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Sample records for blocked intestinal artery

  1. Pulmonary Artery and Intestinal Temperatures during Heat Stress and Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James; Ganio, Matthew S; Seifert, Thomas; Overgaard, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G

    2011-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose In humans, whole body heating and cooling are used to address physiological questions where core temperature is central to the investigated hypotheses. Core temperature can be measured in various locations throughout the human body. The measurement of intestinal temperature is increasingly used in laboratory settings as well as in athletics. However, it is unknown whether intestinal temperature accurately tracks pulmonary artery blood temperature, the gold standard, during thermal stimuli in resting humans, which is the investigated hypothesis. Methods This study compared pulmonary artery blood temperature (via thermistor in a pulmonary artery catheter) with intestinal temperature (telemetry pill) during whole-body heat stress (n=8), followed by whole-body cooling in healthy humans (mean ± SD age 24 ± 3 yrs; height 183 ± 8 cm; mass 78.1 ± 8.2 kg). Heat stress and subsequent cooling were performed by perfusing warm followed by cold water through a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. Results Prior to heat stress blood temperature (36.69 ± 0.25°C) was less than intestinal temperature (36.96 ± 0.21°C, P = 0.004). The increase in blood temperature after 20 min of heat stress was greater than intestinal temperature (0.70 ± 0.24 vs. 0.47 ± 0.18; P = 0.001). However, the increase in temperatures at the end of heat stress were similar between sites (blood Δ = 1.32 ± 0.20°C vs. intestinal Δ = 1.21 ± 0.36°C; P = 0.30). Subsequent cooling decreased blood temperature (Δ = −1.03 ± 0.34°C) to a greater extent than intestinal temperature (Δ = −0.41 ± 0.30°C, P = 0.04). Conclusion In response to the applied thermal provocations, early temperature changes in the intestine are less than the temperature changes in pulmonary artery blood. PMID:22015711

  2. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systematic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure. (Author)

  3. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-06-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H1 and H2 histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H1 and H2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systemic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H1 and H2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure.

  4. Intestinal Infarction Through Arterial Vascular Obstruction - Case Series from 1st and 3rd Surgery Clinics Cluj-Napoca.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Mocan, Mihaela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case series of intestinal infarction through obstruction of superior mesenteric artery - two cases of acute mesenteric artery embolism, two cases of acute mesenteric artery thrombosis and a case of volvulus.

  5. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide may participate in the vasodilation of the dog hepatic artery

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, G.; Kiss, J.Z.; Papp, M.; Vizi, E.S.

    1986-08-01

    The possible direct action of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on dog hepatic arterial wall or on the noradrenergic innervation of the artery was investigated in vitro. In addition, VIP-containing nerve fibers and terminals were located in the wall of the artery with immunochemical staining. Direct evidence showed that VIP did not affect the release of (TH)norepinephrine but reduced the response of the isolated hepatic artery to electrical field stimulation and exogenous norepinephrine. This suggest that the effect of VIP is postjunctional on the smooth muscle of the artery. VIP-containing nerve fibers and varicosities were observed in the adventitial and medial layer of the arterial wall. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that vasoactive intestinal peptide is a physiological mediator of vasodilation in the hepatic artery.

  7. Neuromuscular block after intra-arterially injected acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Tonali, P.; Gambi, D.

    1973-01-01

    The neuromuscular depolarizing block induced by intra-arterially injected ACh was studied to determine the variability in the same subject and in different subjects without disorders at the motor end-plate. Amplitude of action potentials of the opponens pollicis muscle evoked by intermittent repetitive supramaximal stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist were recorded for one hour from the beginning of ACh injection. The features of prompt and late depression stages after the injection were analysed statistically. Re-testing of the same subjects after a while shows that, in spite of all efforts to maintain the same experimental conditions, variations do occur in late depression. Time course and duration are particularly affected, while the degree of depression is altered but slightly. The presence of such variations limits this test to evaluation of the influence of other factors only within their already established statistical limits. Images PMID:4350703

  8. Distribution of arterial supply to the large intestine in the anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla).

    PubMed

    Mortoza, Amanda Rocha; Rezende, Lorenna Cardoso; Oliveira, Carina da Costa; Ferreira, Jussara Rocha

    2013-08-01

    The blood supply in the large intestine of seven specimens of the lesser anteater, Tamandua tetradactyla, studied. The method included preparation of the macroscopic collection report, perfusion of the arterial network with water, injection of colored latex, fixation in formaldehyde, and preservation in ethanol. For our description and analyses, we performed dissections under mesoscopic light and made photo documentation of our observations. The large intestine of T. tetradactyla is irrigated by the caudal mesenteric artery (rectum, left colic fold, descending colon and transverse colon) and cranial mesenteric artery (right colic fold, cecal pouch). We observed that the large intestine in these animals is implied in the abdominal wall without becoming affixed to the wall, or developing adhesions on individual segments. The caudal mesenteric artery feeds the straight collateral branches (primary, secondary, and tertiary) and a few juxtacolic arched branches (first and second order). The straight branches emerge from the arched branches, bifurcate, and embrace the intestinal loop to irrigate it. The presence of anastomoses between the CaMA and the CrMA apparently ensures a relatively stable flow in the event of failure of either. This is very important, as the peritoneum in this species is completely dependent on blood from these two arteries. The model of vascularization and fixation of the large intestine into the abdominal wall of T. tetradactyla is different from that in other vertebrates.

  9. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome: an unusual cause of intestinal obstruction in palliative care.

    PubMed

    So, Chun-Yan; Chan, Kwok-Ying; Au, Ho-Yan; Chan, Man-Lui; Lai, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon cause of intestinal obstruction and seldom been mentioned in palliative care. Hereby, we reported a case of SMA syndrome who presented with symptoms of upper intestinal obstruction in a 68-year-old patient; subsequent CT findings were classical of SMA syndrome. The patient's history of poliomyelitis and recent significant weight loss were the predisposing factors for SMA syndrome. It also highlights the importance of monitoring signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction in such patients before considering switching to oral feeding.

  10. Hazards of calcium gluconate therapy in the newborn infant: intra-arterial injection producing intestinal necrosis in rabbit ileum.

    PubMed

    Book, L S; Herbst, J J; Stewart, D

    1978-05-01

    Five infants received 10% calcium gluconate via umbilical artery catheters, which resulted in intestinal bleeding and lesions of the buttock, anus, groin, and thigh. The effects of intra-arterial calcium gluconate in two animal models were investigated. Injection of calcium into the aorta in the region of the posterior mesenteric artery resulted in immediate hyperperfusion of the descending colon; this may be an early hemodynamic response to injury in the area of colon supplied by this vessel. Injections into the arterial arcade of the rabbit ileum resulted in intestinal necrosis and villous atrophy. The use of umbilical artery catheters for administration of calcium gluconate is potentially hazardous.

  11. Intestinal brucellosis associated with celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery stenosis and with ileum mucosa and submucosa thickening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miaoqian; Zhu, Qingli; Yang, Qian; Li, Wenbo; Wang, Xinning; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Baotong; Li, Zhenghong; Yang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Brucellosis is a multisystem infection found worldwide that has a broad range of characteristics, which range from acute fever and hepatomegaly to chronic infections that most commonly affect the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, or skeletal system. Gastrointestinal and splanchnic artery involvements in brucellosis are relatively uncommon. Patient concerns: We report a case of brucellosis in an adolescent presenting as intermittent abdominal pain, diarrhea, and fever, with intestinal tract involvement. And stenosis of the celiac artery and the superior mesenteric artery was found after exposed to risk factors of Brucella infection. Splanchnic vessels stenosis and an endothelial lesion may exacerbate the prevalent symptom of abdominal pain, as a form of colic pain, occurring after eating. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed as brucellosis. The narrowing of the SMA and CA was suspected to be vasculitis secondary to the brucellosis. Interventions: The patient was treated with minocycline and rifampicin for 12 weeks totally. Outcomes: The gastrointestinal manifestations of brucellosis recovered rapidly under intensive treatment. However, follow-up imaging revealed that the superior mesenteric artery and celiac artery stenosis was unimproved. Lessons: In brucellosis, gastrointestinal manifestations may be the only observable features of the disease. Splanchnic arterial stenosis is a rare complication of brucellosis. Sonography and computed tomography may be useful for both diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:28079834

  12. Atypical Double Right Coronary Artery Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiogenic Shock and Complete Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Shravan; Chaturvedi, Vikash; Agrawal, Puneet; Razi, Mahmadula; Mahrotra, Anupam; Mishra, Vikas; Kumar, Mukesh; Abdali, Nasar; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Thakur, Ramesh; Varma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Umeshwar

    2017-01-01

    Double right coronary artery (RCA) is an extremely rare coronary artery anomaly. We here report an atherosclerotic double RCA which appeared after primary percutaneous intervention performed to treat a 34-year-old male presenting with acute inferior myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock and complete heart block. This is an unusual case as double RCA had been hidden by total atherosclerotic occlusion of the proximal part of the RCA and complete restoration of patency led complete heart block back to normal sinus rhythm. PMID:28179971

  13. Pharmacologically blocking p53-dependent apoptosis protects intestinal stem cells and mice from radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinwei; Wei, Liang; Cramer, Julie M.; Leibowitz, Brian J.; Judge, Colleen; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Linheng; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C. Y.; Martin, Martin G.; Lagasse, Eric; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation (IR) leads to debilitating and dose-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Using three-dimensional mouse crypt culture, we demonstrated that p53 target PUMA mediates radiation-induced apoptosis via a cell-intrinsic mechanism, and identified the GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR99021 as a potent radioprotector. CHIR99021 treatment improved Lgr5+ cell survival and crypt regeneration after radiation in culture and mice. CHIR99021 treatment specifically blocked apoptosis and PUMA induction and K120 acetylation of p53 mediated by acetyl-transferase Tip60, while it had no effect on p53 stabilization, phosphorylation or p21 induction. CHIR99021 also protected human intestinal cultures from radiation by PUMA but not p21 suppression. These results demonstrate that p53 posttranslational modifications play a key role in the pathological and apoptotic response of the intestinal stem cells to radiation and can be targeted pharmacologically. PMID:25858503

  14. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  15. Neuromuscular block after intra-arterially injected acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, P.; Tonali, P.; Gambi, D.

    1973-01-01

    It has been suggested that the effect of ACTH in myasthenia gravis may be ascribed to an action involving neuromuscular transmission which favours repolarization processes, with a tendency towards hyperpolarization of the membranes of muscle fibres and motor nerve endings. A similar mechanism has been postulated for the action of ACTH in epilepsy (Klein, 1970). A direct or indirect action on nerve membrane would interfere with depolarization. There is evidence of raised concentration of intracellular potassium and increased outflow of sodium ions which would cause hyperpolarization of the membrane. This paper studies the effect of ACTH on the late block of neuromuscular transmission caused by acetylcholine (ACTH). Images PMID:4350704

  16. Utility of arterial phase of dynamic CT for detection of intestinal ischemia associated with strangulation ileus

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Gaku; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Kono, Tsuguaki; Tohma, Takayuki; Gunji, Hisashi; Narushima, Kazuo; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Fujishiro, Takeshi; Tochigi, Tohru; Hanaoka, Toshiharu; Miyauchi, Hideaki; Hanari, Naoyuki; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the usefulness of arterial phase scans in contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging of strangulation ileus in order to make an early diagnosis. METHODS: A comparative examination was carried out with respect to the CT value of the intestinal tract wall in each scanning phase, the CT value of the content in the intestinal tract, and the CT value of ascites fluid in the portal vein phase for a group in which ischemia was observed (Group I) and a group in which ischemia was not observed (Group N) based on the pathological findings or intra-surgical findings. Moreover, a comparative examination was carried out in Group I subjects for each scanning phase with respect to average differences in the CT values of the intestinal tract wall where ischemia was suspected and in the intestinal tract wall in non-ischemic areas. RESULTS: There were 15 subjects in Group I and 30 subjects in Group N. The CT value of the intestinal tract wall was 41.8 ± 11.2 Hounsfield Unit (HU) in Group I and 69.6 ± 18.4 HU in Group N in the arterial phase, with the CT value of the ischemic bowel wall being significantly lower in Group I. In the portal vein phase, the CT value of the ischemic bowel wall was 60.6 ± 14.6 HU in Group I and 80.7 ± 17.7 HU in Group N, with the CT value of the ischemic bowel wall being significantly lower in Group I; however, no significant differences were observed in the equilibrium phase. The CT value of the solution in the intestine was 18.6 ± 9.5 HU in Group I and 10.4 ± 5.1 HU in Group N, being significantly higher in Group I. No significant differences were observed in the CT value of the accumulation of ascites fluid. The average difference in the CT values between the ischemic bowel wall and the non-ischemic bowel wall for each subject in Group I was 33.7 ± 20.1 HU in the arterial phase, being significantly larger compared to the other two phases. CONCLUSION: This is a retrospective study using a small number of subjects; however, it

  17. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  18. [Distribution of recombinant pro-urokinase in the rabbit blocked carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Matveev, M Iu; Mukhina, S A; Golubykh, V L; Domogatskiĭ, S P

    1999-07-01

    Distribution of recombinant pro-urokinase (PRU) in segments of blocked carotid arteries of rabbits was measured in 10, 20 and 30 minutes after i.v. administration of the RPU. Concentration of the latter in the bloodstream taken as 100% on the 3rd minute, after the infusion decreased to 42% in 10 min., 24% in 20 min., and 13% in 30 min. The RPU concentration decreased to 2% at the artery clamp point, to 20% at 10-15 cm from the clamp point, and remained constant for 10-30 min. A thrombolytic agent accumulated at the dead-end of the blocked artery, was not subject to rapid clearance in contrast to circulating pro-urokinase.

  19. Atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis resulting in large intestinal hypoperfusion: a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lotun, Kapildeo; Shetty, Ranjith; Topaz, On

    2012-11-01

    Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia results from intestinal hypoperfusion and is classically thought to result from involvement of two or more mesenteric arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery are most frequently implicated in this disease process, and their involvement usually results in symptoms of small intestinal ischemia. Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia resulting predominantly from inferior mesenteric artery involvement has largely been overlooked but does gives rise to its own, unique clinical presentation with symptoms resulting from large intestinal ischemia. We present four patients with atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis with symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia that have unique clinical presentations consistent with large intestinal ischemia that resolved following percutaneous endovascular treatment of the inferior mesenteric artery stenosis. These cases represent a novel approach to the diagnosis and management of this disease process and may warrant a further subclassification of chronic mesenteric ischemia into chronic small intestinal ischemia and chronic large intestinal ischemia.

  20. Soluble plantain fibre blocks adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Carol L; Keita, Asa V; Parsons, Bryony N; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Knight, Paul; Winstanley, Craig; O' Kennedy, Niamh; Söderholm, Johan D; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Campbell, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fibres may have prebiotic effects mediated by promotion of beneficial bacteria. This study explores the possibility that soluble plant fibre may also improve health by inhibiting epithelial adhesion and translocation by pathogenic bacteria. We have focussed on soluble non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) from plantain bananas (Musa spp.) which previous studies showed to be particularly effective at blocking Escherichia coli epithelial adherence. In vitro and ex vivo studies assessed the ability of plantain NSP to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion and invasion of various bacterial pathogens, and to inhibit their translocation through microfold (M)-cells and human Peyer's patches mounted in Ussing chambers. Plantain NSP showed dose-related inhibition of epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation by a range of pathogens. At 5mg/ml, a concentration readily achievable in the gut lumen, plantain NSP inhibited adhesion to Caco2 cells by Salmonella Typhimurium (85.0 ± 8.2%, P<.01), Shigella sonnei (46.6 ± 29.3%, P<.01), enterotoxigenic E.coli (56.1 ± 23.7%, P<.05) and Clostridium difficile (67.6 ± 12.3%, P<.001), but did not inhibit adhesion by enteropathogenic E.coli. Plantain NSP also inhibited invasion of Caco2 cells by S. Typhimurium (80.2 ± 9.7%) and Sh. sonnei (46.7 ± 13.4%); P<.01. Plantain NSP, 5mg/ml, also inhibited translocation of S. Typhimurium and Sh. sonnei across M-cells by 73.3 ± 5.2% and 46.4 ± 7.7% respectively (P<.05). Similarly, S. Typhimurium translocation across Peyer's patches was reduced 65.9 ± 8.1% by plantain NSP (P<.01). Soluble plantain fibre can block epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens. This represents an important novel mechanism by which soluble dietary fibres can promote intestinal health and prevent infective diarrhoea.

  1. Influence of blocks' topologies on endothelial shear stress observed in CFD analysis of artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Milan; Nikolić, Aleksandar; Zivković, Milorad; Zivković, Miroslav; Stanković, Goran

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that endothelial shear stress affects occurrence of plaque in arteries. Lack of a method for measuring this physical quantity limits scientific understanding of this phenomenon. Application of numerical methods in this area has considerable amount of experimental verifications in terms of quantities that can be measured (velocity, pressure). On that basis we can rely on the results of endothelial shear stress calculations. The literature mainly documents the application of numerical methods to average geometries. However, arterial bifurcations are patient-specific. Moreover, occurrence of disease significantly complicates the geometry of the arteries and bifurcations. A multiblock concept provides the necessary geometrical flexibility and computational efficiency to generate patient-specific finite element models. For a particular class of problems different topologies of blocks are possible. This paper provides an overview of the possible block topologies required in finite element modeling using multiblock approach. In order to obtain accurate results of endothelial shear stress, two most general topologies are examined by numerical calculations. Favorable topology of the blocks is implemented in in-house software stl2fem.

  2. Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Erkalp, Kerem; Comlekci, Mevlut; Inan, Bekir; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozdemir, Haluk; Saidoglu, Leyla

    2011-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-brachial bypass to treat axillary artery occlusion. The patient underwent surgery with satisfactory anesthesia using infraclavicular brachial plexus block, thoracic paravertebral block, and unilateral subarachnoid block. These three regional anesthetic interventions were performed in lieu of general anesthesia to minimize risks of thrombotic events, pain, and to decrease recovery time. Despite higher failure rates of regional anesthesia, longer time required for procedures, and added discomforts during surgery, the benefits may outweigh risks for selected high-risk patients, including those with factor V Leiden mutations. PMID:22915885

  3. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Celiac Artery Stenting in the Treatment of Intestinal Ischemia Due to the Sacrifice of the Dominant Inferior Mesenteric Artery During Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Su, Zijie; Pan, Tianyue; Lian, Weishuai; Guo, Daqiao; Dong, Zhihui; Fu, Weiguo

    2016-08-01

    A 42-year-old man had intestinal ischemia 7 weeks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair due to sacrifice of the inferior mesenteric artery, which had compensated for the intestinal blood supply because of the total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and severe stenosis of the celiac artery (CA). He was diagnosed in the active phase of Takayasu arteritis, and an emergency endovascular treatment was performed. After the SMA failed to be recanalized, a stent was successfully placed into the CA; this choice was made based on the preexisting collaterals between them. The symptoms were relieved shortly after the operation. The Kirk arcade, the Barkow arcade, and the enlarged pancreaticoduodenal arcade were visualized on the follow-up computed tomography angiography. Based on this case, a short review of celiomesenteric and intermesenteric collateral circulations is presented.

  5. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  6. Late Atrio-ventricular Block After Arterial Switch for D-transposition of the Great Vessels With Intact Interventricular Septum

    PubMed Central

    Caudron, Guillaume; Hascoet, Sebastien; Dulac, Yves; Maury, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries without ventricular septal defect usually does not lead to atrio-ventricular conduction disturbances. We discuss the case of a young boy presenting with first and second degree supra hisian atrio-ventricular block late after switch operation.

  7. Soluble plantain fibre blocks adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens☆

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Carol L.; Keita, Åsa V.; Parsons, Bryony N.; Prorok-Hamon, Maelle; Knight, Paul; Winstanley, Craig; O′Kennedy, Niamh; Söderholm, Johan D.; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Campbell, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fibres may have prebiotic effects mediated by promotion of beneficial bacteria. This study explores the possibility that soluble plant fibre may also improve health by inhibiting epithelial adhesion and translocation by pathogenic bacteria. We have focussed on soluble non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) from plantain bananas (Musa spp.) which previous studies showed to be particularly effective at blocking Escherichia coli epithelial adherence. In vitro and ex vivo studies assessed the ability of plantain NSP to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion and invasion of various bacterial pathogens, and to inhibit their translocation through microfold (M)-cells and human Peyer′s patches mounted in Ussing chambers. Plantain NSP showed dose-related inhibition of epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation by a range of pathogens. At 5 mg/ml, a concentration readily achievable in the gut lumen, plantain NSP inhibited adhesion to Caco2 cells by Salmonella Typhimurium (85.0±8.2%, P<.01), Shigella sonnei (46.6±29.3%, P<.01), enterotoxigenic E.coli (56.1±23.7%, P<.05) and Clostridium difficile (67.6±12.3%, P<.001), but did not inhibit adhesion by enteropathogenic E.coli. Plantain NSP also inhibited invasion of Caco2 cells by S. Typhimurium (80.2 ± 9.7%) and Sh. sonnei (46.7±13.4%); P<.01. Plantain NSP, 5 mg/ml, also inhibited translocation of S. Typhimurium and Sh. sonnei across M-cells by 73.3±5.2% and 46.4±7.7% respectively (P<.05). Similarly, S. Typhimurium translocation across Peyer′s patches was reduced 65.9±8.1% by plantain NSP (P<.01). Soluble plantain fibre can block epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens. This represents an important novel mechanism by which soluble dietary fibres can promote intestinal health and prevent infective diarrhoea. PMID:22818716

  8. Activation of intestinal spinal afferent endings by changes in intra-mesenteric arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Humenick, A; Chen, B N; Wiklendt, L; Spencer, N J; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Dinning, P G; Costa, M; Brookes, S J H

    2015-01-01

    Spinal sensory neurons innervate many large blood vessels throughout the body. Their activation causes the hallmarks of neurogenic inflammation: vasodilatation through the release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide and plasma extravasation via tachykinins. The same vasodilator afferent neurons show mechanical sensitivity, responding to crushing, compression or axial stretch of blood vessels – responses which activate pain pathways and which can be modified by cell damage and inflammation. In the present study, we tested whether spinal afferent axons ending on branching mesenteric arteries (‘vascular afferents’) are sensitive to increased intravascular pressure. From a holding pressure of 5 mmHg, distension to 20, 40, 60 or 80 mmHg caused graded, slowly adapting increases in firing of vascular afferents. Many of the same afferent units showed responses to axial stretch, which summed with responses evoked by raised pressure. Many vascular afferents were also sensitive to raised temperature, capsaicin and/or local compression with von Frey hairs. However, responses to raised pressure in single, isolated vessels were negligible, suggesting that the adequate stimulus is distortion of the arterial arcade rather than distension per se. Increasing arterial pressure often triggered peristaltic contractions in the neighbouring segment of intestine, an effect that was mimicked by acute exposure to capsaicin (1 μm) and which was reduced after desensitisation to capsaicin. These results indicate that sensory fibres with perivascular endings are sensitive to pressure-induced distortion of branched arteries, in addition to compression and axial stretch, and that they contribute functional inputs to enteric motor circuits. PMID:26010893

  9. Isolated Left Subclavian Artery, Complete Atrioventricular Block, and Tricuspid Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Deepa; Ashwath, Ravi; Strainic, James P.; Snyder, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated left subclavian artery is one of the rarer aortic arch anomalies. It has been associated with other congenital heart diseases, typically tetralogy of Fallot, double-outlet right ventricle, and atrial and ventricular septal defects. Its significant clinical implications include a left-to-right shunt from the vertebrobasilar system, which causes pulmonary overcirculation and subclavian steal. We present an unusual case of a premature infant who was diagnosed prenatally with congenital complete atrioventricular block and tricuspid atresia and was found to have an isolated left subclavian artery postnatally. The patient underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber epicardial pacing system. To our knowledge, this combination of lesions has not been reported—and in our case, it influenced our surgical planning. PMID:28100981

  10. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were changed in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and modulate IP. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in blood sample was checked by 454 pyrosequencing. The zonulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The distribution of zonulin was detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Bacteria and Caco-2 cell surface micro-structure were checked by transmission electron microscopy. A high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene can be detected in samples from CAD patients, most of them (99.4%) belong to Enterobacteriaceaes, eg. Rahnella. The plasma zonulin levels were significantly higher in CAD patients. Pseudomonas fluorescens exposure significantly increased zonulin expression and decreased IP in a time dependent manner. The elevated zonulin increase IP and may facilitate enteric translocation by disassembling the tight junctions, which might explain the observed high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in blood samples. PMID:27353603

  11. The role of cardiac resynchronization therapy for arterial switch operations complicated by complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Mah, Douglas Y; Alexander, Mark E; Banka, Puja; Abrams, Dominic J; Triedman, John K; Walsh, Edward P; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Mayer, John E; Cecchin, Frank

    2013-09-01

    As mortality in patients with D-loop transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) has decreased after the arterial switch operation (ASO), the focus has shifted to higher risk groups and outcomes that impact long-term morbidity and mortality, such as left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We sought to examine the perioperative factors associated with LV dysfunction in patients with D-TGA and ventricular septal defects (VSD) after ASO. A retrospective study was made of all patients with D-TGA/VSD who underwent ASO/VSD closure from 2001 to 2011. Patients with prematurity, L-looped ventricles, and straddling atrioventricular valves were excluded. The primary endpoint was moderate or severe LV dysfunction measured by echocardiogram 2 months or more after surgery. A total of 112 patients underwent ASO/VSD closure at a median age of 5 days. Median time of follow-up was 6.5 months, with no mortality noted. Six patients (8%) were noted to have at least moderate LV dysfunction. Risk factors were heart block requiring pacemaker placement (p<0.001) and length of intensive care unit admission (p=0.04). All 6 patients with heart block had an epicardial lead on the right ventricular free wall; 4 had moderate or severe LV dysfunction and underwent upgrade to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT); median time from initial pacemaker to CRT was 5 months. With a median follow-up of 5 months after CRT, LV function improved to normal (2 patients) or mild dysfunction (2 patients). Left ventricular dysfunction after surgical repair for D-TGA/VSD is low, with heart block and pacemaker insertion playing a significant role. The LV function improved after patients were upgraded to a CRT device. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of left anterior descending coronary artery disease in patients with left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Civelek, A C; Gozukara, I; Durski, K; Ozguven, M A; Brinker, J A; Links, J M; Camargo, E E; Wagner, H N; Flaherty, J T

    1992-12-15

    The detection of coronary artery disease is difficult if a patient has electrocardiographic evidence of left bundle branch block (BBB). Septal blood flow may be reduced in patients with left BBB, despite no angiographic evidence of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery disease. We have developed a new method of quantification of Thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images with the aim of better separating patients with left BBB and LAD disease from those with left BBB alone. The study cohort comprised 8 normal subjects (group I) and 20 patients with left BBB and chest pain who underwent thallium-201 SPECT imaging and coronary angiography. Eight patients (group II) had < or = 50% LAD stenosis, and 12 (group III) had > or = 70% LAD stenosis. Septal abnormality scores on the second short-axis slice from the base were computed, based on comparison of each subject's short-axis circumferential profile with a normal reference curve. This followed a procedure in which each profile was scaled to minimize differences in its absolute level in relation to the reference curve. Septal abnormality scores on stress images were 0.8 +/- 22 for group I, 27 +/- 43 for group II, and 165 +/- 67 for group III (p = 0.15 for group I vs II, and p < 0.0001 between groups I and III, and II and III).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Effect of Meconium on the Contractility of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A Clue to Intestinal Damage in Gastroschisis.

    PubMed

    Karakuş, Osman Z; Solmaz, Bora; Ateş, Oğuz; Ateş, Mehmet; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza M

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal damage has been shown to occur when intra-amniotic meconium concentration exceeds threshold level. However, the mechanism of the meconium-induced intestinal damage is still unclear. Intestinal ischemia can cause intestinal damage in gastroschisis. This study was aimed to determine the effects of intra-amniotic meconium on the contractility of superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Eighteen-day-old fertilized chick embryos (Gallus Domesticus) were extirpated and intestines were harvested. The SMA specimens were prepared as 4 mm segments in the organ bath with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. The isometric contraction responses of the SMA specimens were evaluated with norepinephrine, different meconium concentrations, and clear amniotic fluid. Maximum isometric contractions responses (MICR) of the SMA specimens were recorded with an amplifier system on a computer. In the norepinephrine group, MICR was found as 2.92 ± 0.57 mN. While MICR of the 1/100 meconium group (highest meconium concentration) was found as 1.56 ± 0.40 mN, MICR of the clear amniotic fluid group was 0.41 ± 0.07 mN. The MICR of the norepinephrine group was significantly increased compared with the 1/100 meconium and clear amniotic fluid groups. MICR of the 1/100 meconium group was also found to be significantly increased compared with clear amniotic fluid group. No statistically significant difference was found among the meconium subgroups. Intra-amniotic meconium in fetuses with gastroschisis might cause ischemic intestinal damage by reducing the intestinal blood flow. Further studies are needed to show the outcomes of the vasoactive effect of meconium on the SMA blood flow. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Ca2+ entry blocking and contractility promoting actions of norbormide in single rat caudal artery myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, Fabio; Saponara, Simona; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Cargnelli, Gabriella; Bova, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of norbormide, a selective vasoconstrictor agent of the rat peripheral vessels, on the whole-cell voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ current (ICa(L)) of freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from the rat caudal artery, using either the conventional or the amphotericin B-perforated whole-cell patch-clamp method. Norbormide decreased L-type Ca2+ current in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, without modifying the threshold and the maximum of the current-voltage relationship. Norbormide-induced ICa(L) inhibition was reversible upon wash-out. Norbormide both shifted the voltage dependence of the steady-state inactivation curve to more negative potentials by about 16 mV, without affecting the activation curve, and decreased the slope of inactivation. Norbormide, however, did not modify both the activation and the inactivation kinetics of the ICa(L). Norbormide decreased ICa(L) progressively during repetitive step depolarizations, with inhibition depending on the stimulation frequency (use-dependent block) as well as on the holding potential. Addition of 50 μM norbormide caused the contraction of all freshly isolated cells and also of those impaled with the perforated method, but not of those impaled with the conventional method (i.e. dialysed). In conclusion, these results prove norbormide to be a vascular L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor, which preferentially acts on the inactivated and/or open state of the channel. In rat caudal artery smooth muscle, however, this mechanism does not result in a vasodilating effect since it is overwhelmed by the mechanism underlying norbormide-induced vasoconstriction. PMID:12237251

  15. Reversibility of High-Grade Atrioventricular Block with Revascularization in Coronary Artery Disease without Infarction: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rhanderson; Alfonso, Carlos E.; Coffey, James O.

    2016-01-01

    Complete atrioventricular (AV) block is known to be reversible in some cases of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI). The reversibility of high-grade AV block in non-MI coronary artery disease (CAD), however, is rarely described in the literature. Herein we perform a literature review to assess what is known about the reversibility of high-grade AV block after right coronary artery revascularization in CAD patients who present without an acute MI. To illustrate this phenomenon we describe a case of 2 : 1 AV block associated with unstable angina, in which revascularization resulted in immediate and durable restoration of 1 : 1 AV conduction, thereby obviating the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. The literature review suggests two possible explanations: a vagally mediated response or a mechanism dependent on conduction system ischemia. Due to the limited understanding of AV block reversibility following revascularization in non-acute MI presentations, it remains difficult to reliably predict which patients presenting with high-grade AV block in the absence of MI may have the potential to avoid permanent pacemaker implantation via coronary revascularization. We thus offer this review as a potential starting point for the approach to such patients. PMID:26925272

  16. In situ intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the pig: a model using the first jejunal artery for flushing.

    PubMed

    Yandza, Thierry; Mekaouche, Mourad; Bréaud, Jean; Oroboscianu, Ioana; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Ramella-Virieux, Silvina; Benchimol, Daniel; Gugenheim, Jean

    2007-09-01

    We describe a new surgical technique of in situ intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the pig, which includes transection of the small bowel, extrinsic autonomic denervation, lymphatic disruption, and finally in-situ cold ischemia of the graft by flushing through the first jejunal artery. Ten female pigs were used for the study. All neural and lymphatic connections to the jejunoileum were transected. The stripped superior mesenteric vessels remained as the only connections. The skeletonized mesenteric vessels were clamped and the superior mesenteric artery was cannulated through the first jejunal artery. The isolated jejunoileum was flushed with cold IGL-1 solution. A small incision on the superior mesenteric vein was made to allow outflow of the effluent. After the flushing process was complete, the small incision in the superior mesenteric vein was closed and the vascular clamps were removed. The proximal 70% of the graft was resected. The mean preoperative weight of the animals was 25.8 +/-7.6 kg. The mean duration of the operation was 242.0 +/- 28.6 min. The mean cold ischemia time was 47.6 +/- 3.9 min. All animals survived the procedure and were sacrificed at day 8. At sacrifice, there were no adhesions. The small bowel appeared normal. On intestinal histology, there were no significant changes between specimens obtained from the animal immediately at the end of cold flushing (T0), 2 h after reperfusion (T1), and at sacrifice (T2). This novel technique for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in the pig provides an extremely useful model for experimental studies of immunological and cold ischemia-reperfusion injury of transplanted small bowels.

  17. Blocking peripheral serotonin synthesis by telotristat etiprate (LX1032/LX1606) reduces severity of both chemical- and infection-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janice J; Wang, Huaqing; Terc, Joshua D; Zambrowicz, Brian; Yang, Qi M; Khan, Waliul I

    2015-09-15

    Mucosal inflammation is accompanied by an alteration in 5-HT. Intestinal 5-HT synthesis is catalyzed by tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and we have shown that mice deficient in this rate-limiting enzyme have reduced severity of intestinal inflammation in models of chemical-induced experimental colitis. Here, we investigated the effect of blocking peripheral 5-HT synthesis in generation of intestinal inflammation by a using peripheral Tph inhibitor, telotristat etiprate (LX1606), in models of intestinal inflammation. LX1606 was given orally either prophylactically or therapeutically to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis or with infection with Trichuris muris. Severity of intestinal inflammation was measured by assessment of disease activity scores, histological damage, and MPO and inflammatory cytokine levels. LX1606 significantly reduced intestinal 5-HT levels and delayed onset and severity of DSS-induced acute and chronic colitis. This was associated with decreased MPO and proinflammatory cytokine levels compared with vehicle-treated controls. In the infection-induced inflammation model, treatment with LX1606 enhanced worm expulsion as well as increased IL-10 production and goblet cell numbers. LX1606-treated mice had significantly lower MPO and IL-1β levels compared with controls postinfection. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT plays an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the generation of immune responses. Pharmacological reduction of peripheral 5-HT may serve as a potential strategy for modulating various intestinal inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Comparison of 2% mepivacaine, clipping, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation for duration and magnitude of action in peripheral arterial blood flow induced by sympathetic block in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Otani, Taro; Shinozaki, Mio; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Tomohito; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Shigeki; Kitajima, Toshimitsu

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic sympathetic block has recently been performed by placement of the clips on the sympathetic chain to interrupt nerve conduction. The aim of this study was to compare clipping with 2% mepivacaine and radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the potency of sympathetic block from the results of the duration and magnitude of the vasodilation effect induced by thoracic sympathetic block in dogs. We measured mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and right and left brachial artery blood flow (BABF) before and after thoracic sympathetic block in 24 dogs. The experimental protocol was designed as follows: (1) left thoracic sympathetic block by 1.0 mL of 2% mepivacaine (n = 8), (2) left thoracic sympathetic block by clipping (n = 8), and (3) left thoracic sympathetic block by radiofrequency thermocoagulation (n = 8). Mean arterial pressure and heart rate did not change significantly throughout the study in either group. Left thoracic sympathetic block by 2% mepivacaine increased left BABF significantly from 5 to 70 mins after the block (baseline, 100%; peak at 10 mins after the block, 179% ± 33%; P < 0.01). Left thoracic sympathetic block by clipping increased left BABF significantly from 5 to 120 mins after the block (baseline, 100%; peak at 30 mins after the block, 156% ± 31%; P < 0.01). Left thoracic sympathetic block by radiofrequency thermocoagulation increased left BABF significantly from 5 to 120 mins after the block (baseline, 100%; peak at 10 mins after the block, 206% ± 31%; P < 0.01). Clipping may have a same potency compared with 2% mepivacaine and a less potency compared with radiofrequency thermocoagulation in thoracic sympathetic block in dogs.

  19. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J.; Nikita, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABM_KF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABM_KF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments.

  20. [Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and 2:1 atrioventricular block].

    PubMed

    Conte, Giulio; Coppini, Lucia; Demola, Maria Antonietta; Zardini, Marco; Ardissino, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) is a rare congenital heart disease with an atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial discordance in which the morphological right ventricle supports the systemic circulation and the morphological tricuspid valve is the systemic atrioventricular valve. Heart rhythm disturbances and ventricular dysfunction related to electromechanical dyssynchrony are common in adult congenital heart disease patients with a systemic right ventricle. Thus, these patients may require conventional pacemaker implantation, which in the presence of ventricular dysfunction and conduction disease may further compromise cardiac performance. Indeed, cardiac resynchronization therapy may be an effective treatment option for these patients. We report the case of a patient with CCTGA and moderate depression of systemic ventricular systolic function who developed a 2:1 atrioventricular block and was treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  1. [Anatomic-topographic description of the stomach, small intestine, large intestine and their arteries of the greater mara (Dolichotis patagonum Desmarest 1820)].

    PubMed

    Weissengruber, G E

    2000-04-01

    The abdominal parts of the alimentary canal and the associated arteries from seven male and nine female maras are described. The mara possesses a stomach with a single cavity and a glandular mucosa lining. The large stomach is situated caudal of the liver at right-angles to the longitudinal body axis. The long jejunum is located on the left side of the body caudal of the stomach. The cecum has two teniae and numerous haustra which are proximal larger than distal. The smooth colon ascendens runs proximal parallel to the cecum and describes distal an U-shaped double-loop. The internal surface of the proximal part of the colon ascendens is characterized by two parallel mucosal ledges. Cecum and colon ascendens lie right caudal of the liver. The colon descendens is coiled and situated on the left body side. The A. gastrica sinistra and branches of the A. lienalis and the A. hepatica supply the stomach. The A. mesenterica cranialis which branches of separately from the A. coeliaca is a large and long vessel that supplies the major parts of the small intestine and the colon. The A. mesenterica caudalis supplies parts of the colon desendens and of the rectum.

  2. Angiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Grafting with Prefabricated Small-Diameter, Small-Intestinal Submucosa Grafts in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Obermiller, Josef; Uchida, Barry T.; Van Alstine, William; Edwards, James M.; Landry, Gregory J.; Kaufman, John A.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the longitudinal angiographic evaluation of prefabricated lyophilized small-intestinal submucosa (SIS) grafts placed in ovine carotid arteries and to demonstrate a variety of complications that developed. A total of 24 grafts, 10 cm long and 6 mm in diameter, were placed surgically as interposition grafts. Graft patency at 1 week was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, and angiography was used for follow-up at 1 month and at 3 to 4 months. A 90% patency rate was found at 1 week, 65% at 1 month, and 30% at 3 to 4 months. On the patent grafts, angiography demonstrated a variety of changes, such as anastomotic stenoses, graft diffuse dilations and dissections, and aneurysm formation. These findings have not been previously demonstrated angiographically by other investigators reporting results with small-diameter vessel grafts made from fresh small-intestinal submucosa (SIS). The complications found were partially related to the graft construction from four SIS layers. Detailed longitudinal angiographic study should become an essential part of any future evaluation of small-vessel SIS grafting.

  3. Intraoperative Intermittent Blocking of the Common Iliac Arteries in Cases of Placenta Percreta without the Use of Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heinze, S; Filsinger, B; Kastenholz, G; Schröder, R J

    2016-12-01

    Background: The number of patients with placenta accreta, percreta and increta is increasing. The morbidity and mortality are higher mostly due to hemorrhage. Therefore, new methods to reduce the risk of severe bleeding are necessary. Methods: Three patients were treated in collaboration by obstetricians, urologists, anesthesiologists, and radiologists. An MRI of the pelvis was performed and the diameters and lengths of the iliac arteries were measured to avoid fluoroscopy during the preoperative placement of catheter balloons into the iliac arteries. During the operational procedure the balloons were inflated and deflated depending on the operative site and the occurrence of bleeding. Results: In comparison to the literature, severe bleeding was clearly reduced. No complications of the intervention were observed. Conclusion: The presented method to reduce severe bleeding might represent significant progress in the management of abnormal placenta implantation. Nevertheless, further controlled studies are needed in order to establish evidence-based recommendations. Key Points: • Reduction of perioperative hemorrhage in cases of placenta accreta, percreta, and increta.• A preinterventional MRI of the pelvis allows measurement of the illiac arteries so that the fetus is not exposed to radiation.• The short occlusion time (under the nominal pressure of the balloon) of the common iliac arteries reduced interventional complications. Citation Format: • Heinze S, Filsinger B, Kastenholz G et al. Intraoperative Intermittent Blocking of the Common Iliac Arteries in Cases of Placenta Percreta without the Use of Fluoroscopy. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2016; 188: 1151 - 1155. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. [Normalization of the vascular picture with sympathetic block in severe arterial ischemia from ergotism].

    PubMed

    Rommel, J D; Klee, P; Burkard, A; Ratthey, K P

    1999-09-01

    This case report presents a 44-year-old woman with severe arterial ischemia leading to claudicatio and acute pain in rest caused by an ergotism. In the history was an abuse of suppositories containing caffeine and ergotamine induced by chronic headache. The initial angiography showed occlusions of the femoral arteries. After excluding other vascular diseases, intraarterial infusions of prostaglandin E were administered. Additionally, physiotherapeutic treatment followed. An progrediency of the symptoms made a epidural catheter for sympathicolysis and treatment of the acute pain necessary. As the results of this intervention were encouraging, a sympathetic blockade with injection of 96% ethanol at the level of L 2/3 and 3/4 was performed. After treatment, the clinical symptoms and the blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography normalised. A final angiography demonstrated a now normal arterial status. Ergotism, indication and methods of sympathetic blockades are discussed.

  5. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  6. Maintenance of superior mesenteric arterial perfusion prevents increased intestinal mucosal permeability in endotoxic pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, M.P.; Kaups, K.L.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide increases intestinal mucosal permeability to hydrophilic compounds such as chromium 51-labeled edetate (51Cr-EDTA). The authors sought to determine whether this phenomenon is partly mediated by lipopolysaccharide-induced mesenteric hypoperfusion. They assessed permeability in an isolated segment of ileum by measuring plasma-to-lumen clearances (C) for two probes, 51Cr-EDTA and urea, and expressing the results as a ratio (CEDTA/CUREA). In control pigs (n = 6) resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (RL), mucosal permeability was unchanged during the 210-minute period of observation. In pigs (n = 7) infused with lipopolysaccharide (50 micrograms/kg) and similarly resuscitated with RL, mesenteric perfusion (Qsma) decreased significantly and permeability increased progressively and significantly. When endotoxic pigs (n = 6) were resuscitated with a regimen (RL plus hetastarch plus dobutamine) that preserved normal Qsma, lipopolysaccharide-induced mucosal hyperpermeability was prevented. Resuscitation of endotoxic pigs (n = 6) with RL plus hetastarch provided intermediate protection against both mesenteric hypoperfusion and increased permeability. These data suggest that diminished Qsma contributes to impaired ileal mucosal barrier function in experimental endotoxicosis.

  7. Inhibition of PKC activity blocks the increase of ETB receptor expression in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Marie; Vikman, Petter; Stenman, Emelie; Beg, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that there is a time-dependent upregulation of contractile endothelin B (ETB) receptors in middle cerebral arteries (MCA) after organ culture. This upregulation is dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases and possibly protein kinase C (PKC). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of PKC inhibitors with different profiles on the upregulation of contractile ETB receptors in rat MCA. Artery segments were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. To investigate involvement of PKC, inhibitors were added to the medium before incubation. The contractile endothelin-mediated responses were measured and real-time PCR was used to detect endothelin receptor mRNA levels. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry was used to demonstrate the ETB receptor protein distribution in the MCA and Western blot to measure which of the PKC subtypes that were affected by the inhibitors. Results The PKC inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I, Ro-32-0432 and PKC inhibitor 20–28 attenuated the ETB receptor mediated contractions. Furthermore, Ro-32-0432 and bisindolylmaleimide I decreased ETB receptor mRNA levels while PKC inhibitor 20–28 reduced the amount of receptor protein on smooth muscle cells. PKC inhibitor 20–28 also decreased the protein levels of the five PKC subtypes studied (α, βI, γ, δ and ε). Conclusion The results show that PKC inhibitors are able to decrease the ETB receptor contraction and expression in MCA smooth muscle cells following organ culture. The PKC inhibitor 20–28 affects the protein levels, while Ro-32-0432 and bisindolylmaleimide I affect the mRNA levels, suggesting differences in activity profile. Since ETB receptor upregulation is seen in cerebral ischemia, the results of the present study provide a way to interfere with the vascular involvement in cerebral ischemia. PMID:17129394

  8. Percutaneous Cervical Sympathetic Block for Pain Control after Internal Carotid Artery Dissection. A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Omar; Khan, Asif A.; Herial, Nabeel A.; Aytac, Emrah; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Medical treatment of cranio-cervical pain can be suboptimal in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection. We report the use of cervical sympathetic block for treatment of pain in two patients with ICA dissection. Case Reports A 58-year-old man and a 43-year-old woman presented with severe cranio-cervical pain associated with left and right ICA dissection confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography. Due to suboptimal control of pain with medical treatment, cervical sympathetic block was performed under fluoroscopic guidance using 20 ml of bupivacaine injected lateral to the posterior aspect of sixth vertebral body in both patients. On self-reported pain scale, the 58-year-old man reported improvement in pain intensity from 8/10 pain to 0/10 within 1 h of blockade. The patient remained relatively pain free for the 24-h post blockade. Mild recurrence of pain was noted on Day 2. The 43-year-old woman reported improvement in pain intensity from 6/10 pain to 0/10 within 1 h of blockade. The patient remained pain free for five days with recurrence to previous intensity. Conclusion Cervical sympathetic blockade in patients with ICA dissection may be an effective option in the event of suboptimal pain control with medical treatment; however, the technique may be limited due to relatively short duration of action. PMID:28243349

  9. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Hirzel, Florian C.; Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L.; Hess, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  10. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis blocks the inhibitory response to capsaicin in intestinal circular muscle preparations from different species.

    PubMed

    Benko, Rita; Lazar, Zsofia; Undi, Sarolta; Illenyi, Laszlo; Antal, Andras; Horvath, Ors-Peter; Rumbus, Zoltan; Wolf, Matyas; Maggi, Carlo A; Bartho, Lorand

    2005-04-29

    Moderate concentrations of the sensory stimulant drug capsaicin caused relaxation in human and animal intestinal circular muscle preparations (guinea-pig proximal, mouse distal colon, human small intestine and appendix) in vitro. With the exception of the guinea-pig colon, the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 10(-4) M) strongly inhibited the relaxant effect of capsaicin. Tetrodotoxin, an inhibitor of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels failed to significantly reduce the inhibitory effect of capsaicin in the guinea-pig colon, human ileum and appendix; it caused an approximately 50% reduction in the mouse colon. The relaxant effect of capsaicin was strongly reduced in colonic preparations from transient receptor potential vanilloid type (TRPV1) receptor knockout mice as compared to their wildtype controls. It is concluded that nitric oxide, possibly of sensory origin, is involved in the relaxant action of capsaicin in the circular muscle of the mouse and human intestine.

  11. Salidroside blocks the proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells induced by platelet‑derived growth factor‑BB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changgui; Tang, Yanhong; Deng, Wei; Huang, Congxin; Wu, Tianyi

    2014-08-01

    The proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) contributes to the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling, ultimately leading to pulmonary hypertension. In this study, the effects and molecular mechanisms of salidroside on the platelet‑derived growth factor (PDGF)‑BB‑induced proliferation of primary cultured rat PASMCs were investigated. The presented data demonstrated that salidroside significantly inhibited the proliferation and DNA synthesis of PASMCs induced by PDGF‑BB in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner, without cell cytotoxicity. In accordance with these findings, salidroside blocked progression through G0/G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. The salidroside‑induced inhibition of the cell cycle was associated with the inhibition of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin‑dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and CDK4 mRNA expression, as well as an increase in the mRNA expression of p27 in PDGF‑BB‑stimulated PASMCs. Further experiments showed that the beneficial effect of salidroside on blocking the proliferation of PASMCs was associated with the suppression of the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β) signaling pathway, but did not involve the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2, p38 and c‑Jun‑N‑terminal kinase signaling pathways. These results indicate that salidroside suppresses PDGF‑BB‑induced PASMC proliferation through the AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway and suggests that it may be a feasible therapy for pulmonary vascular remodeling diseases.

  12. Relaxation of endothelin-1-induced pulmonary arterial constriction by niflumic acid and NPPB: mechanism(s) independent of chloride channel block.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Evans, A M; Kozlowski, R Z

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the effects of the Cl- channel blockers niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) and 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) on endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced constriction of rat small pulmonary arteries (diameter 100-400 microm) in vitro, following endothelium removal. ET-1 (30 nM) induced a sustained constriction of rat pulmonary arteries in physiological salt solution. Arteries preconstricted with ET-1 were relaxed by niflumic acid (IC50: 35.8 microM) and NPPB (IC50: 21.1 microM) in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. However, at concentrations known to block Ca++-activated Cl- channels, DIDS (arteries were preincubated with these Cl- channel blockers. When L-type Ca++ channels were blocked by nifedipine (10 microM), the ET-1-induced (30 nM) constriction was inhibited by only 5.8%. However, niflumic acid (30 microM) and NPPB (30 microM) inhibited the ET-1-induced constriction by approximately 53% and approximately 60%, respectively, both in the continued presence of nifedipine and in Ca++-free physiological salt solution. The Ca++ ionophore A23187 (10 microM) also evoked a sustained constriction of pulmonary arteries. Surprisingly, the A23187-induced constriction was also inhibited in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner by niflumic acid (IC50: 18.0 microM) and NPPB (IC50: 8.8 microM), but not by DIDS (artery constriction is independent of Cl- channel blockade. One possibility is that these compounds may block the Ca++-dependent contractile processes.

  13. Thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor identified by high-throughput screening blocks cholera toxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tonghui; Thiagarajah, Jay R; Yang, Hong; Sonawane, Nitin D; Folli, Chiara; Galietta, Luis J V; Verkman, A S

    2002-12-01

    Secretory diarrhea is the leading cause of infant death in developing countries and a major cause of morbidity in adults. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is required for fluid secretion in the intestine and airways and, when defective, causes the lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We screened 50,000 chemically diverse compounds for inhibition of cAMP/flavone-stimulated Cl(-) transport in epithelial cells expressing CFTR. Six CFTR inhibitors of the 2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone chemical class were identified. The most potent compound discovered by screening of structural analogs, CFTR(inh)-172, reversibly inhibited CFTR short-circuit current in less than 2 minutes in a voltage-independent manner with K(I) approximately 300 nM. CFTR(inh)-172 was nontoxic at high concentrations in cell culture and mouse models. At concentrations fully inhibiting CFTR, CFTR(inh)-172 did not prevent elevation of cellular cAMP or inhibit non-CFTR Cl(-) channels, multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR-1), ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, or a series of other transporters. A single intraperitoneal injection of CFTR(inh)-172 (250 micro g/kg) in mice reduced by more than 90% cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion in the small intestine over 6 hours. Thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitors may be useful in developing large-animal models of cystic fibrosis and in reducing intestinal fluid loss in cholera and other secretory diarrheas.

  14. The vasorelaxant effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in isolated rat basilar arteries is partially mediated by activation of nitrergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Jörg; Löwe, Marcus; Kruse, Marie Luise; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Ziegler, Albrecht; Hempelmann, Ralf G

    2002-07-15

    The structurally related neuropeptides pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) are recognised by two G protein-coupled receptors, termed VPAC(1)-R and VPAC(2)-R, with equal affinity. PACAP and VIP have previously been shown to relax cerebral arteries in an endothelium-independent manner. The aim of the present study was to test if intramural neurons are involved in the mediation of PACAP/VIP-induced vasodilatory responses. Therefore, the vascular tone of isolated rat basilar arteries was measured by means of a myograph. The vasorelaxing effect of PACAP was assessed in arteries precontracted by serotonin in the absence or presence of different test compounds known to selectively inhibit certain signaling proteins. The vasorelaxant effect of PACAP could be significantly reduced by the inhibitor of neuronal N-type calcium channels omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx), as well as by 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3Br-7-Ni), an inhibitor of the neuronal nitric oxide-synthase (nNOS). The localization of N-type calcium channels and VPAC-Rs within the rat basilar artery was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy using omega-CgTx- and VIP-analogs labelled with fluorescent dyes. These findings suggest that activation of intramural neurons may represent an important effector mechanism for mediation of the vasorelaxant PACAP-response.

  15. Effects of epidural anaesthesia on intestinal oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Vagts, D A; Iber, T; Szabo, B; Haberstroh, J; Reising, K; Puccini, M; Geiger, K; Nöldge-Schomburg, G F E

    2003-02-01

    Perioperative intestinal hypoperfusion is a major contributing factor leading to organ dysfunction. It can be caused by stress as a result of surgical manipulation or hypoxia. Additionally, anaesthesia can affect intestinal oxygenation. This animal study was designed to assess the effects of reduced regional sympathetic nervous activity induced by thoracic epidural anaesthesia on intestinal oxygenation. After ethical approval, 16 anaesthetized and acutely instrumented pigs were randomly assigned to two groups (epidural anaesthesia alone vs epidural anaesthesia plus volume loading). The epidural anaesthesia aimed for a T5-T12 block. Measurements were at baseline and after 1 and 2 h. Epidural anaesthesia was associated with a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and pronounced mesenteric vasodilatation. Mesenteric blood flow did not change. Intestinal oxygen uptake, mucosal tissue oxygen partial pressure and tissue carbon dioxide partial pressure remained unchanged. Despite marked systemic hypotension, epidural anaesthesia did not affect intestinal oxygenation. There was no benefit obtained from volume loading.

  16. p21 loss blocks senescence following Apc loss and provokes tumourigenesis in the renal but not the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cole, Alicia M; Ridgway, Rachel A; Derkits, Sahra E; Parry, Lee; Barker, Nick; Clevers, Hans; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J

    2010-11-01

    Senescence has been implicated as an important mechanism of tumour suppression in a number of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, we still have a relatively poor understanding of how the underlying mutations that occur in cancer cause senescence and its relevance in vivo. The Apc gene is mutated in approximately 80% of CRC as the initiating event, but rarely elsewhere. In this study we have examined the capacity of Apc loss to induce senescence in the intestinal epithelium compared to the renal epithelium. Within the renal epithelium, loss of Apc function led to an induction of senescence, however, bypassing senescence through combined Apc and p21 or Ink4A gene deletion rapidly initiated renal carcinoma. Within the intestinal epithelium, loss of Apc did not induce senescence. Moreover, combined Apc and p21 or Ink4A loss had no impact upon tumourigenesis. Taken together, these results show that Apc loss in vivo invokes a senescence program in a context-dependent fashion, and implies senescence may play a key barrier to tumourigenesis in the kidney. However, in CRC, escape from senescence is likely to only be a barrier in cancers initiated by other mutations.

  17. Methylene Blue injection via superior mesenteric artery microcatheter for focused enterectomy in the treatment of a bleeding small intestinal arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding from the small intestine may present the Acute Care Surgeon with a formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Despite the current array of diagnostic studies, localization of the causative pathology may be elusive, especially when the bleeding is intermittent. When a small intestinal arteriovenous malformation is the responsible lesion, a technique combining super-selective angiography with intra-operative methylene blue injection and focused enterectomy has been described in a number of case series. The current case report utilizes this same approach with emphasis on computed tomography angiography representing a key first step in the diagnostic algorithm. Case report In this case report, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding emanating from an arteriovenous malformation in the small intestine of a 52 year old male. After an extensive work-up including upper and lower endoscopy, double balloon enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy, he was referred for computed tomography angiography. Though he was not actively bleeding, a jejunal arteriovenous malformation was localized on imaging. This prompted directed transfemoral angiography, placement of a super-selective microcatheter in the 4th jejunal arterial branch, intra-operative methylene blue injection and focused enterectomy with pathological confirmation. The patient was found to be free of gastrointestinal bleeding on 6 month follow-up. Conclusions A step-wise, rational diagnostic approach should be utilized in the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. In the non-actively bleeding patient, computed tomography angiogram may facilitate the diagnosis of a small intestinal arteriovenous malformation. Methylene blue injection via a super-selective angiographic microcatheter may then allow for focused enterectomy. PMID:24552355

  18. Monoclonal immunoglobulin A antibodies directed against cholera toxin prevent the toxin-induced chloride secretory response and block toxin binding to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Apter, F M; Lencer, W I; Finkelstein, R A; Mekalanos, J J; Neutra, M R

    1993-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies directed against cholera toxin (CT) are thought to be important in resistance to oral challenge with virulent Vibrio cholerae, although alternative mechanisms for protection of intestinal epithelia against CT-induced fluid secretion have been proposed. The ability of anti-CT IgA to block the effects of CT on human enterocytes has not been directly tested because of the lack of a well-defined in vitro intestinal epithelial cell system to directly measure toxin action and the limited availability of purified anti-CT IgA antibodies. We have generated hybridomas that produce monoclonal IgA and IgG antibodies directed against CT by fusion of Peyer's patch cells with mouse myeloma cells after oral-systemic immunization of mice with CT and CT B-subunit protein. All of the anti-CT antibodies recognized the B subunit. Three clones (designated anti-CTB IgA-1, IgA-2, and IgA-3) which produced IgA antibodies in dimeric and polymeric forms were selected. Checkerboard immunoblotting demonstrated that IgA-1 recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by IgA-2 and IgA-3 and that none of the antibodies were directed against the binding site of GM1, the intestinal cell membrane toxin receptor. The protective capacity of these IgAs was tested in vitro with human T84 colon carcinoma cells grown on permeable supports as confluent monolayers of polarized enterocytes. When each anti-CTB IgA was mixed with 10 nM CT and applied to the apical surfaces of T84 cell monolayers, all three IgAs blocked CT-induced Cl- secretion in a dose-dependent manner and completely inhibited binding of rhodamine-labelled CT to apical cell membranes. Thus, monoclonal anti-CTB IgA antibodies are sufficient to protect human enterocytes in vitro against CT binding and action. Images PMID:7693598

  19. Intestinal lymphatic transport of halofantrine in rats assessed using a chylomicron flow blocking approach: the influence of polysorbate 60 and 80.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marianne L; Jacobsen, Jette; Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette

    2008-10-02

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of polysorbate 60 and 80 on intestinal lymphatic transport of a poorly water-soluble compound, halofantrine, using a chylomicron flow blocking approach in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated intraperitoneally with 3.0 mg/kg cycloheximide or saline. One hour later, rats were dosed with 6.7 mg/kg halofantrine in 0.4 or 1.0 g/kg polysorbate 60 or 80, 0.33 g/kg soybean oil or 0.33 g/kg soybean oil+1.0 g/kg polysorbate 80 by gavage, and plasma samples were collected. The fraction of halofantrine transported to the lymphatic system was determined as the difference between the bioavailability in saline-pretreated rats and cycloheximide-pretreated rats. No significant differences in halofantrine transport to the systemic blood and in the deduced lymphatic transport were observed between the two polysorbates, at the tested dosages. The lymphatic transport of halofantrine was the same whether dosing with polysorbate 60, polysorbate 80 or soybean oil; accordingly both surfactants can be used as lymphotropic carriers. Furthermore, there was a good correlation between the halofantrine transport to blood and lymphatics in the chylomicron flow blocking model and published results from the mesenteric lymph-cannulated model.

  20. Impact of intraventricular conduction delay on coronary haemodynamics: a study with intracoronary Doppler in patients with bundle branch blocks and normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Sattler, Katherine; von Birgelen, Clemens; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Rechenberg, Wolfram; Sack, Stefan; Dagres, Nikolaos; Erbel, Raimund

    2006-03-01

    The impact of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left bundle branch block (LBBB) on myocardial perfusion is not completely understood as data are often blurred by underlying cardiac disease. The present study investigates whether conduction delays per se affect coronary perfusion-an indirect measure of myocardial oxygen demand. Intracoronary Doppler and ultrasound were performed in 8 patients with RBBB, 10 patients with LBBB, and 10 control subjects. All patients had angiographically normal coronary arteries and normal left ventricular function. Baseline (bAPV) and adenosine-induced hyperaemic average flow velocity and coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) were measured in left anterior descending arteries. Intravascular ultrasound showed no difference in lumen cross-sectional area and plaque burden between groups. Patients with RBBB and LBBB had higher bAPV values than controls (19.0 +/- 4.9, 21.9 +/- 5.1, and 14.6 +/- 2.4 cm/s, respectively; ANOVA P = 0.003). There was no difference between patients with LBBB and RBBB compared with controls in CFVR (2.8 +/- 0.5, 3.0 +/- 1.0, and 3.4 +/- 0.7, respectively; ANOVA P = 0.21). Bundle branch blocks, in particular LBBB, are associated with an increased coronary flow velocity, which indicates enhanced myocardial oxygen demand on the basis of mechanoenergetic disturbance. This may contribute to the unfavourable outcome of patients with intraventricular conduction delay.

  1. [Ultrasound-guided axillary block: anatomical variations of terminal branches of the brachial plexus in relation to the brachial artery].

    PubMed

    Silva, M G; Sala-Blanch, X; Marín, R; Espinoza, X; Arauz, A; Morros, C

    2014-01-01

    To describe the distribution of the terminal branches of the brachial plexus at the axillary level and define distribution patterns after ultrasound evaluation. Fifty volunteers underwent ultrasound bilateral axillary brachial plexus scanning exploration. Nerve distribution around the humeral artery was described and the distance between each nerve and the center of the artery was measured. The distance and relationship between the ulnar nerve and the humeral vein were also recorded. The median nerve was located in the anterolateral quadrant (-29±40°) and at a mean distance of 2.1±0.9mm from the artery (85%). The ulnar nerve was found at 53±26° and at 4.2±2.1mm from the artery in the anteromedial quadrant (90%), anterolateral to the vein in 46% of cases, and deep to it in 54%. The radial nerve was at 122±38° and at 3.3±1.7mm from the artery in the posteromedial quadrant (86%). The musculocutaneous nerve was found at -103±22° and 9.3±5.6mm from the artery in the posterolateral quadrant (90%) and in the anterolateral quadrant (-55±16°) at 4.8±2.7mm (10%). There were no differences regarding laterality, gender or overweight patients. Our results allow defining four different anatomical patterns, two based in the position of the musculocutaneous nerve and two based on the disposition of the ulnar nerve with respect to the humeral vein. These patterns were not related to laterality, gender or body weight. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Polyunsaturated fatty acids block platelet-activating factor-induced phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt-mediated apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Caplan, Michael S; Li, Dan; Jilling, Tamas

    2008-05-01

    We have shown earlier that platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes apoptosis in enterocytes via a mechanism that involves Bax translocation to mitochondria, followed by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation. Herein we report that, in rat small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6), these downstream apoptotic effects are mediated by a PAF-induced inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Treatment with PAF results in rapid dephosphorylation of Akt, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, and the YXXM p85 binding motif of several proteins and redistribution of Akt-pleckstrin homology domain-green fluorescent protein, i.e., an in vivo phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate sensor, from membrane to cytosol. The proapoptotic effects of PAF were inhibited by both n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids but not by a saturated fatty acid palmitate. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, did not influence the baseline or PAF-induced apoptosis, but 2-bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, inhibited all of the proapoptotic effects of PAF. Our data strongly suggest that an inhibition of the PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway is the main mechanism of PAF-induced apoptosis in enterocytes and that polyunsaturated fatty acids block this mechanism very early in the signaling cascade independently of any effect on prostaglandin synthesis, and probably directly via an effect on protein palmitoylation.

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acids block platelet-activating factor-induced phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt-mediated apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Caplan, Michael S.; Li, Dan; Jilling, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    We have shown earlier that platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes apoptosis in enterocytes via a mechanism that involves Bax translocation to mitochondria, followed by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation. Herein we report that, in rat small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6), these downstream apoptotic effects are mediated by a PAF-induced inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Treatment with PAF results in rapid dephosphorylation of Akt, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, and the YXXM p85 binding motif of several proteins and redistribution of Akt-pleckstrin homology domain-green fluorescent protein, i.e., an in vivo phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate sensor, from membrane to cytosol. The proapoptotic effects of PAF were inhibited by both n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids but not by a saturated fatty acid palmitate. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, did not influence the baseline or PAF-induced apoptosis, but 2-bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, inhibited all of the proapoptotic effects of PAF. Our data strongly suggest that an inhibition of the PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway is the main mechanism of PAF-induced apoptosis in enterocytes and that polyunsaturated fatty acids block this mechanism very early in the signaling cascade independently of any effect on prostaglandin synthesis, and probably directly via an effect on protein palmitoylation. PMID:18356536

  4. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ze-yu; Sun, Bin-bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-shi; Tang, Xian-ge; Ling, Zhao-li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-zhu; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Results: Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineintestineintestine, and particularly in ileal valve. Furthermore, ciprofloxacin (10–2000 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited β-glucuronidase activity in distal small intestine content or E coli incubated in vitro, but did not affect that in proximal small intestine content or bovine liver incubated in vitro. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Conclusion: Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via

  5. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ze-Yu; Sun, Bin-Bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-Shi; Tang, Xian-Ge; Ling, Zhao-Li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-Jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-Zhu; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineintestineintestine, and particularly in ileal valve. Furthermore, ciprofloxacin (10-2000 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited β-glucuronidase activity in distal small intestine content or E coli incubated in vitro, but did not affect that in proximal small intestine content or bovine liver incubated in vitro. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via the inhibition of intestinal

  6. Carotid artery wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound using adaptive block matching: in silico evaluation and in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J. S.; Nikita, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Valid risk stratification for carotid atherosclerotic plaques represents a crucial public health issue toward preventing fatal cerebrovascular events. Although motion analysis (MA) provides useful information about arterial wall dynamics, the identification of motion-based risk markers remains a significant challenge. Considering that the ability of a motion estimator (ME) to handle changes in the appearance of motion targets has a major effect on accuracy in MA, we investigated the potential of adaptive block matching (ABM) MEs, which consider changes in image intensities over time. To assure the validity in MA, we optimized and evaluated the ABM MEs in the context of a specially designed in silico framework. ABMFIRF2, which takes advantage of the periodicity characterizing the arterial wall motion, was the most effective ABM algorithm, yielding a 47% accuracy increase with respect to the conventional block matching. The in vivo application of ABMFIRF2 revealed five potential risk markers: low movement amplitude of the normal part of the wall adjacent to the plaques in the radial (RMAPWL) and longitudinal (LMAPWL) directions, high radial motion amplitude of the plaque top surface (RMAPTS), and high relative movement, expressed in terms of radial strain (RSIPL) and longitudinal shear strain (LSSIPL), between plaque top and bottom surfaces. The in vivo results were reproduced by OFLK(WLS) and ABMKF-K2, MEs previously proposed by the authors and with remarkable in silico performances, thereby reinforcing the clinical values of the markers and the potential of those MEs. Future in vivo studies will elucidate with confidence the full potential of the markers.

  7. Comparison of Small Intestinal Submucosa-Covered and Noncovered Nitinol Stents with PTFE Endografts in Injured Ovine Femoral Arteries: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Van Alstine, William; Timmermans, Hans A.; Toyota, Naoyuki; Terada, Masaki; Brountzos, Elias; Kaufman, John A.; Keller, Frederick S.; Rosch, Josef

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare performance of small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-covered endografts (SCEs) to polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered endografts (PCEs) and to bare nitinol stents (BSs) in injured sheep femoral artery (FA). Bare Zilver 6 mm x 40 mm nitinol stents (n = 6), Zilver stents covered with SIS (n = 6), and Palmaz stents 6 mm x 37 mm covered with PTFE (n = 6) were implanted in the balloon-injured FAs of nine female sheep. Follow-up arteriograms were obtained before animal sacrifice at 1, 3 and 6 months, with three animals at each time point. The FAs with the implanted device were explanted for histologic studies and morphologic measurements. Stent implantation was technically successful in all sheep. All BS and SCEs were patent at each time point. Five BSs and five SCEs exhibited formation of progressive eccentric intimal hyperplasia (IH) that was more advanced in SCE at 6 months. Cross-sectional area narrowing averaged 60% for BSs and 67% for SCEs. One BS, one SCE and two patent PCEs exhibited mild-to-moderate formation of concentric IH. Four PCS occluded one at 1 month, two at 3 months and one at 6 months. Performance of the devices placed into sheep FAs depended on their relation to the curving peri-articular portion of the FA during extremity flexion. BSs and SCEs placed in this portion exhibited progressive growth of eccentric IH while PCEs placed in this portion occluded.

  8. Comparison of small intestinal submucosa-covered and noncovered nitinol stents with PTFE endografts in injured ovine femoral arteries: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Manabu; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T; VanAlstine, William; Timmermans, Hans A; Toyota, Naoyuki; Terada, Masaki; Brountzos, Elias; Kaufman, John A; Keller, Frederick S; Rosch, Josef

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare performance of small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-covered endografts (SCEs) to polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered endografts (PCEs) and to bare nitinol stents (BSs) in injured sheep femoral artery (FA). Bare Zilver 6 mm X 40 mm nitinol stents (n = 6), Zilver stents covered with SIS (n = 6), and Palmaz stents 6 mm x 37 mm covered with PTFE (n = 6) were implanted in the balloon-injured FAs of nine female sheep. Follow-up arteriograms were obtained before animal sacrifice at 1, 3 and 6 months, with three animals at each time point. The FAs with the implanted device were explanted for histologic studies and morphologic measurements. Stent implantation was technically successful in all sheep. All BS and SCEs were patent at each time point. Five BSs and five SCEs exhibited formation of progressive eccentric intimal hyperplasia (IH) that was more advanced in SCE at 6 months. Cross-sectional area narrowing averaged 60% for BSs and 67% for SCEs. One BS, one SCE and two patent PCEs exhibited mild-to-moderate formation of concentric IH. Four PCS occluded one at 1 month, two at 3 months and one at 6 months. Performance of the devices placed into sheep FAs depended on their relation to the curving peri-articular portion of the FA during extremity flexion. BSs and SCEs placed in this portion exhibited progressive growth of eccentric IH while PCEs placed in this portion occluded.

  9. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... pale. When PAD becomes severe, you may have: Impotence Pain and cramps at night Pain or tingling ... emboli that block small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores (ischemic ulcers on the lower legs) ...

  10. First-degree atrioventricular block is associated with heart failure and death in persons with stable coronary artery disease: data from the Heart and Soul Study.

    PubMed

    Crisel, Ryan K; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Na, Beeya; Whooley, Mary A

    2011-08-01

    First-degree atrioventricular block (AVB) has traditionally been considered a benign electrocardiographic finding in healthy individuals. However, the clinical significance of first-degree AVB has not been evaluated in patients with stable coronary heart disease. We investigated whether first-degree AVB is associated with heart failure (HF) and mortality in a prospective cohort study of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We measured the P-R interval in 938 patients with stable CAD and classified them into those with (P-R interval ≥ 220 ms) and without (P-R interval <220 ms) first-degree AVB. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for HF hospitalization and all-cause mortality. During 5 years of follow-up, there were 123 hospitalizations for HF and 285 deaths. Compared with patients who had normal atrioventricular conduction, those with first-degree AVB were at increased risk for HF hospitalization (age-adjusted HR 2.33: 95% CI 1.49-3.65; P= 0.0002), mortality [age-adjusted HR 1.58; 95% CI (1.13-2.20); P = 0.008], cardiovascular (CV) mortality [age-adjusted HR 2.33; 95% CI (1.28-4.22); P= 0.005], and the combined endpoint of HF hospitalization or CV mortality (age-adjusted HR 2.43: 95% CI 1.64-3.61; P ≤ 0.0001). These associations persisted after multivariable adjustment for heart rate, medication use, ischaemic burden, and QRS duration. Adjustment for left ventricular systolic and diastolic function partially attenuated the effect, but first-degree AVB remained associated with the combined endpoint of HF or CV death (HR 1.61, CI 1.02-2.54; P= 0.04). In a large cohort of patients with stable coronary artery disease, first-degree AVB is associated with HF and death.

  11. Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT in patients with left bundle branch block suspected for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Elsemiek M; Timmer, Jorik R; Mouden, Mohamed; Knollema, Siert; Jager, Pieter L; Ottervanger, Jan Paul

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on sequential single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/ CT imaging starting with stress-first SPECT. Consecutive symptomatic low- to intermediate-risk patients without a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for SPECT/CT were included from an observational registry. If stress SPECT was abnormal, additional rest SPECT and, if feasible, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) were acquired. Of the 5,018 patients, 218 (4.3 %) demonstrated LBBB. Patients with LBBB were slightly older than patients without LBBB (65±12 vs. 61±11 years, p<0.001). Stress SPECT was more frequently abnormal in patients with LBBB (82 % vs. 46 %, p<0.001). After reviewing stress and rest images, SPECT was normal in 43 % of the patients with LBBB, compared to 77 % of the patients without LBBB (p<0.001). Sixty-four of the 124 patients with LBBB and abnormal stress-rest SPECT underwent CCTA (52 %), which could exclude obstructive CAD in 46 of the patients (72 %). Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT is not the optimal imaging protocol in patients with LBBB, as the majority of these patients have potentially false-positive stress SPECT. First-line testing using CCTA may be more appropriate in low- to intermediate-risk patients with LBBB. • Stress-first SPECT imaging is attractive if many patients demonstrate normal stress perfusion. • The majority of left bundle branch block patients have abnormal stress-first SPECT. • Coronary CT excluded obstructive CAD in many LBBB patients with abnormal SPECT. • Stress-first SPECT imaging is not the optimal imaging protocol in LBBB patients. • In LBBB patients imaging with initial coronary CT may be more appropriate.

  12. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Intestine Transplant Although it is possible for a living donor to donate an intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ ...

  13. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... acquired heart block. Coronary heart disease , also called coronary artery disease. Myocarditis (MI-o-kar-DI-tis), or inflammation ...

  14. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  15. Assessing coronary artery disease in patients with anginal chest pain and left bundle branch block: an emerging role for a new parameter of cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Gomez, Maria Angeles; Garcia-Baute, Maria del Carmen; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Avanzas, Pablo; Lara-Padron, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is used in cardiology to grade the severity of heart failure and to assess its prognosis. However, it is unknown whether CPET may be a useful technique to rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with anginal chest pain and left bundle branch block (LBBB). The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CPET to identify CAD in these patients. A cohort of 90 patients with anginal chest pain, 45 with LBBB (group A) and 45 non-LBBB (group B), were studied with CPET and a single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion study during the same period. The following variables of CPET were analyzed: peak oxygen uptake (VO2), VO2 at anaerobic threshold, and time to reach the anaerobic threshold (TAT). Group A values were lower compared with group B in peak VO2 (23 ± 6.2 vs. 28 ± 7.6 mLO2 · kg · min; P = 0.002), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (16.1 ± 3.6 vs. 18.9 ± 4.1 mLO2 · kg · min; P =0.001), and TAT (2.7 ± 0.96 vs. 4.4 ± 2.1 min; P < 0.001). Group A showed higher perfusion abnormalities in myocardial perfusion study than group B [27 (60%) vs. 12 (26.7%); P = 0.003]. Multivariate analysis showed that TAT (odds ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.39; P = 0.02) was the only independent predictor of CAD, after controlling for other factors. Receiver operator characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.78 for TAT (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.86; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, our findings suggest that a new functional parameter such as TAT significantly predicts CAD in patients with anginal chest pain and LBBB.

  16. Septal and anterior reverse mismatch of myocardial perfusion and metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Fang, Wei; Yang, Min-Fu; Tian, Yue-Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Rui; Sun, Xiao-Xin; Guo, Feng; Wang, Dao-Yu; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    The effects of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on left ventricular myocardial metabolism have not been well investigated. This study evaluated these effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).Sixty-five CAD patients with complete LBBB (mean age, 61.8 ± 9.7 years) and 65 without LBBB (mean age, 59.9 ± 8.4 years) underwent single photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and contrast coronary angiography. The relationship between myocardial perfusion and metabolism and reverse mismatch score, and that between QRS length and reverse mismatch score and wall motion score were evaluated.The incidence of left ventricular septum and anterior wall reverse mismatching between the two groups was significantly different (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The incidences of normal myocardial perfusion and metabolism in the left ventricular lateral and inferior walls were also significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The incidence of septal reverse mismatching in patients with mild to moderate perfusion was significantly higher among those with LBBB than among those without LBBB (P < 0.001). In CAD patients with LBBB, septal reverse mismatching was significantly more common among those with mild to moderate perfusion than among those with severe perfusion defects (P = 0.002). The correlation between the septal reverse mismatch score and QRS length was significant (P = 0.026).In patients with CAD and LBBB, septal and anterior reverse mismatching of myocardial perfusion and metabolism was frequently present; the septal reverse mismatch score negatively correlated with the QRS interval.

  17. Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table ... the arteries to narrow or become blocked, which can reduce or block blood flow. P.A.D. ...

  18. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  19. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  20. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  1. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis.

  2. Isolating and using sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein as a bioassay to test for vasoactivity in the small intestine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mammalian gastrointestinal systems are constantly exposed to compounds (desirable and undesirable) that can have an effect on blood flow to and from that system. Changes in blood flow to the small intestine can result in effects on the absorptive functions of the organ. Particular interest in toxins...

  3. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / ... narrows or blocks these arteries—a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs. A ...

  4. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  5. Uterine artery embolization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... your uterus (uterine artery). Small plastic or gelatin particles were injected into the blood vessels that carry blood to the fibroids. These particles block the blood supply to the fibroids. Without ...

  6. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  7. Mechanisms of microemulsion enhancing the oral bioavailability of puerarin: comparison between oil-in-water and water-in-oil microemulsions using the single-pass intestinal perfusion method and a chylomicron flow blocking approach

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tian-Tian; Hu, Xiong-Bin; Liao, De-Hua; Liu, Xin-Yi; Xiang, Da-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to determine the mechanisms by which microemulsions (MEs) enhance the oral bioavailability of puerarin. The in situ perfusion method was used in rats to study the absorption mechanisms of an oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion (O/W-ME) and a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion (W/O-ME). The possibility of lymphatic transport of the MEs was investigated using a chylomicron flow blocking approach. The results for the absorption mechanisms in the stomach and intestines indicated that the absorption characteristics of the O/W-ME and W/O-ME depend on the segment. The W/O-ME had higher internal membrane permeability than the O/W-ME. The results of the lymphatic transport analyses showed that both the O/W-ME and W/O-ME underwent lymphatic transport and that this pathway was a major contributor to the oral bioavailability of MEs. Furthermore, the type of ME can significantly affect the absorption of puerarin through the lymphatic system due to the oil content and the form of the microemulsion after oral administration. In conclusion, these data indicate that microemulsions are an effective and promising delivery system to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:24277986

  8. PANCREATIC DIGESTIVE ENZYME BLOCKADE IN THE SMALL INTESTINE PREVENTS INSULIN RESISTANCE IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    DeLano, Frank A.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 hours) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution) and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared to control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine lead to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared to controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels two hours after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock, but is restored in when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  9. Pancreatic digestive enzyme blockade in the small intestine prevents insulin resistance in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 h) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution), and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared with control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine led to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared with controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels 2 h after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock but is restored when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  10. Intestinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit, a ...

  12. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  13. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other ... into two main coronary blood vessels (also called arteries). These coronary arteries branch off into smaller arteries, ...

  14. Acute influence of different beta-blocking agents upon left heart hemodynamics at rest and during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Reale, A; Nigri, A; Gioffrè, P A; Motolese, M

    1979-02-01

    The study investigated the acute hemodynamic changes induced in patients with angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease by 3 beta-blockers: metoprolol, cardioselective without intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA), group I, 11 patients; bunitrolol, noncardioselective with ISA, group II, 11 patients; oxprenolol, noncardioselective with ISA, group III, 11 patients. Hemodynamic variables were obtained at rest and during exercise, before and 45 min after 10 mg i.v. of the drug. Changes in LVEDP and cardiac indexes were such as LV function was improved in 1 patient of group I, 7 patients of group II and 5 patients of group III; impaired in 4 patients of group I and in 1 patient of group III; unchanged in the others. Contractility indexes were less influenced by bunitrolol and oxprenolol. During exercise there was a significant difference between groups for LVEDP which was lower in group II (P less than 0.01). The data seem to indicate that the choice of the beta-blocker may be of importance when it is desirable that an already compromised cardiac function be not further impaired by pharmacological intervention.

  15. Intestinal Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and hormone medications, such as estrogen Cocaine or methamphetamine use Vigorous exercise, such as long-distance running ... anti-phospholipid syndrome. Illegal drug use. Cocaine and methamphetamine use have been linked to intestinal ischemia. Complications ...

  16. Intestinal Capillariasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    bhIll inenais, the tiny nematode causing Intestinal capillariasis In humans, Is a Iunique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been...Capillariaphilippinensis, the tiny nematode causing intestinal capillariasis in humans, is a unique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been shown to...stichocytes surrounding the oesophagus. The posterior half of the nematode is wider than the anterior half and contains the digestive tract and the

  17. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAD). Both PAD and CAD are caused by atherosclerosis that narrows and blocks arteries in various critical ... can be managed with lifestyle changes and medication . Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which ...

  18. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  19. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  1. [Digital subtract arteriographic characteristics of carotid artery, vertebral artery, subclavian artery and renal artery in type 2 diabetic patients with lower extremities peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Wei; Lu, Wu-Sheng; Wang, Chun; Jiao, He; Tian, Hao-Ming; Ran, Xing-Wu

    2012-09-01

    To investigate angiographical characteristics of carotid, vertebral, subclavian, and renal arteries in the type 2 diabetic patients with lower extremities peripheral arterial disease (LEPAD). There were 104 type 2 diabetic patients with LEPAD recruited in this study, who received digital subtract arteriography (DSA). Ankle-brachial index (ABI) assessment was also performed in 50 participants. Dependent upon the stenosis degree of vertebral artery, subclavian artery and renal artery measured by DSA, the patients were divided into normal group (stenosis < or = 50%) or pathological group(stenosis > 50% or blocked lesions). The angiographic features of carotid, vertebral, subclavian, and renal arteries were analyzed and the relationship between arterial stenosis and ABI was explored. DSA results of 104 patients showed that the most common lesion in the arteries was plaque. The stenosis degrees of 51%-74% and 75%-99% were most commonly observed in renal artery, with incidence of 22.1% and 5.8%, respectively. Arterial occlusion was most commonly observed in vertebral artery, with incidence of 27.9%. The patients with stenosis or occlusion of arteries had lower ABI (P = 0.000), and the patients with stenosis or occlusion of vertebral and renal arteries also had lower ABI (P = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively), compared with those without stenosis. ABI < 0.9 indicated higher risk of stenosis or occlusion of vertebral and renal arteries (P = 0.008 and 0.047 respectively). Between the patients with subclavian arterial stenosis and those without this artery stenosis, there was no statistical significant difference observed in ABI level. Type 2 diabetic patients with LEPAD can affect multiple arteries, showing plaque formation, multi-segmental stenosis and occlusion of arteries. The patients with ABI < 0.9 have higher risk of multiple arterial stenosis or occlusion lesions.

  2. Hyperthermia induces injury to the intestinal mucosa in the mouse: evidence for an oxidative stress mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, S. R.; Phillips, N. A.; Novosad, V. L.; Bakos, M. P.; Talbert, E. E.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the intestinal barrier is critical to the clinical course of heat illness, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that conditions characteristic of mild heatstroke in mice are associated with injury to the epithelial lining of the intestinal tract and comprise a critical component of barrier dysfunction. Anesthetized mice were gavaged with 4 kDa FITC-dextran (FD-4) and exposed to increasing core temperatures, briefly reaching 42.4°C, followed by 30 min recovery. Arterial samples were collected to measure FD-4 concentration in plasma (in vivo gastrointestinal permeability). The small intestines were then removed to measure histological evidence of injury. Hyperthermia resulted in a ≈2.5-fold elevation in plasma FD-4 and was always associated with significant histological evidence of injury to the epithelial lining compared with matched controls, particularly in the duodenum. When isolated intestinal segments from control animals were exposed to ≥41.5°C, marked increases in permeability were observed within 60 min. These changes were associated with release of lactate dehydrogenase, evidence of protein oxidation via carbonyl formation and histological damage. Coincubation with N-acetylcysteine protected in vitro permeability during hyperthermia and reduced histological damage and protein oxidation. Chelation of intracellular Ca2+ to block tight junction opening during 41.5°C exposure failed to reduce the permeability of in vitro segments. The results demonstrate that hyperthermia exposure in mouse intestine, at temperatures at or below those necessary to induce mild heatstroke, cause rapid and substantial injury to the intestinal lining that may be attributed, in part, to oxidative stress. PMID:22237593

  3. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  4. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  5. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  6. INTESTINAL CAPILLARIES

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Francesco; Palade, George E.

    1969-01-01

    Perfusion of the fenestrated capillaries of the intestinal mucosa of the rat with 0.05–0.1 M EDTA removes the diaphragms of the endothelial cells and detaches these cells from one another and from the basement membrane. The latter, even when completely denuded, retains effectively particles of 340 A (average) diameter. Perfusion with histamine (1 µg/ml) results in partial removal of fenestral diaphragms, occasional detachment of the endothelium from the basement membrane, and focal separation of endothelial intercellular junctions. PMID:4979362

  7. Viability of the vascularly perfused, recirculating rat intestine and intestine-liver preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, H.; Xu, X.; Pang, K.S. )

    1989-08-01

    Function and stability of vascularly perfused, recirculating in situ rat intestine (I) and intestine-liver (IL) preparations were evaluated in fasted and nonfasted rats because these techniques may be readily applied in drug metabolism studies. The rat intestine was perfused with blood medium (7.5 ml/min) via the superior mesenteric artery, with the venous outflow draining into the portal vein, which, together with hepatic arterial flow (2.5 ml/min), constituted the total blood flow (10 ml/min) to the liver. Maintenance of intestinal membrane integrity was observed. Rapid ({sup 14}C)glucose absorption against a concentration gradient and a lack of ({sup 3}H)-polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000, less than 4%) and Evans blue absorption by the recirculating I and IL preparations resulted after bolus injections of these markers into the pyloric end of the duodenum. Other indexes that revealed stable intestinal and liver functions were the following: preservation of reservoir perfusate volume, constancy in perfusion pressure, bile flow, and hemoglobin concentrations, evidence of intestinal glucose utilization and liver glucose production, and a lack of significant leakage of serum glutamic oxalic transaminase. The intestine and liver consumed oxygen at relatively constant rates, but the consumption rates for the fasted tissues (I or L) were significantly higher than those for nonfasted tissues. These results indicate that the vascularly perfused I and IL preparations were maintained in a viable and stable state for a 2-h perfusion period.

  8. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  9. Neuromuscular block.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them specially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are specially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of special interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors.

  10. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  11. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H

    1992-04-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops.

  12. [Short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure - new developments].

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal failure is characterized by intestinal water and electrolyte losses as well as malabsorption of macronutrients. It often requires individually composed parenteral support (so call compounding). Teduglutide, a DPP-IV resistant GLP2 analogue, is available a pharmacologic treatment, which stimulates intestinal absorption and can facilitate infusion free days. Catheter infections are the most common complication of home parenteral support. The incidence can be minimized using Taurolidin as a catheter block solution.

  13. Sodium butyrate blocks interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced biosynthesis of MHC class III gene products (complement C4 and factor B) in human fetal intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, K; Andoh, A; Inoue, T; Amakata, Y; Hodohara, K; Fujiyama, Y; Bamba, T

    1999-01-01

    Human intestinal epithelial cells have been established as local sites for complement biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ and sodium butyrate on biosynthesis of MHC class III gene products (complement C4 and factor B) in the human fetal intestinal epithelial cell line INT-407. IFN-γ induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in C4 and factor B secretion. However, sodium butyrate dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ-induced C4 and factor B secretion. These effects were also observed at the mRNA level. Immunoblotting indicated that IFN-γ induced a rapid activation of Stat1α, and fluorescence immunohistochemistry detected a translocation of Stat1α into the nucleus within 1 h. However, the translocation of Stat1α was not affected by the addition of sodium butyrate. Nuclear run-on assay indicated that IFN-γ induced a weak increase in the transcription rate of factor B gene, and sodium butyrate did not affect this response. IFN-γ and sodium butyrate induced a counter-regulatory effect on C4 and factor B secretion: IFN-γ acted as a potent inducer, but sodium butyrate potently abrogated these responses. These are mainly regulated through the post-transcriptional mechanism. PMID:10540154

  14. Arterial insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... is atherosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries." Fatty material (called plaque) builds up on the walls of your arteries. This causes them to become narrow and stiff. As a result, it is hard for blood to flow through your arteries. Blood flow may be suddenly ...

  15. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  16. Block Busters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noblitt, Bill

    1994-01-01

    A number of college publications editors and designers share their secrets for coping with writer's block and other forms of creative anxiety. Suggested techniques include a change of scenery, guarding one's time, sharing ideas with others, thorough research, and organization. (MSE)

  17. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water.

  18. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  19. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  20. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  1. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  2. [Adult intestinal malrotation associated with intestinal volvulus].

    PubMed

    Hernando-Almudí, Ernesto; Cerdán-Pascual, Rafael; Vallejo-Bernad, Cristina; Martín-Cuartero, Joaquín; Sánchez-Rubio, María; Casamayor-Franco, Carmen

    2016-06-23

    Intestinal malrotation is a congenital anomaly of the intestinal rotation and fixation, and usually occurs in the neonatal age. Description of a clinical case associated with acute occlusive symptoms. A case of intestinal malrotation is presented in a previously asymptomatic woman of 46 years old with an intestinal obstruction, with radiology and surgical findings showing an absence of intestinal rotation. Intestinal malrotation in adults is often asymptomatic, and is diagnosed as a casual finding during a radiological examination performed for other reasons. Infrequently, it can be diagnosed in adults, associated with an acute abdomen. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Composition and functional role of the mucus layers in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V; Ambort, Daniel; Pelaseyed, Thaher; Schütte, André; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Ermund, Anna; Subramani, Durai B; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica M; Thomsson, Kristina A; Bergström, Joakim H; van der Post, Sjoerd; Rodriguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; Sjövall, Henrik; Bäckström, Malin; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-11-01

    In discussions on intestinal protection, the protective capacity of mucus has not been very much considered. The progress in the last years in understanding the molecular nature of mucins, the main building blocks of mucus, has, however, changed this. The intestinal enterocytes have their apical surfaces covered by transmembrane mucins and the whole intestinal surface is further covered by mucus, built around the gel-forming mucin MUC2. The mucus of the small intestine has only one layer, whereas the large intestine has a two-layered mucus where the inner, attached layer has a protective function for the intestine, as it is impermeable to the luminal bacteria.

  4. Brachioradial arteries with anastomotic arteries connecting to brachial arteries bilaterally.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tong; Qiuhong, Dan; Haipeng, Cai

    2010-01-01

    We present a patient with a failed radial coronary angioplasty as a result of bilateral brachioradial arteries, the radial arteries anomalously originating from the axillary arteries. We review the literature concerning abnormal origins of the radial artery and propose the left ulnar artery as optimal access of choice in cases with a right brachioradial artery of relatively small size in its proximal part.

  5. Vagal innervation of intestines: afferent pathways mapped with new en bloc horseradish peroxidase adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Powley, Terry L

    2007-08-01

    Neural tracers have not typically been employed to determine the pathways followed by axons between their perikarya and target tissues. We have adapted the tetramethylbenzidine method for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to stain fibers en bloc in organs and thus to delineate axonal trajectories. We have also applied this protocol to characterize the pathways that vagal afferents follow to the intestines. The protocol confirms that the proximal segment of the duodenum receives afferents carried in the vagal hepatic branch and demonstrates that vagal afferents innervating the remainder of the small and large intestines course through multiple fascicles derived from the celiac branches of the abdominal vagus. These fascicles divide, intermingle, and reorganize along the abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), but not along the inferior mesenteric artery, and then project to the intestines with secondary arteries that branch from the SMA. The inferior pancreaticoduodenal, jejunal, middle colic, right colic, and ileocecocolic arteries all carry vagal afferents to segments of the intestines. As the arteries derived from the SMA divide repeatedly into successively finer branches and course to the intestines, the vagal afferent fascicles (typically a pair) running with each arterial branch also divide. These divisions generate sets/pairs of finer fascicles coursing with even the highest order arterial radicles. The vagal fascicles enter the intestinal wall with the vessels and appear to innervate the organ near the point of entry. The results verify the practicality and sensitivity of the en bloc HRP technique and suggest that the protocol could delineate other peripheral pathways.

  6. Arterial calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Kroon, Abraham A; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Arterial calcifications as found with various imaging techniques, like plain X-ray, computed tomography or ultrasound are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The prevalence of arterial calcification increases with age and is stimulated by several common cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, the clinical importance of arterial calcification and the currently known proteins involved are discussed. Arterial calcification is the result of a complex interplay between stimulating (bone morphogenetic protein type 2 [BMP-2], RANKL) and inhibitory (matrix Gla protein, BMP-7, osteoprotegerin, fetuin-A, osteopontin) proteins. Vascular calcification is especially prevalent and related to adverse outcome in patients with renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. We address the special circumstances and mechanisms in these patient groups. Treatment and prevention of arterial calcification is possible by the use of specific drugs. However, it remains to be proven that reduction of vascular calcification in itself leads to a reduced cardiovascular risk. PMID:20716128

  7. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cláudio; Teixeira, Cristina; Ribeiro, Suzane; Trabulo, Daniel; Cardoso, Cláudia; Mangualde, João; Freire, Ricardo; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gamito, Élia; Cremers, Isabelle; Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described-olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  8. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cristina; Ribeiro, Suzane; Trabulo, Daniel; Cardoso, Cláudia; Mangualde, João; Freire, Ricardo; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gamito, Élia; Cremers, Isabelle; Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy. PMID:27803820

  9. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  10. The treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Papaspyropoulos, V; Mancini, P; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    Due to the rarity of the condition, large and prospective series defining the optimal method of digestive arteries revascularization, for the treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia, are lacking. The aim of this consecutive sample clinical study was to test the hypothesis that flexible application of different revascularization methods, according to individual cases, will yield the best results in the management of chronic intestinal ischemia. Eleven patients, of a mean age of 57 years, underwent revascularization of 11 digestive arteries for symptomatic chronic mesenteric occlusive disease. Eleven superior mesenteric arteries and one celiac axis were revascularized. The revascularization techniques included retrograde bypass grafting in 7 cases, antegrade bypass grafting in 2, percutaneous arterial angioplasty in 1, and arterial reimplantation in one case. The donor axis for either reimplantation or bypass grafting was the infrarenal aorta in 4 cases, an infrarenal Dacron graft in 4, and the celiac aorta in one case. Grafting materials included 5 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and 3 Dacron grafts. Concomitant procedures included 3 aorto-ilio-femoral grafts and one renal artery revascularization. Mean follow-up length was 31 months. There was no operative mortality. Cumulative survival rate was 88.9% at 36 months (SE 12.1%). Primary patency rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). The symptom free rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). Direct reimplantation, antegrade and retrograde bypass grafting, all allow good mid-term results: the choice of the optimal method depends on the anatomic and general patients status. Associated infrarenal and renal arterial lesions can be safely treated in the same time of digestive revascularization. Angioplasty alone yields poor results and should be limited to patients at poor risk for surgery.

  11. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibition and postprandial intestinal hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Gallavan, R H; Chou, C C

    1982-02-01

    The effect of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia was examined in the jejunum of anesthetized dogs. Both intravenous and intra-arterial infusion of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and mefenamic acid reduced resting jejunal blood flow and markedly enhanced the food-induced jejunal hyperemia. The jejunal vascular response to food did not change after either intravenous or intra-arterial infusion of the carrier solutions or intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II. The enhancement of the jejunal hyperemia was associated with an increase in the food-induced increase in jejunal oxygen consumption. Infusion of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors increased the mean amplitude of the monophasic intestinal contractions; however, this did not appear to play a role in the enhancement of the food-induced hyperemia. The study indicates that inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis has a marked effect on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia and that this may be due to its enhancement of the jejunal metabolic response to food. The prostaglandins involved and their mechanism of action are unknown.

  12. Microvascular architecture of anthropoid primate intestine.

    PubMed

    Swan, K G; Spees, E K; Reynolds, D G; Kerr, J C; Zinner, M J

    1978-01-01

    Microvascular architecture of the small intestine of New World monkey, ape, and man was examined with the silicone rubber injection technique and the results compared to previous observations in dogs and Old World monkeys. In man, chimpanzee, and New World monkey the small intestine villus contains a single centrally located vein draining a subepithelial capillary plexus converging at the apex of the villus. These villi also contain a single eccentrically located artery rising to the midlevel of the villus, where it branches into subepithelial capillaries over the rest of its length. This vascular architecture most closely resembles that observed in the gut of Old World monkeys in which the villus artery is absent altogether. This observation contrasts the microvascular architecture of canine intestinal villi in which marginal arteries surround a centrally located vein. These patterns of microvascular anatomy are analyzed in terms of the role of the gut in the pathogenesis of experimental shock. The differences observed may account for the known species variations in canine and primate experimental shock.

  13. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  14. Disorders of the Large Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  15. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  16. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  17. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  18. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  19. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  20. Chronic intestinal ischaemia: measurement of the total splanchnic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D

    2013-04-01

    A redundant collateral network between the intestinal arteries is present at all times. In case of ischaemia in the gastrointestinal tract, the collateral blood supply can develop further, thus accommodating the demand for oxygen even in the presence of significant stenosis or occlusion of the intestinal arteries without clinical symptoms of intestinal ischaemia. Symptoms of ischemia develop when the genuine and collateral blood supply no longer can accommodate the need for oxygen. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of obliteration in the intestinal arteries. In chronic intestinal ischaemia (CII), the fasting splanchnic blood flow (SBF) is sufficient, but the postprandial increase in SBF is inadequate and abdominal pain will therefore develop in relation to food intake causing the patient to eat smaller meals at larger intervals with a resulting weight loss. Traditionally, the CII-diagnosis has exclusively been based upon morphology (angiography) of the intestinal arteries; however, substantial discrepancies between CII-symptoms and the presence of atherosclerosis/stenosis in the intestinal arteries have been described repeatedly in the literature impeding the diagnosis of CII. This PhD thesis explores a method to determine the total SBF and its potential use as a diagnostic tool in patients suspected to suffer from CII. The SBF can be measured using a continuous infusion of a tracer and catheterisation of a hepatic vein and an artery. By measuring the SBF before and after a standard meal it is possible to assess the ability or inability to enhance the SBF and thereby diagnosing CII. In Study I, measurement of SBF was tested against angiography in a group of patients suspected to suffer from CII due to pain and weight loss. A very good agreement between the postprandial increase in SBF and angiography was found. The method was validated against a well-established method independent of the hepatic extraction of tracer using pAH in a porcine model (study II

  1. Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts.

  2. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  3. Axillary arteriovenous fistula after axillary plexus block.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dao-Jun; Yuan, Hai-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Heng

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the case of a 51-year-old man who had an axillary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) as a complication of an axillary plexus block that was performed for internal fixation for a right forefinger phalanx fracture 4 years previously. While performing the axillary plexus block, a 22-gauge needle was placed inside the axillary sheath by observing the pulsations of the axillary artery. A pulsatile mass was found in the right axilla 1 day after the block was performed. Apart from this soft mass, the patient had no symptoms of vascular nerve damage. As the mass gradually increased in size, it became painful. During the past 3 months, in particular, the patient experienced repeated attacks of intermittent sharp pain and requested surgery. Digital subtraction angiography, performed 4 years after the axillary block, showed a tumor-like dilation was developing in both the right axillary artery and vein, almost simultaneously. Thus, the diagnosis of AVF was confirmed. The false aneurysm sac was excised and lateral repair of the axillary artery and vein was carried out under general anesthesia. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The possible occurrence of an AVF after axillary plexus block should be kept in mind, because early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to avoid development of AVF and false aneurysm.

  4. Current Status of Intestinal Transplantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jorge; Bueno, Javier; Kocoshis, Samuel; Green, Mike; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Furukawa, Hiro; Barksdale, Edward M.; Strom, Sharon; Fung, John J.; Todo, Satoru; Irish, William; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A clinical trial of intestinal transplantation (Itx) under tacrolimus and prednisone immunosuppression was initiated in June 1990 in children with irreversible intestinal failure and who were dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Methods Fifty-five patients (28 girls, 27 boys) with a median age of 3.2 years (range, 0.5 to 18 years) received 58 intestinal transplants that included isolated small bowel (SB) (n = 17), liver SB (LSB) (n = 33), and multivisceral (MV) (n = 8) allografts. Nine patients also received bone marrow infusion, and there were 20 colonic allografts. Azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, or mycophenolate mofetil were used in different phases of the series. Indications for Itx included: gastroschisis(n = 14), volvulus (n = 13), necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 6), intestinal atresia (n = 8), chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (n = 5), Hirschsprung’s disease (n = 4), microvillus inclusion disease (n = 3), multiple polyposis (n = 1), and trauma (n = 1). Results Currently, 30 patients are alive (patient survival, 55%; graft survival, 52%). Twenty-nine children with functioning grafts are living at home and off TPN, with a mean follow-up of 962 (range, 75 to 2,424) days. Immunologic complications have included liver allograft rejection (n = 18), intestinal allograft rejection (n = 52), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (n = 16), cytomegalovirus (n = 16) and graft-versus-host disease (n = 4). A combination of associated complications included intestinal perforation (n = 4), biliary leak (n = 3), bile duct stenosis (n = 1), intestinal leak (n = 6), dehiscence with evisceration (n = 4), hepatic artery thrombosis (n = 3), bleeding (n = 9), portal vein stenosis (n = 1), intraabdominal abscess (n = 11), and chylous ascites (n = 4). Graft loss occurred as a result of rejection (n = 8), infection (n = 12), technical complications (n = 8), and complications of TPN after graft removal (n = 3). There were four retransplants (SB, n = 1; LSB n

  5. Arterial Vascularization of the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Pampas Deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Pérez, W; Vazquez, N; Ungerfeld, R

    2016-06-01

    Based on gross dissection of fifteen adult animals (11 females, 4 males), we described the arterial supply of the stomach and intestines of the pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus), a South American endangered species. The coeliac artery emitted the splenic, left gastric and hepatic arteries. The splenic artery directed towards the spleen, and the right ruminal artery, which is its only collateral directed towards the stomach, being the main artery of the rumen. The left gastric artery gave origin to the left ruminal, the reticular and the left gastroepiploic arteries. The left gastroepiploic artery originated the reticular accessory artery. Both arteries, gastric and left gastroepiploic, anastomosed their right counterparts derived from the hepatic artery on the curvatures of the abomasum. The cranial mesenteric artery irrigated the second half of the duodenum until the beginning of the descending colon. The thickest branch emitted by the cranial mesenteric artery was the ileocolic artery, which was destined to the ascending colon, caecum and ileum. The colic branches and the right colic arteries were irradiated on the right surface of the spiral loop of the ascending colon and distributed to both centripetal and centrifugal coils of the ascending colon; the colic branches were also anastomosed with the last jejunals and ileals and with the right colic arteries. There were no variations in the origin of any of the main branches derived from the coeliac and cranial mesenteric arteries. This species had a basic pattern of arterial distribution similar to small domestic ruminants. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Intestinal M cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer’s patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  7. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  8. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  9. [Myoelectric function, metabolism, intestinal circulation and vagal activity after chemical sympathectomy].

    PubMed

    Obuchowicz, Rafał; Sendur, Ryszard; Pawlik, Michał; Biernat, Jarosław; Koprowska, Bernadetta; Jaworek, Jolanta; Thor, Piotr J

    2002-01-01

    Adrenergic innervation plays an important role in the control of electric activity and circulatory parameters of the gut. Importance of adrenergic system as a modulator of motor, neural and metabolic activity of the intestine is studied extensively but still not well understood. We use 6-OHDA a neurotoxin and a blocking agent of adrenergic fibers, to evaluate their exact role in the control of vital parameters of the intestine and vagal nerves. 50 Wistar rats were used. Animals were fasted 24 h prior to experiment with free access to water allowed. Acute experiments were performed on 30 rats, divided in the three groups. Four experimental groups were established. I--sham operated. II and III--pretreated with 6-ODHA (25 mg//kg/24 h s.c.) 3 days before experiment. IV group were used for chronic procedure. Thiopental anesthesia (Vetbutal Biovet) was applied. Animals were artificially ventilated with positive pressure rodent ventilator (Ugo Basile), and heated with continuous temperature control by rectal thermistor (FST). Left carotid artery was cannulated and connected with electro manometer--arterial pressure (AP) was expressed in mm Hg. Right jugular vein was cannulated for continuous saline administration 0.2 ml/h. Mesenteric blood flow (MBF) was recorded with use of ultrasonic probe (Transonic systems T206). Microcirculatory blood Flow (LDBF) was estimated by laser Doppler flowmetry (Periflux 2001 Master). Arterio-venous difference (AVO2) was estimated from whole blood (AVOXimeter 1000 E). Oxygen uptake was calculated from MBF and AVO2 and expressed in ml/min/100 g tissue. Chronic experiments were performed on conscious animals with electrodes implanted to the serosal surface of the intestinal wall. Measurements of intestinal myoelectric parameters were performed one, two and three weeks after 6-OHDA administration. Vagal activity was recorded in left vagus nerve in the neck with suction electrodes (one month after 6-OHDA). 6-OHDA pretreatment evoked increase of

  10. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Carotid Artery Screening What is carotid artery screening? Who should ... information about carotid artery screening? What is carotid artery screening? Screening examinations are tests performed to find ...

  11. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  12. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for embolization (especially to the brain) is mitral stenosis . Endocarditis (infection of the inside of the heart) can also cause arterial emboli. A common source for an embolus is from areas of hardening (atherosclerosis) in the aorta and other large blood vessels. These clots can ...

  13. Treatment of arterial lesions after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergqvist, D.; Jonsson, K.; Nilsson, M.; Takolander, R.

    1987-08-01

    Of 1,724 patients who underwent peripheral vascular operation, 12 (0.7 per cent) underwent radiation therapy of the areas including the relevant arteries one and one-half to 28 years (a mean of 15 years) previously; one patient had carcinoma of the breast, three had tumors of the neck and eight patients had malignant gynecologic disease. One patient with an occluded carotid artery was not actively treated, two underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and the remaining patients underwent different types of vascular reconstructions. These patients frequently have other radiation lesions as well with involvement of the skin, bladder or intestine, which may make them problematic from a surgical point of view. Extra-anatomic reconstructions or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty can be recommended. One patient died of malignant disease three years after arterial operation. Otherwise, the results of follow-up study for these patients did not differ from other patients who underwent arterial reconstruction.

  14. Characterization of intestinal collateral blood flow in the developing piglet.

    PubMed

    Crissinger, K D; Granger, D N

    1988-10-01

    Interest in the pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis has prompted study of the intestinal circulation in developing animals. It is conceivable that poorly developed collateral channels may predispose the neonatal intestine to ischemic insults. We therefore characterized intestinal collateral blood flow in anesthetized and ventilated 1-day and 1-month-old piglets. Intestinal blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres (15 micron diameter) before and after either 1) total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or 2) occlusion of a distal (jejunoileal) branch of the SMA. After total SMA occlusion in 1-day and 1-month-old piglets, perfusion of the intestine via collaterals from the celiac and inferior mesenteric arteries was not evident. Jejunal, ileal, and colonic (except rectal) blood flows fell to zero 30 min after ligation of the SMA. Ligation of a distal branch of the SMA in 1-month-old animals significantly reduced total wall (by 25%) and mucosal/submucosal (by 25%) blood flows in the occluded segment. Similar experiments in 1-day-old piglets produced significantly greater reduction in total (70%) and mucosa/submucosa (70%) blood flows. Muscle/serosa blood flows in both groups were not significantly different from control values. In conclusion, collateral perfusion of the intestine via the celiac and inferior mesenteric arteries is insignificant during acute SMA occlusion in the developing piglet. Although there is significant collateral blood flow within the SMA vascular network, perfusion between adjacent gut segments is less effective in preventing intestinal ischemia after occlusion of a branch of the SMA in neonates than in 1-month-old piglets.

  15. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  16. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. Circovirus inclusion bodies in intestinal muscle cells of a canary.

    PubMed

    Rampin, T; Manarolla, G; Pisoni, G; Recordati, C; Sironi, G

    2006-08-01

    Multiple cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in the intestinal smooth muscle cells of an adult canary from an aviary with a history of high mortality (50%) both in adult and young birds. Grossly, a mild enteritis was the only lesion appreciable. Smears of the proventricular contents contained a few megabacteria (Macrorhabdus ornithogaster). The intestinal inclusions were found in very high numbers in all parts of the tract examined. They appeared round to oval, amphophilic and hyaline in sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and magenta with Feulgen stain. Inclusions of the same type were occasionally detectable in the wall of a few splenic and pancreatic arteries. No inclusions or lesions were seen in the other organs examined. Transmission electron microscopy of the intestinal wall revealed circovirus-like particles either in paracrystalline arrays or loose arrangements, mostly within the cytoplasm of the intestinal muscule cells. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis confirmed infection with canary circovirus.

  18. Intestinal obstruction repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100116.htm Intestinal obstruction repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Adhesions Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  19. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  20. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide: A Possible Transmitter of Nonadrenergic Relaxation of Guinea Pig Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yoshikazu; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Said, Sami I.

    1980-12-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide, a smooth-muscle relaxant neuropeptide with neurotransmitter properties, was released during electrical field stimulation of guinea pig trachea. The amount released correlated with the degree of relaxation, and the release was blocked by tetrodotoxin. Prior incubation of the trachea with antiserum to vasoactive intestinal peptide reduced the relaxation. Thus vasoactive intestinal peptide may mediate the nonadrenergic relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle.

  1. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses.

  2. Factoring the intestinal microbiome into the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a reservoir of microbial antigens and activated immune cells. The aims of this review were to describe the role of the intestinal microbiome in generating innate and adaptive immune responses, indicate how these responses contribute to the development of systemic immune-mediated diseases, and encourage investigations that improve the understanding and management of autoimmune hepatitis. Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) can disrupt intestinal and systemic immune tolerances for commensal bacteria. Toll-like receptors within the intestine can recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and shape subsets of T helper lymphocytes that may cross-react with host antigens (molecular mimicry). Activated gut-derived lymphocytes can migrate to lymph nodes, and gut-derived microbial antigens can translocate to extra-intestinal sites. Inflammasomes can form within hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells, and they can drive the pro-inflammatory, immune-mediated, and fibrotic responses. Diet, designer probiotics, vitamin supplements, re-colonization methods, antibiotics, drugs that decrease intestinal permeability, and molecular interventions that block signaling pathways may emerge as adjunctive regimens that complement conventional immunosuppressive management. In conclusion, investigations of the intestinal microbiome are warranted in autoimmune hepatitis and promise to clarify pathogenic mechanisms and suggest alternative management strategies. PMID:27895415

  3. Factoring the intestinal microbiome into the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2016-11-14

    The intestinal microbiome is a reservoir of microbial antigens and activated immune cells. The aims of this review were to describe the role of the intestinal microbiome in generating innate and adaptive immune responses, indicate how these responses contribute to the development of systemic immune-mediated diseases, and encourage investigations that improve the understanding and management of autoimmune hepatitis. Alterations in the composition of the intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) can disrupt intestinal and systemic immune tolerances for commensal bacteria. Toll-like receptors within the intestine can recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and shape subsets of T helper lymphocytes that may cross-react with host antigens (molecular mimicry). Activated gut-derived lymphocytes can migrate to lymph nodes, and gut-derived microbial antigens can translocate to extra-intestinal sites. Inflammasomes can form within hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells, and they can drive the pro-inflammatory, immune-mediated, and fibrotic responses. Diet, designer probiotics, vitamin supplements, re-colonization methods, antibiotics, drugs that decrease intestinal permeability, and molecular interventions that block signaling pathways may emerge as adjunctive regimens that complement conventional immunosuppressive management. In conclusion, investigations of the intestinal microbiome are warranted in autoimmune hepatitis and promise to clarify pathogenic mechanisms and suggest alternative management strategies.

  4. Arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Planche, C; Lacour-Gayet, F; Serraf, A

    1998-01-01

    A relatively large spectra of anatomic variations are found within the unifying features of discordant ventriculoarterial connections. Variants that lend themselves to anatomic repair by the arterial switch operation are discussed, these include transposition of the great arteries with intact ventricular septum (TGA IVS), TGA associated with a ventricular septal defect (TGA VSD), double-outlet right ventricle with subpulmonary VSD (DORV VSD), and TGA or DORV with VSD associated with coarctation. Double discordance with VSD, which is currently treated by double switch or Rastelli and atrial switch and which probably represents, in our department, the only remaining indication for atrial switch, is not discussed. Also, we exclude TGA associated with pulmonary stenosis, which is treated by Rastelli or REV operation.

  5. New observations on the pathogenesis of multiple intestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Puri, P; Fujimoto, T

    1988-03-01

    It has been suggested that multiple intestinal atresias result from multiple ischemic infarctions of the intestinal tract. We have studied surgical material from 59 neonates with intestinal atresias seen at our hospital between 1975 and 1986. Forty (68%) patients had single intestinal atresias and 19 (32%) had multiple atresias. There were seven cases of hereditary multiple atresias seen in three families and 12 cases of nonhereditary multiple atresias. All hereditary cases had numerous type I or type II gastrointestinal atresias but none had type IIIa atresia. Six of the seven hereditary cases had multiple atresias in the small as well as large bowel. The 12 patients with nonhereditary atresias had various types of atresias but mesenteric or intestinal interruption was observed in only two patients. All patients with hereditary multiple intestinal atresias showed identical microscopic appearances in the small and large intestine, consisting of sieve-like multiple lumina, each surrounded by its own mucosa and muscularis mucosae but sharing a common muscle coat. There was no evidence of lanugo, bile pigments, or squames within the lumen distal to atretic segments in any of these patients. Six nonhereditary cases who had multiple septal atresias affecting only the small bowel demonstrated essentially similar lesions on microscopic examination as seen in hereditary cases. There was no evidence of arterial occlusion in the mesentery and lanugo, bile pigments, and squames could not be found distally in the intestinal contents in any of these cases. These pathologic findings suggest that all cases of hereditary multiple intestinal atresias and some cases of nonhereditary multiple intestinal atresias are a consequence of a malformative process of the gastrointestinal tract rather than an ischemic process.

  6. Intestinal and hepatic metabolism of glutamine and citrulline in humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Poll, Marcel C G; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C; Boelens, Petra G; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Dejong, Cornelis H C

    2007-01-01

    Glutamine plays an important role in nitrogen homeostasis and intestinal substrate supply. It has been suggested that glutamine is a precursor for arginine through an intestinal–renal pathway involving inter-organ transport of citrulline. The importance of intestinal glutamine metabolism for endogenous arginine synthesis in humans, however, has remained unaddressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal conversion of glutamine to citrulline and the effect of the liver on splanchnic citrulline metabolism in humans. Eight patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery received a primed continuous intravenous infusion of [2-15N]glutamine and [ureido-13C–2H2]citrulline. Arterial, portal venous and hepatic venous blood were sampled and portal and hepatic blood flows were measured. Organ specific amino acid uptake (disposal), production and net balance, as well as whole body rates of plasma appearance were calculated according to established methods. The intestines consumed glutamine at a rate that was dependent on glutamine supply. Approximately 13% of glutamine taken up by the intestines was converted to citrulline. Quantitatively glutamine was the only important precursor for intestinal citrulline release. Both glutamine and citrulline were consumed and produced by the liver, but net hepatic flux of both amino acids was not significantly different from zero. Plasma glutamine was the precursor of 80% of plasma citrulline and plasma citrulline in turn was the precursor of 10% of plasma arginine. In conclusion, glutamine is an important precursor for the synthesis of arginine after intestinal conversion to citrulline in humans. PMID:17347276

  7. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  8. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  9. Testing Percutaneous Arterial Closure Devices: An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Ruifang; Kranokpiraksa, Pawanrat; Pavcnik, Dusan Kakizawa, Hideaki; Uchida, Barry T.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2009-03-15

    The ovine superficial femoral artery was used for testing the efficacy of percutaneous arterial closure devices (PACDs) in their developmental stage. Two topical devices containing chitostan, one staple-mediated PACD and a porcine small intestinal submucosa plug, were tested by follow-up angiography in 37 sheep. Absence or presence of bleeding and time to bleeding cessation were the main criteria for evaluation of PAVD efficacy. The results of these tests directed modification of individual PACDs and improved their efficacy.

  10. MR of superior mesenteric artery--renal vein fistula.

    PubMed

    Conces, D J; Kreipke, D L; Tarver, R D

    1986-01-01

    Traumatic arteriovenous fistulas involving the superior mesenteric artery are rare. Diagnosis is most commonly made shortly after the injury. Symptoms, when present, are usually related to intestinal ischemia. Angiography has been the conventional modality used in diagnosing arteriovenous fistulas. We report a patient with a superior mesenteric artery to left renal vein fistula who presented in overt heart failure five years after a gun shot wound. The fistula was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Cav1.2 channel current block by the PKA inhibitor H-89 in rat tail artery myocytes via a PKA-independent mechanism: Electrophysiological, functional, and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Fabio; Trezza, Alfonso; Spiga, Ottavia; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Bova, Sergio

    2017-09-15

    To characterize the role of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in regulating vascular Ca(2+) current through Cav1.2 channels [ICa1.2], we have documented a marked capacity of the isoquinoline H-89, widely used as a PKA inhibitor, to reduce current amplitude. We hypothesized that the ICa1.2 inhibitory activity of H-89 was mediated by mechanisms unrelated to PKA inhibition. To support this, an in-depth analysis of H-89 vascular effects on both ICa1.2 and contractility was undertaken by performing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and functional experiments in rat tail main artery single myocytes and rings, respectively. H-89 inhibited ICa1.2 with a pIC50 (M) value of about 5.5, even under conditions where PKA activity was either abolished by both the PKA antagonists KT5720 and protein kinase inhibitor fragment 6-22 amide or enhanced by the PKA stimulators 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-Br-cAMP. Inhibition of ICa1.2 by H-89 appeared almost irreversible upon washout, was charge carrier- and voltage-dependent, and antagonised by the Cav1.2 channel agonist (S)-(-)-Bay K 8644. H-89 did not alter both potency and efficacy of verapamil, did not affect current kinetics or voltage-dependent activation, while shifting to the left the 50% voltage of inactivation in a concentration-dependent manner. H-89 docked at the α1C subunit in a pocket region close to that of (S)-(-)-Bay K 8644 docking, forming a hydrogen bond with the same, key amino acid residue Tyr-1489. Finally, both high K(+)- and (S)-(-)-Bay K 8644-induced contractions of rings were fully reverted by H-89. In conclusion, these results indicate that H-89 inhibited vascular ICa1.2 and, consequently, the contractile function through a PKA-independent mechanism. Therefore, caution is recommended when interpreting experiments where H-89 is used to inhibit vascular smooth muscle PKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biochemistry of intestinal development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S J

    1979-01-01

    In biochemical terms, the rat small intestine is relatively immature at birth and for the first two postnatal weeks. Then during the third week a dramatic array of enzymic changes begins, and by the end of the fourth week the intestine has the digestive and absorptive properties of the adult. Selective examples of these changes are discussed with emphasis on their implications for toxicological studies. The review also includes a detailed consideration of the roles of the dietary change of weaning and of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones in the regulation of intestinal development. PMID:575507

  13. Carvedilol inhibits proliferation of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Nagase, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Aiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Miura, Daiji; Miura, Aya; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Date, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru

    2006-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is associated with proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in small pulmonary arteries. Inhibition of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) may be an effective treatment of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Recent studies have shown that carvedilol, an alpha- and beta-blocker with antioxidant and calcium channel blocking properties, inhibits the proliferation of cultured normal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that carvedilol has antiproliferative effects on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from six idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients who had undergone lung transplantation were cultured. To determine cell proliferation, H-thymidine incorporation was measured. Platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs was significantly greater than that of normal control pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Carvedilol (0.1 microM to 10 microM) inhibited the proliferation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension-pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Prazosin (an alpha-blocker) and N-acetyl L cysteine (an antioxidant agent) (0.1 microM to 10 microM) did not inhibit their proliferation, but the high concentration of propranolol (a beta-blocker) and nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker) (10 microM) inhibited the proliferation. The combination of propranolol and nifedipine inhibited the proliferation but only at a high concentration (10 microM) combination. Cell cycle analysis revealed that carvedilol (10 microM) significantly decreased the number of cells in S and G2/M phases. These results indicate that carvedilol inhibits the exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  14. Reentrant cannulation of the small intestine in sheep: cannula and surgical method.

    PubMed

    Ivan, M; Johnston, D W

    1981-04-01

    The function, design and production of a reentrant cannula for the small intestine of sheep and the corresponding surgical procedure are described. The cannula is molded in one piece from polyvinylchloride plastisol. It consists of a curved intestinal tube joined to a stem with an external elliptical ring on the distal end and a perforated flange that encircles the stem above the intestinal tube. A circular perspex valve with two curved channels was made to fit into the interior of the cannula, making it capable of either a "maintenance" or a "collection" function. The cannula was inserted into the proximal duodenum and(or) terminal ileum of sheep via a 5-cm incision on the antimesenteric side of the intestine. The intestine was attached to the cannula by a Dacron straight arterial graft. This reentrant cannulation method does not require an intestinal transection and a mesenteric incision under the transection. Therefore, little damage was done to the blood and nervous system.

  15. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  16. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking drugs that slow intestinal movements. These include narcotic (pain) medicines and drugs used when you are ... that may have caused the problem (such as narcotic drugs) may help. In severe cases, surgery may ...

  17. Vasorelaxation to N-oleoylethanolamine in rat isolated arteries: mechanisms of action and modulation via cyclooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Wheal, A J; Alexander, S P H; Randall, M D

    2010-06-01

    The endocannabinoid-like molecule N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA) is found in the small intestine and regulates food intake and promotes weight loss. The principal aim of the present study was to evaluate the vascular effects of OEA. Perfused isolated mesenteric arterial beds were pre-contracted with methoxamine or high potassium buffers and concentration-response curves to OEA were constructed. Combinations of inhibitors to block nitric oxide production, sensory nerve activity, cyclooxygenase activity, potassium channels, chloride channels and gap junctions, and a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, were used during these experiments. The effects of OEA on caffeine-induced contractions in calcium-free buffer were also assessed. Isolated thoracic aortic rings were used as a comparison. OEA caused concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in rat isolated mesenteric arterial beds and thoracic aortic rings, with a greater maximal response in mesenteric vessels. This relaxation was sensitive to inhibition of sensory nerve activity and endothelial removal in both preparations. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin reversed the effects of capsaicin pre-treatment in perfused mesenteric arterial beds and indomethacin alone enhanced vasorelaxation to OEA. The OEA-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by a CB(1) receptor antagonist only in aortic rings. In mesenteric arteries, OEA suppressed caffeine-induced contractions in calcium-free buffer. The vasorelaxant effects of OEA are partly dependent on sensory nerve activity and a functional endothelium in the vasculature. In addition, vasorelaxation to OEA is enhanced following cyclooxygenase inhibition. OEA may also interfere with the release of intracellular calcium in arterial preparations.

  18. Vasorelaxation to N-oleoylethanolamine in rat isolated arteries: mechanisms of action and modulation via cyclooxygenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wheal, AJ; Alexander, SPH; Randall, MD

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The endocannabinoid-like molecule N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA) is found in the small intestine and regulates food intake and promotes weight loss. The principal aim of the present study was to evaluate the vascular effects of OEA. Experimental approach: Perfused isolated mesenteric arterial beds were pre-contracted with methoxamine or high potassium buffers and concentration-response curves to OEA were constructed. Combinations of inhibitors to block nitric oxide production, sensory nerve activity, cyclooxygenase activity, potassium channels, chloride channels and gap junctions, and a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, were used during these experiments. The effects of OEA on caffeine-induced contractions in calcium-free buffer were also assessed. Isolated thoracic aortic rings were used as a comparison. Key results: OEA caused concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in rat isolated mesenteric arterial beds and thoracic aortic rings, with a greater maximal response in mesenteric vessels. This relaxation was sensitive to inhibition of sensory nerve activity and endothelial removal in both preparations. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin reversed the effects of capsaicin pre-treatment in perfused mesenteric arterial beds and indomethacin alone enhanced vasorelaxation to OEA. The OEA-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by a CB1 receptor antagonist only in aortic rings. In mesenteric arteries, OEA suppressed caffeine-induced contractions in calcium-free buffer. Conclusions and implications: The vasorelaxant effects of OEA are partly dependent on sensory nerve activity and a functional endothelium in the vasculature. In addition, vasorelaxation to OEA is enhanced following cyclooxygenase inhibition. OEA may also interfere with the release of intracellular calcium in arterial preparations. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476

  19. Fenofibrate reduces intestinal damage and improves intestinal recovery following intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat.

    PubMed

    Sukhotnik, I; Nissimov, N; Ben Shahar, Y; Moati, D; Bitterman, N; Pollak, Y; Berkowitz, D; Coran, A G; Bitterman, A

    2016-12-01

    Fenofibrate (FEN) is known as a nuclear receptor activator which regulates many pathophysiological processes, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and leukocyte endothelium interactions. Recent studies have demonstrated an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ischemic role of FEN in the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in the kidney, liver, brain, and heart. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of FEN on intestinal recovery and enterocyte turnover after intestinal IR injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) sham rats underwent laparotomy, (2) sham-FEN rats underwent laparotomy and were treated with intraperitoneal (IP) FEN (20 mg/kg); (3) IR rats underwent occlusion of both the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein for 30 min followed by 24 h of reperfusion, and (4) IR-FEN rats underwent IR and were treated with IP FEN immediately before abdominal closure. Intestinal structural changes, Park's injury score, enterocyte proliferation, and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 24 h following IR. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, p-ERK, and caspase-3 in the intestinal mucosa was determined using real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Treatment with FEN resulted in a significant decrease in Park's injury score in jejunum (32 %) and ileum (33 %) compared to IR animals. IR-FEN rats also demonstrated a significant increase in mucosal weight in jejunum (23 %) and ileum (22 %), mucosal DNA (38 %) and protein (65 %) in jejunum, villus height in jejunum (17 %) and ileum (21 %), and crypt depth in ileum (14 %) compared to IR animals. IR-FEN rats also experienced significant proliferation rates as well as lower apoptotic indices in jejunum and ileum which was accompanied with higher Bcl-2 levels compared to IR animals. Treatment with fenofibrate prevents intestinal mucosal damage and stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover following intestinal IR

  20. Intestinal parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    In general, gastrointestinal tract is the primary involvement site of parasites during their life cycle. In this article, we will describe amebiasis, ascariasis, and anisakiasis among the many common intestinal parasitic diseases. We will review the epidemiology, life cycles, clinical manifestations and complications, and illustrate detailed imaging findings of intestinal parasites. Recognizing features of parasitic infection is important to establish an early diagnosis that leads to prompt treatment and helps avoid unnecessary surgery.

  1. Amoebic liver abscess with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment by interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajit K; Gupta, Saumya; Hariprasad, Sudarsan; Kumar, Ashish; Ghuman, Samarjit S; Gupta, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is most common extra-intestinal presentation of amoebiasis. It is rarely complicated with vascular involvement including thrombosis of hepatic vein or IVC and pseudo-aneurysm of hepatic artery. We describe a case of hepatic artery pseudo-aneurysm as a complication of amoebic liver abscess treated with percutaneous embolization.

  2. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  3. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  4. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Ozkan; Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, A. Ebru Salman; Zeybek, N. Dilara; Onal, C. Oztug; Yurekli, Banu; Celik, H. Tugrul; Sirma, Ayse; Kılıc, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF) intraperitoneally (ip) for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px), malondyaldehide (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PCO) were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy prevented

  5. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  6. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of blood pressure ...

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal blood flow and mucosal growth in ruminating calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), increases small intestinal mass and blood flow in non-ruminants, but its effect in ruminants is unknown. Eight Holstein calves with an ultrasonic flow probe around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and catheters in the carotid artery and mesenteric vein, were pa...

  8. Bilateral extensive cerebral infarction and mesenteric ischemia associated with segmental arterial mediolysis in two young women.

    PubMed

    Basso, Monique Camila; Flores, Patrícia Carrasco; de Azevedo Marques, Ary; de Souza, Guilherme Leme; D'Elboux Guimarães Brescia, Marília; Campos, Cynthia Resende; de Cleva, Roberto; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento; Mauad, Thais

    2005-10-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare non-atherosclerotic non-inflammatory vascular disease that affects mainly muscular arteries of the splanchnic and cerebral territories. Reported herein are two cases of SAM in young women with fatal outcome. One of the patients had an atypical form of the disease, which primarily affected small intestinal submucosal and subserosal arteries, and resulted in acute mesenteric ischemia. The other had bilateral brain infarction with SAM of internal carotid arteries (ICA). Pathological examination of both cases did not reveal the cause of blood flow disturbance: large mesenteric branches of the former and ICA of the latter were free of either dissection or thrombosis; in addition, small intestinal arteries of the first patient did not show signs of vasculitis. These findings suggest that unusual pathways of arterial occlusion and dissection may occur in the context of SAM.

  9. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  10. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  11. Living with Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Block First-degree heart block may ... whether you need ongoing care for your condition. Living With a Pacemaker People who have third-degree ...

  12. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  13. Arrange Time into Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepeda, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Block scheduling can help high school principals become staff-development leaders. It gives teachers more time to help individual students and contributes to improved achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. This paper describes the results of research on block scheduling in urban high schools and concludes that block scheduling can support…

  14. Blocked Tear Duct

    MedlinePlus

    Blocked tear duct Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff When you have a blocked tear duct, your tears can't drain normally, leaving you ... in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns. The condition usually gets ...

  15. Cardiolipins Act as a Selective Barrier to Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Stephen R.; Hashim, Ahmed; Paramonov, Nikolay A.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intestinal homeostasis mechanisms must protect the host intestinal tissue from endogenous lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) produced by the intestinal microbiota. In this report, we demonstrate that murine intestinal fecal lipids effectively block Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) responses to naturally occurring Bacteroidetes sp. LPS. Cardiolipin (CL) represents a significant proportion of the total intestinal and fecal lipids and, furthermore, potently antagonizes TLR4 activation by reducing LPS binding at the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), CD14, and MD-2 steps of the TLR4 signaling pathway. It is further demonstrated that intestinal lipids and CL are less effective at neutralizing more potent Enterobacteriaceae-type LPS, which is enriched in feces obtained from mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated inflammatory bowel disease. The selective inhibition of naturally occurring LPS structures by intestinal lipids may represent a novel homeostasis mechanism that blocks LPS activation in response to symbiotic but not dysbiotic microbial communities. IMPORTANCE The guts of animals harbor a variety of Gram-negative bacteria associated with both states of intestinal health and states of disease. Environmental factors, such as dietary habits, can drive the microbial composition of the host animal's intestinal bacterial community toward a more pathogenic state. Both beneficial and harmful Gram-negative bacteria are capable of eliciting potentially damaging inflammatory responses from the host intestinal tissues via a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-dependent pathway. Physical mucosal barriers and antibodies produced by the intestinal immune system protect against the undesired inflammatory effects of LPS, although it is unknown why some bacteria are more effective at overcoming the protective barriers than others. This report describes the discovery of a lipid-type protective barrier in the intestine that reduces the deleterious effects of LPSs from beneficial

  16. SURGICAL EMBOLECTOMY FOR FOVEA-THREATENING ACUTE RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, David R.P.; Mammo, Zaid; Chin, Eric K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a technique of surgical intraocular embolectomy in patients with acute fovea-threatening branch retinal artery occlusion. Methods: Pars plana vitrectomy with embolectomy involving embolus isolation, dissection, and removal in patients with an acute fovea-threatening arterial occlusion without a patent cilioretinal artery. Results: The surgical technique involves a core vitrectomy. The blocked artery is incised using a microvitreoretinal blade, and microsurgical forceps are used to retrieve the embolus. No significant complications were noted. The study technique offers an excellent safety profile and minimizes the risk of vitreous hemorrhage by carefully dissecting the vascular adventitial sheath and isolating the embolus. Conclusion: Surgical embolectomy is a viable technique for patients with acute fovea-threatening arterial occlusions without patent cilioretinal artery. Careful dissection and retrieval of the embolus minimizes the risk of vitreous hemorrhage, which is an important improvement in previous techniques for management of acute retinal arterial occlusions. PMID:26674278

  17. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  18. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  19. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  20. The role of endogenous nitric oxide and platelet-activating factor in hypoxia-induced intestinal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Caplan, M S; Hedlund, E; Hill, N; MacKendrick, W

    1994-02-01

    Nitric oxide is an endothelium-derived relaxing factor that promotes capillary integrity, inhibits leukocyte adherence and activation, and scavenges oxygen radicals. Because these effects are important in experimental intestinal injury, we studied the role of NO inhibition on hypoxia-induced bowel necrosis in the rat and investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor (PAF) and NO in this model. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either hypoxia, NO synthase inhibition (NG-methyl-L-arginine [LNMA] or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME]), hypoxia+LNMA, hypoxia+LNMA+NO donors, or hypoxia+LNMA+PAF receptor inhibition. Evaluations included blood pressure, superior mesenteric artery blood flow, arterial blood gases, histological intestinal injury, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal PAF activity. We found that hypoxia alone for 90 minutes (10% O2, partial O2 pressure = 45 mm Hg) or LNMA alone had no detrimental effects. However, hypoxia+LNMA together caused hypotension, metabolic acidosis, intestinal injury, increased intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and elevated intestinal PAF concentrations that were prevented by exogenous L-arginine. Furthermore, the hypotension and intestinal injury was prevented by PAF receptor blockade. We conclude that endogenous NO protects the intestine from hypoxia-induced inflammation and injury, and the balance between local PAF and NO modulates the outcome of hypoxia-stressed intestine.

  1. Small artery remodelling in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this article is to briefly review available data regarding changes in the structure of microvessels observed in patients with diabetes mellitus, and possible correction by effective treatment. The development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, small arteries of smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, although in some secondary forms of hypertension, a hypertrophic remodelling may be detected. Moreover, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus a hypertrophic remodelling of subcutaneous small arteries is present. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive and diabetic patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, regression of vascular alterations is an appealing goal of antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effect on vascular structure. In diabetic hypertensive patients, a significant regression of structural alterations of small resistance arteries with drugs blocking the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers) was demonstrated. Alterations in the microcirculation represent a common pathological finding, and microangiopathy is one of the most important mechanisms involved in the development of organ damage as well as of clinical events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Renin-angiotensin system blockade seems to be effective in preventing/regressing alterations in microvascular structure.

  2. Small artery remodelling in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to briefly review available data regarding changes in the structure of microvessels observed in patients with diabetes mellitus, and possible correction by effective treatment. The development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, small arteries of smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, although in some secondary forms of hypertension, a hypertrophic remodelling may be detected. Moreover, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus a hypertrophic remodelling of subcutaneous small arteries is present. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive and diabetic patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, regression of vascular alterations is an appealing goal of antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effect on vascular structure. In diabetic hypertensive patients, a significant regression of structural alterations of small resistance arteries with drugs blocking the renin–angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers) was demonstrated. Alterations in the microcirculation represent a common pathological finding, and microangiopathy is one of the most important mechanisms involved in the development of organ damage as well as of clinical events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Renin–angiotensin system blockade seems to be effective in preventing/regressing alterations in microvascular structure. PMID:20646125

  3. The Space Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ciba-Geigy Corporation's "Space Block," technically known as TDT-177-51 Ren Shape epoxy model block, is a two-foot by two-foot by five- inch plastic block from which master models of the Space Shuttle protective tiles are cut by NC machines. Space Block is made of epoxy resin with low viscosity and slow curing time, enabling the large block to cure uniformly without cracking. Rockwell International uses master models of Shuttle tiles to check accuracy of NC machines accurately by comparing model dimensions with specifications. New epoxy resins are attracting broad interest as a replacement for traditional materials used in modeling auto, aerospace or other parts.

  4. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  5. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  6. Intestinal Ischemia: US-CT findings correlations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal ischemia is an abdominal emergency that accounts for approximately 2% of gastrointestinal illnesses. It represents a complex of diseases caused by impaired blood perfusion to the small and/or large bowel including acute arterial mesenteric ischemia (AAMI), acute venous mesenteric ischemia (AVMI), non occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI), ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R), ischemic colitis (IC). In this study different study methods (US, CT) will be correlated in the detection of mesenteric ischemia imaging findings due to various etiologies. Methods Basing on experience of our institutions, over 200 cases of mesenteric ischemia/infarction investigated with both US and CT were evaluated considering, in particular, the following findings: presence/absence of arterial/venous obstruction, bowel wall thickness and enhancement, presence/absence of spastic reflex ileus, hypotonic reflex ileus or paralitic ileus, mural and/or portal/mesenteric pneumatosis, abdominal free fluid, parenchymal ischemia/infarction (liver, kidney, spleen). Results To make an early diagnosis useful to ensure a correct therapeutic approach, it is very important to differentiate between occlusive (arterial,venous) and nonocclusive causes (NOMI). The typical findings of each forms of mesenteric ischemia are explained in the text. Conclusion At present, the reference diagnostic modality for intestinal ischaemia is contrast-enhanced CT. However, there are some disadvantages associated with these techniques, such as radiation exposure, potential nephrotoxicity and the risk of an allergic reaction to the contrast agents. Thus, not all patients with suspected bowel ischaemia can be subjected to these examinations. Despite its limitations, US could constitutes a good imaging method as first examination in acute settings of suspected mesenteric ischemia. PMID:23902826

  7. Intestinal anisakidosis (anisakiosis).

    PubMed

    Takei, Hidehiro; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2007-10-01

    A case of intestinal anisakidosis in a 42-year-old man in Japan is presented. His chief complaint was an acute onset of severe abdominal pain. Approximately 12 hours before the onset of this symptom, he had eaten sliced raw mackerel ("sashimi"). Upper endoscopy was unremarkable. At exploratory laparotomy, an edematous, diffusely thickened segment of jejunum was observed, which was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful. The segment of small intestine showed a granular indurated area on the mucosal surface, and microscopically, a helminthic larva penetrating the intestinal wall, which was surrounded by a cuff of numerous neutrophils and eosinophils, as well as diffuse acute serositis. A cross section of the larva revealed the internal structures, pathognomonic of Anisakis simplex. Although anisakidosis is rare in the United States, with the increasing popularity of Japanese cuisine, the incidence is expected to increase, and pathologists should be familiar with this disease.

  8. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  9. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  10. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  11. Vasorelaxing effects of estetrol in rat arteries.

    PubMed

    Hilgers, Rob H P; Oparil, Suzanne; Wouters, Wout; Coelingh Bennink, Herjan J T

    2012-10-01

    This study compared ex vivo relaxing responses to the naturally occurring human hormone estetrol (E(4)) vs 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in eight different vascular beds. Arteries were mounted in a myograph, contracted with either phenylephrine or serotonin, and cumulative concentration-response curves (CRCs) to E(4) and E(2) (0·1-100  μmol/l) were constructed. In all arteries tested, E(4) had lower potency than E(2), although the differential effect was less in larger than smaller arteries. In uterine arteries, the nonselective estrogen receptor (ER) blocker ICI 182 780 (1  μmol/l) caused a significant rightward shift in the CRC to both E(4) and E(2), indicating that the relaxation responses were ER dependent. Pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide (NO) synthases by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) blunted E(2)-mediated but not E(4)-mediated relaxing responses, while inhibition of prostaglandins and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization did not alter relaxation to either E(4) or E(2) in uterine arteries. Combined blockade of NO release and action with L-NAME and the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ resulted in greater inhibition of the relaxation response to E(4) compared with E(2) in uterine arteries. Endothelium denudation inhibited responses to both E(4) and E(2), while E(4) and E(2) concentration-dependently blocked smooth muscle cell Ca(2)(+) entry in K(+)-depolarized and Ca(2)(+)-depleted uterine arteries. In conclusion, E(4) relaxes precontracted rat arteries in an artery-specific fashion. In uterine arteries, E(4)-induced relaxations are partially mediated via an endothelium-dependent mechanism involving ERs, sGC, and inhibition of smooth muscle cell Ca(2)(+) entry, but not NO synthases or endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization.

  12. General Treatment Information for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer A-Z Small Intestine Cancer Treating Small Intestine Cancer General treatment information Depending on the type ... questions about your treatment options. More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  13. Assessment of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, K; Gupte, G L

    2016-04-01

    Significant efforts have been made in the last decade to either standardize the available tests for intestinal malabsorption or to develop new, more simple and reliable techniques. The quest is still on and, unfortunately, clinical practice has not dramatically changed. The investigation of intestinal malabsorption is directed by the patient's history and baseline tests. Endoscopy and small bowel biopsies play a major role although non-invasive tests are favored and often performed early on the diagnostic algorithm, especially in paediatric and fragile elderly patients. The current clinically available methods and research tools are summarized in this review article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  15. [Intestinal microbiocenosis in children with intestinal enzymopathy].

    PubMed

    Kamilova, A T; Akhmedov, N N; Pulatova, D B; Nurmatov, B A

    2001-01-01

    141 children with different kinds of intestinal enzymopathy were examined; of these, 33 had celiac disease, 39--the syndrome of celiac disease, 12--congenital lactase deficiency and 57--the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency. In these patients a significant decrease in the average characteristics of the main protective flora and the growth of hemolytic and lactose-negative enterobacteria were established. In all groups of patients increased amounts of Proteus were detected, which was indicative of profound dysbiosis. The content of bifidobacteria was found to be decreased in 89.5-97% of the patients and the content of lactic acid bacteria, in 15.8-33.3%. The decreased content of Escherichia coli with normal enzymatic activity (less than 10(7) colony-forming units) was noted in one-third of the patients with the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency, in about a half of the patients with the syndrome of disaccharidase insufficiency and least of all in patients with celiac disease (9.1%). The association of opportunistic microbes was detected in 15.6% of the patients, more often in those with celiac disease, the syndrome of celiac disease and congenital lactase deficiency. The severity of disturbances in intestinal eubiosis was found to depend on the gravity of the patients' state.

  16. Autoregulation in the middle meningeal artery.

    PubMed

    Michalicek, J; Gordon, V; Lambert, G

    1996-05-01

    In cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, autoregulation of blood flow (F) in the middle meningeal and common carotid arteries was assessed by bleeding and subsequently reinfusing the animals to achieve a 25% step reduction in mean arterial blood pressure (P), while maintaining the systolic blood pressure >80 mmHg. The integrity of autoregulation was assessed by calculating the gain factor Gf = 1 - [(deltaF/F)/(deltaP/P)]. Cats were examined intact, after hexamethonium (10 mg/kg), and after papaverine (6 mg/kg). Reduction of blood pressure of 25 to 60 mmHg produced equivalent drops in carotid blood flow (Gf = 0.041 +/- 0.34; mean +/- standard deviation, n = 12). There were only small changes in flow in the middle meningeal artery during this procedure (Gf = 0.91 +/- 0.29). Hexamethonium did not block autoregulation in the middle meningeal artery (Gf = 0.92 +/- 0.13, n = 4). However, papaverine almost completely abolished the ability of the artery to autoregulate (Gf = 0.10 +/- 0.16, n = 7). The results suggest that the middle meningeal artery possesses an ability similar to that of the cortical circulation to autoregulate its blood flow through intrinsic, non-neuronal mechanisms. This will have important implications for the study of disturbances of dural arterial control in migraine and other headaches.

  17. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  18. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  19. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  20. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to ...

  2. Glutamine protects intestinal calcium absorption against oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Moine, Luciana; Díaz de Barboza, Gabriela; Pérez, Adriana; Benedetto, Mercedes; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether glutamine (GLN) could block the inhibition of the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by menadione (MEN), and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To do this, one-month old chicks were divided in four groups: 1) controls, 2) MEN treated, 3) GLN treated and 4) GLN treated before or after MEN treatment. Intestinal Ca(2+) absorption as well as protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular Ca(2+) pathway were determined. Glutathione (GSH) and superoxide anion and activity of enzymes of the antioxidant system were evaluated. Apoptosis was measured by the TUNEL technique, the expression of FAS and FASL and the caspase-3 activity. A previous dose of 0.5gGLN/kg of b.w. was necessary to show its protector effect and a dose of 1g/kg of b.w. could restore the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption after MEN treatment. GLN alone did not modify the protein expression of calbindin D28k and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase, but blocked the inhibitory effect of the quinone. GLN avoided changes in the intestinal redox state provoked by MEN such as a decrease in the GSH content, and increases in the superoxide anion and in the SOD and CAT activities. GLN abrogated apoptotic effects caused by MEN in intestinal mucosa, as indicated by the reduction of TUNEL (+) cells and the FAS/FASL/caspase-3 pathway. In conclusion, GLN could be an oral nutritional supplement to normalize the redox state and the proliferation/cell death ratio in the small intestine improving the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption altered by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenol block for hip flexor muscle spasticity under ultrasonic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Koyama, H; Murakami, K; Suzuki, T; Suzaki, K

    1992-11-01

    Hip flexor spasticity, which is often associated with central nervous system (CNS) diseases, is a major impediment in rehabilitation. In order to cope with this problem, lumbar nerve blocking techniques developed by Meelhuysen and major and minor psoas muscle blocking techniques developed by Awad have been used in combination with physical therapies. Based on these techniques, we conducted major and minor psoas muscle phenol block (motor point block or intramuscular nerve block) under ultrasonic monitoring. Phenol block was conducted in nine patients with cerebral infarction (13 blocking procedures) and three with spinal cord injuries (six blocking procedures) while keeping them in a lateral position with the operation side upside. The beginning of the femoral nerves and part of the lumbar artery were visualized by ultrasound in some patients. As a result of the improvement of hip flexor spasticity, the range of hip joint motion (determined by the Mundale technique, prone hip extension and Thomas test) improved shortly after blocking. When physical therapy was conducted after blocking, improvement of skin care management was observed in eight cases, ability to keep in a stable sitting position in nine, improvement of a standing posture in three, increases in the ability to walk in two and alleviation of pain in three. Although nerve block is reported to result in hematoma, decreases in muscle force, pain, cystic/rectal disorders and hypogonadism, we have observed no such complication in our patients.

  4. Coronary Artery Fistula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    ascending aorta and pulmonary artery) and congenital coronary artery stenosis . Most coronary artery fistulas are congenital but may also...MILITARY MEDICINE, 172, 4: xi-xii, 2007 Military Medicine, Vol. 172, 4, April 2007 Radiology Corner Case #11 Coronary Artery Fistula...man with a single episode of vague sub- sternal chest pain was referred for evaluation of possible coronary artery disease. His medical history was

  5. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Calif. 42 1 •1 90 NEW LEGEND 80 A VIBORG, DENMARK, BLOCKS A VIBORG, DENMARK, ASPHALTIC CONCRETE AFTER 00 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, BLOCKS VIBRATION MEAN ...the load-distributing characteristics of the Mlock pavements. *. 45 -, , - t 171 LEGENDT 0 CONCRETE BASE, MEAN OF 8 TESTS,9 KNAPTON (1978) I RANGE OF...45 to 60 min. 90. Table 11 summarizes the results of these tests. The mean penetration of water through the block pavements with a slope of I per

  6. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of (/sup 35/S) methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed.

  7. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine.

  8. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  9. Patterning mechanisms of the sub-intestinal venous plexus in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Goi, Michela; Childs, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in angiogenesis, organ-specific angiogenesis remains less well characterized. The vessels that absorb nutrients from the yolk and later provide blood supply to the developing digestive system are primarily venous in origin. In zebrafish, these are the vessels of the Sub-intestinal venous plexus (SIVP) and they represent a new candidate model to gain an insight into the mechanisms of venous angiogenesis. Unlike other vessel beds in zebrafish, the SIVP is not stereotypically patterned and lacks obvious sources of patterning information. However, by examining the area of vessel coverage, number of compartments, proliferation and migration speed we have identified common developmental steps in SIVP formation. We applied our analysis of SIVP development to obd mutants that have a mutation in the guidance receptor PlexinD1. obd mutants show dysregulation of nearly all parameters of SIVP formation. We show that the SIVP responds to a unique combination of pathways that control both arterial and venous growth in other systems. Blocking Shh, Notch and Pdgf signaling has no effect on SIVP growth. However Vegf promotes sprouting of the predominantly venous plexus and Bmp promotes outgrowth of the structure. We propose that the SIVP is a unique model to understand novel mechanisms utilized in organ-specific angiogenesis.

  10. Lithocholic acid: a new emergent protector of intestinal calcium absorption under oxidant conditions.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, Ana M; Pérez, Adriana; Rivoira, María A; Rodríguez, Valeria A; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2017-04-01

    LCA and 1,25(OH)2D3 are vitamin D receptor ligands with different binding affinity. The secosteroid stimulates intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Whether LCA alters this process remains unknown. The aim of our work was to determine the effect of LCA on intestinal Ca(2+) absorption in the absence or presence of NaDOC, bile acid that inhibits the cation transport. The data show that LCA by itself did not alter intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, but prevented the inhibitory effect of NaDOC. The concomitant administration of LCA avoided the reduction of intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity caused by NaDOC. In addition, LCA blocked a decrease caused by NaDOC on gene and protein expression of molecules involved in the transcellular pathway of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. The oxidative stress and apoptosis triggered by NaDOC were abrogated by LCA co-treatment. In conclusion, LCA placed in the intestinal lumen protects intestinal Ca(2+) absorption against the inhibitory effects caused by NaDOC. LCA avoids the reduction of the transcellular Ca(2+) movement, apparently by blocking the oxidative stress and apoptosis triggered by NaDOC, normalizing the gene and protein expression of molecules involved in Ca(2+) movement. Therefore, LCA might become a possible treatment to improve intestinal calcium absorption under oxidant conditions.

  11. Intestinal scavenger receptors are involved in vitamin K1 absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-31

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone.

  12. Intestinal Scavenger Receptors Are Involved in Vitamin K1 Absorption*

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  13. Differences in histamine H1 and H2 receptor responses in several rabbit arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C.P.; Maxson, S.

    1982-06-01

    Responses of helically cut segments from six different rabbit arteries to the selective histamine H1 receptor agonist 2-pyridylethylamine (PEA) and, in strips contracted by 10-4 M phenylephrine, to the selective histamine H2 agonist dimaprit have been determined. 10-3 M PEA contracted the renal artery, 96 +/- 2%; mesenteric artery, 92 +/- 2%; coeliac artery, 88 +/- 11% aorta 75 +/- 4%' ear artery 64 +/- 10% and pulmonary artery 48 +/- 5% of the maximal contraction to norepinephrine. 10-3 M dimaprit relaxed the phenylephrine contracted ear artery 48 +/- 8%; renal artery, 43 +/- 8%; coeliac artery 41 +/- 8%; mesenteric artery 36 +/- 5%; aorta 16 +/- 3%; and pulmonary artery 11 +/- 1% of the initial contractile tension. Strips in which histamine H1 receptors are blocked by 7 X 10-6 M mepyramine which are contracted by phenylephrine are partially relaxed by histamine. Cooling these strips markedly enhanced relaxations of the mesenteric and coeliac arteries but not those of the other four vessels. Exposure of the strips to dibenamine potentiated relaxations of all of the arteries except the ear artery and pulmonary artery. Thus there is heterogeneity among the arteries in their responses to histamine H1 and H2 receptor activation.

  14. Thromboxane synthesis inhibition and postprandial intestinal hyperemia and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Mangino, M J; Chou, C C

    1986-01-01

    The effects of imidazole and U-63557A (Upjohn), inhibitors of thromboxane synthesis, on food-induced changes in intestinal blood flow and oxygen uptake were determined in the jejunum of anesthetized dogs. Intra-arterial (5.0 mg/min ia) infusions of imidazole had no effect on the postprandial intestinal hyperemia but significantly potentiated food-induced increases in oxygen uptake via enhanced oxygen extraction. Furthermore, imidazole had no effect on intestinal glucose absorption. The selective thromboxane synthesis inhibitor U-63557A (5 mg/kg iv) also enhanced oxygen uptake during nutrient absorption and had no effect on the hyperemia or glucose absorption. Our study indicates that inhibition of thromboxane synthesis has no effect on either resting intestinal blood flow or postprandial intestinal hyperemia but significantly enhances postprandial oxygen extraction and uptake. The potentiation of the food-induced increases in oxygen uptake by imidazole and U-63557A appears not to be related to glucose absorption. Endogenous thromboxane therefore appears to inhibit oxygen uptake more than blood flow, and yet does not affect glucose absorption during nutrient absorption.

  15. Bundle Branch Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart to pump blood efficiently through your circulatory system. There's no specific treatment for bundle branch block itself. However, any underlying health condition that caused bundle branch block, such as heart disease, will need to be treated. In most people, ...

  16. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  17. Intestinal ascariasis in children.

    PubMed

    Wani, Imtiaz; Rather, Muddasir; Naikoo, Ghulam; Amin, Abid; Mushtaq, Syed; Nazir, Mir

    2010-05-01

    Ascariasis is a staggering health problem commonly seen in children of endemic areas. In the abdomen, ascaris lumbricoides can cause a myriad of surgical complications. Intestinal obstruction by ascaris lumbricoides is commonly seen in children. Most cases are managed conservatively. The purpose was to study the clinical presentation and management of symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. A 3-year study was performed from April 2006 to April 2009 of pediatric-age patients who had symptomatic intestinal ascariasis. All patients had detailed clinical history, examination, plain X-ray of abdomen, and ultrasonography of abdomen. Peroperative findings were recorded in all patients who had surgical intervention. This prospective study had 360 patients. Male to female ratio was 1.37:1. 187 patients (52%) presented within 2-4 days of duration of illness. Mean +/- standard deviation (SD) age of patients was 6.35 +/- 2.25 years. Age group of 4-7 years (80%) was commonest group affected. Abdominal pain was a leading symptom in 357 patients (99%) with the pain in periumbilical area present in 215 patients (60%). In 227 patients (63%) abdominal distension was seen and was the commonest physical finding. Palpable worm masses were seen in 129 patients (36%); 81 patients (63%) had palpable worm masses in the umbilical quadrant. On X-ray of abdomen, visible worm masses were seen in 83 patients (23%). Abdominal sonography showed interloop fluid in 177 patients (49%) and free fluid in the pelvis of 97 patients (27%). The number of patients who were managed conservatively was 281 (78%), and 79 patients (22%) had surgical intervention. In patients who had surgical intervention, 39 patients (49%) had enterotomy and 7 patients (9%) had kneading of worms. Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients, and an overall mortality of 1% (1 patient) was seen. Ascaridial intestinal obstruction is common in children in the Kashmir. Abdominal pain is the leading symptom in

  18. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  19. Influence of fentanyl and morphine on intestinal circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of fentanyl and morphine on the intestinal circulation was evaluated in an isolated loop preparation in 37 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital intravenously. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mm Hg. A mixture of /sup 86/Rb and 9-micron spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A strong correlation was found between the clearances of rubidium and microspheres (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001), suggesting that the shunting of 9-micron spheres through the intestines reflects the shunting of blood through nonnutritive vessels. Intravenous fentanyl decreased oxygen uptake (O/sub 2/up), and vascular resistance (VR), and increased blood flow (BF), rubidium and microsphere clearances (Cl-Rb, Cl-Sph, respectively), and permeability--surface area product (PS) in a dose-related fashion. Intravenous morphine in a dose of 1 mg X kg-1 increased Cl-Rb (nutritive BF) without changes in total (nutritive and nonnutritive) BF. This increase in nutritive BF is probably related to morphine-induced histamine release. Morphine in a dose of 5 mg X kg-1 was accompanied by vasoconstriction that was completely abolished by alpha-adrenoceptor blockade. The data suggest that morphine-induced intestinal vasoconstriction is mediated via a release of epinephrine, apparently from the adrenal medulla. It is concluded that changes in the intestinal circulation during anesthesia with narcotics might play a certain role in the cardiovascular homeostasis during anesthesia and surgery. An increase in oxygen content in portal venous blood, resulting from a decrease in intestinal oxygen uptake, should facilitate hepatic oxygenation.

  20. Utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation alleviates intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in prolonged hemorrhagic shock animal model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Luo, Lin; Chen, Jinjin; Xiao, Juan; Jia, Weikun; Xiao, Yingbin

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is one of the main factors leading to multiple organ failure after resuscitation of prolonged hemorrhagic shock; however, the current conventional fluid resuscitation still cannot effectively reduce intestinal injury caused by prolonged hemorrhagic shock. To investigate the effect of ECMO resuscitation on alleviating intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a prolonged hemorrhagic shock rabbit model. Thirty New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: control group, conventional fluid resuscitation group, and ECMO resuscitation group. The prolonged hemorrhagic shock model was established by keeping the arterial blood pressure from 31 to 40 mmHg for 3 h through the femoral artery bleeding, and performing the resuscitation for 2 h by conventional fluid resuscitation and ECMO resuscitation, respectively. Chiu's score of intestinal injury, serum lactate and TNF-α levels, intestinal mucosamyeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), and Claudin-1expression were detected. The mean arterial blood pressure in Group 2 was significantly higher after resuscitation than in Group 1, but serum lactate and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α level were significantly lower. And Chiu's score of intestinal injury and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity level and ICAM-1 expression were significantly lower in the ECMO resuscitation group, in which the Claudin-1 levels were significantly increased. ECMO resuscitation for the prolonged hemorrhagic shock improves tissue perfusion and reduces the systemic inflammation, and thus alleviates intestinal damage caused by prolonged hemorrhagic shock.

  1. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  2. Unusual intestinal talcosis.

    PubMed

    Anani, P A; Ribaux, C; Gardiol, D

    1987-11-01

    A case of intestinal talcosis in a 46-year-old man is reported. At the age of 27, the patient was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with tablets containing talc (183 g talc per 2,670 g total drug intake) over a period of 28 months. Eighteen years later, the patient was hospitalized for abdominal pain that remained refractory to antacids; he subsequently underwent a right hemicolectomy. Light-microscopic examination revealed a prominent fibrosis of the intestinal wall in which birefringent particles were demonstrated by polarized light. Using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, an analysis of these particles showed that they were predominantly composed of silicon and magnesium as well as small amounts of phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, and iron--the spectrum typically associated with talc. We believe that the source of this talc is the tablets ingested by the patient during prior antituberculosis therapy.

  3. Beautiful Blocks of Bedrock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-01

    This image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft targets a 3-kilometer diameter crater that occurs within the ejecta blanket of the much older Bakhuysen Crater, a 150-kilometer diameter impact crater in Noachis Terra. Impact craters are interesting because they provide a mechanism to uplift and expose underlying bedrock, allowing for the study of the subsurface and the geologic past. An enhanced color image shows the wall of the crater, which exposes layering as well as blocks of rock. There is a distinctive large block in the upper left of the crater wall, generally referred to as a "mega-block." It is an angular, light-toned, highly fragmented block, about 100 meters across. Several smaller light-toned blocks are also in the crater wall, possibly of the same rock type as the "mega-block." Ejecta blocks are thrown outward during the initial excavation of a crater, or are deposited as part of the ground-hugging flows of which the majority of the ejecta blanket is comprised. Through images like these, we are able to study the deeper subsurface of Mars that is not otherwise exposed. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20728

  4. Adductor canal block can result in motor block of the quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junping; Lesser, Jonathan B; Hadzic, Admir; Reiss, Wojciech; Resta-Flarer, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The block of nerves in the adductor canal is considered to cause a sensory block without a motor component. In this report, we describe a case of significant quadriceps muscle weakness after an adductor canal block (ACB). A 65-year-old female patient for ambulatory knee surgery was given an ACB for postoperative pain management. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance at the midthigh level using the transsartorial approach. Twenty milliliters of 0.5% ropivacaine was deposited adjacent to the anterior and posterior areas of the femoral artery. On discharge from the hospital, the patient realized that her thigh muscles were weak and she was unable to extend her leg at the knee. A neuromuscular examination indicated that the patient had no strength in her quadriceps muscle, along with sensory deficit in the medial-anterior lower leg and area in front of knee up to the midthigh. The weakness lasted 20 hours, and the sensory block lasted 48 hours before complete recovery. The optimal level and amount of local anesthetic for adductor canal block are currently not well defined. Proximal spread of local anesthetic and anatomical variation may explain our observation. Several studies have reported that ACB involves no motor blockade. However, our case report illustrates that the ACB can result in clinically significant quadriceps muscle paralysis. This report suggests that patients should be monitored vigilantly for this occurrence to decrease the risk of falls.

  5. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  6. Acute Complete Heart Block in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, T. E.; Gaertner, R. A.; Baker, R. Robinson

    2010-01-01

    A study has been conducted immediately and up to 18 days after the surgical production of complete heart block in dogs. Immediately after surgery cardiac output, coronary flow, and mean arterial pressure were reduced in rough proportion to the degree of bradycardia. In time, these measures began to return toward preoperative levels. Paralleling the diminished left ventricular work was a diminished left ventricular oxygen consumption with little consequent change in myocardial efficiency. Small rises were detected in central venous pressure. At autopsy, the only unequivocal abnormality was myocardial hypertrophy which became measurable between 2 and 18 days after operation. PMID:14390703

  7. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  8. The allometry of rodent intestines.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, Barry G

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the allometry of the small intestine, caecum, colon and large intestine of rodents (n = 51) using a phylogenetically informed approach. Strong phylogenetic signal was detected in the data for the caecum, colon and large intestine, but not for the small intestine. Most of the phylogenetic signal could be attributed to clade effects associated with herbivorous versus omnivorous rodents. The herbivorous rodents have longer caecums, colons and large intestines, but their small intestines, with the exception of the desert otomyine rodents, are no different to those of omnivorous rodents. Desert otomyine rodents have significantly shorter small intestines than all other rodents, reflecting a possible habitat effect and providing a partial explanation for the low basal metabolic rates of small desert mammals. However, the desert otomyines do not have shorter colons or large intestines, challenging claims for adaptation to water retention in arid environments. Data for the Arvicolidae revealed significantly larger caecums and colons, and hence longer large intestines, with no compensatory reduction in the length of the small intestine, which may explain how the smallest mammalian herbivores manage to meet the demands of a very high mass-specific metabolic rate. This study provides phylogenetically corrected allometries suitable for future prediction testing.

  9. Developing treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Developing new treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a challenge. We have enjoyed success with regulatory approvals for three drug classes—prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. But we have also seen some disappointing results, for example, from studies with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, statins and tergolide. Animal models are an unreliable predictor of efficacy in humans. The best model for the disease is the patient. This review discusses three major issues facing the evaluation of drugs in PAH patients—target validation, choosing the right dose, and early trial design. PMID:23662193

  10. Coronary Artery Anomalies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center for Coronary Artery Anomalies Doctors at the Texas Heart Institute's Center for Coronary Artery Anomalies (CCAA) ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronary artery disease: High levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (bad cholesterol) and triglycerides in the blood. High blood pressure Diabetes Smoking Family history of coronary artery disease Obesity ...

  12. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery dissection (SCAD). It's not yet clear what role these factors play in causing the disease. Common factors include: Female sex. Though spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can occur ...

  13. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... These blockages are more likely if there is hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) in the eye. Clots ... Blindness and vision loss Blood clots Diabetes Glaucoma Hardening of the arteries High blood cholesterol levels High ...

  14. Radial Artery Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the radial artery for cardiac catheterization procedures. Advantages of Radial Artery Catheterization Any catheter placement into ... walk, and eat immediately. This is a particular advantage for patients with back problems because there is ...

  15. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000171.htm Hardening of the arteries To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hardening of the arteries, also called atherosclerosis, occurs when ...

  16. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... out of 4 Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  17. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  18. Uterine artery embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007384.htm Uterine artery embolization To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a procedure to treat fibroids ...

  19. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... attaches to one of the chambers of the heart (the atrium or ventricle) or another blood vessel ( ...

  20. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  1. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  2. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease? Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is ... that affects blood flow to the legs. Normal Artery and Artery With Plaque Buildup The illustration shows ...

  3. Intestinal Immunity and Gut Microbiota in Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomoya

    2017-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Interventions targeting the inflammatory process could provide new strategies for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Previously, we have reported that oral administration of anti-CD3 antibodies, or active vitamin D3, reduced atherosclerosis in mice via recruiting regulatory T cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells to the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. From this, it is reasonable to propose that the intestine could be a novel therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerotic CVD. Recently, the association between cardio-metabolic diseases and gut microbiota has attracted increased attention. Gut microbiota, reported to be highly associated with intestinal immunity and metabolism, were shown to aggravate CVD by contributing to the production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a pro-atherogenic compound. We have also previously investigated the relationship between patient susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) and gut microbiota. We found that the order Lactobacillales was significantly increased and the phylum Bacteroidetes was decreased in CAD patients compared with control patients. In this review article, we discuss the evidence for the relationship between the gut microbiota and cardio-metabolic diseases, and consider the gut microbiota as new potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for treating CVD.

  4. Intestinal Immunity and Gut Microbiota in Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Interventions targeting the inflammatory process could provide new strategies for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Previously, we have reported that oral administration of anti-CD3 antibodies, or active vitamin D3, reduced atherosclerosis in mice via recruiting regulatory T cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells to the gut-associated lymphoid tissues. From this, it is reasonable to propose that the intestine could be a novel therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerotic CVD. Recently, the association between cardio-metabolic diseases and gut microbiota has attracted increased attention. Gut microbiota, reported to be highly associated with intestinal immunity and metabolism, were shown to aggravate CVD by contributing to the production of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a pro-atherogenic compound. We have also previously investigated the relationship between patient susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) and gut microbiota. We found that the order Lactobacillales was significantly increased and the phylum Bacteroidetes was decreased in CAD patients compared with control patients. In this review article, we discuss the evidence for the relationship between the gut microbiota and cardio-metabolic diseases, and consider the gut microbiota as new potential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for treating CVD. PMID:27928097

  5. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  6. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  7. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  8. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... is less serious than Mobitz type II. The animation below shows how your heart's electrical system works. ... block. Click the "start" button to play the animation. Written and spoken explanations are provided with each ...

  9. Using the Stern Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from "Experimenting with Numbers" by Margaret Stern demonstrate the use of Stern Blocks to develop the conceptual base on which learning disabled students can build further mathematical skills. (DB)

  10. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  11. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  12. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  13. Recipient block TMA technique.

    PubMed

    Mirlacher, Martina; Simon, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    New high-throughput screening technologies have led to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. One way to prioritize the leads obtained in such studies is to analyze a large number of tissues for candidate gene expression. The TMA methodology is now an established and frequently used tool for high-throughput tissue analysis. The recipient block technology is the "classical" method of TMA making. In this method, minute cylindrical tissue punches typically measuring 0.6 mm in diameter are removed from donor tissue blocks and are transferred into empty "recipient" paraffin blocks. Up to 1,000 different tissues can be analyzed in one TMA block. The equipment is affordable and easy to use in places where basic skills in histology are available.

  14. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Protective effects of fenofibrate against acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiankun; He, Guizhen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yukang; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-23

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate whether pretreatment with fenofibrate could mitigate acute lung injury (ALI) in a mice model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6): sham, intestinal I/R + vehicle, and intestinal I/R + fenofibrate. Intestinal I/R was achieved by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 60 minutes before the ischemia. At the end of experiment, measurement of pathohistological score, inflammatory mediators and other markers were performed. In addition, a 24-hour survival experiment was conducted in intestinal I/R mice treated with fenofibrate or vehicle. The chief results were as anticipated. Pathohistological evaluation indicated that fenofibrate ameliorated the local intestine damage and distant lung injury. Pretreatment with fenofibrate significantly decreased inflammatory factors in both the intestine and the lung. Consistently, renal creatine levels and hepatic ALT levels were significantly decreased in the fenofibrate group. Moreover, serum systemic inflammatory response indicators were significantly alleviated in the fenofibrate group. In addition, fenofibrate administration significantly improved the survival rate. Collectively, our data indicated that pretreatment with fenofibrate prior to ischemia attenuated intestinal I/R injury and ALI.

  17. Protective effects of fenofibrate against acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiankun; He, Guizhen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yukang; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate whether pretreatment with fenofibrate could mitigate acute lung injury (ALI) in a mice model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6): sham, intestinal I/R + vehicle, and intestinal I/R + fenofibrate. Intestinal I/R was achieved by clamping the superior mesenteric artery. Fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 60 minutes before the ischemia. At the end of experiment, measurement of pathohistological score, inflammatory mediators and other markers were performed. In addition, a 24-hour survival experiment was conducted in intestinal I/R mice treated with fenofibrate or vehicle. The chief results were as anticipated. Pathohistological evaluation indicated that fenofibrate ameliorated the local intestine damage and distant lung injury. Pretreatment with fenofibrate significantly decreased inflammatory factors in both the intestine and the lung. Consistently, renal creatine levels and hepatic ALT levels were significantly decreased in the fenofibrate group. Moreover, serum systemic inflammatory response indicators were significantly alleviated in the fenofibrate group. In addition, fenofibrate administration significantly improved the survival rate. Collectively, our data indicated that pretreatment with fenofibrate prior to ischemia attenuated intestinal I/R injury and ALI. PMID:26902261

  18. Ultrasound-guided bilateral combined inguinal femoral and subgluteal sciatic nerve blocks for simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations due to bilateral diabetic foot gangrene unresponsive to peripheral arterial angioplasty and bypass surgery in a coagulopathic patient on antiplatelet therapy with a history of percutaneous coronary intervention for ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Hye; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Jong Hae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients on antiplatelet therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention can become coagulopathic due to infection. Performing regional anesthesia for bilateral surgery in such cases is challenging. We report a case of successful combined inguinal femoral and subgluteal sciatic nerve blocks (CFSNBs) for simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations in a coagulopathic patient on antiplatelet therapy. Methods: A 70-year-old male patient presented with pain in both feet due to diabetic foot syndrome. The condition could not be managed by open amputations of the toes at the metatarsal bones and subsequent antibiotic therapy. Computed tomographic angiography showed significant stenosis in the arteries supplying the lower limbs, indicating atherosclerotic gangrene in both feet. Balloon angioplasty and bypass surgery with subsequent debridements with application of negative-pressure wound therapy and additional open amputations did not improve the patient's clinical condition: his leukocyte counts and C-reactive protein levels were above the normal range, and his prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times were increased. Results: Simultaneous bilateral below-knee amputations were performed under ultrasound-guided CFSNBs. Following left CFSNBs using 45 mL of a local anesthetic mixture (1:1 ratio of 1.0% mepivacaine and 0.75% ropivacaine), the left below-knee amputation was performed for 76 minutes. Subsequently, under right CFSNBs using 47 mL of the local anesthetic mixture, the right below-knee amputation proceeded for 85 minutes. Throughout each surgery, dexmedetomidine was continuously administered, and a sensory blockade was well maintained in both limbs. The patient did not complain of pain due to regression of the first CFSNBs during the second surgery. The CFSNBs successfully prevented tourniquet pain. Local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) and hemodynamic instability due to tourniquet deflation and administration of

  19. Inhibition of CDK4/6 protects against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liang; Leibowitz, Brian J.; Wang, Xinwei; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy causes dose-limiting toxicity and long-term complications in rapidly renewing tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there is no FDA-approved agent for the prevention or treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. In this study, we have shown that PD 0332991 (PD), an FDA-approved selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6), prevents radiation-induced lethal intestinal injury in mice. Treating mice with PD or a structurally distinct CDK4/6 inhibitor prior to radiation blocked proliferation and crypt apoptosis and improved crypt regeneration. PD treatment also enhanced LGR5+ stem cell survival and regeneration after radiation. PD was an on-target inhibitor of RB phosphorylation and blocked G1/S transition in the intestinal crypts. PD treatment strongly but reversibly inhibited radiation-induced p53 activation, which blocked p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis–dependent (PUMA-dependent) apoptosis without affecting p21-dependent suppression of DNA damage accumulation, with a repair bias toward nonhomologous end joining. Further, deletion of PUMA synergized with PD treatment for even greater intestinal radioprotection. Our results demonstrate that the cell cycle critically regulates the DNA damage response and survival of intestinal stem cells and support the concept that pharmacological quiescence is a potentially highly effective and selective strategy for intestinal radioprotection. PMID:27701148

  20. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  1. Long term differential consequences of miglustat therapy on intestinal disaccharidases.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y

    2014-11-01

    Miglustat is an oral medication for treatment of lysosomal storage diseases such as Gaucher disease type I and Niemann Pick disease type C. In many cases application of Miglustat is associated with symptoms similar to those observed in intestinal carbohydrate malabsorption. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal disaccharidases are inhibited immediately by Miglustat in the intestinal lumen. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of Miglustat hypothesize long term effects of Miglustat on intracellular mechanisms, including glycosylation, maturation and trafficking of the intestinal disaccharidases. Our data show that a major long term effect of Miglustat is its interference with N-glycosylation of the proteins in the ER leading to a delay in the trafficking of sucrase-isomaltase. Also association with lipid rafts and plausibly apical targeting of this protein is partly affected in the presence of Miglustat. More drastic is the effect of Miglustat on lactase-phlorizin hydrolase which is partially blocked intracellularly. The de novo synthesized SI and LPH in the presence of Miglustat show reduced functional efficiencies according to altered posttranslational processing of these proteins. However, at physiological concentrations of Miglustat (≤50 μM) a major part of the activity of these disaccharidases is found to be still preserved, which puts the charge of the observed carbohydrate maldigestion mostly on the direct inhibition of disaccharidases in the intestinal lumen by Miglustat as the immediate side effect.

  2. Hypoxic radioprotection by temporary intestinal ischemia: degradable starch microsphere embolization in the cat

    SciTech Connect

    Lote, K.

    1981-01-01

    Temporary small intestinal ischemia was induced by mesenteric arteriolar embolization of degradable starch microspheres in cats. During ischemia, the small intestine received a surface dose of 7 Gy 200 kV x-ray irradiation. One group of animals also had received 7 Gy to the intact abdomen 72 hr earlier. The risk of thrombosis in small intestinal vessels during or after starch microsphere-induced ischemia combined with irradiation was evaluated by monitoring superior mesenteric arterial blood flow, by determination of blood platelets, fibrinogen, and factor VIII consumed across the mesenteric vascular bed, and by histologic examination of small intestinal vessels. Vascular integrity was inferred from intact response to isoproterenol and vasopressin after the combined trauma of ischemia and irradiation. No signs of thrombosis were detected in small intestinal vessels after temporary ischemia and irradiation. Hypoxic radioprotection of the small intestine in the cat can thus be achieved by mesenteric arterial microembolization of degradable starch spheres without evidence of thrombotic complications of significant vascular damage.

  3. Hypoxic radioprotection by temporary intestinal ischemia: degradable starch microsphere embolization in the cat

    SciTech Connect

    Lote, K.

    1981-11-01

    Temporary small intestinal ischemia was induced by mesenteric arteriolar embolization of degradable starch microspheres in cats. During ischemia, the small intestine received a surface dose of 7 Gy 200 kV x-ray irradiation. One group of animals also had received 7 Gy to the intact abdomen 72 hr earlier. The risk of thrombosis in small intestinal vessels during or after starch microsphere-induced ischemia combined with irradiation was evaluated by monitoring superior mesenteric arterial blood flow, by determination of blood platelets, fibrinogen, and factor VIII consumed across the mesenteric vascular bed, and by histologic examination of small intestinal vessels. Vascular integrity was inferred from intact response to isoproterenol and vasopressin after the combined trauma of ischemia and irradiation. No signs of thrombosis were detected in small intestinal vessels after temporary ischemia and irradiation. Hypoxic radioprotection of the small intestine in the cat can thus be achieved by mesenteric arterial microembolization of degradable starch spheres without evidence of thrombotic complications or significant vascular damage.

  4. How to make an intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Spence, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    With the high prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders, there is great interest in establishing in vitro models of human intestinal disease and in developing drug-screening platforms that more accurately represent the complex physiology of the intestine. We will review how recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have made it possible to generate complex, three-dimensional, human intestinal tissues in vitro through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. These are currently being used to study human development, genetic forms of disease, intestinal pathogens, metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:24496613

  5. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  6. Extracranial vertebral artery intervention.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Pineda, Guillermo

    2007-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vertebral artery stenosis and has a predilection for the origin and proximal section of the extracranial portion of the vessel and also the intracranial portion of the vessel. Although it has generally been thought that extracranial vertebral artery (ECVA) disease has a more benign outcome compared to intracranial vertebral artery disease, significant occlusive disease of the proximal vertebral artery is the primary cause of vertebral artery ischemia in a significant proportion of patients. We focus on the interventional management of patients with proximal ECVA disease in this article.

  7. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  8. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy of superior mesenteric artery embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Kavcic, Pavel; Popovic, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The present series present three consecutive cases of successful percutaneous mechanical embolectomy in acute superior mesenteric artery ischemia. Superior mesenteric artery embolism is a rare abdominal emergency that commonly leads to bowel infarction and has a very high mortality rate. Prompt recognition and treatment are crucial for successful outcome. Endovascular therapeutic approach in patients with acute SMA embolism in median portion of its stem is proposed. Case reports. Three male patients had experienced a sudden abdominal pain and acute superior mesenteric artery embolism in median portion of its stem was revealed on computed tomography angiography. No signs of intestinal infarction were present. The decision for endovascular treatment was made in concordance with the surgeons. In one patient 6 French gauge Rotarex® device was used while in others 6 French gauge Aspirex® device were used. All patients experienced sudden relief of pain after the procedure with no signs of intestinal infarction. Minor procedural complication – rupture of a smaller branch of SMA during Aspirex® treatment was successfully managed by coiling while transient paralytic ileus presented in one patient resolved spontaneously. All three patients remained symptom-free with patent superior mesenteric artery during the follow-up period. Conclusions Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy seems to be a rapid and effective treatment of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism in median portion of its stem in absence of bowel necrosis. Follow-up of our patients showed excellent short- and long-term results. PMID:24133388

  9. Transradial artery coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; de Melker, E

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and safety of percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) with miniaturized PTCA equipment via the radial artery. Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) via the femoral or brachial arteries may be associated with rare vascular complications such as bleeding and damage to the artery and adjacent structures. It was postulated that PTCA via the radial artery with miniaturized angioplasty equipment is feasible and that no major puncture site-related complications occur because hemostasis is obtained easily and because no major structures are near the radial artery. With double blood supply to the hand, radial artery occlusion is well tolerated. In 100 patients with collateral blood supply to the right hand, PTCA was attempted with 6F guiding catheters and rapid-exchange balloon catheters for exertional angina (87 patients) or nonexertional angina (13 patients). Angioplasty was attempted in 122 lesions (type A n = 67 [55%], Type B n = 37 [30%], and type C n = 18 [15%]). Pre- and post-PTCA computerized quantitative coronary analysis was performed. Radial artery function and structure were assessed clinically and with Doppler and two-dimensional ultrasound on the day of discharge. Coronary catheterization via the radial artery was successful in 94 patients (94%). The 6 remaining patients had successful PTCA via the femoral artery (n = 5) or the brachial artery (n = 1). Procedural success (120 of 122 lesions) was achieved in 92 patients (98%) via the radial artery and in 98 patients of the total study population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Intestinal and peri-tumoral lymphatic endothelial cells are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hoon Ki; Morisada, Tohru; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Oike, Yuichi; Lee, Jayhun; Sung, Eon Ki; Chung, Jae Hoon; Suda, Toshio; Koh, Gou Young . E-mail: gykoh@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-06-30

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment, but it is unable to completely block cancer metastasis. The lymphatic vasculature serves as the primary route for metastatic spread, but little is known about how lymphatic endothelial cells respond to radiation. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells in the small intestine and peri-tumor areas are highly resistant to radiation injury, while blood vessel endothelial cells in the small intestine are relatively sensitive. Our results suggest the need for alternative therapeutic modalities that can block lymphatic endothelial cell survival, and thus disrupt the integrity of lymphatic vessels in peri-tumor areas.

  11. Immunoglobulin in intestinal secretions.

    PubMed

    Cutropia de Guirao, C

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the present investigation is the study and interpretation of the role played by the immunoglobulins, especially IgA, during acute diarrhea in children. IgA, IGG and IgM values in serum and IgA in intestinal secretions were studied in a group of children (between 3 months and 5 years of age) during diarrhea, convalescence and in normals. The method of simple radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini was employed. IgA is the immunoglobulin which suffers the greastest alteration in acute diarrhea. The precipitation halos (the average values), were lower during the diarrhea than in convalescence and in normals.

  12. Teleost intestinal immunology.

    PubMed

    Rombout, Jan H W M; Abelli, Luigi; Picchietti, Simona; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Kiron, Viswanath

    2011-11-01

    Teleosts clearly have a more diffuse gut associated lymphoid system, which is morphological and functional clearly different from the mammalian GALT. All immune cells necessary for a local immune response are abundantly present in the gut mucosa of the species studied and local immune responses can be monitored after intestinal immunization. Fish do not produce IgA, but a special mucosal IgM isotype seems to be secreted and may (partly) be the recently described IgZ/IgT. Fish produce a pIgR in their mucosal tissues but it is smaller (2 ILD) than the 4-5 ILD pIgR of higher vertebrates. Whether teleost pIgR is transcytosed and cleaved off in the same way needs further investigation, especially because a secretory component (SC) is only reported in one species. Teleosts also have high numbers of IEL, most of them are CD3-ɛ+/CD8-α+ and have cytotoxic and/or regulatory function. Possibly many of these cells are TCRγδ cells and they may be involved in the oral tolerance induction observed in fish. Innate immune cells can be observed in the teleost gut from first feeding onwards, but B cells appear much later in mucosal compartments compared to systemic sites. Conspicuous is the very early presence of putative T cells or their precursors in the fish gut, which together with the rag-1 expression of intestinal lymphoid cells may be an indication for an extra-thymic development of certain T cells. Teleosts can develop enteritis in their antigen transporting second gut segment and epithelial cells, IEL and eosinophils/basophils seem to play a crucial role in this intestinal inflammation model. Teleost intestine can be exploited for oral vaccination strategies and probiotic immune stimulation. A variety of encapsulation methods, to protect vaccines against degradation in the foregut, are reported with promising results but in most cases they appear not to be cost effective yet. Microbiota in fish are clearly different from terrestrial animals. In the past decade a fast

  13. Common flora and intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kepeng; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Commensal microflora engages in a symbiotic relationship with their host, and plays an important role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Pathogenic bacteria promote chronic intestinal inflammation and accelerate tumorigenesis. In sporadic CRC, loss of an effective epithelial barrier occurs at early stage of CRC development. As a result, non-pathogenic bacteria and/or their products infiltrate tumor stroma, drive “tumor-elicited inflammation” and promote CRC progression by activating tumor-associated myeloid and immune cells that produce IL-23 and IL-17. In this article we will summarize the recent advances in understanding the relationship between gut flora and CRC. PMID:24516778

  14. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  15. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YONG; GAO, QIANG; WU, NAN; LI, SHENG-DE; YAO, JING-XIN; FAN, WEN-JIE

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has been hypothesized to possess anti-oxidative properties that may mitigate the damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of DEX on intestinal contractile activity, inflammation and apoptosis following intestinal IR injury. Intestinal IR injury was induced in rats by complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for 60 min, followed by a 60-min reperfusion period. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of 25 µg/kg DEX at 30 min prior to the mesenteric IR injury. Following reperfusion, segments of the terminal ileum were rapidly extracted and transferred into an isolated organ bath. The contractile responses to receptor-mediated acetylcholine (Ach) and non-receptor-mediated potassium chloride (KCl) were subsequently examined. Nitric oxide (NO) levels were determined and the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, Bax and Bcl-2 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of telomerase and caspase-3 were determined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that DEX treatment produced a significant reduction in the IR-induced contractile response to Ach and KCl in the intestinal tissue. Furthermore, DEX appeared to significantly ameliorate intestinal IR injury, in addition to reducing the production of NO. Similar reductions were observed in the intestinal expression levels of TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, DEX treatment resulted in a reduction in the expression levels of Bax in the intestinal tissues, while increasing those of Bcl-2, in addition to significantly increasing the mRNA levels of telomerase and caspase-3. Therefore, the present study indicated that NO, TNF-α and IL-6 may partially contribute to the pathogenesis of intestinal IR injury in addition to the increased expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, telomerase and caspase-3. These findings suggest that DEX

  16. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  18. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  19. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  20. Double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy of intestinal hemodynamics following massive small bowel resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Rowland, Kathryn J.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Warner, Brad W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Massive small bowel resection (SBR) results in villus angiogenesis and intestinal adaptation. The exact mechanism that causes intestinal villus angiogenesis remains unknown. We hypothesize that hemodynamic changes within the remnant bowel after SBR will trigger intestinal angiogenesis. To validate this, we used photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to image the microvascular system of the intestine in C57B6 mice and to measure blood flow and oxygen saturation (sO2) of a supplying artery and vein. Baseline measurements were made 6 cm proximal to the ileal-cecal junction (ICJ) prior to resection. A 50% proximal bowel resection was then performed, and measurements were again recorded at the same location immediately, 1, 3 and 7 days following resection. The results show that arterial and venous sO2 were similar prior to SBR. Immediately following SBR, the arterial and venous sO2 decreased by 14.3 +/- 2.7% and 32.7 +/- 6.6%, respectively, while the arterial and venous flow speed decreased by 62.9 +/- 17.3% and 60.0 +/- 20.1%, respectively. Such significant decreases in sO2 and blood flow indicate a hypoxic state after SBR. Within one week after SBR, both sO2 and blood flow speed had gradually recovered. By 7 days after SBR, arterial and venous sO2 had increased to 101.0 +/- 2.9% and 82.7 +/- 7.3% of the baseline values, respectively, while arterial and venous flow speed had increased to 106.0 +/- 21.4% and 150.0 +/- 29.6% of the baseline values, respectively. Such increases in sO2 and blood flow may result from angiogenesis following SBR.

  1. Intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Blaut, Michael; Klaus, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The human gut harbors a highly diverse microbial ecosystem of approximately 400 different species, which is characterized by a high interindividual variability. The intestinal microbiota has recently been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Transplantation of gut microbiota from obese mice to nonobese, germ-free mice resulted in transfer of metabolic syndrome-associated features from the donor to the recipient. Proposed mechanisms for the role of gut microbiota include the provision of additional energy by the conversion of dietary fiber to short-chain fatty acids, effects on gut-hormone production, and increased intestinal permeability causing elevated systemic levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This metabolic endotoxemia is suggested to contribute to low-grade inflammation, a characteristic trait of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Finally, activation of the endocannabinoid system by LPS and/or high-fat diets is discussed as another causal factor. In conclusion, there is ample evidence for a role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity in rodents. However, the magnitude of its contribution to human obesity is still unknown.

  2. 31 CFR 547.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 547.302 Section 547.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 547.302 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and blocked property shall mean any account or property subject to the prohibitions in § 547.201...

  3. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Young Military Basic Trainee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    computed tomography angiogram of the abdomen was an abnormally narrow takeoff angle of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) from the aorta near the...loss of retroperitoneal fat , resulting in obstruction at the level of the third portion of duodenum as it is distended by food.3 It most commonly occurs...discomfort out of proportion to exam was concerning for intestinal angina. We obtained a computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the abdomen and surgical

  4. Clostridium perfringens Sialidases: Potential Contributors to Intestinal Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of histotoxic and intestinal infections of humans and other animals. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium can produce up to three sialidases named NanH, NanI, and NanJ. The role of sialidases in histotoxic infections, such as gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis), remains equivocal. However, recent in vitro studies suggest that NanI may contribute to intestinal virulence by upregulating production of some toxins associated with intestinal infection, increasing the binding and activity of some of those toxins, and enhancing adherence of C. perfringens to intestinal cells. Possible contributions of NanI to intestinal colonization are further supported by observations that the C. perfringens strains causing acute food poisoning in humans often lack the nanI gene, while other C. perfringens strains causing chronic intestinal infections in humans usually carry a nanI gene. Certain sialidase inhibitors have been shown to block NanI activity and reduce C. perfringens adherence to cultured enterocyte-like cells, opening the possibility that sialidase inhibitors could be useful therapeutics against C. perfringens intestinal infections. These initial in vitro observations should be tested for their in vivo significance using animal models of intestinal infections. PMID:27869757

  5. Clostridium perfringens Sialidases: Potential Contributors to Intestinal Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2016-11-19

    Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of histotoxic and intestinal infections of humans and other animals. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium can produce up to three sialidases named NanH, NanI, and NanJ. The role of sialidases in histotoxic infections, such as gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis), remains equivocal. However, recent in vitro studies suggest that NanI may contribute to intestinal virulence by upregulating production of some toxins associated with intestinal infection, increasing the binding and activity of some of those toxins, and enhancing adherence of C. perfringens to intestinal cells. Possible contributions of NanI to intestinal colonization are further supported by observations that the C. perfringens strains causing acute food poisoning in humans often lack the nanI gene, while other C. perfringens strains causing chronic intestinal infections in humans usually carry a nanI gene. Certain sialidase inhibitors have been shown to block NanI activity and reduce C. perfringens adherence to cultured enterocyte-like cells, opening the possibility that sialidase inhibitors could be useful therapeutics against C. perfringens intestinal infections. These initial in vitro observations should be tested for their in vivo significance using animal models of intestinal infections.

  6. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  7. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  8. Protective effect of the traditional Chinese medicine xuesaitong on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Li, Dengxiao; Gao, Hong; Gao, Yuejin; Zhang, Long; Du, Yuling; Wu, Jian; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of xuesaitong on intestinal barrier dysfunction and related mechanisms in a rat model for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Rats were divided into sham-operated, disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated groups. In the disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated rats an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) model was introduced, which was created by a temporary obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The xuesaitong group was pre-treated with injections into the abdominal cavity prior to the generation of the IRI model. Tissue changes were evaluated using H&E staining and electron microscopy. Samples were analyzed at 0, 3 and 24 h post IRI. Ascites volumes as well as small intestinal mucosa bleeding, injury scores, wet to dry weight ratios, and propulsions were evaluated. Apoptotic rates were determined with TUNNEL assays. Blood serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured using ELISA, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression in small intestinal mucosa measured using immunohistochemistry. Results: We determined a significant increase of pathological damage to small intestinal tissues, intestinal wet to dry ratios, ascites volume, TNF-α levels, apoptosis rates of small intestinal mucosa, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 proteins in the disease-model group compared to the sham-operated group (P < 0.001), and intestinal motility was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). However, comparisons between disease-model and xuesaitong pre-treated animals revealed, that in the treatment group these changes occurred in significant less severities. Conclusions: Xuesaitong can effectively alleviate intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing TNF-α, up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating caspase-3 expression, in addition to increasing peristalsis. PMID:25932105

  9. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Margallo, F. M.; Latorre, R.; López-Albors, O.; Wise, R.; Malbrain, M. L. N. G.; Castellanos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient’s risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5) and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min. Results Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05). In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours. Conclusion The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction. PMID

  10. Mechanical Intestinal Obstruction in a Porcine Model: Effects of Intra-Abdominal Hypertension. A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Correa-Martín, L; Párraga, E; Sánchez-Margallo, F M; Latorre, R; López-Albors, O; Wise, R; Malbrain, M L N G; Castellanos, G

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical intestinal obstruction is a disorder associated with intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. As the large intestine intraluminal and intra-abdominal pressures are increased, so the patient's risk for intestinal ischaemia. Previous studies have focused on hypoperfusion and bacterial translocation without considering the concomitant effect of intra-abdominal hypertension. The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a mechanical intestinal obstruction model in pigs similar to the human pathophysiology. Fifteen pigs were divided into three groups: a control group (n = 5) and two groups of 5 pigs with intra-abdominal hypertension induced by mechanical intestinal obstruction. The intra-abdominal pressures of 20 mmHg were maintained for 2 and 5 hours respectively. Hemodynamic, respiratory and gastric intramucosal pH values, as well as blood tests were recorded every 30 min. Significant differences between the control and mechanical intestinal obstruction groups were noted. The mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, dynamic pulmonary compliance and abdominal perfusion pressure decreased. The systemic vascular resistance index, central venous pressure, pulse pressure variation, airway resistance and lactate increased within 2 hours from starting intra-abdominal hypertension (p<0.05). In addition, we observed increased values for the peak and plateau airway pressures, and low values of gastric intramucosal pH in the mechanical intestinal obstruction groups that were significant after 3 hours. The mechanical intestinal obstruction model appears to adequately simulate the pathophysiology of intestinal obstruction that occurs in humans. Monitoring abdominal perfusion pressure, dynamic pulmonary compliance, gastric intramucosal pH and lactate values may provide insight in predicting the effects on endorgan function in patients with mechanical intestinal obstruction.

  11. Farnesoid X Receptor Activation Attenuates Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Farré, Ricard; De Hertogh, Gert; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Jochmans, Ina; Monbaliu, Diethard; Nevens, Frederik; Tack, Jan; Laleman, Wim; Pirenne, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is abundantly expressed in the ileum, where it exerts an enteroprotective role as a key regulator of intestinal innate immunity and homeostasis, as shown in pre-clinical models of inflammatory bowel disease. Since intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is characterized by hyperpermeability, bacterial translocation and inflammation, we aimed to investigate, for the first time, if the FXR-agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) could attenuate intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury. Material and Methods In a validated rat model of intestinal IRI (laparotomy + temporary mesenteric artery clamping), 3 conditions were tested (n = 16/group): laparotomy only (sham group); ischemia 60min+ reperfusion 60min + vehicle pretreatment (IR group); ischemia 60min + reperfusion 60min + OCA pretreatment (IR+OCA group). Vehicle or OCA (INT-747, 2*30mg/kg) was administered by gavage 24h and 4h prior to IRI. The following end-points were analyzed: 7-day survival; biomarkers of enterocyte viability (L-lactate, I-FABP); histology (morphologic injury to villi/crypts and villus length); intestinal permeability (Ussing chamber); endotoxin translocation (Lipopolysaccharide assay); cytokines (IL-6, IL-1-β, TNFα, IFN-γ IL-10, IL-13); apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3); and autophagy (LC3, p62). Results It was found that intestinal IRI was associated with high mortality (90%); loss of intestinal integrity (structurally and functionally); increased endotoxin translocation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production; and inhibition of autophagy. Conversely, OCA-pretreatment improved 7-day survival up to 50% which was associated with prevention of epithelial injury, preserved intestinal architecture and permeability. Additionally, FXR-agonism led to decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine release and alleviated autophagy inhibition. Conclusion Pretreatment with OCA, an FXR-agonist, improves survival in a rodent model of intestinal IRI, preserves the gut barrier

  12. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  13. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  14. Hawaii Census 2000 Blocks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Tiger line files are the source of the geometry representing the Census blocks. Attributes include total population counts, racial/ethnic, and poverty/income information. Racial/ethnic classifications are represented in units of blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Poverty and income data are represented in units of blockgroups and tracts. Percentages of each racial/ethnic group have been calculated from the population counts. Total Minority counts and percentages were compiled from each racial/ethnic non-white category. Categories compiled to create the Total Minority count includes the following: African American, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, White Hispanic, Other and all mixed race categories. The percentage poverty attribute represents the percent of the population living at or below poverty level. The per capita income attribute represents the sum of all income within the geographic entity, divided by the total population of that entity. Special fields designed to be used for EJ analysis have been derived from the PL data and include the following: Percentage difference of block, blockgroup and total minority from the state and county averages, percentile rank for each percent total minority within state and county entitie

  15. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  16. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  17. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  18. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  19. Palmar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shutze, Ryan A.; Liechty, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms of the hand are rarely encountered and more rarely reported. The least common locations of these aneurysms are the palmar and digital arteries. The etiologies of these entities are quite varied, although they usually present as a pulsatile mass. Following a thorough evaluation, including arterial anatomic imaging, they should be repaired. The reported results following repair have been good. Herein we report a girl with a spontaneous palmar artery aneurysm and its management. PMID:28127131

  20. Arterial waveform analysis.

    PubMed

    Esper, Stephen A; Pinsky, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The bedside measurement of continuous arterial pressure values from waveform analysis has been routinely available via indwelling arterial catheterization for >50 years. Invasive blood pressure monitoring has been utilized in critically ill patients, in both the operating room and critical care units, to facilitate rapid diagnoses of cardiovascular insufficiency and monitor response to treatments aimed at correcting abnormalities before the consequences of either hypo- or hypertension are seen. Minimally invasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (CO) have gained increased appeal. This has led to the increased interest in arterial waveform analysis to provide this important information, as it is measured continuously in many operating rooms and intensive care units. Arterial waveform analysis also allows for the calculation of many so-called derived parameters intrinsically created by this pulse pressure profile. These include estimates of left ventricular stroke volume (SV), CO, vascular resistance, and during positive-pressure breathing, SV variation, and pulse pressure variation. This article focuses on the principles of arterial waveform analysis and their determinants, components of the arterial system, and arterial pulse contour. It will also address the advantage of measuring real-time CO by the arterial waveform and the benefits to measuring SV variation. Arterial waveform analysis has gained a large interest in the overall assessment and management of the critically ill and those at a risk of hemodynamic deterioration.

  1. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  2. [Platelets and arterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François; Wiesel, Marie-Louise

    2003-01-01

    The pathological mechanisms involved in arterial thrombus formation are similar to the mechanisms involved in physiological hemostasis. Arterial thrombosis is initiated following lesion of the vessel wall, either through rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque containing lipids, adhesive proteins and tissue factor or after angioplasty exposing the thrombogenic subendothelial matrix. Platelets play a major role in arterial thrombus formation through ADP secretion and thrombin generation on their activated surface. Arterial thrombosis is a frequent complication of atherosclerotic lesions and leads to acute ischemic events. These events are therapeutic emergencies which require administration of antithrombotic drugs inhibiting platelet functions and thrombin.

  3. Single Umbilical Artery

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, J. David; McKee, James

    1964-01-01

    A prospective study of 2000 obstetrical deliveries was undertaken to establish the incidence of single umbilical artery in the newborn and the frequency of congenital malformations reported to be associated with this disorder. Twenty cases of single umbilical artery were discovered; two proved to have an associated congenital malformation. In neither of these cases was medical management affected by the discovery of a single artery. In addition, the vascular arrangement in the cords of 31 concurrently occurring congenitally malformed babies was examined, and in no instance was a single umbilical artery found. PMID:14214230

  4. Sinoatrial node artery arising from posterolateral branch of right coronary artery: definition by screening consecutive 1500 coronary angiographies.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Arda Sanli; Okmen, Ertan

    2009-12-01

    Sinoatrial node (SAN) artery originates from proximal segment of right coronary artery (RCA) or from left circumflex artery. Sinoatrial node artery artery originating from posterolateral (PL) branch of RCA is very rare. Only several cases have been reported. The study was performed to seek the frequency of this variation, evaluate clinical relevance, and describe electrocardiographic, angiographic characteristics of patients. Consecutive 1500 coronary angiography were screened to detect specifically SAN artery originating from PL branch of RCA. Patients with this variation were followed-up for one year regarding the arrhythmic events. The origin of SAN artery was proximal RCA in 1280 (85%), circumflex artery in 208 (14%), and PL branch of RCA in 12 (0.8%) patients (8 male, 4 female, mean age 64+/- 9 years). There was no history of arrhythmia in all patients. One patient presented with atrioventricular block. Indications of angiography were stable angina in 5, unstable angina in 5, and acute myocardial infarction in 2 patients. The patient with inferior myocardial infarction due to RCA total occlusion did not develop bradycardia or conduction defect. In four patients (33%) there was another artery originating from proximal RCA, ending at same territory with the variant artery suggesting dual blood supply. During one-year follow-up none of the patients experienced arrhythmic event. Sinoatrial node artery originating from distal RCA is very rare. This variation, even in patients with severe RCA disease is not associated with severe arrhythmia. Dual blood supply may be a protective factor in this subgroup of patients from arrhythmic events. To be aware of the origin and course of variant SAN artery may provide safe approach to interventional cardiologist and cardiac surgeon during percutaneous and surgical coronary and atrial interventions.

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Following Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Block

    PubMed Central

    Guirguis, Maged; Karroum, Rami; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Mounir-Soliman, Loran

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus blocks have become very common for patients undergoing upper extremity surgery. We report a case in which the patient developed ipsilateral phrenic nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure following supraclavicular nerve block. Case Report A 61-year-old female diabetic, morbidly obese patient presented for a repeat debridement of necrotizing fasciitis on her left arm. She received a left-sided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Within a few minutes, the patient began to experience acute dyspnea, anxiety, and oxygen saturation of 90%. Breath sounds were diminished in the left hemithorax. Arterial blood gases revealed evidence of acute respiratory acidosis. The chest x-ray was normal. After induction, we intubated the patient. Subsequent arterial blood gases showed marked improvement in respiratory acidosis. We believed left phrenic nerve paralysis to be the cause of the distress. The patient was extubated in the surgical intensive care unit the following day, and infusion of ropivacaine 0.2% was started. The catheter was removed afterward secondary to its occlusion. Conclusion Phrenic nerve injury leading to respiratory distress is a rare complication of supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Anesthesiologists should be ready for emergency intubation when performing this kind of block. PMID:22778683

  6. The Intestinal Microbiome and Health

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, Susan; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review A diverse array of microbes colonizes the human intestine. In this review we seek to outline the current state of knowledge on what characterizes a “healthy” or “normal” intestinal microbiome, what factors modify the intestinal microbiome in the healthy state and how the intestinal microbiome affects normal host physiology Recent Findings What constitutes a “normal” or “healthy” intestinal microbiome is an area of active research, but key characteristics may include diversity, richness and a microbial community’s resilience and ability to resist change. A number of factors, including age, the host immune system, host genetics, diet and antibiotic use appear to modify the intestinal microbiome in the normal state. New research shows that the microbiome likely plays a critical role in the healthy human immune system and metabolism. Summary It is clear that there is a complicated bi-directional relationship between the intestinal microbiota and host which is vital to health. An enhanced understanding of this relationship will be critical not only to maximize and maintain human health but also to shape our understanding of disease and to foster new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26237547

  7. Intestinal flora, probiotics, and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo; Vargas Vorackova, Florencia; Uribe, Misael

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal microflora constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem in permanent equilibrium, composed mainly of anaerobic bacteria. However, such equilibrium may be altered by daily conditions as drug use or pathologies interfering with intestinal physiology, generating an unfavorable environment for the organism. Besides, there are factors which may cause alterations in the intestinal wall, creating the conditions for translocation or permeation of substances or bacteria. In cirrhotic patients, there are many conditions that combine to alter the amount and populations of intestinal bacteria, as well as the functional capacity of the intestinal wall to prevent the permeation of substances and bacteria. Nowadays, numerous complications associated with cirrhosis have been identified, where such mechanisms could play an important role. There is evidence that some probiotic microorganisms could restore the microbiologic and immunologic equilibrium in the intestinal wall in cirrhotic patients and help in the treatment of complications due to cirrhosis. This article has the objective to review the interactions between intestinal flora, gut permeability, and the actual role of probiotics in the field of cirrhotic patients.

  8. Origin and propagation of individual slow waves along the intact feline small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Wim J E P; Stephen, Betty

    2008-03-01

    The pattern of propagation of slow waves in the small intestine is not clear. Specifically, it is not known whether propagation is determined by a single dominant ICC-MP (Interstitial cells of Cajal located in the Myenteric Plexus) pacemaker unit or whether there are multiple active pacemakers. To determine this pattern of propagation, waveforms were recorded simultaneously from 240 electrodes distributed along the whole length of the intact isolated feline small intestine. After the experiments, the propagation patterns of successive individual slow waves were analysed. In the intact small intestine, there was only a single slow wave pacemaker unit active, and this was located at or 6-10 cm from the pyloric junction. From this site, slow waves propagated in the aboral direction at gradually decreasing velocities. The majority of slow waves (73%) reached the ileocaecal junction while the remaining waves were blocked. Ligation of the intestine at one to four locations led to: (a) decrease in the distal frequencies; (b) disappearance of distal propagation blocks; (c) increase in velocities; (d) emergence of multiple and unstable pacemaker sites; and (e) propagation from these sites in the aboral and oral directions. In conclusion, in the quiescent feline small intestine a single pacemaker unit dominates the organ, with occasional propagation blocks of the slow waves, thereby producing the well-known frequency gradient.

  9. Immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies: importance of the blocking solution.

    PubMed

    Hauri, H P; Bucher, K

    1986-12-01

    Four commonly used blocking agents, i.e., fetal calf serum, mammalian gelatin-Nonidet-P40, fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40, and defatted powdered milk were compared with respect to their efficiency to block the nonspecific background and to promote maximal immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human intestinal sucrase-isomaltase during immunoblotting. Two of five monoclonal antibodies were found to react with the electroblotted enzyme. However, one of the reacting antibodies gave optimal results with fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40 and the other with defatted powdered milk, while fetal calf serum lead to unacceptably high backgrounds. The results suggest that some of the difficulties encountered with monoclonal antibodies in immunoblotting may be due to inappropriate blocking conditions.

  10. Intestinal nematodes: biology and control.

    PubMed

    Epe, Christian

    2009-11-01

    A variety of nematodes occur in dogs and cats. Several nematode species inhabit the small and large intestines. Important species that live in the small intestine are roundworms of the genus Toxocara (T canis, T cati) and Toxascaris (ie, T leonina), and hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma (A caninum, A braziliense, A tubaeforme) or Uncinaria (U stenocephala). Parasites of the large intestine are nematodes of the genus Trichuris (ie, whipworms, T vulpis). After a comprehensive description of their life cycle and biology, which are indispensable for understanding and justifying their control, current recommendations for nematode control are presented and discussed thereafter.

  11. Bovine Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Reduces Inflammation After Induction of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiechter, Danielle; Kats, Suzanne; Brands, Ruud; van Middelaar, Ben; Pasterkamp, Gerard; de Kleijn, Dominique; Seinen, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been increasing evidence suggesting that lipopolysaccharide or endotoxin may be an important activator of the innate immune system after acute myocardial infarction. Bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase reduces inflammation in several endotoxin mediated diseases by dephosphorylation of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase on reducing inflammation after acute myocardial infarction. Methods Just before permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary (LAD) artery to induce acute myocardial infarction in Balb/c mice, bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (bIAP) was administrated intravenously. After 4 hours, mice were sacrificed and the inflammatory response was assessed. Acute myocardial infarction induced the production of different cytokines, which were measured in blood. Results Treatment with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase resulted in a significant reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and the chymase mouse mast cell protease-1. No difference in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was observed between the control group and the bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase treated group. Conclusion In a mouse model of permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, bIAP diminishes the pro-inflammatory responses but does not have an effect on the anti-inflammatory response in the acute phase after acute myocardial infarction.

  12. [Part of the vertebral artery in patients with sudden deafness].

    PubMed

    Song, Yisa; Lv, Fengquan; Cai, Huixiau; Wu, Hao

    2013-08-01

    To explore the characteristics of vertebral artery system in the patients with sudden deafness by using digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Thirty-four cases of sudden deafness with vertebrobasilar artery ischemia confirmed by the color doppler ultrasound were undergone DSA in both side. The characteristics of vertebral artery, basal artery and before-cerebellum artery were analysis before specific therapy. There is no related complication were occurred among 34 cases. Side vertebral artery was blocked in 2 cases, atherosclerosis was found in 5 cases. The right cerebellar artery anterior and the left cerebellar artery posterior were found filling defect or minor change in 29.4% (10/34) and 35.3% (12/34) of the patients, respectively. The right and the left arteria auditiva interna were found filling defect or minor change in 64.7% (22/34) and 73.5% (25/34) of the patients, respectively. After specific therapy, 8 cases were cured, the hearing of 9 cases were markedly improved, the hearing of 12 cases were improved efficient and 5 patients have no hearing improvement, the total effective rate was 85.3%. The arteria auditiva interna and inferior anterior arteria cerebelli caused inner ear ischemia were found in the patients with sudden deafness. The using of vasodilator may have satisfactory and positive curative effect in the therapy of sudden deafness.

  13. Fetal intestinal graft is the best source for intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M F; Cabrita, A M; Patrício, J A

    2000-01-01

    Adult intestinal allografts have demonstrated high immunogenicity in human transplantation, making the search for new and more favorable grafts an actual problem. Accepting that fetal and newborn immune systems are relatively immature, their intestines could be ideal sources for organ donation. The purpose of this study was to compare the immunogenicity of fetal, newborn, and adult intestine for selection of the least antigenic. Using a bidirectional rat model for immunologic responses, 116 small-bowel transplantations were done: 36 fetal, 40 newborn, and 40 adult grafts. Two histocompatibility barriers and different immunosuppression regimes were used. For fetal and newborn intestines, free grafts into the omentum of adult recipients were done; for adult intestines, accessory grafts in adult recipients of the same age, using vascular anastomoses. The diagnosis of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was based on histology of hematoxylin and eosin-stained biopsies from target organs. Recipients of fetal and newborn grafts did not show signs of GVHD, while 12% of the adult group did (P < 0.05). Rejection was less severe in fetal and adult (P > 0.05) than in newborn (P < 0.05) intestinal transplantation. Treatment with 10 mg/kg per day cyclosporine prevented rejection in 70% of fetal and 75% of adult grafts, while all newborn grafts were rejected. Under no immunosuppression, or with low doses of cyclosporine (2 mg/kg per day), all groups showed histologic signs of rejection in almost all cases, the fetal intestine being the least affected. Concerning histocompatibility barriers, grafts were usually less damaged in the weaker transplantation subgroups. Our data indicate that fetal intestine is the least immunogenic of the three grafts studied, suggesting that it will be the most suitable tissue for organ donation.

  14. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  15. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  16. What Is Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  17. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  18. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  19. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  20. NCCN Evidence Blocks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-05-01

    NCCN has developed a series of Evidence Blocks: graphics that provide ratings for each recommended treatment regimen in terms of efficacy, toxicity, quality and consistency of the supporting data, and affordability. The NCCN Evidence Blocks are currently available in 10 tumor types within the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). At a glance, patients and providers can understand how a given treatment was assessed by the NCCN Guidelines Panel and get a sense of how a given treatment may match individual needs and preferences. Robert W. Carlson, MD, CEO of NCCN, described the reasoning behind this new feature and how the tool is used, and Eric Jonasch, MD, Professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Vice Chair of the NCCN Kidney Cancer Panel, described its applicability in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  1. Thermal blocking of preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Rose; Tranberg, Anders E-mail: anders.tranberg@uis.no

    2015-04-01

    The parametric resonance responsible for preheating after inflation will end when self-interactions of the resonating field and interactions of this field with secondary degrees of freedom become important. In many cases, the effect may be quantified in terms of an effective mass and the resulting shifting out of the spectrum of the strongest resonance band. In certain curvaton models, such thermal blocking can even occur before preheating has begun, delaying or even preventing the decay of the curvaton. We investigate numerically to what extent this thermal blocking is realised in a specific scenario, and whether the effective mass is well approximated by the perturbative leading order thermal mass. We find that the qualitative behaviour is well reproduced in this approximation, and that the end of preheating can be confidently estimated.

  2. Evidence against local neural mechanism for intestinal postprandial hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Nyhof, R A; Chou, C C

    1983-09-01

    The role of local intestinal nerves in the nutrient-induced intestinal hyperemia was investigated in jejunal segments of anesthetized dogs by comparing the hyperemic effect of intraluminal glucose and oleic acid solutions before and after mucosal anesthesia and infusions of methysergide, hexamethonium, and tetrodotoxin. Methysergide, hexamethonium, and tetrodotoxin all failed to alter either the vascular or metabolic responses to luminal placement of glucose or oleic acid. The increases in blood flow and oxygen uptake produced by glucose or oleic acid, however, were blocked or attenuated after exposing the mucosa to dibucaine. The effect was norepinephrine due to an altered vascular response to vasoactive substances as dibucaine did not alter vascular responses to isoproterenol or norepinephrine. Dibucaine, however, inhibited active transport and increased passive transport of glucose across rat intestinal sacs in vitro. Oxygen consumption of the canine jejunal mucosa was also inhibited by dibucaine in vitro. It seems that inhibition of the nutrient-induced intestinal hyperemia by dibucaine is due, at least in part, to its effect on oxygen consumption and glucose transport of the mucosal epithelial cells. Nutrient-induced hyperemia appears not to be neurally mediated but more closely related to metabolism.

  3. Feature-accelerated block matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Bo; Orchard, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    We study the relationship between local features and block matching in this paper. We show that the use of many features can greatly improve the block matching results by introducing several fast block matching algorithms. The first algorithm is pixel decimation-based. We show that pixels with larger gradient magnitude have larger motion compensation error. Therefore for pixel decimation-based fast block matching, it benefits to subsample the block by selecting pixels with the largest gradient magnitude. Such a gradient-assisted adaptive pixel selection strategy greatly outperforms two other subsampling procedures proposed in previous literature. Fast block matching can achieve the optimal performance obtained using full search. We present a family of such fast block matching algorithm using various local features, such as block mean and variance. Our algorithm reduces more than 80 percent computation, while achieving the same performance as the full search. This present a brand new approach toward fast block matching algorithm design.

  4. Recovery from blocking between outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-10-01

    Contemporary associative learning research largely focuses on cue competition phenomena that occur when 2 cues are paired with a common outcome. Little research has been conducted to investigate similar phenomena occurring when a single cue is trained with 2 outcomes. Three conditioned lick suppression experiments with rats assessed whether treatments known to alleviate blocking between cues would also attenuate blocking between outcomes. In Experiment 1, conditioned responding recovered from blocking between outcomes when a long retention interval was interposed between training and testing. Experiment 2 obtained recovery from blocking between outcomes when the blocking outcome was extinguished after the blocking treatment. In Experiment 3, a recovery from blocking between outcomes occurred when a reminder stimulus was presented in a novel context prior to testing. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that blocking of outcomes, like blocking of cues, appears to be caused by a deficit in the expression of an acquired association.

  5. Liquid blocking check valve

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, John T.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  6. Genetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Rutsch, Frank; Nitschke, Yvonne; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Artery calcification reflects an admixture of factors such as ectopic osteochondral differentiation with primary host pathological conditions. We review how genetic factors, as identified by human genome-wide association studies, and incomplete correlations with various mouse studies, including knockout and strain analyses, fit into “pieces of the puzzle” in intimal calcification in human atherosclerosis, and artery tunica media calcification in aging, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. We also describe in sharp contrast how ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 serve as “cogs in a wheel” of arterial calcification. Specifically, each is a minor component in the function of a much larger network of factors that exert balanced effects to promote and suppress arterial calcification. For the network to normally suppress spontaneous arterial calcification, the “cogs” ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 must be present and in working order. Monogenic ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 deficiencies each drive a molecular pathophysiology of closely related but phenotypically different diseases (generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), pseudoxan-thoma elasticum (PXE) and arterial calcification caused by CD73 deficiency (ACDC)), in which premature onset arterial calcification is a prominent but not the sole feature. PMID:21852556

  7. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  8. [Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bourry, N; Chabrot, P; Jeannin, G; Filaire, M; Charpy, C; Bay, J O; Kemeny, J L; Caillaud, D; Escande, G; Boyer, L

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor. We present a case of intimal sarcoma arising from right pulmonary artery and left lower pulmonary vein observed in a 44-year-old man with a non-productive cough. Computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance imaging showing filling defect enhancement contributed early, suggesting the diagnosis of primary vascular tumor, hypothesis confirmed by pathologist findings.

  9. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  10. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  11. Intraocular radiation blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Ho, T.K.; Fastenberg, D.M.; Hyman, R.A.; Stroh, E.M.; Packer, S.; Perry, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Iodine-based liquid radiographic contrast agents were placed in normal and tumor-bearing (Greene strain) rabbit eyes to evaluate their ability to block iodine-125 radiation. This experiment required the procedures of tumor implantation, vitrectomy, air-fluid exchange, and 125I plaque and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chip implantation. The authors quantified the amount of radiation attenuation provided by intraocularly placed contrast agents with in vivo dosimetry. After intraocular insertion of a blocking agent or sham blocker (saline) insertion, episcleral 125I plaques were placed across the eye from episcleral TLD dosimeters. This showed that radiation attenuation occurred after blocker insertion compared with the saline controls. Then computed tomographic imaging techniques were used to describe the relatively rapid transit time of the aqueous-based iohexol compared with the slow transit time of the oil-like iophendylate. Lastly, seven nontumor-bearing eyes were primarily examined for blocking agent-related ocular toxicity. Although it was noted that iophendylate induced intraocular inflammation and retinal degeneration, all iohexol-treated eyes were similar to the control eyes at 7 and 31 days of follow-up. Although our study suggests that intraocular radiopaque materials can be used to shield normal ocular structures during 125I plaque irradiation, a mechanism to keep these materials from exiting the eye must be devised before clinical application.

  12. Diagnosis of Intracranial Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    KANOTO, Masafumi; HOSOYA, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial dissection is defined as a hematoma in the wall of a cervical or an intracranial artery. Cerebral arterial dissection causes arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm, resulting in acute infarction and hemorrhage. Image analysis by such methods as conventional angiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and so on plays an important role in diagnosing cerebral arterial dissection. In this study, we explore the methods and findings involved in the diagnosis of cerebral arterial dissection. PMID:27180630

  13. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  14. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  15. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  16. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  17. Fishborne Zoonotic Intestinal Trematodes, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Do Trung; Van De, Nguyen; Waikagul, Jitra; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2007-01-01

    Although fishborne zoonotic trematodes that infect the liver are well documented in Vietnam, intestinal fishborne zoonotic trematodes are unreported. Recent discoveries of the metacercarial stage of these flukes in wild and farmed fish prompted an assessment of their risk to a community that eats raw fish. A fecal survey of 615 persons showed a trematode egg prevalence of 64.9%. Infected persons were treated to expel liver and intestinal parasites for specific identification. The liver trematode Clonorchis sinensis was recovered from 51.5%, but >1 of 4 intestinal species of the family Heterophyidae was recovered from 100%. The most numerous were Haplorchis spp. (90.4% of all worms recovered). These results demonstrate that fishborne intestinal parasites are an unrecognized food safety risk in a country whose people have a strong tradition of eating raw fish. PMID:18258031

  18. Excess mortality and morbidity associated with right bundle branch and left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Pine, M B; Oren, M; Ciafone, R; Rosner, B; Hirota, Y; Rabinowitz, B; Abelmann, W H

    1983-05-01

    Excess mortality and morbidity associated with right bundle branch and left anterior fascicular block were evaluated in 108 patients with block (age 74 +/- 10 years, 69% male) and 108 age- and sex-matched control patients with normal conduction. Clinical characteristics were similar initially except for more congestive heart failure in patients with block. Life table analysis revealed a higher 12 year mortality with block, even after omitting patients with moderate or severe congestive heart failure (risk ratio 1.47, p less than 0.05). Compared with control subjects, the group of patients with block had more sudden death and deaths of unknown cause, but a similar number of noncardiac and diagnosed cardiac deaths. More patients with block developed new second and third degree atrioventricular block or new overt coronary artery disease, but this finding did not support prophylactic pacing in asymptomatic patients. The importance of internal controls in assessing the natural history of clinical and electrocardiographic abnormalities is emphasized.

  19. Interactions of cadmium compounds with endogenous iron in the intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, N.; Sugawara, C. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors previously reported that when cadmium (Cd) given orally to mice or rats, they showed a decrease of hemoglobin, or of hepatic and renal iron (Fe). The decrease may be due to the decrease of Fe uptake into the intestinal mucosa brush border membrane. In a related work, it was suggested that internalized-Cd blocks the transferrin cycle within intestinal cells. Recently, the role of ferritin in the process of intestinal Fe absorption has been evaluated. Even now, Fe absorption from the GI tract is still under discussion. In order to understand the competition of Cd with Fe further, the authors gave some Cd compounds known to be taken up in different manners into the intestinal mucosa to mice.

  20. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  1. Sonographic detection of intestinal pneumatosis.

    PubMed

    Danse, E M; Van Beers BE; Gilles, A; Jacquet, L

    2000-06-01

    Intestinal pneumatosis is an uncommon affection characterized by the presence of gas in the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. The prognosis of this condition, observed in benign or severe diseases, is based on the outcome of the underlying affection. The diagnosis of pneumatosis intestinalis is unusually made with sonography. We report a case of pneumatosis intestinalis due to small bowel necrosis, initially suggested with sonography and further confirmed with computed tomography (CT) and pathology.

  2. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  3. Degeneration and regeneration of perivascular innervation in arterial grafts.

    PubMed

    Heikki, Penttilä; Timo, Waris; Nureddin, Ashammakhi; Sampsa, Vanhatalo

    2004-07-01

    Because the understanding of postoperative changes in arterial graft innervation is limited, this study was performed to characterize neuronal degeneration and regeneration events immunohistochemically in femoral arterial grafts transplanted to carotid arteries in rats. Specimens taken 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, 3 months, and 5 months after surgery were assessed for vasoactive intestinal peptide, neurofilaments, growth-associated protein 43, tyrosine hydroxylase, and nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes. During neuronal degeneration, vasoactive intestinal peptide disappeared within 1 day, transmitter-synthesizing enzymes (nitric oxide synthase and tyrosine hydroxylase) had vanished by day 7, and neurofilaments (cytoskeletal markers) had essentially disappeared after 1 week. In the regeneration phase, the most robust axonal growth, as visualized by growth-associated protein 43, was observed at 1 month, followed by a gradual increase in neurotransmitter markers at 1 and 3 months, whereas the neurofilaments increased gradually up to the end of the 5-month observation period. Reinnervation proceeded from the proximal carotid (host) trunk distally to the graft. Axonal re-growth occurred mainly in arterial adventitia. Innervation density, as visually assessed, was denser in the graft than in the host. These findings suggest that 1) the main sequence of degeneration and regeneration follows that reported in other models of neuronal degeneration; 2) reinnervation of the arterial grafts comes mainly from the host arteries; and 3) the innervation density in the graft may differ from that in the host, which may suggest target-derived regulation of innervation. The latter finding may have clinical implications. It suggests that for a good outcome it would be beneficial to choose a sparsely innervated graft rather than a densely innervated one.

  4. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. Intestinal microflora and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serino, M; Luche, E; Chabo, C; Amar, J; Burcelin, R

    2009-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular sequencing technology have allowed researchers to answer major questions regarding the relationship between a vast genomic diversity-such as found in the intestinal microflora-and host physiology. Over the past few years, it has been established that, in obesity, type 1 diabetes and Crohn's disease-to cite but a few-the intestinal microflora play a pathophysiological role and can induce, transfer or prevent the outcome of such conditions. A few of the molecular vectors responsible for this regulatory role have been determined. Some are related to control of the immune, vascular, endocrine and nervous systems located in the intestines. However, more important is the fact that the intestinal microflora-to-host relationship is bidirectional, with evidence of an impact of the host genome on the intestinal microbiome. This means that the ecology shared by the host and gut microflora should now be considered a new player that can be manipulated, using pharmacological and nutritional approaches, to control physiological functions and pathological outcomes. What now remains is to demonstrate the molecular connection between the intestinal microflora and metabolic diseases. We propose here that the proinflammatory lipopolysaccharides play a causal role in the onset of metabolic disorders.

  6. Intestinal epithelial stem/progenitor cells are controlled by mucosal afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Ove; Jodal, Mats; Jansson, Madeleine; Ryberg, Anders T; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-02-09

    The maintenance of the intestinal epithelium is of great importance for the survival of the organism. A possible nervous control of epithelial cell renewal was studied in rats and mice. Mucosal afferent nerves were stimulated by exposing the intestinal mucosa to capsaicin (1.6 mM), which stimulates intestinal external axons. Epithelial cell renewal was investigated in the jejunum by measuring intestinal thymidine kinase (TK) activity, intestinal (3)H-thymidine incorporation into DNA, and the number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU. The influence of the external gut innervation was minimized by severing the periarterial nerves. Luminal capsaicin increased all the studied variables, an effect nervously mediated to judge from inhibitory effects on TK activity or (3)H-thymidine incorporation into DNA by exposing the mucosa to lidocaine (a local anesthetic) or by giving four different neurotransmitter receptor antagonists i.v. (muscarinic, nicotinic, neurokinin1 (NK1) or calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptors). After degeneration of the intestinal external nerves capsaicin did not increase TK activity, suggesting the involvement of an axon reflex. Intra-arterial infusion of Substance P (SP) or CGRP increased intestinal TK activity, a response abolished by muscarinic receptor blockade. Immunohistochemistry suggested presence of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptors on the intestinal stem/progenitor cells. We propose that the stem/progenitor cells are controlled by cholinergic nerves, which, in turn, are influenced by mucosal afferent neuron(s) releasing acetylcholine and/or SP and/or CGRP. In mice lacking the capsaicin receptor, thymidine incorporation into DNA and number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU was lower than in wild type animals suggesting that nerves are important also in the absence of luminal capsaicin, a conclusion also supported by the observation that atropine lowered thymidine incorporation into DNA by 60% in control rat segments. Enteric nerves are

  7. Blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 consumption along the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, N R; Weiss, H R

    1988-05-01

    Differences in O2 delivery and consumption along the fed and fasted small intestine are described. Total wall blood flow was determined in sequential segments of small intestine from 5 to 6-month-old male, anesthetized Fischer 344 rats either 75-80 min before or after feeding, using radioactive microspheres. Oxygen saturation in submucosal arterioles and venules (50-60 micron diam) was determined throughout the intestine, using a microspectrophotometric technique. Venous O2 saturations showed considerable heterogeneity in all regions, and ranged from 0 to 77%. Arterial-venous O2 content differences (CaO2-CvO2) did not change along the fasted rat intestine, and averaged 8.2 ml O2/100 ml blood. However, CaO2-CvO2 followed a small proximal to distal gradient (proximal greater than distal) in the fed rats. Larger proximal to distal gradients (proximal greater than distal) occurred in both blood flow and O2 consumption in both groups. Feeding did not change intestinal average CaO2-CvO2. However, feeding induced a 53% increase in average O2 consumption, with the greatest increase (130%) occurring in the middle third of the intestine. Feeding induced a 42% increase in average blood flow, with the greatest increase (70%) occurring in the distal third of the intestine. The increased O2 used by the fed intestine was primarily provided by the increased blood flow. The O2 consumption gradient is assumed to reflect differences in mucosal mass along the intestine and/or differences in metabolic activity.

  8. Intestinal Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells Are Controlled by Mucosal Afferent Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Ove; Jodal, Mats; Jansson, Madeleine; Ryberg, Anders T.; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Background The maintenance of the intestinal epithelium is of great importance for the survival of the organism. A possible nervous control of epithelial cell renewal was studied in rats and mice. Methods Mucosal afferent nerves were stimulated by exposing the intestinal mucosa to capsaicin (1.6 mM), which stimulates intestinal external axons. Epithelial cell renewal was investigated in the jejunum by measuring intestinal thymidine kinase (TK) activity, intestinal 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA, and the number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU. The influence of the external gut innervation was minimized by severing the periarterial nerves. Principal Findings Luminal capsaicin increased all the studied variables, an effect nervously mediated to judge from inhibitory effects on TK activity or 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA by exposing the mucosa to lidocaine (a local anesthetic) or by giving four different neurotransmitter receptor antagonists i.v. (muscarinic, nicotinic, neurokinin1 (NK1) or calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptors). After degeneration of the intestinal external nerves capsaicin did not increase TK activity, suggesting the involvement of an axon reflex. Intra-arterial infusion of Substance P (SP) or CGRP increased intestinal TK activity, a response abolished by muscarinic receptor blockade. Immunohistochemistry suggested presence of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptors on the intestinal stem/progenitor cells. We propose that the stem/progenitor cells are controlled by cholinergic nerves, which, in turn, are influenced by mucosal afferent neuron(s) releasing acetylcholine and/or SP and/or CGRP. In mice lacking the capsaicin receptor, thymidine incorporation into DNA and number of crypt cells labeled with BrdU was lower than in wild type animals suggesting that nerves are important also in the absence of luminal capsaicin, a conclusion also supported by the observation that atropine lowered thymidine incorporation into DNA by 60% in control

  9. [Intestinal infarct caused by giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Kalbermatter, V; Laudanno, C; Bagilet, D; Diab, M; Giménez, D; Serra, F

    1999-01-01

    Arteritis of giant cells compromising extracranial and particularly intestinal tissues is not frequent. Therefore, it is common practice to make the diagnosis retrospectively after analyzing the surgical sample. A case is presented of an 83 year old woman admitted to the Clinical Department with a clinical course of 3 days of evolution characterized by fever and pain in the left hemiabdomen. Her personal medical history included multiple diverticulosis of colon, collecistectomy and appendicectomy. Laboratory tests showed that uremia was 0.75 g/L (N.L to 0.45 g/L), V.E.S. 90 mm at the first hour, and the rest of the determinations were normal. The chest and abdomen rays as well as the abdomen and pelvis ecographies were normal. A diagnosis was reached as acute diverticulitis and the patient was treated with 400 mgr of ciprofloxacina and 2,000 mgr a day of metronidazol. She continued in a feverish state and with abdominal pain, so that an anexial tomography of abdomen was taken. It showed a widening of peritoneal fascias with scarce liquid in the left parietocolic dripping and Douglas septum. After 96 hours, surgery exploration was done and injuries in the left colon revealed compatibility with an infarct of the colon which had to be extirpated. Pathological examination revealed an infarct of colon due to a secondary arterial thrombosis characteristic of giant cell arteritis. After the diagnosis, immunological studies and biopsy of the left temporal artery were performed and reported as normal. The patient was treated with 40 mgr of prednisone a day improving rapidly.

  10. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Sachin B; Hinge (Ingle), Chitra R

    2014-01-01

    Primary idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia is an unusual disease featured by the presence of dilated lymphatic channels which are located in the mucosa, submucosa or subserosa leading to protein loosing enteropathy.Most often affected were children and generally diagnosed before third year of life but may be rarely seen in adults too. Bilateral pitting oedema of lower limb is the main clinical manifestation mimicking the systemic disease and posing a real diagnostic dilemma to the clinicians to differentiate it from other common systemic diseases like Congestive cardiac failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, Protein Energy Malnutrition, etc. Diagnosis can be made on capsule endoscopy which can localise the lesion but unable to take biopsy samples. Thus, recently double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy in combination can be used as an effective diagnostic tool to hit the correct diagnosis. Patients respond dramatically to diet constituting low long chain triglycerides and high protein content with supplements of medium chain triglyceride. So early diagnosis is important to prevent untoward complications related to disease or treatment for the sake of accurate pathological diagnosis. PMID:25325063

  12. Acetylcholine produces contraction mediated by cyclooxigenase pathway in arterial vessels in the marine fish (Isacia conceptionis).

    PubMed

    Moraga, F A; Urriola-Urriola, N

    2015-05-01

    Preliminary studies showed that dorsal artery contraction mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) is blocked with indomethacin in intertidal fish (G. laevifrons). Our objective was to characterize the cholinergic pathway in several artery vessels of the I. conceptionis. Afferent and efferent branchial, dorsal and mesenteric arteries were dissected of 6 juvenile specimens, isometric tension studies were done using doses response curves (DRC) for Ach (10(-13) to 10(-3) M), and cholinergic pathways were obtained by blocking with atropine or indomethacin. CRC to ACh showed a pattern of high sensitivity only in efferente branchial artery and low sensibility in all vessels. Furthermore, these contractions were blocked in the presence of atropine and indomethacin in all vessels. Our results corroborate previous results observed in intertidal species that contraction induced by acetylcholine is mediated by receptors that activate a cyclooxygenase contraction pathway.

  13. Pancreatic Digestive Enzyme Blockade in the Intestine Increases Survival After Experimental Shock

    PubMed Central

    DeLano, Frank A.; Hoyt, David B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2015-01-01

    Shock, sepsis, and multiorgan failure are associated with inflammation, morbidity, and high mortality. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests that pancreatic enzymes in the intestinal lumen autodigest the intestine and generate systemic inflammation. Blocking these enzymes in the intestine reduces inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction. We investigated whether enzymatic blockade also reduces mortality after shock. Three rat shock models were used here: hemorrhagic shock, peritonitis shock induced by placement of cecal material into the peritoneum, and endotoxin shock. One hour after initiation of hemorrhagic, peritonitis, or endotoxin shock, animals were administered one of three different pancreatic enzyme inhibitors—6-amidino-2-naphtyl p-guanidinobenzoate di-methanesulfate, tranexamic acid, or aprotinin—into the lumen of the small intestine. In all forms of shock, blockade of digestive proteases with protease inhibitor attenuated entry of digestive enzymes into the wall of the intestine and subsequent autodigestion and morphological damage to the intestine, lung, and heart. Animals treated with protease inhibitors also survived in larger numbers than untreated controls over a period of 12 weeks. Surviving animals recovered completely and returned to normal weight within 14 days after shock. The results suggest that the active and concentrated digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine play a central role in shock and multi-organ failure, which can be treated with protease inhibitors that are currently available for use in the clinic. PMID:23345609

  14. TLR2 mediates gap junctional intercellular communication through connexin-43 in intestinal epithelial barrier injury.

    PubMed

    Ey, Birgit; Eyking, Annette; Gerken, Guido; Podolsky, Daniel K; Cario, Elke

    2009-08-14

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) coordinates cellular functions essential for sustaining tissue homeostasis; yet its regulation in the intestine is not well understood. Here, we identify a novel physiological link between Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and GJIC through modulation of Connexin-43 (Cx43) during acute and chronic inflammatory injury of the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) barrier. Data from in vitro studies reveal that TLR2 activation modulates Cx43 synthesis and increases GJIC via Cx43 during IEC injury. The ulcerative colitis-associated TLR2-R753Q mutant targets Cx43 for increased proteasomal degradation, impairing TLR2-mediated GJIC during intestinal epithelial wounding. In vivo studies using mucosal RNA interference show that TLR2-mediated mucosal healing depends functionally on intestinal epithelial Cx43 during acute inflammatory stress-induced damage. Mice deficient in TLR2 exhibit IEC-specific alterations in Cx43, whereas administration of a TLR2 agonist protects GJIC by blocking accumulation of Cx43 and its hyperphosphorylation at Ser368 to prevent spontaneous chronic colitis in MDR1alpha-deficient mice. Finally, adding the TLR2 agonist to three-dimensional intestinal mucosa-like cultures of human biopsies preserves intestinal epithelial Cx43 integrity and polarization ex vivo. In conclusion, Cx43 plays an important role in innate immune control of commensal-mediated intestinal epithelial wound repair.

  15. Pancreatic digestive enzyme blockade in the intestine increases survival after experimental shock.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Frank A; Hoyt, David B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2013-01-23

    Shock, sepsis, and multiorgan failure are associated with inflammation, morbidity, and high mortality. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests that pancreatic enzymes in the intestinal lumen autodigest the intestine and generate systemic inflammation. Blocking these enzymes in the intestine reduces inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction. We investigated whether enzymatic blockade also reduces mortality after shock. Three rat shock models were used here: hemorrhagic shock, peritonitis shock induced by placement of cecal material into the peritoneum, and endotoxin shock. One hour after initiation of hemorrhagic, peritonitis, or endotoxin shock, animals were administered one of three different pancreatic enzyme inhibitors--6-amidino-2-naphtyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfate, tranexamic acid, or aprotinin--into the lumen of the small intestine. In all forms of shock, blockade of digestive proteases with protease inhibitor attenuated entry of digestive enzymes into the wall of the intestine and subsequent autodigestion and morphological damage to the intestine, lung, and heart. Animals treated with protease inhibitors also survived in larger numbers than untreated controls over a period of 12 weeks. Surviving animals recovered completely and returned to normal weight within 14 days after shock. The results suggest that the active and concentrated digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine play a central role in shock and multiorgan failure, which can be treated with protease inhibitors that are currently available for use in the clinic.

  16. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for ... in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. It can be run either with a licensed version of the IDL package or by ...

  17. How Is Heart Block Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... second-degree heart block, you may need a pacemaker . A pacemaker is a small device that's placed under the ... third-degree heart block, you will need a pacemaker. In an emergency, a temporary pacemaker might be ...

  18. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  19. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  20. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  1. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  2. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  3. How Artists Overcome Creative Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Six practicing artists were interviewed about how they overcome creative blocks. Their responses indicated that feelings of self-doubt, fear, and depression accompany blocks but that relaxing and working on new directions and playing ideas off a supportive person helped to overcome such blocks. (DB)

  4. Solving DAEs using block method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abasi, Naghmeh; Suleiman, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Zarina Bibi

    2013-04-01

    This paper is on solving semi-explicit index-one Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs). The block method suggested computes the solutions of the DAE at 2-point simultaneously. The numerical results obtained are compared with non-block backward differentiation method (BDF). The comparison of the numerical results confirms that the block method developed is more efficient and accurate.

  5. On Post-Hoc Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonett, Douglas G.

    1982-01-01

    Post-hoc blocking and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) both employ a concomitant variable to increase statistical power relative to the completely randomized design. It is argued that the advantages attributed to the block design are not always valid and that there are circumstances when the ANCOVA would be preferred to post-hoc blocking.…

  6. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  7. Mesenteric Artery Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Coles, John C.; Walker, John B.; Gergely, N. F.; Buttigliero, Jorge

    1963-01-01

    The syndromes of superior mesenteric artery insufficiency are briefly reviewed. Three cases associated with infarction of bowel which were treated with restoration of arterial flow and resection of residual irretrievable bowel are reported. In two patients an embolectomy and in one patient a bypass graft were used to restore arterial continuity. The importance of the recognition and removal of irretrievable bowel at the time of vascular reconstruction is emphasized. Success is not necessarily predicated by the time factor alone, although the importance of early diagnosis and surgical intervention cannot be denied. PMID:14042788

  8. Ruptured visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chiaradia, M; Novelli, L; Deux, J-F; Tacher, V; Mayer, J; You, K; Djabbari, M; Luciani, A; Rahmouni, A; Kobeiter, H

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms are rare but their estimated mortality due to rupture ranges between 25 and 70%. Treatment of visceral artery aneurysm rupture is usually managed by interventional radiology. Specific embolization techniques depend on the location, affected organ, locoregional arterial anatomy, and interventional radiologist skill. The success rate following treatment by interventional radiology is greater than 90%. The main complication is recanalization of the aneurysm, showing the importance of post-therapeutic monitoring, which should preferably be performed using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Bilateral variant testicular arteries with double renal arteries

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The testicular arteries normally arise from the abdominal aorta. There are reports about the variant origin of these arteries. Accessory renal arteries are also a common finding but their providing origin to testicular arteries is an important observation. The variations described here are unique and provide significant information to surgeons dissecting the abdominal cavity. Case presentation During routine dissection classes of abdominal region of a 60-year-old male cadaver, we observed bilateral variant testicular arteries and double renal arteries. Conclusion Awareness of variations of the testicular arteries such as those presented here becomes important during surgical procedures like varicocele and undescended testes. PMID:19187540

  10. Impact of Intestinal Microbiota on Intestinal Luminal Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kibe, Ryoko; Ooga, Takushi; Aiba, Yuji; Kurihara, Shin; Sawaki, Emiko; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Low–molecular-weight metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota play a direct role in health and disease. In this study, we analyzed the colonic luminal metabolome using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry with time-of-flight (CE-TOFMS) —a novel technique for analyzing and differentially displaying metabolic profiles— in order to clarify the metabolite profiles in the intestinal lumen. CE-TOFMS identified 179 metabolites from the colonic luminal metabolome and 48 metabolites were present in significantly higher concentrations and/or incidence in the germ-free (GF) mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), 77 metabolites were present in significantly lower concentrations and/or incidence in the GF mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), and 56 metabolites showed no differences in the concentration or incidence between GF and Ex-GF mice. These indicate that intestinal microbiota highly influenced the colonic luminal metabolome and a comprehensive understanding of intestinal luminal metabolome is critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions. PMID:22724057

  11. Effect of glutamate on inflammatory responses of intestine and brain after focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Jie; Lu, Ran; Ji, Qing; Xu, Jian-Guo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the modulation of glutamate on post-ischemic intestinal and cerebral inflammatory responses in a ischemic and excitotoxic rat model. METHODS: Adult male rats were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min and injection of monosodium glutamate intraperitoneally, to decapitate them at selected time points. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously during the whole process of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. RESULTS: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) treated rats displayed statistically significant high levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissues within the first 6 h of ischemia. The rats with cerebral ischemia showed a minor decrease of TNF-α production in cerebral and intestinal tissues. The rats with cerebral ischemia and treated with MSG displayed statistically significant low levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissues. These results correlated significantly with NF-κB production calculated at the same intervals. During experiment, the mean blood pressure and heart rates in all groups were stable. CONCLUSION: Glutamate is involved in the mechanism of intestinal and cerebral inflammation responses. The effects of glutamate on cerebral and intestinal inflammatory responses after ischemia are up-regulated at the transcriptional level, through the NF-κB signal transduction pathway. PMID:15655833

  12. Intestinal microbiota and overweight.

    PubMed

    Lyra, A; Lahtinen, S; Tiihonen, K; Ouwehand, A C

    2010-11-01

    The microbes in our gut can influence our weight by providing us with energy through the degradation of nondigestable carbohydrates and by affecting the cellular energy status of liver and muscle cells and the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissue. Thus, it is not surprising that in several studies the gastrointestinal microbiota of overweight and obese subjects has been found to differ from that of lean subjects. The initial findings linked obesity with proportionally decreased levels of the phylum Bacteroidetes and increased levels of the phylum Firmicutes. Later, several studies have assessed the association between overweight or obesity and the gastrointestinal microbiota, applying an array of molecular methods targeting the microbiota as a whole or specific bacterial groups or species within. However, at present it is difficult to draw conclusions on which of the observed microbiota alterations are relevant; essentially all of the bacterial groups that have been studied in more than one trial have given contradictory results in regard to their association with weight. Some of these discrepancies can result from methodological issues and some from the nature of the gastrointestinal microbiota, which is an extremely complex and dynamic microbial ecosystem with high subject specificity. In addition, selecting subjects purely based on weight may result in a largely heterogeneous group with several potentially confounding factors. While it may be premature to conclude which specific groups of bacteria are prominent in the intestinal tract of overweight and obese subjects, it appears clear that microbes contribute to weight gain and related health issues, such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes. Therefore, it is important to continue to search for common microbial markers and predictors of obesity, and to study how these may be modulated with probiotics and prebiotics to promote health.

  13. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; ...

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  14. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  15. Solar power building block

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.T.

    1982-04-20

    A building unit for exterior walls and the like comprising a molded block of glass having a recess in the side face which is to face the exterior, the recess having a side wall and an open outer end on which a fresnel lens is disposed, the inner end of the recess having a solar cell disposed therein so that sunlight passing through the fresnel lens impinges on the solar cell for the generation of electric power together with a battery disposed within a cavity molded in the block connected by a circuit to the solar cell for storing the generated electric power for subsequent use as needed in a residence or the like. A further embodiment has attached to the interior wall a black painted duct containing vertical radiant fins. This unit contains a ''window'' through which the concentrated radiation is directed by the lens arrangement of the side walls and front lens to create a highly energetic radiant impingement upon the black duct heating it. Air flowing vertically in the duct is used for heating of interior air or removal of superheated interior air by using the force of the rising air for an '' air cooling'' effect.

  16. [Circulatory effects of stellate ganglion block in idiopathic facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Murakawa, K; Ishimoto, E; Noma, K; Ishida, K; Nishijima, M; Izumi, R

    1994-03-01

    The circulatory effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB) on the blood flow through the common carotid artery were determined in 35 patients in acute phase of idiopathic facial palsy (Bell's palsy). SGB was performed by para-tracheal approach with 8 ml of 1% mepivacaine. The blood flow was measured with an ultrasonic blood flowmeter before and 30 minutes after SGB at both sides of the common carotid artery in 20 cases. Measurement was performed continuously for 90 minutes on the palsy side in the other 15 patients. Before SGB, there were no significant differences between the blood flow of the palsy side and the intact side. Thirty minutes after SGB, the blood flow markedly increased to 169.4 +/- 6.2% on the performed side with no change on the non-performed side in 20 cases. In the other 15 patients, the blood flow increased significantly 5 minutes after SGB and reached its peak of 179.7 +/- 11.1% at 20 minutes later. This increase continued for 75 minutes after SGB. It is well known that impaired microcirculation in the facial nerve has an important role in the pathophysiology of Bell's palsy. In view of the fact that the nutrient arteries for the facial nerve are the peripheral branches of the external carotid artery, we believe that SGB which causes significant increase in the blood flow through the common carotid artery is an effective treatment in Bell's palsy.

  17. Immediate Alterations in Intestinal Oxygen Saturation and Blood Flow Following Massive Small Bowel Resection As Measured By Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Kathryn J.; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Erwin, Christopher R.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.; Warner, Brad W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Massive small bowel resection (SBR) results in villus angiogenesis and a critical adaptation response within the remnant bowel. Previous ex vivo studies of intestinal blood flow after SBR are conflicting. We sought to determine the effect of SBR on intestinal hemodynamics using photoacoustic microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, high-resolution in vivo hybrid imaging modality. Methods Photoacoustic microscopy was used to image the intestine microvascular system and measure blood flow and oxygen saturation (sO2) of the terminal mesenteric arteriole and accompanying vein in C57BL6 mice (n=7) prior to and immediately following a 50% proximal small bowel resection. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Prior to SBR, arterial and venous sO2 were similar. Immediately following SBR, the venous sO2 decreased with an increase in the oxygen extraction fraction. In addition, the arterial and venous blood flow significantly decreased. Conclusion Massive SBR results in an immediate reduction in intestinal blood flow and increase in tissue oxygen utilization. These physiologic changes are observed throughout the remnant small intestine. The contribution of these early hemodynamic alterations may contribute to the induction of villus angiogenesis and the pathogenesis of normal intestinal adaptation responses. PMID:22703784

  18. Immediate alterations in intestinal oxygen saturation and blood flow after massive small bowel resection as measured by photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Kathryn J; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Erwin, Christopher R; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wang, Lihong V; Warner, Brad W

    2012-06-01

    Massive small bowel resection (SBR) results in villus angiogenesis and a critical adaptation response within the remnant bowel. Previous ex vivo studies of intestinal blood flow after SBR are conflicting. We sought to determine the effect of SBR on intestinal hemodynamics using photoacoustic microscopy, a noninvasive, label-free, high-resolution in vivo hybrid imaging modality. Photoacoustic microscopy was used to image the intestine microvascular system and measure blood flow and oxygen saturation (So(2)) of the terminal mesenteric arteriole and accompanying vein in C57BL6 mice (n = 7) before and immediately after a 50% proximal SBR. A P value of less than .05 was considered significant. Before SBR, arterial and venous So(2) were similar. Immediately after SBR, the venous So(2) decreased with an increase in the oxygen extraction fraction. In addition, the arterial and venous blood flow significantly decreased. Massive SBR results in an immediate reduction in intestinal blood flow and increase in tissue oxygen utilization. These physiologic changes are observed throughout the remnant small intestine. The contribution of these early hemodynamic alterations may contribute to the induction of villus angiogenesis and the pathogenesis of normal intestinal adaptation responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modulating the p66shc signaling pathway with protocatechuic acid protects the intestine from ischemia-reperfusion injury and alleviates secondary liver damage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lingfei; Wang, Guangzhi; Chen, Zhao; Li, Zhenlu; Yao, Jihong; Zhao, Haidong; Wang, Shu; Ma, Zhenhai; Chang, Hong; Tian, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a serious clinical pathophysiological process that may result in acute local intestine and remote liver injury. Protocatechuic acid (PCA), which has been widely studied as a polyphenolic compound, induces expression of antioxidative genes that combat oxidative stress and cell apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of PCA pretreatment for protecting intestinal I/R-induced local intestine and remote liver injury in mice. Intestinal I/R was established by superior mesenteric artery occlusion for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 90 min. After the reperfusion period, PCA pretreatment markedly alleviated intestine and liver injury induced by intestinal I/R as indicated by histological alterations, decreases in serological damage parameters and nuclear factor-kappa B and phospho-foxo3a protein expression levels, and increases in glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, and Bcl-xL protein expression in the intestine and liver. These parameters were accompanied by PCA-induced adaptor protein p66shc suppression. These results suggest that PCA has a significant protective effect in the intestine and liver following injury induced by intestinal I/R. The protective effect of PCA may be attributed to the suppression of p66shc and the regulation of p66shc-related antioxidative and antiapoptotic factors.

  20. Postoperative internal thoracic artery spasm after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Ralf E; McNeil, Jeffrey D; van Ginkel, Margreet W; Bastos, Renata B; Baisden, Clinton E; Calhoon, John H

    2008-02-01

    Spasm of the left internal thoracic artery in the perioperative period represents a life-threatening complication after coronary artery bypass grafting. We present a case in which graft spasm was treated with the administration of intra-arterial nitroglycerin and verapamil. Although vasospasm is more often seen in radial artery grafts, this case demonstrates that left internal thoracic artery grafts are also prone to spasm.

  1. Anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinalendu; Mahindrakar, Pallavi; Das, Debasis; Behera, Sukanta Kumar; Chowdhury, Saibal Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit

    2011-08-01

    The usual presentation of anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery is severe left-sided heart failure and mitral valve insufficiency presenting during the first months of life. The manifestations of left heart failure may be masked if pulmonary artery pressure remains high. We believe this is a rarest of rare case of anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with severe mitral stenosis and pulmonary hypertension in which pulmonary hypertension, along with good collateral circulation helped to preserve left ventricular function.

  2. Schlafen 3 induction by cyclic strain regulates intestinal epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Yu, Yingjie; Sanders, Matthew A; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Basson, Marc D

    2010-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium is subjected to repetitive deformation during normal gut function by peristalsis and villous motility. In vitro, cyclic strain promotes intestinal epithelial proliferation and induces an absorptive phenotype characterized by increased dipeptidyl dipeptidase (DPPIV) expression. Schlafen 3 is a novel gene recently associated with cellular differentiation. We sought to evaluate whether Schlafen 3 mediates the effects of strain on the differentiation of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-6 in the absence or presence of cyclic strain. Strain increased Schlafen 3 mRNA and protein. In cells transfected with a control-nontargeting siRNA, strain increased DPPIV-specific activity. However, Schlafen 3 reduction by siRNA decreased basal DPPIV and prevented any stimulation of DPPIV activity by strain. Schlafen 3 reduction also prevented DPPIV induction by sodium butyrate (1 mM) or transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta (0.1 ng/ml), two unrelated differentiating stimuli. However, Schlafen-3 reduction by siRNA did not prevent the mitogenic effect of strain or that of EGF. Blocking Src and phosphatidyl inositol (PI3)-kinase prevented strain induction of Schlafen 3, but Schlafen 3 induction required activation of p38 but not ERK. These results suggest that cyclic strain induces an absorptive phenotype characterized by increased DPPIV activity via Src-, p38-, and PI3-kinase-dependent induction of Schlafen 3 in rat IEC-6 cells on collagen, whereas Schlafen 3 may also be a key factor in the induction of intestinal epithelial differentiation by other stimuli such as sodium butyrate or TGF-beta. The induction of Schlafen 3 or its human homologs may modulate intestinal epithelial differentiation and preserve the gut mucosa during normal gut function.

  3. Schlafen 3 induction by cyclic strain regulates intestinal epithelial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lisi; Yu, Yingjie; Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is subjected to repetitive deformation during normal gut function by peristalsis and villous motility. In vitro, cyclic strain promotes intestinal epithelial proliferation and induces an absorptive phenotype characterized by increased dipeptidyl dipeptidase (DPPIV) expression. Schlafen 3 is a novel gene recently associated with cellular differentiation. We sought to evaluate whether Schlafen 3 mediates the effects of strain on the differentiation of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-6 in the absence or presence of cyclic strain. Strain increased Schlafen 3 mRNA and protein. In cells transfected with a control-nontargeting siRNA, strain increased DPPIV-specific activity. However, Schlafen 3 reduction by siRNA decreased basal DPPIV and prevented any stimulation of DPPIV activity by strain. Schlafen 3 reduction also prevented DPPIV induction by sodium butyrate (1 mM) or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β (0.1 ng/ml), two unrelated differentiating stimuli. However, Schlafen-3 reduction by siRNA did not prevent the mitogenic effect of strain or that of EGF. Blocking Src and phosphatidyl inositol (PI3)-kinase prevented strain induction of Schlafen 3, but Schlafen 3 induction required activation of p38 but not ERK. These results suggest that cyclic strain induces an absorptive phenotype characterized by increased DPPIV activity via Src-, p38-, and PI3-kinase-dependent induction of Schlafen 3 in rat IEC-6 cells on collagen, whereas Schlafen 3 may also be a key factor in the induction of intestinal epithelial differentiation by other stimuli such as sodium butyrate or TGF-β. The induction of Schlafen 3 or its human homologs may modulate intestinal epithelial differentiation and preserve the gut mucosa during normal gut function. PMID:20299602

  4. Insect's intestinal organ for symbiont sorting.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Tsubasa; Takeshita, Kazutaka; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo; Koga, Ryuichi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Tago, Kanako; Hori, Tomoyuki; Hayatsu, Masahito; Asano, Kozo; Kamagata, Yoichi; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2015-09-15

    Symbiosis has significantly contributed to organismal adaptation and diversification. For establishment and maintenance of such host-symbiont associations, host organisms must have evolved mechanisms for selective incorporation, accommodation, and maintenance of their specific microbial partners. Here we report the discovery of a previously unrecognized type of animal organ for symbiont sorting. In the bean bug Riptortus pedestris, the posterior midgut is morphologically differentiated for harboring specific symbiotic bacteria of a beneficial nature. The sorting organ lies in the middle of the intestine as a constricted region, which partitions the midgut into an anterior nonsymbiotic region and a posterior symbiotic region. Oral administration of GFP-labeled Burkholderia symbionts to nymphal stinkbugs showed that the symbionts pass through the constricted region and colonize the posterior midgut. However, administration of food colorings revealed that food fluid enters neither the constricted region nor the posterior midgut, indicating selective symbiont passage at the constricted region and functional isolation of the posterior midgut for symbiosis. Coadministration of the GFP-labeled symbiont and red fluorescent protein-labeled Escherichia coli unveiled selective passage of the symbiont and blockage of E. coli at the constricted region, demonstrating the organ's ability to discriminate the specific bacterial symbiont from nonsymbiotic bacteria. Transposon mutagenesis and screening revealed that symbiont mutants in flagella-related genes fail to pass through the constricted region, highlighting that both host's control and symbiont's motility are involved in the sorting process. The blocking of food flow at the constricted region is conserved among diverse stinkbug groups, suggesting the evolutionary origin of the intestinal organ in their common ancestor.

  5. Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Hirofumi; Koike, Minoru; Takeuchi, Seiichi; Douhara, Noriyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK (robot block system) and the rational formula of robots were proposed. ROBO-BLOCK is composed of servo motors, the parts for servomotor rotor, the brackets for servomotor fixation, the board parts and the controllers. A robot can be assembled easily by ROBO-BLOCK. Meanwhile, it is convenient when the structure of the robot can be described easily as a character. The whole structure of the robot is expressed as rational formula of the robot to show molecule structure in chemistry. ROBO-BLOCK can be useful for not only the research but also the education. Creative student experiment was done in the college of industrial technology.

  6. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  7. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  8. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stroke recover most or all of their functions. Others die of the stroke itself or from complications. About half of people ... patients with extracranial carotid and vertebral artery disease: executive summary: ... American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, American Association ...

  9. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to restore blood flow: Angioplasty : In an angioplasty procedure, an interventional radiologist threads a catheter through a blood vessel to the affected artery and inflates a small balloon to reopen it. In some cases, the insertion ...

  10. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  11. Coronary artery spasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocker or a long-acting nitrate long-term. Beta-blockers are another type of medicine that is used with other coronary artery problems. However, beta-blockers may make this problem worse. They should be ...

  12. Median artery revisited

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-NIEDENFÜHR, M.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; VÁZQUEZ, T.; NEARN, L.; LOGAN, B.; PARKIN, I.

    1999-01-01

    This study confirms that the median artery may persist in adult life in 2 different patterns, palmar and antebrachial, based on their vascular territory. The palmar type, which represents the embryonic pattern, is large, long and reaches the palm. The antebrachial type, which represents a partial regression of the embryonic artery is slender, short, and terminates before reaching the wrist. These 2 arterial patterns appear with a different incidence. The palmar pattern was studied in the whole sample (120 cadavers) and had an incidence of 20%, being more frequent in females than in males (1.3∶1), occurring unilaterally more often than bilaterally (4∶1) and slightly more frequently on the right than on the left (1.1∶1). The antebrachial pattern was studied in only 79 cadavers and had an incidence of 76%, being more frequent in females than in males (1.6∶1); it was commoner unilaterally than bilaterally (1.5∶1) and was again slightly more prevalent on the right than on the left (1.2∶1). The origin of the median artery was variable in both patterns. The palmar type most frequently arose from the caudal angle between the ulnar artery and its common interosseous trunk (59%). The antebrachial pattern most frequently originated from the anterior interosseous artery (55%). Other origins, for both patterns, were from the ulnar artery or from the common interosseous trunk. The median artery in the antebrachial pattern terminated in the upper third (74%) or in the distal third of the forearm (26%). However, the palmar pattern ended as the 1st, 2nd or 1st and 2nd common digital arteries (65%) or joined the superficial palmar arch (35%). The median artery passed either anterior (67%) or posterior (25%) to the anterior interosseous nerve. It pierced the median nerve in the upper third of the forearm in 41% of cases with the palmar pattern and in none of the antebrachial cases. In 1 case the artery pierced both the anterior interosseous and median nerves. PMID

  13. Small intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1989-06-01

    The small intestine, like the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, is an intelligent organ. It generates a wide variety of motor patterns to meet motility requirements in different situations. Its basic motor function after a meal is to mix the chyme with exocrine and intestinal secretions, agitate its contents to uniformly and evenly expose them to the mucosal surface, and to propel them distally at a rate that allows optimal absorption of food components, and reabsorption of bile. Most of these functions are performed by individual phasic contractions. In humans, the phasic contractions are largely disorganized in time and space. These contractions may cause mixing and agitation of luminal contents with slow distal propulsion. Occasionally, an individual contraction of large amplitude and long duration migrates over several centimeters and may rapidly propel the contents over this distance. In general, the spatial and temporal relationships of individual phasic contractions become less organized distally, resulting in a slower propulsion rate in the distal small intestine than in the proximal small intestine. The migrating clustered contractions generated after a meal may also be propulsive, but because of their unpredictable and irregular occurrence, their precise role in postprandial propulsion is incompletely understood. Rapidly migrating contractions may occur when the electrical control activity is obliterated by pharmacologic agents or during parasitic infections. Their effects on motility are not known yet. Between meals, when digestion is complete, the small intestine generates migrating motor complexes that help keep the small intestine clean by dislodging debris from the villi and dumping them into the colon. This may prevent decay of these materials in the small intestine and limit their contribution to bacterial overgrowth. Giant migrating contractions may perform a similar function in the distal small intestine as well as return any refluxed fecal

  14. Simultaneous Kissing Stenting: A Valuable Technique for Reconstructing the Stenotic Initial Segment of the Right Subclavian Artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Chen, Daiqi; Tian, Daishi; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Minghuan; Li, Qian; Luo, Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion often involves the subclavian artery. For lesions that are close to the orifice of the right subclavian artery, stenting of the right subclavian artery itself blocks the pathway from the innominate artery to the right carotid artery and causes problems in patients with multiple angiostenosis, especially involving the right carotid system. In this study, we report 2 cases using simultaneous kissing stenting (SKS) of the right subclavian artery and the right carotid artery to relieve right subclavian stenosis and maintain right carotid system patency. Standard stenting methods were used to perform SKS. Two self-expanding stents were implanted simultaneously into the initial segment of the right subclavian artery and the right carotid artery, forming a "Y" shape, with the overlap of the proximal segments in the innominate artery ≥5 mm. After SKS, the stenosed right subclavian artery was dilated, and the patency of the right carotid system was maintained. The symptoms of patients were relieved and the stents were intact at several months of follow-up. In conclusion, SKS of the right subclavian artery and the right carotid artery might be a safe and effective procedure when the stenotic or occlusive lesion in the initial segment of the right subclavian artery is close to the orifice, and lesions (or potential ones) exist in the right carotid system.

  15. Block loss for ATM video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Sze K.; Leon-Garcia, Alberto

    1993-10-01

    In BISDN, the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) requires all information to be represented as a sequence of standard data units called cells. Cell los is inherent in ATM networks due to the cell header corruption and buffer overflow in the network. Several studies have shown that cell losses are bursty for an ATM network. In this work, we encoded real video sequences with a variable bit-rate (VBR) version of the H.261 video encoder in order for us to determine the relationship between blocks in a video frame and the number of ATM cells generated. We then considered the impact of bursty cell losses on image block loss probability. Block loss distributions are given at different codec and channel parameters. We also obtained block loss results using a cell loss correction scheme. Three sequences were analyzed to obtain the cumulative block loss probability distribution. Similar maximum and minimum block loss probability values were obtained for each sequence. The block loss probability distribution varies according to the amount and type of motion present in each sequence. We show that the block loss is confined to one group of blocks (GOB). The maximum block loss probability can be two orders of magnitude larger than the channel cell loss probability. By using the cell loss correction scheme, block loss was reduced to a level equivalent to reducing cell loss probability by five orders of magnitude.

  16. Intestinal dysfunction associated with acute thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Peschiera, J L; Beerman, S P

    1990-03-01

    The frequency of intestinal dysfunction, particularly intestinal ileus, among patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise was assessed. We reviewed the medical records of 70 patients who met specific criteria. Only four (6%) of these patients developed intestinal dysfunction, manifested by vomiting, abdominal distention, diminished bowel sounds, or an intestinal ileus documented by an abdominal roentgenogram. Conservative initial nutritional management of the patients did not reduce the incidence of intestinal dysfunction. This study suggests that patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise are not at substantial risk of intestinal dysfunction and that nasogastric suction and restriction of oral intake are unnecessary in the initial management of these patients.

  17. [Intestinal carcinoid tumour: Case report].

    PubMed

    Mussan-Chelminsky, Gil; Vidal-González, Pablo; Núñez-García, Edgar; Valencia-García, Luis César; Márquez-Ugalde, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid of the small intestine, is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor that rarely presents with clinical signs. This tumour can be associated with other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, presenting a wide range of symptoms. In some cases they have an aggressive and highly symptomatic behaviour; thus, clinical suspicion must be high to make an early diagnosis. A 60 year-old male patient with Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal symptoms attributed to this disease within the last year. He presented with intestinal obstruction initially treated with conservative management with no improvement. Exploratory laparotomy was performed finding a mesenteric tumour that caused the bowel obstruction. Bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed. The pathology report showed an intestinal carcinoid tumour with lymph node metastases. The patient recovered well, and was discharged without complications to continue medical treatment and follow-up by the Oncology department. In almost 42% of the cases, the most common site of carcinoid tumours is the small intestine, and of these, 41% are presented as locoregional disease. Patients with Crohn's disease present a higher incidence. In these cases, the most common presentation is an acute intestinal obstruction (90%). Surgery is usually curative, and follow up is important as the symptoms of Crohn's disease can hide any recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Claudin-related intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barmeyer, Christian; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2015-06-01

    With up to 200 m(2) the human intestine is the organ with the largest absorptive surface of the body. It is lined by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the host from the environment. The intestinal epithelium provides both, selective absorption of nutrients, ions, and water but also a highly effective barrier function which includes the first line of defense against environmental antigens. The paracellular part of this barrier function is provided by tight junction (TJ) proteins, especially the large family of claudins. Changes in abundance or molecular structure of claudins can generally result in three typical effects, (i) decreased absorptive passage, (ii) increased secretory passage of small solutes and water causing leak flux diarrhea and (iii) increased absorptive passage of macromolecules which may induce inflammatory processes. Several intestinal diseases are associated with such changes that can result in intestinal inflammation and symptoms like weight loss, abdominal pain or diarrhea. This review summarizes our current knowledge on barrier dysfunction and claudin dysregulation in several intestinal diseases gastroenterologists are often faced with, like inflammatory bowel disease, microscopic colitis, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gallstones and infectious diseases like HIV enteropathy, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium perfringens infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Therapeutic modulation of intestinal dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alan W; Lawley, Trevor D

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is home to an extremely numerous and diverse collection of microbes, collectively termed the "intestinal microbiota". This microbiota is considered to play a number of key roles in the maintenance of host health, including aiding digestion of otherwise indigestible dietary compounds, synthesis of vitamins and other beneficial metabolites, immune system regulation and enhanced resistance against colonisation by pathogenic microorganisms. Conversely, the intestinal microbiota is also a potent source of antigens and potentially harmful compounds. In health, humans can therefore be considered to exist in a state of natural balance with their microbial inhabitants. A shift in the balance of microbiota composition such that it may become deleterious to host health is termed "dysbiosis". Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in numerous disorders, ranging from intestinal maladies such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer to disorders with more systemic effects such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and atopy. Given the far reaching influence of the intestinal microbiota on human health a clear future goal must be to develop reliable means to alter the composition of the microbiota and restore a healthy balance of microbial species. While it is clear that much fundamental research remains to be done, potentially important therapeutic options include narrow spectrum antibiotics, novel probiotics, dietary interventions and more radical techniques such as faecal transplantation, all of which aim to suppress clinical dysbiosis, restore intestinal microbiota diversity and improve host health.

  20. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  2. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Saichua, Prasert; Nithikathkul, Choosak; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. PMID:18203280

  3. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Solís Herruzo, J A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a syndrome characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of clinical intestinal obstruction in the absence of obstructive lesions. Although this syndrome is rare, it causes a high morbidity. It is caused by a disturbance of the intestinal motility, that results in a failure of the progression of the intestinal content. Basically, the failure of the intestinal motility is a consequence of muscular disorder, neurological disorder or both. Usually, CIPO is secondary to other systemic disease; however, in the last years, many cases of primary CIPO have been described. The use of new manometric tecniques and specific histological procedures have allowed to clarify the pathogenesis of some of these entities including mitochondrial diseases and paraneoplasic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of CIPO are diverse, depending on the location and extension of the motility disorder. As the diagnosis of this disease is usually not an easy task, patients frecuently undergo unnecesary surgical interventions, are diagnosed of psyquiatric disorders, or the correct diagnosis is delayed several years after the first symptoms arise. The aims of the treatment are to maintain the nutritional condition and to improve symptoms using nutritional measures, drugs or, eventually, endoscopical or surgical procedures.

  4. Prebiotics in Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Looijer–van Langen, Mirjam A.C.; Dieleman, Levinus A.

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are nondigestible fermentable fibers that are reported to have health benefits for the host. Older as well as more recent studies show beneficial effects in experimental colitis and lately also in human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and chronic pouchitis. In this review we give an overview of the benefits of prebiotics in rodent IBD models and in IBD patients and discuss their possible protective mechanisms. Commensal intestinal bacteria induce and perpetuate chronic intestinal inflammation, whereas others are protective. However, most of the current medications are directed against the exaggerated proinflammatory immune response of the host, some of them toxic and costly. Feeding prebiotics changes the composition of the intestinal microflora toward more protective intestinal bacteria and alters systemic and mucosal immune responses of the host. Therapy for IBD targeting intestinal bacteria and their function is just emerging. Prebiotics have the promise to be relatively safe, inexpensive, and easy to administer. Unraveling their protective mechanisms will help to develop rational applications of prebiotics. However, the initial promising results with dietary prebiotics in preclinical trials as well as small studies in human IBD will need to be confirmed in large randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:18831524

  5. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  6. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine, but not by δ- and κ-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment.

  7. Internal mammary artery.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Antonio M; Weltert, Luca; Mauro, Michele Di; Actis-Dato, Guglielmo; Iacò, Angela L; Centofanti, Paolo; Torre, Michele La; Patanè, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    The internal mammary artery (IMA) has been already used in some pioneering experiences since the middle of last century but it became the graft of choice only in the 1980s, after widespread angiographic and clinical demonstration of its superiority over the saphenous vein graft (SVG). The use of both mammary arteries was then explored in order to achieve better long-term results when compared to single IMA and SVG. The IMA can be harvested pedicled or skeletonized and used as an in situ graft or as a source for composite graft (Y-graft, lengthened graft). When the bilateral internal mammary artery (BIMA) is grafted in situ, the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) is generally used for the left descending artery (LAD) and the RIMA for the right coronary artery (RCA), or for the lateral wall, usually going through the transverse sinus. In the case of Y-graft, the left coronary system is more frequently chosen as the target site of revascularization. Our experience shows that: (1) The use of IMA provides better 15-year clinical results when compared to SVG. (2) The use of BIMA in patients younger than 75 years can produce higher 10-year freedom from cardiac-related events than the single one, even in diabetic patients.

  8. A direct anatomical study of additional renal arteries in a Colombian mestizo population.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, B; Pérez, A F; Ballesteros, L E

    2008-05-01

    Traditional anatomy describes each kidney as receiving irrigation from a single renal artery. However, current literature reports great variability in renal blood supply, the number of renal arteries mentioned being the most frequently found variation. Such variation has great implications when surgery is indicated, such as in renal transplants, uroradiological procedures, renovascular hypertension, renal trauma and hydronephrosis. This article pretends to determine the frequency of additional renal arteries and their morphological expression in Colombian population in a cross-sectional study. A total of 196 of renal blocks were analysed from autopsies carried out in the Bucaramanga Institute of Forensic Medicine, Colombia; these renal blocks were processed by the injection- corrosion technique. The average age of the people being studied was 33.8 +/- 15.6 years; 85.4% of them were male and the rest female. An additional renal artery was found in 22.3% of the whole population and two additional ones were found in 2.6% of the same sample. The additional renal artery was most frequently found on the left side. The additional artery arose from the aorta's lateral aspect (52.4%); these additional arteries usually entered the renal parenchyma through the hilum. No difference was established according to gender. Nearly a third of the Colombian population presents one additional renal artery and about 3% of the same population presents two additional renal arteries. Most of them reached the kidney through its hilar region.

  9. Segmental arterial mediolysis accompanied by renal infarction and pancreatic enlargement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Due to recent advances in imaging diagnostic techniques, there are an increasing number of case reports of segmental arterial mediolysis. However, there are only a limited number of reports on segmental arterial mediolysis-related abnormalities of abdominal organs other than the intestine. This report describes a case of segmental arterial mediolysis accompanied by abnormalities of abdominal organs without clinical symptoms. Case presentation A 52-year-old Japanese man with hematuria and no prior medical history was referred to a urologist and was diagnosed as having urinary bladder cancer. He underwent trans-urethral resection of the bladder tumor and intra-vesical instillation therapy, which was followed by observation. During follow-up, although no abdominal symptoms were observed, an abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a dissection of the superior mesenteric artery. A false lumen partially occluded by a thrombus was located distal to this occlusion. The lumen was irregularly shaped with narrow and wide sections. Similar irregularities were also observed in the wall of the inferior mesenteric artery. Arterial dissection with thromboembolism in the left renal artery and renal infarction was also observed. Follow-up computed tomography after two months revealed an enlargement of the pancreatic tail adjacent to the splenic artery. Follow-up three-dimensional computed tomography showed gradual re-expansion of the true lumen of the superior mesenteric artery, improvement in arterial wall irregularities, and a reduction in the pancreas enlargement and renal infarction. Over the following 15 months, these changes gradually normalized. On the basis of the vascular changes in multiple arterial systems that resolved spontaneously, we considered that the lesions were associated with segmental arterial mediolysis. Conclusions We present a rare case of segmental arterial mediolysis accompanied by abnormalities of abdominal organs without clinical

  10. Massive intestinal infarction in young women: complication of use of oral contraceptives?

    PubMed Central

    Koh, K. S.; Danzinger, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Massive intestinal infarction due to occlusion of the celiac, superior mesenteric and inferior mesenteric arteries occurred in two young women, one of who subsequently died. Both were smokers. They had ingested oral contraceptives for 5 and 8 years, respectively, but this therapy could not be proven to be a causative factor in their ischemic bowel disease; although such an association is uncommon, it should be considered in young women with abdominal pain. Images FIG. 1 PMID:837318

  11. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  12. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  13. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  14. Baroplastic Block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewlett, Sheldon A.

    2005-03-01

    Block copolymers with rubbery and glassy components have been observed to have pressure induced miscibility. These microphase-separated materials, termed baroplastics, were able to flow and be processed at temperatures below the Tg of the glassy component by simple compression molding and extrusion. Diblock and triblock copolymers of polystyrene and poly(butyl acrylate) or poly(2-ethyl hexyl acrylate) were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and processed at room temperature into well defined transparent objects. SAXS and SANS measurements demonstrated partial mixing between components as a result of pressure during processing. DSC results also show the presence of distinct domains even after several processing cycles. Their mechanical properties after processing were tested and compared with commercial thermoplastic elastomers.

  15. Blocking the Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autzen, Martin; Kouvaris, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Some severe constraints on asymmetric dark matter are based on the scenario that certain types of weakly interacting massive particles can form mini-black holes inside neutron stars that can lead to their destruction. A crucial element for the realization of this scenario is that the black hole grows after its formation (and eventually destroys the star) instead of evaporating. The fate of the black hole is dictated by the two opposite mechanics, i.e., accretion of nuclear matter from the center of the star and Hawking radiation that tends to decrease the mass of the black hole. We study how the assumptions for the accretion rate can in fact affect the critical mass beyond which a black hole always grows. We also study to what extent degenerate nuclear matter can impede Hawking radiation due to the fact that emitted particles can be Pauli blocked at the core of the star.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation modulates the vascular responses of mesenteric arteries from human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Eduardo; Mauricio, María Dolores; Granado, Miriam; García-Villar, Oscar; Aldasoro, Martín; Vila, José María; Hidalgo, Manuel; Ferrero, Jorge Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Monge, Luis; García-Villalón, Angel Luis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  17. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Eduardo; Mauricio, María Dolores; Granado, Miriam; García-Villar, Oscar; Aldasoro, Martín; Vila, José María; Hidalgo, Manuel; Ferrero, Jorge Luis; Fernández, Nuria; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors. PMID:24324963

  18. Intestinal mycoplasma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roediger, W E W

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal diversion with reconnection in active Crohn's disease (CD) indicates that luminal contents or bacteria contribute to the formation of CD lesions. Fluorescent staining for mycoplasma in freshly resected Crohn's tissue and electron microscopy reveal intracellular organisms akin to mycoplasma. Historically, tissue culture of CD has shown mycoplasma described as contaminants. Mycoplasma are surface epithelial parasites requiring exogenous cholesterol for membrane stability and cell entry. PCR of intestinal tissue has shown Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be detectable more significantly in CD. Oral M. iowae in experimental poultry localizes to the distal small bowel and colon. Hypothetically, lipopeptides of mycoplasmal membranes are proposed to cause chronicity and stronger immune responses than by other bacteria. 'Intestinal' mycoplasmas, from a number of observations, deserve consideration as organisms mediating inflammation of acute and chronic CD.

  19. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  20. [Intestinal cystic duplication. Case report].

    PubMed

    Herranz Barbero, Ana; Prat Ortells, Jordi; Muñoz Fernández, M Elena; Castañón García-Alix, Montserrat; Figueras Aloy, Josep

    2017-08-01

    Intestinal cystic duplications are rare congenital anomalies, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1:4500 autopsies. The etiopathogenesis is uncertain. These duplications are cystic, tubular or diverticular structures lined with gastrointestinal mucosa. They share a common smooth muscle wall with the gastrointestinal tract but usually their lumens do not communicate with each other. Gastric duplication cysts represent 7-9% of the gastrointestinal tract duplication. They can be diagnosed prenatally by fetal ultrasound; magnetic resonance imaging characterizes the cyst and excludes other malformations. Postnatal ultrasound shows a characteristic double walled cyst. Newborns are usually asymptomatic, although nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, intestinal obstruction due to mass effect, volvulus or infection are described. In asymptomatic patients, clinical follow-up and periodic image controls are recommended. Elective surgical resection is the treatment of choice, using minimally invasive technique whenever possible. A case of prenatally suspected intestinal cystic duplication is presented. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  1. Arterial stump pressure: a determinant of arterial patency?

    PubMed

    Nunley, J A; Goldner, R D; Koman, L A; Gelberman, R; Urbaniak, J R

    1987-03-01

    Twenty-seven patients with acute injuries to the radial or ulnar arteries had arterial repairs using microvascular techniques. No patient had an ischemic hand secondary to his arterial injury. The overall patency rate for all repaired vessels was 56%. For sharp, clean lacerations, the success rate for repairs was 55%. Repairs of acute, sharp lacerations yielded no better results than delayed reconstructions. The average distal end arterial stump pressure for patent arteries was 66% of mean, while for thrombosed vessels it was 76% of mean; this was not a statistically significant difference (p = 0.9). There was no statistical correlation between forearm arterial patency, age, sex, vessel injured, mechanism of injury, time of repair, or clinically measured distal arterial stump pressure. At the present time, it does not appear to be possible to predict arterial patency by measuring arterial stump pressure at the time of definitive repair.

  2. Evolution of complete arterial grafting. For coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, B F; Fuller, J A; Tatoulis, J

    1998-01-01

    Arterial grafting for the correction of coronary artery disease preceded the use of saphenous vein grafts, but the overwhelming popularity of the saphenous vein from 1970 to 1985 left the development of arterial grafting dormant. Excellent graft patency results from pedicled internal thoracic artery grafting and continued saphenous vein graft failure prompted our unit to explore complete arterial grafting with internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts. One thousand and fifty-three patients who received a combination of internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts were compared with 1,156 patients who received internal thoracic artery and saphenous vein grafts. All patients underwent primary coronary artery bypass surgery between 1995 and 1998. The early mortality and morbidity and the probability of survival at 2 years were similar in both groups of patients. Early graft patency studies of 35 radial artery grafts showed 33 (94%) were patent at a mean of 12 months. Complete arterial grafting using internal thoracic and radial arteries is safe and may provide a long-term benefit. Images PMID:9566058

  3. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  4. The surgical treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia: results of a recent series.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Papaspiropoulos, V; Mancini, P; Ceccanei, G

    2004-04-01

    Due to the rarity of the condition, large and prospective series defining the optimal method of digestive arteries revascularization, for the treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia, are lacking. The aim of this consecutive sample clinical study was to test the hypothesis that flexible application of different revascularization methods, according to individual cases, will yield the best results in the management of chronic intestinal ischemia. Eleven patients, of a mean age of 56 years, underwent revascularization of 11 digestive arteries for symptomatic chronic mesenteric occlusive disease. Eleven superior mesenteric arteries and one celiac axis were revascularized. The revascularization techniques included retrograde bypass grafting in 7 cases, antegrade bypass grafting in 2, percutaneous arterial angioplasty in 1, and arterial reimplantation in one case. The donor axis for either reimplantation or bypass grafting was the infrarenal aorta in 4 cases, an infrarenal Dacron graft in 4, and the celiac aorta in one case. Grafting materials included 5 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and 3 Dacron grafts. Concomitant procedures included 3 aorto-ilio-femoral grafts and one renal artery revascularization. Mean follow-up duration was 31 months. There was no operative mortality. Cumulative survival rate was 88.9% at 36 months (SE 12.1%). Primary patency rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). The symptom free rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). Direct reimplantation, antegrade and retrograde bypass grafting, all allow good mid-term results: the choice of the optimal method depends on the anatomic and general patient's status. Associated infrarenal and renal arterial lesions can be safely treated in the same time of digestive revascularization. Angioplasty alone yields poor results and should be limited to patients at poor risk for surgery.

  5. Cryoplasty for peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, James E; Andras, Alina; Stansby, Gerard

    2013-08-11

    Percutaneous balloon angioplasty is an endovascular technique for restoring blood flow through an artery that has become narrowed or blocked by atherosclerosis. Narrowing of the artery following angioplasty (restenosis) is the major cause of long-term failure. Cryoplasty offers a different approach to improving long-term angioplasty results. It combines the dilation force of balloon angioplasty with cooling of the vessel wall. This systematic review evaluated cryoplasty in peripheral arterial disease and provides focus for further research in the field. This is an update of a review first published in 2007. To assess the efficacy of, and complications associated with, cryoplasty for maintaining patency in the iliac, femoropopliteal and crural arteries in the short and medium term. For this update the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (last searched October 2012) and CENTRAL (2012, Issue 10). Trial databases were searched for ongoing or unpublished studies. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised controlled trials in which participants with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower limbs, or lower limb bypass graft stenoses, were randomised to cryoplasty with or without another procedure versus a procedure without cryoplasty were considered. This included trials where all participants received angioplasty and the randomisation was for cryoplasty versus no cryoplasty and trials where cryoplasty was used as an adjunct to conventional treatment (for example stenting) against a control. Two review authors independently reviewed, assessed and selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Seven trials (six primary cryoplasty and one adjunctive cryoplasty trial) with a combined total of 478 patients were included in this review. The trials reported patency and restenosis either by participant, lesion or vessel location. Follow-up ranged from 30 days to

  6. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  7. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  8. Postischemic intestinal motility in rat is inversely correlated to length of ischemia. An in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Udassin, R; Eimerl, D; Schiffman, J; Haskel, Y

    1995-05-01

    An inverse correlation between postischemic gastrointestinal motility and the length of intestinal ischemia was found in an animal model. Intestinal ischemia was caused without concurrent laparotomy and for a predetermined time period (ischemia time) by pulling on an external nylon thread that was threaded through a double-lumen catheter. This catheter was passed into the abdominal cavity to encircle the superior mesenteric artery. Gastrointestinal motility was determined by the introduction of a color-marked meal into the animal's stomach and the measurement of the proportionate length of the small bowel filled with it (transit index). This simple and reliable animal model can also be used for the evaluation of techniques and pharmacological manipulations aimed at modulation of the effects of intestinal ischemia on intestinal motility and its consequences.

  9. Regulation of intestinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Matheson, P J; Wilson, M A; Garrison, R N

    2000-09-01

    The gastrointestinal system anatomically is positioned to perform two distinct functions: to digest and absorb ingested nutrients and to sustain barrier function to prevent transepithelial migration of bacteria and antigens. Alterations in these basic functions contribute to a variety of clinical scenarios. These primary functions intrinsically require splanchnic blood flow at both the macrovascular and microvascular levels of perfusion. Therefore, a greater understanding of the mechanisms that regulate intestinal vascular perfusion in the normal state and during pathophysiological conditions would be beneficial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding regarding the regulatory mechanisms of intestinal blood flow in fasted and fed conditions and during pathological stress.

  10. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  11. Bronchopulmonary arterial anastomosis at the precapillary level in human lung. Visualization using CT angiography compared with microangiography of autopsied lung.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, I; Kobayashi, K; Kohda, E; Hiramatsu, K

    1999-11-01

    To investigate the interrelationships between the bronchial and pulmonary circulations including the existence of precapillary bronchopulmonary arterial anastomoses. CT of bronchial arteriography (BAG-CT) was performed in 10 patients and BAG-CT during a pulmonary artery block test (PA-block) in 5 patients with lung cancer. Bronchial and pulmonary circulations were evaluated in 5 autopsied normal lungs by injecting silicone rubber with different colors into the bronchial and pulmonary arteries. BAG-CT correlated well with the findings at silicone rubber injection into lung autopsy samples. BAG-CT demonstrated inflow of contrast medium into the pulmonary artery during PA-block in all cases, while no inflow was observed before and following reversal of PA-block. Mixed silicone rubber was observed in the lobar to subsubsegmental bronchial arteries in all cases and in the subsubsegmental pulmonary artery in one case. Precapillary bronchopulmonary arterial anastomoses may exist at the level of the lobar bronchi to the periphery. If either the pulmonary or bronchial circulation is disturbed, flow occurs inside the anastomoses to supplement the other flow, especially flow from the bronchial to the pulmonary arteries via the anastomoses, which occurs within 30 min.

  12. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  13. Surgery Averted Using a Novel, Minimally Invasive Approach to Treat Very Severe Radial Artery Spasm.

    PubMed

    Cochet, Anthony A; Bellin, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old male admitted with a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction was referred for invasive angiographic assessment. Based on preprocedural assessment, the right radial artery approach was selected. Despite possessing none of the consensus risk factors for radial artery spasm, in addition to receiving standard arterial spasm prophylaxis and conscious sedation, the patient suffered very severe radial artery spasm with initial catheter placement, resulting in entrapment of a 5 Fr pigtail catheter within the left ventricle. After exhausting traditional methods for resolution of radial artery spasm, surgical intervention appeared to be the only remaining option for removal of the entrapped catheter. Prior to committing to surgery, use of an axillary nerve block to hinder sympathetic vascular tone was suggested and attempted. This intervention resulted in atraumatic catheter removal. We present a case of very severe radial artery spasm refractory to customary interventions, alleviated with a novel, minimally invasive technique, which spared surgical intervention.

  14. [Branches of the perforating portions of the internal carotid arteries and their commissural anastomoses].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V E

    1984-01-01

    By means of injection methods allowing microscopic preparation of vessels 0.015 mm and less in diameter the author examined 25 block-specimens of the base of the skull which contained the left and right cavernous parts of the internal carotid arteries and structures adjacent to them. The specimens were obtained in cases in which death was caused by the disease not associated with pathological conditions of the central nervous system. Arteries arising from the cavernous part of the internal carotid artery are described. The author determined the existence of a system of permanent commissural anastomoses between the cavernous parts of the left and right internal carotid arteries which is formed by the branches of the dorsal meningeal, inferior hypophyseal, and capsular arteries (McConnell arteries). The importance of the system in the diagnosis and treatment of pathological processes of parasinus and parasellar localization, particularly arteriosinus malformations of this region, is pointed out.

  15. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  16. Paracervical Block Anesthesia in Labour

    PubMed Central

    Van Praagh, Ian G. L.; Povey, W. G.

    1966-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of paracervical block anesthesia were studied in 153 patients in the first stage of labour. Transient decrease in uterine activity was noted in 77 patients. There was no acceleration in cervical dilatation following the block. The duration of action of the block in 80 primiparas was 31 to 120 minutes in 69, and over 120 minutes in five. In the 73 multiparas, 53 of the blocks lasted 31 to 90 minutes, eight from 90 to 120 minutes, and two over 120 minutes. The results were good in 66 primiparas and 54 multiparas. The blocks failed in four primiparas and six multiparas. Twenty-six infants had low Apgar scores, but in none could this be related to the paracervical block. There were no significant fetal or maternal complications. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5903165

  17. Needleless transcutaneous electroacupuncture improves rectal distension-induced impairment in intestinal motility and slow waves via vagal mechanisms in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to compare the effects and mechanisms of transcutaneous electroacupuncture (TEA) on rectal distention (RD)-induced intestinal dysmotility with EA. Methods: six female dogs chronically implanted with a duodenal fistula, a proximal colon fistula and intestinal serosal electrodes were studied. EA and TEA were performed via needles and cutaneous electrodes placed at bilateral ST-36 (Zusanli) acupoints respectively; their effects on postprandial intestinal dysmotility (slow waves, contractions and transit) induced by RD, and autonomic functions were compared. Results: RD at a volume of 140 ml suppressed intestinal contractions; the motility index was reduced with RD (P = 0.001). Both EA and TEA ameliorated the suppressed contractions (P = 0.003 and 0.001) and their effects were comparable. RD reduced the percentage of normal intestinal slow waves (P = 0.002) that was increased with both EA and TEA (P = 0.005 and 0.035). No significant difference was noted between EA and TEA. EA and TEA reduced small bowel transit time (P = 0.001 and 0.007); these prokinetic effects were blocked by atropine. Both EA and TEA increased vagal activity assessed by the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (both P = 0.03). Conclusion: RD inhibits postprandial intestinal motility. Both EA and TEA at ST-36 are able to improve the RD-induced impairment in intestinal contractions, transit and slow waves mediated via the vagal mechanism. Needleless TEA is as effective as EA in ameliorating the intestinal hypomotility. PMID:26064396

  18. Lipopolysaccharide impairs endothelial nitric oxide synthesis in rat renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Piepot, H A; Boer, C; Groeneveld, A B; Van Lambalgen, A A; Sipkema, P

    2000-06-01

    Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to hypoperfusion and failure of abdominal organs, including the kidneys during endotoxin or septic shock. In this study, the short-term (2 h) effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rat renal and superior mesenteric arteries were documented. Rat renal and mesenteric arteries were dissected and exposed in vitro to LPS for two hours. The effects of LPS on vascular reactivity were determined and compared with time-matched controls. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release was determined using an NO microsensor in adjacent vessel segments. LPS impaired maximal acetylcholine (ACh)-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in renal arteries (62.5 +/- 8.8% vs. 34.4 +/- 7.5% in controls and LPS-exposed arteries), but not in mesenteric arteries. LPS did not alter the sensitivity of renal arteries to exogenous NO. ACh-dependent vasodilation was abolished after blocking NO synthesis with 10-4 mol/L L-NA in control and LPS-incubated renal arteries. When compared with controls, NO release induced by ACh and the receptor-independent calcium ionophore A23187 was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in LPS-exposed renal segments and was fully abolished in endothelium-denuded segments, indicating that LPS attenuated receptor-dependent as well as receptor-independent endothelial NO release. In contrast, ACh- and A23187-induced NO release was normal in LPS-exposed mesenteric arteries. These results indicate that LPS-induced selective impairment of ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat renal arteries is caused by decreased endothelial NO release. This may contribute to the propensity for acute renal failure during septic shock.

  19. Human Enteroids/Colonoids and Intestinal Organoids Functionally Recapitulate Normal Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Blutt, Sarah E; de Jonge, Hugo R; Estes, Mary K; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-02-19

    Identification of Lgr5 as the intestinal stem cell marker as well as the growth factors necessary to replicate adult intestinal stem cell division has led to the establishment of the methods to generate "indefinite" ex vivo primary intestinal epithelial cultures, termed "mini-intestines." Primary cultures developed from isolated intestinal crypts or stem cells (termed enteroids/colonoids) and from inducible pluripotent stem cells (termed intestinal organoids) are being applied to study human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology with great expectations for translational applications, including regenerative medicine. Here we discuss the physiologic properties of these cultures, their current use in understanding diarrhea-causing host-pathogen interactions, and potential future applications.

  20. Augmented cholesterol absorption and sarcolemmal sterol enrichment slow small intestinal transit in mice, contributing to cholesterol cholelithogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meimin; Kotecha, Vijay R; Andrade, Jon David P; Fox, James G; Carey, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol gallstones are associated with slow intestinal transit in humans as well as in animal models, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We investigated in C57L/J mice whether the components of a lithogenic diet (LD; 1.0% cholesterol, 0.5% cholic acid and 17% triglycerides), as well as distal intestinal infection with Helicobacter hepaticus, influence small intestinal transit time. By quantifying the distribution of 3H-sitostanol along the length of the small intestine following intraduodenal instillation, we observed that, in both sexes, the geometric centre (dimensionless) was retarded significantly (P < 0.05) by LD but not slowed further by helicobacter infection (males, 9.4 ± 0.5 (uninfected), 9.6 ± 0.5 (infected) on LD compared with 12.5 ± 0.4 and 11.4 ± 0.5 on chow). The effect of the LD was reproduced only by the binary combination of cholesterol and cholic acid. We inferred that the LD-induced cholesterol enrichment of the sarcolemmae of intestinal smooth muscle cells produced hypomotility from signal-transduction decoupling of cholecystokinin (CCK), a physiological agonist for small intestinal propulsion in mice. Treatment with ezetimibe in an amount sufficient to block intestinal cholesterol absorption caused small intestinal transit time to return to normal. In most cholesterol gallstone-prone humans, lithogenic bile carries large quantities of hepatic cholesterol into the upper small intestine continuously, thereby reproducing this dietary effect in mice. Intestinal hypomotility promotes cholelithogenesis by augmenting formation of deoxycholate, a pro-lithogenic secondary bile salt, and increasing the fraction of intestinal cholesterol absorbed. PMID:22331417

  1. LXR driven induction of HDL-cholesterol is independent of intestinal cholesterol absorption and ABCA1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kannisto, Kristina; Gåfvels, Mats; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Slätis, Katharina; Hu, Xiaoli; Jorns, Carl; Steffensen, Knut R; Eggertsen, Gösta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether: (1) liver X receptor (LXR)-driven induction of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and other LXR-mediated effects on cholesterol metabolism depend on intestinal cholesterol absorption; and (2) combined treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 and the cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe results in synergistic effects on cholesterol metabolism that could be beneficial for treatment of atherosclerosis. Mice were fed 0.2 % cholesterol and treated with GW3965+ezetimibe, GW3965 or ezetimibe. GW3965+ezetimibe treatment elevated serum HDL-C and Apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, effectively reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased the excretion of faecal neutral sterols. No changes in intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1 or ABCG5 protein expression were observed, despite increased mRNA expression, while hepatic ABCA1 was slightly reduced. The combined treatment caused a pronounced down-regulation of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and reduced hepatic and intestinal cholesterol levels. GW3965 did not affect the intestinal cholesterol absorption, but increased serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels. GW3965 also increased Apoa1 mRNA levels in primary mouse hepatocytes and HEPA1-6 cells. Ezetimibe reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption, ABCA1 and ABCG5, but did not affect the serum HDL-C or ApoAI levels. Thus, the LXR-driven induction of HDL-C and ApoAI was independent of the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased expression of intestinal or hepatic ABCA1 was not required. Inhibited influx of cholesterol via NPC1L1 and/or low levels of intracellular cholesterol prevented post-transcriptional expression of intestinal ABCA1 and ABCG5, despite increased mRNA levels. Combined LXR activation and blocked intestinal cholesterol absorption induced effective faecal elimination of cholesterol.

  2. Intestinal disaccharidase activities in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Siddons, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Disaccharidase activities of the small and large intestines of the chick were studied. 2. Homogenates of the small intestine readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose and palatinose (6-O-α-d-glucopyranosyl-d-fructose), hydrolysed lactose slowly and did not hydrolyse trehalose and cellobiose. 3. Within the small intestine the disaccharidases were located mainly in the intestinal wall; the activity in the contents accounted for less than 5% of the total activity. 4. The disaccharidases were non-uniformly distributed along the small intestine, the activities being greatest in the middle section. 5. The disaccharidase activities increased with age between 1 and 43 days. 6. Homogenates of the large intestine and contents readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose, palatinose and lactose and hydrolysed cellobiose and trehalose slowly. 7. The large-intestinal disaccharidases were located mainly in the contents. 8. Similar Km and pH optimum values were found for the maltase, sucrase and palatinase activities of the large and small intestines. 9. The lactase activity of the large intestine was markedly affected by diet and had different Km and pH values from the small intestinal lactase. 10. Low activities of intestinal disaccharidase were found in 12-day-old embryos and marked increases in the intestinal disaccharidases of the developing embryo occurred 2–3 days before hatching. PMID:5774506

  3. Reliability computation from reliability block diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.; Eckstein, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Computer program computes system reliability for very general class of reliability block diagrams. Four factors are considered in calculating probability of system success: active block redundancy, standby block redundancy, partial redundancy, and presence of equivalent blocks in the diagram.

  4. Ischemic post-conditioning to counteract intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yan-Fang; Pritts, Timothy A; Montrose, Marshall H

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a severe disorder with a variety of causes. Reperfusion is a common occurrence during treatment of acute intestinal ischemia but the injury resulting from ischemia/reperfusion (IR) may lead to even more serious complications from intestinal atrophy to multiple organ failure and death. The susceptibility of the intestine to IR-induced injury (IRI) appears from various experimental studies and clinical settings such as cardiac and major vascular surgery and organ transplantation. Whereas oxygen free radicals, activation of leukocytes, failure of microvascular perfusion, cellular acidosis and disturbance of intracellular homeostasis have been implicated as important factors in the pathogenesis of intestinal IRI, the mechanisms underlying this disorder are not well known. To date, increasing attention is being paid in animal studies to potential pre- and post-ischemia treatments that protect against intestinal IRI such as drug interference with IR-induced apoptosis and inflammation processes and ischemic pre-conditioning. However, better insight is needed into the molecular and cellular events associated with reperfusion-induced damage to develop effective clinical protection protocols to combat this disorder. In this respect, the use of ischemic post-conditioning in combination with experimentally prolonged acidosis blocking deleterious reperfusion actions may turn out to have particular clinical relevance. PMID:21607154

  5. Coronary artery imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery problems in children usually have a significant impact on both short-term and long-term outcomes. Early and accurate diagnosis, therefore, is crucial but technically challenging due to the small size of the coronary artery, high heart rates, and limited cooperation of children. Coronary artery visibility on CT and MRI in children is considerably improved with recent technical advancements. Consequently, CT and MRI are increasingly used for evaluating various congenital and acquired coronary artery abnormalities in children, such as coronary artery anomalies, aberrant coronary artery anatomy specific to congenital heart disease, Kawasaki disease, Williams syndrome, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

  6. Coronary Artery Imaging in Children

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery problems in children usually have a significant impact on both short-term and long-term outcomes. Early and accurate diagnosis, therefore, is crucial but technically challenging due to the small size of the coronary artery, high heart rates, and limited cooperation of children. Coronary artery visibility on CT and MRI in children is considerably improved with recent technical advancements. Consequently, CT and MRI are increasingly used for evaluating various congenital and acquired coronary artery abnormalities in children, such as coronary artery anomalies, aberrant coronary artery anatomy specific to congenital heart disease, Kawasaki disease, Williams syndrome, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:25741188

  7. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Mayda, Aslan; Karcı, Tolga; Aycan, Hakan; Kobak, Şenol

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome) but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases. PMID:25276455

  8. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  9. Intestinal fistula after magnets ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maurício; Velhote, Manoel Carlos Prieto; Maschietto, Rafael Forti; Waksman, Renata Dejtiar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accidental ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies has become more common due to increased availability of objects and toys with magnetic elements. The majority of them traverse the gastrointestinal system spontaneously without complication. However, ingestion of multiple magnets may require surgical resolution. The case of an 18-month girl who developed an intestinal fistula after ingestion of two magnets is reported. PMID:23843068

  10. Glutamine and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Guoyao; Zhou, Zhigang; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Yuli; Ji, Yun; Li, Wei; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Han, Feng; Wu, Zhenlong

    2015-10-01

    The intestinal barrier integrity is essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Dysfunction of the mucosal barrier is associated with increased gut permeability and development of multiple gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies highlighted a critical role for glutamine, which had been traditionally considered as a nutritionally non-essential amino acid, in activating the mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling in enterocytes. In addition, glutamine has been reported to enhance intestinal and whole-body growth, to promote enterocyte proliferation and survival, and to regulate intestinal barrier function in injury, infection, weaning stress, and other catabolic conditions. Mechanistically, these effects were mediated by maintaining the intracellular redox status and regulating expression of genes associated with various signaling pathways. Furthermore, glutamine stimulates growth of the small intestinal mucosa in young animals and also enhances ion transport by the gut in neonates and adults. Growing evidence supports the notion that glutamine is a nutritionally essential amino acid for neonates and a conditionally essential amino acid for adults. Thus, as a functional amino acid with multiple key physiological roles, glutamine holds great promise in protecting the gut from atrophy and injury under various stress conditions in mammals and other animals.

  11. Environmental contaminants and intestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, John G.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental contaminants which have their major effects on the small intestine may be classified into five major categories: (1) bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents, (2) food and plant substances, (3) environmental and industrial products, (4) pharmaceutical agents, and (5) toxic agents whose metabolic effects are dependent on interreaction with intestinal bacterial flora, other physical agents (detergents), human intestinal enzyme deficiency states, and the nutritional state of the host. Bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents are the most important of all such agents, being responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in association with diarrheal diseases of adults and children. Several plant substances ingested as foods have unique effects on the small bowel as well as from contaminants such as fungi on poorly preserved grains and cereals. Environmental and industrial products, in spite of their widespread prevalence in industrial societies as contaminants, are less important unless unexpectedly intense exposure occurs to the intestinal tract. Pharmaceutical agents of several types interreact with the small bowel mucosa causing impairment of transport processes for fluid and electrolytes, amino acid, lipid and sugars as well as vitamins. These interreactions may be dependent on bacterial metabolic activity, association with detergents, mucosal enzyme deficiency state (disaccharidases), and the state of nutrition of the subject. PMID:540611

  12. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  13. Intestinal surgery of adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Ewoldt, Jennifer M Ivany

    2005-03-01

    Surgical disorders of the gastrointestinal tract of cattle occur occasionally, and veterinarians are challenged to determine an accurate diagnosis and treatment for these conditions. Although surgical diseases most commonly occur in the forestomachs (dislocated abomasum, reticuloperitonitis) and the colons (cecal dilation), this article focuses n lesions in the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum).

  14. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Amiot, Aurélien; Coffin, Benoît; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Messing, Bernard; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disease characterized by episodes resembling mechanical obstruction in the absence of organic, systemic, or metabolic disorders. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary (40%) or secondary (60%) causes. The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal pain and constipation or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually present many years before CIPO diagnosis. They can lead to severe electrolyte disorders and malnutrition. Principles for management of patients with CIPO are: to establish a correct clinical diagnosis in excluding mechanical obstruction; to perform a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the gastrointestinal tract involved; to look for extra-intestinal manifestations, especially for myopathy and neuropathy; to discuss in some cases a surgery for full-thickness intestinal biopsies, and/or a neuromuscular biopsy in case of mitochondrial cytopathy suspicion. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. Treatment of CIPO includes prokinetic agents which may help to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms Courses of antibiotics may be needed in patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth. When necessary, enteral nutrition is preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Intestinal transplantation can be discussed in selected patients.

  15. 31 CFR 593.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 593.301 Section 593.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR...

  16. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  19. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  1. Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the west to the east. This photograph reveals the alignment of trees within the central path of the park. In addition, this photograph exposes broken bricks aligning tree beds - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  2. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 586.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 586.301 Section 586.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF...

  8. 31 CFR 587.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 587.301 Section 587.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF...

  9. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  10. 31 CFR 543.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 543.302 Section 543.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CôTE D'IVOIRE SANCTIONS...

  11. 31 CFR 558.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 558.301 Section 558.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOUTH SUDAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  15. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  16. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 545.301 Section 545.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  17. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  18. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  19. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  20. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...