, which assembles via Zn coordination interactions into a series of crystalline, helical nanotubes whose widths can be controlled by solution conditions. X-ray crystallography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements indicate that all classes of protein nanotubes are constructed through the same 2D arrangement of Zn8R4 tetramers held together by Zn coordination. The mechanical properties of these nanotubes are correlated with their widths. All Zn8R4 nanotubes are found to be highly flexible despite possessing crystalline order, owing to their minimal interbuilding-block interactions mediated solely by metal coordination.

  8. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin) into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:21569443

  9. Protein ligand interaction database (PLID).

    PubMed

    Reddy, A Srinivas; Amarnath, H S Durga; Bapi, Raju S; Sastry, G Madhavi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2008-10-01

    A comprehensive database named, protein ligand interaction database (PLID), is created with 6295 ligands bound to proteins extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). This is by far the most comprehensive database of physico-chemical properties, quantum mechanical descriptors and the residues present in the active site of proteins. It is a publicly available web-based database (via the Internet) at http://203.199.182.73/gnsmmg/databases/plid/.

  10. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    PubMed Central

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  11. Aeolotopic interactions of globular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lomakin, Aleksey; Asherie, Neer; Benedek, George B.

    1999-01-01

    Protein crystallization, aggregation, liquid–liquid phase separation, and self-assembly are important in protein structure determination in the industrial processing of proteins and in the inhibition of protein condensation diseases. To fully describe such phase transformations in globular protein solutions, it is necessary to account for the strong spatial variation of the interactions on the protein surface. One difficulty is that each globular protein has its own unique surface, which is crucial for its biological function. However, the similarities amongst the macroscopic properties of different protein solutions suggest that there may exist a generic model that is capable of describing the nonuniform interactions between globular proteins. In this paper we present such a model, which includes the short-range interactions that vary from place to place on the surface of the protein. We show that this aeolotopic model [from the Greek aiolos (“variable”) and topos (“place”)] describes the phase diagram of globular proteins and provides insight into protein aggregation and crystallization. PMID:10449715

  12. Quantification of the Influence of Protein-Protein Interactions on Adsorbed Protein Structure and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Latour, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    While protein-surface interactions have been widely studied, relatively little is understood at this time regarding how protein-surface interaction effects are influenced by protein-protein interactions and how these effects combine with the internal stability of a protein to influence its adsorbed-state structure and bioactivity. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to study these combined effects under widely varying protein-protein interaction conditions using hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) adsorbed on silica glass, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polyethylene as our model systems. In order to vary protein-protein interaction effects over a wide range, HEWL was first adsorbed to each surface type under widely varying protein solution concentrations for 2 h to saturate the surface, followed by immersion in pure buffer solution for 15 h to equilibrate the adsorbed protein layers in the absence of additionally adsorbing protein. Periodic measurements were made at selected time points of the areal density of the adsorbed protein layer as an indicator of the level of protein-protein interaction effects within the layer, and these values were then correlated with measurements of the adsorbed protein’s secondary structure and bioactivity. The results from these studies indicate that protein-protein interaction effects help stabilize the structure of HEWL adsorbed on silica glass, have little influence on the structural behavior of HEWL on HDPE, and actually serve to destabilize HEWL’s structure on PMMA. The bioactivity of HEWL on silica glass and HDPE was found to decrease in direct proportion to the degree of adsorption-induce protein unfolding. A direct correlation between bioactivity and the conformational state of adsorbed HEWL was less apparent on PMMA, thus suggesting that other factors influenced HEWL’s bioactivity on this surface, such as the accessibility of HEWL’s bioactive site being blocked by neighboring proteins or the surface

  13. Protein-protein interactions in multienzyme megasynthetases.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Kira J; Müller, Rolf

    2008-04-14

    The multienzyme polyketide synthases (PKSs), nonribosomal polypeptide synthetases (NRPSs), and their hybrids are responsible for the construction in bacteria of numerous natural products of clinical value. These systems generate high structural complexity by using a simple biosynthetic logic--that of the assembly line. Each of the individual steps in building the metabolites is designated to an independently folded domain within gigantic polypeptides. The domains are clustered into functional modules, and the modules are strung out along the proteins in the order in which they act. Every metabolite results, therefore, from the successive action of up to 100 individual catalysts. Despite the conceptual simplicity of this division-of-labor organization, we are only beginning to decipher the molecular details of the numerous protein-protein interactions that support assembly-line biosynthesis, and which are critical to attempts to re-engineer these systems as a tool in drug discovery. This review aims to summarize the state of knowledge about several aspects of protein-protein interactions, including current architectural models for PKS and NRPS systems, the central role of carrier proteins, and the structural basis for intersubunit recognition.

  14. Solution Self-Assembly of Globular Protein-Polymer Conjugate Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the nanostructured self-assembly of globular proteins and enzymes can significantly advance the applications of soft materials as catalysts, sensors, and medical materials. However, the incorporation of globular proteins as one block in the block copolymer introduces changes in chain shape, chain entropy, and specific interactions that significantly impact the thermodynamics of self-assembly. Here, we explore the self-assembly of model globular protein-polymer block copolymers in concentrated solutions to form nanostructured materials. A phase diagram as a function of concentration and temperature for a model material mCherry-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is asymmetric, showing hexagonal cylinders for coil fractions less than 0.5 and a lamellar ordering for coil fractions greater than 0.5, divided by a narrow region of hexagonally perforated lamellae. Order-order transitions as a function of temperature are driven by the thermoresponsive desolvation of PNIPAM. Surprisingly, the materials exhibit reentrant order-disorder transition behavior, such that the conjugate block copolymers are disordered at both low and high concentrations but well-ordered at intermediate concentrations. Changing the polymer chemistry to monomers with different types of hydrogen bonding results in significant changes in the self-assembly, including the observation of a cubic phase that shows the same scattering pattern as the gyroid phase observed in traditional block copolymers. The choice of polymer also has a strong impact on the order-disorder transition concentration, demonstrating that the polymer-protein interaction plays a significant role in governing self-assembly in solution. Consistent with this effect, the order-disorder transition concentration is minimized in symmetric conjugates. Changing the protein from mCherry to myoglobin results in a reduction in ordering, suggesting that the regularity of the protein shape is important. This research was supported by

  15. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  16. Aminoguanidine inhibits protein browning without extensive Amadori carbonyl blocking.

    PubMed

    Requena, J R; Vidal, P; Cabezas-Cerrato, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that aminoguanidine reacts extensively with Amadori carbonyl groups of glycated proteins thus blocking them and inhibiting the further reactions which lead to browning and fluorescence development. We have glycated bovine serum albumin in the presence of 1, 5, 10 and 25 mM aminoguanidine and measured fluorescence development at 440 nm upon excitation at 370 nm, free (unblocked) Amadori groups as fructosamine with a colorimetric assay and furosine by HPLC, as an index of total Amadori products. Aminoguandine significantly inhibited fluorescence development at all the tested concentrations (31%, 65%, 69% and 82% inhibitions, respectively) (P < 0.001). Blocking of Amadori groups was demonstrated by decreased fructosamine and unchanged furosine yields but only at the higher concentrations and to a very limited extent (13% and 27% blocking, respectively) (P < 0.01). Incubation of Aminoguanidine with albumin produced the appearance of 320 nm absorbing yellow chromophores, quite increased in the presence of glucose. These results suggest that Aminoguanidine is able to block Amadori groups, as previously hypothesized, but question the importance of this mechanism as an explanation of its capacity to inhibit browning. Scavenging of glucose seems to have no impact on glycation as seen by unchanged furosine yields.

  17. Nanopatterning of Viruses and Proteins Using Microphase Separated Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresce, Arthur; Lewandowski, Angela; Bentley, William; Kofinas, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Diblock copolymers containing nickel ions have been prepared that are capable of selectively adsorbing histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (hisGFP), and also binding tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). A block copolymer of norbornene and norbornene dicarboxylic acid was synthesized using ring-opening metathesis polymerization. A 400/50 block ratio achieved a spherical microphase-separated morphology with roughly 20 nm diameter dicarboxylic acid spheres. The spherical phase was exposed to nickel ions in solution, templating the formation of nickel nanoparticles. This process gave a nickel-loaded diblock copolymer film whose surface was used to chelate hisGFP. Fluorescence spectroscopy and TEM confirmed the presence of the protein on the polymer surface. A sulfonated triblock copolymer was loaded with nickel ions using a similar solution-doping procedure. The morphology of this copolymer was lamellar, and its sulfonated block was loaded with nickel ions. TEM studies revealed the presence of the virus on the surface of the copolymer and showed that the bond between the TMV and the polymer surface can withstand severe detergent washes.

  18. Protein Conjugation with Amphiphilic Block Copolymers for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Batrakova, Elena; Banks, William A.; Vinogradov, Serguei; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Modification of a model protein, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), with amphiphilic block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (Pluronic), was previously shown to enhance the transport of this protein across the blood—brain barrier in vivo and brain microvessel endothelial cells in vitro. This work develops procedures for synthesis and characterization of HRP with Pluronic copolymers, having different lengths of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) blocks. Four monoamine Pluronic derivatives (L81, P85, L121, P123) were synthesized and successfully conjugated to a model protein, HRP, via biodegradable or nondegradable linkers (dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) (DSP), dimethyl 3,3′-dithiobispropionimidate (DTBP), and disuccinimidyl propionate (DSS)). The conjugation was confirmed by HRP amino group titration, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight spectroscopy, and cation-exchange chromatography. HRP conjugates containing an average of one to two Pluronic moieties and retaining in most cases over 70% of the activity were synthesized. Increased cellular uptake of these conjugates was demonstrated using the Mardin-Derby canine kidney cell line and primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells. The optimal modifications included Pluronic L81 and P85. These copolymers have shorter PPO chains compared to Pluronic P123 and L121, which were less efficient. There was little if any dependence of the uptake on the length of the hydrophilic PEO block for the optimal modifications. The proposed modifications may be used to increase cellular uptake of other proteins. PMID:18447367

  19. Neuromuscular blocking effect of fluoxetine and its interaction with rocuronium.

    PubMed

    Patel, J C; Barvaliya, M J; Patel, T K; Tripathi, C B

    2013-04-01

    As selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have an inhibitory effect on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, they may affect the neuromuscular transmission and interact with neuromuscular blockers. This study was designed to observe the effect of fluoxetine on neuromuscular transmission and its interaction with rocuronium using the rat phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm and rabbit head drop methods. Rat phrenic nerve hemidiaphragms were mounted and stimulated using a train of four pulses (TOF). The effect of fluoxetine was studied on both indirectly and directly stimulated basal twitch responses by plotting cumulative dose response curves (DRCs). DRCs of rocuronium were obtained in the absence, and presence of 5 μm and 20 μm fluoxetine to study its interaction. ED5 , ED50 and ED95 values of rocuronium DRCs in absence and presence of fluoxetine were calculated. Fluoxetine significantly inhibited twitch responses in both indirect and directly stimulated preparations. Fluoxetine (20 μm) caused an increase in the potency of rocuronium such that the ED50 and ED95 values of rocuronium DRCs were significantly decreased. Partially inhibited twitch responses by fluoxetine (100 μm) were not reversed by neostigmine (3.3 μm) or 3,4 diaminopyridine (0.25 μm). Rabbits were given fluoxetine 0.25 mg kg(-1) and 1 mg kg(-1) orally for 15 days, and on 15th day, rocuronium infusion was given, and time for head drop was recorded. The time of head drop was significantly reduced in fluoxetine pretreated as compared to control group. Fluoxetine blocks the neuromuscular transmission and increases the potency of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block.

  20. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  1. Control of Protein Affinity of Bioactive Nanocellulose and Passivation Using Engineered Block and Random Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vuoriluoto, Maija; Orelma, Hannes; Zhu, Baolei; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-03-02

    We passivated TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNF) toward human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) by modification with block and random copolymers of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA). The block copolymers reversibly adsorbed on TOCNF and were highly effective in preventing nonspecific interactions with hIgG, especially if short PDMAEMA blocks were used. In such cases, total protein rejection was achieved. This is in contrast to typical blocking agents, which performed poorly. When an anti-human IgG biointerface was installed onto the passivated TOCNF, remarkably high affinity antibody-antigen interactions were observed (0.90 ± 0.09 mg/m(2)). This is in contrast to the nonpassivated biointerface, which resulted in a significant false response. In addition, regeneration of the biointerface was possible by low pH aqueous wash. Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus was also utilized to successfully increase the sensitivity for human IgG recognition (1.28 ± 0.11 mg/m(2)). Overall, the developed system based on TOCNF modified with multifunctional polymers can be easily deployed as bioactive material with minimum fouling and excellent selectivity.

  2. New Compound Classes: Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ottmann, C

    2016-01-01

    "Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are one of the most promising new targets in drug discovery. With estimates between 300,000 and 650,000 in human physiology, targeted modulation of PPIs would tremendously extend the "druggable" genome. In fact, in every disease a wealth of potentially addressable PPIs can be found making pharmacological intervention based on PPI modulators in principle a generally applicable technology. An impressing number of success stories in small-molecule PPI inhibition and natural-product PPI stabilization increasingly encourage academia and industry to invest in PPI modulation. In this chapter examples of both inhibition as well as stabilization of PPIs are reviewed including some of the technologies which has been used for their identification."

  3. Direct Probing of Protein-Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W

    2005-03-10

    This project aimed to establish feasibility of using experimental techniques based on direct measurements of interaction forces on the single molecule scale to characterize equilibrium interaction potentials between individual biological molecules. Such capability will impact several research areas, ranging from rapid interaction screening capabilities to providing verifiable inputs for computational models. It should be one of the enabling technologies for modern proteomics research. This study used a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations, theoretical considerations, and direct experimental measurements to investigate two model systems that represented typical experimental situations: force-induced melting of DNA rigidly attached to the tip, and force-induced unbinding of a protein-antibody pair connected to flexible tethers. Our results establish that for both systems researchers can use force spectroscopy measurements to extract reliable information about equilibrium interaction potentials. However, the approaches necessary to extract these potentials in each case--Jarzynski reconstruction and Dynamic Force Spectroscopy--are very different. We also show how the thermodynamics and kinetics of unbinding process dictates the choice between in each case.

  4. Binder-block copolymer micelle interactions in bactericidal filter paper.

    PubMed

    Mansur-Azzam, Nura; Woo, Su Gyeong; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2013-08-06

    We previously produced a bactericidal filter paper loaded with PAA47-b-PS214 block copolymer micelles containing the biocide triclosan (TCN), using cationic polyacryamide (cPAM) as a binder. However, we encountered a very slow filtration, resulting in long bacteria deactivation times. Slow drainage occurred only when the filter paper was left to dry. It appears that the filter paper with cPAM and micelles develops hydrophobic properties responsible for this very slow filtration. Three approaches were taken to accelerate the very slow drainage all based on modification of binder-micelle interactions: (i) keeping the micelles wet, (ii) modification of the corona, and (iii) replacing cPAM with smaller and more highly charged cationic poly(isopropanol dimethylammonium) chloride (PIDMAC). In all cases, the drainage time of bactericidal filter paper became close to that of untreated filter paper, without decreasing its efficiency. Moreover, replacing cPAM with PIDMAC led to a much more efficient bactericidal filter paper that reduced bacteria viability by more than 6 orders of magnitude. In addition to resolving the hydrophobic drainage hurdle, the three solutions also offer a better understanding of the interaction between cPAM and micelles in the filter paper.

  5. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  6. Repeat protein engineering: creating functional nanostructures/biomaterials from modular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Main, Ewan R G; Phillips, Jonathan J; Millership, Charlotte

    2013-10-01

    There is enormous interest in molecular self-assembly and the development of biological systems to form smart nanostructures for biotechnology (so-called 'bottom-up fabrications'). Repeat proteins are ideal choices for development of such systems as they: (i) possess a relatively simple relationship between sequence, structure and function; (ii) are modular and non-globular in structure; (iii) act as diverse scaffolds for the mediation of a diverse range of protein-protein interactions; and (iv) have been extensively studied and successfully engineered and designed. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in the use of engineered repeat proteins in the self-assembly of novel materials, nanostructures and biosensors. In particular, we show that repeat proteins are excellent monomeric programmable building blocks that can be triggered to associate into a range of morphologies and can readily be engineered as stimuli-responsive biofunctional materials.

  7. Hydrodynamic interactions in protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Niewieczerzał, Szymon

    2009-03-01

    We incorporate hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) in a coarse-grained and structure-based model of proteins by employing the Rotne-Prager hydrodynamic tensor. We study several small proteins and demonstrate that HIs facilitate folding. We also study HIV-1 protease and show that HIs make the flap closing dynamics faster. The HIs are found to affect time correlation functions in the vicinity of the native state even though they have no impact on same time characteristics of the structure fluctuations around the native state.

  8. A High Performance Block Eigensolver for Nuclear Configuration Interaction Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Aktulga, Hasan Metin; Afibuzzaman, Md.; Williams, Samuel; ...

    2017-06-01

    As on-node parallelism increases and the performance gap between the processor and the memory system widens, achieving high performance in large-scale scientific applications requires an architecture-aware design of algorithms and solvers. We focus on the eigenvalue problem arising in nuclear Configuration Interaction (CI) calculations, where a few extreme eigenpairs of a sparse symmetric matrix are needed. Here, we consider a block iterative eigensolver whose main computational kernels are the multiplication of a sparse matrix with multiple vectors (SpMM), and tall-skinny matrix operations. We then present techniques to significantly improve the SpMM and the transpose operation SpMM T by using themore » compressed sparse blocks (CSB) format. We achieve 3-4× speedup on the requisite operations over good implementations with the commonly used compressed sparse row (CSR) format. We develop a performance model that allows us to correctly estimate the performance of our SpMM kernel implementations, and we identify cache bandwidth as a potential performance bottleneck beyond DRAM. We also analyze and optimize the performance of LOBPCG kernels (inner product and linear combinations on multiple vectors) and show up to 15× speedup over using high performance BLAS libraries for these operations. The resulting high performance LOBPCG solver achieves 1.4× to 1.8× speedup over the existing Lanczos solver on a series of CI computations on high-end multicore architectures (Intel Xeons). We also analyze the performance of our techniques on an Intel Xeon Phi Knights Corner (KNC) processor.« less

  9. TMPyP4 Porphyrin Distorts RNA G-quadruplex Structures of the Disease-associated r(GGGGCC)n Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene and Blocks Interaction of RNA-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Zamiri, Bita; Reddy, Kaalak; Macgregor, Robert B.; Pearson, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Certain DNA and RNA sequences can form G-quadruplexes, which can affect genetic instability, promoter activity, RNA splicing, RNA stability, and neurite mRNA localization. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia can be caused by expansion of a (GGGGCC)n repeat in the C9orf72 gene. Mutant r(GGGGCC)n- and r(GGCCCC)n-containing transcripts aggregate in nuclear foci, possibly sequestering repeat-binding proteins such as ASF/SF2 and hnRNPA1, suggesting a toxic RNA pathogenesis, as occurs in myotonic dystrophy. Furthermore, the C9orf72 repeat RNA was recently demonstrated to undergo the noncanonical repeat-associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation) into pathologic dipeptide repeats in patient brains, a process that is thought to depend upon RNA structure. We previously demonstrated that the r(GGGGCC)n RNA forms repeat tract length-dependent G-quadruplex structures that bind the ASF/SF2 protein. Here we show that the cationic porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (TMPyP4)), which can bind some G-quadruplex-forming sequences, can bind and distort the G-quadruplex formed by r(GGGGCC)8, and this ablates the interaction of either hnRNPA1 or ASF/SF2 with the repeat. These findings provide proof of concept that nucleic acid binding small molecules, such as TMPyP4, can distort the secondary structure of the C9orf72 repeat, which may beneficially disrupt protein interactions, which may ablate either protein sequestration and/or RAN translation into potentially toxic dipeptides. Disruption of secondary structure formation of the C9orf72 RNA repeats may be a viable therapeutic avenue, as well as a means to test the role of RNA structure upon RAN translation. PMID:24371143

  10. Molecular modelling of protein-protein/protein-solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchko, Tyler

    The inner workings of individual cells are based on intricate networks of protein-protein interactions. However, each of these individual protein interactions requires a complex physical interaction between proteins and their aqueous environment at the atomic scale. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations are used in three theoretical studies to gain insight at the atomic scale about protein hydration, protein structure and tubulin-tubulin (protein-protein) interactions, as found in microtubules. Also presented, in a fourth project, is a molecular model of solvation coupled with the Amber molecular modelling package, to facilitate further studies without the need of explicitly modelled water. Basic properties of a minimally solvated protein were calculated through an extended study of myoglobin hydration with explicit solvent, directly investigating water and protein polarization. Results indicate a close correlation between polarization of both water and protein and the onset of protein function. The methodology of explicit solvent molecular dynamics was further used to study tubulin and microtubules. Extensive conformational sampling of the carboxy-terminal tails of 8-tubulin was performed via replica exchange molecular dynamics, allowing the characterisation of the flexibility, secondary structure and binding domains of the C-terminal tails through statistical analysis methods. Mechanical properties of tubulin and microtubules were calculated with adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics. The function of the M-loop in microtubule stability was demonstrated in these simulations. The flexibility of this loop allowed constant contacts between the protofilaments to be maintained during simulations while the smooth deformation provided a spring-like restoring force. Additionally, calculating the free energy profile between the straight and bent tubulin configurations was used to test the proposed conformational change in tubulin, thought to cause microtubule

  11. Protein interactions in genome maintenance as novel antibacterial targets.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Aimee H; Bernstein, Douglas A; Walsh, Brian W; Shapiro, Walker; Simmons, Lyle A; Keck, James L

    2013-01-01

    Antibacterial compounds typically act by directly inhibiting essential bacterial enzyme activities. Although this general mechanism of action has fueled traditional antibiotic discovery efforts for decades, new antibiotic development has not kept pace with the emergence of drug resistant bacterial strains. These limitations have severely restricted the therapeutic tools available for treating bacterial infections. Here we test an alternative antibacterial lead-compound identification strategy in which essential protein-protein interactions are targeted rather than enzymatic activities. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) form conserved protein interaction "hubs" that are essential for recruiting many DNA replication, recombination, and repair proteins to SSB/DNA nucleoprotein substrates. Three small molecules that block SSB/protein interactions are shown to have antibacterial activity against diverse bacterial species. Consistent with a model in which the compounds target multiple SSB/protein interactions, treatment of Bacillus subtilis cultures with the compounds leads to rapid inhibition of DNA replication and recombination, and ultimately to cell death. The compounds also have unanticipated effects on protein synthesis that could be due to a previously unknown role for SSB/protein interactions in translation or to off-target effects. Our results highlight the potential of targeting protein-protein interactions, particularly those that mediate genome maintenance, as a powerful approach for identifying new antibacterial compounds.

  12. Insulin/poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) Complexes: Physicochemical Properties and Protein Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Kalinova, Radostina; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-04

    Insulin (INS) was encapsulated into complexes with poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLys), which is a polypeptide-based block copolymer (a neutral-cationic block polyelectrolyte). The particular cationic-neutral block copolymer can complex INS molecules in aqueous media via electrostatic interactions. Light-scattering techniques are used to study the complexation process and structure of the hybrid nanoparticles in a series of buffers, as a function of protein concentration. The physicochemical and structural characteristics of the complexes depend on the ionic strength of the aqueous medium, while the concentration of PEG-b-PLys was constant through the series of solutions. As INS concentration increased the size distribution of the complexes decreased, especially at the highest ionic strength. The size/structure of complexes diluted in biological medium indicated that the copolymer imparts stealth properties and colloidal and biological stability to the complexes, features that could in turn affect the clearance properties in vivo. Therefore, these studies could be a rational roadmap for designing the optimum complexes/effective nanocarriers for proteins and peptides.

  13. Probing protein-sugar interactions.

    PubMed

    Ebel, C; Eisenberg, H; Ghirlando, R

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the partial specific volumes (2) (ml/g), hydration, and cosolvent interactions of rabbit muscle aldolase by equilibrium sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge and by direct density increment (partial differential/partial differentialc(2))(mu) measurements over a range of sugar concentrations and temperature. In a series of sugars increasing in size, glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and alpha-cyclodextrin, (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu) decreases linearly with the solvent density rho(0). These sugar cosolvents do not interact with the protein; however, the interaction parameter B(1) (g water/g protein) mildly increases with increasing sugar size. The experimental B(1) values are smaller than values calculated by excluded volume (rolling ball) considerations. B(1) relates to hydration in this and in other instances studied. It decreases with increasing temperature, leading to an increase in (2) due to reduced water of hydration electrostriction. The density increments (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu), however, decrease in concave up form in the case of glycerol and in concave down form for trehalose, leading to more complex behavior in the case of carbohydrates playing a biological role as osmolytes and antifreeze agents. A critical discussion, based on the thermodynamics of multicomponent solutions, is presented.

  14. Probing protein-sugar interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Ebel, C; Eisenberg, H; Ghirlando, R

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the partial specific volumes (2) (ml/g), hydration, and cosolvent interactions of rabbit muscle aldolase by equilibrium sedimentation in the analytical ultracentrifuge and by direct density increment (partial differential/partial differentialc(2))(mu) measurements over a range of sugar concentrations and temperature. In a series of sugars increasing in size, glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and alpha-cyclodextrin, (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu) decreases linearly with the solvent density rho(0). These sugar cosolvents do not interact with the protein; however, the interaction parameter B(1) (g water/g protein) mildly increases with increasing sugar size. The experimental B(1) values are smaller than values calculated by excluded volume (rolling ball) considerations. B(1) relates to hydration in this and in other instances studied. It decreases with increasing temperature, leading to an increase in (2) due to reduced water of hydration electrostriction. The density increments (partial differential/ partial differentialc(2))(mu), however, decrease in concave up form in the case of glycerol and in concave down form for trehalose, leading to more complex behavior in the case of carbohydrates playing a biological role as osmolytes and antifreeze agents. A critical discussion, based on the thermodynamics of multicomponent solutions, is presented. PMID:10620302

  15. Importin-α-Mediated Nucleolar Localization of Potato Mop-Top Virus TRIPLE GENE BLOCK1 (TGB1) Protein Facilitates Virus Systemic Movement, Whereas TGB1 Self-Interaction Is Required for Cell-to-Cell Movement in Nicotiana benthamiana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I.; Cowan, Graham H.; Vetukuri, Ramesh R.; Tilsner, Jens; Torrance, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become evident that nucleolar passage of movement proteins occurs commonly in a number of plant RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. Systemic movement of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) involves two viral transport forms represented by a complex of viral RNA and TRIPLE GENE BLOCK1 (TGB1) movement protein and by polar virions that contain the minor coat protein and TGB1 attached to one extremity. The integrity of polar virions ensures the efficient movement of RNA-CP, which encodes the virus coat protein. Here, we report the involvement of nuclear transport receptors belonging to the importin-α family in nucleolar accumulation of the PMTV TGB1 protein and, subsequently, in the systemic movement of the virus. Virus-induced gene silencing of two importin-α paralogs in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in significant reduction of TGB1 accumulation in the nucleus, decreasing the accumulation of the virus progeny in upper leaves and the loss of systemic movement of RNA-CP. PMTV TGB1 interacted with importin-α in N. benthamiana, which was detected by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus. The interaction was mediated by two nucleolar localization signals identified by bioinformatics and mutagenesis in the TGB1 amino-terminal domain. Our results showed that while TGB1 self-interaction is needed for cell-to-cell movement, importin-α-mediated nucleolar targeting of TGB1 is an essential step in establishing the efficient systemic infection of the entire plant. These results enabled the identification of two separate domains in TGB1: an internal domain required for TGB1 self-interaction and cell-to-cell movement and the amino-terminal domain required for importin-α interaction in plants, nucleolar targeting, and long-distance movement. PMID:25576325

  16. Position-dependent interactions of Y-box protein 2 (YBX2) with mRNA enable mRNA storage in round spermatids by repressing mRNA translation and blocking translation-dependent mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Kleene, Kenneth C

    2016-03-01

    Many mRNAs encoding proteins needed for the construction of the specialized organelles of spermatozoa are stored as translationally repressed, free messenger ribonucleoproteins in round spermatids, to be actively translated in elongating and elongated spermatids. The factors that repress translation in round spermatids, however, have been elusive. Two lines of evidence implicate the highly abundant and well-known translational repressor, Y-box protein 2 (YBX2), as a critical factor: First, protamine 1 (Prm1) and sperm-mitochondria cysteine-rich protein (Smcp) mRNAs are prematurely recruited onto polysomes in Ybx2-knockout mouse round spermatids. Second, mutations in 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) cis-elements that abrogate YBX2 binding activate translation of Prm1 and Smcp mRNAs in round spermatids of transgenic mice. The abundance of YBX2 and its affinity for variable sequences, however, raise questions of how YBX2 targets specific mRNAs for repression. Mutations to the Prm1 and Smcp mRNAs in transgenic mice reveal that strong repression in round spermatids requires YBX2 binding sites located near the 3' ends of their 3'UTRs as locating the same sites in upstream positions produce negligible repression. This location-dependence implies that the assembly of repressive complexes is nucleated by adjacent cis-elements that enable cooperative interactions of YBX2 with co-factors. The available data suggest that, in vertebrates, YBX2 has the important role of coordinating the storage of translationally repressed mRNAs in round spermatids by inhibiting translational activity and the degradation of transcripts via translation-dependent deadenylation. These insights should facilitiate future experiments designed to unravel how YBX2 targets mRNAs for repression in round spermatids and how mutations in the YBX2 gene cause infertility in humans. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 190-207, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. PRISM: protein interactions by structural matching.

    PubMed

    Ogmen, Utkan; Keskin, Ozlem; Aytuna, A Selim; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2005-07-01

    Prism (http://gordion.hpc.eng.ku.edu.tr/prism) is a website for protein interface analysis and prediction of putative protein-protein interactions. It is composed of a database holding protein interface structures derived from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The server also includes summary information about related proteins and an interactive protein interface viewer. A list of putative protein-protein interactions obtained by running our prediction algorithm can also be accessed. These results are applied to a set of protein structures obtained from the PDB at the time of algorithm execution (January 2004). Users can browse through the non-redundant dataset of representative interfaces on which the prediction algorithm depends, retrieve the list of similar structures to these interfaces or see the results of interaction predictions for a particular protein. Another service provided is interactive prediction. This is done by running the algorithm for user input structures.

  18. Evolutionary reprograming of protein-protein interaction specificity.

    PubMed

    Akiva, Eyal; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2015-10-22

    Using mutation libraries and deep sequencing, Aakre et al. study the evolution of protein-protein interactions using a toxin-antitoxin model. The results indicate probable trajectories via "intermediate" proteins that are promiscuous, thus avoiding transitions via non-interactions. These results extend observations about other biological interactions and enzyme evolution, suggesting broadly general principles.

  19. Light scattering evidence of selective protein fouling on biocompatible block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Fernando C; Stepánek, Petr; Schmidt, Vanessa; Jäger, Eliézer; Jäger, Alessandro; Giacomelli, Cristiano

    2012-08-07

    Selective protein fouling on block copolymer micelles with well-known potential for tumour-targeting drug delivery was evidenced by using dynamic light scattering measurements. The stability and interaction of block copolymer micelles with model proteins (BSA, IgG, lysozyme and CytC) is reported for systems featuring a hydrophobic (poly[2-(diisopropylamino)-ethyl methacrylate]) (PDPA) core and hydrophilic coronas comprising poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PEO-b-PG2MA) or poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine] (PMPC). The results revealed that protein size and hydrophilic chain density play important roles in the observed interactions. The PEO(113)-b-PG2MA(30)-b-PDPA(50) nanoparticles are stable and protein adsorption is prevented at all investigated protein environments. The successful protein-repellent characteristic of these nanoparticles is attributed to a high hydrophilic surface chain density (>0.1 chains per nm(2)) and to the length of the hydrophilic chains. On the other hand, although PMPC also has protein-repellent characteristics, the low surface chain density of the hydrophilic shell is supposed to enable interactions with small proteins. The PMPC(40)-b-PDPA(70) micelles are stable in BSA and IgG environments due to weak repulsion forces between PMPC and the proteins, to the hydration layer, and particularly to a size-effect where the large BSA (R(H) = 4.2 nm) and IgG (R(H) = 7.0 nm) do not easily diffuse within the PMPC shell. Conversely, a clear interaction was observed with the 2.1 nm radius lysozyme. The lysozyme protein can diffuse within the PMPC micellar shell towards the PDPA hydrophobic core in a process favored by its smaller size and the low hydrophilic PMPC surface chain density (∼0.049 chains per nm(2)) as compared to PEO-b-PG2MA (∼0.110 chains per nm(2)). The same behavior was not evidenced with the 2.3 nm radius positively charged CytC, probably due to its higher surface hydrophilicity and the consequent

  20. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  3. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  4. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  5. A protein block based fold recognition method for the annotation of twilight zone sequences.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Ganesan, K; Parthasarathy, S

    2013-03-01

    The description of protein backbone was recently improved with a group of structural fragments called Structural Alphabets instead of the regular three states (Helix, Sheet and Coil) secondary structure description. Protein Blocks is one of the Structural Alphabets used to describe each and every region of protein backbone including the coil. According to de Brevern (2000) the Protein Blocks has 16 structural fragments and each one has 5 residues in length. Protein Blocks fragments are highly informative among the available Structural Alphabets and it has been used for many applications. Here, we present a protein fold recognition method based on Protein Blocks for the annotation of twilight zone sequences. In our method, we align the predicted Protein Blocks of a query amino acid sequence with a library of assigned Protein Blocks of 953 known folds using the local pair-wise alignment. The alignment results with z-value ≥ 2.5 and P-value ≤ 0.08 are predicted as possible folds. Our method is able to recognize the possible folds for nearly 35.5% of the twilight zone sequences with their predicted Protein Block sequence obtained by pb_prediction, which is available at Protein Block Export server.

  6. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  7. Cell-mediated immune response to unrelated proteins and unspecific inflammation blocked by orally tolerated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gustavo C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Azevedo, Geraldo M; Pinho, Vanessa; Carvalho, Cláudia R; Vaz, Nelson M

    2009-03-01

    Oral tolerance promotes a generalized decrease in specific immune responsiveness to proteins previously encountered via the oral route. In addition, parenteral immunization with a tolerated protein also triggers a significant reduction in the primary responsiveness to a second unrelated antigen. This is generally explained by 'innocent bystander suppression', suggesting that the transient and episodic effects of inhibitory cytokines released by contact with the tolerated antigen would block responses to the second antigen. In disagreement with this view, we have previously shown that: (i) these inhibitory effects do not require concomitance or contiguity of the injections of the two proteins; (ii) that intravenous or intragastric exposures to the tolerated antigen are not inhibitory; and (iii) that the inhibitory effect, once triggered, persists in the absence of further contact with the tolerated protein, possibly by inhibition of secondary responsiveness (immunological memory). The present work confirms that immunological memory of the second unrelated antigen is hindered by exposure to the tolerated antigen and, in addition, shows that this exposure: (i) inhibits the inflammation triggered by an unrelated antigen through the double effect of inhibiting production of leucocytes in the bone marrow and blocking their migration to inflammed sites; and (ii) significantly blocks footpaw swelling triggered by carrageenan. Taken together, these results conclusively demonstrate that inhibitory effects of parenteral injection of tolerated antigens are much more general than suggested by the 'innocent bystander suppression' hypothesis.

  8. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  9. Hox protein interactions: screening and network building.

    PubMed

    Bergiers, Isabelle; Lambert, Barbara; Daakour, Sarah; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Rezsohazy, René

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mode of action of Hox proteins requires the identification of molecular and cellular pathways they take part in. This includes to characterize the networks of protein-protein interactions involving Hox proteins. In this chapter we propose a strategy and methods to map Hox interaction networks, from yeast two-hybrid and high-throughput yeast two-hybrid interaction screening to bioinformatic analyses based on the software platform Cytoscape.

  10. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  11. Small molecules that target phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Protein-protein interaction is one of the key events in the signal transduction pathway. The interaction changes the conformations, activities, localization and stabilities of the proteins, and transduces the signal to the next step. Frequently, this interaction occurs upon the protein phosphorylation. When upstream signals are stimulated, protein kinase(s) is/are activated and phosphorylate(s) their substrates, and induce the phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction. For this interaction, several domains in proteins are known to specifically recognize the phosphorylated residues of target proteins. These specific domains for interaction are important in the progression of the diseases caused by disordered signal transduction such as cancer. Thus small molecules that modulate this interaction are attractive lead compounds for the treatment of such diseases. In this review, we focused on three examples of phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction modules (14-3-3, polo box domain of Plk1 and F-box proteins in SCF ubiquitin ligases) and summarize small molecules that modulate their interaction. We also introduce our original screening system to identify such small molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Do cancer proteins really interact strongly in the human protein-protein interaction network?

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Sun, Jingchun; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2011-06-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis has been widely applied in the investigation of the mechanisms of diseases, especially cancer. Recent studies revealed that cancer proteins tend to interact more strongly than other categories of proteins, even essential proteins, in the human interactome. However, it remains unclear whether this observation was introduced by the bias towards more cancer studies in humans. Here, we examined this important issue by uniquely comparing network characteristics of cancer proteins with three other sets of proteins in four organisms, three of which (fly, worm, and yeast) whose interactomes are essentially not biased towards cancer or other diseases. We confirmed that cancer proteins had stronger connectivity, shorter distance, and larger betweenness centrality than non-cancer disease proteins, essential proteins, and control proteins. Our statistical evaluation indicated that such observations were overall unlikely attributed to random events. Considering the large size and high quality of the PPI data in the four organisms, the conclusion that cancer proteins interact strongly in the PPI networks is reliable and robust. This conclusion suggests that perturbation of cancer proteins might cause major changes of cellular systems and result in abnormal cell function leading to cancer. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PSAIA – Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Mihel, Josip; Šikić, Mile; Tomić, Sanja; Jeren, Branko; Vlahoviček, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Background PSAIA (Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer) was developed to compute geometric parameters for large sets of protein structures in order to predict and investigate protein-protein interaction sites. Results In addition to most relevant established algorithms, PSAIA offers a new method PIADA (Protein Interaction Atom Distance Algorithm) for the determination of residue interaction pairs. We found that PIADA produced more satisfactory results than comparable algorithms implemented in PSAIA. Particular advantages of PSAIA include its capacity to combine different methods to detect the locations and types of interactions between residues and its ability, without any further automation steps, to handle large numbers of protein structures and complexes. Generally, the integration of a variety of methods enables PSAIA to offer easier automation of analysis and greater reliability of results. PSAIA can be used either via a graphical user interface or from the command-line. Results are generated in either tabular or XML format. Conclusion In a straightforward fashion and for large sets of protein structures, PSAIA enables the calculation of protein geometric parameters and the determination of location and type for protein-protein interaction sites. XML formatted output enables easy conversion of results to various formats suitable for statistic analysis. Results from smaller data sets demonstrated the influence of geometry on protein interaction sites. Comprehensive analysis of properties of large data sets lead to new information useful in the prediction of protein-protein interaction sites. PMID:18400099

  14. Protein–Protein Interactions in Virus–Host Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Anderson F.; Pinney, John W.

    2017-01-01

    To study virus–host protein interactions, knowledge about viral and host protein architectures and repertoires, their particular evolutionary mechanisms, and information on relevant sources of biological data is essential. The purpose of this review article is to provide a thorough overview about these aspects. Protein domains are basic units defining protein interactions, and the uniqueness of viral domain repertoires, their mode of evolution, and their roles during viral infection make viruses interesting models of study. Mutations at protein interfaces can reduce or increase their binding affinities by changing protein electrostatics and structural properties. During the course of a viral infection, both pathogen and cellular proteins are constantly competing for binding partners. Endogenous interfaces mediating intraspecific interactions—viral–viral or host–host interactions—are constantly targeted and inhibited by exogenous interfaces mediating viral–host interactions. From a biomedical perspective, blocking such interactions is the main mechanism underlying antiviral therapies. Some proteins are able to bind multiple partners, and their modes of interaction define how fast these “hub proteins” evolve. “Party hubs” have multiple interfaces; they establish simultaneous/stable (domain–domain) interactions, and tend to evolve slowly. On the other hand, “date hubs” have few interfaces; they establish transient/weak (domain–motif) interactions by means of short linear peptides (15 or fewer residues), and can evolve faster. Viral infections are mediated by several protein–protein interactions (PPIs), which can be represented as networks (protein interaction networks, PINs), with proteins being depicted as nodes, and their interactions as edges. It has been suggested that viral proteins tend to establish interactions with more central and highly connected host proteins. In an evolutionary arms race, viral and host proteins are constantly

  15. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  16. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  17. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  18. Light scattering evidence of selective protein fouling on biocompatible block copolymer micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, Fernando C.; Stepánek, Petr; Schmidt, Vanessa; Jäger, Eliézer; Jäger, Alessandro; Giacomelli, Cristiano

    2012-07-01

    Selective protein fouling on block copolymer micelles with well-known potential for tumour-targeting drug delivery was evidenced by using dynamic light scattering measurements. The stability and interaction of block copolymer micelles with model proteins (BSA, IgG, lysozyme and CytC) is reported for systems featuring a hydrophobic (poly[2-(diisopropylamino)-ethyl methacrylate]) (PDPA) core and hydrophilic coronas comprising poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PEO-b-PG2MA) or poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine] (PMPC). The results revealed that protein size and hydrophilic chain density play important roles in the observed interactions. The PEO113-b-PG2MA30-b-PDPA50 nanoparticles are stable and protein adsorption is prevented at all investigated protein environments. The successful protein-repellent characteristic of these nanoparticles is attributed to a high hydrophilic surface chain density (>0.1 chains per nm2) and to the length of the hydrophilic chains. On the other hand, although PMPC also has protein-repellent characteristics, the low surface chain density of the hydrophilic shell is supposed to enable interactions with small proteins. The PMPC40-b-PDPA70 micelles are stable in BSA and IgG environments due to weak repulsion forces between PMPC and the proteins, to the hydration layer, and particularly to a size-effect where the large BSA (RH = 4.2 nm) and IgG (RH = 7.0 nm) do not easily diffuse within the PMPC shell. Conversely, a clear interaction was observed with the 2.1 nm radius lysozyme. The lysozyme protein can diffuse within the PMPC micellar shell towards the PDPA hydrophobic core in a process favored by its smaller size and the low hydrophilic PMPC surface chain density (~0.049 chains per nm2) as compared to PEO-b-PG2MA (~0.110 chains per nm2). The same behavior was not evidenced with the 2.3 nm radius positively charged CytC, probably due to its higher surface hydrophilicity and the consequent chemical

  19. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  20. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  1. Peroxiredoxin 1 interacts with and blocks the redox factor APE1 from activating interleukin-8 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Hassan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Saad, Amine; Papaluca, Arturo; Brosseau, Nicolas; Affar, El Bachir; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    APE1 is an essential DNA repair protein that also possesses the ability to regulate transcription. It has a unique cysteine residue C65, which maintains the reduce state of several transcriptional activators such as NF-κB. How APE1 is being recruited to execute the various biological functions remains unknown. Herein, we show that APE1 interacts with a novel partner PRDX1, a peroxidase that can also prevent oxidative damage to proteins by serving as a chaperone. PRDX1 knockdown did not interfere with APE1 expression level or its DNA repair activities. However, PRDX1 knockdown greatly facilitates APE1 detection within the nucleus by indirect immunofluorescence analysis, even though APE1 level was unchanged. The loss of APE1 interaction with PRDX1 promotes APE1 redox function to activate binding of the transcription factor NF-κB onto the promoter of a target gene, the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, resulting in its upregulation. Depletion of APE1 blocked the upregulation of IL-8 in the PRDX1 knockdown cells. Our findings suggest that the interaction of PRDX1 with APE1 represents a novel anti-inflammatory function of PRDX1, whereby the association safeguards APE1 from reducing transcription factors and activating superfluous gene expression, which otherwise could trigger cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27388124

  2. Probing the mechanisms underlying modulation of quinidine sensitivity to cardiac IKs block by protein kinase A-mediated IKs phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Kanki, Hideaki; Zhang, Wei; Roden, Dan M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cardiac IKs is enhanced by protein kinase A (PKA) stimulation. And PKA-stimulated IKs is about threefold less sensitive to quinidine block than basal current. In this study, we further tested two competing hypotheses: IKs phosphorylation either (i) modulates access of blocking drugs to a binding site; or (ii) destabilizes the drug–channel interaction. Experimental approach: To distinguish between these hypotheses, we studied quinidine block of IKs channels in which three PKA site residues of the α-subunit KCNQ1 were mutated with a bulky negative charged aspartic acid (D). To study alleviation of IKs block by quinidine, we compared activating current at +60 mV, either with or without 5 s hyperpolarizing prepulses to −120 mV. Key results: Without PKA stimulation, quinidine (100 µM) blocked wild-type current to a similar extent with and without the prepulse (93 ± 2% of pre-drug current at +60 mV vs. 95 ± 1%). With PKA-stimulated wild-type channels, however, there was less block with the hyperpolarization to −120 mV: at +60 mV, block was 71 ± 2% (−prepulse) versus 58 ± 3% (+prepulse). Individual D-mutations and the triple-D mutant were resistant to quinidine block similar to that seen with PKA-stimulated wild-type IKs. Conclusions and implications: We conclude that phosphorylation-induced insertion of bulky negative charges alleviates quinidine block and that PKA-induced stimulation, by conferring negative charges to the channels, blunts IKs block as the interaction between the channels and blockers becomes destabilized. These effects would be of clinical significance in providing protective mechanisms against pro-arrhythmias caused by drug-induced inhibition of IKs and IKr. PMID:19522859

  3. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  4. Protein-protein interactions in the synaptonemal complex.

    PubMed Central

    Tarsounas, M; Pearlman, R E; Gasser, P J; Park, M S; Moens, P B

    1997-01-01

    In mammalian systems, an approximately M(r) 30,000 Cor1 protein has been identified as a major component of the meiotic prophase chromosome cores, and a M(r) 125,000 Syn1 protein is present between homologue cores where they are synapsed and form the synaptonemal complex (SC). Immunolocalization of these proteins during meiosis suggests possible homo- and heterotypic interactions between the two as well as possible interactions with yet unrecognized proteins. We used the two-hybrid system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to detect possible protein-protein associations. Segments of hamsters Cor1 and Syn1 proteins were tested in various combinations for homo- and heterotypic interactions. In the cause of Cor1, homotypic interactions involve regions capable of coiled-coil formation, observation confirmed by in vitro affinity coprecipitation experiments. The two-hybrid assay detects no interaction of Cor1 protein with central and C-terminal fragments of Syn1 protein and no homotypic interactions involving these fragments of Syn1. Hamster Cor1 and Syn1 proteins both associate with the human ubiquitin-conjugation enzyme Hsubc9 as well as with the hamster Ubc9 homologue. The interactions between SC proteins and the Ubc9 protein may be significant for SC disassembly, which coincides with the repulsion of homologs by late prophase I, and also for the termination of sister centromere cohesiveness at anaphase II. Images PMID:9285814

  5. Pooled Screening for Synergistic Interactions Subject to Blocking and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kyle; Precup, Doina; Perkins, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The complex molecular networks in the cell can give rise to surprising interactions: gene deletions that are synthetically lethal, gene overexpressions that promote stemness or differentiation, synergistic drug interactions that heighten potency. Yet, the number of actual interactions is dwarfed by the number of potential interactions, and discovering them remains a major problem. Pooled screening, in which multiple factors are simultaneously tested for possible interactions, has the potential to increase the efficiency of searching for interactions among a large set of factors. However, pooling also carries with it the risk of masking genuine interactions due to antagonistic influence from other factors in the pool. Here, we explore several theoretical models of pooled screening, allowing for synergy and antagonism between factors, noisy measurements, and other forms of uncertainty. We investigate randomized sequential designs, deriving formulae for the expected number of tests that need to be performed to discover a synergistic interaction, and the optimal size of pools to test. We find that even in the presence of significant antagonistic interactions and testing noise, randomized pooled designs can significantly outperform exhaustive testing of all possible combinations. We also find that testing noise does not affect optimal pool size, and that mitigating noise by a selective approach to retesting outperforms naive replication of all tests. Finally, we show that a Bayesian approach can be used to handle uncertainty in problem parameters, such as the extent of synergistic and antagonistic interactions, resulting in schedules for adapting pool size during the course of testing. PMID:24454940

  6. Protein Synthesis--An Interactive Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Lee Ann J.; Jackson, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interactive game designed to help students see and understand the dynamic relationship between DNA, RNA, and proteins. Appropriate for either a class or laboratory setting, following a lecture session about protein synthesis. (DDR)

  7. Protein Synthesis--An Interactive Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Lee Ann J.; Jackson, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interactive game designed to help students see and understand the dynamic relationship between DNA, RNA, and proteins. Appropriate for either a class or laboratory setting, following a lecture session about protein synthesis. (DDR)

  8. Prediction of protein-protein interactions: unifying evolution and structure at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2011-06-01

    The vast majority of the chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Providing details of protein interactions at the residue level and incorporating them into protein interaction networks are crucial toward the elucidation of a dynamic picture of cells. Despite the rapid increase in the number of structurally known protein complexes, we are still far away from a complete network. Given experimental limitations, computational modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete structural networks. In this work, we focus on the question 'how do proteins interact?' rather than 'which proteins interact?' and we review structure-based protein-protein interaction prediction approaches. As a sample approach for modeling protein interactions, PRISM is detailed which combines structural similarity and evolutionary conservation in protein interfaces to infer structures of complexes in the protein interaction network. This will ultimately help us to understand the role of protein interfaces in predicting bound conformations.

  9. Prediction of protein-protein interactions: unifying evolution and structure at protein interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2011-06-01

    The vast majority of the chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Providing details of protein interactions at the residue level and incorporating them into protein interaction networks are crucial toward the elucidation of a dynamic picture of cells. Despite the rapid increase in the number of structurally known protein complexes, we are still far away from a complete network. Given experimental limitations, computational modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete structural networks. In this work, we focus on the question 'how do proteins interact?' rather than 'which proteins interact?' and we review structure-based protein-protein interaction prediction approaches. As a sample approach for modeling protein interactions, PRISM is detailed which combines structural similarity and evolutionary conservation in protein interfaces to infer structures of complexes in the protein interaction network. This will ultimately help us to understand the role of protein interfaces in predicting bound conformations.

  10. Protein interactions in human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schuster-Böckler, Benjamin; Bateman, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method that combines protein structure information with protein interaction data to identify residues that form part of an interaction interface. Our prediction method can retrieve interaction hotspots with an accuracy of 60% (at a 20% false positive rate). The method was applied to all mutations in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, predicting 1,428 mutations to be related to an interaction defect. Combining predicted and hand-curated sets, we discuss how mutations affect protein interactions in general. PMID:18199329

  11. Dissecting protein-protein interactions using directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Sundberg, Eric J

    2011-04-05

    Protein-protein interactions are essential for life. They are responsible for most cellular functions and when they go awry often lead to disease. Proteins are inherently complex. They are flexible macromolecules whose constituent amino acid components act in combinatorial and networked ways when they engage one another in binding interactions. It is just this complexity that allows them to conduct such a broad array of biological functions. Despite decades of intense study of the molecular basis of protein-protein interactions, key gaps in our understanding remain, hindering our ability to accurately predict the specificities and affinities of their interactions. Until recently, most protein-protein investigations have been probed experimentally at the single-amino acid level, making them, by definition, incapable of capturing the combinatorial nature of, and networked communications between, the numerous residues within and outside of the protein-protein interface. This aspect of protein-protein interactions, however, is emerging as a major driving force for protein affinity and specificity. Understanding a combinatorial process necessarily requires a combinatorial experimental tool. Much like the organisms in which they reside, proteins naturally evolve over time, through a combinatorial process of mutagenesis and selection, to functionally associate. Elucidating the process by which proteins have evolved may be one of the keys to deciphering the molecular rules that govern their interactions with one another. Directed evolution is a technique performed in the laboratory that mimics natural evolution on a tractable time scale that has been utilized widely to engineer proteins with novel capabilities, including altered binding properties. In this review, we discuss directed evolution as an emerging tool for dissecting protein-protein interactions.

  12. Protein-protein interactions: methods for detection and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Phizicky, E M; Fields, S

    1995-01-01

    The function and activity of a protein are often modulated by other proteins with which it interacts. This review is intended as a practical guide to the analysis of such protein-protein interactions. We discuss biochemical methods such as protein affinity chromatography, affinity blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and cross-linking; molecular biological methods such as protein probing, the two-hybrid system, and phage display: and genetic methods such as the isolation of extragenic suppressors, synthetic mutants, and unlinked noncomplementing mutants. We next describe how binding affinities can be evaluated by techniques including protein affinity chromatography, sedimentation, gel filtration, fluorescence methods, solid-phase sampling of equilibrium solutions, and surface plasmon resonance. Finally, three examples of well-characterized domains involved in multiple protein-protein interactions are examined. The emphasis of the discussion is on variations in the approaches, concerns in evaluating the results, and advantages and disadvantages of the techniques. PMID:7708014

  13. IFT-Cargo Interactions and Protein Transport in Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2015-12-01

    The motile and sensory functions of cilia and flagella are indispensable for human health. Cilia assembly requires a dedicated protein shuttle, intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional motility of multi-megadalton protein arrays along ciliary microtubules. IFT functions as a protein carrier delivering hundreds of distinct proteins into growing cilia. IFT-based protein import and export continue in fully grown cilia and are required for ciliary maintenance and sensing. Large ciliary building blocks might depend on IFT to move through the transition zone, which functions as a ciliary gate. Smaller, freely diffusing proteins, such as tubulin, depend on IFT to be concentrated or removed from cilia. As I discuss here, recent work provides insights into how IFT interacts with its cargoes and how the transport is regulated.

  14. Protein-protein Interactions using Radiolytic Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto,K.; Chance, M.

    2006-01-01

    Structural proteomics approaches using mass spectrometry are increasingly used in biology to examine the composition and structure of macromolecules. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting using mass spectrometry has recently been developed to define structure, assembly, and conformational changes of macromolecules in solution based on measurements of reactivity of amino acid side chain groups with covalent modification reagents. Accurate measurements of side chain reactivity are achieved using quantitative liquid-chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry, whereas the side chain modification sites are identified using tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the use of footprinting data in conjunction with computational modeling approaches is a powerful new method for testing and refining structural models of macromolecules and their complexes. In this review, we discuss the basic chemistry of hydroxyl radical reactions with peptides and proteins, highlight various approaches to map protein structure using radical oxidation methods, and describe state-of-the-art approaches to combine computational and footprinting data.

  15. A method for interactive specification of multiple-block topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, Reese L.; Mccann, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for dealing with the vast amount of topological and other data which must be specified to generate a multiple-block computational grid. Specific uses of the graphical capabilities of a powerful scientific workstation are described which reduce the burden on the user of collecting and formatting such large amounts of data. A program to implement this method, 3DPREP, is described. A plotting transformation algorithm, some useful software tools, notes on programming, and a database organization are also presented. Example grids developed using the method are shown.

  16. A method for interactive specification of multiple-block topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, Reese L.; Mccann, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for dealing with the vast amount of topological and other data which must be specified to generate a multiple-block computational grid. Specific uses of the graphical capabilities of a powerful scientific workstation are described which reduce the burden on the user of collecting and formatting such large amounts of data. A program to implement this method, 3DPREP, is described. A plotting transformation algorithm, some useful software tools, notes on programming, and a database organization are also presented. Example grids developed using the method are shown.

  17. Cyclosporine Inhibits Flavivirus Replication through Blocking the Interaction between Host Cyclophilins and Viral NS5 Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Min; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Zou, Gang; Robida, John M.; Yuan, Zhiming; Tang, Hengli; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Although flaviviruses cause significant human diseases, no effective therapy is currently available. Host factors essential for viral replication are potential targets for antiviral development. Here we report that cyclophilins (CyPs), a family of cellular peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases), play a role in flavivirus replication. Huh-7.5 cells with knockdown of different isoforms of CyP were less efficient than parental cells in supporting flavivirus replication, including West Nile virus (WNV), dengue virus, and yellow fever virus. The low viral replication in CyP A (CyPA) knockdown cells could be rescued by trans supplying of a wild-type CyPA but not by trans supplying of a mutant CyPA (defective in the PPIase activity), indicating that the isomerase activity of CyPA is critical for viral replication. Immunoprecipitation and biochemical pulldown analyses showed that CyPA interacts with WNV genomic RNA and viral NS5 protein in the replication complex. Furthermore, antiviral experiments demonstrated that cyclosporine (Cs; an 11-amino-acid cyclic peptide known to block the PPIase activity of CyPA) inhibits flavivirus replication in cell culture at nontoxic concentrations. Time-of-addition and transient replicon results indicated that Cs inhibits flavivirus at the step of viral RNA synthesis. Biochemical analysis showed that Cs directly blocks the interaction between CyPA and WNV NS5 protein. Our results suggest that host CyPA is a component of flavivirus replication complex and could be targeted for potential antiviral development. PMID:19451286

  18. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Protein quaternary structure universe” refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  19. Electrostatic interactions as governing the fouling in protein microfiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouammou, M.; Tijani, N.; Calvo, J. I.; Palacio, L.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2005-03-01

    The influence of pH and electrostatic interactions on the fouling mechanism during protein dead-end microfiltration (MF) has been investigated for two charged membranes. Polyethersulfone acidic membranes (ICE-450), being negatively charged, and basic ones (SB-6407), these positively charged, both from Pall Co., have been used in the investigations. BSA and Lysozyme solutions at different pH values (3.0, 5.0, 7.0, 8.5 and 10.0) were microfiltered through the membranes at a constant applied transmembrane pressure. Results have been analysed in terms of usual blocking filtration laws and a substantial change in the fouling behaviour has been observed when solution pH and/or membrane charge as the pressure was changed, this change being clearly related with the specific membrane-protein and protein-protein interactions.

  20. Protein interaction networks from literature mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Sigeo

    2005-03-01

    The ability to accurately predict and understand physiological changes in the biological network system in response to disease or drug therapeutics is of crucial importance in life science. The extensive amount of gene expression data generated from even a single microarray experiment often proves difficult to fully interpret and comprehend the biological significance. An increasing knowledge of protein interactions stored in the PubMed database, as well as the advancement of natural language processing, however, makes it possible to construct protein interaction networks from the gene expression information that are essential for understanding the biological meaning. From the in house literature mining system we have developed, the protein interaction network for humans was constructed. By analysis based on the graph-theoretical characterization of the total interaction network in literature, we found that the network is scale-free and semantic long-ranged interactions (i.e. inhibit, induce) between proteins dominate in the total interaction network, reducing the degree exponent. Interaction networks generated based on scientific text in which the interaction event is ambiguously described result in disconnected networks. In contrast interaction networks based on text in which the interaction events are clearly stated result in strongly connected networks. The results of protein-protein interaction networks obtained in real applications from microarray experiments are discussed: For example, comparisons of the gene expression data indicative of either a good or a poor prognosis for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL rearrangements, using our system, showed newly discovered signaling cross-talk.

  1. Solid State NMR and Protein-Protein Interactions in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  2. Design and construction of self-assembling supramolecular protein complexes using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Arai, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The central goal of nanobiotechnology is to design and construct novel biomaterials of nanometer sizes. In this short review, we describe recent progress of several approaches for designing and creating artificial self-assembling protein complexes and primarily focus on the following biotechnological strategies for using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks: fusion proteins designed for symmetrical self-assembly; three-dimensional domain-swapped oligomers; self-assembling designed coiled-coil peptide modules; metal-directed self-assembling engineered proteins; computationally designed self-assembling de novo proteins; and self-assembling protein nanobuilding blocks (PN-Blocks) using an intermolecularly folded dimeric de novo protein. These state-of-the-art nanobiotechnologies for designing supramolecular protein complexes will facilitate the development of novel functional nanobiomaterials.

  3. Replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes have limited stability in vitro.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter; Guy, Colin P

    2008-08-29

    There are many barriers that replication forks must overcome in order to duplicate a genome in vivo. These barriers include damage to the template DNA and proteins bound to this template. If replication is halted by such a block, then the block must be either removed or bypassed for replication to continue. If continuation of replication employs the original fork, avoiding the need to reload the replication apparatus, then the blocked replisome must retain functionality. In vivo studies of Escherichia coli replication forks suggest that replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes retain the ability to resume replication upon removal of the block for several hours. Here we tested the functional stability of replication forks reconstituted in vitro and blocked by lac repressor-operator complexes. Once a fork comes to a halt at such a block, it cannot continue subsequently to translocate through the block until addition of IPTG induces repressor dissociation. However, the ability to resume replication is retained only for 4-6 min regardless of the topological state of the template DNA. Comparison of our in vitro data with previous in vivo data suggests that either accessory factors that stabilise blocked forks are present in vivo or the apparent stability of blocked forks in vivo is due to continual reloading of the replication apparatus at the site of the block.

  4. New learning while consolidating memory during sleep is actively blocked by a protein synthesis dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Roi; Levitan, David; Susswein, Abraham J

    2016-01-01

    Brief experiences while a memory is consolidated may capture the consolidation, perhaps producing a maladaptive memory, or may interrupt the consolidation. Since consolidation occurs during sleep, even fleeting experiences when animals are awakened may produce maladaptive long-term memory, or may interrupt consolidation. In a learning paradigm affecting Aplysia feeding, when animals were trained after being awakened from sleep, interactions between new experiences and consolidation were prevented by blocking long-term memory arising from the new experiences. Inhibiting protein synthesis eliminated the block and allowed even a brief, generally ineffective training to produce long-term memory. Memory formation depended on consolidative proteins already expressed before training. After effective training, long term memory required subsequent transcription and translation. Memory formation during the sleep phase was correlated with increased CREB1 transcription, but not CREB2 transcription. Increased C/EBP transcription was a correlate of both effective and ineffective training and of treatments not producing memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17769.001 PMID:27919318

  5. Geminivirus C3 Protein: Replication Enhancement and Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Settlage, Sharon B.; See, Renee G.; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Most dicot-infecting geminiviruses encode a replication enhancer protein (C3, AL3, or REn) that is required for optimal replication of their small, single-stranded DNA genomes. C3 interacts with C1, the essential viral replication protein that initiates rolling circle replication. C3 also homo-oligomerizes and interacts with at least two host-encoded proteins, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the retinoblastoma-related protein (pRBR). It has been proposed that protein interactions contribute to C3 function. Using the C3 protein of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, we examined the impact of mutations to amino acids that are conserved across the C3 protein family on replication enhancement and protein interactions. Surprisingly, many of the mutations did not affect replication enhancement activity of C3 in tobacco protoplasts. Other mutations either enhanced or were detrimental to C3 replication activity. Analysis of mutated proteins in yeast two-hybrid assays indicated that mutations that inactivate C3 replication enhancement activity also reduce or inactivate C3 oligomerization and interaction with C1 and PCNA. In contrast, mutated C3 proteins impaired for pRBR binding are fully functional in replication assays. Hydrophobic residues in the middle of the C3 protein were implicated in C3 interaction with itself, C1, and PCNA, while polar resides at both the N and C termini of the protein are important for C3-pRBR interaction. These experiments established the importance of C3-C3, C3-C1, and C3-PCNA interactions in geminivirus replication. While C3-pRBR interaction is not required for viral replication in cycling cells, it may play a role during infection of differentiated cells in intact plants. PMID:16014949

  6. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-07-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein-protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the 'proteins': connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the 'interactions': number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain-domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at http://bioinfow.dep.usal.es/apid/.

  7. Computational Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions of Human Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su-Fang; Oh, Sangho; Si, Yue-Xiu; Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Han, Hong-Yan; Lee, Jinhyuk; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The various studies on tyrosinase have recently gained the attention of researchers due to their potential application values and the biological functions. In this study, we predicted the 3D structure of human tyrosinase and simulated the protein-protein interactions between tyrosinase and three binding partners, four and half LIM domains 2 (FHL2), cytochrome b-245 alpha polypeptide (CYBA), and RNA-binding motif protein 9 (RBM9). Our interaction simulations showed significant binding energy scores of −595.3 kcal/mol for FHL2, −859.1 kcal/mol for CYBA, and −821.3 kcal/mol for RBM9. We also investigated the residues of each protein facing toward the predicted site of interaction with tyrosinase. Our computational predictions will be useful for elucidating the protein-protein interactions of tyrosinase and studying its binding mechanisms. PMID:22577521

  8. Mapping interactions of Chikungunya virus nonstructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R; Rana, Jyoti; Dudha, Namrata; Kumar, Kapila; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Amita; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    The four nonstructural proteins (nsPs1-4) of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) play important roles involving enzymatic activities and specific interactions with both viral and host components, during different stages of viral pathogenesis. Elucidation of the presence and/or absence of interactions among nsPs in a systematic manner is thus of scientific interest. In the current study, each pair-wise combination among the four nonstructural proteins of CHIKV was systematically analyzed for possible interactions. Six novel protein interactions were identified for CHIKV, using systems such as yeast two-hybrid, GST pull down and ELISA, three of which have not been previously reported for the genus Alphavirus. These interactions form a network of organized associations that suggest the spatial arrangement of nonstructural proteins in the late replicase complex. The study identified novel interactions as well as concurred with previously described associations in related alphaviruses.

  9. Curvature-mediated interactions between membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K S; Neu, J; Oster, G

    1998-01-01

    Membrane proteins can deform the lipid bilayer in which they are embedded. If the bilayer is treated as an elastic medium, then these deformations will generate elastic interactions between the proteins. The interaction between a single pair is repulsive. However, for three or more proteins, we show that there are nonpairwise forces whose magnitude is similar to the pairwise forces. When there are five or more proteins, we show that the nonpairwise forces permit the existence of stable protein aggregates, despite their pairwise repulsions. PMID:9788923

  10. Protein-protein interactions in complex cosolvent solutions.

    PubMed

    Javid, Nadeem; Vogtt, Karsten; Krywka, Chris; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2007-04-02

    The effects of various kosmotropic and chaotropic cosolvents and salts on the intermolecular interaction potential of positively charged lysozyme is evaluated at varying protein concentrations by using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with liquid-state theoretical approaches. The experimentally derived static structure factors S(Q) obtained without and with added cosolvents and salts are analysed with a statistical mechanical model based on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential, which accounts for repulsive and attractive interactions between the protein molecules. Different cosolvents and salts influence the interactions between protein molecules differently as a result of changes in the hydration level or solvation, in charge screening, specific adsorption of the additives at the protein surface, or increased hydrophobic interactions. Intermolecular interaction effects are significant above protein concentrations of 1 wt %, and with increasing protein concentration, the repulsive nature of the intermolecular pair potential V(r) increases markedly. Kosmotropic cosolvents like glycerol and sucrose exhibit strong concentration-dependent effects on the interaction potential, leading to an increase of repulsive forces between the protein molecules at low to medium high osmolyte concentrations. Addition of trifluoroethanol exhibits a multiphasic effect on V(r) when changing its concentration. Salts like sodium chloride and potassium sulfate exhibit strong concentration-dependent changes of the interaction potential due to charge screening of the positively charged protein molecules. Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) at low concentrations exhibits a similar charge-screening effect, resulting in increased attractive interactions between the protein molecules. At higher GdmCl concentrations, V(r) becomes more repulsive in nature due to the presence of high concentrations of Gdm(+) ions binding to the protein molecules. Our findings also

  11. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  12. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  13. Protein-protein interactions: scoring schemes and binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Yugandhar, K; Jemimah, Sherlyn

    2017-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediate several cellular functions, which can be understood from the information obtained using the three-dimensional structures of protein-protein complexes and binding affinity data. This review focuses on computational aspects of predicting the best native-like complex structure and binding affinities. The first part covers the prediction of protein-protein complex structures and the advantages of conformational searching and scoring functions in protein-protein docking. The second part is devoted to various aspects of protein-protein interaction thermodynamics, such as databases for binding affinities and other thermodynamic parameters, computational methods to predict the binding affinity using either the three-dimensional structures of complexes or amino acid sequences, and change in binding affinities of the complexes upon mutations. We provide the latest developments on protein-protein docking and binding affinity studies along with a list of available computational resources for understanding protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inferring interaction partners from protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Dwyer, Robert S.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific protein−protein interactions are crucial in the cell, both to ensure the formation and stability of multiprotein complexes and to enable signal transduction in various pathways. Functional interactions between proteins result in coevolution between the interaction partners, causing their sequences to be correlated. Here we exploit these correlations to accurately identify, from sequence data alone, which proteins are specific interaction partners. Our general approach, which employs a pairwise maximum entropy model to infer couplings between residues, has been successfully used to predict the 3D structures of proteins from sequences. Thus inspired, we introduce an iterative algorithm to predict specific interaction partners from two protein families whose members are known to interact. We first assess the algorithm’s performance on histidine kinases and response regulators from bacterial two-component signaling systems. We obtain a striking 0.93 true positive fraction on our complete dataset without any a priori knowledge of interaction partners, and we uncover the origin of this success. We then apply the algorithm to proteins from ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter complexes, and obtain accurate predictions in these systems as well. Finally, we present two metrics that accurately distinguish interacting protein families from noninteracting ones, using only sequence data. PMID:27663738

  15. DIP: The Database of Interacting Proteins

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DIP Database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. By interaction, the DIP Database creators mean that two amino acid chains were experimentally identified to bind to each other. The database lists such pairs to aid those studying a particular protein-protein interaction but also those investigating entire regulatory and signaling pathways as well as those studying the organisation and complexity of the protein interaction network at the cellular level. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. It is a relational database that can be searched by protein, sequence, motif, article information, and pathBLAST. The website also serves as an access point to a number of projects related to DIP, such as LiveDIP, The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) and JDIP. Users have free and open access to DIP after login. [Taken from the DIP Guide and the DIP website] (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

  16. Cation-pi interactions in protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Peter B; Golovin, Adel

    2005-05-01

    Arginine is an abundant residue in protein-protein interfaces. The importance of this residue relates to the versatility of its side chain in intermolecular interactions. Different classes of protein-protein interfaces were surveyed for cation-pi interactions. Approximately half of the protein complexes and one-third of the homodimers analyzed were found to contain at least one intermolecular cation-pi pair. Interactions between arginine and tyrosine were found to be the most abundant. The electrostatic interaction energy was calculated to be approximately 3 kcal/mol, on average. A distance-based search of guanidinium:aromatic interactions was also performed using the Macromolecular Structure Database (MSD). This search revealed that half of the guanidinium:aromatic pairs pack in a coplanar manner. Furthermore, it was found that the cationic group of the cation-pi pair is frequently involved in intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In this manner the arginine side chain can participate in multiple interactions, providing a mechanism for inter-protein specificity. Thus, the cation-pi interaction is established as an important contributor to protein-protein interfaces.

  17. Predicting protein interactions by Brownian dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Mezei, Mihaly; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    We present a newly adapted Brownian-Dynamics (BD)-based protein docking method for predicting native protein complexes. The approach includes global BD conformational sampling, compact complex selection, and local energy minimization. In order to reduce the computational costs for energy evaluations, a shell-based grid force field was developed to represent the receptor protein and solvation effects. The performance of this BD protein docking approach has been evaluated on a test set of 24 crystal protein complexes. Reproduction of experimental structures in the test set indicates the adequate conformational sampling and accurate scoring of this BD protein docking approach. Furthermore, we have developed an approach to account for the flexibility of proteins, which has been successfully applied to reproduce the experimental complex structure from the structure of two unbounded proteins. These results indicate that this adapted BD protein docking approach can be useful for the prediction of protein-protein interactions.

  18. Noninvasive imaging of protein-protein interactions in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luker, Gary D.; Sharma, Vijay; Pica, Christina M.; Dahlheimer, Julie L.; Li, Wei; Ochesky, Joseph; Ryan, Christine E.; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions control transcription, cell division, and cell proliferation as well as mediate signal transduction, oncogenic transformation, and regulation of cell death. Although a variety of methods have been used to investigate protein interactions in vitro and in cultured cells, none can analyze these interactions in intact, living animals. To enable noninvasive molecular imaging of protein-protein interactions in vivo by positron-emission tomography and fluorescence imaging, we engineered a fusion reporter gene comprising a mutant herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase and green fluorescent protein for readout of a tetracycline-inducible, two-hybrid system in vivo. By using micro-positron-emission tomography, interactions between p53 tumor suppressor and the large T antigen of simian virus 40 were visualized in tumor xenografts of HeLa cells stably transfected with the imaging constructs. Imaging protein-binding partners in vivo will enable functional proteomics in whole animals and provide a tool for screening compounds targeted to specific protein-protein interactions in living animals.

  19. In Vivo Probe of Lipid II-Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sourav; Libby, Elizabeth A; Pidgeon, Sean E; Dworkin, Jonathan; Pires, Marcos M

    2016-07-11

    β-Lactams represent one of the most important classes of antibiotics discovered to date. These agents block Lipid II processing and cell wall biosynthesis through inactivation of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). PBPs enzymatically load cell wall building blocks from Lipid II carrier molecules onto the growing cell wall scaffold during growth and division. Lipid II, a bottleneck in cell wall biosynthesis, is the target of some of the most potent antibiotics in clinical use. Despite the immense therapeutic value of this biosynthetic pathway, the PBP-Lipid II association has not been established in live cells. To determine this key interaction, we designed an unnatural d-amino acid dipeptide that is metabolically incorporated into Lipid II molecules. By hijacking the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery, photoaffinity probes were installed in combination with click partners within Lipid II, thereby allowing, for the first time, demonstration of PBP interactions in vivo with Lipid II.

  20. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins. PMID:27610389

  1. Novel chemiluminescent Western blot blocking and antibody incubation solution for enhanced antibody-antigen interaction and increased specificity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Kimberly; Bochkariov, Dmitry

    2017-07-13

    Western blotting is a ubiquitous tool used in protein and molecular biology research, providing information about the presence, size, relative abundance, and state of a protein in a mixture. First, the proteins in a sample are separated by size using SDS-PAGE then transferred onto a membrane for detection with a set of primary and secondary antibodies. High-quality Western data requires high signal-to-noise ratios, which depend upon reduction of nonspecific antibody interactions. Blocking is a critical step in the Western blot method as it prevents the antibodies from binding nonspecifically to the membrane and irrelevant proteins. A solution of nonfat dry milk (NFDM) in physiological buffer is commonly used for this purpose, but does not perform well with every type of antibody and is not optimal for low-abundance proteins. We present a novel blocking solution for chemiluminescent Western blots, AdvanBlock™-chemi, which outperforms NFDM in experiments with 20 unique antibodies by increasing signal-to-noise ratios and minimizing nonspecific binding. This solution enhances protein detection by Western blot and provides consistent results for detection of low abundant and modified proteins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Human Milk Blocks DC-SIGN-Pathogen Interaction via MUC1.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nathalie; Kessen, Sabine F M; Van Der Voorn, J Patrick; Appelmelk, Ben J; Jeurink, Prescilla V; Knippels, Leon M J; Garssen, Johan; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of breastfeeding are well-recognized and include both immediate neonatal protection against pathogens and long-term protection against allergies and autoimmune diseases. Although several proteins have been identified to have anti-viral or anti-bacterial effects like secretory IgA or lactoferrin, the mechanisms of immune modulation are not fully understood. Recent studies identified important beneficial effects of glycans in human milk, such as those expressed in oligosaccharides or on glycoproteins. Glycans are recognized by the carbohydrate receptors C-type lectins on dendritic cell (DC) and specific tissue macrophages, which exert important functions in immune modulation and immune homeostasis. A well-characterized C-type lectin is dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), which binds terminal fucose. The present study shows that in human milk, MUC1 is the major milk glycoprotein that binds to the lectin domain of DC-SIGN and prevents pathogen interaction through the presence of Lewis x-type oligosaccharides. Surprisingly, this was specific for human milk, as formula, bovine or camel milk did not show any presence of proteins that interacted with DC-SIGN. The expression of DC-SIGN is found in young infants along the entire gastrointestinal tract. Our data thus suggest the importance of human milk glycoproteins for blocking pathogen interaction to DC in young children. Moreover, a potential benefit of human milk later in life in shaping the infants immune system through DC-SIGN cannot be ruled out.

  3. Human Milk Blocks DC-SIGN–Pathogen Interaction via MUC1

    PubMed Central

    Koning, Nathalie; Kessen, Sabine F. M.; Van Der Voorn, J. Patrick; Appelmelk, Ben J.; Jeurink, Prescilla V.; Knippels, Leon M. J.; Garssen, Johan; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of breastfeeding are well-recognized and include both immediate neonatal protection against pathogens and long-term protection against allergies and autoimmune diseases. Although several proteins have been identified to have anti-viral or anti-bacterial effects like secretory IgA or lactoferrin, the mechanisms of immune modulation are not fully understood. Recent studies identified important beneficial effects of glycans in human milk, such as those expressed in oligosaccharides or on glycoproteins. Glycans are recognized by the carbohydrate receptors C-type lectins on dendritic cell (DC) and specific tissue macrophages, which exert important functions in immune modulation and immune homeostasis. A well-characterized C-type lectin is dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), which binds terminal fucose. The present study shows that in human milk, MUC1 is the major milk glycoprotein that binds to the lectin domain of DC-SIGN and prevents pathogen interaction through the presence of Lewis x-type oligosaccharides. Surprisingly, this was specific for human milk, as formula, bovine or camel milk did not show any presence of proteins that interacted with DC-SIGN. The expression of DC-SIGN is found in young infants along the entire gastrointestinal tract. Our data thus suggest the importance of human milk glycoproteins for blocking pathogen interaction to DC in young children. Moreover, a potential benefit of human milk later in life in shaping the infants immune system through DC-SIGN cannot be ruled out. PMID:25821450

  4. Engineering building blocks for self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Like natural viruses, manmade protein cages for drug delivery are to be ideally formed by repetitive subunits with self-assembling properties, mimicking viral functions and molecular organization. Naturally formed nanostructures (such as viruses, flagella or simpler protein oligomers) can be engineered to acquire specific traits of interest in biomedicine, for instance through the addition of cell targeting agents for desired biodistribution and specific delivery of associated drugs. However, fully artificial constructs would be highly desirable regarding finest tuning and adaptation to precise therapeutic purposes. Although engineering of protein assembling is still in its infancy, arising principles and promising strategies of protein manipulation point out the rational construction of nanoscale protein cages as a feasible concept, reachable through conventional recombinant DNA technologies and microbial protein production. PMID:21192790

  5. Capturing the Interaction Potential of Amyloidogenic Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Javid, Nadeem; Vogtt, Karsten; Winter, Roland; Krywka, Christina; Tolan, Metin

    2007-07-13

    Experimentally derived static structure factors obtained for the aggregation-prone protein insulin were analyzed with a statistical mechanical model based on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential. The data reveal that the protein self-assembles into equilibrium clusters already at low concentrations. Furthermore, striking differences regarding interaction forces between aggregation-prone proteins such as insulin in the preaggregated regime and natively stable globular proteins are found.

  6. PPIM: A Protein-Protein Interaction Database for Maize1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aibo; Xu, Xin-Jian; Lu, Le; Liu, Jingdong; Cao, Yongwei; Chen, Luonan; Wu, Jun; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) is one of the most important crops worldwide. To understand the biological processes underlying various traits of the crop (e.g. yield and response to stress), a detailed protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is highly demanded. Unfortunately, there are very few such PPIs available in the literature. Therefore, in this work, we present the Protein-Protein Interaction Database for Maize (PPIM), which covers 2,762,560 interactions among 14,000 proteins. The PPIM contains not only accurately predicted PPIs but also those molecular interactions collected from the literature. The database is freely available at http://comp-sysbio.org/ppim with a user-friendly powerful interface. We believe that the PPIM resource can help biologists better understand the maize crop. PMID:26620522

  7. Protein-protein interaction predictions using text mining methods.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Nikolas; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Theodosiou, Theodosios; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-03-01

    It is beyond any doubt that proteins and their interactions play an essential role in most complex biological processes. The understanding of their function individually, but also in the form of protein complexes is of a great importance. Nowadays, despite the plethora of various high-throughput experimental approaches for detecting protein-protein interactions, many computational methods aiming to predict new interactions have appeared and gained interest. In this review, we focus on text-mining based computational methodologies, aiming to extract information for proteins and their interactions from public repositories such as literature and various biological databases. We discuss their strengths, their weaknesses and how they complement existing experimental techniques by simultaneously commenting on the biological databases which hold such information and the benchmark datasets that can be used for evaluating new tools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural similarity enhances interaction propensity of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lukatsky, D B; Shakhnovich, B E; Mintseris, J; Shakhnovich, E I

    2007-02-02

    We study statistical properties of interacting protein-like surfaces and predict two strong, related effects: (i) statistically enhanced self-attraction of proteins; (ii) statistically enhanced attraction of proteins with similar structures. The effects originate in the fact that the probability to find a pattern self-match between two identical, even randomly organized interacting protein surfaces is always higher compared with the probability for a pattern match between two different, promiscuous protein surfaces. This theoretical finding explains statistical prevalence of homodimers in protein-protein interaction networks reported earlier. Further, our findings are confirmed by the analysis of curated database of protein complexes that showed highly statistically significant overrepresentation of dimers formed by structurally similar proteins with highly divergent sequences ("superfamily heterodimers"). We suggest that promiscuous homodimeric interactions pose strong competitive interactions for heterodimers evolved from homodimers. Such evolutionary bottleneck is overcome using the negative design evolutionary pressure applied against promiscuous homodimer formation. This is achieved through the formation of highly specific contacts formed by charged residues as demonstrated both in model and real superfamily heterodimers.

  9. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  10. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer-phospholipid hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Nussberger, Stephan; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas; Müller, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness.

  11. Linkers in the structural biology of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J

    2013-02-01

    Linkers or spacers are short amino acid sequences created in nature to separate multiple domains in a single protein. Most of them are rigid and function to prohibit unwanted interactions between the discrete domains. However, Gly-rich linkers are flexible, connecting various domains in a single protein without interfering with the function of each domain. The advent of recombinant DNA technology made it possible to fuse two interacting partners with the introduction of artificial linkers. Often, independent proteins may not exist as stable or structured proteins until they interact with their binding partner, following which they gain stability and the essential structural elements. Gly-rich linkers have been proven useful for these types of unstable interactions, particularly where the interaction is weak and transient, by creating a covalent link between the proteins to form a stable protein-protein complex. Gly-rich linkers are also employed to form stable covalently linked dimers, and to connect two independent domains that create a ligand-binding site or recognition sequence. The lengths of linkers vary from 2 to 31 amino acids, optimized for each condition so that the linker does not impose any constraints on the conformation or interactions of the linked partners. Various structures of covalently linked protein complexes have been described using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and cryo-electron microscopy techniques. In this review, we evaluate several structural studies where linkers have been used to improve protein quality, to produce stable protein-protein complexes, and to obtain protein dimers.

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions of Viroporins in Coronaviruses and Paramyxoviruses: New Targets for Antivirals?

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jaume; Surya, Wahyu; Li, Yan; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Viroporins are members of a rapidly growing family of channel-forming small polypeptides found in viruses. The present review will be focused on recent structural and protein-protein interaction information involving two viroporins found in enveloped viruses that target the respiratory tract; (i) the envelope protein in coronaviruses and (ii) the small hydrophobic protein in paramyxoviruses. Deletion of these two viroporins leads to viral attenuation in vivo, whereas data from cell culture shows involvement in the regulation of stress and inflammation. The channel activity and structure of some representative members of these viroporins have been recently characterized in some detail. In addition, searches for protein-protein interactions using yeast-two hybrid techniques have shed light on possible functional roles for their exposed cytoplasmic domains. A deeper analysis of these interactions should not only provide a more complete overview of the multiple functions of these viroporins, but also suggest novel strategies that target protein-protein interactions as much needed antivirals. These should complement current efforts to block viroporin channel activity. PMID:26053927

  13. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene specific DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Benoukraf, Touati; Amabile, Giovanni; Goff, Loyal A.; Terragni, Joylon; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; De Figureido Pontes, Lorena Lobo; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, Pu; Wu, Mengchu; D’Alò, Francesco; Melnick, Ari; Leone, Giuseppe; Ebralidze, Konstantin K.; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Rinn, John L.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation was described almost a century ago. However, the rules governing its establishment and maintenance remain elusive. Here, we present data demonstrating that active transcription regulates levels of genomic methylation. We identified a novel RNA arising from the CEBPA gene locus critical in regulating the local DNA methylation profile. This RNA binds to DNMT1 and prevents CEBPA gene locus methylation. Deep sequencing of transcripts associated with DNMT1 combined with genome-scale methylation and expression profiling extended the generality of this finding to numerous gene loci. Collectively, these results delineate the nature of DNMT1-RNA interactions and suggest strategies for gene selective demethylation of therapeutic targets in disease. PMID:24107992

  14. Protein-phospholipid interactions in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-04-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein-Phospholipid Interactions in Blood Clotting

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  16. Single-Molecule Study of Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H. PETER

    2005-03-01

    Protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions play critical roles in biological functions of living cells, such as cell signaling, receptor-ligand activation, cellular metabolism, DNA damage recognition and repair, gene expression, replication, etc. These protein interactions often involve complex mechanisms and inhomogeneous dynamics with significant conformational changes. Protein-protein, protein-ligand, and protein-DNA interactions are often intrinsically single-molecule processes at an induction stage associated with the initiation of crucial early eents in living cells. For example, cell-signaling processes are often initiated through a few copies of protein-interaction complexes, being amplified along the signaling pathway.

  17. Poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9ORF72 repeats block global protein translation.

    PubMed

    Kanekura, Kohsuke; Yagi, Takuya; Cammack, Alexander J; Mahadevan, Jana; Kuroda, Masahiko; Harms, Matthew B; Miller, Timothy M; Urano, Fumihiko

    2016-05-01

    The expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of the Chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This genetic alteration leads to the accumulation of five types of poly-dipeptides translated from the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat. Among these, poly-proline-arginine (poly-PR) and poly-glycine-arginine (poly-GR) peptides are known to be neurotoxic. However, the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with these poly-dipeptides are not clear. A proteomics approach identified a number of interacting proteins with poly-PR peptide, including mRNA-binding proteins, ribosomal proteins, translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors. Immunostaining of brain sections from patients with C9orf72 ALS showed that poly-GR was colocalized with a mRNA-binding protein, hnRNPA1. In vitro translation assays showed that poly-PR and poly-GR peptides made insoluble complexes with mRNA, restrained the access of translation factors to mRNA, and blocked protein translation. Our results demonstrate that impaired protein translation mediated by poly-PR and poly-GR peptides plays a role in neurotoxicity and reveal that the pathways altered by the poly-dipeptides-mRNA complexes are potential therapeutic targets for treatment of C9orf72 FTD/ALS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Predicting the fission yeast protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pancaldi, Vera; Saraç, Omer S; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R; Převorovský, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bähler, Jürg

    2012-04-01

    A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein-protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70-80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt).

  19. Intraviral protein interactions of Chandipura virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kapila; Rana, Jyoti; Sreejith, R; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-10-01

    Chandipura virus (CHPV) is an emerging rhabdovirus responsible for several outbreaks of fatal encephalitis among children in India. The characteristic structure of the virus is a result of extensive and specific interplay among its five encoded proteins. The revelation of interactions among CHPV proteins can help in gaining insight into viral architecture and pathogenesis. In the current study, we carried out comprehensive yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) analysis to elucidate intraviral protein-protein interactions. All of the interactions identified by Y2H were assessed for reliability by GST pull-down and ELISA. A total of eight interactions were identified among four viral proteins. Five of these interactions are being reported for the first time for CHPV. Among these, the glycoprotein (G)-nucleocapsid (N) interaction could be considered novel, as this has not been reported for any members of the family Rhabdoviridae. This study provides a framework within which the roles of the identified protein interactions can be explored further for understanding the biology of this virus at the molecular level.

  20. Van der Waals Interactions Involving Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Charles M.; Neal, Brian L.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models. with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth.

  1. Van der Waals interactions involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, C M; Neal, B L; Lenhoff, A M

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. Whereas the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models, with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation, and crystal growth. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:8789115

  2. Characterization of protein-protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein interactions has attracted the attention of many researchers from both a fundamental point of view and a practical point of view. From a fundamental point of view, the development of an understanding of the signaling events triggered by the interaction of two or more proteins provides key information to elucidate the functioning of many cell processes. From a practical point of view, understanding protein-protein interactions at a quantitative level provides the foundation for the development of antagonists or agonists of those interactions. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique with the capability of measuring not only binding affinity but the enthalpic and entropic components that define affinity. Over the years, isothermal titration calorimeters have evolved in sensitivity and accuracy. Today, TA Instruments and MicroCal market instruments with the performance required to evaluate protein-protein interactions. In this methods paper, we describe general procedures to analyze heterodimeric (porcine pancreatic trypsin binding to soybean trypsin inhibitor) and homodimeric (bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin) protein associations by ITC.

  3. STITCH: interaction networks of chemicals and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Michael; von Mering, Christian; Campillos, Monica; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge about interactions between proteins and small molecules is essential for the understanding of molecular and cellular functions. However, information on such interactions is widely dispersed across numerous databases and the literature. To facilitate access to this data, STITCH (‘search tool for interactions of chemicals’) integrates information about interactions from metabolic pathways, crystal structures, binding experiments and drug–target relationships. Inferred information from phenotypic effects, text mining and chemical structure similarity is used to predict relations between chemicals. STITCH further allows exploring the network of chemical relations, also in the context of associated binding proteins. Each proposed interaction can be traced back to the original data sources. Our database contains interaction information for over 68 000 different chemicals, including 2200 drugs, and connects them to 1.5 million genes across 373 genomes and their interactions contained in the STRING database. STITCH is available at http://stitch.embl.de/ PMID:18084021

  4. Structure Activity Relationships of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Complex with a Blocking Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Reid,C.; Rushe, M.; Jarpe, M.; Van Vlijmen, H.; Dolinski, B.; Qian, F.; Cachero, T.; Cuervo, H.; Yanachkova, M.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) are cytokines that direct immune cells bearing appropriate receptors to sites of inflammation or injury and are therefore attractive therapeutic targets for inhibitory molecules. 11K2 is a blocking mouse monoclonal antibody active against several human and murine MCPs. A 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Fab fragment of this antibody in complex with human MCP-1 has been solved. The Fab blocks CCR2 receptor binding to MCP-1 through an adjacent but distinct binding site. The orientation of the Fab indicates that a single MCP-1 dimer will bind two 11K2 antibodies. Several key residues on the antibody and on human MCPs were predicted to be involved in antibody selectivity. Mutational analysis of these residues confirms their involvement in the antibody- chemokine interaction. In addition to mutations that decreased or disrupted binding, one antibody mutation resulted in a 70-fold increase in affinity for human MCP-2. A key residue missing in human MCP-3, a chemokine not recognized by the antibody, was identified and engineering the preferred residue into the chemokine conferred binding to the antibody.

  5. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease.

  6. Response of the mosquito protein interaction network to dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two fifths of the world's population is at risk from dengue. The absence of effective drugs and vaccines leaves vector control as the primary intervention tool. Understanding dengue virus (DENV) host interactions is essential for the development of novel control strategies. The availability of genome sequences for both human and mosquito host greatly facilitates genome-wide studies of DENV-host interactions. Results We developed the first draft of the mosquito protein interaction network using a computational approach. The weighted network includes 4,214 Aedes aegypti proteins with 10,209 interactions, among which 3,500 proteins are connected into an interconnected scale-free network. We demonstrated the application of this network for the further annotation of mosquito proteins and dissection of pathway crosstalk. Using three datasets based on physical interaction assays, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens and microarray assays, we identified 714 putative DENV-associated mosquito proteins. An integrated analysis of these proteins in the network highlighted four regions consisting of highly interconnected proteins with closely related functions in each of replication/transcription/translation (RTT), immunity, transport and metabolism. Putative DENV-associated proteins were further selected for validation by RNAi-mediated gene silencing, and dengue viral titer in mosquito midguts was significantly reduced for five out of ten (50.0%) randomly selected genes. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of common host requirements for DENV in mosquitoes and humans. We discuss the significance of our findings for pharmacological intervention and genetic modification of mosquitoes for blocking dengue transmission. PMID:20553610

  7. Interaction of permeant and blocking ions in cloned inward-rectifier K+ channels.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, D; Hahn, H; Antz, C; Ruppersberg, J P; Fakler, B

    1998-01-01

    Blocking cloned inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels from the cytoplasmic side was analyzed with a rapid application system exchanging the intracellular solution on giant inside-out patches from Xenopus oocytes in <2 ms. Dependence of the pore-block on interaction of the blocking molecule with permeant and impermeant ions on either side of the membrane was investigated in Kir1.1 (ROMK1) channels blocked by ammonium derivatives and in Kir4.1 (BIR10) channels blocked by spermine. The blocking reaction in both systems showed first-order kinetics and allowed separate determination of on- and off-rates. The off-rates of block were strongly dependent on the concentration of internal and external bulk ions, but almost independent of the ion species at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. With K+ as the only cation on both sides of the membrane, off-rates exhibited strong coupling to the K+ reversal potential (E(K)) and increased and decreased with reduction in intra and extracellular K+ concentration, respectively. The on-rates showed significant dependence on concentration and species of internal bulk ions. This control of rate-constants by interaction of permeant and impermeant internal and external ions governs the steady-state current-voltage relation (I-V) of Kir channels and determines their physiological function under various conditions. PMID:9591659

  8. Conformational distributions of denatured and unstructured proteins are similar to those of 20 × 20 blocked dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Jung, Young-Sang; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Cho, Minhaeng

    2012-05-01

    Understanding intrinsic conformational preferences of amino-acids in unfolded proteins is important for elucidating the underlying principles of their stability and re-folding on biological timescales. Here, to investigate the neighbor interaction effects on the conformational propensities of amino-acids, we carried out (1)H NMR experiments for a comprehensive set of blocked dipeptides and measured the scalar coupling constants between alpha protons and amide protons as well as their chemical shifts. Detailed inspection of these NMR properties shows that, irrespective of amino-acid side-chain properties, the distributions of the measured coupling constants and chemical shifts of the dipeptides are comparatively narrow, indicating small variances of their conformation distributions. They are further compared with those of blocked amino-acids (Ac-X-NHMe), oligopeptides (Ac-GGXGG-NH(2)), and native (lysozyme), denatured (lysozyme and outer membrane protein X from Escherichia coli), unstructured (Domain 2 of the protein 5A of Hepatitis C virus), and intrinsically disordered (hNlg3cyt: intracellular domain of human NL3) proteins. These comparative investigations suggest that the conformational preferences and local solvation environments of the blocked dipeptides are quite similar to not only those of other short oligopeptides but also those of denatured and natively unfolded proteins.

  9. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  10. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-06

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Convergent evolution led ribosome inactivating proteins to interact with ribosomal stalk.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, Walter J; Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri

    2012-03-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating an adenine on the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) of the large subunit ribosomal RNA. Several RIPs interact with the C-terminal end of ribosomal stalk P proteins, and this interaction is required for their full activity. In contrast, the activity of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein is not affected by blocking this stalk component. Here, we provide evidence from phylogenetic analyses and sequence alignments suggesting that the interaction with the C-terminal end of P proteins evolved independently in different RIPs by convergent evolution.

  12. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein–protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the ‘proteins’: connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the ‘interactions’: number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain–domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at . PMID:16845013

  13. Loss of BiP/GRP78 function blocks translocation of secretory proteins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    BiP/GRP78 is an essential member of the HSP70 family that resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, BiP/GRP78 is encoded by the KAR2 gene. A temperature sensitive mutation was isolated in KAR2 and found to cause a rapid block in protein secretion. Secretory precursors of a number of proteins (invertase, carboxypeptidase Y, alpha-factor, and BiP) accumulated that were characteristic of a block in translocation into the lumen of the ER. Protease protection experiments confirmed that the precursors accumulated on the cytoplasmic side of the ER membrane. Moreover, depletion of wild-type KAR2 protein also resulted in a block in translocation of secretory proteins. These results implicate BiP/GRP78 function in the continued translocation of proteins into the lumen of the ER. PMID:2190988

  14. "Graft-to" Protein/Polymer Conjugates Using Polynorbornene Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Isarov, Sergey A; Lee, Parker W; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2016-02-08

    A series of water-soluble polynorbornene block copolymers prepared via Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) were grafted to proteins to form ROMP-derived bioconjugates. ROMP afforded low-dispersity polymers and allowed for strict control over polymer molecular weight and architecture. The polymers consisted of a large block of PEGylated monoester norbornene and were capped with a short block of norbornene dicarboxylic anhydride. This cap served as a reactive linker that facilitated attachment of the polymer to lysine residues under mildly alkaline conditions. The generality of this approach was shown by synthesizing multivalent polynorbornene-modified viral nanoparticles derived from bacteriophage Qβ, a protein nanoparticle used extensively for nanomedicine. The conjugated nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity to NIH 3T3 murine fibroblast cells. These findings establish protein bioconjugation with functionalized polynorbornenes as an effective alternative to conventional protein/polymer modification strategies and further expand the toolbox for protein bioconjugates.

  15. Evolvability of yeast protein-protein interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Talavera, David; Williams, Simon G; Norris, Matthew G S; Robertson, David L; Lovell, Simon C

    2012-06-22

    The functional importance of protein-protein interactions indicates that there should be strong evolutionary constraint on their interaction interfaces. However, binding interfaces are frequently affected by amino acid replacements. Change due to coevolution within interfaces can contribute to variability but is not ubiquitous. An alternative explanation for the ability of surfaces to accept replacements may be that many residues can be changed without affecting the interaction. Candidates for these types of residues are those that make interchain interaction only through the protein main chain, β-carbon, or associated hydrogen atoms. Since almost all residues have these atoms, we hypothesize that this subset of interface residues may be more easily substituted than those that make interactions through other atoms. We term such interactions "residue type independent." Investigating this hypothesis, we find that nearly a quarter of residues in protein interaction interfaces make exclusively interchain residue-type-independent contacts. These residues are less structurally constrained and less conserved than residues making residue-type-specific interactions. We propose that residue-type-independent interactions allow substitutions in binding interfaces while the specificity of binding is maintained.

  16. Tetrodotoxin block of sodium channels in rabbit Purkinje fibers. Interactions between toxin binding and channel gating

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in rabbit Purkinje fibers using a two-microelectrode voltage clamp to measure sodium current. INa decreases with TTX as if one toxin molecule blocks one channel with a dissociation constant KD approximately equal to 1 microM. KD remains unchanged when INa is partially inactivated by steady depolarization. Thus, TTX binding and channel inactivation are independent at equilibrium. Interactions between toxin binding and gating were revealed, however, by kinetic behavior that depends on rates of equilibration. For example, frequent suprathreshold pulses produce extra use-dependent block beyond the tonic block seen with widely spaced stimuli. Such lingering aftereffects of depolarization were characterized by double-pulse experiments. The extra block decays slowly enough (tau approximately equal to 5 s) to be easily separated from normal recovery from inactivation (tau less than 0.2 s at 18 degrees C). The amount of extra block increases to a saturating level with conditioning depolarizations that produce inactivation without detectable activation. Stronger depolarizations that clearly open channels give the same final level of extra block, but its development includes a fast phase whose voltage- and time-dependence resemble channel activation. Thus, TTX block and channel gating are not independent, as believed for nerve. Kinetically, TTX resembles local anesthetics, but its affinity remains unchanged during maintained depolarization. On this last point, comparison of our INa results and earlier upstroke velocity (Vmax) measurements illustrates how much these approaches can differ. PMID:6270235

  17. Amphiphilic block copolymer-based photonic platform towards efficient protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, Afroditi; Gibson, Thomas J.; Themistou, Efrosyni; Pispas, Stergios; Riziotis, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The development of a low complexity fiber optic based protein sensor by functionalizing the surface of silica optical fibers using block copolymers having both hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and hydrophilic poly[2- (dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) blocks is presented here. The amphiphilic thiol-functionalized PMMA117-b-P(DMAEMA17-st-TEMA2) and vinyl-sulfone PMMA117-b-P(DMAEMA17-st-VSTEMA2) block copolymers designed and synthesized in this work contain a cationic hydrophilic PDMAEMA block that can electrostatically bind selected oppositely charged proteins and also appropriate functional groups for reversible or non-reversible protein binding, respectively, leading to a refractive index change of the overlayer and hence, enabling the sensing. The developed PMMA117-b-PDMAEMA16-based platform has been evaluated for bovine serum albumin (BSA) sensing, exhibiting linear response to detected BSA concentrations.

  18. Predicting the Fission Yeast Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Pancaldi, Vera; Saraç, Ömer S.; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R.; Převorovský, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bähler, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein–protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70–80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt). PMID:22540037

  19. Moonlighting proteins in sperm-egg interactions.

    PubMed

    Petit, François M; Serres, Catherine; Auer, Jana

    2014-12-01

    Sperm-egg interaction is a highly species-specific step during the fertilization process. The first steps consist of recognition between proteins on the sperm head and zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins, the acellular coat that protects the oocyte. We aimed to determine which sperm head proteins interact with ZP2, ZP3 and ZP4 in humans. Two approaches were combined to identify these proteins: immunoblotting human spermatozoa targeted by antisperm antibodies (ASAs) from infertile men and far-Western blotting of human sperm proteins overlaid by each of the human recombinant ZP (hrZP) proteins. We used a proteomic approach with 2D electrophoretic separation of sperm protein revealed using either ASAs eluted from infertile patients or recombinant human ZP glycoproteins expressed in Chinese-hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Only spots highlighted by both methods were analysed by MALDI-MS/MS for identification. We identified proteins already described in human spermatozoa, but implicated in different metabolic pathways such as glycolytic enzymes [phosphokinase type 3 (PK3), enolase 1 (ENO1), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), aldolase A (ALDOA) and triose phosphate isomerase (TPI)], detoxification enzymes [GST Mu (GSTM) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) 4], ion channels [voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2)] or structural proteins (outer dense fibre 2). Several proteins were localized on the sperm head by indirect immunofluorescence, and their interaction with ZP proteins was confirmed by co-precipitation experiments. These results confirm the complexity of the sperm-ZP recognition process in humans with the implication of different proteins interacting with the main three ZP glycoproteins. The multiple roles of these proteins suggest that they are multifaceted or moonlighting proteins.

  20. Interface-Resolved Network of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret E.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    We define an interface-interaction network (IIN) to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI). This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked in the coarser

  1. Morbillivirus V Proteins Exhibit Multiple Mechanisms to Block Type 1 and Type 2 Interferon Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chinnakannan, Senthil K.; Nanda, Sambit K.; Baron, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Morbilliviruses form a closely related group of pathogenic viruses which encode three non-structural proteins V, W and C in their P gene. Previous studies with rinderpest virus (RPV) and measles virus (MeV) have demonstrated that these non-structural proteins play a crucial role in blocking type I (IFNα/β) and type II (IFNγ) interferon action, and various mechanisms have been proposed for these effects. We have directly compared four important morbilliviruses, rinderpest (RPV), measles virus (MeV), peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and canine distemper virus (CDV). These viruses and their V proteins could all block type I IFN action. However, the viruses and their V proteins had varying abilities to block type II IFN action. The ability to block type II IFN-induced gene transcription correlated with co-precipitation of STAT1 with the respective V protein, but there was no correlation between co-precipitation of either STAT1 or STAT2 and the abilities of the V proteins to block type I IFN-induced gene transcription or the creation of the antiviral state. Further study revealed that the V proteins of RPV, MeV, PPRV and CDV could all interfere with phosphorylation of the interferon-receptor-associated kinase Tyk2, and the V protein of highly virulent RPV could also block the phosphorylation of another such kinase, Jak1. Co-precipitation studies showed that morbillivirus V proteins all form a complex containing Tyk2 and Jak1. This study highlights the ability of morbillivirus V proteins to target multiple components of the IFN signalling pathways to control both type I and type II IFN action. PMID:23431397

  2. The design and characterization of protein based block polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghpanah, Jennifer Shorah

    Over the past decades, protein engineering has provided noteworthy advances in basic science as well as in medicine and industry. Protein engineers are currently focusing their efforts on developing elementary rules to design proteins with a specific structure and function. Proteins derived from natural sources have been used generate a plethora of materials with remarkable structural and functional properties. In the first chapter, we show how we can fabricate protein polymers comprised of two different self-assembling domains (SADs). From our studies, we discover that SADs in different orientations have a large impact on their overall microscopic and macroscopic features. In the second chapter, we explore the impact of cellulose (Tc) on the diblocks EC and CE. We discover that Tc is able to selectively impact the mechanical propertied of CE because CE has smaller particle sizes and more E domain exposed on its surface at RT. In the third chapter, we appended an extra C domain to CE to generate CEC with improved mechanical properties, structure and small molecule recognition.

  3. Carbohydrate-Aromatic Interactions in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Kieran L; Bartlett, Gail J; Diehl, Roger C; Agirre, Jon; Gallagher, Timothy; Kiessling, Laura L; Woolfson, Derek N

    2015-12-09

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in health and disease. However, defining and manipulating these interactions has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying fundamental forces. To elucidate common and discriminating features in carbohydrate recognition, we have analyzed quantitatively X-ray crystal structures of proteins with noncovalently bound carbohydrates. Within the carbohydrate-binding pockets, aliphatic hydrophobic residues are disfavored, whereas aromatic side chains are enriched. The greatest preference is for tryptophan with an increased prevalence of 9-fold. Variations in the spatial orientation of amino acids around different monosaccharides indicate specific carbohydrate C-H bonds interact preferentially with aromatic residues. These preferences are consistent with the electronic properties of both the carbohydrate C-H bonds and the aromatic residues. Those carbohydrates that present patches of electropositive saccharide C-H bonds engage more often in CH-π interactions involving electron-rich aromatic partners. These electronic effects are also manifested when carbohydrate-aromatic interactions are monitored in solution: NMR analysis indicates that indole favorably binds to electron-poor C-H bonds of model carbohydrates, and a clear linear free energy relationships with substituted indoles supports the importance of complementary electronic effects in driving protein-carbohydrate interactions. Together, our data indicate that electrostatic and electronic complementarity between carbohydrates and aromatic residues play key roles in driving protein-carbohydrate complexation. Moreover, these weak noncovalent interactions influence which saccharide residues bind to proteins, and how they are positioned within carbohydrate-binding sites.

  4. A Tool for Interactive Protein Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kreylos, Oliver; Max, Nelson; Bethel, Wes; Crivelli, Silvia; Lu, James; Crawford, Clark

    2005-03-28

    ProteinShop is a graphical environment that facilitates a solution to the protein prediction problem through a combination of unique features and capabilities. These include: 1. Helping researchers automatically generate 3D protein structures from scratcW by using the sequence of amino acids and secondary structure specifications as input. 2. Enabling users to apply their accumulated biochemical knowledge and intuition during the interactive manipulation of structures. 3. FacIlitating interactive comparison and analysis of alternative structures through visualization of free energy computed during modeling. 4. Accelerating discovery of low-energy configurations by applying local optimizations plug-in to user-selected protein structures. ProteinShop v.2.0 includes the following new features: - Visualizes multiple-domain structures - Automatically creates a user-specified number of beta-sheet configurations - Provides the interface and the libraries for energy visualization and local minimization of protein structures - Reads standard POB files without previous editing

  5. Brownian dynamics simulation of electrostatically interacting proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E.; Krushelnitsky, A. G.; Fedotov, V. D.

    Brownian dynamics simulation software has been developed to study the dynamics of proteins as a whole in solution. The proteins were modelled as spheres with point dipoles embedded in the centre of sphere. A set of Brownian dynamics simulations at different values of the dipole moments, protein concentration and translational diffusion coefficient was performed to investigate the influence of interprotein electrostatic interactions on dynamic protein behaviour in solution. It was shown that these interactions led to the slowing down of protein rotation and a complex non-exponential shape of the rotational correlation function. Analysis of the correlation functions was performed within the frame of the model of electrostatic interprotein interactions advanced earlier on the basis of NMR and dielectric spectroscopy data. This model assumes that, due to electrostatic interactions, protein Brownian rotation becomes anisotropic. The lifetime of this anisotropy is controlled mainly by translational diffusion of proteins. Thus, the correlation function can be decomposed into two components corresponding to anisotropic Brownian rotation and an isotropic motion of an external electric field vector produced by the surrounding proteins.

  6. On the role of electrostatics on protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Witham, Shawn; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    The role of electrostatics on protein-protein interactions and binding is reviewed in this article. A brief outline of the computational modeling, in the framework of continuum electrostatics, is presented and basic electrostatic effects occurring upon the formation of the complex are discussed. The role of the salt concentration and pH of the water phase on protein-protein binding free energy is demonstrated and indicates that the increase of the salt concentration tends to weaken the binding, an observation that is attributed to the optimization of the charge-charge interactions across the interface. It is pointed out that the pH-optimum (pH of optimal binding affinity) varies among the protein-protein complexes, and perhaps is a result of their adaptation to particular subcellular compartment. At the end, the similarities and differences between hetero- and homo-complexes are outlined and discussed with respect to the binding mode and charge complementarity. PMID:21572182

  7. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Angerer, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine) motif proteins (LYRMs) of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6) or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1) of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM) independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria. PMID:25686363

  8. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  9. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  10. Protein-protein interaction networks in the spinocerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsztein, David C

    2006-01-01

    A large yeast two-hybrid study investigating whether the proteins mutated in different forms of spinocerebellar ataxia have interacting protein partners in common suggests that some forms do share common pathways, and will provide a valuable resource for future work on these diseases. PMID:16904001

  11. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions (PPI) reagents: | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below.

  14. Teaching Noncovalent Interactions Using Protein Molecular Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornasari, Maria Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo; Echave, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Noncovalent interactions and physicochemical properties of amino acids are important topics in biochemistry courses. Here, we present a computational laboratory where the capacity of each of the 20 amino acids to maintain different noncovalent interactions are used to investigate the stabilizing forces in a set of proteins coming from organisms…

  15. Teaching Noncovalent Interactions Using Protein Molecular Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornasari, Maria Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo; Echave, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Noncovalent interactions and physicochemical properties of amino acids are important topics in biochemistry courses. Here, we present a computational laboratory where the capacity of each of the 20 amino acids to maintain different noncovalent interactions are used to investigate the stabilizing forces in a set of proteins coming from organisms…

  16. Inferring Domain-Domain Interactions from Protein-Protein Interactions with Formal Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains. PMID:24586450

  17. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  18. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  19. The role of synoptic/planetary scale interactions during the development of a blocking anticyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Chin-Hua; Smith, Phillip J.

    1990-01-01

    The period 19 21 January 1979 marked the development of a blocking anticyclone over the North Atlantic Ocean preceded by explosive cyclogenesis about 500km south of Nova Scotia. Using fields derived from GLA analyzes (4° lat×5° long) of the FGGE SOP-I data set, the general behavior of this block is diagnosed using the extended height tendency equation. This equation preserves much of the simplicity of the quasi-geostrophic form, but replaces the geostrophic wind and relative vorticity by the observed value. Three-dimensionally varying static stability and strong diabatic heating are also allowed in the extended form. To further analyze the relative importance of planetary-scale, synoptic-scale, and scale-interaction forcing of this block, height tendencies were solved from a scale-partitioned form of height tendency equation. The scale partitioning is accomplished using the Barnes objective analysis scheme. Results indicate that vorticity advection was the primary forcing mechanism during the block development. Growth in this mechanism occurred during and extended beyond the period of explosive cyclogenesis and was located downstream from the cyclone event. In fact, much of the vorticity advection was attributed to the northward advection of negative relative vorticity east of a jet streak that formed between the cyclone and anticyclone. The scale interactions implied by this relationship between the cyclone and anticyclone were confirmed in the partitioned height tendencies. The scale interaction component was consistently larger than the other two and was particularly significant during the block development. This component was followed in importance by the synoptic-scale component, although the latter was significant only in the vorticity advection term. Interestingly, despite pronounced northward warm air advection, the direct forcing of the block by thermal advection was relatively small. Rather, the thermal forcing was strongest in the upstream cyclone

  20. Novel computational methods to design protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Alice Qinhua; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    2014-03-01

    Despite the abundance of structural data, we still cannot accurately predict the structural and energetic changes resulting from mutations at protein interfaces. The inadequacy of current computational approaches to the analysis and design of protein-protein interactions has hampered the development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic agents. In this work, we apply a simple physical model that includes only a minimal set of geometrical constraints, excluded volume, and attractive van der Waals interactions to 1) rank the binding affinity of mutants of tetratricopeptide repeat proteins with their cognate peptides, 2) rank the energetics of binding of small designed proteins to the hydrophobic stem region of the influenza hemagglutinin protein, and 3) predict the stability of T4 lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease mutants. This work will not only lead to a fundamental understanding of protein-protein interactions, but also to the development of efficient computational methods to rationally design protein interfaces with tunable specificity and affinity, and numerous applications in biomedicine. NSF DMR-1006537, PHY-1019147, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical and Engineering Sciences, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  1. Protein complexes predictions within protein interaction networks using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Emad; Naef, Ahmed; Ahmed, Moataz

    2016-07-25

    Protein-protein interaction networks are receiving increased attention due to their importance in understanding life at the cellular level. A major challenge in systems biology is to understand the modular structure of such biological networks. Although clustering techniques have been proposed for clustering protein-protein interaction networks, those techniques suffer from some drawbacks. The application of earlier clustering techniques to protein-protein interaction networks in order to predict protein complexes within the networks does not yield good results due to the small-world and power-law properties of these networks. In this paper, we construct a new clustering algorithm for predicting protein complexes through the use of genetic algorithms. We design an objective function for exclusive clustering and overlapping clustering. We assess the quality of our proposed clustering algorithm using two gold-standard data sets. Our algorithm can identify protein complexes that are significantly enriched in the gold-standard data sets. Furthermore, our method surpasses three competing methods: MCL, ClusterOne, and MCODE in terms of the quality of the predicted complexes. The source code and accompanying examples are freely available at http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/ics/eramadan/GACluster.zip .

  2. Cell-free Determination of Binary Complexes That Comprise Extended Protein-Protein Interaction Networks of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Keasey, Sarah L; Natesan, Mohan; Pugh, Christine; Kamata, Teddy; Wuchty, Stefan; Ulrich, Robert G

    2016-10-01

    Binary protein interactions form the basic building blocks of molecular networks and dynamic assemblies that control all cellular functions of bacteria. Although these protein interactions are a potential source of targets for the development of new antibiotics, few high-confidence data sets are available for the large proteomes of most pathogenic bacteria. We used a library of recombinant proteins from the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis to probe planar microarrays of immobilized proteins that represented ∼85% (3552 proteins) of the bacterial proteome, resulting in >77,000 experimentally determined binary interactions. Moderate (KD ∼μm) to high-affinity (KD ∼nm) interactions were characterized for >1600 binary complexes by surface plasmon resonance imaging of microarrayed proteins. Core binary interactions that were in common with other gram-negative bacteria were identified from the results of both microarray methods. Clustering of proteins within the interaction network by function revealed statistically enriched complexes and pathways involved in replication, biosynthesis, virulence, metabolism, and other diverse biological processes. The interaction pathways included many proteins with no previously known function. Further, a large assembly of proteins linked to transcription and translation were contained within highly interconnected subregions of the network. The two-tiered microarray approach used here is an innovative method for detecting binary interactions, and the resulting data will serve as a critical resource for the analysis of protein interaction networks that function within an important human pathogen. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  4. A protein-protein interaction dictates Borrelial infectivity.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Meghna; Sharma, Kavita; Chao, Kinlin; Smith, Alexis A; Herzberg, Osnat; Pal, Utpal

    2017-06-07

    Two Borrelia burgdorferi interacting proteins, BB0238 and BB0323, play distinct roles in pathogen biology and infectivity although a significance of their interaction remained enigmatic. Here we identified the polypeptide segment essential for BB0238-BB0323 interaction and examined how it supports spirochete infectivity. We show that the interaction region in BB0323 requires amino acid residues 22-200, suggesting that the binding encompasses discontinuous protein segments. In contrast, the interaction region in BB0238 spans only 11 amino acids, residues 120-130. A deletion of these 11 amino acids neither alters the overall secondary structure of the protein, nor affects its stability or oligomerization property, however, it reduces the post-translational stability of the binding partner, BB0323. Mutant B. burgdorferi isolates producing BB0238 lacking the 11-amino acid interaction region were able to persist in ticks but failed to transmit to mice or to establish infection. These results suggest that BB0238-BB0323 interaction is critical for post-translational stability of BB0323, and that this interaction is important for mammalian infectivity and transmission of B. burgdorferi. We show that saturation or inhibition of BB0238-BB0323 interaction could be studied in a luciferase assay, which could be amenable for future identification of small molecule inhibitors to combat B. burgdorferi infection.

  5. Determination of the centroid of interaction of crystals in block detectors for pet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Y.; Thompson, C. J.

    1994-08-01

    Cut blocks of bismuth germanate (BGO) are the most common detectors used in current positron emission tomography (PET) imaging systems. The distribution of light received by four photo-multiplier (PMT) cathodes is used to assign each gamma ray to one crystal. Most 511-keV gamma rays undergo Compton scattering in the crystal before being photoelectrically absorbed. This, and the effects of dense metal septa between blocks change the response of the crystals depending on their position in the block and the angle of incidence of gamma rays on the block. For each projection, we used Monte Carlo simulation to determine the 'centroid of interaction' for each crystal in the block. We found the crystals appear to be packed slightly closer in each block than their geometrical distance. We found the location of the crystal's centroid relative to its center changes along each projection. We simulated the 4 x 4 crystal arrays of the Scanditronix PC2048-B, determined the centroid of interaction for each crystal, then modified the reconstruction program's interpolation parameters. The spatial resolution improved by up to 10%, and a distortion of 1.5 mm at the edge of the imaging field was eliminated.

  6. Lacosamide neurotoxicity associated with concomitant use of sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs: a pharmacodynamic interaction?

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Patsalos, Philip N; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) apparently devoid of major pharmacokinetic interactions. Data from a small postmarketing assessment suggest people who had lacosamide co-prescribed with a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-blocking AED seemed more likely to discontinue lacosamide because of tolerability problems. Among 39 people with refractory epilepsy who developed neurotoxicity (diplopia, dizziness, drowsiness) on lacosamide treatment given in combination with VGSC-blocking AEDs, we identified 7 (17.9%) without any changes in serum levels of other AEDs in whom the symptoms were ameliorated by dose reduction of the concomitant VGSC-blocking AED. Symptoms in these people seem to have arisen from a pharmacodynamic interaction between lacosamide and other VGSC-blocking AEDs. Slow-inactivated VGSCs targeted by lacosamide might be more sensitive to the effects of conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs. Advising people to reduce concomitantly the conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs during lacosamide uptitration in cases of neurotoxicity might improve the tolerability of combination treatment.

  7. Revealing protein-lncRNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Fabrizio; Colantoni, Alessio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated to a plethora of cellular functions, most of which require the interaction with one or more RNA-binding proteins (RBPs); similarly, RBPs are often able to bind a large number of different RNAs. The currently available knowledge is already drawing an intricate network of interactions, whose deregulation is frequently associated to pathological states. Several different techniques were developed in the past years to obtain protein-RNA binding data in a high-throughput fashion. In parallel, in silico inference methods were developed for the accurate computational prediction of the interaction of RBP-lncRNA pairs. The field is growing rapidly, and it is foreseeable that in the near future, the protein-lncRNA interaction network will rise, offering essential clues for a better understanding of lncRNA cellular mechanisms and their disease-associated perturbations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Proteins as Supramolecular Building Blocks for Responsive Materials and Nanodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-20

    the New Zealand government, which has incorporated the proteins and peptides designed in this programme into useful materials and devices. 1. REPORT...successfully completed. In addition to the work funded by this programme, significant synergies were gained with a parallel programme funded by the New ...published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support from the start of the project to

  9. An evaluation of in vitro protein-protein interaction techniques: assessing contaminating background proteins.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jenika M; Winstone, Tara L; Coorssen, Jens R; Turner, Raymond J

    2006-04-01

    Determination of protein-protein interactions is an important component in assigning function and discerning the biological relevance of proteins within a broader cellular context. In vitro protein-protein interaction methodologies, including affinity chromatography, coimmunoprecipitation, and newer approaches such as protein chip arrays, hold much promise in the detection of protein interactions, particularly in well-characterized organisms with sequenced genomes. However, each of these approaches attracts certain background proteins that can thwart detection and identification of true interactors. In addition, recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are also extensively used to assess protein-protein interactions, and background proteins in these isolates can thus contaminate interaction studies. Rigorous validation of a true interaction thus requires not only that an interaction be found by alternate techniques, but more importantly that researchers be aware of and control for matrix/support dependence. Here, we evaluate these methods for proteins interacting with DmsD (an E. coli redox enzyme maturation protein chaperone), in vitro, using E. coli subcellular fractions as prey sources. We compare and contrast the various in vitro interaction methods to identify some of the background proteins and protein profiles that are inherent to each of the methods in an E. coli system.

  10. Geometric de-noising of protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kuchaiev, Oleksii; Rasajski, Marija; Higham, Desmond J; Przulj, Natasa

    2009-08-01

    Understanding complex networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the foremost challenges of the post-genomic era. Due to the recent advances in experimental bio-technology, including yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H), tandem affinity purification (TAP) and other high-throughput methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) detection, huge amounts of PPI network data are becoming available. Of major concern, however, are the levels of noise and incompleteness. For example, for Y2H screens, it is thought that the false positive rate could be as high as 64%, and the false negative rate may range from 43% to 71%. TAP experiments are believed to have comparable levels of noise.We present a novel technique to assess the confidence levels of interactions in PPI networks obtained from experimental studies. We use it for predicting new interactions and thus for guiding future biological experiments. This technique is the first to utilize currently the best fitting network model for PPI networks, geometric graphs. Our approach achieves specificity of 85% and sensitivity of 90%. We use it to assign confidence scores to physical protein-protein interactions in the human PPI network downloaded from BioGRID. Using our approach, we predict 251 interactions in the human PPI network, a statistically significant fraction of which correspond to protein pairs sharing common GO terms. Moreover, we validate a statistically significant portion of our predicted interactions in the HPRD database and the newer release of BioGRID. The data and Matlab code implementing the methods are freely available from the web site: http://www.kuchaev.com/Denoising.

  11. Interaction of melanosomal proteins with melanin.

    PubMed

    Donatien, P D; Orlow, S J

    1995-08-15

    Melanin is deposited in melanosomes upon a proteinaceous matrix enveloped by a melanosomal membrane. Since melanin is highly detergent insoluble, we hypothesized that the detergent solubility of proteins of the melanosomal matrix might be inversely related to the state of melanosomal melanization. Immunoblotting analyses were performed on extracts of albino and black melanocytes to test this hypothesis. The protein products of the silver (si) and the pink-eyed-dilution (p) loci as well as other matrix constituents were present at twofold higher levels in extracts of albino cells. When black cells were rendered amelanotic by growing cultures in the presence of the tyrosinase inhibitor phenylthiourea, the apparent levels of these proteins were also increased. To obviate the potential role of different levels of synthesis in contributing to these differences, we developed a cell-free melanosomal melanization assay. Upon incubation of a melanosome-rich fraction with the melanin precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) followed by immunoblot analysis, the si locus protein, the p locus protein, and other putative matrix constituents became rapidly insoluble in SDS when compared with the members of the tyrosinase-related family of melanosomal membrane proteins. Our results suggest that melanosomal proteins that interact with melanin may be identified by their relative insolubility in SDS under conditions of increasing melanization. In addition to the si locus protein and other putative melanosomal matrix proteins, the membrane-bound p locus protein may also interact closely with melanin.

  12. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease.

  13. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. Background: In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Methods: Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Results: Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Conclusion: Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease. PMID:27099671

  14. Ac-susceptibility investigations of superspin blocking and freezing in interacting magnetic nanoparticle ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Cristian E.; Morris, Joshua L.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of dipolar interactions on the superspin blocking and freezing of 9 nm average size Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle ensembles. Our dynamic susceptibility data reveals a two-regime behavior of the blocking temperature, T B, upon diluting a Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluid. As the nanoparticle volume ratio, Φ, is reduced from an as-prepared reference Φ = 1 to Φ = 1/96, the blocking temperature decreases from 46.1 K to 34.2 K, but higher values reenter upon further diluting the magnetic fluid to Φ = 1/384 (where T B = 42.5 K). We found evidence that cooling below T B within the higher concentration range (Φ > 1/48) leads to the collective freezing of the superspins, whereas individual superspin blocking occurs in the presence of weaker interactions (Φ < 1/96). The unexpected increase of the blocking temperature with the decrease of the inter-particle interactions observed at low nanoparticle concentrations is well described by the Mørup-Tronc model.

  15. Enhancing interacting residue prediction with integrated contact matrix prediction in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H

    2016-12-01

    Identifying the residues in a protein that are involved in protein-protein interaction and identifying the contact matrix for a pair of interacting proteins are two computational tasks at different levels of an in-depth analysis of protein-protein interaction. Various methods for solving these two problems have been reported in the literature. However, the interacting residue prediction and contact matrix prediction were handled by and large independently in those existing methods, though intuitively good prediction of interacting residues will help with predicting the contact matrix. In this work, we developed a novel protein interacting residue prediction system, contact matrix-interaction profile hidden Markov model (CM-ipHMM), with the integration of contact matrix prediction and the ipHMM interaction residue prediction. We propose to leverage what is learned from the contact matrix prediction and utilize the predicted contact matrix as "feedback" to enhance the interaction residue prediction. The CM-ipHMM model showed significant improvement over the previous method that uses the ipHMM for predicting interaction residues only. It indicates that the downstream contact matrix prediction could help the interaction site prediction.

  16. Biospecific protein immobilization for rapid analysis of weak protein interactions using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bengali, Aditya N; Tessier, Peter M

    2009-10-01

    "Reversible" protein interactions govern diverse biological behavior ranging from intracellular transport and toxic protein aggregation to protein crystallization and inactivation of protein therapeutics. Much less is known about weak protein interactions than their stronger counterparts since they are difficult to characterize, especially in a parallel format (in contrast to a sequential format) necessary for high-throughput screening. We have recently introduced a highly efficient approach of characterizing protein self-association, namely self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (SINS; Tessier et al., 2008; J Am Chem Soc 130:3106-3112). This approach exploits the separation-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles to detect weak self-interactions between proteins immobilized on nanoparticles. A limitation of our previous work is that differences in the sequence and structure of proteins can lead to significant differences in their affinity to adsorb to nanoparticle surfaces, which complicates analysis of the corresponding protein self-association behavior. In this work we demonstrate a highly specific approach for coating nanoparticles with proteins using biotin-avidin interactions to generate protein-nanoparticle conjugates that report protein self-interactions through changes in their optical properties. Using lysozyme as a model protein that is refractory to characterization by conventional SINS, we demonstrate that surface Plasmon wavelengths for gold-avidin-lysozyme conjugates over a range of solution conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength) are well correlated with lysozyme osmotic second virial coefficient measurements. Since SINS requires orders of magnitude less protein and time than conventional methods (e.g., static light scattering), we envision this approach will find application in large screens of protein self-association aimed at either preventing (e.g., protein aggregation) or promoting (e.g., protein crystallization) these

  17. Effect of the quality of the interaction data on predicting protein function from protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing-Shan; Wang, Zheng-Zhi; Li, Gang-Guo; Wang, Guang-Yun; Zhao, Ying-Jie

    2009-03-01

    Protein function prediction is an important issue in the post-genomic era. When protein function is deduced from protein interaction data, the traditional methods treat each interaction sample equally, where the qualities of the interaction samples are seldom taken into account. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the quality of protein-protein interaction data on predicting protein function. Moreover, two improved methods, weight neighbour counting method (WNC) and weight chi-square method (WCHI), are proposed by considering the quality of interaction samples with the neighbour counting method (NC) and chi-square method (CHI). Experimental results have shown that the qualities of interaction samples affect the performances of protein function prediction methods seriously. It is also demonstrated that WNC and WCHI methods outperform NC and CHI methods in protein function prediction when example weights are chosen properly.

  18. Inferring High-Confidence Human Protein-Protein Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    iPfam: visualization of protein-protein interactions in PDB at domain and amino acid resolutions. Bioinformatics 2005, 21(3):410–412. 43. Kanehisa M, Goto...comprised proteins that had the same specific func- tion or were subunits of the same protein complex, such as branched chain keto acid E1 alpha (BCKDHA...and branched chain keto acid E1 beta (BCKDHB) [3,29], and dynein cytoplasmic 2 intermediate chain 1 (D2LIC) and dynein cytoplasmic 2 heavy chain 1

  19. Surface modification of nanoparticles by PEO/PPO block copolymers to minimize interactions with blood components and prolong blood circulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, J S; Butterfield, D E; Voycheck, C L; Caldwell, K D; Li, J T

    1993-09-01

    The biological fate of injected foreign particles is believed to be closely related to their interactions with blood plasma proteins and cells. In order to verify this correlation, we have quantitatively measured protein adsorption and blood retention profiles in rats by using model polystyrene latex nanoparticles. The in vitro interactions of these non-biodegradable particles with plasma proteins and whole blood can be altered by modifying their surfaces with a family of amphiphilic polymeric surfactants, PEO/PPO Pluronic or Tetronic block copolymers. Protein adsorption was measured by several techniques, including photon correlation spectroscopy, centrifugation, high performance liquid chromatography and field-flow fractionation. Pluronic F108 and Tetronic 908 and 1508 copolymers (with PEO terminal block MWPEO > 5000, PPO middle block MWPPO > 3000, and HLB values > 24) were shown to be the most effective surface modifiers in reducing adsorption of plasma proteins on the particles. Minimum interaction of coated particles with whole blood was also observed by optical microscopy. The blood circulation half-life of the particles injected in rats was increased from 20 min to 13 h when the latex particles (75 nm) were precoated with these block copolymers. These results suggest that nanoparticles designed for use as injectable drugs or drug carriers should display similar surface characteristics provided by such amphiphilic surface modifiers.

  20. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Lee, Erinna F; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J; Eddinger, Geoffrey A; Belair, David G; Wilson, Julia L; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T; Murphy, William L; Smith, Brian J; Gellman, Samuel H; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2015-09-09

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of l-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous "α-peptides". This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a "stapled" Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon cross-link to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent stapled α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain cross-linking to produce synergistic benefits.

  1. Fast glycorrhachia and cerebrospinal fluid protein as predictors of sensory block in anesthesia with subarachnoid Ropivacaine.

    PubMed

    Collini, S; Troisi, F; Pacella, F; Merlin, P; De Sio, S; Pacella, E

    2016-01-01

    Identify if glycorrhachia and cerebrospinal fluid protein could influence the time of sensory block to T10, the duration and the metameric block's level, after a standard dose of Ropivacaine. 80 patients, ASA I - III undergoing to transurethral prostate resection with spinal anesthesia in a prospected open study were recruited. A 0.2 ml liquor's sample was taken; glycorrhachia, by glycemic stix and CSF protein, by urinary stix, were got, before Ropivacaine 0.5% 15 mg injection (0.10 - 0.15 mlsec). After anti-trendelemburg, with 30 ° tilting for 15 min, the onset of sensory block to T10, the maximum metameric level to 15' and the time of sensory block were reported. The data collection were analyzed using the software language R. A significant correlation liquor specific weigh preoperative glycemia (0.749), liquoral specific weigh glycorrhachia (rho = 0.751; R2 = 0.564; P 0.05) and specific weigh CSF protein (rho = 0.684; R2 = 0.468; P 0.05) were reported. Inverse relation CSF weightsensory block level (rho -0.789, P 0.05, R2 0.621) was evidenced. Inverse relation onset time to T10 glycorrhachia (84%) and cephalic block glycorrhachia (76%) were found. Inverse correlation onset time to T 10 CSF protein and cephalic block proteinorrachia was respectively 84% and 67%. A rho of 0.712 with R2 of 51% BMI onset to T10 and rho of 0.681 with R2 of 51% BMI maximum cephalic block with P 0.05 were reported. The predictability of a iso-hypobaric local anesthetic could reduce the risk of procedure failure and adverse events by further cephalic spread.

  2. Building protein interaction maps for Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Davisson, Muriel T; Crnic, Linda S

    2004-08-01

    Now that the complete sequences for human chromosome 21 and the orthologous mouse genomic regions are known, reasonably complete, conserved, protein-coding gene catalogues are also available. The central issue now facing Down's syndrome researchers is the correlation of increased expression of specific, normal, chromosome 21 genes with the development of specific deficits in learning and memory. Because of the number of candidate genes involved, the number of alternative splice variants of individual genes and the number of pathways in which these genes function, a pathway analysis approach will be critical to success. Here, three examples, both gene specific and pathway related, that would benefit from pathway analysis are discussed: (1) the potential roles of eight chromosome 21 proteins in RNA processing pathways; (2) the chromosome 21 protein intersectin 1 and its domain composition, alternative splicing, protein interactions and functions; and (3) the interactions of ten chromosome 21 proteins with components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and the calcineurin signalling pathways. A productive approach to developing gene-phenotype correlations in Down's syndrome will make use of known and predicted functions and interactions of chromosome 21 genes to predict pathways that may be perturbed by their increased levels of expression. Investigations may then be targeted in animal models to specific interactions, intermediate steps or end-points of such pathways and the downstream - perhaps amplified - consequences of gene dosage directly assessed. Once pathway perturbations have been identified, the potential for rational design of therapeutics becomes practical.

  3. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  4. Evolution of protein-protein interaction networks in yeast.

    PubMed

    Schoenrock, Andrew; Burnside, Daniel; Moteshareie, Houman; Pitre, Sylvain; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Green, James R; Golshani, Ashkan; Dehne, Frank; Wong, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the evolution of protein-protein and genetic interaction networks has been rising in recent years, but the lack of large-scale high quality comparative datasets has acted as a barrier. Here, we carried out a comparative analysis of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks from five closely related yeast species. We used the Protein-protein Interaction Prediction Engine (PIPE), which uses a database of known interactions to make sequence-based PPI predictions, to generate high quality predicted interactomes. Simulated proteomes and corresponding PPI networks were used to provide null expectations for the extent and nature of PPI network evolution. We found strong evidence for conservation of PPIs, with lower than expected levels of change in PPIs for about a quarter of the proteome. Furthermore, we found that changes in predicted PPI networks are poorly predicted by sequence divergence. Our analyses identified a number of functional classes experiencing fewer PPI changes than expected, suggestive of purifying selection on PPIs. Our results demonstrate the added benefit of considering predicted PPI networks when studying the evolution of closely related organisms.

  5. Evolution of protein-protein interaction networks in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schoenrock, Andrew; Burnside, Daniel; Moteshareie, Houman; Pitre, Sylvain; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Green, James R.; Golshani, Ashkan; Dehne, Frank; Wong, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the evolution of protein-protein and genetic interaction networks has been rising in recent years, but the lack of large-scale high quality comparative datasets has acted as a barrier. Here, we carried out a comparative analysis of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks from five closely related yeast species. We used the Protein-protein Interaction Prediction Engine (PIPE), which uses a database of known interactions to make sequence-based PPI predictions, to generate high quality predicted interactomes. Simulated proteomes and corresponding PPI networks were used to provide null expectations for the extent and nature of PPI network evolution. We found strong evidence for conservation of PPIs, with lower than expected levels of change in PPIs for about a quarter of the proteome. Furthermore, we found that changes in predicted PPI networks are poorly predicted by sequence divergence. Our analyses identified a number of functional classes experiencing fewer PPI changes than expected, suggestive of purifying selection on PPIs. Our results demonstrate the added benefit of considering predicted PPI networks when studying the evolution of closely related organisms. PMID:28248977

  6. Topology of Protein Interaction Network Shapes Protein Abundances and Strengths of Their Functional and Nonspecific Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Heo, M.; Shakhnovich, E.

    2011-03-08

    How do living cells achieve sufficient abundances of functional protein complexes while minimizing promiscuous nonfunctional interactions? Here we study this problem using a first-principle model of the cell whose phenotypic traits are directly determined from its genome through biophysical properties of protein structures and binding interactions in a crowded cellular environment. The model cell includes three independent prototypical pathways, whose topologies of protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks are different, but whose contributions to the cell fitness are equal. Model cells evolve through genotypic mutations and phenotypic protein copy number variations. We found a strong relationship between evolved physical-chemical properties of protein interactions and their abundances due to a 'frustration' effect: Strengthening of functional interactions brings about hydrophobic interfaces, which make proteins prone to promiscuous binding. The balancing act is achieved by lowering concentrations of hub proteins while raising solubilities and abundances of functional monomers. On the basis of these principles we generated and analyzed a possible realization of the proteome-wide PPI network in yeast. In this simulation we found that high-throughput affinity capture-mass spectroscopy experiments can detect functional interactions with high fidelity only for high-abundance proteins while missing most interactions for low-abundance proteins.

  7. Non-interacting proteins may resemble interacting proteins: prevalence and implications

    PubMed Central

    Launay, Guillaume; Ceres, Nicoletta; Martin, Juliette

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of proteins do not form functional interactions in physiological conditions. We have considered several sets of protein pairs from S. cerevisiae with no functional interaction reported, denoted as non-interacting pairs, and compared their 3D structures to available experimental complexes. We identified some non-interacting pairs with significant structural similarity with experimental complexes, indicating that, even though they do not form functional interactions, they have compatible structures. We estimate that up to 8.7% of non-interacting protein pairs could have compatible structures. This number of interactions exceeds the number of functional interactions (around 0.2% of the total interactions) by a factor 40. Network analysis suggests that the interactions formed by non-interacting pairs with compatible structures could be particularly hazardous to the protein-protein interaction network. From a structural point of view, these interactions display no aberrant structural characteristics, and are even predicted as relatively stable and enriched in potential physical interactors, suggesting a major role of regulation to prevent them. PMID:28084410

  8. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Protein and Network Topology Information for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Birlutiu, Adriana; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Heskes, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein-protein interactions are important tools that can complement high-throughput technologies and guide biologists in designing new laboratory experiments. The proteins and the interactions between them can be described by a network which is characterized by several topological properties. Information about proteins and interactions between them, in combination with knowledge about topological properties of the network, can be used for developing computational methods that can accurately predict unknown protein-protein interactions. This paper presents a supervised learning framework based on Bayesian inference for combining two types of information: i) network topology information, and ii) information related to proteins and the interactions between them. The motivation of our model is that by combining these two types of information one can achieve a better accuracy in predicting protein-protein interactions, than by using models constructed from these two types of information independently.

  9. The binary protein-protein interaction landscape of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Vlasblom, James; Arnold, Roland; Franca-Koh, Jonathan; Pakala, Suman B.; Phanse, Sadhna; Ceol, Arnaud; Häuser, Roman; Siszler, Gabriella; Wuchty, Stefan; Emili, Andrew; Babu, Mohan; Aloy, Patrick; Pieper, Rembert; Uetz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to map the Escherichia coli interactome have identified several hundred macromolecular complexes, but direct binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have not been surveyed on a large scale. Here we performed yeast two-hybrid screens of 3,305 baits against 3,606 preys (~70% of the E. coli proteome) in duplicate to generate a map of 2,234 interactions, approximately doubling the number of known binary PPIs in E. coli. Integration of binary PPIs and genetic interactions revealed functional dependencies among components involved in cellular processes, including envelope integrity, flagellum assembly and protein quality control. Many of the binary interactions that could be mapped within multi-protein complexes were informative regarding internal topology and indicated that interactions within complexes are significantly more conserved than those interactions connecting different complexes. This resource will be useful for inferring bacterial gene function and provides a draft reference of the basic physical wiring network of this evolutionarily significant model microbe. PMID:24561554

  10. Interaction of poloxamine block copolymers with lipid membranes: Role of copolymer structure and membrane cholesterol content.

    PubMed

    Sandez-Macho, Isabel; Casas, Matilde; Lage, Emilio V; Rial-Hermida, M Isabel; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Interactions of X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) block copolymers with cell membranes were investigated recording the π-A isotherms of monolayer systems of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC):cholesterol 100:0; 80:20 and 60:40 mol ratio and evaluating the capability of the copolymers to trigger haemolysis or to protect from haemolytic agents. Four varieties of poloxamine (Tetronic 904, 908, 1107 and 1307) were chosen in order to cover a wide range of EO and PO units contents and molecular weights, and compared to a variety of poloxamer (Pluronic P85). The π-A isotherms revealed that the greater the content in cholesterol, the stronger the interaction of the block copolymers with the lipids monolayer. The interactions were particularly relevant at low pressures and low lipid proportions, mimicking the conditions of damaged membranes. Relatively hydrophobic copolymers bearing short PEO blocks (e.g., T904 and P85) intercalated among the lipids expanding the surface area (ΔGexc) but not effectively sealing the pores. These varieties showed haemolytic behavior. Oppositely, highly hydrophilic copolymers bearing long PEO blocks (e.g., T908, T1107 and T1307) caused membrane contraction and outer leaflet sealing due to strong interactions of PEO with cholesterol and diamine core with phospholipids. These later varieties were not haemolytic and exerted a certain protective effect against spontaneous haemolysis for both intact erythrocytes and cholesterol-depleted erythrocytes.

  11. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. Material and methods: In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. Results: According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Conclusion: Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease. PMID:27895852

  12. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction's mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein-protein interactions or protein-DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1,040,000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43,000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12,000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  13. Targeting protein-protein interactions in hematologic malignancies: still a challenge or a great opportunity for future therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over the past several years, there has been an increasing research effort focused on inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) to develop novel therapeutic approaches for cancer, including hematologic malignancies. These efforts have led to development of small molecule inhibitors of PPIs, some of which already advanced to the stage of clinical trials while others are at different stages of pre-clinical optimization, emphasizing PPIs as an emerging and attractive class of drug targets. Here, we review several examples of recently developed inhibitors of protein-protein interactions highly relevant to hematologic cancers. We address the existing skepticism about feasibility of targeting PPIs and emphasize potential therapeutic benefit from blocking PPIs in hematologic malignancies. We then use these examples to discuss the approaches for successful identification of PPI inhibitors and provide analysis of the protein-protein interfaces, with the goal to address ‘druggability’ of new PPIs relevant to hematology. We discuss lessons learned to improve the success of targeting new protein-protein interactions and evaluate prospects and limits of the research in this field. We conclude that not all PPIs are equally tractable for blocking by small molecules, and detailed analysis of PPI interfaces is critical for selection of those with the highest chance of success. Together, our analysis uncovers patterns that should help to advance drug discovery in hematologic malignancies by successful targeting of new protein-protein interactions. PMID:25510283

  14. KFC Server: interactive forecasting of protein interaction hot spots.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Steven J; LeGault, Laura; Mitchell, Julie C

    2008-07-01

    The KFC Server is a web-based implementation of the KFC (Knowledge-based FADE and Contacts) model-a machine learning approach for the prediction of binding hot spots, or the subset of residues that account for most of a protein interface's; binding free energy. The server facilitates the automated analysis of a user submitted protein-protein or protein-DNA interface and the visualization of its hot spot predictions. For each residue in the interface, the KFC Server characterizes its local structural environment, compares that environment to the environments of experimentally determined hot spots and predicts if the interface residue is a hot spot. After the computational analysis, the user can visualize the results using an interactive job viewer able to quickly highlight predicted hot spots and surrounding structural features within the protein structure. The KFC Server is accessible at http://kfc.mitchell-lab.org.

  15. [Methods for analysis of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions].

    PubMed

    Durech, M; Trčka, F; Vojtěšek, B; Müller, P

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain cellular homeostasis, cellular proteins coexist in complex and variable molecular assemblies. Therefore, understanding of major physiological processes at molecular level is based on analysis of protein-protein interaction networks. Firstly, composition of the molecular assembly has to be qualitatively analyzed. In the next step, quantitative bio-chemical properties of the identified protein-protein interactions are determined. Detailed information about the protein-protein interaction interface can be obtained by crystallographic methods. Accordingly, the insight into the molecular architecture of these protein-protein complexes allows us to rationally design new synthetic compounds that specifically influence various physiological or pathological processes by targeted modulation of protein interactions. This review is focused on description of the most used methods applied in both qualitative and quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions. Co- immunoprecipitation and affinity co- precipitation are basic methods designed for qualitative analysis of protein binding partners. Further bio-chemical analysis of the interaction requires definition of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is used for description of affinity and kinetic profile of the interaction, fluorescence polarization (FP) method for fast determination of inhibition potential of inhibitors and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) for definition of thermodynamic parameters of the interaction (G, H and S). Besides the importance of uncovering the molecular basis of protein interactions for basic research, the same methodological approaches open new possibilities in rational design of novel therapeutic agents.

  16. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  17. Annotation and retrieval in protein interaction databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannataro, Mario; Hiram Guzzi, Pietro; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Biological databases have been developed with a special focus on the efficient retrieval of single records or the efficient computation of specialized bioinformatics algorithms against the overall database, such as in sequence alignment. The continuos production of biological knowledge spread on several biological databases and ontologies, such as Gene Ontology, and the availability of efficient techniques to handle such knowledge, such as annotation and semantic similarity measures, enable the development on novel bioinformatics applications that explicitly use and integrate such knowledge. After introducing the annotation process and the main semantic similarity measures, this paper shows how annotations and semantic similarity can be exploited to improve the extraction and analysis of biologically relevant data from protein interaction databases. As case studies, the paper presents two novel software tools, OntoPIN and CytoSeVis, both based on the use of Gene Ontology annotations, for the advanced querying of protein interaction databases and for the enhanced visualization of protein interaction networks.

  18. Thermosensing via transmembrane protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Saita, Emilio A; de Mendoza, Diego

    2015-09-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a lipid bilayer containing proteins that cross and/or interact with lipids on either side of the two leaflets. The basic structure of cell membranes is this bilayer, composed of two opposing lipid monolayers with fascinating properties designed to perform all the functions the cell requires. To coordinate these functions, lipid composition of cellular membranes is tailored to suit their specialized tasks. In this review, we describe the general mechanisms of membrane-protein interactions and relate them to some of the molecular strategies organisms use to adjust the membrane lipid composition in response to a decrease in environmental temperature. While the activities of all biomolecules are altered as a function of temperature, the thermosensors we focus on here are molecules whose temperature sensitivity appears to be linked to changes in the biophysical properties of membrane lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  19. Lethality and entropy of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Manke, Thomas; Demetrius, Lloyd; Vingron, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We characterize protein interaction networks in terms of network entropy. This approach suggests a ranking principle, which strongly correlates with elements of functional importance, such as lethal proteins. Our combined analysis of protein interaction networks and functional profiles in single cellular yeast and multi-cellular worm shows that proteins with large contribution to network entropy are preferentially lethal. While entropy is inherently a dynamical concept, the present analysis incorporates only structural information. Our result therefore highlights the importance of topological features, which appear as correlates of an underlying dynamical property, and which in turn determine functional traits. We argue that network entropy is a natural extension of previously studied observables, such as pathway multiplicity and centrality. It is also applicable to networks in which the processes can be quantified and therefore serves as a link to study questions of structural and dynamical robustness in a unified way.

  20. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deciphering peculiar protein-protein interacting modules in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Mezhoud, Karim; Sghaier, Haïtham; Barkallah, Insaf

    2009-01-01

    Interactomes of proteins under positive selection from ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) might be a part of the answer to the question as to how IRRB, particularly Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (Deira), resist ionizing radiation. Here, using the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and the Protein Structural Interactome (PSI)-base server for PSI map, we have predicted novel interactions of orthologs of the 58 proteins under positive selection in Deira and other IRRB, but which are absent in IRSB. Among these, 18 domains and their interactomes have been identified in DNA checkpoint and repair; kinases pathways; energy and nucleotide metabolisms were the important biological processes that were found to be involved. This finding provides new clues to the cellular pathways that can to be important for ionizing-radiation resistance in Deira. PMID:19356244

  2. Hash subgraph pairwise kernel for protein-protein interaction extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijia; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian; Li, Yanpeng

    2012-01-01

    Extracting protein-protein interaction (PPI) from biomedical literature is an important task in biomedical text mining (BioTM). In this paper, we propose a hash subgraph pairwise (HSP) kernel-based approach for this task. The key to the novel kernel is to use the hierarchical hash labels to express the structural information of subgraphs in a linear time. We apply the graph kernel to compute dependency graphs representing the sentence structure for protein-protein interaction extraction task, which can efficiently make use of full graph structural information, and particularly capture the contiguous topological and label information ignored before. We evaluate the proposed approach on five publicly available PPI corpora. The experimental results show that our approach significantly outperforms all-path kernel approach on all five corpora and achieves state-of-the-art performance.

  3. [Chemical libraries dedicated to protein-protein interactions].

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Olivier; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    The identification of complete networks of protein-protein interactions (PPI) within a cell has contributed to major breakthroughs in understanding biological pathways, host-pathogen interactions and cancer development. As a consequence, PPI have emerged as a new class of promising therapeutic targets. However, they are still considered as a challenging class of targets for drug discovery programs. Recent successes have allowed the characterization of structural and physicochemical properties of protein-protein interfaces leading to a better understanding of how they can be disrupted with small molecule compounds. In addition, characterization of the profiles of PPI inhibitors has allowed the development of PPI-focused libraries. In this review, we present the current efforts at developing chemical libraries dedicated to these innovative targets. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. A method for predicting protein-protein interaction types.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Yael; Kupiec, Martin; Sharan, Roded

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) govern basic cellular processes through signal transduction and complex formation. The diversity of those processes gives rise to a remarkable diversity of interactions types, ranging from transient phosphorylation interactions to stable covalent bonding. Despite our increasing knowledge on PPIs in humans and other species, their types remain relatively unexplored and few annotations of types exist in public databases. Here, we propose the first method for systematic prediction of PPI type based solely on the techniques by which the interaction was detected. We show that different detection methods are better suited for detecting specific types. We apply our method to ten interaction types on a large scale human PPI dataset. We evaluate the performance of the method using both internal cross validation and external data sources. In cross validation, we obtain an area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve ranging from 0.65 to 0.97 with an average of 0.84 across the predicted types. Comparing the predicted interaction types to external data sources, we obtained significant agreements for phosphorylation and ubiquitination interactions, with hypergeometric p-value = 2.3e(-54) and 5.6e(-28) respectively. We examine the biological relevance of our predictions using known signaling pathways and chart the abundance of interaction types in cell processes. Finally, we investigate the cross-relations between different interaction types within the network and characterize the discovered patterns, or motifs. We expect the resulting annotated network to facilitate the reconstruction of process-specific subnetworks and assist in predicting protein function or interaction.

  5. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  6. Optical methods in the study of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Masi, Alessio; Cicchi, Riccardo; Carloni, Adolfo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2010-01-01

    Förster (or Fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a physical process in which energy is transferred nonradiatively from an excited fluorophore, serving as a donor, to another chromophore (acceptor). Among the techniques related to fluorescence microscopy, FRET is unique in providing signals sensitive to intra- and intermolecular distances in the 1-10 nm range. Because of its potency, FRET is increasingly used to visualize and quantify the dynamics of protein-protein interaction in living cells, with high spatio-temporal resolution. Here we describe the physical bases of FRET, detailing the principal methods applied: (1) measurement of signal intensity and (2) analysis of fluorescence lifetime (FLIM). Although several technical complications must be carefully considered, both methods can be applied fruitfully to specific fields. For example, FRET based on intensity detection is more suitable to follow biological phenomena at a finely tuned spatial and temporal scale. Furthermore, a specific fluorescence signal occurring close to the plasma membrane (< or = 100 nm) can be obtained using a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy system. When performing FRET experiments, care must be also taken to the method chosen for labeling interacting proteins. Two principal tools can be applied: (1) fluorophore tagged antibodies; (2) recombinant fluorescent fusion proteins. The latter method essentially takes advantage of the discovery and use of spontaneously fluorescent proteins, like the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Until now, FRET has been widely used to analyze the structural characteristics of several proteins, including integrins and ion channels. More recently, this method has been applied to clarify the interaction dynamics of these classes of membrane proteins with cytosolic signaling proteins. We report two examples in which the interaction dynamics between integrins and ion channels have been studied with FRET methods. Using

  7. Interaction site prediction by structural similarity to neighboring clusters in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Monji, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ozaki, Tomonobu; Ohkawa, Takenao

    2011-02-15

    Recently, revealing the function of proteins with protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is regarded as one of important issues in bioinformatics. With the development of experimental methods such as the yeast two-hybrid method, the data of protein interaction have been increasing extremely. Many databases dealing with these data comprehensively have been constructed and applied to analyzing PPI networks. However, few research on prediction interaction sites using both PPI networks and the 3D protein structures complementarily has explored. We propose a method of predicting interaction sites in proteins with unknown function by using both of PPI networks and protein structures. For a protein with unknown function as a target, several clusters are extracted from the neighboring proteins based on their structural similarity. Then, interaction sites are predicted by extracting similar sites from the group of a protein cluster and the target protein. Moreover, the proposed method can improve the prediction accuracy by introducing repetitive prediction process. The proposed method has been applied to small scale dataset, then the effectiveness of the method has been confirmed. The challenge will now be to apply the method to large-scale datasets.

  8. Modulators of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Sijbesma, Eline; Botta, Maurizio; MacKintosh, Carol; Obsil, Tomas; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cau, Ylenia; Wilson, Andrew J; Karawajczyk, Anna; Eickhoff, Jan; Davis, Jeremy; Hann, Michael M; O'Mahony, Gavin; Doveston, Richard G; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-10-02

    Direct interactions between proteins are essential for the regulation of their functions in biological pathways. Targeting the complex network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has now been widely recognized as an attractive means to therapeutically intervene in disease states. Even though this is a challenging endeavor and PPIs have long been regarded as 'undruggable' targets, the last two decades have seen an increasing number of successful examples of PPI modulators resulting in a growing interest in this field. PPI modulation requires novel approaches and the integrated efforts of multiple disciplines to be a fruitful strategy. This Perspective focuses on the hub protein 14-3-3, which has several hundred identified protein interaction partners and is therefore involved in a wide range of cellular processes and diseases. Here, we aim to provide an integrated overview of the approaches explored for the modulation of 14-3-3 PPIs and review the examples resulting from these efforts in both inhibiting and stabilizing specific 14-3-3 protein complexes by small molecules, peptide-mimetics and natural products.

  9. Structural biology and drug discovery for protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Harry; Higueruelo, Alicia P; Winter, Anja; Blundell, Tom L

    2012-05-01

    Although targeting protein-protein interfaces of regulatory multiprotein complexes has become a significant focus in drug discovery, it continues to pose major challenges. Most interfaces would be classed as 'undruggable' by conventional analyses, as they tend to be large, flat and featureless. Over the past decade, encouragement has come from the discovery of hotspots that contribute much of the free energy of interaction, and this has led to the development of tethering methods that target small molecules to these sites, often inducing adaptive changes. Equally important has been the recognition that many protein-protein interactions involve a continuous epitope of one partner and a well-defined groove or series of specific small pockets. These observations have stimulated the development of stapled α-helical peptides and other proteomimetic approaches. They have also led to the realisation that fragments might gain low-affinity 'footholds' on some protein-protein interfaces, and that these fragments might be elaborated to useful modulators of the interactions.

  10. Protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms: facilitation of acetylcholine release and interactions with prejunctional blocking toxins.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Karlsson, E

    1982-09-01

    1 Five polypeptides, which were isolated from elapid snake venoms and which are structurally related to protease inhibitors, were tested for action on isolated biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparations of the chick. 2 Dendrotoxin from the Eastern green mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) and toxins K and I from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) increased to indirect stimulation without affecting responses to exogenous acetylcholine, carbachol of KCl. 3 The two other protease inhibitor homologues, HHV-II from Ringhals cobra (Hemachatus haemachatus) and NNV-II from Cape cobra (Naja nivea) did not increase responses to nerve stimulation. Trypsin inhibitor from bovine pancreas also had no facilitatory effects on neuromuscular transmission. 4 The facilitatory toxins from mamba venoms interacted with the prejunctional blocking toxins, beta-bungarotoxin, crotoxin and notexin, but not with taipoxin. The blocking effects of beta-bungarotoxin were reduced by pretreatment with the mamba toxins, whereas the blocking actions of crotoxin and notexin were enhanced. 5 The results indicate that protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms form a new class of neurotoxin, which acts to increase the release of acetylcholine in response to motor nerve stimulation. 6 From the interaction studies it is concluded that the facilitatory toxins bind to motor nerve terminals at sites related to those occupied by the prejunctional blocking toxins. However, differences in interactions with individual toxins suggest that there must be several related binding sites on the nerve terminals.

  11. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions for Parasite Control

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christina M.; Fischer, Kerstin; Abubucker, Sahar; Wang, Zhengyuan; Martin, John; Jiang, Daojun; Magliano, Marc; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Li, Ben-Wen; Fischer, Peter U.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2011-01-01

    Finding new drug targets for pathogenic infections would be of great utility for humanity, as there is a large need to develop new drugs to fight infections due to the developing resistance and side effects of current treatments. Current drug targets for pathogen infections involve only a single protein. However, proteins rarely act in isolation, and the majority of biological processes occur via interactions with other proteins, so protein-protein interactions (PPIs) offer a realm of unexplored potential drug targets and are thought to be the next-generation of drug targets. Parasitic worms were chosen for this study because they have deleterious effects on human health, livestock, and plants, costing society billions of dollars annually and many sequenced genomes are available. In this study, we present a computational approach that utilizes whole genomes of 6 parasitic and 1 free-living worm species and 2 hosts. The species were placed in orthologous groups, then binned in species-specific ortholgous groups. Proteins that are essential and conserved among species that span a phyla are of greatest value, as they provide foundations for developing broad-control strategies. Two PPI databases were used to find PPIs within the species specific bins. PPIs with unique helminth proteins and helminth proteins with unique features relative to the host, such as indels, were prioritized as drug targets. The PPIs were scored based on RNAi phenotype and homology to the PDB (Protein DataBank). EST data for the various life stages, GO annotation, and druggability were also taken into consideration. Several PPIs emerged from this study as potential drug targets. A few interactions were supported by co-localization of expression in M. incognita (plant parasite) and B. malayi (H. sapiens parasite), which have extremely different modes of parasitism. As more genomes of pathogens are sequenced and PPI databases expanded, this methodology will become increasingly applicable. PMID

  12. The fragility of protein-protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C. M.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Shinbrot, T.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity to resist perturbations from the environment is crucial to the survival of all organisms. We quantitatively analyze the susceptibility of protein interaction networks of numerous organisms to random and targeted failures. We find for all organisms studied that random rewiring improves protein network robustness, so that actual networks are more fragile than rewired surrogates. This unexpected fragility contrasts with the behavior of networks such as the Internet, whose robustness decreases with random rewiring. We trace this surprising effect to the modular structure of protein networks.

  13. Quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by quartz nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Astudillo, Luisana; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Wenzhi; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with a series of concentrations in the bath solution. Such current change is due to the adsorption of Cyt c to the inner surface of the nanopipette through specific interactions with hNgb. In contrast, a smaller current change with weak concentration dependence was observed when Cyt c was replaced with lysozyme, which does not specifically bind to hNgb. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the Cyt c-hNgb complex formation was derived and the value matched very well with the result from surface plasmon resonance measurement. This is the first quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by a conical-shaped nanopore based on charge sensing. Our results demonstrate that nanopipettes can potentially be used as a label-free analytical tool to quantitatively characterize protein-protein interactions.In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with

  14. Self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the generalized Smoluchowski equation is used to analyze the time (or distance) dependent self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins in concentrated membrane systems. This equation provides a well established starting point for descriptions of the diffusion of particles that interact through both direct and hydrodynamic forces; in this initial work only the effects of direct interactions are explicitly considered. Data describing diffusion in the presence of hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions are presented. The effect that interactions have on the self-diffusion coefficient of a real protein molecule from mouse liver gap junctions is also calculated. The results indicate that self diffusion is always inhibited by direct interactions; this observation is interpreted in terms of the caging that will exist at finite protein concentration. It is also noted that, over small distance scales, the diffusion coefficient is determined entirely by the very strong Brownian forces; therefore, as a function of displacement the self-diffusion coefficient decays (rapidly) from its value at infinite dilution to its steady-state interaction-averaged value. The steady-state self-diffusion coefficient describes motion over distance scales that range from approximately 10 nm to cellular dimensions and is the quantity measured in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. The short-ranged behavior of the diffusion coefficient is important on the interparticle-distance scale and may therefore influence the rate at which nearest-neighbor collisional processes take place. The hard-disk theoretical results presented here are in excellent agreement with lattice Monte-Carlo results obtained by other workers. The concentration dependence of experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of antibody-hapten complexes bound to the membrane surface is consistent with that predicted by the theory. The

  15. Chemical Interactions and Their Role in the Microphase Separation of Block Copolymer Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Richard A.; Fitzgerald, Thomas G.; Borah, Dipu; Holmes, Justin D.; Morris, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamics of self-assembling systems are discussed in terms of the chemical interactions and the intermolecular forces between species. It is clear that there are both theoretical and practical limitations on the dimensions and the structural regularity of these systems. These considerations are made with reference to the microphase separation that occurs in block copolymer (BCP) systems. BCP systems self-assemble via a thermodynamic driven process where chemical dis-affinity between the blocks driving them part is balanced by a restorative force deriving from the chemical bond between the blocks. These systems are attracting much interest because of their possible role in nanoelectronic fabrication. This form of self-assembly can obtain highly regular nanopatterns in certain circumstances where the orientation and alignment of chemically distinct blocks can be guided through molecular interactions between the polymer and the surrounding interfaces. However, for this to be possible, great care must be taken to properly engineer the interactions between the surfaces and the polymer blocks. The optimum methods of structure directing are chemical pre-patterning (defining regions on the substrate of different chemistry) and graphoepitaxy (topographical alignment) but both centre on generating alignment through favourable chemical interactions. As in all self-assembling systems, the problems of defect formation must be considered and the origin of defects in these systems is explored. It is argued that in these nanostructures equilibrium defects are relatively few and largely originate from kinetic effects arising during film growth. Many defects also arise from the confinement of the systems when they are ‘directed’ by topography. The potential applications of these materials in electronics are discussed. PMID:19865513

  16. Chemical interactions and their role in the microphase separation of block copolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Richard A; Fitzgerald, Thomas G; Borah, Dipu; Holmes, Justin D; Morris, Michael A

    2009-08-25

    The thermodynamics of self-assembling systems are discussed in terms of the chemical interactions and the intermolecular forces between species. It is clear that there are both theoretical and practical limitations on the dimensions and the structural regularity of these systems. These considerations are made with reference to the microphase separation that occurs in block copolymer (BCP) systems. BCP systems self-assemble via a thermodynamic driven process where chemical dis-affinity between the blocks driving them part is balanced by a restorative force deriving from the chemical bond between the blocks. These systems are attracting much interest because of their possible role in nanoelectronic fabrication. This form of self-assembly can obtain highly regular nanopatterns in certain circumstances where the orientation and alignment of chemically distinct blocks can be guided through molecular interactions between the polymer and the surrounding interfaces. However, for this to be possible, great care must be taken to properly engineer the interactions between the surfaces and the polymer blocks. The optimum methods of structure directing are chemical pre-patterning (defining regions on the substrate of different chemistry) and graphoepitaxy (topographical alignment) but both centre on generating alignment through favourable chemical interactions. As in all self-assembling systems, the problems of defect formation must be considered and the origin of defects in these systems is explored. It is argued that in these nanostructures equilibrium defects are relatively few and largely originate from kinetic effects arising during film growth. Many defects also arise from the confinement of the systems when they are 'directed' by topography. The potential applications of these materials in electronics are discussed.

  17. Host interactions of Chandipura virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, Sreejith; Kumar, Kapila; Rana, Jyoti; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    The rhabdovirus matrix (M) protein is a multifunctional virion protein that plays major role in virus assembly and budding, virus-induced inhibition of host gene expression and cytopathic effects observed in infected cells. The myriad roles played by this protein in the virus biology make it a critical player in viral pathogenesis. Therefore, discerning the interactions of this protein with host can greatly facilitate our understanding of virus infections, ultimately leading to both improved therapeutics and insight into cellular processes. Chandipura virus (CHPV; Family Rhabdoviridae, Genus Vesiculovirus) is an emerging rhabdovirus responsible for several outbreaks of fatal encephalitis among children in India. The present study aims to screen the human fetal brain cDNA library for interactors of CHPV M protein using yeast two-hybrid system. Ten host protein interactors were identified, three of which were further validated by affinity pull down and protein interaction ELISA. The study identified novel human host interactors for CHPV which concurred with previously described associations in other human viruses.

  18. Carbohydrate–Aromatic Interactions in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein–carbohydrate interactions play pivotal roles in health and disease. However, defining and manipulating these interactions has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the underlying fundamental forces. To elucidate common and discriminating features in carbohydrate recognition, we have analyzed quantitatively X-ray crystal structures of proteins with noncovalently bound carbohydrates. Within the carbohydrate-binding pockets, aliphatic hydrophobic residues are disfavored, whereas aromatic side chains are enriched. The greatest preference is for tryptophan with an increased prevalence of 9-fold. Variations in the spatial orientation of amino acids around different monosaccharides indicate specific carbohydrate C–H bonds interact preferentially with aromatic residues. These preferences are consistent with the electronic properties of both the carbohydrate C–H bonds and the aromatic residues. Those carbohydrates that present patches of electropositive saccharide C–H bonds engage more often in CH−π interactions involving electron-rich aromatic partners. These electronic effects are also manifested when carbohydrate–aromatic interactions are monitored in solution: NMR analysis indicates that indole favorably binds to electron-poor C–H bonds of model carbohydrates, and a clear linear free energy relationships with substituted indoles supports the importance of complementary electronic effects in driving protein–carbohydrate interactions. Together, our data indicate that electrostatic and electronic complementarity between carbohydrates and aromatic residues play key roles in driving protein–carbohydrate complexation. Moreover, these weak noncovalent interactions influence which saccharide residues bind to proteins, and how they are positioned within carbohydrate-binding sites. PMID:26561965

  19. PCorral--interactive mining of protein interactions from MEDLINE.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Jimeno-Yepes, Antonio; Arregui, Miguel; Kirsch, Harald; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of information from the scientific literature is a complex task-for researchers doing manual curation and for automatic text processing solutions. The identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) requires the extraction of protein named entities and their relations. Semi-automatic interactive support is one approach to combine both solutions for efficient working processes to generate reliable database content. In principle, the extraction of PPIs can be achieved with different methods that can be combined to deliver high precision and/or high recall results in different combinations at the same time. Interactive use can be achieved, if the analytical methods are fast enough to process the retrieved documents. PCorral provides interactive mining of PPIs from the scientific literature allowing curators to skim MEDLINE for PPIs at low overheads. The keyword query to PCorral steers the selection of documents, and the subsequent text analysis generates high recall and high precision results for the curator. The underlying components of PCorral process the documents on-the-fly and are available, as well, as web service from the Whatizit infrastructure. The human interface summarizes the identified PPI results, and the involved entities are linked to relevant resources and databases. Altogether, PCorral serves curator at both the beginning and the end of the curation workflow for information retrieval and information extraction. Database URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Rebholz-srv/pcorral.

  20. Measuring Protein Interactions by Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Boyd, Lisa F; Schuck, Peter

    2017-04-03

    This unit gives an introduction to the basic techniques of optical biosensing for measuring equilibrium and kinetics of reversible protein interactions. Emphasis is placed on description of robust approaches that will provide reliable results with few assumptions. How to avoid the most commonly encountered problems and artifacts is also discussed. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. A versatile building block: the structures and functions of negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuna; Guo, Yu; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NPs) of negative-sense single-stranded RNA (-ssRNA) viruses function in different stages of viral replication, transcription, and maturation. Structural investigations show that -ssRNA viruses that encode NPs preliminarily serve as structural building blocks that encapsidate and protect the viral genomic RNA and mediate the interaction between genomic RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, recent structural results have revealed other biological functions of -ssRNA viruses that extend our understanding of the versatile roles of virally encoded NPs.

  2. Finding protein-protein interaction patterns by contact map matching.

    PubMed

    Melo, R C; Ribeiro, C; Murray, C S; Veloso, C J M; da Silveira, C H; Neshich, G; Meira, W; Carceroni, R L; Santoro, M M

    2007-10-05

    We propose a novel method for defining patterns of contacts present in protein-protein complexes. A new use of the traditional contact maps (more frequently used for representation of the intra-chain contacts) is presented for analysis of inter-chain contacts. Using an algorithm based on image processing techniques, we can compare protein-protein interaction maps and also obtain a dissimilarity score between them. The same algorithm used to compare the maps can align the contacts of all the complexes and be helpful in the determination of a pattern of conserved interactions at the interfaces. We present an example for the application of this method by analyzing the pattern of interaction of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitors and trypsins, chymotrypsins, a thrombin, a matriptase, and a kallikrein - all classified as serine proteases. We found 20 contacts conserved in trypsins and chymotrypsins and 3 specific ones are present in all the serine protease complexes studied. The method was able to identify important contacts for the protein family studied and the results are in agreement with the literature.

  3. Low-Temperature Processable Block Copolymers That Preserve the Function of Blended Proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kyohei; Tanaka, Shinya; Taniguchi, Ikuo

    2016-07-11

    Low-temperature processable polymers have attracted increasing interest as ecological materials because of their reduced energy consumption during processing and suitability for making composites with heat-sensitive biomolecules at ambient temperature. In the current study, low-temperature processable biodegradable block copolymers were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide (LLA) using polyphosphoester as a macroinitiator. The polymer films could be processed under a hydraulic pressure of 35 MPa. The block copolymer films swelled in water because the polyphosphoester block was partially hydrated. Interestingly, the swelling ratio of the films changed with temperature. The pressure-induced order-to-disorder transition of the block copolymers was characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering; a crystallinity reduction in the block copolymers was observed after application of pressure. The crystallinity of the block copolymers was recovered after removing the applied pressure. The Young's modulus of the block copolymer films increased as the LLA unit content increased. Moreover, the modulus did not change after multiple processing cycles and the recyclability of the block copolymers was also confirmed. Finally, polymer films with embedded proteinase K as a model protein were prepared. The activity of catalase loaded into the polymer films was evaluated after processing at different temperatures. The activity of catalase was preserved when the polymer films were processed at room temperature but was significantly reduced after high-temperature processing. The suitability of low-temperature processable biodegradable polymers for making biofunctional composites without reducing protein activity was clarified. These materials will be useful for biomedical and therapeutic applications.

  4. Experimental and bioinformatic approaches for interrogating protein-protein interactions to determine protein function.

    PubMed

    Droit, Arnaud; Poirier, Guy G; Hunter, Joanna M

    2005-04-01

    An ambitious goal of proteomics is to elucidate the structure, interactions and functions of all proteins within cells and organisms. One strategy to determine protein function is to identify the protein-protein interactions. The increasing use of high-throughput and large-scale bioinformatics-based studies has generated a massive amount of data stored in a number of different databases. A challenge for bioinformatics is to explore this disparate data and to uncover biologically relevant interactions and pathways. In parallel, there is clearly a need for the development of approaches that can predict novel protein-protein interaction networks in silico. Here, we present an overview of different experimental and bioinformatic methods to elucidate protein-protein interactions.

  5. Interaction of ice binding proteins with ice, water and ions.

    PubMed

    Oude Vrielink, Anneloes S; Aloi, Antonio; Olijve, Luuk L C; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-03-19

    Ice binding proteins (IBPs) are produced by various cold-adapted organisms to protect their body tissues against freeze damage. First discovered in Antarctic fish living in shallow waters, IBPs were later found in insects, microorganisms, and plants. Despite great structural diversity, all IBPs adhere to growing ice crystals, which is essential for their extensive repertoire of biological functions. Some IBPs maintain liquid inclusions within ice or inhibit recrystallization of ice, while other types suppress freezing by blocking further ice growth. In contrast, ice nucleating proteins stimulate ice nucleation just below 0 °C. Despite huge commercial interest and major scientific breakthroughs, the precise working mechanism of IBPs has not yet been unraveled. In this review, the authors outline the state-of-the-art in experimental and theoretical IBP research and discuss future scientific challenges. The interaction of IBPs with ice, water and ions is examined, focusing in particular on ice growth inhibition mechanisms.

  6. Dynamic network analysis of protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind; Deri, Joya

    2007-03-01

    Network approaches have recently become a popular tool to study complex systems such as cellular metabolism and protein interactions. A substantial number of analyses of the protein interaction network (PIN) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have considered this network as a static entity, not taking the network's dynamic nature into account. Here, we examine the time-variation of gene regulation superimposed on the PIN by defining mRNA expression profiles throughout the cell cycle as node weights. To characterize these network dynamics, we have both developed a set of novel network measures as well as studied previously published measures for weighted networks. We expect that our approach will provide a deeper understanding of protein regulation during the cell cycle.

  7. Detection of protein-protein interactions using tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian; Bailey, Dalan

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an invaluable technique for identifying interaction partners for an affinity tagged bait protein. The approach relies on the fusion of dual tags to the bait before separate rounds of affinity purification and precipitation. Frequently two specific elution steps are also performed to increase the specificity of the overall technique. In the method detailed here, the two tags used are protein G and a short streptavidin binding peptide; however, many variations can be employed. In our example the tags are separated by a cleavable tobacco etch virus protease target sequence, allowing for specific elution after the first round of affinity purification. Proteins isolated after the final elution step in this process are concentrated before being identified by mass spectrometry. The use of dual affinity tags and specific elution in this technique dramatically increases both the specificity and stringency of the pull-downs, ensuring a low level of background nonspecific interactions.

  8. Integrating protein-protein interaction networks with phenotypes reveals signs of interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zirin, Jonathan; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Yilmazel, Bahar; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A major objective of systems biology is to organize molecular interactions as networks and to characterize information-flow within networks. We describe a computational framework to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and genetic screens to predict the “signs” of interactions (i.e. activation/inhibition relationships). We constructed a Drosophila melanogaster signed PPI network, consisting of 6,125 signed PPIs connecting 3,352 proteins that can be used to identify positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways and protein complexes. We identified an unexpected role for the metabolic enzymes Enolase and Aldo-keto reductase as positive and negative regulators of proteolysis, respectively. Characterization of the activation/inhibition relationships between physically interacting proteins within signaling pathways will impact our understanding of many biological functions, including signal transduction and mechanisms of disease. PMID:24240319

  9. Prediction of protein-protein interactions by combining structure and sequence conservation in protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aytuna, A Selim; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2005-06-15

    Elucidation of the full network of protein-protein interactions is crucial for understanding of the principles of biological systems and processes. Thus, there is a need for in silico methods for predicting interactions. We present a novel algorithm for automated prediction of protein-protein interactions that employs a unique bottom-up approach combining structure and sequence conservation in protein interfaces. Running the algorithm on a template dataset of 67 interfaces and a sequentially non-redundant dataset of 6170 protein structures, 62 616 potential interactions are predicted. These interactions are compared with the ones in two publicly available interaction databases (Database of Interacting Proteins and Biomolecular Interaction Network Database) and also the Protein Data Bank. A significant number of predictions are verified in these databases. The unverified ones may correspond to (1) interactions that are not covered in these databases but known in literature, (2) unknown interactions that actually occur in nature and (3) interactions that do not occur naturally but may possibly be realized synthetically in laboratory conditions. Some unverified interactions, supported significantly with studies found in the literature, are discussed. http://gordion.hpc.eng.ku.edu.tr/prism agursoy@ku.edu.tr; okeskin@ku.edu.tr.

  10. Evolutionary Capacitance and Control of Protein Stability in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Purushottam D.; Maslov, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their biological function, protein complexes reduce the exposure of the constituent proteins to the risk of undesired oligomerization by reducing the concentration of the free monomeric state. We interpret this reduced risk as a stabilization of the functional state of the protein. We estimate that protein-protein interactions can account for of additional stabilization; a substantial contribution to intrinsic stability. We hypothesize that proteins in the interaction network act as evolutionary capacitors which allows their binding partners to explore regions of the sequence space which correspond to less stable proteins. In the interaction network of baker's yeast, we find that statistically proteins that receive higher energetic benefits from the interaction network are more likely to misfold. A simplified fitness landscape wherein the fitness of an organism is inversely proportional to the total concentration of unfolded proteins provides an evolutionary justification for the proposed trends. We conclude by outlining clear biophysical experiments to test our predictions. PMID:23592969

  11. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    amyloidogenic proteins. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship in phthalocyanines revealed that their anti-amyloid activity is highly dependent on the type of metal ion coordinated to the tetrapyrrolic system but is not sensitive to the number of peripheral charged substituents. The tendency of phthalocyanines to oligomerize (self-association) via aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions correlates precisely with their binding capabilities to target proteins and, more importantly, determines their efficiency as anti-amyloid agents. The ability to block different types of disease-associated protein aggregation raises the possibility that these cyclic tetrapyrrole compounds have a common mechanism of action to impair the formation of a variety of pathological aggregates. Because the structural and molecular basis for the anti-amyloid effects of these molecules is starting to emerge, combined efforts from the fields of structural, cellular, and animal biology will result critical for the rational design and discovery of new drugs for the treatment of amyloid related neurological disorders.

  12. Secretion modification region-derived peptide disrupts HIV-1 Nef's interaction with mortalin and blocks virus and Nef exosome release.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Martin N; Huang, Ming-Bo; Ali, Syed A; Powell, Michael D; Bond, Vincent C

    2012-01-01

    Nef is secreted from infected cells in exosomes and is found in abundance in the sera of HIV-infected individuals. Secreted exosomal Nef (exNef) induces apoptosis in uninfected CD4⁺ T cells and may be a key component of HIV pathogenesis. The exosomal pathway has been implicated in HIV-1 virus release, suggesting a possible link between these two viral processes. However, the underlying mechanisms and cellular components of exNef secretion have not been elucidated. We have previously described a Nef motif, the secretion modification region (SMR; amino acids 66 to 70), that is required for exNef secretion. In silico modeling data suggest that this motif can form a putative binding pocket. We hypothesized that the Nef SMR binds a cellular protein involved in protein trafficking and that inhibition of this interaction would abrogate exNef secretion. By using tandem mass spectrometry and coimmunoprecipitation with a novel SMR-based peptide (SMRwt) that blocks exNef secretion and HIV-1 virus release, we identified mortalin as an SMR-specific cellular protein. A second set of coimmunoprecipitation experiments with full-length Nef confirmed that mortalin interacts with Nef via Nef's SMR motif and that this interaction is disrupted by the SMRwt peptide. Overexpression and microRNA knockdown of mortalin revealed a positive correlation between exNef secretion levels and mortalin protein expression. Using antibody inhibition we demonstrated that the Nef/mortalin interaction is necessary for exNef secretion. Taken together, this work constitutes a significant step in understanding the underlying mechanism of exNef secretion, identifies a novel host-pathogen interaction, and introduces an HIV-derived peptide with antiviral properties.

  13. Amlexanox Blocks the Interaction between S100A4 and Epidermal Growth Factor and Inhibits Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    The human S100A4 protein binds calcium, resulting in a change in its conformation to promote the interaction with its target protein. Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) is the target protein of S100A4 and a critical ligand of the receptor EGFR. The EGF/EGFR system promotes cell survival, differentiation, and growth by activating several signaling pathways. Amlexanox is an anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic drug that is used to treat recurrent aphthous ulcers. In the present study, we determined that amlexanox interacts with S100A4 using heteronuclear single quantum correlation titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A4 with EGF and amlexanox using fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We generated two binary models (for the S100A4-EGF and S100A4-amlexanox complexes) and observed that amlexanox and EGF share a similar binding region in mS100A4. We also used a WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A4, EGF, and amlexanox, and found that amlexanox blocks the binding between S100A4 and EGF, and is therefore useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. PMID:27559743

  14. What properties characterize the hub proteins of the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Diana; Light, Sara; Björklund, Åsa K; Elofsson, Arne

    2006-01-01

    Background Most proteins interact with only a few other proteins while a small number of proteins (hubs) have many interaction partners. Hub proteins and non-hub proteins differ in several respects; however, understanding is not complete about what properties characterize the hubs and set them apart from proteins of low connectivity. Therefore, we have investigated what differentiates hubs from non-hubs and static hubs (party hubs) from dynamic hubs (date hubs) in the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results The many interactions of hub proteins can only partly be explained by bindings to similar proteins or domains. It is evident that domain repeats, which are associated with binding, are enriched in hubs. Moreover, there is an over representation of multi-domain proteins and long proteins among the hubs. In addition, there are clear differences between party hubs and date hubs. Fewer of the party hubs contain long disordered regions compared to date hubs, indicating that these regions are important for flexible binding but less so for static interactions. Furthermore, party hubs interact to a large extent with each other, supporting the idea of party hubs as the cores of highly clustered functional modules. In addition, hub proteins, and in particular party hubs, are more often ancient. Finally, the more recent paralogs of party hubs are underrepresented. Conclusion Our results indicate that multiple and repeated domains are enriched in hub proteins and, further, that long disordered regions, which are common in date hubs, are particularly important for flexible binding. PMID:16780599

  15. Design of Protein-Peptide Interaction Modules for Assembling Supramolecular Structures in Vivo and in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Speltz, Elizabeth B; Nathan, Aparna; Regan, Lynne

    2015-09-18

    Synthetic biology and protein origami both require protein building blocks that behave in a reliable, predictable fashion. In particular, we require protein interaction modules with known specificity and affinity. Here, we describe three designed TRAP (Tetratricopeptide Repeat Affinity Protein)-peptide interaction pairs that are functional in vivo. We show that each TRAP binds to its cognate peptide and exhibits low cross-reactivity with the peptides bound by the other TRAPs. In addition, we demonstrate that the TRAP-peptide interactions are functional in many cellular contexts. In extensions of these designs, we show that the binding affinity of a TRAP-peptide pair can be systematically varied. The TRAP-peptide pairs we present thus represent a powerful set of new building blocks that are suitable for a variety of applications.

  16. Post-translational regulation of sucrose transporters by direct protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Krügel, Undine; Kühn, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose transporters are essential membrane proteins for the allocation of carbon resources in higher plants and protein–protein interactions play a crucial role in the post-translational regulation of sucrose transporters affecting affinity, transport capacity, oligomerization, localization, and trafficking. Systematic screening for protein interactors using sucrose transporters as bait proteins helped identifying several proteins binding to sucrose transporters from apple, Arabidopsis, potato, or tomato using the split ubiquitin system. This mini-review summarizes known sucrose transporter-interacting proteins and their potential function in plants. Not all of the identified interaction partners are postulated to be located at the plasma membrane, but some are predicted to be endoplasmic reticulum-residing proteins such as a protein disulfide isomerase and members of the cytochrome b5 family. Many of the SUT1-interacting proteins are secretory proteins or involved in metabolism. Identification of actin and actin-related proteins as SUT1-interacting proteins confirmed the observation that movement of SUT1-containing intracellular vesicles can be blocked by inhibition of actin polymerization using specific inhibitors. Manipulation of expression of these interacting proteins represents one possible way to modify resource allocation by post-translational regulation of sucrose transporters. PMID:23847641

  17. Tools for controlling protein interactions using light.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Chandra L; Vrana, Justin D; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2014-09-02

    Genetically encoded actuators that allow control of protein-protein interactions using light, termed 'optical dimerizers', are emerging as new tools for experimental biology. In recent years, numerous new and versatile dimerizer systems have been developed. Here we discuss the design of optical dimerizer experiments, including choice of a dimerizer system, photoexcitation sources, and the coordinate use of imaging reporters. We provide detailed protocols for experiments using two dimerization systems we previously developed, CRY2/CIB and UVR8/UVR8, for use in controlling transcription, protein localization, and protein secretion using light. Additionally, we provide instructions and software for constructing a pulse-controlled LED device for use in experiments requiring extended light treatments.

  18. Tools for controlling protein interactions with light

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Chandra L.; Vrana, Justin D.; Kennedy, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-encoded actuators that allow control of protein-protein interactions with light, termed ‘optical dimerizers’, are emerging as new tools for experimental biology. In recent years, numerous new and versatile dimerizer systems have been developed. Here we discuss the design of optical dimerizer experiments, including choice of a dimerizer system, photoexcitation sources, and coordinate use of imaging reporters. We provide detailed protocols for experiments using two dimerization systems we previously developed, CRY2/CIB and UVR8/UVR8, for use controlling transcription, protein localization, and protein secretion with light. Additionally, we provide instructions and software for constructing a pulse-controlled LED light device for use in experiments requiring extended light treatments. PMID:25181301

  19. A Note regarding Problems with Interaction and Varying Block Sizes in a Comparison of Endotracheal Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Einsporn, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    A randomized clinical experiment to compare two types of endotracheal tubes utilized a block design where each of the six participating anesthesiologists performed tube insertions for an equal number of patients for each type of tube. Five anesthesiologists intubated at least three patients with each tube type, but one anesthesiologist intubated only one patient per tube type. Overall, one type of tube outperformed the other on all three effectiveness measures. However, analysis of the data using an interaction model gave conflicting and misleading results, making the tube with the better performance appear to perform worse. This surprising result was caused by the undue influence of the data for the anesthesiologist who intubated only two patients. We therefore urge caution in interpreting results from interaction models with designs containing small blocks. PMID:25132863

  20. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  1. KFC Server: interactive forecasting of protein interaction hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Steven J.; LeGault, Laura; Mitchell, Julie C.

    2008-01-01

    The KFC Server is a web-based implementation of the KFC (Knowledge-based FADE and Contacts) model—a machine learning approach for the prediction of binding hot spots, or the subset of residues that account for most of a protein interface's; binding free energy. The server facilitates the automated analysis of a user submitted protein–protein or protein–DNA interface and the visualization of its hot spot predictions. For each residue in the interface, the KFC Server characterizes its local structural environment, compares that environment to the environments of experimentally determined hot spots and predicts if the interface residue is a hot spot. After the computational analysis, the user can visualize the results using an interactive job viewer able to quickly highlight predicted hot spots and surrounding structural features within the protein structure. The KFC Server is accessible at http://kfc.mitchell-lab.org. PMID:18539611

  2. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with protein: A spectroscopic study to monitor protein conformational changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangoo, Nishima; Suri, C. Raman; Shekhawat, G.

    2008-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) conjugated with biomolecules are promising building blocks for assembly into nanostructured functional materials for developing biomarker platforms because of their size dependent optical and electrical properties. Biocompatible GNPs were synthesized using glutamic acid as a reducing agent and the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and GNPs was investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. The binding constant (Kb) of protein (BSA) to GNPs was determined by measuring the quenching of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues of the protein molecules after conjugation. The conformational change in BSA at its native form after conjugation with GNPs confirmed that protein undergoes a more flexible conformational state on the boundary surface of GNPs after bioconjugation. The CD studies further showed a decrease in the α-helical content after conjugation. The results confirmed that the change in conformation was larger at higher concentrations of GNPs.

  3. Alignment-free protein interaction network comparison

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Waqar; Rito, Tiago; Reinert, Gesine; Sun, Fengzhu; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological network comparison software largely relies on the concept of alignment where close matches between the nodes of two or more networks are sought. These node matches are based on sequence similarity and/or interaction patterns. However, because of the incomplete and error-prone datasets currently available, such methods have had limited success. Moreover, the results of network alignment are in general not amenable for distance-based evolutionary analysis of sets of networks. In this article, we describe Netdis, a topology-based distance measure between networks, which offers the possibility of network phylogeny reconstruction. Results: We first demonstrate that Netdis is able to correctly separate different random graph model types independent of network size and density. The biological applicability of the method is then shown by its ability to build the correct phylogenetic tree of species based solely on the topology of current protein interaction networks. Our results provide new evidence that the topology of protein interaction networks contains information about evolutionary processes, despite the lack of conservation of individual interactions. As Netdis is applicable to all networks because of its speed and simplicity, we apply it to a large collection of biological and non-biological networks where it clusters diverse networks by type. Availability and implementation: The source code of the program is freely available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources. Contact: w.ali@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161230

  4. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  5. Characterization and modeling of protein protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria; Flammini, Alessandro; Maritan, Amos; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2005-07-01

    The recent availability of high-throughput gene expression and proteomics techniques has created an unprecedented opportunity for a comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of many biological networks. Global proteomic interaction data, in particular, are synthetically represented as undirected networks exhibiting features far from the random paradigm which has dominated past effort in network theory. This evidence, along with the advances in the theory of complex networks, has triggered an intense research activity aimed at exploiting the evolutionary and biological significance of the resulting network's topology. Here we present a review of the results obtained in the characterization and modeling of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae protein interaction networks obtained with different experimental techniques. We provide a comparative assessment of the topological properties and discuss possible biases in interaction networks obtained with different techniques. We report on dynamical models based on duplication mechanisms that cast the protein interaction networks in the family of dynamically growing complex networks. Finally, we discuss various results and analysis correlating the networks’ topology with the biological function of proteins.

  6. Using support vector machine for improving protein-protein interaction prediction utilizing domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Mudita; Shah, Anuj R.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-10-02

    Understanding protein interactions is essential to gain insights into the biological processes at the whole cell level. The high-throughput experimental techniques for determining protein-protein interactions (PPI) are error prone and expensive with low overlap amongst them. Although several computational methods have been proposed for predicting protein interactions there is definite room for improvement. Here we present DomainSVM, a predictive method for PPI that uses computationally inferred domain-domain interaction values in a Support Vector Machine framework to predict protein interactions. DomainSVM method utilizes evidence of multiple interacting domains to predict a protein interaction. It outperforms existing methods of PPI prediction by achieving very high explanation ratios, precision, specificity, sensitivity and F-measure values in a 10 fold cross-validation study conducted on the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. A Functional comparison study using GO annotations on the positive and the negative test sets is presented in addition to discussing novel PPI predictions in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  7. Protease-inhibitor interaction predictions: Lessons on the complexity of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher Mark; Pavlidis, Paul

    2017-04-06

    Protein interactions shape proteome function and thus biology. Identification of protein interactions is a major goal in molecular biology, but biochemical methods, although improving, remain limited in coverage and accuracy. Whereas computational predictions can guide biochemical experiments, low validation rates of predictions remain a major limitation. Here, we investigated computational methods in the prediction of a specific type of interaction, the inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors. Proteases generate thousands of proteoforms that dynamically shape the functional state of proteomes. Despite the important regulatory role of proteases, knowledge of their inhibitors remains largely incomplete with the vast majority of proteases lacking an annotated inhibitor. To link inhibitors to their target proteases on a large scale, we applied computational methods to predict inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors based on complementary data including coexpression, phylogenetic similarity, structural information, co-annotation, and colocalization, and also surveyed general protein interaction networks for potential inhibitory interactions. In testing nine predicted interactions biochemically, we validated the inhibition of kallikrein 5 by serpin B12. Despite the use of a wide array of complementary data, we found a high false positive rate of computational predictions in biochemical follow-up. Based on a protease-specific definition of true negatives derived from the biochemical classification of proteases and inhibitors, we analyzed prediction accuracy of individual features. Thereby we identified feature-specific limitations, which also affected general protein interaction prediction methods. Interestingly, proteases were often not coexpressed with most of their functional inhibitors, contrary to what is commonly assumed and extrapolated predominantly from cell culture experiments. Predictions of inhibitory interactions

  8. Antibodies to plant-produced Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage protein Pfs25 exhibit transmission blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Farrance, Christine E; Chichester, Jessica A; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Shamloul, Moneim; Rhee, Amy; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Jones, R Mark; Mamedov, Tarlan; Sharma, Satish; Mett, Vadim; Streatfield, Stephen J; Roeffen, Will; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Sauerwein, Robert W; Wu, Yimin; Muratova, Olga; Miller, Louis; Duffy, Patrick; Sinden, Robert; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal mosquito-borne disease caused by a protozoan parasite. Each year, it is estimated that over one million people are killed by malaria, yet the disease is preventable and treatable. Developing vaccines against the parasite is a critical component in the fight against malaria and these vaccines can target different stages of the pathogen's life cycle. We are targeting sexual stage proteins of P. falciparum which are found on the surface of the parasite reproductive cells present in the mosquito gut. Antibodies against these proteins block the progression of the parasite's life cycle in the mosquito, and thus block transmission to the next human host. Transmission blocking vaccines are essential to the malaria eradication program to ease the disease burden at the population level. We have successfully produced multiple versions of the Pfs25 antigen in a plant virus-based transient expression system and have evaluated these vaccine candidates in an animal model. The targets are expressed in plants at a high level, are soluble and most importantly, generate strong transmission blocking activity as determined by a standard membrane feeding assay. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expressing Plasmodium antigens in a plant-based system for the economic production of a transmission blocking vaccine against malaria.

  9. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  10. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  11. Diversity in protein-protein interactions of connexins: emerging roles.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Jean-Claude; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions, specialised membrane structures that mediate cell-to-cell communication in almost all tissues, are composed of channel-forming integral membrane proteins termed connexins. The activity of these intercellular channels is closely regulated, particularly by intramolecular modifications as phosphorylations of proteins by protein kinases, which appear to regulate the gap junction at several levels, including assembly of channels in the plasma membrane, connexin turnover as well as directly affecting the opening and closure ("gating") of channels. The regulation of membrane channels by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes commonly requires the formation of a multiprotein complex, where pore-forming subunits bind to auxiliary proteins (e.g. scaffolding proteins, catalytic and regulatory subunits), that play essential roles in channel localisation and activity, linking signalling enzymes, substrates and effectors into a structure frequently anchored to the cytoskeleton. The present review summarises the up-to-date progress regarding the proteins capable of interacting or at least of co-localising with connexins and their functional importance.

  12. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanghe; Wang, Qi; Wang, Tengjiao

    2017-01-01

    The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target's homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper.

  13. Prediction and integration of regulatory and protein-protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wichadakul, Duangdao; McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram

    2009-04-20

    Knowledge of transcriptional regulatory interactions (TRIs) is essential for exploring functional genomics and systems biology in any organism. While several results from genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks are available, they are limited to model organisms such as yeast [1] and worm [2]. Beyond these networks, experiments on TRIs study only individual genes and proteins of specific interest. In this chapter, we present a method for the integration of various data sets to predict TRIs for 54 organisms in the Bioverse [3]. We describe how to compile and handle various formats and identifiers of data sets from different sources, and how to predict the TRIs using a homology-based approach, utilizing the compiled data sets. Integrated data sets include experimentally verified TRIs, binding sites of transcription factors, promoter sequences, protein sub-cellular localization, and protein families. Predicted TRIs expand the networks of gene regulation for a large number of organisms. The integration of experimentally verified and predicted TRIs with other known protein-protein interactions (PPIs) gives insight into specific pathways, network motifs, and the topological dynamics of an integrated network with gene expression under different conditions, essential for exploring functional genomics and systems biology.

  14. Protein-protein interactions as druggable targets: recent technological advances.

    PubMed

    Higueruelo, Alicia P; Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L

    2013-10-01

    Classical target-based drug discovery, where large chemical libraries are screened using inhibitory assays for a single target, has struggled to find ligands that inhibit protein-protein interactions (PPI). Nevertheless, in the past decade there have been successes that have demonstrated that PPI can be useful drug targets, and the field is now evolving fast. This review focuses on the new approaches and concepts that are being developed to tackle these challenging targets: the use of fragment based methods to explore the chemical space, stapled peptides to regulate intracellular PPI, alternatives to competitive inhibition and the use of antibodies to enable small molecule discovery for these targets.

  15. Small Molecule Inhibitors to Disrupt Protein-protein Interactions of Heat Shock Protein 90 Chaperone Machinery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ho

    2015-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an adenosine triphosphate dependent molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells that regulates the activation and maintenance of numerous regulatory and signaling proteins including epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor, cyclin-dependent kinase-4, protein kinase B, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Since many of Hsp90 clients are oncogenic proteins, Hsp90 has become an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of cancer. To discover small molecule inhibitors targeting Hsp90 chaperone machinery, several strategies have been employed, which results in three classes of inhibitors such as N-terminal inhibitors, C-terminal inhibitors, and inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 chaperone machinery. Developing small molecule inhibitors that modulate protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 is a challenging task, although it offers many alternative opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The lack of well-defined binding pocket and starting points for drug design challenges medicinal chemists to discover small molecule inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90. The present review will focus on the current studies on small molecule inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 chaperone machinery, provide biological background on the structure, function and mechanism of Hsp90's protein-protein interactions, and discuss the challenges and promise of its small molecule modulations.

  16. Production in Pichia pastoris of protein-based polymers with small heterodimer-forming blocks.

    PubMed

    Domeradzka, Natalia E; Werten, Marc W T; de Vries, Renko; de Wolf, Frits A

    2016-05-01

    Some combinations of leucine zipper peptides are capable of forming α-helical heterodimeric coiled coils with very high affinity. These can be used as physical cross-linkers in the design of protein-based polymers that form supramolecular structures, for example hydrogels, upon mixing solutions containing the complementary blocks. Such two-component physical networks are of interest for many applications in biomedicine, pharmaceutics, and diagnostics. This article describes the efficient secretory production of A and B type leucine zipper peptides fused to protein-based polymers in Pichia pastoris. By adjusting the fermentation conditions, we were able to significantly reduce undesirable proteolytic degradation. The formation of A-B heterodimers in mixtures of the purified products was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography. Our results demonstrate that protein-based polymers incorporating functional heterodimer-forming blocks can be produced with P. pastoris in sufficient quantities for use in future supramolecular self-assembly studies and in various applications.

  17. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  18. Superparamagnetic blocking of an ensemble of magnetite nanoparticles upon interparticle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Semenov, S. V.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Yakushkin, S. S.; Kirillov, V. L.; Martyanov, O. N.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the effect of interparticle magnetic interactions in an ensemble of superparamagnetic magnetite particles with an average size of 8.4 nm dispersed in the diamagnetic matrix on the blocking of this ensemble in external magnetic field. The two limit cases are investigated: the case of strongly interacting particles, when the value of magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between particles is comparable with the energy of other interactions in the ensemble (the interparticle distance is similar to the nanoparticle diameter) and the case of almost noninteracting particles distant from each other by about ten particle diameters. We demonstrate that the experimental dependence of the blocking temperature on external field is described well within the model [1], in which the density of particles in a nonmagnetic medium is taken into account and the correlation value depends on external magnetic field. The model for describing the magnetic properties of a disperse nanoparticle ensemble is proposed, which makes corrections related to the particle size and mean dipole-dipole interaction energy for the anisotropy constant. The surface magnetic anisotropy of Fe3O4 particles and parameters of the interparticle coupling are estimated.

  19. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  20. Identification of Bacterial Target Proteins for the Salicylidene Acylhydrazide Class of Virulence-blocking Compounds*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dai; Zetterström, Caroline E.; Gabrielsen, Mads; Beckham, Katherine S. H.; Tree, Jai J.; Macdonald, Sarah E.; Byron, Olwyn; Mitchell, Tim J.; Gally, David L.; Herzyk, Pawel; Mahajan, Arvind; Uvell, Hanna; Burchmore, Richard; Smith, Brian O.; Elofsson, Mikael; Roe, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    A class of anti-virulence compounds, the salicylidene acylhydrazides, has been widely reported to block the function of the type three secretion system of several Gram-negative pathogens by a previously unknown mechanism. In this work we provide the first identification of bacterial proteins that are targeted by this group of compounds. We provide evidence that their mode of action is likely to result from a synergistic effect arising from a perturbation of the function of several conserved proteins. We also examine the contribution of selected target proteins to the pathogenicity of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and to expression of virulence genes in Escherichia coli O157. PMID:21724850

  1. Protein self-interaction chromatography on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Kedar; Ahamed, Tangir; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Horst, Joop H Ter; Jansens, Peter J; Ottens, Marcel

    2009-02-21

    This paper presents the development of a novel miniaturized experimental procedure for the measurement of protein-protein interactions through Self-Interaction Chromatography (SIC) on a microchip, without the use of chromatographic resins. SIC was recently demonstrated to be a relatively easy method to obtain quantitative thermodynamic information about protein-protein interactions, like the osmotic second virial coefficient B(22), which relates to protein phase behavior including protein crystallization. This successful miniaturization to microchip level of a measurement device for protein self-interaction data is a first key step to a complete microfluidic screening platform for the rational design of protein crystallizations, using substantially less expensive protein and experimentation time.

  2. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host’s immune system (molecular mimicry). Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells), stick and roll (bacteria) or surfacing (viruses). PMID:26340640

  3. Stabilizer-Guided Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Bartel, Maria; Henen, Morkos A; Leysen, Seppe; Adriaans, Joris M C; Brunsveld, Luc; Landrieu, Isabelle; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-12-21

    The discovery of novel protein-protein interaction (PPI) modulators represents one of the great molecular challenges of the modern era. PPIs can be modulated by either inhibitor or stabilizer compounds, which target different though proximal regions of the protein interface. In principle, protein-stabilizer complexes can guide the design of PPI inhibitors (and vice versa). In the present work, we combine X-ray crystallographic data from both stabilizer and inhibitor co-crystal complexes of the adapter protein 14-3-3 to characterize, down to the atomic scale, inhibitors of the 14-3-3/Tau PPI, a potential drug target to treat Alzheimer's disease. The most potent compound notably inhibited the binding of phosphorylated full-length Tau to 14-3-3 according to NMR spectroscopy studies. Our work sets a precedent for the rational design of PPI inhibitors guided by PPI stabilizer-protein complexes while potentially enabling access to new synthetically tractable stabilizers of 14-3-3 and other PPIs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Human rhinovirus 16 causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation without blocking protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Mousnier, Aurelie; Swieboda, Dawid; Pinto, Anaïs; Guedán, Anabel; Rogers, Andrew V; Walton, Ross; Johnston, Sebastian L; Solari, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The replication of picornaviruses has been described to cause fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus that blocks the secretory pathway. The inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class I upregulation and cytokine, chemokine and interferon secretion may have important implications for host defense. Previous studies have shown that disruption of the secretory pathway can be replicated by expression of individual nonstructural proteins; however the situation with different serotypes of human rhinovirus (HRV) is unclear. The expression of 3A protein from HRV14 or HRV2 did not cause Golgi apparatus disruption or a block in secretion, whereas other studies showed that infection of cells with HRV1A did cause Golgi apparatus disruption which was replicated by the expression of 3A. HRV16 is the serotype most widely used in clinical HRV challenge studies; consequently, to address the issue of Golgi apparatus disruption for HRV16, we have systematically and quantitatively examined the effect of HRV16 on both Golgi apparatus fragmentation and protein secretion in HeLa cells. First, we expressed each individual nonstructural protein and examined their cellular localization and their disruption of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus architecture. We quantified their effects on the secretory pathway by measuring secretion of the reporter protein Gaussia luciferase. Finally, we examined the same outcomes following infection of cells with live virus. We demonstrate that expression of HRV16 3A and 3AB and, to a lesser extent, 2B caused dispersal of the Golgi structure, and these three nonstructural proteins also inhibited protein secretion. The infection of cells with HRV16 also caused significant Golgi apparatus dispersal; however, this did not result in the inhibition of protein secretion. Importance: The ability of replicating picornaviruses to influence the function of the secretory pathway has important implications for host defense. However, there appear to be

  5. Interaction of Curcumin with PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymers: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Susruta; Roccatano, Danilo

    2013-03-21

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring drug molecule, has been extensively investigated for its various potential usages in medicine. Its water insolubility and high metabolism rate require the use of drug delivery systems to make it effective in the human body. Among various types of nanocarriers, block copolymer based ones are the most effective. These polymers are broadly used as drug-delivery systems, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. In this paper, we propose a molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of Curcumin with block copolymer based on polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polypropylene oxide (PPO). The study has been conducted considering the smallest PEO and PPO oligomers and multiple chains of the block copolymer Pluronic P85. Our study shows that the more hydrophobic 1,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP) molecules and PPO block preferentially coat the Curcumin molecule. In the case of the Pluronic P85, simulation shows formation of a drug-polymer aggregate within 50 ns. This process leaves exposed the PEO part of the polymers, resulting in better solvation and stability of the drug in water.

  6. Heparan sulfate and heparin interactions with proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meneghetti, Maria C. Z.; Hughes, Ashley J.; Rudd, Timothy R.; Nader, Helena B.; Powell, Andrew K.; Yates, Edwin A.; Lima, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) polysaccharides are ubiquitous components of the cell surface and extracellular matrix of all multicellular animals, whereas heparin is present within mast cells and can be viewed as a more sulfated, tissue-specific, HS variant. HS and heparin regulate biological processes through interactions with a large repertoire of proteins. Owing to these interactions and diverse effects observed during in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments, manifold biological/pharmacological activities have been attributed to them. The properties that have been thought to bestow protein binding and biological activity upon HS and heparin vary from high levels of sequence specificity to a dependence on charge. In contrast to these opposing opinions, we will argue that the evidence supports both a level of redundancy and a degree of selectivity in the structure–activity relationship. The relationship between this apparent redundancy, the multi-dentate nature of heparin and HS polysaccharide chains, their involvement in protein networks and the multiple binding sites on proteins, each possessing different properties, will also be considered. Finally, the role of cations in modulating HS/heparin activity will be reviewed and some of the implications for structure–activity relationships and regulation will be discussed. PMID:26289657

  7. Factors affecting alum-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Wang, Wei

    2014-05-15

    Alum (or aluminum-containing) adjuvants are key components of many vaccines currently on the market. The immuno-potentiation effect of alum adjuvants is presumably due to their interaction with antigens, leading to adsorption on the alum particle surface. Understanding the mechanism of antigen adsorption/desorption and its influencing factors could provide guidance on formulation design and ensure proper in-vivo immuno-potentiation effect. In this paper, surface adsorption of several model proteins on two types of aluminum adjuvants (Alhydrogel(®) and Adjuphos(®)) are investigated to understand the underlying adsorption mechanisms, capacities, and potential influencing factors. It was found that electrostatic interactions are the major driving force for surface adsorption of all the model proteins except ovalbumin. Alhydrogel has a significantly higher adsorption capacity than Adjuphos. Several factors significantly change the adsorption capacity of both Alhydrogel and Adjuphos, including molecular weight of protein antigens, sodium chloride, phosphate buffer, denaturing agents, and size of aluminum particles. These important factors need to be carefully considered in the design of an effective protein antigen-based vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heparan sulfate and heparin interactions with proteins.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Maria C Z; Hughes, Ashley J; Rudd, Timothy R; Nader, Helena B; Powell, Andrew K; Yates, Edwin A; Lima, Marcelo A

    2015-09-06

    Heparan sulfate (HS) polysaccharides are ubiquitous components of the cell surface and extracellular matrix of all multicellular animals, whereas heparin is present within mast cells and can be viewed as a more sulfated, tissue-specific, HS variant. HS and heparin regulate biological processes through interactions with a large repertoire of proteins. Owing to these interactions and diverse effects observed during in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments, manifold biological/pharmacological activities have been attributed to them. The properties that have been thought to bestow protein binding and biological activity upon HS and heparin vary from high levels of sequence specificity to a dependence on charge. In contrast to these opposing opinions, we will argue that the evidence supports both a level of redundancy and a degree of selectivity in the structure-activity relationship. The relationship between this apparent redundancy, the multi-dentate nature of heparin and HS polysaccharide chains, their involvement in protein networks and the multiple binding sites on proteins, each possessing different properties, will also be considered. Finally, the role of cations in modulating HS/heparin activity will be reviewed and some of the implications for structure-activity relationships and regulation will be discussed.

  9. Stabilization of protein-protein interactions by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Giordanetto, Fabrizio; Schäfer, Anja; Ottmann, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are implicated in every disease and mastering the ability to influence PPIs with small molecules would considerably enlarge the druggable genome. Whereas inhibition of PPIs has repeatedly been shown to work successfully, targeted stabilization of PPIs is underrepresented in the literature. This is all the more surprising because natural products like FK506, rapamycin, brefeldin, forskolin and fusicoccin confer their physiological activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. However, recently a number of very interesting synthetic molecules have been reported from drug discovery projects that indeed achieve their desired activities by stabilizing either homo- or hetero-oligomeric complexes of their target proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of dual-layer GSO depth-of-interaction block detector using angled optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kato, Natsuki; Hamamura, Huka

    2015-05-01

    A PET system for small animals requires a small detector ring to obtain high-spatial resolution images. However, when we use a relatively large size of photodetector such as a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT), the detector ring is arranged in a hexagonal- or octagonal-shape, and the PET system has large gaps between the block detectors. The large gaps produce image distortion, and the reconstruction algorithm is difficult. To solve these problems, we proposed to arrange two scintillator blocks on one PSPMT using two angled optical fiber-based image guides. We could set two scintillator blocks angled at 22.5° on a PSPMT so that these scintillator blocks are arranged in a nearly circular (hexadecagonal) shape with eight developed block detectors. We used Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillators with Ce concentrations of 1.5 mol% (decay time: 39 ns) and 0.4 mol% (decay time: 63 ns). Sizes of these GSO cells were 1.6×2.4×7.0 mm3 and 1.6×2.4×8.0 mm3 for 1.5 mol% Ce and 0.4 mol% Ce, respectively. These two types of GSO were arranged in an 11×15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector. Two GSO blocks and two optical fiber-based image guides were optically coupled to a 2-in. PSPMT (Hamamatsu Photonics H8500: 8×8 anodes). We measured the performances of the block detector with Cs-137 gamma photons (662-keV). We could resolve almost all pixels clearly in a two-dimensional position histogram. The average peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) of the two-dimensional position histogram along profiles were 2.6 and 4.8 in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. The energy resolution was 28.4% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The pulse shape spectra showed good separation with a P/V of 5.2. The developed block detector performed well and shows promise for the development of high-sensitivity and high-spatial resolution PET systems.

  11. Free energy decomposition of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Noskov, S Y; Lim, C

    2001-01-01

    A free energy decomposition scheme has been developed and tested on antibody-antigen and protease-inhibitor binding for which accurate experimental structures were available for both free and bound proteins. Using the x-ray coordinates of the free and bound proteins, the absolute binding free energy was computed assuming additivity of three well-defined, physical processes: desolvation of the x-ray structures, isomerization of the x-ray conformation to a nearby local minimum in the gas-phase, and subsequent noncovalent complex formation in the gas phase. This free energy scheme, together with the Generalized Born model for computing the electrostatic solvation free energy, yielded binding free energies in remarkable agreement with experimental data. Two assumptions commonly used in theoretical treatments; viz., the rigid-binding approximation (which assumes no conformational change upon complexation) and the neglect of vdW interactions, were found to yield large errors in the binding free energy. Protein-protein vdW and electrostatic interactions between complementary surfaces over a relatively large area (1400--1700 A(2)) were found to drive antibody-antigen and protease-inhibitor binding. PMID:11463622

  12. Integrating structure to protein-protein interaction networks that drive metastasis to brain and lung in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Guney, Emre; Keskin, Ozlem; Oliva, Baldo; Gursoy, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Blocking specific protein interactions can lead to human diseases. Accordingly, protein interactions and the structural knowledge on interacting surfaces of proteins (interfaces) have an important role in predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. We have built the phenotype specific sub-networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) involving the relevant genes responsible for lung and brain metastasis from primary tumor in breast cancer. First, we selected the PPIs most relevant to metastasis causing genes (seed genes), by using the "guilt-by-association" principle. Then, we modeled structures of the interactions whose complex forms are not available in Protein Databank (PDB). Finally, we mapped mutations to interface structures (real and modeled), in order to spot the interactions that might be manipulated by these mutations. Functional analyses performed on these sub-networks revealed the potential relationship between immune system-infectious diseases and lung metastasis progression, but this connection was not observed significantly in the brain metastasis. Besides, structural analyses showed that some PPI interfaces in both metastasis sub-networks are originating from microbial proteins, which in turn were mostly related with cell adhesion. Cell adhesion is a key mechanism in metastasis, therefore these PPIs may be involved in similar molecular pathways that are shared by infectious disease and metastasis. Finally, by mapping the mutations and amino acid variations on the interface regions of the proteins in the metastasis sub-networks we found evidence for some mutations to be involved in the mechanisms differentiating the type of the metastasis.

  13. Amino acid interaction preferences in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nath Jha, Anupam; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi; Banavar, Jayanth R

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the key factors that influence the interaction preferences of amino acids in the folding of proteins have remained a challenge. Here we present a knowledge-based approach for determining the effective interactions between amino acids based on amino acid type, their secondary structure, and the contact based environment that they find themselves in the native state structure as measured by their number of neighbors. We find that the optimal information is approximately encoded in a 60 × 60 matrix describing the 20 types of amino acids in three distinct secondary structures (helix, beta strand, and loop). We carry out a clustering scheme to understand the similarity between these interactions and to elucidate a nonredundant set. We demonstrate that the inferred energy parameters can be used for assessing the fit of a given sequence into a putative native state structure. PMID:20073083

  14. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  15. Turning the spotlight on protein-lipid interactions in cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Yuan, Xiaoqiu; Hang, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein function is largely dependent on coordinated and dynamic interactions of the protein with biomolecules including other proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. While powerful methods for global profiling of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are available, proteome-wide mapping of protein-lipid interactions is still challenging and rarely performed. The emergence of bifunctional lipid probes with photoactivatable and clickable groups offers new chemical tools for globally profiling protein-lipid interactions under cellular contexts. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of bifunctional lipid probes for studying protein-lipid interactions. We also highlight how in vivo photocrosslinking reactions contribute to the characterization of lipid-binding proteins and lipidation-mediated protein-protein interactions. PMID:25129056

  16. Protease substrate profiling using bacterial display of self-blocking affinity proteins and flow-cytometric sorting.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Jonsson, Andreas; Löfblom, John

    2017-01-01

    Proteases are involved in fundamental biological processes and are important tools in both biotechnological and biomedical research. An important property of proteases is to discriminate among potential substrates. Here, a new method for substrate profiling of proteases is presented. The substrates are displayed between two anti-idiotypic affinity domains on the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus carnosus. The first domain functions as a reporter tag and has affinity for a labeled reporter protein, whereas the second domain blocks the reporter tag from interacting with the reporter protein. Site-specific proteolysis of the substrate results in release of the blocking domain, enabling the reporter tag to bind the labeled reporter protein. Proteolysis is therefore reflected in reporter binding, which is quantified by flow cytometry. First, the method with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is evaluated and then the substrate preference of matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) is determined using two libraries of around three million substrates each. Identified substrate peptides contained the previously reported motif (PXXXHy ) and on-cell determination of apparent kcat /KM revealed that the enriched substrate peptides are hydrolyzed six to eight-fold more efficiently than a previously reported substrate peptide. The method thus works as intended and the authors believe it has potential as an efficient tool for substrate profiling.

  17. Tetramethylpyrazine blocks TFAM degradation and up-regulates mitochondrial DNA copy number by interacting with TFAM

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Linhua; Guo, Miaomiao; Ai, Yong; Chen, Fuhong; Zhang, Ya; Xia, Lei; Huang, Dawei; Niu, Lili; Zheng, Ying; Suzuki, Carolyn K.

    2017-01-01

    The natural small molecule compound: 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), is a major component of the Chinese medicine Chuanxiong, which has wide clinical applications in dilating blood vessels, inhibiting platelet aggregation and treating thrombosis. Recent work suggests that TMP is also an antitumour agent. Despite its chemotherapeutic potential, the mechanism(s) underlying TMP action are unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that TMP binds to mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and blocks its degradation by the mitochondrial Lon protease. TFAM is a key regulator of mtDNA replication, transcription and transmission. Our previous work showed that when TFAM is not bound to DNA, it is rapidly degraded by the ATP-dependent Lon protease, which is essential for mitochondrial proteostasis. In cultured cells, TMP specifically blocks Lon-mediated degradation of TFAM, leading to TFAM accumulation and subsequent up-regulation of mtDNA content in cells with substantially low levels of mtDNA. In vitro protease assays show that TMP does not directly inhibit mitochondrial Lon, rather interacts with TFAM and blocks degradation. Pull-down assays show that biotinylated TMP interacts with TFAM. These findings suggest a novel mechanism whereby TMP stabilizes TFAM and confers resistance to Lon-mediated degradation, thereby promoting mtDNA up-regulation in cells with low mtDNA content. PMID:28465355

  18. Structure-based ligand design for flexible proteins: Application of new F-DycoBlock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Fan, Hao; Liu, Haiyan; Shi, Yunyu

    2001-11-01

    A method of structure-based ligand design - DycoBlock - has been proposed and tested by Liu et al.[1]. It was further improved by Zhu et al. and applied to design new selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase 2 [2]. In the current work, we present a new methodology - F-DycoBlock that allows for the incorporation of receptor flexibility. During the designing procedure, both the receptor and molecular building blocks are subjected to the multiple-copy stochastic molecular dynamics (MCSMD) simulation [1], while the protein moves in the mean field of all copies. It is tested for two enzymes studied previously - cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) protease. To identify the applicability of F-DycoBlock, the binding protein structure was used as starting point to explore the conformational space around the bound state. This method can be easily extended to accommodate the flexibility in different degree. Four types of treatment of the receptor flexibility - all-atom restrained, backbone restrained, intramolecular hydrogen-bond restrained and active-site flexible - were tested with or without the grid approximation. Two inhibitors, SC-558 for COX-2 and L700417 for HIV-1 protease, are used in this testing study for comparison with previous results. The accuracy of recovery, binding energy, solvent accessible surface area (SASA) and positional root-mean-square (RMS) deviation are used as criteria. The results indicate that F-DycoBlock is a robust methodology for flexible drug design. It is particularly notable that the protein flexibility has been perfectly associated with each stage of drug design - search for the binding sites, dynamic assembly and optimization of candidate compounds. When all protein atoms were restrained, F-DycoBlock yielded higher accuracy of recovery than DycoBlock (100%). If backbone atoms were restrained, the same ratio of accuracy was achieved. Moreover, with the intramolecular hydrogen bonds restrained, reasonable

  19. Comprehensive peptidomimetic libraries targeting protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Landon R; Boger, Dale L

    2012-10-16

    Transient protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential components in cellular signaling pathways as well as in important processes such as viral infection, replication, and immune suppression. The unknown or uncharacterized PPIs involved in such interaction networks often represent compelling therapeutic targets for drug discovery. To date, however, the main strategies for discovery of small molecule modulators of PPIs are typically limited to structurally characterized targets. Recent developments in molecular scaffolds that mimic the side chain display of peptide secondary structures have yielded effective designs, but few screening libraries of such mimetics are available to interrogate PPI targets. We initiated a program to prepare a comprehensive small molecule library designed to mimic the three major recognition motifs that mediate PPIs (α-helix, β-turn, and β-strand). Three libraries would be built around templates designed to mimic each such secondary structure and substituted with all triplet combinations of groups representing the 20 natural amino acid side chains. When combined, the three libraries would contain a member capable of mimicking the key interaction and recognition residues of most targetable PPIs. In this Account, we summarize the results of the design, synthesis, and validation of an 8000 member α-helix mimetic library and a 4200 member β-turn mimetic library. We expect that the screening of these libraries will not only provide lead structures against α-helix- or β-turn-mediated protein-protein or peptide-receptor interactions, even if the nature of the interaction is unknown, but also yield key insights into the recognition motif (α-helix or β-turn) and identify the key residues mediating the interaction. Consistent with this expectation, the screening of the libraries against p53/MDM2 and HIV-1 gp41 (α-helix mimetic library) or the opioid receptors (β-turn mimetic library) led to the discovery of library members expected

  20. Synoptic/planetary-scale interactions and blocking over the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip J.

    1992-01-01

    The work completed under this grant represents a continuing investigation of synoptic/planetary-scale interactions over the North Atlantic Ocean in late Jan. 1979. The focus of attention was a blocking episode that developed over southern Greenland on 21 Jan. However, the diagnosis also extended to antecedent cyclone activity and the role of moist processes during wave development. In all, the project was partitioned into two phases: (1) an extension of diagnoses that were already in progress of the 21 Jan. blocking episode and its antecedent cyclone activity using satellite-enhanced level 3-b NASA/Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) analyses; and (2) an analysis of the extent to which the results of Phase 1 are sensitive to the presence of satellite information.

  1. Synoptic/planetary-scale interactions and blocking over the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip J.; Uhl, Mary A.; Lupo, Anthony R.; Lamberty, Gregory L.; Hunter, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    One segment of work in the past year focused on the diagnosis of a major blocking anticyclone and its interacting synoptic scale circulations that occurred during January 1979 over the North Atlantic Ocean. Another segment focused on the diagnosis of a second explosive cyclone development that occurred over the southeastern United States during the time of block formation. The diagnoses were accomplished using the diagnostic relationship known as the Zwack-Okossi (Z-O) development equation. Results indicate that in both cyclone cases the development occurred as a result of the favorable influence of positive vorticity advection, warm air advection, and latent heat release and ceased when one or more of these influences diminished. The advantages of the Z-O equation are described.

  2. Physical and chemical interactions in cold gelation of food proteins.

    PubMed

    Alting, Arno C; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Visschers, Ronald W; Simons, Jan-Willem F A

    2002-07-31

    pH-Induced cold gelation of whey proteins is a two-step process. After protein aggregates have been prepared by heat treatment, gelation is established at ambient temperature by gradually lowering the pH. To demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions between aggregates during this latter process, beta-lactoglobulin aggregates with a decreased iso-electric point were prepared via succinylation of primary amino groups. The kinetics of pH-induced gelation was affected significantly, with the pH gelation curves shifting to lower pH after succinylation. With increasing modification, the pH of gelation decreased to about 2.5. In contrast, unmodified aggregates gel around pH 5. Increasing the iso-electric point of beta-lactoglobulin via methylation of carboxylic acid groups resulted in gelation at more alkaline pH values. Comparable results were obtained with whey protein isolate. At low pH disulfide cross-links between modified aggregates were not formed after gelation and the gels displayed both syneresis and spontaneous gel fracture, in this way resembling the morphology of previously characterized thiol-blocked whey protein isolate gels (Alting, et al., J. Agric. Food Chem. 2000, 48, 5001-5007). Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of the net electric charge of the aggregates during pH-induced gelation. In addition, the absence of disulfide bond formation between aggregates during low-pH gelation was demonstrated with the modified aggregates.

  3. Identification of essential proteins based on ranking edge-weights in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Huiyan; Du, Wei; Blanzieri, Enrico; Viero, Gabriella; Xu, Ying; Liang, Yanchun

    2014-01-01

    Essential proteins are those that are indispensable to cellular survival and development. Existing methods for essential protein identification generally rely on knock-out experiments and/or the relative density of their interactions (edges) with other proteins in a Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) network. Here, we present a computational method, called EW, to first rank protein-protein interactions in terms of their Edge Weights, and then identify sub-PPI-networks consisting of only the highly-ranked edges and predict their proteins as essential proteins. We have applied this method to publicly-available PPI data on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yeast) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) for essential protein identification, and demonstrated that EW achieves better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of the precision-recall and Jackknife measures. The highly-ranked protein-protein interactions by our prediction tend to be biologically significant in both the Yeast and E. coli PPI networks. Further analyses on systematically perturbed Yeast and E. coli PPI networks through randomly deleting edges demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and the top-ranked edges tend to be more associated with known essential proteins than the lowly-ranked edges.

  4. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthias C.; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R.; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally ‘program’ the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  5. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias C; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally 'program' the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  6. Module organization and variance in protein-protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lee, Tsai-Ling; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shu; Lin, Chih-Ta; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-03-01

    A module is a group of closely related proteins that act in concert to perform specific biological functions through protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that occur in time and space. However, the underlying module organization and variance remain unclear. In this study, we collected module templates to infer respective module families, including 58,041 homologous modules in 1,678 species, and PPI families using searches of complete genomic database. We then derived PPI evolution scores and interface evolution scores to describe the module elements, including core and ring components. Functions of core components were highly correlated with those of essential genes. In comparison with ring components, core proteins/PPIs were conserved across multiple species. Subsequently, protein/module variance of PPI networks confirmed that core components form dynamic network hubs and play key roles in various biological functions. Based on the analyses of gene essentiality, module variance, and gene co-expression, we summarize the observations of module organization and variance as follows: 1) a module consists of core and ring components; 2) core components perform major biological functions and collaborate with ring components to execute certain functions in some cases; 3) core components are more conserved and essential during organizational changes in different biological states or conditions.

  7. Interactions of amino terminal domains of Shaker K channels with a pore blocking site studied with synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Synthetic peptides of the five alternative NH2-terminal sequences of Shaker when applied to the cytoplasmic side of ShB channels that have an NH2-terminal deletion (ShB delta 6-46) block the channel with potencies correlated with the rate of inactivation in the corresponding variant. These peptides share no sequence similarity and yet three out of the five have apparent dissociation constants between 2 and 15 microM, suggesting that the specificity requirements for binding are low. To identify the primary structural determinants required for effective block of ShB delta 6-46, we examined the effects of substitutions made to the 20 residue ShB peptide on association and dissociation rates. Nonpolar residues within the peptide appear to be important in stabilizing the binding through hydrophobic interactions. Substitutions to leucine-7 showed there was a clear correlation between hydrophobicity and the dissociation rate constant (koff) with little effect on the association rate constant (kon). Substituting charged residues for hydrophobic residues within the region 4-8 disrupted binding. Within the COOH-terminal half of the peptide, substitutions that increased the net positive charge increased kon with relatively small changes in koff, suggesting the involvement of long-range electrostatic interactions in increasing the effective concentration of the peptide. Neutralizing charged residues produced small changes in koff. Charges within the region 12-20 act equivalently; alterations which conserved net charge produced little effect on either kon or koff. The results are consistent with this region of the peptide having an extended conformation and suggest that when bound this region makes few contacts with the channel protein and remains relatively unconstrained. Analogous mutations within the NH2-terminal domain of the intact ShB channel produced qualitatively similar effects on blocking and unblocking rates. PMID:8133245

  8. Block-adaptive quantum mechanics: an adaptive divide-and-conquer approach to interactive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Maël; Grudinin, Sergei; Redon, Stephane

    2013-03-05

    We present a novel Block-Adaptive Quantum Mechanics (BAQM) approach to interactive quantum chemistry. Although quantum chemistry models are known to be computationally demanding, we achieve interactive rates by focusing computational resources on the most active parts of the system. BAQM is based on a divide-and-conquer technique and constrains some nucleus positions and some electronic degrees of freedom on the fly to simplify the simulation. As a result, each time step may be performed significantly faster, which in turn may accelerate attraction to the neighboring local minima. By applying our approach to the nonself-consistent Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization Molecular Orbital theory, we demonstrate interactive rates and efficient virtual prototyping for systems containing more than a thousand of atoms on a standard desktop computer.

  9. Retinoblastoma protein disrupts interactions required for RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, J E; Brown, T R; Allison, S J; Scott, P H; White, R J

    2000-12-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been shown to suppress RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription in vivo (R. J. White, D. Trouche, K. Martin, S. P. Jackson, and T. Kouzarides, Nature 382:88-90, 1996). This regulation involves interaction with TFIIIB, a multisubunit factor that is required for the expression of all Pol III templates (C. G. C. Larminie, C. A. Cairns, R. Mital, K. Martin, T. Kouzarides, S. P. Jackson, and R. J. White, EMBO J. 16:2061-2071, 1997; W.-M. Chu, Z. Wang, R. G. Roeder, and C. W. Schmid, J. Biol. Chem. 272:14755-14761, 1997). However, it has not been established why RB binding to TFIIIB results in transcriptional repression. For several Pol II-transcribed genes, RB has been shown to inhibit expression by recruiting histone deacetylases, which are thought to decrease promoter accessibility. We present evidence that histone deacetylases exert a negative effect on Pol III activity in vivo. However, RB remains able to regulate Pol III transcription in the presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Instead, RB represses by disrupting interactions between TFIIIB and other components of the basal Pol III transcription apparatus. Recruitment of TFIIIB to most class III genes requires its binding to TFIIIC2, but this can be blocked by RB. In addition, RB disrupts the interaction between TFIIIB and Pol III that is essential for transcription. The ability of RB to inhibit these key interactions can explain its action as a potent repressor of class III gene expression.

  10. Protein Complex Identification by Integrating Protein-Protein Interaction Evidence from Multiple Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Lin, Hongfei; Chen, Yang; Yang, Zhihao; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding protein complexes is important for understanding the science of cellular organization and function. Many computational methods have been developed to identify protein complexes from experimentally obtained protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. However, interaction information obtained experimentally can be unreliable and incomplete. Reconstructing these PPI networks with PPI evidences from other sources can improve protein complex identification. Results We combined PPI information from 6 different sources and obtained a reconstructed PPI network for yeast through machine learning. Some popular protein complex identification methods were then applied to detect yeast protein complexes using the new PPI networks. Our evaluation indicates that protein complex identification algorithms using the reconstructed PPI network significantly outperform ones on experimentally verified PPI networks. Conclusions We conclude that incorporating PPI information from other sources can improve the effectiveness of protein complex identification. PMID:24386289

  11. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Morishita, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-12-01

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios-Ce-doped Gd3Al2.6Ga2.4O12 (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These results indicate that phoswich DOI detectors with the two

  12. Prediction of protein-protein interactions by label propagation with protein evolutionary and chemical information derived from heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu-Ting; Lei, Hai-Jun; You, Zhu-Hong; Lei, Bai-Ying; Chen, Xing; Li, Li-Ping

    2017-10-07

    Prediction of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is of great significance. To achieve this, we propose a novel computational method for PPIs prediction based on a similarity network fusion (SNF) model for integrating the physical and chemical properties of proteins. Specifically, the physical and chemical properties of protein are the protein amino acid mutation rate and its hydrophobicity, respectively. The amino acid mutation rate is extracted using a BLOSUM62 matrix, which puts the protein sequence into block substitution matrix. The SNF model is exploited to fuse protein physical and chemical features of multiple data by iteratively updating each original network. Finally, the complementary features from the fused network are fed into a label propagation algorithm (LPA) for PPIs prediction. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves promising performance and outperforms the traditional methods for the public dataset of H. pylori, Human, and Yeast. In addition, our proposed method achieves average accuracy of 76.65%, 81.98%, 84.56%, 84.01% and 84.38% on E. coli, C. elegans, H. sapien, H. pylori and M. musculus datasets, respectively. Comparison results demonstrate that the proposed method is very promising and provides a cost-effective alternative for predicting PPIs. The source code and all datasets are available at http://pan.baidu.com/s/1dF7rp7N. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Parallel Force Assay for Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Pippig, Diana A.; Klamecka, Kamila; Limmer, Katja; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteome research is greatly promoted by high-resolution parallel format assays. A characterization of protein complexes based on binding forces offers an unparalleled dynamic range and allows for the effective discrimination of non-specific interactions. Here we present a DNA-based Molecular Force Assay to quantify protein-protein interactions, namely the bond between different variants of GFP and GFP-binding nanobodies. We present different strategies to adjust the maximum sensitivity window of the assay by influencing the binding strength of the DNA reference duplexes. The binding of the nanobody Enhancer to the different GFP constructs is compared at high sensitivity of the assay. Whereas the binding strength to wild type and enhanced GFP are equal within experimental error, stronger binding to superfolder GFP is observed. This difference in binding strength is attributed to alterations in the amino acids that form contacts according to the crystal structure of the initial wild type GFP-Enhancer complex. Moreover, we outline the potential for large-scale parallelization of the assay. PMID:25546146

  14. Deciphering Supramolecular Structures with Protein-Protein Interaction Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Takao; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many biological molecules are assembled into supramolecules that are essential to perform complicated functions in the cell. However, experimental information about the structures of supramolecules is not sufficient at this point. We developed a method of predicting and modeling the structures of supramolecules in a biological network by combining structural data of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and interaction data in IntAct databases. Templates for binary complexes in IntAct were extracted from PDB. Modeling was attempted by assembling binary complexes with superposed shared subunits. A total of 3,197 models were constructed, and 1,306 (41% of the total) contained at least one subunit absent from experimental structures. The models also suggested 970 (25% of the total) experimentally undetected subunit interfaces, and 41 human disease-related amino acid variants were mapped onto these model-suggested interfaces. The models demonstrated that protein-protein interaction network modeling is useful to fill the information gap between biological networks and structures. PMID:26549015

  15. Targeting protein-protein interactions as an anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrei A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian

    2013-07-01

    The emergence and convergence of cancer genomics, targeted therapies, and network oncology have significantly expanded the landscape of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks in cancer for therapeutic discovery. Extensive biological and clinical investigations have led to the identification of protein interaction hubs and nodes that are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of characteristics of cancer essential for cell transformation. Such cancer-enabling PPIs have become promising therapeutic targets. With technological advances in PPI modulator discovery and validation of PPI-targeting agents in clinical settings, targeting of PPI interfaces as an anticancer strategy has become a reality. Future research directed at genomics-based PPI target discovery, PPI interface characterization, PPI-focused chemical library design, and patient-genomic subpopulation-driven clinical studies is expected to accelerate the development of the next generation of PPI-based anticancer agents for personalized precision medicine. Here we briefly review prominent PPIs that mediate cancer-acquired properties, highlight recognized challenges and promising clinical results in targeting PPIs, and outline emerging opportunities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  17. Quantifying the Molecular Origins of Opposite Solvent Effects on Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vagenende, Vincent; Han, Alvin X.; Pek, Han B.; Loo, Bernard L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the nature of solvent-protein interactions is generally weak and non-specific, addition of cosolvents such as denaturants and osmolytes strengthens protein-protein interactions for some proteins, whereas it weakens protein-protein interactions for others. This is exemplified by the puzzling observation that addition of glycerol oppositely affects the association constants of two antibodies, D1.3 and D44.1, with lysozyme. To resolve this conundrum, we develop a methodology based on the thermodynamic principles of preferential interaction theory and the quantitative characterization of local protein solvation from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that changes of preferential solvent interactions at the protein-protein interface quantitatively account for the opposite effects of glycerol on the antibody-antigen association constants. Detailed characterization of local protein solvation in the free and associated protein states reveals how opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions depend on the extent of dewetting of the protein-protein contact region and on structural changes that alter cooperative solvent-protein interactions at the periphery of the protein-protein interface. These results demonstrate the direct relationship between macroscopic solvent effects on protein-protein interactions and atom-scale solvent-protein interactions, and establish a general methodology for predicting and understanding solvent effects on protein-protein interactions in diverse biological environments. PMID:23696727

  18. Detection of protein complex from protein-protein interaction network using Markov clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochieng, P. J.; Kusuma, W. A.; Haryanto, T.

    2017-05-01

    Detection of complexes, or groups of functionally related proteins, is an important challenge while analysing biological networks. However, existing algorithms to identify protein complexes are insufficient when applied to dense networks of experimentally derived interaction data. Therefore, we introduced a graph clustering method based on Markov clustering algorithm to identify protein complex within highly interconnected protein-protein interaction networks. Protein-protein interaction network was first constructed to develop geometrical network, the network was then partitioned using Markov clustering to detect protein complexes. The interest of the proposed method was illustrated by its application to Human Proteins associated to type II diabetes mellitus. Flow simulation of MCL algorithm was initially performed and topological properties of the resultant network were analysed for detection of the protein complex. The results indicated the proposed method successfully detect an overall of 34 complexes with 11 complexes consisting of overlapping modules and 20 non-overlapping modules. The major complex consisted of 102 proteins and 521 interactions with cluster modularity and density of 0.745 and 0.101 respectively. The comparison analysis revealed MCL out perform AP, MCODE and SCPS algorithms with high clustering coefficient (0.751) network density and modularity index (0.630). This demonstrated MCL was the most reliable and efficient graph clustering algorithm for detection of protein complexes from PPI networks.

  19. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  20. Inhibition of the function of class IIa HDACs by blocking their interaction with MEF2

    PubMed Central

    Jayathilaka, Nimanthi; Gaffney, Kevin J.; Dey, Raja; Jarusiewicz, Jamie A.; Noridomi, Kaori; Philips, Michael A.; Lei, Xiao; He, Ju; Ye, Jun; Gao, Tao; Petasis, Nicos A.; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes that modify the epigenetic status of cells provide attractive targets for therapy in various diseases. The therapeutic development of epigenetic modulators, however, has been largely limited to direct targeting of catalytic active site conserved across multiple members of an enzyme family, which complicates mechanistic studies and drug development. Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a group of epigenetic enzymes that depends on interaction with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 (MEF2) for their recruitment to specific genomic loci. Targeting this interaction presents an alternative approach to inhibiting this class of HDACs. We have used structural and functional approaches to identify and characterize a group of small molecules that indirectly target class IIa HDACs by blocking their interaction with MEF2 on DNA.Weused X-ray crystallography and 19F NMRto show that these compounds directly bind to MEF2. We have also shown that the small molecules blocked the recruitment of class IIa HDACs to MEF2-targeted genes to enhance the expression of those targets. These compounds can be used as tools to study MEF2 and class IIa HDACs in vivo and as leads for drug development. PMID:22396528

  1. Orientational interactions in block copolymer melts: self-consistent field theory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Russell, Thomas P; Grason, Gregory M

    2012-09-14

    We study the phase behavior of diblock copolymer melts with one block possessing orientation-dependent segmental interactions using self-consistent field theory. A generalized coarse-grained description is introduced based on the local (polar) orientational order parameter and K, an effective Frank elastic constant for orientational gradients. To explore the role played by orientational interactions in assembly thermodynamics, we apply the theory to two-dimensional melt morphologies for a range of K. As microphase segregation necessarily introduces splay deformations of the segment orientation, we find that increasing the stiffness K raises the critical χN at the onset of microphase separation. Furthermore, we find that strong orientational interactions in one block give rise to highly asymmetric phase diagrams due to the large penalty for high-splay morphologies, such as the cylindrical phase. Finally, we analyze the costs of inter-segmental splay as well as the size dependence of domain spacing on K based on a strong-segregation picture of morphologies.

  2. Improving the prediction of yeast protein function using weighted protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics can be used to predict protein function, leading to an understanding of cellular activities, and equally-weighted protein-protein interactions (PPI) are normally used to predict such protein functions. The present study provides a weighting strategy for PPI to improve the prediction of protein functions. The weights are dependent on the local and global network topologies and the number of experimental verification methods. The proposed methods were applied to the yeast proteome and integrated with the neighbour counting method to predict the functions of unknown proteins. Results A new technique to weight interactions in the yeast proteome is presented. The weights are related to the network topology (local and global) and the number of identified methods, and the results revealed improvement in the sensitivity and specificity of prediction in terms of cellular role and cellular locations. This method (new weights) was compared with a method that utilises interactions with the same weight and it was shown to be superior. Conclusions A new method for weighting the interactions in protein-protein interaction networks is presented. Experimental results concerning yeast proteins demonstrated that weighting interactions integrated with the neighbor counting method improved the sensitivity and specificity of prediction in terms of two functional categories: cellular role and cell locations. PMID:21524280

  3. Controlling Directed Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanhaiya, Krishna; Czeizler, Eugen; Gratie, Cristian; Petre, Ion

    2017-09-04

    Control theory is a well-established approach in network science, with applications in bio-medicine and cancer research. We build on recent results for structural controllability of directed networks, which identifies a set of driver nodes able to control an a-priori defined part of the network. We develop a novel and efficient approach for the (targeted) structural controllability of cancer networks and demonstrate it for the analysis of breast, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer. We build in each case a protein-protein interaction network and focus on the survivability-essential proteins specific to each cancer type. We show that these essential proteins are efficiently controllable from a relatively small computable set of driver nodes. Moreover, we adjust the method to find the driver nodes among FDA-approved drug-target nodes. We find that, while many of the drugs acting on the driver nodes are part of known cancer therapies, some of them are not used for the cancer types analyzed here; some drug-target driver nodes identified by our algorithms are not known to be used in any cancer therapy. Overall we show that a better understanding of the control dynamics of cancer through computational modelling can pave the way for new efficient therapeutic approaches and personalized medicine.

  4. From Topology to Phenotype in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pržulj, Nataša

    We have recently witnessed an explosion in biological network data along with the development of computational approaches for their analyses. This new interdisciplinary research area is an integral part of systems biology, promising to provide new insights into organizational principles of life, as well as into evolution and disease. However, there is a danger that the area might become hindered by several emerging issues. In particular, there is typically a weak link between biological and computational scientists, resulting in the use of simple computational techniques of limited potential to explain these complex biological data. Hence, there is a danger that the community might view the topological features of network data as mere statistics, ignoring the value of the information contained in these data. This might result in the imposition of scientific doctrines, such as scale-free-centric (on the modelling side) and genome-centric (on the biological side) opinions onto this nascent research area. In this chapter, we take a network science perspective and present a brief, high-level overview of the area, commenting on possible challenges ahead. We focus on protein-protein interaction networks (PINs) in which nodes correspond to proteins in a cell and edges to physical bindings between the proteins.

  5. Interaction of Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT (PIAS) Proteins with the TATA-binding Protein, TBP*

    PubMed Central

    Prigge, Justin R.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Transcription activators often recruit promoter-targeted assembly of a pre-initiation complex; many repressors antagonize recruitment. These activities can involve direct interactions with proteins in the pre-initiation complex. We used an optimized yeast two-hybrid system to screen mouse pregnancy-associated libraries for proteins that interact with TATA-binding protein (TBP). Screens revealed an interaction between TBP and a single member of the zinc finger family of transcription factors, ZFP523. Two members of the protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) family, PIAS1 and PIAS3, also interacted with TBP in screens. Endogenous PIAS1 and TBP co-immunoprecipitated from nuclear extracts, suggesting the interaction occurred in vivo. In vitro-translated PIAS1 and TBP coimmunopreciptated, which indicated that other nuclear proteins were not required for the interaction. Deletion analysis mapped the PIAS-interacting domain of TBP to the conserved TBPCORE and the TBP-interacting domain on PIAS1 to a 39-amino acid C-terminal region. Mammals issue seven known PIAS proteins from four pias genes, pias1, pias3, piasx, and piasy, each with different cell type-specific expression patterns; the TBP-interacting domain reported here is the only part of the PIAS C-terminal region shared by all seven PIAS proteins. Direct analyses indicated that PIASx and PIASy also interacted with TBP. Our results suggest that all PIAS proteins might mediate situation-specific regulatory signaling at the TBP interface and that previously unknown levels of complexity could exist in the gene regulatory interplay between TBP, PIAS proteins, ZFP523, and other transcription factors. PMID:16522640

  6. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  7. Identification of an inhibitory budding signal that blocks the release of HIV particles and exosome/microvesicle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

     Animal cells bud exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) from endosome and plasma membranes. The combination of higher-order oligomerization and plasma membrane binding is a positive budding signal that targets diverse proteins into EMVs and retrovirus particles. Here we describe an inhibitory budding signal (IBS) from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein. This IBS was identified in the spacer peptide 2 (SP2) domain of Gag, is activated by C-terminal exposure of SP2, and mediates the severe budding defect of p6-deficient and PTAP-deficient strains of HIV. This IBS also impairs the budding of CD63 and several other viral and nonviral EMV proteins. The IBS does not prevent cargo delivery to the plasma membrane, a major site of EMV and virus budding. However, the IBS does inhibit an interaction between EMV cargo proteins and VPS4B, a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inhibitory signals can block protein and virus budding, raise the possibility that the ESCRT machinery plays a role in EMV biogenesis, and shed new light on the role of the p6 domain and PTAP motif in the biogenesis of HIV particles. PMID:21248205

  8. Identification of an inhibitory budding signal that blocks the release of HIV particles and exosome/microvesicle proteins.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J

    2011-03-15

    Animal cells bud exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) from endosome and plasma membranes. The combination of higher-order oligomerization and plasma membrane binding is a positive budding signal that targets diverse proteins into EMVs and retrovirus particles. Here we describe an inhibitory budding signal (IBS) from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein. This IBS was identified in the spacer peptide 2 (SP2) domain of Gag, is activated by C-terminal exposure of SP2, and mediates the severe budding defect of p6-deficient and PTAP-deficient strains of HIV. This IBS also impairs the budding of CD63 and several other viral and nonviral EMV proteins. The IBS does not prevent cargo delivery to the plasma membrane, a major site of EMV and virus budding. However, the IBS does inhibit an interaction between EMV cargo proteins and VPS4B, a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inhibitory signals can block protein and virus budding, raise the possibility that the ESCRT machinery plays a role in EMV biogenesis, and shed new light on the role of the p6 domain and PTAP motif in the biogenesis of HIV particles.

  9. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  10. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  11. Comparative analysis of five protein-protein interaction corpora.

    PubMed

    Pyysalo, Sampo; Airola, Antti; Heimonen, Juho; Björne, Jari; Ginter, Filip; Salakoski, Tapio

    2008-04-11

    Growing interest in the application of natural language processing methods to biomedical text has led to an increasing number of corpora and methods targeting protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction. However, there is no general consensus regarding PPI annotation and consequently resources are largely incompatible and methods are difficult to evaluate. We present the first comparative evaluation of the diverse PPI corpora, performing quantitative evaluation using two separate information extraction methods as well as detailed statistical and qualitative analyses of their properties. For the evaluation, we unify the corpus PPI annotations to a shared level of information, consisting of undirected, untyped binary interactions of non-static types with no identification of the words specifying the interaction, no negations, and no interaction certainty. We find that the F-score performance of a state-of-the-art PPI extraction method varies on average 19 percentage units and in some cases over 30 percentage units between the different evaluated corpora. The differences stemming from the choice of corpus can thus be substantially larger than differences between the performance of PPI extraction methods, which suggests definite limits on the ability to compare methods evaluated on different resources. We analyse a number of potential sources for these differences and identify factors explaining approximately half of the variance. We further suggest ways in which the difficulty of the PPI extraction tasks codified by different corpora can be determined to advance comparability. Our analysis also identifies points of agreement and disagreement in PPI corpus annotation that are rarely explicitly stated by the authors of the corpora. Our comparative analysis uncovers key similarities and differences between the diverse PPI corpora, thus taking an important step towards standardization. In the course of this study we have created a major practical contribution in

  12. Roles of European blocking and tropical-extratropical interaction in the 2010 Pakistan flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chi-Cherng; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Lin, Nai-Hsin; Chiu, Hsun

    2011-07-01

    A sequence of monsoon surges struck Pakistan and Northwestern India during late July-early August 2010. The unusually heavy monsoon rainfall resulted in record-breaking floods, which affected 20 million people with a death toll of near 3000. Simultaneously, a long-lived blocking high appeared over Europe and Russia in middle June and persisted for nearly two months. Extreme flooding occurred when the southward penetration of extratropical potential vorticity in the deep trough east of the European blocking and the tropical monsoon surges arrived concurrently in Pakistan. This study demonstrates that the interaction between the tropical monsoon surges and the extratropical disturbances downstream of the European blocking was the key factor leading to the severe flooding in Pakistan. The 2010 La Niña condition contributed indirectly to the flooding by inducing a low-level easterly anomaly in South and Southeast Asia, which weakened eastward moisture transport and helped enhance moisture transport (convergence) to (in) the Northern Arabian Sea and Pakistan.

  13. Reduced hydrophobic interaction of polystyrene surfaces by spontaneous segregation of block copolymers with oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate blocks: force measurements in water using atomic force microscope with hydrophobic probes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Seki, Akiko; Ishizone, Takashi; Yokoyama, Hideaki

    2008-05-20

    Reduction of hydrophobic interaction in water is important in biological interfaces. In our previous work, we have found that poly(styrene- b-triethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PS-PME3MA) segregates the PME3MA block to the surface in hydrophobic environment, such as in air or in a vacuum, and shows remarkable resistance against adsorption or adhesion of proteins, platelets, and cells in water. In this paper, we report that atomic force microscopy (AFM) with hydrophobic probes can directly monitor the reduced hydrophobic interaction of the PS surfaces modified by poly(styrene- b-origoethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PS-PME NMA), where N is the number of ethylene glycol units. The pull-off forces between the hydrophobic probes that are coated with octyltrichlorosilane (OLTS) and the PS-PME NMA modified polystyrene (PS) surfaces in water were measured. The absolute spring constants and tip-curvatures of the AFM cantilevers were measured to compute the work of adhesion by the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts (JKR) theory, which relates the pull-off force at which the separation occurs between a hemisphere and a plane to the work of adhesion. The hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic tip and polymer surfaces in water were greatly reduced with the segregated PME NMA blocks. The hydrophobic interactions decrease with increasing N of the series of PS-PME NMA and show a correlation with the amount of protein adsorbed.

  14. Rapamycin administration in humans blocks the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Micah J; Fry, Christopher S; Glynn, Erin L; Dreyer, Hans C; Dhanani, Shaheen; Timmerman, Kyle L; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2009-01-01

    Muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signalling are concurrently stimulated following muscle contraction in humans. In an effort to determine whether mTORC1 signalling is essential for regulating muscle protein synthesis in humans, we treated subjects with a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to performing a series of high-intensity muscle contractions. Here we show that rapamycin treatment blocks the early (1–2 h) acute contraction-induced increase (∼40%) in human muscle protein synthesis. In addition, several downstream components of the mTORC1 signalling pathway were also blunted or blocked by rapamycin. For instance, S6K1 phosphorylation (Thr421/Ser424) was increased post-exercise 6-fold in the control group while being unchanged with rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, eEF2 phosphorylation (Thr56) was reduced by ∼25% post-exercise in the control group but phosphorylation following rapamycin treatment was unaltered, indicating that translation elongation was inhibited. Rapamycin administration prior to exercise also reduced the ability of raptor to associate with mTORC1 during post-exercise recovery. Surprisingly, rapamycin treatment prior to resistance exercise completely blocked the contraction-induced increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) and blunted the increase in MNK1 (Thr197/202) phosphorylation. However, the phosphorylation of a known target of MNK1, eIF4E (Ser208), was similar in both groups (P > 0.05) which is consistent with the notion that rapamycin does not directly inhibit MAPK signalling. We conclude that mTORC1 signalling is, in part, playing a key role in regulating the contraction-induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in humans, while dual activation of mTORC1 and ERK1/2 stimulation may be required for full stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis. PMID:19188252

  15. Synthesis and studies of polypeptide materials: Self-assembled block copolypeptide amphiphiles, DNA-condensing block copolypeptides and membrane-interactive random copolypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrsta, Michael Dmytro

    A new class of transition metal initiators for the controlled polymerization of alpha-aminoacid-N-carboxyanhydrides (alpha-NCAs), has been developed by Deming et al. This discovery has allowed for the synthesis of well-defined "protein-like" polymers. Using this chemistry we have made distinct block/random copolypeptides for biomedical applications. Drug delivery, gene delivery, and antimicrobial polymers were the focus of our research efforts. The motivation for the synthesis and study of synthetic polypeptide based materials comes from proteins. Natural proteins are able to adopt a staggeringly large amount of uniquely well-defined folded structures. These structures account for the diversity in properties of proteins. As catalysts (enzymes) natural proteins perform some of the most difficult chemistry with ease and precision at ambient pressures and temperatures. They also exhibit incredible structural properties that directly result from formation of complex hierarchical assemblies. Self-assembling block copolymers were synthesized with various compositions and architectures. In general, di- and tri-block amphiphiles were studied for their self-assembling properties. Both spherical and tubular vesicles were found to assemble from di- and tri-block amphiphiles, respectively. In addition to self-assembly, pH responsiveness was engineered into these amphiphiles by the incorporation of basic residues (lysine) into the hydrophobic block. Another form of self-assembly studied was the condensation of DNA using cationic block copolymers. It was found that cationic block copolymers could condense DNA into compact, ordered, water-soluble aggregates on the nanoscale. These aggregates sufficiently protected DNA from nucleases and yet were susceptible to proteases. These studies form the basis of a gene delivery platform. The ease with which NCAs are polymerized renders them completely amenable to parallel synthetic methods. We have employed this technique to discover new

  16. Mapping of the interaction domains of the Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Jesica M. Levingston; Marmor, Hannah; Frias-Staheli, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the genus Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, that can cause severe haemorrhagic fever in humans, with mortality rates above 30 %. CCHFV is the most widespread of the tick-borne human viruses and it is endemic in areas of central Asia, the Middle East, Africa and southern Europe. Its viral genome consists of three negative-sense RNA segments. The large segment (L) encodes a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L protein), the small segment (S) encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) and the medium segment (M) encodes the envelope proteins. The N protein of bunyaviruses binds genomic RNA, forming the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. The L protein interacts with these RNP structures, allowing the initiation of viral replication. The N protein also interacts with actin, although the regions and specific residues involved in these interactions have not yet been described. Here, by means of immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays, we identified the regions within the CCHFV N protein implicated in homo-oligomerization and actin binding. We describe the interaction of the N protein with the CCHFV L protein, and identify the N- and C-terminal regions within the L protein that might be necessary for the formation of these N–L protein complexes. These results may guide the development of potent inhibitors of these complexes that could potentially block CCHFV replication. PMID:25389186

  17. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion based assays for studying protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Vikis, Haris G; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins have become an effective reagent to use in the study of protein-protein interactions. GST-fusion proteins can be produced in bacterial and mammalian cells in large quantities and purified rapidly. GST can be coupled to a glutathione matrix, which permits its use as an effective affinity column to study interactions in vitro or to purify protein complexes in cells expressing the GST-fusion protein. Here, we provide a technical description of the utilization of GST-fusion proteins as both a tool to study protein-protein interactions and also as a means to purify interacting proteins.

  18. Protein-protein interactions of tandem affinity purification-tagged protein kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald; Dardick, Chris; Canlas, Patrick; Xu, Xia; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E

    2006-04-01

    Forty-one rice cDNAs encoding protein kinases were fused to the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged kinases and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by mass spectrometry. Ninety-five percent of the TAP-tagged kinases were recovered. Fifty-six percent of the TAP-tagged kinases were found to interact with other rice proteins. A number of these interactions were consistent with known protein complexes found in other species, validating the TAP-tag method in rice plants. Phosphorylation sites were identified on four of the kinases that interacted with either 14-3-3 proteins or cyclins.

  19. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  20. Calcium-Mediated Control of S100 Proteins: Allosteric Communication via an Agitator/Signal Blocking Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Shaw, Gary S; Konermann, Lars

    2017-08-23

    Allosteric proteins possess dynamically coupled residues for the propagation of input signals to distant target binding sites. The input signals usually correspond to "effector is present" or "effector is not present". Many aspects of allosteric regulation remain incompletely understood. This work focused on S100A11, a dimeric EF-hand protein with two hydrophobic target binding sites. An annexin peptide (Ax) served as the target. Target binding is allosterically controlled by Ca(2+) over a distance of ∼26 Å. Ca(2+) promotes formation of a [Ca4 S100 Ax2] complex, where the Ax peptides are accommodated between helices III/IV and III'/IV'. Without Ca(2+) these binding sites are closed, precluding interactions with Ax. The allosteric mechanism was probed by microsecond MD simulations in explicit water, complemented by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HDX/MS). Consistent with experimental data, MD runs in the absence of Ca(2+) and Ax culminated in target binding site closure. In simulations on [Ca4 S100] the target binding sites remained open. These results capture the essence of allosteric control, revealing how Ca(2+) prevents binding site closure. Both HDX/MS and MD data showed that the metalation sites become more dynamic after Ca(2+) loss. However, these enhanced dynamics do not represent the primary trigger of the allosteric cascade. Instead, a labile salt bridge acts as an incessantly active "agitator" that destabilizes the packing of adjacent residues, causing a domino chain of events that culminates in target binding site closure. This agitator represents the starting point of the allosteric signal propagation pathway. Ca(2+) binding rigidifies elements along this pathway, thereby blocking signal transmission. This blocking mechanism does not conform to the commonly held view that allosteric communication pathways generally originate at the sites where effectors interact with the protein.

  1. Modelling of the Vajont rockslide displacements by delayed plasticity of interacting sliding blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanza, riccardo; Hedge, Amarnath; Crosta, Giovanni; di Prisco, Claudio; Frigerio, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    In order to model complex sliding masses subject to continuous slow movements related to water table fluctuations it is convenient to: i) model the time-dependent mechanical behaviour of the materials by means of a viscous-plastic constitutive law; ii) assume the water table fluctuation as the main input to induce displacement acceleration; iii) consider, the 3D constrains by maintaining a level of simplicity such to allow the implementation into EWS (Early Warning System) for risk management. In this work a 1D pseudo-dynamic visco-plastic model (Secondi et al. 2011), based on Perzyna's delayed plasticity theory is applied. The sliding mass is considered as a rigid block subject to its self weight, inertial forces and seepage forces varying with time. All non-linearities are lumped in a thin layer positioned between the rigid block and the stable bedrock. The mechanical response of this interface is assumed to be visco-plastic. The viscous nucleus is assumed to be of the exponential type, so that irreversible strains develop for both positive and negative values of the yield function; the sliding mass is discretized in blocks to cope with complex rockslide geometries; the friction angle is assumed to reduce with strain rate assuming a sort of strain - rate law (Dietrich-Ruina law). To validate the improvements introduced in this paper the simulation of the displacements of the Vajont rockslide from 1960 to the failure, occurred on October the 9th 1963, is perfomed. It will be shown that, in its modified version, the model satisfactorily fits the Vajont pre-collapse displacements triggered by the fluctuation of the Vajont lake level and the associated groundwater level. The model is able to follow the critical acceleration of the motion with a minimal change in friction properties.The discretization in interacting sliding blocks confirms its suitability to model the complex 3D rockslide behaviour. We are currently implementing a multi-block model capable to include

  2. The V protein of Tioman virus is incapable of blocking type I interferon signaling in human cells.

    PubMed

    Caignard, Grégory; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Dhondt, Kevin P; Labernardière, Jean-Louis; Petit, Thierry; Jacob, Yves; Horvat, Branka; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV), a close relative of mumps virus (MuV), has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V) hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host.

  3. The V Protein of Tioman Virus Is Incapable of Blocking Type I Interferon Signaling in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Dhondt, Kevin P.; Labernardière, Jean-Louis; Petit, Thierry; Jacob, Yves; Horvat, Branka; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV), a close relative of mumps virus (MuV), has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V) hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host. PMID:23342031

  4. Predicting protein-protein interactions from sequence using correlation coefficient and high-quality interaction dataset.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming-Guang; Xia, Jun-Feng; Li, Xue-Ling; Huang, De-Shuang

    2010-03-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is critical for understanding the cellular function of the proteins and the machinery of a proteome. Data of PPIs derived from high-throughput technologies are often incomplete and noisy. Therefore, it is important to develop computational methods and high-quality interaction dataset for predicting PPIs. A sequence-based method is proposed by combining correlation coefficient (CC) transformation and support vector machine (SVM). CC transformation not only adequately considers the neighboring effect of protein sequence but describes the level of CC between two protein sequences. A gold standard positives (interacting) dataset MIPS Core and a gold standard negatives (non-interacting) dataset GO-NEG of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were mined to objectively evaluate the above method and attenuate the bias. The SVM model combined with CC transformation yielded the best performance with a high accuracy of 87.94% using gold standard positives and gold standard negatives datasets. The source code of MATLAB and the datasets are available on request under smgsmg@mail.ustc.edu.cn.

  5. Measuring frequency domain granger causality for multiple blocks of interacting time series.

    PubMed

    Faes, Luca; Nollo, Giandomenico

    2013-04-01

    In the past years, several frequency-domain causality measures based on vector autoregressive time series modeling have been suggested to assess directional connectivity in neural systems. The most followed approaches are based on representing the considered set of multiple time series as a realization of two or three vector-valued processes, yielding the so-called Geweke linear feedback measures, or as a realization of multiple scalar-valued processes, yielding popular measures like the directed coherence (DC) and the partial DC (PDC). In the present study, these two approaches are unified and generalized by proposing novel frequency-domain causality measures which extend the existing measures to the analysis of multiple blocks of time series. Specifically, the block DC (bDC) and block PDC (bPDC) extend DC and PDC to vector-valued processes, while their logarithmic counterparts, denoted as multivariate total feedback [Formula: see text] and direct feedback [Formula: see text], represent into a full multivariate framework the Geweke's measures. Theoretical analysis of the proposed measures shows that they: (i) possess desirable properties of causality measures; (ii) are able to reflect either direct causality (bPDC, [Formula: see text] or total (direct + indirect) causality (bDC, [Formula: see text] between time series blocks; (iii) reduce to the DC and PDC measures for scalar-valued processes, and to the Geweke's measures for pairs of processes; (iv) are able to capture internal dependencies between the scalar constituents of the analyzed vector processes. Numerical analysis showed that the proposed measures can be efficiently estimated from short time series, allow to represent in an objective, compact way the information derived from the causal analysis of several pairs of time series, and may detect frequency domain causality more accurately than existing measures. The proposed measures find their natural application in the evaluation of directional

  6. Protein-protein interactions of tandem affinity purified protein kinases from rice.

    PubMed

    Rohila, Jai S; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald L; Dardick, Christopher; Canlas, Patrick; Fujii, Hiroaki; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Knoflicek, Lucas; Stevenson, Becky; Xie, Mingtang; Xu, Xia; Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E

    2009-08-19

    Eighty-eight rice (Oryza sativa) cDNAs encoding rice leaf expressed protein kinases (PKs) were fused to a Tandem Affinity Purification tag (TAP-tag) and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged PKs and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five TAP-tagged PKs were recovered in this study and thirteen of these were found to interact with other rice proteins with a high probability score. In vivo phosphorylated sites were found for three of the PKs. A comparison of the TAP-tagged data from a combined analysis of 129 TAP-tagged rice protein kinases with a concurrent screen using yeast two hybrid methods identified an evolutionarily new rice protein that interacts with the well conserved cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) protein complex.

  7. Protein-Protein Interactions of Tandem Affinity Purified Protein Kinases from Rice

    PubMed Central

    Rohila, Jai S.; Chen, Mei; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Johann; Cerny, Ronald L.; Dardick, Christopher; Canlas, Patrick; Fujii, Hiroaki; Gribskov, Michael; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Knoflicek, Lucas; Stevenson, Becky; Xie, Mingtang; Xu, Xia; Zheng, Xianwu; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Ronald, Pamela; Fromm, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Eighty-eight rice (Oryza sativa) cDNAs encoding rice leaf expressed protein kinases (PKs) were fused to a Tandem Affinity Purification tag (TAP-tag) and expressed in transgenic rice plants. The TAP-tagged PKs and interacting proteins were purified from the T1 progeny of the transgenic rice plants and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five TAP-tagged PKs were recovered in this study and thirteen of these were found to interact with other rice proteins with a high probability score. In vivo phosphorylated sites were found for three of the PKs. A comparison of the TAP-tagged data from a combined analysis of 129 TAP-tagged rice protein kinases with a concurrent screen using yeast two hybrid methods identified an evolutionarily new rice protein that interacts with the well conserved cell division cycle 2 (CDC2) protein complex. PMID:19690613

  8. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  9. Interaction graph mining for protein complexes using local clique merging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Li; Tan, Soon-Heng; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Ng, See-Kiong

    2005-01-01

    While recent technological advances have made available large datasets of experimentally-detected pairwise protein-protein interactions, there is still a lack of experimentally-determined protein complex data. To make up for this lack of protein complex data, we explore the mining of existing protein interaction graphs for protein complexes. This paper proposes a novel graph mining algorithm to detect the dense neighborhoods (highly connected regions) in an interaction graph which may correspond to protein complexes. Our algorithm first locates local cliques for each graph vertex (protein) and then merge the detected local cliques according to their affinity to form maximal dense regions. We present experimental results with yeast protein interaction data to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. Compared with other existing techniques, our predicted complexes can match or overlap significantly better with the known protein complexes in the MIPS benchmark database. Novel protein complexes were also predicted to help biologists in their search for new protein complexes.

  10. Bioassay using blocking temperature: Interparticle interactions between biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biotargets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Yang, T. W.; Shen, D.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, J. M.; Liao, S. H.; Chieh, J. J.; Yang, H. C.; Wang, L. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a bioassay of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) concentration achieved via the measurement of blocking temperature (TB). Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) consisting of anti-alpha-fetoprotein coated onto dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles composed of Fe3O4 were prepared and then conjugated with AFP biotargets. It was found that both the saturation magnetization and value of TB increased with the concentration of the associated AFP. Furthermore, the dependence of TB of the samples on magnetic field agreed with the interparticle interaction model. Thus, this study demonstrated a platform to detect biomarkers by characterizing TB with a sensitivity limit of 20 ppb of AFP. The promising results obtained for this bioassay can be attributed to the interparticle interactions and Néel motions of magnetic moments in the BMNs.

  11. Perfluorinated Moieties Increase the Interaction of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers with Lipid Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Christian; Blaffert, Jacob; Li, Zheng; Kressler, Jörg; Blume, Alfred

    2016-08-16

    The interaction of amphiphilic and triphilic block copolymers with lipid monolayers has been studied. Amphiphilic triblock copolymer PGMA20-PPO34-PGMA20 (GP) is composed of a hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) middle block that is flanked by two hydrophilic poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) side blocks. The attachment of a perfluoro-n-nonyl residue (F9) to either end of GP yields a triphilic polymer with the sequence F9-PGMA20-PPO34-PGMA20-F9 (F-GP). The F9 chains are fluorophilic, i.e., they have a tendency to demix in hydrophilic as well as in lipophilic environments. We investigated (i) the adsorption of both polymers to differently composed lipid monolayers and (ii) the compression behavior of mixed polymer/lipid monolayers. The lipid monolayers are composed of phospholipids with PC or PE headgroups and acyl chains of different length and saturation. Both polymers interact with lipid monolayers by inserting their hydrophobic moieties (PPO, F9). The interaction is markedly enhanced in the presence of F9 chains, which act as membrane anchors. GP inserts into lipid monolayers up to a surface pressure of 30 mN/m, whereas F-GP inserts into monolayers at up to 45 mN/m, suggesting that F-GP also inserts into lipid bilayer membranes. The adsorption of both polymers to lipid monolayers with short acyl chains is favored. Upon compression, a two-step squeeze-out of F-GP occurs, with PPO blocks being released into the aqueous subphase at 28 mN/m and the F9 chains being squeezed out at 48 mN/m. GP is squeezed out in one step at 28 mN/m because of the lack of F9 anchor groups. The liquid expanded (LE) to liquid condensed (LC) phase transition of DPPC and DMPE is maintained in the presence of the polymers, indicating that the polymers can be accommodated in LE- and LC-phase monolayers. These results show how fluorinated moieties can be included in the rational design of membrane-binding polymers.

  12. Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Gene Ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yunkyu; Kim, Seok; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Jinah

    Evolution of computer technologies makes it possible to access a large amount and various kinds of biological data via internet such as DNA sequences, proteomics data and information discovered about them. It is expected that the combination of various data could help researchers find further knowledge about them. Roles of a visualization system are to invoke human abilities to integrate information and to recognize certain patterns in the data. Thus, when the various kinds of data are examined and analyzed manually, an effective visualization system is an essential part. One instance of these integrated visualizations can be combination of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and Gene Ontology (GO) which could help enhance the analysis of PPI network. We introduce a simple but comprehensive visualization system that integrates GO and PPI data where GO and PPI graphs are visualized side-by-side and supports quick reference functions between them. Furthermore, the proposed system provides several interactive visualization methods for efficiently analyzing the PPI network and GO directedacyclic- graph such as context-based browsing and common ancestors finding.

  13. Insights from protein-protein interaction studies on bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Cygler, Miroslaw; Babu, Mohan

    2017-09-01

    The threat bacterial pathogens pose to human health is increasing with the number and distribution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, while the rate of discovery of new antimicrobials dwindles. Proteomics is playing key roles in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis, and in identifying disease outcome determinants. The physical associations identified by proteomics can provide the means to develop pathogen-specific treatment methods that reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance and alleviate the negative effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on beneficial bacteria. Areas covered: This review discusses recent trends in proteomics and introduces new and developing approaches that can be applied to the study of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlying bacterial pathogenesis. The approaches examined encompass options for mapping proteomes as well as stable and transient interactions in vivo and in vitro. We also explored the coverage of bacterial and human-bacterial PPIs, knowledge gaps in this area, and how they can be filled. Expert commentary: Identifying potential antimicrobial candidates is confounded by the complex molecular biology of bacterial pathogenesis and the lack of knowledge about PPIs underlying this process. Proteomics approaches can offer new perspectives for mechanistic insights and identify essential targets for guiding the discovery of next generation antimicrobials.

  14. Vaccinia virus p37 interacts with host proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yali; Honeychurch, Kady M; Yang, Guang; Byrd, Chelsea M; Harver, Chris; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2009-04-28

    Proteins associated with the late endosome (LE) appear to play a central role in the envelopment of a number of taxonomically diverse viruses. How viral proteins interact with LE-associated proteins to facilitate envelopment is not well understood. LE-derived transport vesicles form through the interaction of Rab9 GTPase with cargo proteins, and TIP47, a Rab9-specific effector protein. Vaccinia virus (VV) induces a wrapping complex derived from intracellular host membranes to envelope intracellular mature virus particles producing egress-competent forms of virus. We show that VV p37 protein associates with TIP47-, Rab9-, and CI-MPR-containing membranes. Mutation of a di-aromatic motif in p37 blocks association with TIP47 and inhibits plaque formation. ST-246, a specific inhibitor of p37 function, inhibits these interactions and also blocks wrapped virus particle formation. Vaccinia virus expressing p37 variants with reduced ST-246 susceptibility associates with Rab9 and co-localizes with CI-MPR in the presence and absence of compound. These results suggest that p37 localizes to the LE and interacts with proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis to facilitate assembly of extracellular forms of virus.

  15. Vaccinia virus p37 interacts with host proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yali; Honeychurch, Kady M; Yang, Guang; Byrd, Chelsea M; Harver, Chris; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteins associated with the late endosome (LE) appear to play a central role in the envelopment of a number of taxonomically diverse viruses. How viral proteins interact with LE-associated proteins to facilitate envelopment is not well understood. LE-derived transport vesicles form through the interaction of Rab9 GTPase with cargo proteins, and TIP47, a Rab9-specific effector protein. Vaccinia virus (VV) induces a wrapping complex derived from intracellular host membranes to envelope intracellular mature virus particles producing egress-competent forms of virus. Results We show that VV p37 protein associates with TIP47-, Rab9-, and CI-MPR-containing membranes. Mutation of a di-aromatic motif in p37 blocks association with TIP47 and inhibits plaque formation. ST-246, a specific inhibitor of p37 function, inhibits these interactions and also blocks wrapped virus particle formation. Vaccinia virus expressing p37 variants with reduced ST-246 susceptibility associates with Rab9 and co-localizes with CI-MPR in the presence and absence of compound. Conclusion These results suggest that p37 localizes to the LE and interacts with proteins associated with LE-derived transport vesicle biogenesis to facilitate assembly of extracellular forms of virus. PMID:19400954

  16. Protein Cross-Linking Capillary Electrophoresis for Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Claire M; Shao, Hao; Rauch, Jennifer N; Dawod, Mohamed; Nordhues, Bryce; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kennedy, Robert T

    2016-08-16

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been identified as a useful platform for detecting, quantifying, and screening for modulators of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this method, one protein binding partner is labeled with a fluorophore, the protein binding partners are mixed, and then, the complex is separated from free protein to allow direct determination of bound to free ratios. Although it possesses many advantages for PPI studies, the method is limited by the need to have separation conditions that both prevent protein adsorption to capillary and maintain protein interactions during the separation. In this work, we use protein cross-linking capillary electrophoresis (PXCE) to overcome this limitation. In PXCE, the proteins are cross-linked under binding conditions and then separated. This approach eliminates the need to maintain noncovalent interactions during electrophoresis and facilitates method development. We report PXCE methods for an antibody-antigen interaction and heterodimer and homodimer heat shock protein complexes. Complexes are cross-linked by short treatments with formaldehyde after reaching binding equilibrium. Cross-linked complexes are separated by electrophoretic mobility using free solution CE or by size using sieving electrophoresis of SDS complexes. The method gives good quantitative results; e.g., a lysozyme-antibody interaction was found to have Kd = 24 ± 3 nM by PXCE and Kd = 17 ± 2 nM using isothermal calorimetry (ITC). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in complex with bcl2 associated athanogene 3 (Bag3) was found to have Kd = 25 ± 5 nM by PXCE which agrees with Kd values reported without cross-linking. Hsp70-Bag3 binding site mutants and small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70-Bag3 were characterized by PXCE with good agreement to inhibitory constants and IC50 values obtained by a bead-based flow cytometry protein interaction assay (FCPIA). PXCE allows rapid method development for quantitative analysis of PPIs.

  17. Developing algorithms for predicting protein-protein interactions of homology modeled proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the protein-protein docking problem, especially as it relates to homology-based structures, identify the key bottlenecks in current software tools, and evaluate and prototype new algorithms that may be developed to improve these bottlenecks. This report describes the current challenges in the protein-protein docking problem: correctly predicting the binding site for the protein-protein interaction and correctly placing the sidechains. Two different and complementary approaches are taken that can help with the protein-protein docking problem. The first approach is to predict interaction sites prior to docking, and uses bioinformatics studies of protein-protein interactions to predict theses interaction site. The second approach is to improve validation of predicted complexes after docking, and uses an improved scoring function for evaluating proposed docked poses, incorporating a solvation term. This scoring function demonstrates significant improvement over current state-of-the art functions. Initial studies on both these approaches are promising, and argue for full development of these algorithms.

  18. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  19. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network.

  20. Interaction of surfactants with block-copolymer systems in the presence of Hofmeister anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadoon, Quratulain; Bibi, Iram; Mehmood, Khalid; Sajjad, Saman; Nawaz, Mohsan; Ali, Farman; Bibi, Saira; ur-Rehman, Wajid; Bano, Shakeela; Usman, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    The interactions of block copolymers poly (ethylene oxide butylene oxide), E58B7 and E58B11 with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were studied by using different techniques such as surface tension, conductivity, and dynamic light scattering. The effect of salts in the Hofmeister series on polymer-surfactant systems was also investigated. The interactions were found to be dependent on both surfactant and polymer concentrations. The results were utilized to compute different thermodynamic parameters including enthalpy of micellization (ΔH m), entropy of micellization (ΔS m), free energy of adsorption (ΔG ads) and free energy of micellization (ΔG mic). For diblock-copolymer surfactant systems the negative value of (ΔG mic) shows that the process of micelle formation is thermodynamically favorable. The solubilization in surfactant micelles altered the physicochemical properties of the block copolymer. The value of critical aggregation concentration decreases with the addition of Hofmeister anions, and the decrease is more pronounced for sodium fluoride as compared to sodium iodide.

  1. The Foundations of Protein-Ligand Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    For the specific design of a drug we must first answer the question: How does a drug achieve its activity? An active ingredient must, in order to develop its action, bind to a particular target molecule in the body. Usually this is a protein, but also nucleic acids in the form of RNA and DNA can be target structures for active agents. The most important condition for binding is at first that the active agent exhibits the correct size and shape in order to optimally fit into a cavity exposed to the surface of the protein, the "bindingpocket". It is further necessary for the surface properties of the ligand and protein to be mutually compatible to form specific interactions. In 1894 Emil Fischer compared the exact fit of a substrate for the catalytic centre of an enzyme with the picture of a "lock-and-key". Paul Ehrlich coined in 1913 "Corpora non agunt nisi fixata", literally "bodies do not work when they are not bound". He wanted to imply that active agents that are meant to kill bacteria or parasites must be "fixed" by them, i.e. linked to their structures. Both concepts form the starting point for any rational concept in the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In many respects they still apply today. A drug must, after being administered, reach its target and interact with a biological macromolecule. Specific agents have a large affinity and sufficient selectivity to bind to the macromolecule's active site. This is the only way they can develop the desired biological activity without side-effects.

  2. Morphological changes from silica tubules to hollow spheres controlled by the intermolecular interactions within block copolymer micelle templates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyemin; Char, Kookheon

    2009-04-01

    The morphological changes from tubules to large hollow spheres to (micelle-sized) small hollow-spherical silica were realized by polystyrene-block-poly(vinylpyridine) (PS-b-PVP) block copolymer micelle templates by controlling the intermolecular interactions with the corona chains. PS-b-PVP with weak intermolecular interactions among PVP corona chains yields the coexistence of tubules, large hollow spheres, and small hollow spheres. The coexistence of the three phases arises from the direct aggregation of block copolymer micelles during hydrolytic condensation of a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate), as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. When the degree of intermolecular interactions within the PVP corona blocks is increased by a change in either the degree of quaternization of the PVP blocks or the dielectric constant of the medium, small hollow spherical silica, with size equivalent to the block copolymer micelles, were solely obtained. We believe that this morphological change is due to the fact that the dipole-dipole interactions among quaternized PVP blocks physically cross-link the PVP coronas in micelles resisting the curvature change during the silica condensation.

  3. Sedimentation Patterns of Rapidly Reversible Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The transport behavior of macromolecular mixtures with rapidly reversible complex formation is of great interest in the study of protein interactions by many different methods. Complicated transport patterns arise even for simple bimolecular reactions, when all species exhibit different migration velocities. Although partial differential equations are available to describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the interacting system given particular initial conditions, a general overview of the phase behavior of the systems in parameter space has not yet been reported. In the case of sedimentation of two-component mixtures, this study presents simple analytical solutions that solve the underlying equations in the diffusion-free limit previously subject to Gilbert-Jenkins theory. The new expressions describe, with high precision, the average sedimentation coefficients and composition of each boundary, which allow the examination of features of the whole parameter space at once, and may be used for experimental design and robust analysis of experimental boundary patterns to derive the stoichiometry and affinity of the complex. This study finds previously unrecognized features, including a phase transition between boundary patterns. The model reveals that the time-average velocities of all components in the reaction mixture must match—a condition that suggests an intuitive physical picture of an effective particle of the coupled cosedimentation of an interacting system. Adding to the existing numerical solutions of the relevant partial differential equations, the effective particle model provides physical insights into the relationships of the parameters that govern sedimentation patterns. PMID:20441765

  4. Elucidation of the Structure Formation of Polymer-Conjugated Proteins in Solution and Block Copolymer Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferebee, Rachel L.

    The broader technical objective of this work is to contribute to the development of enzyme-functionalized nanoporous membranes that can function as autonomous and target selective dynamic separators. The scientific objective of the research performed within this thesis is to elucidate the parameters that control the mixing of proteins in organic host materials and in block copolymers templates in particular. A "biomimetic" membrane system that uses enzymes to selectively neutralize targets and trigger a change in permeability of nanopores lined with a pH-responsive polymer has been fabricated and characterized. Mechanical and functional stability, as well as scalability, have been demonstrated for this system. Additional research has focused on the role of polymeric ligands on the solubility characteristics of the model protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). For this purpose BSA was conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands of varied degree of polymerization and grafting density. Combined static and dynamic light scattering was used (in conjunction with MALDI-TOF) to determine the second virial coefficient in PBS solutions. At a given mass fraction PEG or average number of grafts, the solubility of BSA-PEG conjugates is found to increase with the degree of polymerization of conjugated PEG. This result informs the synthesis of protein-conjugate systems that are optimized for the fabrication of block copolymer blend materials with maximum protein loading. Blends of BSA-PEG conjugates and block copolymer (BCP) matrices were fabricated to evaluate the dispersion morphology and solubility limits in a model system. Electron microscopy was used to evaluate the changes in lamellar spacing with increased filling fraction of BSA-PEG conjugates.

  5. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  6. Action of protein synthesis inhibitors in blocking electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux from corn roots

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, C.J.; LaFayette, P.R.; Hanson, J.B.

    1981-04-01

    The block in the electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux produced by protein synthesis inhibitors in corn root tissue can be released or by-passed by addition of fusicoccin or nigericin. The inhibition also lowers cell potential, and the release repolarizes. Associated with the inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux is inhibition of K/sup +/ influx and the growth of the root tip; fusicoccin partially relieves these inhibitions, but nigericin does not. The inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux which arises from blocking the proton channel of the ATPase by oligomycin or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide can also be partially relieved by fusicoccin, but not by nigericin; the inhibition produced by diethylstilbestrol is not relieved by fusicoccin. The results are discussed in terms of the presumed mode of action of fusicoccin on the plasmalemma ATPase.

  7. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  8. Detection of peptides, proteins, and drugs that selectively interact with protein targets.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Mitina, Olga; Pugacheva, Elena N; Benevolenskaya, Elizaveta; Kotova, Elena; Toby, Garabet G; Khazak, Vladimir; Kaelin, William G; Chernoff, Jonathan; Golemis, Erica A

    2002-11-01

    Genome sequencing has been completed for multiple organisms, and pilot proteomic analyses reported for yeast and higher eukaryotes. This work has emphasized the facts that proteins are frequently engaged in multiple interactions, and that governance of protein interaction specificity is a primary means of regulating biological systems. In particular, the ability to deconvolute complex protein interaction networks to identify which interactions govern specific signaling pathways requires the generation of biological tools that allow the distinction of critical from noncritical interactions. We report the application of an enhanced Dual Bait two-hybrid system to allow detection and manipulation of highly specific protein-protein interactions. We summarize the use of this system to detect proteins and peptides that target well-defined specific motifs in larger protein structures, to facilitate rapid identification of specific interactors from a pool of putative interacting proteins obtained in a library screen, and to score specific drug-mediated disruption of protein-protein interaction.

  9. Use of a tandem affinity purification assay to detect interactions between West Nile and dengue viral proteins and proteins of the mosquito vector.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Tonya M; Cox, Jonathan; Nguyen, Annie; Feitosa, Fabiana; Krishnan, Manoj N; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-08-15

    West Nile and dengue viruses are (re)emerging mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality in man. The identification of mosquito proteins that associate with flaviviruses may provide novel targets to inhibit infection of the vector or block transmission to humans. Here, a tandem affinity purification (TAP) assay was used to identify 18 mosquito proteins that interact with dengue and West Nile capsid, envelope, NS2A or NS2B proteins. We further analyzed the interaction of mosquito cadherin with dengue and West Nile virus envelope protein using co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Blocking the function of select mosquito factors, including actin, myosin, PI3-kinase and myosin light chain kinase, reduced both dengue and West Nile virus infection in mosquito cells. We show that the TAP method may be used in insect cells to accurately identify flaviviral-host protein interactions. Our data also provides several targets for interrupting flavivirus infection in mosquito vectors.

  10. Targeting Plant Ethylene Responses by Controlling Essential Protein-Protein Interactions in the Ethylene Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Groth, Georg

    2015-08-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene regulates many processes of high agronomic relevance throughout the life span of plants. A central element in ethylene signaling is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized membrane protein ethylene insensitive2 (EIN2). Recent studies indicate that in response to ethylene, the extra-membranous C-terminal end of EIN2 is proteolytically processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus. Here, we report that the conserved nuclear localization signal (NLS) mediating nuclear import of the EIN2 C-terminus provides an important domain for complex formation with ethylene receptor ethylene response1 (ETR1). EIN2 lacking the NLS domain shows strongly reduced affinity for the receptor. Interaction of EIN2 and ETR1 is also blocked by a synthetic peptide of the NLS motif. The corresponding peptide substantially reduces ethylene responses in planta. Our results uncover a novel mechanism and type of inhibitor interfering with ethylene signal transduction and ethylene responses in plants. Disruption of essential protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway as shown in our study for the EIN2-ETR1 complex has the potential to guide the development of innovative ethylene antagonists for modern agriculture and horticulture.

  11. Decoupling Substrate Surface Interactions in Block Polymer Thin Film Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Cameron; Epps, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the impact of the major factors that affect block polymer (BP) thin film self-assembly is necessary to control nanostructure ordering, orientation, and defect density. In this work, we systematically studied the influence of the substrate surface energy, one of the most significant parameters directing self-assembly, on wetting behavior, through-film interactions, and substrate surface field propagation. Notably, we determined the applicability of decoupled surface energy components (dispersive and polar interactions) as opposed to total surface energy, using a suite of chlorosilane monolayers and UV-ozone degradation to create a library of total, dispersive, and polar surface energy effects. Our experimental results combined with surface chemistry literature indicated repulsive total surface energy interactions are the dominant force at the substrate-polymer interface, whereas attractive decoupled surface energy interactions become significant past the contacting layer. This work represents a thorough analysis of a vital force affecting BP self-assembly as well as a blueprint for the generalized design of substrate surfaces that achieve target BP nanostructure orientations for nanolithography, templating, and nanoporous membrane applications.

  12. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  13. Directional interactions and cooperativity between mechanosensitive membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2013-03-01

    While modern structural biology has provided us with a rich and diverse picture of membrane proteins, the biological function of membrane proteins is often influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Here we explore the relation between the shape of membrane proteins and the cooperative function of membrane proteins induced by membrane-mediated elastic interactions. For the experimental model system of mechanosensitive ion channels we find that the sign and strength of elastic interactions depend on the protein shape, yielding distinct cooperative gating curves for distinct protein orientations. Our approach predicts how directional elastic interactions affect the molecular structure, organization, and biological function of proteins in crowded membranes.

  14. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    PubMed

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent.

  15. SVM-PB-Pred: SVM based protein block prediction method using sequence profiles and secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Parthasarathy, S

    2014-01-01

    We developed a support vector machine based web server called SVM-PB-Pred, to predict the Protein Block for any given amino acid sequence. The input features of SVM-PB-Pred include i) sequence profiles (PSSM) and ii) actual secondary structures (SS) from DSSP method or predicted secondary structures from NPS@ and GOR4 methods. There were three combined input features PSSM+SS(DSSP), PSSM+SS(NPS@) and PSSM+SS(GOR4) used to test and train the SVM models. Similarly, four datasets RS90, DB433, LI1264 and SP1577 were used to develop the SVM models. These four SVM models developed were tested using three different benchmarking tests namely; (i) self consistency, (ii) seven fold cross validation test and (iii) independent case test. The maximum possible prediction accuracy of ~70% was observed in self consistency test for the SVM models of both LI1264 and SP1577 datasets, where PSSM+SS(DSSP) input features was used to test. The prediction accuracies were reduced to ~53% for PSSM+SS(NPS@) and ~43% for PSSM+SS(GOR4) in independent case test, for the SVM models of above two same datasets. Using our method, it is possible to predict the protein block letters for any query protein sequence with ~53% accuracy, when the SP1577 dataset and predicted secondary structure from NPS@ server were used. The SVM-PB-Pred server can be freely accessed through http://bioinfo.bdu.ac.in/~svmpbpred.

  16. Small-molecule tools for dissecting the roles of SSB/protein interactions in genome maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Duo; Bernstein, Douglas A.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.

    2010-09-03

    Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) help to recruit a diverse array of genome maintenance enzymes to their sites of action through direct protein interactions. For all cases examined to date, these interactions are mediated by the evolutionarily conserved C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct). The essential nature of SSB protein interactions makes inhibitors that block SSB complex formation valuable biochemical tools and attractive potential antibacterial agents. Here, we identify four small molecules that disrupt complexes formed between Escherichia coli SSB and Exonuclease I (ExoI), a well-studied SSB-interacting enzyme. Each compound disrupts ExoI/SSB-Ct peptide complexes and abrogates SSB stimulation of ExoI nuclease activity. Structural and biochemical studies support a model for three of the compounds in which they compete with SSB for binding to ExoI. The fourth appears to rely on an allosteric mechanism to disrupt ExoI/SSB complexes. Subsets of the inhibitors block SSB-Ct complex formation with two other SSB-interaction partners as well, which highlights their utility as reagents for investigating the roles of SSB/protein interactions in diverse DNA replication, recombination, and repair reactions.

  17. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models—the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex—and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. - Highlights: • The interaction between mS100A5–RAGE V was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. • The interfacial residues on mS100A5–RAGE V and mS100A5–pentamidine contact surface were mapped by {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC experiments. • mS100A5–RAGE V and mS100A5–pentamidine complex models were generated from NMR restraints using HADDOCK program. • The bioactivity of the mS100A5–RAGE V and mS100A5–pentamidine complex was studied using WST-1 assay.

  18. Analyses of Interactions Between Heparin and the Apical Surface Proteins of Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Takano, Ryo; Takemae, Hitoshi; Sugi, Tatsuki; Ishiwa, Akiko; Gong, Haiyan; Recuenco, Frances C.; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi; Kato, Kentaro

    2013-11-01

    Heparin, a sulfated glycoconjugate, reportedly inhibits the blood-stage growth of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Elucidation of the inhibitory mechanism is valuable for developing novel invasion-blocking treatments based on heparin. Merozoite surface protein 1 has been reported as a candidate target of heparin; however, to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we characterized the molecules that bind to heparin during merozoite invasion. Here, we show that heparin binds only at the apical tip of the merozoite surface and that multiple heparin-binding proteins localize preferentially in the apical organelles. To identify heparin-binding proteins, parasite proteins were fractionated by means of heparin affinity chromatography and subjected to immunoblot analysis with ligand-specific antibodies. All tested members of the Duffy and reticulocyte binding-like families bound to heparin with diverse affinities. These findings suggest that heparin masks the apical surface of merozoites and blocks interaction with the erythrocyte membrane after initial attachment.

  19. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite interactions with heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; Groves, John T

    2010-07-19

    Oxygenated heme proteins are known to react rapidly with nitric oxide (NO) to produce peroxynitrite (PN) at the heme site. This process could lead either to attenuation of the effects of NO or to nitrosative protein damage. PN is a powerful nitrating and oxidizing agent that has been implicated in a variety of cell injuries. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the nature and variety of reaction mechanisms of PN interactions with heme proteins. In this Forum, we survey the range of reactions of PN with heme proteins, with particular attention to myoglobin and cytochrome c. While these two proteins are textbook paradigms for oxygen binding and electron transfer, respectively, both have recently been shown to have other important functions that involve NO and PN. We have recently described direct evidence that ferrylmyolgobin (ferrylMb) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) are both produced during the reaction of PN and metmyolgobin (metMb) (Su, J.; Groves, J. T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 12979-12988). Kinetic evidence indicates that these products evolve from the initial formation of a caged radical intermediate [Fe(IV) horizontal lineO.NO(2)]. This caged pair reacts mainly via internal return with a rate constant k(r) to form metMb and nitrate in an oxygen-rebound scenario. Detectable amounts of ferrylMb are observed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, appearing at a rate consistent with the rate, k(obs), of heme-mediated PN decomposition. Freely diffusing NO(2), which is liberated concomitantly from the radical pair (k(e)), preferentially nitrates myoglobin Tyr103 and added fluorescein. For cytochrome c, Raman spectroscopy has revealed that a substantial fraction of cytochrome c converts to a beta-sheet structure, at the expense of turns and helices at low pH (Balakrishnan, G.; Hu, Y.; Oyerinde, O. F.; Su, J.; Groves, J. T.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 504-505). It is proposed that a short beta-sheet segment, comprising residues 37-39 and 58

  20. Essential protein identification based on essential protein-protein interaction prediction by Integrated Edge Weights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Huiyan; Liang, Yanchun; Blanzieri, Enrico

    2015-07-15

    Essential proteins play a crucial role in cellular survival and development process. Experimentally, essential proteins are identified by gene knockouts or RNA interference, which are expensive and often fatal to the target organisms. Regarding this, an alternative yet important approach to essential protein identification is through computational prediction. Existing computational methods predict essential proteins based on their relative densities in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Degree, betweenness, and other appropriate criteria are often used to measure the relative density. However, no matter what criterion is used, a protein is actually ordered by the attributes of this protein per se. In this research, we presented a novel computational method, Integrated Edge Weights (IEW), to first rank protein-protein interactions by integrating their edge weights, and then identified sub PPI networks consisting of those highly-ranked edges, and finally regarded the nodes in these sub networks as essential proteins. We evaluated IEW on three model organisms: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The experimental results showed that IEW achieved better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision-recall and Jackknife measures. We had also demonstrated that IEW is a robust and effective method, which can retrieve biologically significant modules by its highly-ranked protein-protein interactions for S. cerevisiae, E. coli, and C. elegans. We believe that, with sufficient data provided, IEW can be used to any other organisms' essential protein identification. A website about IEW can be accessed from http://digbio.missouri.edu/IEW/index.html.

  1. Testing ancient RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Landweber, Laura F.

    1999-01-01

    The past decade in molecular biology has seen remarkable advances in the study of the origin and early evolution of life. The mathematical tools for analyzing DNA and protein sequences, coupled with the availability of complete microbial genome sequences, provide insight almost as far back as the age of the nucleic acids themselves. Experimental evolution in the laboratory and especially in vitro evolution of RNA provide insight into a hypothetical world where RNA, or a close relative, may have debuted as a primary functional and informational molecule. The ability to isolate new functional RNAs from random sequences now ultimately makes the world of possible primitive chemical interactions accessible even when the molecules or reactions are no longer present in modern species. Thus we can at last form direct experimental tests of specific models for the origin of RNA–protein associations, such as those that influenced the genetic code. This marks a turning point for probing the origin and early history of life at the molecular level. PMID:10500126

  2. Fundamentals of protein interaction network mapping.

    PubMed

    Snider, Jamie; Kotlyar, Max; Saraon, Punit; Yao, Zhong; Jurisica, Igor; Stagljar, Igor

    2015-12-17

    Studying protein interaction networks of all proteins in an organism ("interactomes") remains one of the major challenges in modern biomedicine. Such information is crucial to understanding cellular pathways and developing effective therapies for the treatment of human diseases. Over the past two decades, diverse biochemical, genetic, and cell biological methods have been developed to map interactomes. In this review, we highlight basic principles of interactome mapping. Specifically, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of individual assays, how to select a method appropriate for the problem being studied, and provide general guidelines for carrying out the necessary follow-up analyses. In addition, we discuss computational methods to predict, map, and visualize interactomes, and provide a summary of some of the most important interactome resources. We hope that this review serves as both a useful overview of the field and a guide to help more scientists actively employ these powerful approaches in their research. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  3. Assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal stalk: binding of P1 proteins is required for the interaction of P2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Parada, P; van den Berg, A; Nusspaumer, G; Jimenez-Diaz, A; Remacha, M; Ballesta, J P

    2000-08-01

    The yeast ribosomal stalk is formed by a protein pentamer made of the 38 kDa P0 and four 12 kDa acidic P1/P2. The interaction of recombinant acidic proteins P1 alpha and P2 beta with ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4567, lacking all the 12 kDa stalk components, has been used to study the in vitro assembly of this important ribosomal structure. Stimulation of the ribosome activity was obtained by incubating simultaneously the particles with both proteins, which were nonphosphorylated initially and remained unmodified afterward. The N-terminus state, free or blocked, did not affect either the binding or reactivating activity of both proteins. Independent incubation with each protein did not affect the activity of the particles, however, protein P2 beta alone was unable to bind the ribosome whereas P1 alpha could. The binding of P1 alpha alone is a saturable process in acidic-protein-deficient ribosomes and does not take place in complete wild-type particles. Binding of P1 proteins in the absence of P2 proteins takes also place in vivo, when protein P1 beta is overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, protein P2 beta is not detected in the ribosome in the P1-deficient D67 strain despite being accumulated in the cytoplasm. The results confirm that neither phosphorylation nor N-terminal blocking of the 12 kDa acidic proteins is required for the assembly and function of the yeast stalk. More importantly, and regardless of the involvement of other elements, they indicate that stalk assembling is a coordinated process, in which P1 proteins would provide a ribosomal anchorage to P2 proteins, and P2 components would confer functionality to the complex.

  4. Linguistic feature analysis for protein interaction extraction

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The rapid growth of the amount of publicly available reports on biomedical experimental results has recently caused a boost of text mining approaches for protein interaction extraction. Most approaches rely implicitly or explicitly on linguistic, i.e., lexical and syntactic, data extracted from text. However, only few attempts have been made to evaluate the contribution of the different feature types. In this work, we contribute to this evaluation by studying the relative importance of deep syntactic features, i.e., grammatical relations, shallow syntactic features (part-of-speech information) and lexical features. For this purpose, we use a recently proposed approach that uses support vector machines with structured kernels. Results Our results reveal that the contribution of the different feature types varies for the different data sets on which the experiments were conducted. The smaller the training corpus compared to the test data, the more important the role of grammatical relations becomes. Moreover, deep syntactic information based classifiers prove to be more robust on heterogeneous texts where no or only limited common vocabulary is shared. Conclusion Our findings suggest that grammatical relations play an important role in the interaction extraction task. Moreover, the net advantage of adding lexical and shallow syntactic features is small related to the number of added features. This implies that efficient classifiers can be built by using only a small fraction of the features that are typically being used in recent approaches. PMID:19909518

  5. Studying protein-protein interactions via blot overlay/far western blot.

    PubMed

    Hall, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Blot overlay is a useful method for studying protein-protein interactions. This technique involves fractionating proteins on SDS-PAGE, blotting to nitrocellulose or PVDF membrane, and then incubating with a probe of interest. The probe is typically a protein that is radiolabeled, biotinylated, or simply visualized with a specific antibody. When the probe is visualized via antibody detection, this technique is often referred to as "Far Western blot." Many different kinds of protein-protein interactions can be studied via blot overlay, and the method is applicable to screens for unknown protein-protein interactions as well as to the detailed characterization of known interactions.

  6. HoxB8 requires its Pbx-interaction motif to block differentiation of primary myeloid progenitors and of most cell line models of myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, P S; Sykes, D B; Pasillas, M; Kamps, M P

    2001-09-06

    HoxB8 was the first homeobox gene identified as a cause of leukemia. In murine WEHI3B acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, proviral integration leads to the expression of both HoxB8 and Interleukin (IL-3). Enforced expression of HoxB8 blocks differentiation of factor-dependent myeloid progenitors, while IL-3 co-expression induces autocrine proliferation and overt leukemogenicity. Previously, we demonstrated that HoxB8 binds DNA cooperatively with members of the Pbx family of transcription factors, and that HoxB8 makes contact with the Pbx homeodomain through a hexameric sequence designated the Pbx-interaction motif (PIM). E2a-Pbx1, an oncogenic derivative of Pbx1, both retains its ability to heterodimerize with Hox proteins and arrest myeloid differentiation. This observation prompts the question of whether E2a-Pbx1 and Hox oncoproteins use endogenous Hox and Pbx proteins, respectively, to target a common set of cellular genes. Here, we use four different models of neutrophil and macrophage differentiation to determine whether HoxB8 needs to bind DNA or Pbx cofactors in order to arrest myeloid differentiation. The ability of HoxB8 to bind DNA or to bind Pbx was essential (1) to block differentiation of factor-dependent myeloid progenitors from primary marrow; (2) to block IL-6-induced monocytic differentiation of M1-AML cells; and (3) to block granulocytic differentiation of GM-CSF-dependent ECoM-G cells. However, while DNA-binding was required, the HoxB8 Pbx-interaction motif was unnecessary for preventing macrophage differentiation of ECoM-M cells. We conclude that HoxB8 prevents differentiation by directly influencing cellular gene expression, and that the genetic context within a cell dictates whether the effect of HoxB8 is dependent on a physical interaction with Pbx proteins.

  7. CPI motif interaction is necessary for capping protein function in cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marc; McConnell, Patrick; Schafer, Dorothy A.; Cooper, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) has critical roles in actin assembly in vivo and in vitro. CP binds with high affinity to the barbed end of actin filaments, blocking the addition and loss of actin subunits. Heretofore, models for actin assembly in cells generally assumed that CP is constitutively active, diffusing freely to find and cap barbed ends. However, CP can be regulated by binding of the ‘capping protein interaction' (CPI) motif, found in a diverse and otherwise unrelated set of proteins that decreases, but does not abolish, the actin-capping activity of CP and promotes uncapping in biochemical experiments. Here, we report that CP localization and the ability of CP to function in cells requires interaction with a CPI-motif-containing protein. Our discovery shows that cells target and/or modulate the capping activity of CP via CPI motif interactions in order for CP to localize and function in cells. PMID:26412145

  8. Interaction of Proteins Identified in Human Thyroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Jessica; Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Sickmann, Albert; Weber, Gerhard; Grosse, Jirka; Infanger, Manfred; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Influence of gravity forces on the regulation of protein expression by healthy and malignant thyroid cells was studied with the aim to identify protein interactions. Western blot analyses of a limited number of proteins suggested a time-dependent regulation of protein expression by simulated microgravity. After applying free flow isoelectric focusing and mass spectrometry to search for differently expressed proteins by thyroid cells exposed to simulated microgravity for three days, a considerable number of candidates for gravi-sensitive proteins were detected. In order to show how proteins sensitive to microgravity could directly influence other proteins, we investigated all polypeptide chains identified with Mascot scores above 100, looking for groups of interacting proteins. Hence, UniProtKB entry numbers of all detected proteins were entered into the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and processed. The program indicated that we had detected various groups of interacting proteins in each of the three cell lines studied. The major groups of interacting proteins play a role in pathways of carbohydrate and protein metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell membrane structuring. Analyzing these groups, networks of interaction could be established which show how a punctual influence of simulated microgravity may propagate via various members of interaction chains. PMID:23303277

  9. Intermolecular interactions and solvent diffusion in ordered nanostructures formed by self-assembly of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiyong

    Hydrogels formed by Poloxamer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) block copolymers find various pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. A variety of ordered structures can be exhibited by Poloxamer block copolymers in selective solvents such as water, for example, micellar cubic phase, hexagonal phase, lamellar phase, etc. We are interested in the thermodynamic and transport properties of water in such hydrogels that have an ordered (lyotropic liquid crystalline) structure. We have investigated the time evolution of water loss from Poloxamer gel films under a driving force of known water vapor pressure in the air in contact with the film. The experimental data on the drying process have been fitted to the diffusion equation for water in the film, under a boundary condition that includes the water concentration in the gel at infinite time; the water diffusion coefficient and other parameters have thus been obtained. The water chemical potential and osmotic pressure in the gel have been obtained from osmotic stress measurements. The osmotic pressure (force), together with data on the corresponding lyotropic liquid crystal spacing (distance) that we obtained from Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) measurements, have been analyzed to provide information on the prevailing intermolecular (inter-assembly) forces in the gel. The forces in the gel reveal interactions that occur at two levels, that of the PEO coil and that of the PEO segment.

  10. Synoptic/planetary-scale interactions and blocking over the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip J.; Lupo, Anthony R.; Hunter, Melinda L.; Stettner, David R.

    1993-01-01

    The central theme of this project has been the diagnosis of blocking anticyclogenesis and the corresponding interactions with synoptic-scale circulations. To that end an extensive investigation of the dynamics and energetics of a major blocking anticyclone and two upstream cyclones, all of which occurred over the North Atlantic Ocean and the United States in January 1979, was undertaken. Data for the study were provided by Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) 4 LAT by 5 LON FGGE analyses. The methodology has primarily focused on the diagnosis of circulation forcing mechanisms using the modified forms (referred to as the extended forms) of the height tendency and Zwack-Okossi equations developed by our research group. Calculations use routine second-order finite differencing with boundary layer fraction and sensible heating and latent heat release represented as parameterized quantities. Of particular interest are the latent heat release estimates, which combine convectional parameterized values with estimates derived from satellite IR data. The latter were obtained using an algorithm derived by Dr. Franklin R. Robertson of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Results are contained in project reports, theses and publications identified in previous review summaries and reports, and publications listed at the end of this summary. Significant accomplishments in the past year are presented.

  11. Conditional random field approach to prediction of protein-protein interactions using domain information.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Morihiro; Kamada, Mayumi; Song, Jiangning; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2011-06-20

    For understanding cellular systems and biological networks, it is important to analyze functions and interactions of proteins and domains. Many methods for predicting protein-protein interactions have been developed. It is known that mutual information between residues at interacting sites can be higher than that at non-interacting sites. It is based on the thought that amino acid residues at interacting sites have coevolved with those at the corresponding residues in the partner proteins. Several studies have shown that such mutual information is useful for identifying contact residues in interacting proteins. We propose novel methods using conditional random fields for predicting protein-protein interactions. We focus on the mutual information between residues, and combine it with conditional random fields. In the methods, protein-protein interactions are modeled using domain-domain interactions. We perform computational experiments using protein-protein interaction datasets for several organisms, and calculate AUC (Area Under ROC Curve) score. The results suggest that our proposed methods with and without mutual information outperform EM (Expectation Maximization) method proposed by Deng et al., which is one of the best predictors based on domain-domain interactions. We propose novel methods using conditional random fields with and without mutual information between domains. Our methods based on domain-domain interactions are useful for predicting protein-protein interactions.

  12. Detection of conserved segments in proteins: iterative scanning of sequence databases with alignment blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Tatusov, R L; Altschul, S F; Koonin, E V

    1994-01-01

    We describe an approach to analyzing protein sequence databases that, starting from a single uncharacterized sequence or group of related sequences, generates blocks of conserved segments. The procedure involves iterative database scans with an evolving position-dependent weight matrix constructed from a coevolving set of aligned conserved segments. For each iteration, the expected distribution of matrix scores under a random model is used to set a cutoff score for the inclusion of a segment in the next iteration. This cutoff may be calculated to allow the chance inclusion of either a fixed number or a fixed proportion of false positive segments. With sufficiently high cutoff scores, the procedure converged for all alignment blocks studied, with varying numbers of iterations required. Different methods for calculating weight matrices from alignment blocks were compared. The most effective of those tested was a logarithm-of-odds, Bayesian-based approach that used prior residue probabilities calculated from a mixture of Dirichlet distributions. The procedure described was used to detect novel conserved motifs of potential biological importance. Images PMID:7991589

  13. Categorizing Biases in High-Confidence High-Throughput Protein-Protein Interaction Data Sets*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Ivanic, Joseph; Memišević, Vesna; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2011-01-01

    We characterized and evaluated the functional attributes of three yeast high-confidence protein-protein interaction data sets derived from affinity purification/mass spectrometry, protein-fragment complementation assay, and yeast two-hybrid experiments. The interacting proteins retrieved from these data sets formed distinct, partially overlapping sets with different protein-protein interaction characteristics. These differences were primarily a function of the deployed experimental technologies used to recover these interactions. This affected the total coverage of interactions and was especially evident in the recovery of interactions among different functional classes of proteins. We found that the interaction data obtained by the yeast two-hybrid method was the least biased toward any particular functional characterization. In contrast, interacting proteins in the affinity purification/mass spectrometry and protein-fragment complementation assay data sets were over- and under-represented among distinct and different functional categories. We delineated how these differences affected protein complex organization in the network of interactions, in particular for strongly interacting complexes (e.g. RNA and protein synthesis) versus weak and transient interacting complexes (e.g. protein transport). We quantified methodological differences in detecting protein interactions from larger protein complexes, in the correlation of protein abundance among interacting proteins, and in their connectivity of essential proteins. In the latter case, we showed that minimizing inherent methodology biases removed many of the ambiguous conclusions about protein essentiality and protein connectivity. We used these findings to rationalize how biological insights obtained by analyzing data sets originating from different sources sometimes do not agree or may even contradict each other. An important corollary of this work was that discrepancies in biological insights did not

  14. Categorizing biases in high-confidence high-throughput protein-protein interaction data sets.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueping; Ivanic, Joseph; Memisević, Vesna; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2011-12-01

    We characterized and evaluated the functional attributes of three yeast high-confidence protein-protein interaction data sets derived from affinity purification/mass spectrometry, protein-fragment complementation assay, and yeast two-hybrid experiments. The interacting proteins retrieved from these data sets formed distinct, partially overlapping sets with different protein-protein interaction characteristics. These differences were primarily a function of the deployed experimental technologies used to recover these interactions. This affected the total coverage of interactions and was especially evident in the recovery of interactions among different functional classes of proteins. We found that the interaction data obtained by the yeast two-hybrid method was the least biased toward any particular functional characterization. In contrast, interacting proteins in the affinity purification/mass spectrometry and protein-fragment complementation assay data sets were over- and under-represented among distinct and different functional categories. We delineated how these differences affected protein complex organization in the network of interactions, in particular for strongly interacting complexes (e.g. RNA and protein synthesis) versus weak and transient interacting complexes (e.g. protein transport). We quantified methodological differences in detecting protein interactions from larger protein complexes, in the correlation of protein abundance among interacting proteins, and in their connectivity of essential proteins. In the latter case, we showed that minimizing inherent methodology biases removed many of the ambiguous conclusions about protein essentiality and protein connectivity. We used these findings to rationalize how biological insights obtained by analyzing data sets originating from different sources sometimes do not agree or may even contradict each other. An important corollary of this work was that discrepancies in biological insights did not

  15. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  16. RNA polymerase II conserved protein domains as platforms for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    García-López, M Carmen

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase II establishes many protein-protein interactions with transcriptional regulators to coordinate gene expression, but little is known about protein domains involved in the contact with them. We use a new approach to look for conserved regions of the RNA pol II of S. cerevisiae located at the surface of the structure of the complex, hypothesizing that they might be involved in the interaction with transcriptional regulators. We defined five different conserved domains and demonstrate that all of them make contact with transcriptional regulators. PMID:21922063

  17. Physical tuning of cellulose-polymer interactions utilizing cationic block copolymers based on PCL and quaternized PDMAEMA.

    PubMed

    Utsel, Simon; Bruce, Carl; Pettersson, Torbjörn; Fogelström, Linda; Carlmark, Anna; Malmström, Eva; Wågberg, Lars

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the objective was to synthesize and evaluate the properties of a compatibilizer based on poly(ε-caprolactone) aimed at tuning the surface properties of cellulose fibers used in fiber-reinforced biocomposites. The compatibilizer is an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of two different blocks which have different functions. One block is cationic, quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and can therefore electrostatically attach to anionic reinforcing materials such as cellulose-based fibers/fibrils under mild conditions in water. The other block consists of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) which can decrease the surface energy of a cellulose surface and also has the ability to form physical entanglements with a PCL surface thereby improving the interfacial adhesion. Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) and Ring-Opening Polymerization (ROP) were used to synthesize three block copolymers with the same length of the cationic PDMAEMA block but with different lengths of the PCL blocks. The block copolymers form cationic micelles in water which can adsorb to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. After heat treatment, the contact angles of water on the treated surfaces increased significantly, and contact angles close to those of pure PCL were obtained for the block copolymers with longer PCL blocks. AFM force measurements showed a clear entangling behavior between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 °C, which is important for the formation of an adhesive interface in the final biocomposites. This demonstrates that this type of amphiphilic block copolymer can be used to improve interactions in biocomposites between anionic reinforcing materials such as cellulose-based fibers/fibrils and less polar matrices such as PCL.

  18. Nanoparticle-target interactions parallel antibody-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Koh, Isaac; Hong, Rui; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic particles can act as magnetic relaxation switches (MRSw's) when they bind to target analytes, and switch between their dispersed and aggregated states resulting in changes in the spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) of their surrounding water protons. Both nanoparticles (NPs, 10-100 nm) and micrometer-sized particles (MPs) have been employed as MRSw's, to sense drugs, metabolites, oligonucleotides, proteins, bacteria, and mammalian cells. To better understand how NPs or MPs interact with targets, we employed as a molecular recognition system the reaction between the Tag peptide of the influenza virus hemagglutinin and a monoclonal antibody to that peptide (anti-Tag). To obtain targets of different size and valency, we attached the Tag peptide to BSA (M(w)= 65000 Daltons, diameter = 8 nm) and to Latex spheres (diameter = 900 nm). To obtain magnetic probes of very different sizes, anti-Tag was conjugated to 40 nm NPs and 1 microm MPs. MP and NP probes reacted with Tag peptide targets in a manner similar to antibody/antigen reactions in solution, exhibiting so-called Prozone effects. MPs detected all types of targets with higher sensitivity than NPs with targets of higher valency being better detected than those of lower valency. The Tag/anti Tag recognition system can be used to synthesize combinations of molecular targets and magnetic probes, to more fully understand the aggregation reaction that occurs when probes bind targets in solution and the ensuing changes in water relaxation times that result.

  19. Lipid demixing and protein-protein interactions in the adsorption of charged proteins on mixed membranes.

    PubMed Central

    May, S; Harries, D; Ben-Shaul, A

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption free energy of charged proteins on mixed membranes, containing varying amounts of (oppositely) charged lipids, is calculated based on a mean-field free energy expression that accounts explicitly for the ability of the lipids to demix locally, and for lateral interactions between the adsorbed proteins. Minimization of this free energy functional yields the familiar nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the boundary condition at the membrane surface that allows for lipid charge rearrangement. These two self-consistent equations are solved simultaneously. The proteins are modeled as uniformly charged spheres and the (bare) membrane as an ideal two-dimensional binary mixture of charged and neutral lipids. Substantial variations in the lipid charge density profiles are found when highly charged proteins adsorb on weakly charged membranes; the lipids, at a certain demixing entropy penalty, adjust their concentration in the vicinity of the adsorbed protein to achieve optimal charge matching. Lateral repulsive interactions between the adsorbed proteins affect the lipid modulation profile and, at high densities, result in substantial lowering of the binding energy. Adsorption isotherms demonstrating the importance of lipid mobility and protein-protein interactions are calculated using an adsorption equation with a coverage-dependent binding constant. Typically, at bulk-surface equilibrium (i.e., when the membrane surface is "saturated" by adsorbed proteins), the membrane charges are "overcompensated" by the protein charges, because only about half of the protein charges (those on the hemispheres facing the membrane) are involved in charge neutralization. Finally, it is argued that the formation of lipid-protein domains may be enhanced by electrostatic adsorption of proteins, but its origin (e.g., elastic deformations associated with lipid demixing) is not purely electrostatic. PMID:11023883

  20. Relationship between blocking temperature and strength of interparticle interaction in magnetic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehra, M. S.; Pisane, K. L.

    2016-06-01

    In magnetic nanoparticle systems, the variation of the blocking temperature TB with the measuring frequency fm is often used to determine the strength of the interparticle interactions (IPI) through a parameter Φ or the Vogel-Fulcher temperature To. Presence of IPI is inferred if To > 0 and Φ = ∆TB/[ TB ∆ log10fm ] < 0.13 where Δ signifies changes in TB and fm. Here it is shown that these two parameters are related by the Eq. Φ = Φo [ 1 - (To/TB(1)) ] where Φo ≈ 0.11-0.15 is a constant of the system depending on the magnitudes of measuring frequency and the attempt frequency fo of the Néel relaxation. Using data on a variety of nanoparticle systems, experimental verification of this relationship is also presented.

  1. Computational Study of Positron-Monovacancy Interaction in d-Block Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji

    2015-08-01

    The positron-monovacancy interaction in d-block metals (except for Mn, Tc, and Hg) has been studied by the two-component density-functional-theory formalism [E. Boroński and R. M. Nieminen, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.34.3820, Phys. Rev. B 34, 3820 (1986)]. On the unrelaxed structure, the positron lifetime calculated with the presence of a positron is generally longer than that obtained neglecting the positron effect. When the atomic positions are relaxed, the difference is widened, especially for the group V metals. The inward relaxation of the atoms surrounding the monovacancy is suppressed when the positron effect is taken into account. The difference in the positron lifetime can be also related to the bulk modulus and the cohesive energy.

  2. Engineering modular protein interaction switches by sequence overlap.

    PubMed

    Sallee, Nathan A; Yeh, Brian J; Lim, Wendell A

    2007-04-18

    Many cellular signaling pathways contain proteins whose interactions change in response to upstream inputs, allowing for conditional activation or repression of the interaction based on the presence of the input molecule. The ability to engineer similar regulation into protein interaction elements would provide us with powerful tools for controlling cell signaling. Here we describe an approach for engineering diverse synthetic protein interaction switches. Specifically, by overlapping the sequences of pairs of protein interaction domains and peptides, we have been able to generate mutually exclusive regulation over their interactions. Thus, the hybrid protein (which is composed of the two overlapped interaction modules) can bind to either of the two respective ligands for those modules, but not to both simultaneously. We show that these synthetic switch proteins can be used to regulate specific protein-protein interactions in vivo. These switches allow us to disrupt an interaction with the addition or activation of a protein input that has no natural connection to the interaction in question. Therefore, they give us the ability to make novel connections between normally unrelated signaling pathways and to rewire the input/output relationships of cellular behaviors. Our experiments also suggest a possible mechanism by which complex regulatory proteins might have evolved from simpler components.

  3. Retinoblastoma Protein Disrupts Interactions Required for RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Josephine E.; Brown, Timothy R. P.; Allison, Simon J.; Scott, Pamela H.; White, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been shown to suppress RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription in vivo (R. J. White, D. Trouche, K. Martin, S. P. Jackson, and T. Kouzarides, Nature 382:88–90, 1996). This regulation involves interaction with TFIIIB, a multisubunit factor that is required for the expression of all Pol III templates (C. G. C. Larminie, C. A. Cairns, R. Mital, K. Martin, T. Kouzarides, S. P. Jackson, and R. J. White, EMBO J. 16:2061–2071, 1997; W.-M. Chu, Z. Wang, R. G. Roeder, and C. W. Schmid, J. Biol. Chem. 272:14755–14761, 1997). However, it has not been established why RB binding to TFIIIB results in transcriptional repression. For several Pol II-transcribed genes, RB has been shown to inhibit expression by recruiting histone deacetylases, which are thought to decrease promoter accessibility. We present evidence that histone deacetylases exert a negative effect on Pol III activity in vivo. However, RB remains able to regulate Pol III transcription in the presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Instead, RB represses by disrupting interactions between TFIIIB and other components of the basal Pol III transcription apparatus. Recruitment of TFIIIB to most class III genes requires its binding to TFIIIC2, but this can be blocked by RB. In addition, RB disrupts the interaction between TFIIIB and Pol III that is essential for transcription. The ability of RB to inhibit these key interactions can explain its action as a potent repressor of class III gene expression. PMID:11094071

  4. Development of small molecules designed to modulate protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Che, Ye; Brooks, Bernard R; Marshall, Garland R

    2006-02-01

    Protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous, essential to almost all known biological processes, and offer attractive opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Developing small molecules that modulate protein-protein interactions is challenging, owing to the large size of protein-complex interface, the lack of well-defined binding pockets, etc. We describe a general approach based on the "privileged-structure hypothesis" [Che, Ph.D. Thesis, Washington University, 2003] - that any organic templates capable of mimicking surfaces of protein-recognition motifs are potential privileged scaffolds as protein-complex antagonists--to address the challenges inherent in the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  5. Biomimetic block copolymer particles with gated nanopores and ultrahigh protein sorption capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haizhou; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Nunes, Suzana P.; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The design of micro- or nanoparticles that can encapsulate sensitive molecules such as drugs, hormones, proteins or peptides is of increasing importance for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Examples are micelles, liposomes and vesicles. The tiny and, in most cases, hollow spheres are used as vehicles for transport and controlled administration of pharmaceutical drugs or nutrients. Here we report a simple strategy to fabricate microspheres by block copolymer self-assembly. The microsphere particles have monodispersed nanopores that can act as pH-responsive gates. They contain a highly porous internal structure, which is analogous to the Schwarz P structure. The internal porosity of the particles contributes to their high sorption capacity and sustained release behaviour. We successfully separated similarly sized proteins using these particles. The ease of particle fabrication by macrophase separation and self-assembly, and the robustness of the particles makes them ideal for sorption, separation, transport and sustained delivery of pharmaceutical substances.

  6. Nanoporous membrane based on block copolymer thin film for protein drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-03-01

    We studied long term and controlled release of protein drugs by using nanoporous membranes with various pore sizes. Nanoporous membrane consists of the separation layer prepared by polystyrene-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) copolymer thin film and conventional microfiltration membrane as a support. We demonstrate a long-term constant in vitro release of bovine serum albumin (BSA)and human growth hormone ) (hGH) without their denaturation up to 2 months. A nearly constant serum concentration of hGH was maintained up to 3 weeks in SD rats. The long-term constant delivery based on this membrane for protein drugs within the therapeutic range can be highly appreciated for the patients with hormone- deficiency.

  7. In vitro self-assembly of tailorable nanotubes from a simple protein building block

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Lai, Angela H.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Cheng, Yifan; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for generating discretely structured protein nanotubes from the simple ring-shaped building block, homohexameric Hcp1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our design exploited the observation that the crystal lattice of Hcp1 contains rings stacked in a repeating head-to-tail pattern. High-resolution detail of the ring–ring interface allowed the selection of sites for specific cysteine mutations capable of engaging in disulfide bond formation across rings, thereby generating stable Hcp1 nanotubes. Protein nanotubes containing up to 25 subunits (≈100 nm in length) were self-assembled under simple conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the tube ends and interior can be independently and specifically functionalized to generate nanocapsules. PMID:18310321

  8. Evolution of protein interactions: from interactomes to interfaces.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphael

    2014-07-15

    Protein-protein interactions lie at the heart of most cellular processes. Many experimental and computational studies aim to deepen our understanding of these interactions and improve our capacity to predict them. In this respect, the evolutionary perspective is most interesting, since the preservation of structure and function puts constraints on the evolution of proteins and their interactions. However, uncovering these constraints remains a challenge, and the description and detection of evolutionary signals in protein-protein interactions is currently a very active field of research. Here, we review recent works dissecting the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction evolution and exploring how to use evolutionary information to predict interactions, both at the global level of the interactome and at the detailed level of protein-protein interfaces. We first present to what extent protein-protein interactions are found to be conserved within interactomes and which properties can influence their conservation. We then discuss the evolutionary and co-evolutionary pressures applied on protein-protein interfaces. Finally, we describe how the computational prediction of interfaces can benefit from evolutionary inputs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. RING finger protein PLR-1 blocks Wnt signaling by altering trafficking of Wnt Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan E.

    Secreted Wnt proteins control a wide range of essential developmental processes, including axon guidance and establishment of anteroposterior neuronal polarity. We identified a transmembrane RING finger protein, PLR-1, that governs the response to Wnts by reducing the cell surface levels of Wnt receptors Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are normally enriched at the plasma membrane where they are capable of detecting and responding to extracellular Wnts. However, when PLR-1 is expressed Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are no longer detected at the cell surface and instead colocalize with PLR-1 in endosomes and Golgi. PLR-1 is related to a broad family of transmembrane proteins that contain a lumenal protease associated domain and a cytosolic RING finger. The RING finger is a hallmark of one type of E3 ubiquitin ligase and monoubiquitination is commonly used to regulate protein trafficking. Protease associated domains are largely thought to mediate interactions between proteins. To identify the domains responsible for PLR-1 regulation of Frizzled from the cell surface we utilized a series of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and protein truncations containing various domains from PLR-1 and Frizzled. Our data suggests that PLR-1 and Frizzled interact and form a complex via their respective extracellular/lumenal domains, and that ubiqiuitination of Frizzled by PLR-1 targets the Frizzled/PLR-1 complex to the endosome.

  10. Exploiting Host-Guest Interactions for the Synthesis of a Rod-Rod Block Copolymer with Crystalline and Liquid-Crystalline Blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Gu, Ke-Hua; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Meng-Yao; Zhou, Sheng; Shen, Zhihao; Fan, Xing-He

    2016-11-21

    By making use of the host-guest interactions between the host molecule tris-o-phenylenedioxycyclotriphosphazene (TPP) and the rod-coil block copolymer (BCP) poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(octyl 4'-octyloxy-2-vinylbiphenyl-4-carboxylate) (PEO-b-PVBP), the supramolecular rod-rod block copolymer P(EO@TPP)-b-PVBP was constructed. It consists of a crystalline segment P(EO@TPP) with a hexagonal crystalline structure and a columnar nematic liquid-crystalline segment (PVBP). As the PVBP segments arrange themselves as columnar nematic phases, the crystalline structure of the inclusion complex P(EO@TPP), which has a smaller diameter, is destroyed. The self-assembled nanostructure is thus clearly affected by the interplay between the two blocks. On the basis of wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we conclude that the supramolecular rod-rod BCP can self-assemble into a cylinder-in-cylinder double hexagonal structure. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Defining subdomains of the K domain important for protein-protein interactions of plant MADS proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingzhen; Jack, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    The MADS proteins APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI), SEPALLATAI (SEPI), SEP2, SEP3, AGAMOUS, and APETALA are required for proper floral organ identity in Arabidopsis flowers. All of these floral MADS proteins conserve two domains: the MADS domain that mediates DNA binding and dimerization, and the K domain that mediates protein protein interaction. The K domain is postulated to form a several amphipathic c-helices referred to as K1, K2, and K3. The K1 and K2 helicies are located entirely within the K domain while the K3 helix spans the K domain-C domain boundary. Here we report on our studies on the interactions of the B class MADS proteins AP3 and PI with the E class MADS proteins SEP1, SEP2, and SEP3. A comparative analysis of mutants in the K domain reveals that the subdomains mediating the PI/AP3 interaction are different from the subdomains mediating the PI/SEP3 (or PI/SEP1) interaction. The strong PI/SEP3 (or PI/SEP1) interaction requires K2, part of K3, and the interhelical region between K1 and K2. By contrast, K1, K2 and the region between K1 and K2 are important for strong AP3/PI interaction. Most of the K3 helix does not appear to be important for either the PI/AP3 or the PI/SEP3 (or PI/SEP1) interaction. Conserved hydrophobic positions are most important for the strength of both PI/AP3 and PI/SEP3 dimerization, though ionic and/or polar interactions appear to play a secondary role.

  12. Specific interactions improve the loading capacity of block copolymer micelles in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Cristiano; Schmidt, Vanessa; Borsali, Redouane

    2007-06-19

    Block copolymer micelles find application in many fields as nanocarriers, especially in drug delivery. We report herein that specific interactions between hydrophobic guest molecules and core-forming segments can significantly improve the loading capacity of polymeric micelles. High loading capacities (>100% weight/weight of polymer (w/wp)) were systematically observed for the encapsulation of probes containing weak carboxylic acid groups by micellar nanoparticles having poly[2-(dialkylamino)ethyl methacrylate] cores (i.e., particles whose cargo space exhibits antagonist weak base functions), as demonstrated by the incorporation of indomethacin (IND), ibuprofen (IBPF), and trans-3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)cinnamic acid (F-CIN) into either poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PEO-b-PDPA) or poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-b-PDPA (PG2MA-b-PDPA) micelles. The esterification of IND yielding to a nonionizable IND ethyl ester derivative (IND-Et) caused an abrupt decrease in the micellar loading capacity down to 10-15% w/wp. Similar results were also obtained when IND was combined with nonionizable block copolymers such as PEO-b-polycaprolactone (PEO-b-PCL) and PEO-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PGMA). The existence of acid-base interactions between the solubilizate and the weak polybase block forming the micelle core was confirmed by 1H NMR measurements. However, the incorporation of high numbers of hydrophobic guest molecules inside polymeric micelles can provoke not only an increase in the hydrodynamic size (2RH) of the objects but also a substantial change in the morphology (transition from spheres to cylinders). The application of the Higuchi model showed that the probe release followed a diffusion-controlled mechanism, and diffusion coefficients (D) on the order of 10-18-10-17 cm2/s were determined for IND release from 1.0 mg/mL PEO113-b-PDPA50 + 100% w/wp IND. Probe release from micelles with weak polybase-based cores can also be

  13. Selective separation of similarly sized proteins with tunable nanoporous block copolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Haizhou; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Pradeep, Neelakanda; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2013-01-22

    An integral asymmetric membrane was fabricated in a fast and one-step process by combining the self-assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) with nonsolvent-induced phase separation. The structure was found to be composed of a thin layer of densely packed highly ordered cylindrical channels with uniform pore sizes perpendicular to the surface on top of a nonordered sponge-like layer. The as-assembled membrane obtained a water flux of more than 3200 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), which was at least an order of magnitude higher than the water fluxes of commercially available membranes with comparable pore sizes, making this membrane particularly well suited to size-selective and charge-based separation of biomolecules. To test the performance of the membrane, we conducted diffusion experiments at the physiological pH of 7.4 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and globulin-γ, two proteins with different diameters but too close in size (2-fold difference in molecular mass) to be efficiently separated via conventional dialysis membrane processes. The diffusion rate differed by a factor of 87, the highest value reported to date. We also analyzed charge-based diffusive transport and separation of two proteins of similar molecular weight (BSA and bovine hemoglobin (BHb)) through the membrane as a function of external pH. The membrane achieved a selectivity of about 10 at pH 4.7, the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA. We then positively charged the membrane to improve the separation selectivity. With the modified membrane BSA was completely blocked when the pH was 7.0, the pI of BHb, while BHb was completely blocked at pH 4.7. Our results demonstrate the potential of our asymmetric membrane to efficiently separate biological substances/pharmaceuticals in bioscience, biotechnology, and biomedicine applications.

  14. Heterogeneous patterns on block copolymer thin film via solvent annealing: Effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Zhu, Jintao; Liang, Haojun

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous patterns consisting of nanometer-scaled hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains were generated by self-assembly of poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PHEMA) block copolymer thin film. The effect of the heterogeneity of the polymer film surface on the nonspecific adsorption of the protein human plasma fibrinogen (FBN, 5.0 × 5.0 × 47.5 nm3) was investigated. The kinetics of the FBN adsorption varies from a single-component Langmuir model on homogeneous hydrophilic PHEMA to a two-stage spreading relaxation model on homogeneous hydrophobic PS surface. On a heterogeneous PS-b-PHEMA surface with majority PS part, the initial FBN adsorption rate remains the same as that on the homogeneous PS surface. However, hydrophilic PHEMA microdomains on the heterogeneous surface slow down the second spreading stage of the FBN adsorption process, leading to a surface excess of adsorbed FBN molecules less than the presumed one simply calculated as adsorption onto multiple domains. Importantly, when the PS-b-PHEMA surface is annealed to form minority domelike PS domains (diameter: ˜50-100 nm) surrounded by a majority PHEMA matrix, such surface morphology proves to be strongly protein-repulsive. These interesting findings can be attributed to the enhancement of the spread FBN molecule in a mobile state by the heterogeneity of polymer film surface before irreversible adsorption occurs.

  15. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of APC-Asef interaction block colorectal cancer migration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiming; Deng, Rong; Yang, Xiuyan; Shang, Jialin; Lu, Shaoyong; Zhao, Yanlong; Song, Kun; Liu, Xinyi; Zhang, Qiufen; Chen, Yu; Chinn, Y Eugene; Wu, Geng; Li, Jian; Chen, Guoqiang; Yu, Jianxiu; Zhang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    The binding of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) to its receptor Asef relieves the negative intramolecular regulation of Asef and leads to aberrant cell migration in human colorectal cancer. Because of its crucial role in metastatic dissemination, the interaction between APC and Asef is an attractive target for anti-colorectal-cancer therapy. We rationally designed a series of peptidomimetics that act as potent inhibitors of the APC interface. Crystal structures and biochemical and cellular assays showed that the peptidomimetics in the APC pocket inhibited the migration of colorectal cells by disrupting APC-Asef interaction. By using the peptidomimetic inhibitor as a chemical probe, we found that CDC42 was the downstream GTPase involved in APC-stimulated Asef activation in colorectal cancer cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of exploiting APC-Asef interaction to regulate the migration of colorectal cancer cells, and provides what to our knowledge is the first class of protein-protein interaction inhibitors available for the development of cancer therapeutics targeting APC-Asef signaling.

  16. Preparation of non-aggregated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) by non-covalent coating with a block copolymer and proteins for enhancement of intracellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Woo; Lee, Seonju; Jang, Sangmok; Han, Kyu Young; Kim, Younggyu; Hyun, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are very promising fluorophores for use in biosystems due to their high biocompatibility and photostability. To overcome their tendency to aggregate in physiological solutions, which severely limits the biological applications of FNDs, we developed a new non-covalent coating method using a block copolymer, PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-BMA), or proteins such as BSA and HSA. By simple mixing of the block copolymer with FNDs, the cationic DMAEMA and hydrophobic BMA moieties can strongly interact with the anionic and hydrophobic moieties on the FND surface, while the PEG block can form a shell to prevent the direct contact between FNDs. The polymer-coated FNDs, along with BSA- and HSA-coated FNDs, showed non-aggregation characteristics and maintained their size at the physiological salt concentration. The well-dispersed, polymer- or protein-coated FNDs in physiological solutions showed enhanced intracellular uptake, which was confirmed by CLSM. In addition, the biocompatibility of the coated FNDs was expressly supported by a cytotoxicity assay. Our simple non-covalent coating with the block copolymer, which can be easily modified by various chemical methods, projects a very promising outlook for future biomedical applications, especially in comparison with covalent coating or protein-based coating.

  17. MCLIP Detection of Novel Protein-Protein Interactions at the Nuclear Envelope.

    PubMed

    Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Hallberg, Einar

    2016-01-01

    The organization and function of the nuclear envelope (NE) involves hundreds of nuclear membrane proteins and myriad protein-protein interactions, most of which are still uncharacterized. Many NE proteins interact stably or dynamically with the nuclear lamina or chromosomes. This can make them difficult to extract under nondenaturing conditions, and greatly limits our ability to explore and identify functional protein interactions at the NE. This knowledge is needed to understand nuclear envelope structure and the mechanisms of human laminopathy diseases. This chapter provides detailed protocols for MCLIP (membrane cross-linking immunoprecipitation) identification of novel protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells.

  18. Protein-Protein Interactions Suggest Novel Activities of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pUL103

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Daniel A.; Glassbrook, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that causes severe disease in newborns and immunocompromised patients. During infection, the host cell endosecretory system is remodeled to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). We and others previously identified the conserved, multifunctional HCMV virion tegument protein pUL103 as important for cVAC biogenesis and efficient secondary envelopment. To help define its mechanisms of action and predict additional functions, we used two complementary methods, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) and proximity biotinylation (BioID), to identify viral and cellular proteins that interact with pUL103. By using the two methods in parallel and applying stringent selection criteria, we identified potentially high-value interactions of pUL103 with 13 HCMV and 18 cellular proteins. Detection of the previously identified pUL103-pUL71 interaction, as well as verification of several interactions by reverse co-IP, supports the specificity of our screening process. As might be expected for a tegument protein, interactions were identified that suggest distinct roles for pUL103 across the arc of lytic infection, including interactions with proteins involved in cellular antiviral responses, nuclear activities, and biogenesis and transport of cytoplasmic vesicles. Further analysis of some of these interactions expands our understanding of the multifunctional repertoire of pUL103: we detected HCMV pUL103 in nuclei of infected cells and identified an ALIX-binding domain within the pUL103 sequence. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is able to reconfigure the host cell machinery to establish a virion production factory, the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). cVAC biogenesis and operation represent targets for development of novel HCMV antivirals. We previously showed that the HCMV tegument protein pUL103 is required for cVAC biogenesis. Using pUL103 as bait, we investigated viral and

  19. Interactions between permeant and blocking anions inside the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Binding of cytoplasmic anionic open channel blockers within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is antagonized by extracellular Cl(-). In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the interaction between extracellular Cl(-) (and other anions) and cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions inside the CFTR channel pore. In constitutively open (E1371Q-CFTR) channels, these different anions bind to two separate sites, located in the outer and inner vestibules of the pore respectively, in a mutually antagonistic fashion. A mutation in the inner vestibule (I344K) that greatly increased Pt(NO2)4(2-) binding affinity also greatly strengthened antagonistic Cl(-):blocker interactions as well as the voltage-dependence of block. Quantitative analysis of ion binding affinity suggested that the I344K mutation strengthened interactions not only with intracellular Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions but also with extracellular Cl(-), and that altered blocker Cl(-)- and voltage-dependence were due to the introduction of a novel type of antagonistic ion:ion interaction inside the pore that was independent of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule. It is proposed that this mutation alters the arrangement of anion binding sites inside the pore, allowing both Cl(-) and Pt(NO2)4(2-) to bind concurrently within the inner vestibule in a strongly mutually antagonistic fashion. However, the I344K mutation does not increase single channel conductance following disruption of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule in R334Q channels. Implications for the arrangement of ion binding sites in the pore, and their functional consequences for blocker binding and for rapid Cl(-) permeation, are discussed.

  20. Cryptic protein-protein interaction motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of MHCI proteins.

    PubMed

    Frietze, Karla K; Pappy, Adlai L; Melson, Jack W; O'Driscoll, Emily E; Tyler, Carolyn M; Perlman, David H; Boulanger, Lisa M

    2016-07-19

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) proteins present antigenic peptides for immune surveillance and play critical roles in nervous system development and plasticity. Most MHCI are transmembrane proteins. The extracellular domain of MHCI interacts with immunoreceptors, peptides, and co-receptors to mediate immune signaling. While the cytoplasmic domain also plays important roles in endocytic trafficking, cross-presentation of extracellularly derived antigens, and CTL priming, the molecular mediators of cytoplasmic signaling by MHCI remain largely unknown. Here we show that the cytoplasmic domain of MHCI contains putative protein-protein interaction domains known as PDZ (PSD95/disc large/zonula occludens-1) ligands. PDZ ligands are motifs that bind to PDZ domains to organize and mediate signaling at cell-cell contacts. PDZ ligands are short, degenerate motifs, and are therefore difficult to identify via sequence homology alone, but several lines of evidence suggest that putative PDZ ligand motifs in MHCI are under positive selective pressure. Putative PDZ ligands are found in all of the 99 MHCI proteins examined from diverse species, and are enriched in the cytoplasmic domain, where PDZ interactions occur. Both the position of the PDZ ligand and the class of ligand motif are conserved across species, as well as among genes within a species. Non-synonymous substitutions, when they occur, frequently preserve the motif. Of the many specific possible PDZ ligand motifs, a handful are strikingly and selectively overrepresented in MHCI's cytoplasmic domain, but not elsewhere in the same proteins. Putative PDZ ligands in MHCI encompass conserved serine and tyrosine residues that are targets of phosphorylation, a post-translational modification that can regulate PDZ interactions. Finally, proof-of-principle in vitro interaction assays demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domains of particular MHCI proteins can bind directly and specifically to PDZ1 and PDZ4&5 of MAGI

  1. S-linked protein homocysteinylation: identifying targets based on structural, physicochemical and protein-protein interactions of homocysteinylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Silla, Yumnam; Sundaramoorthy, Elayanambi; Talwar, Puneet; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2013-05-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine, a thiol-containing amino acid is associated with a wide spectrum of disease conditions. A majority (>80 %) of the circulating homocysteine exist in protein-bound form. Homocysteine can bind to free cysteine residues in the protein or could cleave accessible cysteine disulfide bonds via thiol disulfide exchange reaction. Binding of homocysteine to proteins could potentially alter the structure and/or function of the protein. To date only 21 proteins have been experimentally shown to bind homocysteine. In this study we attempted to identify other proteins that could potentially bind to homocysteine based on the criteria that such proteins will have significant 3D structural homology with the proteins that have been experimentally validated and have solvent accessible cysteine residues either with high dihedral strain energy (for cysteine-cysteine disulfide bonds) or low pKa (for free cysteine residues). This analysis led us to the identification of 78 such proteins of which 68 proteins had 154 solvent accessible disulfide cysteine pairs with high dihedral strain energy and 10 proteins had free cysteine residues with low pKa that could potentially bind to homocysteine. Further, protein-protein interaction network was built to identify the interacting partners of these putative homocysteine binding proteins. We found that the 21 experimentally validated proteins had 174 interacting partners while the 78 proteins identified in our analysis had 445 first interacting partners. These proteins are mainly involved in biological activities such as complement and coagulation pathway, focal adhesion, ECM-receptor, ErbB signalling and cancer pathways, etc. paralleling the disease-specific attributes associated with hyperhomocysteinemia.

  2. Improved understanding of pathogenesis from protein interactions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tao; He, Zheng-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive mapping and analysis of protein-protein interactions provide not only systematic approaches for dissecting the infection and survival mechanisms of pathogens but also clues for discovering new antibacterial drug targets. Protein interaction data on Mycobacterium tuberculosis have rapidly accumulated over the past several years. This review summarizes the current progress of protein interaction studies on M. tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. These efforts improve our knowledge on the stress response, signaling regulation, protein secretion and drug resistance of the bacteria. M. tuberculosis-host protein interaction studies, although still limited, have recently opened a new door for investigating the pathogenesis of the bacteria. Finally, this review discusses the importance of protein interaction data on identifying and screening new anti-tuberculosis targets and drugs, respectively.

  3. Ensemble learning prediction of protein-protein interactions using proteins functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Saha, Indrajit; Zubek, Julian; Klingström, Tomas; Forsberg, Simon; Wikander, Johan; Kierczak, Marcin; Maulik, Ujjwal; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2014-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for the majority of biological processes. A significant number of computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions using protein sequence, structural and genomic data. Vast experimental data is publicly available on the Internet, but it is scattered across numerous databases. This fact motivated us to create and evaluate new high-throughput datasets of interacting proteins. We extracted interaction data from DIP, MINT, BioGRID and IntAct databases. Then we constructed descriptive features for machine learning purposes based on data from Gene Ontology and DOMINE. Thereafter, four well-established machine learning methods: Support Vector Machine, Random Forest, Decision Tree and Naïve Bayes, were used on these datasets to build an Ensemble Learning method based on majority voting. In cross-validation experiment, sensitivity exceeded 80% and classification/prediction accuracy reached 90% for the Ensemble Learning method. We extended the experiment to a bigger and more realistic dataset maintaining sensitivity over 70%. These results confirmed that our datasets are suitable for performing PPI prediction and Ensemble Learning method is well suited for this task. Both the processed PPI datasets and the software are available at .

  4. Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Network: Recent Advances in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Athanasios, Alexiou; Charalampos, Vairaktarakis; Vasileios, Tsiamis; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the cellular components, their interactions and related functions constitute the major conditions in order to understand the cell as an integrated system. More specifically, the Protein-Protein Interactions and the obtained networks are very important in the majority of biological functions and processes, while most of the proteins appear to activate their functionalities through their interaction. Our in depth review analysis, include Sixty-five peer-reviewed research and review studies from several bibliographic databases. The most significant components were fully described, filtered, combined and analyzed in order to provide documented proofs on the Protein-Protein Interaction Network' applications in biomedicine. The Protein-Protein Interaction Network' alignment and mapping give the opportunity of further knowledge extraction concerning the evolutionary relationships between the species through conserved pathways and protein complexes. Additionally, Protein-Protein Interaction Network information has been demonstrated to be able to predict functionally orthologous proteins within sequence homology clusters. Our review analysis concluded that, while Protein- Protein Interaction was used to be characterized just by their large and plain interacting surfaces, they were considered inapplicable for drug discovery studies for a long time. The present review explores multiple technologies implicated in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks, implicating their potential role in drug discovery mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Newcastle Disease Virus V Protein Targets Phosphorylated STAT1 to Block IFN-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xusheng; Fu, Qiang; Meng, Chunchun; Yu, Shengqing; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Luna; Song, Cuiping; Sun, Yingjie; Tan, Lei; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) V protein is considered as an effector for IFN antagonism, however, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, the expression of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1 in cells infected with NDV or transfected with V protein-expressing plasmids were analyzed. Our results showed that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 reduction in the cells depends on the stimulation of IFN-α. In addition, a V-deficient genotype VII recombinant NDV strain rZJ1-VS was constructed using reverse genetic technique to confirm the results. The rZJ1-VS lost the ability to reduce phospho-STAT1 and induced higher expression of IFN-responsive genes in infected cells. Furthermore, treatment with an ubiquitin E1 inhibitor PYR-41 demonstrated that phospho-STAT1 reduction was caused by degradation, but not de-phosphorylation. We conclude that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 degradation to block IFN-α signaling, which adds novel knowledge to the strategies used by paramyxoviruses to evade IFN. PMID:26859759

  6. A surface interaction model for self-assembly of block copolymers under soft confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun-Qing; Liu, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Hong-Dong

    2016-12-01

    The surface interaction between substrates and block copolymers is one of the most important factors that control the alignment of self-assembled domains under thin film confinement. Most previous studies simply modeled substrates modified by grafting polymers as a hard wall with a specified surface energy, leading to an incomplete understanding of the role of grafted polymers. In this study, we propose a general model of surface interactions where the role of grafted polymers is decomposed into two independent contributions: the surface preference and the surface softness. Based on this model, we perform a numerical analysis of the stability competition between perpendicular and parallel lamellae of symmetric diblock copolymers on substrates modified by homopolymers using self-consistent field theory. The effects of the surface preference and the surface softness on the alignment of lamellar domains are carefully examined. A phase diagram of the alignment in the plane of the surface preference parameter and the surface softness parameter is constructed, which reveals a considerable parameter window for preparing stable perpendicular lamellae even on highly preferential substrates.

  7. A Laboratory-Intensive Course on the Experimental Study of Protein-Protein Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherow, D. Scott; Carson, Sue

    2011-01-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions is important to scientists in a wide range of disciplines. We present here the assessment of a lab-intensive course that teaches students techniques used to identify and further study protein-protein interactions. One of the unique elements of the course is that students perform a yeast two-hybrid screen…

  8. A Laboratory-Intensive Course on the Experimental Study of Protein-Protein Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherow, D. Scott; Carson, Sue

    2011-01-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions is important to scientists in a wide range of disciplines. We present here the assessment of a lab-intensive course that teaches students techniques used to identify and further study protein-protein interactions. One of the unique elements of the course is that students perform a yeast two-hybrid screen…

  9. Computational approaches for detecting protein complexes from protein interaction networks: a survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most proteins form macromolecular complexes to perform their biological functions. However, experimentally determined protein complex data, especially of those involving more than two protein partners, are relatively limited in the current state-of-the-art high-throughput experimental techniques. Nevertheless, many techniques (such as yeast-two-hybrid) have enabled systematic screening of pairwise protein-protein interactions en masse. Thus computational approaches for detecting protein complexes from protein interaction data are useful complements to the limited experimental methods. They can be used together with the experimental methods for mapping the interactions of proteins to understand how different proteins are organized into higher-level substructures to perform various cellular functions. Results Given the abundance of pairwise protein interaction data from high-throughput genome-wide experimental screenings, a <