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Sample records for blood cells implications

  1. Cell cycle status in AML blast cells from peripheral blood, bone marrow aspirates and trephines and implications for biological studies and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Rob S; Fraser, Laura; Khwaja, Asim; Gale, Rosemary E; Marafioti, Teresa; Akarca, Ayse; Hubank, Mike; Brooks, Tony; Stoeber, Kai; Williams, Gareth; Linch, David C

    2016-07-01

    Using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry to define phases of the cell cycle, this study shows that a high proportion of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts obtained from trephine biopsies are cycling, whereas >95% of peripheral blood-derived blasts are arrested in G1 . Results obtained from bone marrow aspirates are more similar to those from blood rather than from trephine biopsies. These differences were confirmed by gene expression profiling in a patient with high count AML. This has implications for cell cycle and other biological studies using aspirates rather than trephine biopsies and for the use of cell mobilising agents before chemotherapy. PMID:27061724

  2. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  3. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  4. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures.

  5. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zenil-Ferguson, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures. PMID:24765580

  6. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  7. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  8. Quantitative peripheral blood perturbations of γδ T cells in human disease and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bank, Ilan; Marcu-Malina, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    Human γδ T cells, which play innate and adaptive, protective as well as destructive, roles in the immune response, were discovered in 1986, but the clinical significance of alterations of the levels of these cells in the peripheral blood in human diseases has not been comprehensively reviewed. Here, we review patterns of easily measurable changes of this subset of T cells in peripheral blood from relevant publications in PubMed and their correlations with specific disease categories, specific diagnoses within disease categories, and prognostic outcomes. These collective data suggest that enumeration of γδ T cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood of patients could be a useful tool to evaluate diagnosis and prognosis in the clinical setting.

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy activation in blood mononuclear cells of fibromyalgia patients: implications in the pathogenesis of the disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. However, it is still not clear whether oxidative stress is the cause or the effect of the abnormalities documented in fibromyalgia. Furthermore, the role of mitochondria in the redox imbalance reported in fibromyalgia also is controversial. We undertook this study to investigate the role of mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and mitophagy in fibromyalgia. Methods We studied 20 patients (2 male, 18 female patients) from the database of the Sevillian Fibromyalgia Association and 10 healthy controls. We evaluated mitochondrial function in blood mononuclear cells from fibromyalgia patients measuring, coenzyme Q10 levels with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and mitochondrial membrane potential with flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring mitochondrial superoxide production with MitoSOX™ and lipid peroxidation in blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Autophagy activation was evaluated by quantifying the fluorescence intensity of LysoTracker™ Red staining of blood mononuclear cells. Mitophagy was confirmed by measuring citrate synthase activity and electron microscopy examination of blood mononuclear cells. Results We found reduced levels of coenzyme Q10, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased levels of mitochondrial superoxide in blood mononuclear cells, and increased levels of lipid peroxidation in both blood mononuclear cells and plasma from fibromyalgia patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was also associated with increased expression of autophagic genes and the elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria with mitophagy. Conclusions These findings may support the role of oxidative stress and mitophagy in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia. PMID:20109177

  10. Post-thaw viability of cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) does not guarantee functional activity: important implications for quality assurance of stem cell transplant programmes.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; Ahsan, Gulrukh; Brocklesby, Margaret; Ings, Stuart; Balsa, Carmen; Veys, Paul; Brock, Penelope; Anderson, John; Amrolia, Persis; Goulden, Nicholas; Cale, Catherine M; Watts, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Standard quality assurance (QA) of cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) uses post-thaw viable CD34(+) cell counts. In 2013, concerns arose at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) about 8 patients with delayed engraftment following myeloablative chemotherapy with cryopreserved cell rescue, despite adequate post-thaw viable cell counts in all cases. Root cause analysis was undertaken; investigations suggested the freeze process itself was a contributing factor to suboptimal engraftment. Experiments were undertaken in which a single PBSC product was divided into three and cryopreserved in parallel using a control-rate freezer (CRF) or passive freezing method (-80°C freezer) at GOSH, or the same passive freezing at another laboratory. Viable CD34(+) counts were equivalent and adequate in each. Granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming unit assays demonstrated colonies from the products cryopreserved using passive freezing (both laboratories), but no colonies from products cryopreserved using the CRF. The CRF was shown to be operating within manufacturer's specifications with freeze-profile within acceptable limits. This experience has important implications for quality assurance for all transplant programmes, particularly those using cryopreserved products. The failure of post-thaw viable CD34(+) counts, the most widely used routine QA test available, to ensure PBSC function is of great concern and should prompt reassessment of protocols and QA procedures. PMID:27291859

  11. Post-thaw viability of cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) does not guarantee functional activity: important implications for quality assurance of stem cell transplant programmes.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; Ahsan, Gulrukh; Brocklesby, Margaret; Ings, Stuart; Balsa, Carmen; Veys, Paul; Brock, Penelope; Anderson, John; Amrolia, Persis; Goulden, Nicholas; Cale, Catherine M; Watts, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Standard quality assurance (QA) of cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) uses post-thaw viable CD34(+) cell counts. In 2013, concerns arose at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) about 8 patients with delayed engraftment following myeloablative chemotherapy with cryopreserved cell rescue, despite adequate post-thaw viable cell counts in all cases. Root cause analysis was undertaken; investigations suggested the freeze process itself was a contributing factor to suboptimal engraftment. Experiments were undertaken in which a single PBSC product was divided into three and cryopreserved in parallel using a control-rate freezer (CRF) or passive freezing method (-80°C freezer) at GOSH, or the same passive freezing at another laboratory. Viable CD34(+) counts were equivalent and adequate in each. Granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming unit assays demonstrated colonies from the products cryopreserved using passive freezing (both laboratories), but no colonies from products cryopreserved using the CRF. The CRF was shown to be operating within manufacturer's specifications with freeze-profile within acceptable limits. This experience has important implications for quality assurance for all transplant programmes, particularly those using cryopreserved products. The failure of post-thaw viable CD34(+) counts, the most widely used routine QA test available, to ensure PBSC function is of great concern and should prompt reassessment of protocols and QA procedures.

  12. Storing Blood Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute worked with Goddard Space Flight Center to propose a solution to the blood-cell freezing problem. White blood cells and bone marrow are stored for future use by leukemia patients as a result of Goddard and Jet Propulsion Laboratory expertise in electronics and cryogenics. White blood cell and bone marrow bank established using freezing unit. Freezing unit monitors temperature of cells themselves. Thermocouple placed against polyethylene container relays temperature signals to an electronic system which controls small heaters located outside container. Heaters allow liquid nitrogen to circulate at constant temperature and maintain consistent freezing rate. Ability to freeze, store, and thaw white cells and bone marrow without damage is important in leukemia treatment.

  13. Blood cell generation from the hemangioblast.

    PubMed

    Lancrin, Christophe; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Serrano, Alicia G; Gandillet, Arnaud; Ferreras, Cristina; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2010-02-01

    Understanding how blood cells are generated is important from a biological perspective but also has potential implications in the treatment of blood diseases. Such knowledge could potentially lead to defining new conditions to amplify hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or could translate into new methods to produce HSCs, or other types of blood cells, from human embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. Additionally, as most key transcription factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding their function during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of blood development from the earliest hematopoietic precursor, the hemangioblast, a precursor for both endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages.

  14. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  15. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  16. High-dose mitoxantrone with peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue: toxicity, pharmacokinetics and implications for dosage and schedule.

    PubMed Central

    Ballestrero, A.; Ferrando, F.; Garuti, A.; Basta, P.; Gonella, R.; Esposito, M.; Vannozzi, M. O.; Sorice, G.; Friedman, D.; Puglisi, M.; Brema, F.; Mela, G. S.; Sessarego, M.; Patrone, F.

    1997-01-01

    The optimal use of mitoxantrone (NOV) in the high-dose range requires elucidation of its maximum tolerated dose with peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) support and the time interval needed between drug administration and PBPC reinfusion in order to avoid graft toxicity. The aims of this study were: (1) to verify the feasibility and haematological toxicity of escalating NOV up to 90 mg m(-2) with PBPC support; and (2) to verify the safeness of a short (96 h) interval between NOV administration and PBPC reinfusion. Three cohorts of ten patients with breast cancer (BC) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) received escalating doses of NOV, 60, 75 and 90 mg m(-2) plus melphalan (L-PAM), 140-180 mg m(-2), with PBPC rescue 96 h after NOV. Haematological toxicity was evaluated daily (WHO criteria). NOV plasma pharmacokinetics was also evaluated, as well as NOV cytotoxicity against PBPCs. Haematological recovery was rapid and complete at each NOV dose level without statistically significant differences, and there were no major toxicities. NOV plasma concentrations at the time of PBPC reinfusion were below the toxicity threshold against haemopoietic progenitors. It is concluded that, when adequately supported with PBPCs, NOV can be escalated up to 90 mg m(-2) with acceptable haematological toxicity. PBPCs can be safely reinfused as early as 96 h after NOV administration. PMID:9310249

  17. Red blood cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    2013-06-01

    The foundation of laboratory hematologic diagnosis is the complete blood count and review of the peripheral smear. In patients with anemia, the peripheral smear permits interpretation of diagnostically significant red blood cell (RBC) findings. These include assessment of RBC shape, size, color, inclusions, and arrangement. Abnormalities of RBC shape and other RBC features can provide key information in establishing a differential diagnosis. In patients with microcytic anemia, RBC morphology can increase or decrease the diagnostic likelihood of thalassemia. In normocytic anemias, morphology can assist in differentiating among blood loss, marrow failure, and hemolysis-and in hemolysis, RBC findings can suggest specific etiologies. In macrocytic anemias, RBC morphology can help guide the diagnostic considerations to either megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic causes. Like all laboratory tests, RBC morphologies must be interpreted with caution, particularly in infants and children. When used properly, RBC morphology can be a key tool for laboratory hematology professionals to recommend appropriate clinical and laboratory follow-up and to select the best tests for definitive diagnosis. PMID:23480230

  18. Red blood cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    2013-06-01

    The foundation of laboratory hematologic diagnosis is the complete blood count and review of the peripheral smear. In patients with anemia, the peripheral smear permits interpretation of diagnostically significant red blood cell (RBC) findings. These include assessment of RBC shape, size, color, inclusions, and arrangement. Abnormalities of RBC shape and other RBC features can provide key information in establishing a differential diagnosis. In patients with microcytic anemia, RBC morphology can increase or decrease the diagnostic likelihood of thalassemia. In normocytic anemias, morphology can assist in differentiating among blood loss, marrow failure, and hemolysis-and in hemolysis, RBC findings can suggest specific etiologies. In macrocytic anemias, RBC morphology can help guide the diagnostic considerations to either megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic causes. Like all laboratory tests, RBC morphologies must be interpreted with caution, particularly in infants and children. When used properly, RBC morphology can be a key tool for laboratory hematology professionals to recommend appropriate clinical and laboratory follow-up and to select the best tests for definitive diagnosis.

  19. Cathepsin D: an Mϕ-derived factor mediating increased endothelial cell permeability with implications for alteration of the blood-retinal barrier in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Monickaraj, Finny; McGuire, Paul G; Nitta, Carolina Franco; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Das, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have previously reported increased monocyte (Mono) trafficking into the retinas of diabetic animals. In this study, we have examined the effect of activated Monos on retinal endothelial cells (ECs). The U937 Mϕ-conditioned medium (CM) significantly decreased the transendothelial resistance of EC monolayers as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (P= 0.007). The CM was fractioned, and the effective fraction (30-100 kDa) was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and cathepsin D (CD) was identified as a major secreted product. Immunoprecipitated CD resulted in decreased resistance in ECs (P= 0.006). The specificity of CD in mediating alterations of the EC barrier was confirmed using small interfering RNA. The decreased resistance correlated with a significantly increased gap between ECs. CD altered the Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated kinase pathway with increased stress actin filament formation in the EC layer. Increased CD levels were found in the retinas of diabetic mice (3-fold) and serum samples of patients with diabetic macular edema (1.6-fold) measured by Western blot and ELISA. These findings suggest an important role for Mϕ-derived CD in altering the blood-retinal barrier and reveal a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of DR.-Monickaraj, F., McGuire, P. G., Nitta, C. F., Ghosh, K., Das, A. Cathepsin D: an Mϕ-derived factor mediating increased endothelial cell permeability with implications for alteration of the blood-retinal barrier in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26718887

  20. Clinical implications of positive blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, C S

    1989-01-01

    Positive blood cultures can be classified according to their veracity (true-positive or false-positive culture), clinical severity (inconsequential or life threatening), place of origin (community acquired or nosocomial), source (primary or secondary), duration (transient, intermittent, or continuous), pattern of occurrence (single episode, persistent, or recurrent), or intensity (high or low grade). In general, however, positive blood cultures identify a patient population at high risk of death. In my studies, patients with positive blood cultures were 12 times more likely to die during hospitalization than patients without positive blood cultures. Many bacteremias and fungemias occur in complicated clinical settings, and it appears that only about one-half of the deaths among affected patients are due directly to infection. Hence, it is appropriate to speak of "crude mortality" and "attributable mortality." Among hospitalized patients, recent trends include rising incidences of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcal and enterococcal bacteremias and a dramatic increase in the incidence of fungemias. The diagnostic and therapeutic implications of blood cultures positive for specific microorganisms continue to evolve and are the subject of a large and growing medical literature. PMID:2680055

  1. Red blood cells, sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    These crescent or sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs) are present with Sickle cell anemia, and stand out clearly against the normal round RBCs. These abnormally shaped cells may become entangled and ...

  2. Humoral Activity of Cord Blood-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells: Implications for Stem Cell-Based Adjuvant Therapy of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowska, Edyta; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Rogińska, Dorota; Kawa, Miłosz; Ustianowski, Przemysław; Safranow, Krzysztof; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    Background Stem/progenitor cells (SPCs) demonstrate neuro-regenerative potential that is dependent upon their humoral activity by producing various trophic factors regulating cell migration, growth, and differentiation. Herein, we compared the expression of neurotrophins (NTs) and their receptors in specific umbilical cord blood (UCB) SPC populations, including lineage-negative, CD34+, and CD133+ cells, with that in unsorted, nucleated cells (NCs). Methods and Results The expression of NTs and their receptors was detected by QRT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescent staining in UCB-derived SPC populations (i.e., NCs vs. lineage-negative, CD34+, and CD133+ cells). To better characterize, global gene expression profiles of SPCs were determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Furthermore, the intracellular production of crucial neuro-regenerative NTs (i.e., BDNF and NT-3) was assessed in NCs and lineage-negative cells after incubation for 24, 48, and 72 h in both serum and serum-free conditions. We discovered significantly higher expression of NTs and NT receptors at both the mRNA and protein level in lineage-negative, CD34+, and CD133+ cells than in NCs. Global gene expression analysis revealed considerably higher expression of genes associated with the production and secretion of proteins, migration, proliferation, and differentiation in lineage-negative cells than in CD34+ or CD133+ cell populations. Notably, after short-term incubation under serum-free conditions, lineage-negative cells and NCs produced significantly higher amounts of BDNF and NT-3 than under steady-state conditions. Finally, conditioned medium (CM) from lineage-negative SPCs exerted a beneficial impact on neural cell survival and proliferation. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate that UCB-derived SPCs highly express NTs and their relevant receptors under steady-state conditions, NT expression is greater under stress-related conditions and that CM from SPCs

  3. Genetic effects on variation in red-blood-cell folate in adults: Implications for the familial aggregation of neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, L.E.; Duffy, P.; Bellingham, G.

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated folic acid as an important determinant of normal human growth, development, and function. Insufficient folate levels appear to be a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTD), as well as for several chronic diseases of adulthood. However, relatively little is known about the factors that influence folate status in the general population. To estimate the relative contribution of genetic and nongenetic factors to variation in folate, we have evaluated red blood cell (RBC) folate levels in 440 pairs of MZ twins and in 331 pairs of DZ twins. The data were best described by a model in which 46% of the variance in RBC folate was attributable to additive genetic effects, 16% of the variance was due to measured phenotypic covariates, and 38% of the variance was due to random environmental effects. Moreover, the correlations for RBC folate in MZ co-twins (r = .46) and in repeat measures from the same individual (r = .51) were very similar, indicating that virtually all repeatable variation in RBC folate is attributable to genetic factors. On the basis of these results, it would seem reasonable to initiate a search for the specific genes that influence RBC folate levels in the general population. Such genes ultimately may be used to identify individuals at increased risk for NTD and other folate-related diseases. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Autoantibodies to red blood cell antigens occur frequently with hemolysis among pediatric small bowel transplant recipients: clinical implications and management.

    PubMed

    Koepsell, Scott A; Grant, Wendy; Landmark, James D

    2015-02-01

    Reports have linked pediatric solid organ transplant recipients with the development of hemolytic autoimmune antibodies, especially in the setting of the immunosuppressant tacrolimus. This study aims to identify whether these observations also occurred at an institution that frequently performs pediatric multivisceral transplants and to characterize the treatment and outcome. Chart review was performed on all patients with RBC autoantibodies. Laboratory and clinical data were used to identify hemolysis. For transplant recipients with RBC autoantibodies, the type of transplant and outcome of the AIHA were profiled. One hundred twenty-eight patients were identified with RBC autoantibodies, of which 22 patients were solid organ transplant recipients, including 18 SB graft recipients. Sixteen of the 18 had evidence of hemolysis. The incidence rate of AIHA in this population is estimated to be 10%, resulting in significant cost. Treatment included immunosuppressant modulation, steroids, IVIG, and plasma exchange, with 12 of the 16 patients responding. RBC autoantibodies occur in up to 10% in pediatric SB transplant recipients, with high cost of obtaining compatible blood. Neither tacrolimus nor receipts of a donor spleen were associated with the development of AIHA. Treatment using steroids and IVIG appears to be effective.

  5. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. PMID:25267201

  6. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  7. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  8. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  9. Mueller imaging of blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Shirsendu; Ghosh, Neelakshi; Adhikary, Aghya; Ghosh, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    The polarization parameters of light transmitted through biological cells contain morphological and functional information for biomedical purposes. As more imaging became available to research applications, Mueller imaging's importance has increased regularly in biomedical approach over the years. This paper summarizes the context of Mueller imaging and polarization optical analysis on blood cells for medical applications. Basically this method is related to Mueller Matrix Imaging Polarimetry. Knowing all 16-element Mueller matrix using 36 independent polarization states completely describes the blood cells in terms of birefringence properties.

  10. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  11. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Suszynska, Ewa; Malicka, Iwona; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in peripheral blood (PB) as well as in bone marrow (BM). We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers had trained in long-distance running for one year, six times per week. FACS-based analyses and RT-PCR of murine and human VSELs and HSPCs from collected bone marrow and peripheral blood were performed. We observed that endurance exercise increased the number of VSELs circulating in PB and residing in BM. In parallel, we observed an increase in the number of HSPCs. These observations were subsequently confirmed in young athletes, who showed an increase in circulating VSELs and HSPCs after intensive running exercise. We provide for the first time evidence that endurance exercise may have beneficial effects on the expansion of developmentally early stem cells. We hypothesize that these circulating stem cells are involved in repairing minor exercise-related tissue and organ injuries.

  12. White blood cell counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a prototype white blood cell counting system for use in the Skylab IMSS are presented. The counting system consists of a sample collection subsystem, sample dilution and fluid containment subsystem, and a cell counter. Preliminary test results show the sample collection and the dilution subsystems are functional and fulfill design goals. Results for the fluid containment subsystem show the handling bags cause counting errors due to: (1) adsorption of cells to the walls of the container, and (2) inadequate cleaning of the plastic bag material before fabrication. It was recommended that another bag material be selected.

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 359 359 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  14. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.

  15. Cellular Reprogramming of Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in cell fate conversion have made it possible to generate large quantities of patient-specific cells for regenerative medicine. Due to multiple advantages of peripheral blood cells over fibroblasts from skin biopsy, the use of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) instead of skin fibroblasts will expedite reprogramming research and broaden the application of reprogramming technology. This review discusses current progress and challenges of generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from peripheral blood MNCs and of in vitro and in vivo conversion of blood cells into cells of therapeutic value, such as mesenchymal stem cells, neural cells and hepatocytes. An optimized design of lentiviral vectors is necessary to achieve high reprogramming efficiency of peripheral blood cells. More recently, non-integrating vectors such as Sendai virus and episomal vectors have been successfully employed in generating integration-free iPSCs and somatic stem cells. PMID:24060839

  16. Ability of goat milk to modulate healthy human peripheral blood lymphomonocyte and polymorphonuclear cell function: in vitro effects and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jirillo, F; Martemucci, G; D'Alessandro, A G; Panaro, M A; Cianciulli, A; Superbo, M; Jirillo, E; Magrone, T

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro effects of goat's milk from different sources (Jonica, Saanen, and Priska breeds plus a commercial preparation) on healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated in terms of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine release. According to the incubation time (24 h or 48 h) used all milks could induce release of NO from monocytes. In this context, however, in the presence of a commercial milk preparation inhibition of lypopolysaccharide (LPS)-induce NO generation was evident. Also polymorphonuclear cells stimulated with the various milks released detectable amounts of NO. In the case of Priska milk inhibition of LPS-mediated NO generation was observed. Despite a broad array of cytokines tested [Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-alpha, Transforming Growth Factor-beta and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor] only IL-10, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were released by PBMCs upon stimulation with various milks. Taken together, these data indicate that goat's milk for its capacity to produce NO may exert a cardioprotective and anti-atherogenic effect in consumers. Moreover, induction of proinflammatory (TNF-alpha and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines suggests the ability of this milk to maintain immune homeostasis in the immunocompromised host (e.g., aged people).

  17. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  18. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  19. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  20. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  1. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  2. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  3. Trapping cells in paper for white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Jianhao; Wu, Hong; Ying, Jackie Y

    2015-07-15

    White blood cell count is an important indicator of each individual's health condition. An abnormal white blood cell count usually results from an infection, cancer, or other conditions that trigger systemic inflammation responses. White blood cell count also provides predictive information on the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, monitoring white blood cell count on a regular basis can potentially help individuals to take preventive measures and improve healthcare outcomes. Currently, white blood cell count is primarily conducted in centralized laboratories, and it requires specialized equipment and dedicated personnel to perform the test and interpret the results. So far there has been no rapid test that allows white blood cell count in low-resource settings. In this study, we have demonstrated a vertical flow platform that quantifies white blood cells by trapping them in the paper. White blood cells were tagged with gold nanoparticles, and flowed through the paper via a small orifice. The white blood cell count was determined by measuring the colorimetric intensity of gold nanoparticles on the surface of white blood cells that were trapped in the paper mesh. Using this platform, we were able to quantify white blood cells in 15 μL of blood, and visually differentiate the abnormal count of white blood cells from the normal count. The proposed platform enabled rapid white blood cell count in low resource settings with a small sample volume requirement. Its low-cost, instrument-free operations would be attractive for point-of-care applications.

  4. Blood Cell Interactions and Segregation in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Lance L.; Dupin, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, pioneering researchers have been using novel experimental and computational approaches to probe the mysteries of blood flow. Thanks to their efforts, we know that blood cells generally prefer to migrate to the axis of flow, that red and white cells segregate in flow, and that cell deformability and their tendency to reversibly aggregate contribute to the non-Newtonian nature of this unique fluid. All of these properties have beneficial physiological consequences, allowing blood to perform a variety of critical functions. Our current understanding of these unusual flow properties of blood have been made possible by the ingenuity and diligence of a number of researchers, including Harry Goldsmith, who developed novel technologies to visualize and quantify the flow of blood at the level of individual cells. Here we summarize efforts in our lab to continue this tradition and to further our understanding of how blood cells interact with each other and with the blood vessel wall. PMID:18188702

  5. Microfluidic Blood Cell Preparation: Now and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Yong, Koh Meng Aw; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Blood plays an important role in homeostatic regulation with each of its cellular components having important therapeutic and diagnostic uses. Therefore, separation and sorting of blood cells has been of a great interest to clinicians and researchers. However, while conventional methods of processing blood have been successful in generating relatively pure fractions, they are time consuming, labor intensive, and are not optimal for processing small volume blood samples. In recent years, microfluidics has garnered great interest from clinicians and researchers as a powerful technology for separating blood into different cell fractions. As microfluidics involves fluid manipulation at the microscale level, it has the potential for achieving high-resolution separation and sorting of blood cells down to a single-cell level, with an added benefit of integrating physical and biological methods for blood cell separation and analysis on the same single chip platform. This paper will first review the conventional methods of processing and sorting blood cells, followed by a discussion on how microfluidics is emerging as an efficient tool to rapidly change the field of blood cell sorting for blood-based therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:24515899

  6. Alteration of red blood cell aggregation during blood storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun-Jung; Nam, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Suh, Jang-Soo; Shin, Sehyun

    2011-06-01

    Even though the trade-off between the benefits and risks of blood transfusion has been discussed for the last several decades, it requires further understanding of the rheological changes in stored blood that include the alteration of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. The RBC aggregation of stored blood in its autologous plasma was monitored through the storage period (35 days). The critical shear stress, as a measure of RBC aggregation, was determined by using a microfluidic aggregometer. Blood was processed into a blood bag containing the anticoagulant CPDA1 and stored at 4°C. It was subjected to assays after zero, seven, 14, and 35 days. The critical shear stress for stored blood did not change up to 14 days of storage but exhibited a significant decrease after 35 days of storage. These results were identical to those of the conventional aggregation index (AI). Also, in the alteration of RBC aggregation for blood storage, the effect of the plasma factor was slightly stronger than that of the cellular factor. Through the present study, the critical shear stress as a new measure of RBC aggregation may help to monitor and control the quality of blood storage.

  7. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  11. 21 CFR 864.6160 - Manual blood cell counting device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual blood cell counting device. 864.6160... blood cell counting device. (a) Identification. A manual blood cell counting device is a device used to count red blood cells, white blood cells, or blood platelets. (b) Classification. Class I...

  12. Racial differences in hypertension: implications for high blood pressure management.

    PubMed

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2014-08-01

    The racial disparity in hypertension and hypertension-related outcomes has been recognized for decades with African Americans with greater risks than Caucasians. Blood pressure levels have consistently been higher for African Americans with an earlier onset of hypertension. Although awareness and treatment levels of high blood pressure have been similar, racial differences in control rates are evident. The higher blood pressure levels for African Americans are associated with higher rates of stroke, end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. The reasons for the racial disparities in elevated blood pressure and hypertension-related outcomes risk remain unclear. However, the implications of the disparities of hypertension for prevention and clinical management are substantial, identifying African American men and women with excel hypertension risk and warranting interventions focused on these differences. In addition, focused research to identify the factors attributed to these disparities in risk burden is an essential need to address the evidence gaps.

  13. Racial differences in hypertension: implications for high blood pressure management.

    PubMed

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2014-08-01

    The racial disparity in hypertension and hypertension-related outcomes has been recognized for decades with African Americans with greater risks than Caucasians. Blood pressure levels have consistently been higher for African Americans with an earlier onset of hypertension. Although awareness and treatment levels of high blood pressure have been similar, racial differences in control rates are evident. The higher blood pressure levels for African Americans are associated with higher rates of stroke, end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. The reasons for the racial disparities in elevated blood pressure and hypertension-related outcomes risk remain unclear. However, the implications of the disparities of hypertension for prevention and clinical management are substantial, identifying African American men and women with excel hypertension risk and warranting interventions focused on these differences. In addition, focused research to identify the factors attributed to these disparities in risk burden is an essential need to address the evidence gaps. PMID:24983758

  14. Blood cell characterization by light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnin, Olivier

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we are going to introduce optical methods for blood cell characterization performed by standard hematology analyzers. As a consequence, we are going to focus on methods that are, or will be, compatible with an average cost, commercial, blood cell counter.

  15. Blood cell findings resembling Bartonella spp.

    PubMed

    Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Cintra, Maria Letícia; Ferreira, Marilucia Ruggiero Martins; Magalhães, Renata Ferreira; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    Some Bartonella species are able to invade red blood cells (RBC) and may cause persistent infection in the susceptible host. Use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrates, inside erythrocytes, the typical triple-walled agents. However, when examining ultrathin sections of blood cells, the authors have, on several occasions, detected intraerythrocytic abnormalities that mimic but are not typical of Bartonella spp. Small endovesicles, pseudoinclusions, cavities, and irregular hemoglobin granules distribution, resulting in regions of increased or decreased electron density, may be observed in the erythrocytes and platelets, which may be confused with bartonellas. So far, detailed ultrastructural findings of Bartonella spp. in blood cells have not yet been described. Aiming to improve TEM interpretation of blood cells changes, in routine examination of blood sections of patients with suspected bartonellosis, the authors studied the morphological findings they have observed, and present their putative nature, according to information in the literature.

  16. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luize G; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-09-04

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies.

  17. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies. PMID:23889169

  18. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  19. [Current aspects in red blood cell substitutes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfeng; Pan, Jilun; Yu, Yaoting

    2004-06-01

    Red blood cell substitutes are a group of oxygen carriers designed to temporarily replace transfused blood. Current developing products include perfluorocarbon-based and hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier. Each product is unique in its limitations and advantages. A number of products are in advanced clinical trials and nearing market. When they are available for use it is likely that development will accelerate and even better products will substantially alleviate the world-wide shortage of blood for transfusion.

  20. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  1. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  2. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  3. Implications of the Kidd blood group system in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rourk, A; Squires, J E

    2012-01-01

    The association of the Kidd blood group system with hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the newborn is well known. The Kidd antigens, which are localized to the HUT/UT-B urea transport protein, are found on red blood cells and the endothelial cells of the blood vessels of the medulla of the kidney. Recently it has been suggested that these antigens might play a role as minor histocompatibility antigens in renal transplantation. In the current case, the appearance of an anti-Jk(b) 10 years after renal transplantation associated with early renal allograft rejection further supports the potential importance of these antigens in renal transplantation and allograft rejection. PMID:23286555

  4. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Marouf, Rajaa

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. Its pathognomonic signs and symptoms are caused by hemoglobin (Hb) S, which results from a single nucleotide substitution in the β-globin gene that places the amino acid valine with glutamic acid at codon 6 of the β-globin chain. Hb S is an insoluble Hb that crystalizes at low oxygen tension and other precipitating conditions leading to rigidity of red cells and clumping in small blood vessels. Patients with sickle cell disease have a variable Hb level that may range from 7.0 to 11.0 g/dL in their steady state condition. The most common cause of hospital presentation is due to acute painful crisis that results from vaso-occlusion by sickled cells. These episodes are treated with hydration and analgesia and do not require blood transfusion. Blood transfusion should be aimed to increase tissue delivery of oxygen. Hb S is known to be a low affinity Hb and so delivers oxygen at a lower partial pressure of oxygen compared to Hb A. Even with adequate pre transfusion testing and precautions, blood transfusion is never totally safe and short or long term complications may occur. Blood transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease has only limited indications such as acute hemolytic, aplastic or sequestration crises. Chronic transfusion protocols are implemented in cases of strokes or high cerebral blood flow ultrasonic studies as a prophylactic measure. Exchange blood transfusion is used in some complications of the disease such as acute chest syndrome (ACS), priapism or peri operatively. Once it is decided to transfuse blood, the transfused blood should be Hb S negative, Rh and Kell antigen matched. PMID:21981466

  5. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  6. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen. This medical emergency, called a sickle cell crisis, can be treated with pain medication and blood ... Although the treatment of sickle cell disease pain crisis hasn’t changed much since the discovery of ...

  7. 21 CFR 864.8200 - Blood cell diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood cell diluent. 864.8200 Section 864.8200 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8200 Blood cell diluent. (a) Identification. A blood cell diluent is a device used to dilute blood for further testing, such as blood...

  8. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated blood cell separator. 864.9245 Section... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell separator is a device that uses a centrifugal or filtration separation principle...

  9. 21 CFR 864.8200 - Blood cell diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood cell diluent. 864.8200 Section 864.8200 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8200 Blood cell diluent. (a) Identification. A blood cell diluent is a device used to dilute blood for further testing, such as blood...

  10. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated blood cell separator. 864.9245 Section... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell separator is a device that uses a centrifugal or filtration separation principle...

  11. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated blood cell separator. 864.9245 Section... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell separator is a device that uses a centrifugal or filtration separation principle...

  12. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated blood cell separator. 864.9245 Section... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell separator is a device that uses a centrifugal or filtration separation principle...

  13. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated blood cell separator. 864.9245 Section... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell separator is a device that uses a centrifugal or filtration separation principle...

  14. 21 CFR 864.8200 - Blood cell diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood cell diluent. 864.8200 Section 864.8200 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8200 Blood cell diluent. (a) Identification. A blood cell diluent is a device used to dilute blood for further testing, such as blood...

  15. 21 CFR 864.8200 - Blood cell diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood cell diluent. 864.8200 Section 864.8200 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8200 Blood cell diluent. (a) Identification. A blood cell diluent is a device used to dilute blood for further testing, such as blood...

  16. 21 CFR 864.8200 - Blood cell diluent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood cell diluent. 864.8200 Section 864.8200 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8200 Blood cell diluent. (a) Identification. A blood cell diluent is a device used to dilute blood for further testing, such as blood...

  17. Blood flow and arterial endothelial dysfunction: Mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Abdul I.

    2013-06-01

    The arterial endothelium exquisitely regulates vascular function, and endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesions develop preferentially at arterial branches and bifurcations where the blood flow is disturbed. Understanding the basis for this observation requires elucidating the effects of blood flow on the endothelial cell (EC) function. The goal of this review is: (1) to describe our current understanding of the relationships between arterial blood flow and atherosclerosis, (2) to present the wide array of flow-induced biological responses in ECs, and (3) to discuss the mechanisms by which ECs sense, transmit, and transduce flow-derived mechanical forces. We conclude by presenting some future perspectives in the highly interdisciplinary field of EC mechanotransduction.

  18. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide production by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Giulivi, C; Hochstein, P; Davies, K J

    1994-01-01

    Red blood cells are frequently employed in studies of oxidative stress. Technical difficulties have previously prevented the measurement of H2O2 production by red blood cells, except during exposure to certain drugs or toxicants. We now show that a combination of glutathione depletion and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole) treatment can be used to measure the endogenous generation of H2O2 by red blood cells. In our studies, aminotriazole was used as an H2O2 dependent (irreversible) catalase inhibitor, and catalase inhibition was used as an indirect measure of H2O2 production. Our results indicate that H2O2 is generated at a rate of 1.36 +/- 0.2 microM/h (3.9 +/- 0.6 nmol.h-1.g Hb-1), and that the steady-state red blood cell concentration of H2O2 is approximately 2 x 10(-10) M. Kinetic comparisons of H2O2 production and oxyhemoglobin autooxidation (which generates O2.- that dismutases to H2O2) indicate that the latter is probably the main source of H2O2 in red blood cells.

  20. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  1. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  2. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  3. "Blood failure" time to view blood as an organ: how oxygen debt contributes to blood failure and its implications for remote damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Bjerkvig, Christopher K; Strandenes, Geir; Eliassen, Håkon S; Spinella, Philip C; Fosse, Theodor K; Cap, Andrew P; Ward, Kevin R

    2016-04-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is both a local and systemic disorder. In the context of systemic effects, blood loss may lead to levels of reduced oxygen delivery (DO2 ) sufficient to cause tissue ischemia. Similar to other physiologic debts such as sleep, it is not possible to incur a significant oxygen debt and suffer no consequences for lack of timely repayment. While the linkage between oxygen debt and traditional organ failure (renal, hepatic, lung, and circulation) has been long recognized, we should consider failure in two additional linked and very dynamic organ systems, the endothelium and blood. These systems are very sensitive to oxygen debt and at risk for failing, having further implications on all other organ systems. The degree of damage to the endothelium is largely modulated by the degree of oxygen debt. Thus hypoperfusion is believed to begin a cascade of events leading to acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). This combination of oxygen debt driven endothelial damage and ATC might be considered collectively as "blood failure" due to the highly connected networks between these drivers. This article presents the implications of oxygen debt for remote damage control resuscitation strategies, such as permissive hypotension and hemostatic resuscitation. We review the impact of whole blood resuscitation and red blood cell efficacy in mitigation of oxygen debt. At last, this article recognizes the need for simple and durable, lightweight equipment that can detect the adequacy of tissue DO2 and thus patient needs for resuscitative care. Point-of-care lactate measuring may be a predictive tool for identifying high-risk trauma patients and occult shock because it provides information beyond that of vital signs and mechanism of injury as it may help predict the level of oxygen debt accumulation and need for resuscitation. Serial measurements may also be valuable as a tool in guiding resuscitative efforts. PMID:27100755

  4. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  5. White blood cell deformation and firm adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2011-11-01

    For a white blood cell (WBC) to arrive at infection sites, it forms chemical attachments with activated endothelial cells. First, it bonds with P-selectin, which holds it to the wall, but weakly; this allows the WBC to roll under the shear flow of the blood around it. Later, the WBCs bond with the stronger intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); it is these ICAM bonds that allow the WBCs to fully resist the flow and stop rolling, allowing them to crawl through the endothelial wall. We model this numerically. Our model uses the immersed boundary method to represent the interaction of the shear flow with the deformable cell membrane. Receptors are on the tips of microvilli-little fingers sticking off of the cell membrane. The microvilli also deform. The receptors stochastically form and break bonds with molecules on the wall. Using this method, the history of each microvillus and its bonds can be found, as well as the distribution of the adhesion traction forces and how all of these vary with the deformability of the white blood cell. At higher shear rates, the white blood cell membrane deforms more, increasing its contact area with the surface; this effect is larger for softer membranes. We investigate how the deformability of the WBC affects the ease with which it forms firm adhesion.

  6. Exploiting osmosis for blood cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Parichehreh, Vahidreza; Estrada, Rosendo; Kumar, Srikanth Suresh; Bhavanam, Kranthi Kumar; Raj, Vinay; Raj, Ashok; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2011-06-01

    Blood is a valuable tissue containing cellular populations rich in information regarding the immediate immune and inflammatory status of the body. Blood leukocytes or white blood cells (WBCs) provide an ideal sample to monitor systemic changes and understand molecular signaling mechanisms in disease processes. Blood samples need to be processed to deplete contaminating erythrocytes or red blood cells (RBCs) and sorted into different WBC sub-populations prior to analysis. This is typically accomplished using immuno-affinity protocols which result in undesirable activation. An alternative is size based sorting which by itself is unsuitable for WBCs sorting due to size overlap between different sub-populations. To overcome this limitation, we investigated the possibility of using controlled osmotic exposure to deplete and/or create a differential size increase between WBC populations. Using a new microfluidic cell docking platform, the response of RBCs and WBCs to deionized (DI) water was evaluated. Time lapse microscopy confirms depletion of RBCs within 15 s and creation of > 3 μm size difference between lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. A flow through microfluidic device was also used to expose different WBCs to DI water for 30, 60 and 90 s to quantify cell loss and activation. Results confirm preservation of ~100% of monocytes, granulocytes and loss of ~30% of lymphocytes (mostly CD3+/CD4+) with minimal activation. These results indicate feasibility of this approach for monocyte, granulocyte and lymphocyte (sub-populations) isolation based on size. PMID:21279444

  7. Exploiting osmosis for blood cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Parichehreh, Vahidreza; Estrada, Rosendo; Kumar, Srikanth Suresh; Bhavanam, Kranthi Kumar; Raj, Vinay; Raj, Ashok; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2011-06-01

    Blood is a valuable tissue containing cellular populations rich in information regarding the immediate immune and inflammatory status of the body. Blood leukocytes or white blood cells (WBCs) provide an ideal sample to monitor systemic changes and understand molecular signaling mechanisms in disease processes. Blood samples need to be processed to deplete contaminating erythrocytes or red blood cells (RBCs) and sorted into different WBC sub-populations prior to analysis. This is typically accomplished using immuno-affinity protocols which result in undesirable activation. An alternative is size based sorting which by itself is unsuitable for WBCs sorting due to size overlap between different sub-populations. To overcome this limitation, we investigated the possibility of using controlled osmotic exposure to deplete and/or create a differential size increase between WBC populations. Using a new microfluidic cell docking platform, the response of RBCs and WBCs to deionized (DI) water was evaluated. Time lapse microscopy confirms depletion of RBCs within 15 s and creation of > 3 μm size difference between lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. A flow through microfluidic device was also used to expose different WBCs to DI water for 30, 60 and 90 s to quantify cell loss and activation. Results confirm preservation of ~100% of monocytes, granulocytes and loss of ~30% of lymphocytes (mostly CD3+/CD4+) with minimal activation. These results indicate feasibility of this approach for monocyte, granulocyte and lymphocyte (sub-populations) isolation based on size.

  8. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  9. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology. PMID:26579528

  10. ALLERGIC IMPLICATIONS OF BLOOD DISORDERS IN INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carl H.

    1957-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of many of the blood disorders are wholly or partially dependent on immunoallergic reactions. A growing body of evidence permits the characterization of antigenantibody mechanisms in connection with hemolytic anemia, purpura and agranulocytosis, and more specifically for each of the blood cell elements and for the vessel wall. These reactions extend to maternal-fetal relationships producing well defined blood disorders manifest at birth or in the neonatal period. Once the effects of the hypersensitive state are set in motion during the course of a blood disorder, therapeutic measures to slow their progress are often futile. Because it is not always possible to identify the potentially allergic child in whom these circumstances will occur, it is extremely important to weigh the advantages of the use of a drug before it is administered especially when its side effects have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Important information has recently been obtained regarding the heightened susceptibility to infection in children with chronic anemia who have had splenectomy to reduce the frequency of transfusions. The hypersensitive responses in children with spleen removed may result in overwhelming and often fulminating infections necessitating rigid criteria in selecting patients of the pediatric age for this operation. PMID:13426810

  11. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  12. Thrombosis and blood cells in atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, C; Hernández, M R; Villaverde, C A

    1988-06-01

    Hemorheological changes produced in blood cells seem to be essential in atheroma plaque development and thrombotic episodes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between blood cells count, thrombogenic situations and morphological mesenteric alterations in atherosclerotic rats. Atherosclerosis was induced by an atherogenic diet made up of two phases, the first a hypervitaminic diet, and the second a hyperlipidic one. Cell counts were performed with Thoma's camera. Morphological changes were observed directly in rat mesentery. Thrombogenic situations were investigated by a mesenteric microthrombosis induction method. In atherosclerotic animals we can observe a higher mesenteric opacity, increase in blood viscosity and a thickness in vessel wall. Thrombosis time is shortened at 3 days, which indicates a thrombogenic situation although at 10 days there is a lenthening in this parameter. Blood cell counts were not modified significantly, but modifications in differential leukocyte counts were significant. We found a direct relationship between lymphocyte number and thrombosis time whereas with granulocytes this relationship was inverse: shortening in thrombosis time appearing simultaneously with an increase in cell number. PMID:3419397

  13. Cancer cells in the circulating blood

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Haruo

    1962-01-01

    The author discusses the relation between the presence of cancer cells in the circulating blood and the development of metastasis, as demonstrated by studies on animals with experimentally induced tumours, by post-mortem studies on fatal human cases of cancer, and by studies on patients operated upon for stomach cancer. Although the correlation between the presence of tumour cells in the blood and the occurrence of metastatic lesions was found to be less close in the human cases of cancer than in the experimental animals, the author considers that it was sufficiently marked to justify the assumption that the appearance of tumour cells in the circulating blood is an important link in the chain of processes leading to cancer metastasis. In conclusion, the author puts forward the suggestion, based on the results of animal experiments, that chemotherapy might have an inhibitory effect on the liberated tumour cells in the blood, particularly if these cells are present only in small numbers, and thus be instrumental in halting the course of metastasis. PMID:14497407

  14. Dielectrophoretic Separation of Cancer Cells from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Huang, Ying; Becker, Frederick F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated that the dielectric properties of cells depend on their type and physiological status. For example, MDA-231 human breast cancer cells were found to have a mean plasma membrane specific capacitance of 26 mF/m2, more than double the value (11 mF/m2) observed for resting T-lymphocytes. When an inhomogeneous ac electric field is applied to a particle, a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force arises that depends on the particle dielectric properties. Therefore, cells having different dielectric characteristics will experience differential DEP forces when subjected to such a field. In this article, we demonstrate the use of differential DEP forces for the separation of several different cancerous cell types from blood in a dielectric affinity column. These separations were accomplished using thin, flat chambers having microelectrode arrays on the bottom wall. DEP forces generated by the application of ac fields to the electrodes were used to influence the rate of elution of cells from the chamber by hydrodynamic forces within a parabolic fluid flow profile. Electrorotation measurements were first made on the various cell types found within cell mixtures to be separated, and theoretical modeling was used to derive the cell dielectric parameters. Optimum separation conditions were then predicted from the frequency and suspension conductivity dependencies of cell DEP responses defined by these parameters. Cell separations were then undertaken for various ratios of cancerous to normal cells at different concentrations. Eluted cells were characterized in terms of separation efficiency, cell viability, and separation speed. For example, 100% efficiency was achieved for purging MDA-231 cells from blood at the tumor to normal cell ratio 1:1 × 105 or 1:3 × 105, cell viability was not compromised, and separation rates were at least 103 cells/s. Theoretical and experimental criteria for the design and operation of such separators are presented. PMID

  15. Microfluidic immunomagnetic cell separation from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanendran Nair Gourikutty, Sajay; Chang, Chia-Pin; Puiu, Poenar Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Immunomagnetic-based separation has become a viable technique for the separation of cells and biomolecules. Here we report on the design and analysis of a simple and efficient microfluidic device for high throughput and high efficiency capture of cells tagged with magnetic particles. This is made possible by using a microfluidic chip integrated with customized arrays of permanent magnets capable of creating large magnetic field gradients, which determine the effective capturing of the tagged cells. This method is based on manipulating the cells which are under the influence of a combination of magnetic and fluid dynamic forces in a fluid under laminar flow through a microfluidic chip. A finite element analysis (FEA) model is developed to analyze the cell separation process and predict its behavior, which is validated subsequently by the experimental results. The magnetic field gradients created by various arrangements of magnetic arrays have been simulated using FEA and the influence of these field gradients on cell separation has been studied with the design of our microfluidic chip. The proof-of-concept for the proposed technique is demonstrated by capturing white blood cells (WBCs) from whole human blood. CD45-conjugated magnetic particles were added into whole blood samples to label WBCs and the mixture was flown through our microfluidic device to separate the labeled cells. After the separation process, the remaining WBCs in the elute were counted to determine the capture efficiency, and it was found that more than 99.9% WBCs have been successfully separated from whole blood. The proposed design can be used for positive selection as well as for negative enrichment of rare cells. PMID:26773879

  16. Toward Personalized Cell Therapies: Autologous Menstrual Blood Cells for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Carolina O.; Glover, Loren E.; Weinbren, Nathan; Rizzi, Jessica A.; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Sanberg, Paul R.; Allickson, Julie G.; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Voltarelli, Julio Cesar; Cruz, Eduardo; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapy has been established as an important field of research with considerable progress in the last years. At the same time, the progressive aging of the population has highlighted the importance of discovering therapeutic alternatives for diseases of high incidence and disability, such as stroke. Menstrual blood is a recently discovered source of stem cells with potential relevance for the treatment of stroke. Migration to the infarct site, modulation of the inflammatory reaction, secretion of neurotrophic factors, and possible differentiation warrant these cells as therapeutic tools. We here propose the use of autologous menstrual blood cells in the restorative treatment of the subacute phase of stroke. We highlight the availability, proliferative capacity, pluripotency, and angiogenic features of these cells and explore their mechanistic pathways of repair. Practical aspects of clinical application of menstrual blood cells for stroke will be discussed, from cell harvesting and cryopreservation to administration to the patient. PMID:22162629

  17. Photomodification of human immunocompetent blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krylenkov, V.A.; Ogurtsov, R.P.; Osmanov, M.A.; Kholmogorov, V.E.

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, processes of photomodification of lymphoid cells in human blood, developing immediately after exposure to visible radiation and also in the late stages after irradiation, were investigated by methods of spontaneous and immune rosette formation and the blast transformation test, combined with treatment with the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol and the radioactive assessment of spontaneous and stimulated DNA synthesis by tritium-thymidine-labelled cells.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Morota, Saori; Hansson, Magnus J; Paul, Gesine; Elmér, Eskil

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, where the progressive degeneration of motor neurons results in muscle atrophy, paralysis and death. Abnormalities in both central nervous system and muscle mitochondria have previously been demonstrated in patient samples, indicating systemic disease. In this case-control study, venous blood samples were acquired from 24 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and 21 age-matched controls. Platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and mitochondrial oxygen consumption measured in intact and permeabilized cells with additions of mitochondrial substrates, inhibitors and titration of an uncoupler. Respiratory values were normalized to cell count and for two markers of cellular mitochondrial content, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Mitochondrial function was correlated with clinical staging of disease severity. Complex IV (cytochrome c-oxidase)-activity normalized to mitochondrial content was decreased in platelets from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients both when normalized to citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA copy number. In mononuclear cells, complex IV-activity was decreased when normalized to citrate synthase activity. Mitochondrial content was increased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient platelets. In mononuclear cells, complex I activity declined and mitochondrial content increased progressively with advancing disease stage. The findings are, however, based on small subsets of patients and need to be confirmed. We conclude that when normalized to mitochondria-specific content, complex IV-activity is reduced in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and that there is an apparent compensatory increase in cellular mitochondrial content. This supports systemic involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggests further study of mitochondrial function in blood cells as a future biomarker for the

  19. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  20. Osmotic parameters of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; McGann, Locksley E; Acker, Jason P

    2014-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood (cord RBCs) is gathering significant interest for the treatment of fetal and neonatal anemia, due to its high content of fetal hemoglobin as well as numerous other potential benefits to fetuses and neonates. However, in order to establish a stable supply of cord RBCs for clinical use, a cryopreservation method must be developed. This, in turn, requires knowledge of the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs: osmotically inactive fraction (b), hydraulic conductivity (Lp), permeability to cryoprotectant glycerol (Pglycerol), and corresponding Arrhenius activation energies (Ea). For Lp and Pglycerol determination, RBCs were analyzed using a stopped-flow system to monitor osmotically-induced RBC volume changes via intrinsic RBC hemoglobin fluorescence. Lp and Pglycerol were characterized at 4°C, 20°C, and 35°C using Jacobs and Stewart equations with the Ea calculated from the Arrhenius plot. Results indicate that cord RBCs have a larger osmotically inactive fraction compared to adult RBCs. Hydraulic conductivity and osmotic permeability to glycerol of cord RBCs differed compared to those of adult RBCs with the differences dependent on experimental conditions, such as temperature and osmolality. Compared to adult RBCs, cord RBCs had a higher Ea for Lp and a lower Ea for Pglycerol. This information regarding osmotic parameters will be used in future work to develop a protocol for cryopreserving cord RBCs. PMID:24727610

  1. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  2. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  3. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  5. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window.

  6. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window. PMID:26096663

  7. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  8. Pleomorphic Structures in Human Blood Are Red Blood Cell-Derived Microparticles, Not Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam J.; Gray, Warren D.; Schroeder, Max; Yi, Hong; Taylor, Jeannette V.; Dillard, Rebecca S.; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Stephens, David; Roback, John D.; Searles, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are a common, life-saving therapy for many patients, but they have also been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We identified unusual, pleomorphic structures in human RBC transfusion units by negative-stain electron microscopy that appeared identical to those previously reported to be bacteria in healthy human blood samples. The presence of viable, replicating bacteria in stored blood could explain poor outcomes in transfusion recipients and have major implications for transfusion medicine. Here, we investigated the possibility that these structures were bacteria. Results Flow cytometry, miRNA analysis, protein analysis, and additional electron microscopy studies strongly indicated that the pleomorphic structures in the supernatant of stored RBCs were RBC-derived microparticles (RMPs). Bacterial 16S rDNA PCR amplified from these samples were sequenced and was found to be highly similar to species that are known to commonly contaminate laboratory reagents. Conclusions These studies suggest that pleomorphic structures identified in human blood are RMPs and not bacteria, and they provide an example in which laboratory contaminants may can mislead investigators. PMID:27760197

  9. Automated microscopy system for peripheral blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boev, Sergei F.; Sazonov, Vladimir V.; Kozinets, Gennady I.; Pogorelov, Valery M.; Gusev, Alexander A.; Korobova, Farida V.; Vinogradov, Alexander G.; Verdenskaya, Natalya V.; Ivanova, Irina A.

    2000-11-01

    The report describes the instrument ASPBS (Automated Screening of Peripheral Blood Cells) designed for an automated analysis of dry blood smears. The instrument is based on computer microscopy and uses dry blood smears prepared according to the standard Romanovskii-Giemza procedure. In comparison with the well-known flow cytometry systems, our instrument provides more detailed information and offers an opporunity of visualizing final results. The basic performances of the instrument are given. Software of this instrument is based on digital image processing and image recognition procedures. It is pointed out that the instrument can be used as a fairly universal tool in scientific research, public demonstrations, in medical treatment, and in medical education. The principle used as the basis of the instrument appeared adequate for creating an instrument version serviceable even during space flights where standard manual procedures and flow cytometry systems fail. The benefit of the use of the instrument in clinical laboratories is described.

  10. Viscoelastic Transient of Confined Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Gaël; Farutin, Alexander; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    The unique ability of a red blood cell to flow through extremely small microcapillaries depends on the viscoelastic properties of its membrane. Here, we study in vitro the response time upon flow startup exhibited by red blood cells confined into microchannels. We show that the characteristic transient time depends on the imposed flow strength, and that such a dependence gives access to both the effective viscosity and the elastic modulus controlling the temporal response of red cells. A simple theoretical analysis of our experimental data, validated by numerical simulations, further allows us to compute an estimate for the two-dimensional membrane viscosity of red blood cells, ηmem2D ∼ 10−7 N⋅s⋅m−1. By comparing our results with those from previous studies, we discuss and clarify the origin of the discrepancies found in the literature regarding the determination of ηmem2D, and reconcile seemingly conflicting conclusions from previous works. PMID:25954871

  11. Piezo1 links mechanical forces to red blood cell volume

    PubMed Central

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Lukacs, Viktor; Ranade, Sanjeev S; Chien, Shu; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) experience significant mechanical forces while recirculating, but the consequences of these forces are not fully understood. Recent work has shown that gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated Piezo1 cation channels are associated with the dehydrating RBC disease xerocytosis, implicating a role of mechanotransduction in RBC volume regulation. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations result in RBC dehydration are unknown. In this study, we show that RBCs exhibit robust calcium entry in response to mechanical stretch and that this entry is dependent on Piezo1 expression. Furthermore, RBCs from blood-cell-specific Piezo1 conditional knockout mice are overhydrated and exhibit increased fragility both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Yoda1, a chemical activator of Piezo1, causes calcium influx and subsequent dehydration of RBCs via downstream activation of the KCa3.1 Gardos channel, directly implicating Piezo1 signaling in RBC volume control. Therefore, mechanically activated Piezo1 plays an essential role in RBC volume homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07370.001 PMID:26001274

  12. Piezo1 links mechanical forces to red blood cell volume.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Lukacs, Viktor; Ranade, Sanjeev S; Chien, Shu; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) experience significant mechanical forces while recirculating, but the consequences of these forces are not fully understood. Recent work has shown that gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated Piezo1 cation channels are associated with the dehydrating RBC disease xerocytosis, implicating a role of mechanotransduction in RBC volume regulation. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations result in RBC dehydration are unknown. In this study, we show that RBCs exhibit robust calcium entry in response to mechanical stretch and that this entry is dependent on Piezo1 expression. Furthermore, RBCs from blood-cell-specific Piezo1 conditional knockout mice are overhydrated and exhibit increased fragility both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Yoda1, a chemical activator of Piezo1, causes calcium influx and subsequent dehydration of RBCs via downstream activation of the KCa3.1 Gardos channel, directly implicating Piezo1 signaling in RBC volume control. Therefore, mechanically activated Piezo1 plays an essential role in RBC volume homeostasis. PMID:26001274

  13. Stem-cell therapies for blood diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordignon, Claudio

    2006-06-01

    For decades, transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells - either unmodified, or genetically modified to correct genetic disorders - has been used to treat disorders of the blood and immune systems. The present challenge is to reduce the risk of such transplants and increase the number of patients who can safely access this treatment. In developing countries, such `one-shot' treatments are highly desirable because chronic treatments are difficult to sustain. To make these therapies more accessible and effective it will be important to improve clinical protocols and gene-delivery vectors, and to gain a deeper understanding of stem cells.

  14. Cryopreservation of Autologous Blood (Red Blood Cells, Platelets and Plasma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebine, Kunio

    Prevention of post-transfusion hepatitis is still a problem in cardiovascular surgery. We initiated the cryopreservation of autologous blood for the transfusion in elective cardiovascular surgery since 1981. This study includes 152 surgical cases in which autologous frozen, allogeneic frozen, and/or allogeneic non-frozen blood were used. In the 152 surgical cases, there were 69 cases in which autologous blood only (Group I) was used; 12 cases with autologous and allogeneic frozen blood (Group II); 46 cases with autologous and allgeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group III); and 25 cases with allogeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group IV). No hepatitis developed in Groups I (0%) and II (0%), but there was positive hepatitis in Groups III (4.3%) and IV (8.0%) . In 357 cases of those who underwent surgery with allogeneic non-frozen whole blood during the same period, the incidence rate of hepatitis was 13.7% (49/357). Patients awaiting elective surgery can store their own blood in the frozen state. Patients who undergo surgery with the cryoautotransfusion will not produce any infections or immunologic reactions as opposed to those who undergo surgery with the allogeneic non-frozen blood.

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  17. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  18. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  20. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  1. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  4. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  6. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  7. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  9. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  10. Multiscale modeling of blood flow: from single cells to blood rheology.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Mesoscale simulations of blood flow, where the red blood cells are described as deformable closed shells with a membrane characterized by bending rigidity and stretching elasticity, have made much progress in recent years to predict the flow behavior of blood cells and other components in various flows. To numerically investigate blood flow and blood-related processes in complex geometries, a highly efficient simulation technique for the plasma and solutes is essential. In this review, we focus on the behavior of single and several cells in shear and microcapillary flows, the shear-thinning behavior of blood and its relation to the blood cell structure and interactions, margination of white blood cells and platelets, and modeling hematologic diseases and disorders. Comparisons of the simulation predictions with existing experimental results are made whenever possible, and generally very satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  11. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  12. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  13. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  14. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  15. Regulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by matricellular thrombospondins: implications for blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Seeger, Franziska; Garcin, Elsa D; Roberts, David D; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) maintains cardiovascular health by activating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) to increase cellular cGMP levels. Cardiovascular disease is characterized by decreased NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. Pharmacological activators and stimulators of sGC are being actively pursued as therapies for acute heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. Here we review molecular mechanisms that modulate sGC activity while emphasizing a novel biochemical pathway in which binding of the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) to the cell surface receptor CD47 causes inhibition of sGC. We discuss the therapeutic implications of this pathway for blood flow, tissue perfusion, and cell survival under physiologic and disease conditions.

  16. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  17. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  18. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  19. Isolation of whole mononuclear cells from peripheral blood and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Ivan J; Kanof, Marjorie E; Smith, Phillip D; Zola, Heddy

    2009-04-01

    Peripheral blood is the primary source of lymphoid cells for investigation of the human immune system. Its use is facilitated by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation-a simple and rapid method of purifying peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that takes advantage of the density differences between mononuclear cells and other elements found in the blood sample. Thus, cells are distributed in the solution in layers based on the differences in their density/size. Additional purification methods can be employed as the mononuclear cell sample can be purified from monocytes by adherence or by exposure to L-leucine methyl ester; these methods are described for both procedures. Cord blood and peripheral blood from infants contain immature cells, including nucleated red cells, which can result in significant contamination of the mononuclear cell layer, and removal of these cells requires additional steps that are described. The isolation procedures presented here can also be applied to cell populations derived from tissues.

  20. Migration of blood cells to β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to the progressive deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid (Aβ) senile plaques and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles are considered the cardinal pathological hallmarks of AD, however, accumulating evidence indicates that immune cells may also play an important role in disease pathogenesis. Among these immune cells, blood-derived cells and their infiltration into the CNS towards Aβ plaques have been implicated in therapeutic strategies against AD. Here, we review the current literature on blood cell migration into the AD brain and the important players involved in this selective migration towards Aβ plaques. PMID:25752742

  1. Hemoglobin-based red blood cell substitutes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2004-09-01

    Polyhemoglobin is already well into the final stages of clinical trials in humans with one approved for routine clinical use in South Africa. Conjugated hemoglobin is also in ongoing clinical trials. Meanwhile, recombinant Hb has been modified to modulate the effects of nitric oxide. Other systems contain antioxidant enzymes for those clinical applications that may have potential problems related to ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Other developments are based on hemoglobin-lipid vesicles and also the use of nanotechnology and biodegradable copolymers to prepare nanodimension artificial red blood cells containing hemoglobin and complex enzyme systems.

  2. Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion: Military and Civilian Implications.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Carl W; Tranberg, John W; Boyer, Phillip; Silvestri, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination are the leading cause of preventable death, and resuscitative therapy is a critical component for survival. In various combinations, fresh whole blood, blood components, colloids, and crystalloids have all been staples of trauma care. The use of fresh whole blood is a well-established military practice that has saved the lives of thousands of American and coalition military personnel. Civilian use of fresh whole blood is far less established owing to the wide availability of individual blood components. However, this highly tailored blood supply is vulnerable to both natural and man-made disasters. In the event of such disruption, such as a major hurricane, it may be necessary for civilian hospitals to rapidly enact a fresh whole blood program. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the current use of blood therapy for trauma resuscitation, the US military's approach to fresh whole blood, and how maintaining a civilian capacity for fresh whole blood collection in the event of future man-made and natural disasters is key to promoting survival from trauma. PMID:27252101

  3. Collection of peripheral blood stem cells using an automated discontinuous flow blood cell separator.

    PubMed

    Pierelli, L; Menichella, G; Paoloni, A; Teofili, L; Sica, S; Foddai, M L; Rossi, P L; Leone, G; Mango, G; Bizzi, B

    1990-01-01

    Twenty collections of peripheral blood stem cells were performed in 3 patients (2 NHL, 1 AML) using the Haemonetics V50S discontinuous flow blood cell separator. A modified lymphocyte collection protocol (Nebraska Surge) was used in all instances. Leukapheresis were performed after 1 or 2 courses of chemotherapy and started when peripheral blood leukocytes count reached 1 x 10e9/l and platelets count 80 x 10e9/l. A mean blood volume of 5.9 +/- 0.6 litres was processed per procedure and the mean yields for mononuclear cells, nucleated cells and CFU-GM were respectively 5.4 +/- 1.4 x 10e9, 4.9 +/- 1.6 x 10e9 and 128.5 +/- 182.3 x 10e4 per procedure. Haemonetics V50S had showed a mean collection efficiency for mononuclear cells of 67.5 +/- 5.0% per procedure. Results obtained are not significantly different from the ones obtained with an automated continuous flow separator even if extracorporeal circulation is consistently high in patients with a low hematocrit when the 250 ml Latham Bowl is used.

  4. Anemia and transfusion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés Buelvas, Armando

    2013-10-01

    The red cells transfusion is a mainstay in the treatment of anemic patients. These blood transfusions are not without risks. The risk-benefit profile for red cell transfusions to treat anaemia is uncertain, but they may contribute to adverse patient outcomes in some situations. The ability of a patient to tolerate anaemia depends on their clinical condition and the presence of any significant co-morbidity; maintenance of circulating volume is of paramount importance. There is no universal transfusion trigger. Advances in the development and validation of physiological, accessible, practical and reliable markers to guide therapy are expected. To improve patients' outcomes, further study is required to more fully explore the risk of anemia, optimal hemoglobin level, and the risk and efficacy of RBC transfusion. Future clinical investigations with high priority should determine the efficacy of transfusion in those classified as uncertain scenarios. In the absence of data, it is prudent that transfusion is administered with caution in these clinical scenarios.

  5. Using red blood cell genomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Jill M

    2015-01-01

    Blood types (blood group antigens) are heritable polymorphic antigenic molecules on the surface of blood cells. These were amongst the first human Mendelian traits identified, and the genetic basis of nearly all of the hundreds of blood types is known. Clinical laboratory methods have proven useful to identify selected blood group gene variants, and use of genetic blood type information is becoming widespread. However, the breadth and complexity of clinically relevant blood group genetic variation poses challenges. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, a more comprehensive DNA sequence-based genetic blood typing approach is now feasible. This chapter introduces the practitioner to high-resolution genetic blood typing beginning with an overview of the genetics of blood group antigens, the clinical problem of allosensitization, current blood type testing methods, and then discussion of next-generation sequencing and its application to the problem of genetic blood typing. PMID:26637717

  6. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Peng, Weng Kung; Han, Jongyoon; Pumera, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood cells on glassy carbon electrode (GC) was demonstrated. Red blood cells or raw blood cells was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode surface with Nafion films employed to sandwich the layer of biological sample firmly on the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed a well-defined reduction peak for haemoglobin at about -0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the red blood cell (GC-Nf-RBC-3Nf) and blood (GC-Nf-B-3Nf) film modified GCE in a pH 3.5 phosphate buffer solution. We further demonstrated that the complex biological conditions of a human red blood cell displayed no interference with the detection of haemoglobin. Such findings shall have an implication on the possibilities of studying the electrochemical behaviour of haemoglobin directly from human blood, for various scientific and clinical purposes.

  7. Red blood cell storage duration and trauma.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2015-04-01

    Numerous retrospective clinical studies suggest that transfusion of longer stored red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with an independent risk of poorer outcomes for certain groups of patients, including trauma, intensive care, and cardiac surgery patients. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials are currently underway to address the concern about RBC storage duration. However, none of these randomized controlled trials focus specifically on trauma patients with hemorrhage. Major trauma, particularly due to road accidents, is the leading cause of critical injury in the younger-than-40-year-old age group. Severe bleeding associated with major trauma induces hemodynamic dysregulation that increases the risk of hypoxia, coagulopathy, and potentially multiorgan failure, which can be fatal. In major trauma, a multitude of stress-associated changes occur to the patient's RBCs, including morphological changes that increase cell rigidity and thereby alter blood flow hemodynamics, particularly in the microvascular vessels, and reduce RBC survival. Initial inflammatory responses induce deleterious cellular interactions, including endothelial activation, RBC adhesion, and erythrophagocytosis that are quickly followed by profound immunosuppressive responses. Stored RBCs exhibit similar biophysical characteristics to those of trauma-stressed RBCs. Whether transfusion of RBCs that exhibit storage lesion changes exacerbates the hemodynamic perturbations already active in the trauma patient is not known. This article reviews findings from several recent nonrandomized studies examining RBC storage duration and clinical outcomes in trauma patients. The rationale for further research on RBC storage duration in the trauma setting is provided.

  8. Amplified-fragment length polymorphism analysis of Propionibacterium isolates implicated in contamination of blood products.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, T; Reesink, H W; Pietersz, R N I; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E; Savelkoul, P H M

    2005-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is implicated in most cases of bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs). To determine the source of contamination, amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was applied. This DNA fingerprinting technique was used to study the molecular relationship of 44 isolates derived from 22 PCs and 22 corresponding red blood cells concentrates (RBCs) from the same whole blood donations. The AFLP results together with sequencing analysis of the 1,200 bp of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed the existence of three main groups: two groups (groups 2 and 3) (55%) consisted of isolates that did not originate from skin flora and another group (group 1) (45%) comprised bacteria belonging to the skin flora. This latter group showed complete homology with reference strains of P. acnes. Therefore these isolates can be considered as P. acnes strains. In contrast, contaminants from groups 2 and 3 were shown to be molecularly unrelated to the P. acnes found on the skin surface. The AFLP is reproducible and gave invaluable information about the nature of Propionibacteria contaminating PCs. To gain more insights into the source of contamination, this technique could be exploited in further studies to determine the molecular relationship of different bacteria commonly found in blood products.

  9. The blood-brain barrier-gatekeeper to neuronal homeostasis: clinical implications in the setting of stroke.

    PubMed

    Schoknecht, Karl; David, Yaron; Heinemann, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier is part of the neurovascular unit and serves as a functional and anatomical barrier between the blood and the extracellular space. It controls the flow of solutes in and out of the brain thereby providing an optimal environment for neuronal functioning. Paracellular transport between endothelial cells is restricted by tight junctions and transendothelial transport is reduced and more selective compared to capillaries of other organs. Further, the blood-brain barrier is involved in controlling blood flow and it is the site for signaling damage of the nervous system to the peripheral immune system. As an important player in brain homeostasis, blood-brain barrier dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many brain diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders. In this article - highlighting recent advances in basic science - we review the features of the blood-brain barrier and their significance for neuronal homeostasis to discuss clinical implications for neurological complications following cerebral ischemia.

  10. Human red blood cell aging: correlative changes in surface charge and cell properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Mehrishi, Jitendra; Huang, Bao-Tian; Chen, Xing-Yao; Zheng, Xin-Jing; Liu, Wen-Jing; Luo, Man

    2011-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) during microcirculation, aging and storage, lose N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and other biomaterials thereby altering cell structures, some properties and functions. Such cell damage very likely underlies the serious adverse effects of blood transfusion. However, a controversy has remained since 1961-1977 as to whether with aging, the RBCs, suffering loss of NANA, do have a decreased charge density. Any correlation between the changes in the cell properties with cell aging is also not clear. Therefore, to remove the ambiguity and uncertainty, we carried out multiparameteric studies on Percoll fractions of blood of 38 volunteers (lightest-young-Y-RBCs, densest-old-O-RBCs, two middle fractions).We found that there were striking differences between the properties of Y-RBCs and O-RBCs. The ζ-potential of Y-RBCs decreased gradually with aging. Studies in parallel on RBC fractions incubated with both positively charged quantum dots and Sambucus Nigra-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) along with their ζ-potentials provide for the first time direct visual evidence about the lesser amount of charge density and NANA on O-RBCs, and a collinear decrease in their respective ζ-potentials. Close correlation was found between the surface charge on an aging RBC and its structure and functions, from the cell morphology, the membrane deformability to the intracellular Hb structure and oxidation ability. This quantitative approach not only clarifies the picture but also has implications in biology and medicine.

  11. Blood vessels and red blood cells preserved in dinosaur bones.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, R; Nowogrodzka-Zagórska, M

    1998-02-01

    Dinosaur bones, 80 million years old, were studied in the scanning electron microscope, and subjected to X-ray microanalysis. Samples for the investigations were prepared according to specially elaborated, and simultaneously described methods. Analysed were (a) the morphological structure of the blood vessels and (b) the remains of their contents. The walls of the blood vessels were found to be morphologically identical with those in present-day reptiles. Bodies were found at several places inside the vessels which strongly remind one of erythrocytes in modern bones. X-ray microanalysis of places where these bodies were accumulated revealed much higher levels of iron, than at any other regions of the blood-vessel wall. Further analysis of the "dinosaur erythrocyte" iron content could be a starting point for the possible determination of oxygen in the earth's atmosphere, 80 million years ago.

  12. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  13. Serological distinction of A antigen between red blood cells and saliva in blood grouping of blood and body fluid stains.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Iwasa, M; Yokoi, T

    1984-02-01

    A antigens of red blood cells and body fluids such as saliva, semen and sweat could be serologically distinguished using rabbit or guinea pig immune anti-A. As for antisera specific for red blood cell A, A+ rabbits were intravenously immunized with A group red blood cells. The resulting antisera were absorbed with O and B red cells and with A. Se saliva. The absorbed anti-A reacted with A red cells (titer 1:32) and was not inhibited with A. Se saliva. Guinea pigs were intramuscularly injected with A. Se saliva. Crude antisera contained agglutinins to human red cells which were abolished by absorption with A red cells. After absorption with O. Se saliva, the antisera were proved to have agglutinin activity with A group saliva using latex coated with A. Se saliva. A antigens from blood or body fluid stains could be distinguished by the elution method with these anti-A sera. PMID:6719447

  14. Human red blood cells' physiological water exchange with the plasma.

    PubMed

    Kargol, M; Kargol, A; Przestalski, M; Siedlecki, J; Karpińska, M; Rogowski, M

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, fundamental issues related to the mechanisms of human red blood cells' physiological water exchange with the plasma (for the stationary conditions) have been discussed. It has been demonstrated, on the basis of mechanistic transport equations for membrane transport that red blood cells are capable of exchanging considerable amounts of water with the plasma. Water absorption is osmosis-driven, and its removal occurs according to the hydromechanics principle, i.e. is driven by the turgor pressure of red blood cells. This newly-acquired knowledge of these issues may appear highly useful for clinical diagnosis of blood diseases and blood circulation failures. PMID:16358974

  15. Portable microfluidic cytometer for whole blood cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafton, Meggie M.; Zordan, Michael D.; Chuang, Han-Sheng; Rajdev, Pooja; Reece, Lisa M.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.; Wereley, Steven T.; Byrnes, Ron; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2010-02-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems allow complex laboratory assays to be carried out on a single chip using less time, reagents, and manpower than traditional methods. There are many chips addressing PCR and other DNA assays, but few that address blood cell analysis. Blood analysis, particularly of the cellular component, is highly important in both medical and scientific fields. Traditionally blood samples require a vial of blood, then several processing steps to separate and stain the various components, followed by the preparations for each specific assay to be performed. A LOC system for blood cell analysis and sorting would be ideal. The microfluidic-based system we have developed requires a mere drop of blood to be introduced onto the chip. Once on chip, the blood is mixed with both fluorescent and magnetic labels. The lab-on-a-chip device then uses a syringe drive to push the cells through the chip, while a permanent magnet is positioned to pull the magnetically labeled white blood cells to a separate channel. The white blood cells, labeled with different color fluorescent quantum dots (Qdots) conjugated to antibodies against WBC subpopulations, are analyzed and counted, while a sampling of red blood cells is also counted in a separate channel. This device will be capable of processing whole blood samples on location in a matter of minutes and displaying the cell count and should eventually find use in neonatology, AIDS and remote site applications.

  16. [Blood stem cell transplantation in pediatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Mentkevich, G L; Dolgopolov, I S; Popa, A V; Boiarshinov, V K; Ravshanova, R S

    2001-01-01

    Large-dose chemotherapy (LDCT) with auto- and allogenic transplantation of blood stem cells (BSC) in pediatric oncology remains so far the last hope for many patients. The number of such procedures made in Europe increases by 10% every year. At the same time many issues of the place and role of transplantation in pediatric oncology remains unclear. Based on 240 sessions of cytopheresis, the author show that BSC can be sampled from severe pretreated patients despite the drug therapy regimen. The efficacy of G-KSF and GM-KSF used to stimulate BSC secretion is similar. After LDCT with BSC autotransplantation, the relapse-free survival rates in patients with Ewing's sarcoma and acute myeloblast-cell leukemia were 55.4 and 44.4%, respectively (in the first and second remissions). Consolidation as LDCT with BSC autotransplantation without cleansing the material from malignant cells is not a sufficient therapeutical measurement in disseminated neuroblastoma. Whether partial compatible related BSC transplantation can be possible made after non-myeloablative preparation regimens is shown.

  17. Counting white blood cells using morphological granulometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theera-Umpon, Nipon; Gader, Paul D.

    2000-04-01

    We describe a modification of the mixture proportion estimation algorithm based on the granulometric mixing theorem. The modified algorithm is applied to the problem of counting different types of white blood cells in bone marrow images. In principle, the algorithm can be used to count the proportion of cells in each class without explicitly segmenting and classifying them. The direct application of the original algorithm does not converge well for more than two classes. The modified algorithm uses prior statistics to initially segment the mixed pattern spectrum and then applies the one-primitive estimation algorithm to each initial component. Applying the algorithm to one class at a time results in better convergence. The counts produced by the modified algorithm on six classes of cells--myeloblast, promyelocyte, myelocyte, metamyelocyte, band, and PolyMorphoNuclear--are very close to the human expert's numbers; the deviation of the algorithm counts is similar to the deviation of counts produced by human experts. The important technical contributions are that the modified algorithm uses prior statistics for each shape class in place or prior knowledge of the total number of objects in an image, and it allows for more than one primitive from each class.

  18. Thermoelasticity of red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, R; Evans, E A

    1979-01-01

    The elastic properties of the human red blood cell membrane have been measured as functions of temperature. The area compressibility modulus and the elastic shear modulus, which together characterize the surface elastic behavior of the membrane, have been measured over the temperature range of 2-50 degrees C with micropipette aspiration of flaccid and osmotically swollen red cells. In addition, the fractional increase in membrane surface area from 2-50 degrees C has been measured to give a value for the thermal area expansivity. The value of the elastic shear modulus at 25 degrees C was measured to be 6.6 X 10(-3) dyne/cm. The change in the elastic shear modulus with temperature was -6 X 10(-5) dyne/cm degrees C. Fractional forces were shown to be only on the order of 10-15%. The area compressibility modulus at 25 degrees C was measured to be 450 dyne/cm. The change in the area compressibility modulus with temperature was -6 dyne/cm degrees C. The thermal area expansivity for red cell membrane was measured to be 1.2 X 10(-3)/degrees C. With this data and thermoelastic relations the heat of expansion is determined to be 110-200 ergs/cm2; the heat of extension is 2 X 10(-2) ergs/cm2 for unit extension of the red cell membrane. The heat of expansion is of the order anticipated for a lipid bilayer idealized as twice the behavior of a monolayer at an oil-water interface. The observation that the heat of extension is positive demonstrates that the entropy of the material increases with extension, and that the dominant mechanism of elastic energy storage is energetic. Assuming that the red cell membrane shear rigidity is associated with "spectrin," unit extension of the membrane increases the configurational entropy of spectrin by 500 cal/mol. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:262408

  19. Single scattering by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hammer, M; Schweitzer, D; Michel, B; Thamm, E; Kolb, A

    1998-11-01

    A highly diluted suspension of red blood cells (hematocrit 0.01) was illuminated with an Ar or a dye laser in the wavelength range of 458-660 nm. The extinction and the angle-resolved intensity of scattered light were measured and compared with the predictions of Mie theory, the Rayleigh-Gans approximation, and the anomalous diffraction approximation. Furthermore, empirical phase functions were fitted to the measurements. The measurements were in satisfactory agreement with the predictions of Mie theory. However, better agreement was found with the anomalous diffraction model. In the Rayleigh-Gans approximation, only small-angle scattering is described appropriately. The scattering phase function of erythrocytes may be represented by the Gegenbauer kernel phase function. PMID:18301575

  20. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. PMID:26590403

  1. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  2. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-14

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. PMID:26815946

  3. Immunoglobulin G-mediated regulation of the murine immune response to transfused red blood cells occurs in the absence of active immune suppression: implications for the mechanism of action of anti-D in the prevention of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn?

    PubMed Central

    Brinc, Davor; Le-Tien, Hoang; Crow, Andrew R; Siragam, Vinayakumar; Freedman, John; Lazarus, Alan H

    2008-01-01

    Anti-D has been widely and effectively used in Rhesus blood group D negative mothers for the prevention of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn; its mechanism of action however, often referred to as antibody-mediated immune suppression (AMIS), remains largely unresolved. We investigated, in a murine model, whether active immune suppression or clonal deletion mediated by anti-red blood cell (RBC) immunoglobulin G (IgG) could explain the phenomenon of AMIS. Transfusion of IgG-opsonized foreign RBCs (i.e. AMIS) strongly attenuated antibody responses compared to transfusion of untreated foreign RBCs. When the AMIS-mice were subsequently transfused with untreated RBCs, no immune suppression was observed at 5 and 35 days after AMIS induction; in fact, the mice responded to retransfusion with untreated RBCs in a manner that was characteristic of a secondary immune response. When IgG-opsonized RBCs were transfused concurrently with untreated RBCs, a dose-dependent reduction of the antibody response was observed. This work suggests that the attenuation of the antibody responsiveness by anti-RBC IgG is not associated with active immune suppression or clonal deletion at either the T-cell or B-cell level; rather, the effect appears more characteristic of B-cell unresponsiveness to IgG-opsonized RBCs. These results may have implications for the understanding of the mechanism of action of anti-D in haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. PMID:18266717

  4. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  5. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  6. Meanings of blood, bleeding and blood donations in Pakistan: implications for national vs global safe blood supply policies

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Zubia; Bowen, Sarah; Mumtaz, Rubina

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary public policy, supported by international arbitrators of blood policy such as the World Health Organization and the International Federation of the Red Cross, asserts that the safest blood is that donated by voluntary, non-remunerated donors from low-risk groups of the population. These policies promote anonymous donation and discourage kin-based or replacement donation. However, there is reason to question whether these policies, based largely on Western research and beliefs, are the most appropriate for ensuring an adequate safe blood supply in many other parts of the world. This research explored the various and complex meanings embedded in blood using empirical ethnographic data from Pakistan, with the intent of informing development of a national blood policy in that country. Using a focused ethnographic approach, data were collected in 26 in-depth interviews, 6 focus group discussions, 12 key informant interviews and 25 hours of observations in blood banks and maternity and surgical wards. The key finding was that notions of caste-based purity of blood, together with the belief that donors and recipients are symbolically knitted in a kin relationship, place a preference on kin-blood. The anonymity inherent in current systems of blood extraction, storage and use as embedded in contemporary policy discourse and practice was problematic as it blurred distinctions that were important within this society. The article highlights the importance—to ensuring a safe blood supply—of basing blood procurement policies on local, context-specific belief systems rather than relying on uniform, one-size-fits-all global policies. Drawing on our empirical findings and the literature, it is argued that the practice of kin-donated blood remains a feasible alternative to the global ideal of voluntary, anonymous donations. There is a need to focus on developing context-sensitive strategies for promoting blood safety, and critically revisit the assumptions

  7. Mechanical damage of red blood cells by rotary blood pumps: selective destruction of aged red blood cells and subhemolytic trauma.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryuki; Sobajima, Hideo; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Waguri, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Takatani, Setsuo

    2008-10-01

    In this study, mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) were measured to quantify RBC damage by rotary blood pumps. Six-hour hemolysis tests were conducted with a Bio-pump BPX-80, a Sarns 15200 roller pump, and a prototype mag-lev centrifugal pump (MedTech Heart) using fresh porcine blood circulated at 5 L/min against a 100 mm Hg head pressure. The temperature of the test and noncirculated control blood was maintained at 37 degrees C. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of each pump was determined by measuring the plasma-free hemoglobin level. The MCV was measured with a Coulter counter, and MCHC was derived from total hemoglobin and hematocrit. MCH was derived from MCV and MCHC. A multivariance statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences (n = 15, P < 0.05) in MCV, MCHC, and MCH between the blood sheared by the rotary blood pumps and the nonsheared control blood. Normalized to the control blood, the Bio-pump BPX-80 showed an MCV of 1.04 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.95 +/- 0.04, and an MCH of 0.98 +/- 0.02; the mag-lev MedTech Heart had an MCV of 1.02 +/- 0.02, an MCHC of 0.97 +/- 0.02, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01; and the roller pump exhibited an MCV of 1.03 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.96 +/- 0.03, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01. Per 0.01 increase in NIH, the BPX-80 showed a normalized MCV change of +10.1% and a normalized MCHC change of -14.0%; the MedTech Heart demonstrated a +6.9% MCV and -9.5% MCHC change; and the roller pump had a +0.5% MCV and -0.6% MCHC change. Due to shear in the pump circuits, the RBC increased while the MCHC decreased. The likely mechanism is that older RBCs with smaller size and higher hemoglobin concentration were destroyed fast by the shear, leaving younger RBCs with larger size and lower hemoglobin concentration. Subhemolytic trauma caused the intracellular hemoglobin to decrease due to gradual hemoglobin leakage through the micropores formed in the thinned

  8. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  9. Oscillating blood droplets--implications for crime scene reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Raymond, M A; Smith, E R; Liesegang, J

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, the analysis of blood spatter on surfaces in the reconstruction of crime scenes relies on the assumption that blood droplets are spherical when they strike the surface. This paper explores the effects of their shape on the reconstruction of trajectories from their impact pattern, and reports a theoretical analysis of the lifetime of droplet oscillations. Oscillations damp quickly in blood droplets due to the viscosity. The analysis provides ranges of velocities and distances from the point of droplet projection within which it is unreliable to assume the droplets are spherical when they stain a surface. Non-spherical droplet stains predict incorrect positioning of the droplet projection point. Experimental data are presented to show that the estimates apply in practice. PMID:8789933

  10. Skeletal blood flow: implications for bone-scan interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Charkes, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    The dispersion of the skeleton throughout the body and its complex vascular anatomy require indirect methods for the measurement of skeletal blood flow. The results of one such method, compartmental analysis of skeletal tracer kinetics, are presented. The assumptions underlying the models were tested in animals and found to be in agreement with experimental observations. Based upon the models and the experimental results, inferences concerning bone-scan interpretation can be drawn: decreased cardiac output produces low-contrast (technically poor) scans; decreased skeletal flow produces photon-deficient lesions; increase of cardiac output or of generalized systemic blood flow is undetectable 1 to 2 h after dose; increased local skeletal blood flow results from disturbance of the bone microvasculature and can occur from neurologic (sympatholytic) disorders or in association with focal abnormalities that also incite the formation of reactive bone (e.g., metastasis, fracture, etc.). Mathematical solutions of tracer kinetic data thus become relevant to bone-scan interpretation.

  11. Oscillating blood droplets--implications for crime scene reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Raymond, M A; Smith, E R; Liesegang, J

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, the analysis of blood spatter on surfaces in the reconstruction of crime scenes relies on the assumption that blood droplets are spherical when they strike the surface. This paper explores the effects of their shape on the reconstruction of trajectories from their impact pattern, and reports a theoretical analysis of the lifetime of droplet oscillations. Oscillations damp quickly in blood droplets due to the viscosity. The analysis provides ranges of velocities and distances from the point of droplet projection within which it is unreliable to assume the droplets are spherical when they stain a surface. Non-spherical droplet stains predict incorrect positioning of the droplet projection point. Experimental data are presented to show that the estimates apply in practice.

  12. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  13. Developmental Plasticity of Red Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Malka, Roy; Higgins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Most human physiologic set points like body temperature are tightly regulated and show little variation between healthy individuals. Red blood cell (RBC) characteristics such as hematocrit (HCT) and mean cell volume (MCV) are stable within individuals but can vary by 20% from one healthy person to the next. The mechanisms for the majority of this inter-individual variation are unknown and do not appear to involve common genetic variation. Here we show that environmental conditions present during development, namely in utero iron availability, can exert long-term influence on a set point related to the RBC life cycle. In a controlled study of rhesus monkeys and a retrospective study of humans, we use a mathematical model of in vivo RBC population dynamics to show that in utero iron deficiency is associated with a lowered threshold for RBC clearance and turnover. This in utero effect is plastic, persisting at least two years after birth and after the cessation of iron deficiency. Our study reports a rare instance of developmental plasticity in the human hematologic systems and also shows how mathematical modeling can be used to identify cellular mechanisms involved in the adaptive control of homeostatic set points. PMID:24415575

  14. The treatment of neurodegenerative disorders using umbilical cord blood and menstrual blood-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Eve, David J; Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Tan, Jun; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Allickson, Julie G; Cruz, L Eduardo; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a potentially important means of treatment for a number of disorders. Two different stem cell populations of interest are mononuclear umbilical cord blood cells and menstrual blood-derived stem cells. These cells are relatively easy to obtain, appear to be pluripotent, and are immunologically immature. These cells, particularly umbilical cord blood cells, have been studied as either single or multiple injections in a number of animal models of neurodegenerative disorders with some degree of success, including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Sanfilippo syndrome type B. Evidence of anti-inflammatory effects and secretion of specific cytokines and growth factors that promote cell survival, rather than cell replacement, have been detected in both transplanted cells.

  15. Quality of red blood cells isolated from umbilical cord blood stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  16. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  17. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells. PMID:26554882

  18. Clinical implications of non-invasive measurement of central aortic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Stepień, Mariusz; Banach, Maciej; Jankowski, Piotr; Rysz, Jacek

    2010-11-01

    Central arterial systolic blood pressure is a very important factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Central arterial pressure is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than peripheral brachial blood pressure. Measurement of central blood pressure is useful for a diagnosis of spurious systolic hypertension in young people. Antihypertensive drugs have a different impact on central blood pressure, for example angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, antagonists of angiotensin II receptors, calcium channel blockers more effectively lower central blood pressure than betablockers, despite all of those drugs (including beta-blockers) having a similar impact on peripheral pressure. This mechanism may be responsible for the beneficial effect of some antihypertensive drugs on cardiovascular end points observed in clinical trials, despite a low peripheral hypotensive effect. However, further clinical trials are required to provide more evidence for the prognostic and therapeutic implications of the measurement of central blood pressure before adopting its routine application in clinical practice.

  19. Hemobilia detected by Tc-99m labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Wholey, M.H.; Ismail-Beigi, F.

    1982-01-01

    Tc-99m labeled red blood cells were successfully used to determine the site of hemorrhage in a 67-year-old man with hemobilia. A false hepatic artery aneurysm was confirmed at angiography and ultimately successfully embolized. The relative merits of using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells for detecting sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are discussed.

  20. Hormones that Stimulate the Growth of Blood Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golde, David W.; Gasson, Judith C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the nature and action of hematopoietic proteins which regulate the production of specific sets of blood cells. Discusses the production of these hematopoietins by recombinant-DNA methods in an effort to enable physicians to treat patients by eliciting production of specific types of blood cells. (CW)

  1. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called “sports anemia.” This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  2. Establishment of outgrowth endothelial cells from peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ramirez, Javier; Hofman, Menno; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hebbel, Robert P; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) are important tools when investigating diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for vascular disease. In this protocol, mononuclear cells are isolated from peripheral blood and plated on type I collagen at ∼135,000 cells per cm(2) in endothelial cell differentiation medium. On average, 0.34 colonies of endothelial cells per milliliter of blood can be obtained. Colonies of endothelial cells become visible after 14-28 d. Upon confluence, these rapidly expanding colonies can be passaged and have been shown to propagate up to 10(18)-fold. Isolated BOECs are phenotypically similar to vascular endothelial cells, as revealed by their cobblestone morphology, the presence of endothelial cell-specific Weibel-Palade bodies and the expression of endothelial cell markers such as VE-cadherin. The protocol presented here also provides a particularly useful tool for the ex vivo assessment of endothelial cell function from patients with different vascular abnormalities. PMID:22918388

  3. The meanings of consent to the donation of cord blood stem cells: perspectives from an interview-based study of a public cord blood bank in England

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the perspectives of women who have agreed that their umbilical cord blood may be collected for a public ‘cord blood bank’, for use in transplant medicine or research. Drawing on interview data from 27 mothers who agreed to the collection and use of their umbilical cord blood, these choices and the informed consent process are explored. It is shown that the needs of sick children requiring transplants are prominent in narrative accounts of cord blood banking, together with high expectations for future applications of stem cells. Given this dynamic, a concern arises that the complex and multiple uses of tissues and related data might be oversimplified in the consent process. In conclusion, the positive finding of a commitment to mutuality in cord blood banking among these women is underlined, and its implications for the wider debate on cord blood banking are discussed. PMID:21666742

  4. Microfluidic impedance cytometry of tumour cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Daniel; Hollis, Veronica; Morgan, Hywel

    2014-11-01

    The dielectric properties of tumour cells are known to differ from normal blood cells, and this difference can be exploited for label-free separation of cells. Conventional measurement techniques are slow and cannot identify rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a realistic timeframe. We use high throughput single cell microfluidic impedance cytometry to measure the dielectric properties of the MCF7 tumour cell line (representative of CTCs), both as pure populations and mixed with whole blood. The data show that the MCF7 cells have a large membrane capacitance and size, enabling clear discrimination from all other leukocytes. Impedance analysis is used to follow changes in cell viability when cells are kept in suspension, a process which can be understood from modelling time-dependent changes in the dielectric properties (predominantly membrane conductivity) of the cells. Impedance cytometry is used to enumerate low numbers of MCF7 cells spiked into whole blood. Chemical lysis is commonly used to remove the abundant erythrocytes, and it is shown that this process does not alter the MCF7 cell count or change their dielectric properties. Combining impedance cytometry with magnetic bead based antibody enrichment enables MCF7 cells to be detected down to 100 MCF7 cells in 1 ml whole blood, a log 3.5 enrichment and a mean recovery of 92%. Microfluidic impedance cytometry could be easily integrated within complex cell separation systems for identification and enumeration of specific cell types, providing a fast in-line single cell characterisation method.

  5. Differential effects of Tat proteins derived from HIV-1 subtypes B and recombinant CRF02_AG on human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implications for blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Shawna M; Bhargavan, Biju; Yu, Fang; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2014-06-01

    HIV-1 genetic differences influence viral replication and progression to AIDS. HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF)02_AG is the predominant viral subtype infecting humans in West and Central Africa, but its effects on HIV neuropathogenesis are not known. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Tat proteins from HIV-1 subtype B (Tat.B) and HIV-1 CRF02_AG (Tat.AG) on primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), the major component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0.ST arrays, we showed that Tat.AG had minimal effects while Tat.B induced transcriptional upregulation of 90 genes in HBMEC, including proinflammatory chemokines, complement components C3, C7, and complement factor B, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3, MMP-10, and MMP-12. These results were confirmed by real-time PCR. Compared with Tat.AG, Tat.B significantly increased MMP-3, MMP-10, and MMP-12 activities in HBMEC, and the MMPs tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 blocked Tat-induced increase in MMPs activity. Western blot analyses also showed that Tat increased the expression of C3 and its cleaved fragment C3b in HBMEC. These data suggest that genetic differences between HIV-1 subtypes B and CRF02_AG influence the effects of Tat proteins from these two clades on HBMEC, including molecular and cellular functions, and canonical pathways, which would affect BBB dysfunction and viral neuropathogenesis.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptors, in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, T; Yasuoka, S; Nakayama, T; Tsubura, E

    1982-01-01

    The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells were measured with 3H-prednisolone. Alveolar macrophages, which constituted 89.0 +/- 5.9% of broncho-alveolar cells, obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage from normal volunteers had much larger numbers of specific glucocorticoid receptors than peripheral blood cells. The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in peripheral polymorphonuclear leucocytes, lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (B cells, T cells, TG cells and TnonG cells) were nearly equal. In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in whom alveolar macrophages amounted to over 85% of the broncho-alveolar cells, the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages was significantly decreased, but the numbers in their peripheral blood cells were normal. This finding suggests that the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages may change specifically during disorders of the lung. PMID:7075033

  7. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  8. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  9. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Groshar, D.; Weininger, J.

    1984-07-01

    Red blood cells labeled with 99mTc constitute a suitable intravascular agent for imaging of vascular abnormalities. Hemangiomas are characterized by low perfusion and a high blood pool. This ''perfusion blood-pool mismatch,'' not encountered in other lesions, may help in the specific diagnosis of this tumor. This is particularly so in cavernous hemangiomas of the liver where three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy should precede liver biopsy. Red cell scintigraphy also is useful for establishing the vascular nature of hemangiomas of the head and neck and the skin and for diagnosis of venous occlusion. Heat-damaged red blood cells provide a specific spleen imaging agent. This should be used when patients with suspected splenic pathology have equivocal colloid scintigraphy.

  10. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters.

  11. Formation of dimethylthioarsenicals in red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Kazuo T.

    2008-03-15

    The bladder and skin are the primary targets for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in mammals. Thioarsenicals dimethylmonothioarsinic (DMMTA{sup V}) and dimethyldithioarsinic (DMDTA{sup V}) acids are common urinary metabolites, the former being much more toxic than non-thiolated dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) and comparable to dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in epidermoid cells, suggesting that the metabolic production of thioarsenicals may be a risk factor for the development of cancer in these organs. To reveal their production sites (tissues/body fluids), we examined the uptake and transformation of the four dimethylated arsenicals by incubation with rat and human red blood cells (RBCs). Although DMA{sup V} and DMDTA{sup V} were not taken up by either type of RBCs, DMA{sup III} and DMMTA{sup V} were taken up by both (more efficiently by rat ones), though DMMTA{sup V} was taken up slowly, and then the arsenic transformed into DMDTA{sup V} was excreted from both types of animal RBCs. On the other hand, although DMA{sup III} taken up rapidly by rat RBCs was retained in the RBCs, that taken up by human RBCs was immediately transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted into the incubation medium without being retained in the RBCs. In a separate experiment, arsenic remaining in primary rat hepatocytes after incubation with 1.5 {mu}M DMA{sup III} was recovered from the incubation medium in the forms of DMA{sup V} and DMMTA{sup V} in the presence of human RBCs, but not in the presence of rat RBCs (in which the arsenic was bound to hemoglobin). Thus, DMMTA{sup V} was detected in the medium only in the presence of human RBCs and increased with incubation time. It was proposed that arsenic is excreted from hepatocytes into the bloodstream in the form of DMA{sup III} and then taken up by RBCs in humans, where it is transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted again into the bloodstream.

  12. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  13. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield.

  14. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield. PMID:24611298

  15. A novel hydrophilic polymer-brush pattern for site-specific capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Qiang; Ye, Wei; Fan, Qunfu; Shi, Hengchong; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2015-03-11

    A novel hydrophilic PAMPS-PAAm brush pattern is fabricated to selectively capture blood cells from whole blood. PAMPS brushes provide antifouling surfaces to resist protein and cell adhesion while PAAm brushes effectively entrap targeted proteins for site-specific and cell-type dependent capture of blood cells. PMID:25469596

  16. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Loh, Yuin-Han; Agarwal, Suneet; Park, In-Hyun; Urbach, Achia; Huo, Hongguang; Heffner, Garrett C; Kim, Kitai; Miller, Justine D; Ng, Kitwa; Daley, George Q

    2009-05-28

    Human dermal fibroblasts obtained by skin biopsy can be reprogrammed directly to pluripotency by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Here, we describe the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from CD34+ mobilized human peripheral blood cells using retroviral transduction of OCT4/SOX2/KLF4/MYC. Blood-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells are indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, expression of surface antigens, and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, DNA methylation status at pluripotent cell-specific genes, and the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in teratomas. The ability to reprogram cells from human blood will allow the generation of patient-specific stem cells for diseases in which the disease-causing somatic mutations are restricted to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. PMID:19299331

  17. Red blood cell damage by shear stress for different blood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Bedkowski, Katherine; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    In surgical practice, blood damage caused by medical devices is often a limiting factor in the duration of an acute procedure or in chronic exposures such as hemodialysis. In order to establish guidelines for designing medical devices, a study was conducted to determine the relationship between shear stress and damage to red blood cells using a concentric Couette device. By measuring the hemolysis level for various shear stresses and exposure times, a non-dimensional relationship between shear stress and blood damage for different blood types was established. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  18. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  19. Relation between stable isotope ratios in human red blood cells and hair: implications for using the nitrogen isotope ratio of hair as a biomarker of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid1234

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Sarah H; Kristal, Alan R; Boyer, Bert B; King, Irena B; Metzgar, Jordan S

    2009-01-01

    Background: The nitrogen isotope ratio (expressed as δ15N) of red blood cells (RBCs) is highly correlated with the RBC long-chain ω−3 (n−3) fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in Yup'ik Eskimos. Because δ15N can also be measured in hair samples, it could provide a noninvasive, retrospective biomarker for EPA and DHA intakes. Objectives: We investigated the agreement between δ15N in hair and RBCs and then evaluated the relations between hair δ15N and RBC EPA and DHA. We also assessed the agreement in carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) between hair and RBCs, because δ13C has been proposed as a dietary biomarker in other populations. Design: We assessed relations between hair and RBC δ15N and δ13C in a community-based sample of 144 Yup'ik Eskimos and examined the correlations between δ15N and RBC EPA and DHA in a subset of these participants (n = 44). Results: We showed a 1:1 relation with good agreement between hair and RBC δ15N (r = 0.91) and δ13C (r = 0.87). Hair isotope ratios were greater than RBC ratios by 1.5‰ for δ15N and by 2.3‰ for δ13C. There were strong correlations between hair δ15N and RBC EPA and DHA (r = 0.83 and 0.84, respectively). Conclusions: These results support the use of hair δ15N values as a biomarker of EPA and DHA intakes. Because hair collection is noninvasive and the samples require no special processing, studies of EPA and DHA intakes in large populations could use biomarkers rather than self-reports to assess these fatty acids. PMID:19864410

  20. Detection and Characterization of Carcinoma Cells in the Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racila, Emilian; Euhus, David; Weiss, Arthur J.; Rao, Chandra; McConnell, John; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1998-04-01

    A highly sensitive assay combining immunomagnetic enrichment with multiparameter flow cytometric and immunocytochemical analysis has been developed to detect, enumerate, and characterize carcinoma cells in the blood. The assay can detect one epithelial cell or less in 1 ml of blood. Peripheral blood (10-20 ml) from 30 patients with carcinoma of the breast, from 3 patients with prostate cancer, and from 13 controls was examined by flow cytometry for the presence of circulating epithelial cells defined as nucleic acid+, CD45-, and cytokeratin+. Highly significant differences in the number of circulating epithelial cells were found between normal controls and patients with cancer including 17 with organ-confined disease. To determine whether the circulating epithelial cells in the cancer patients were neoplastic cells, cytospin preparations were made after immunomagnetic enrichment and were analyzed. Epithelial cells from patients with breast cancer generally stained with mAbs against cytokeratin and 3 of 5 for mucin-1. In contrast, no cells that stained for these antigens were observed in the blood from normal controls. The morphology of the stained cells was consistent with that of neoplastic cells. Of 8 patients with breast cancer followed for 1-10 months, there was a good correlation between changes in the level of tumor cells in the blood with both treatment with chemotherapy and clinical status. The present assay may be helpful in early detection, in monitoring disease, and in prognostication.

  1. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious agents for sterilization of red blood cell concentrates and whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Newman, Joseph T.; Chanh, Tran C.; Marengo-Rowe, Alain J.

    1992-06-01

    More than 10 million units of human blood components are transfused annually in the United States. Although donor screening and testing have greatly lowered the risk of transmission of viral and protozoan infectious agents, additional sterilization procedures which also preserve blood component function would be of significant value. Use of visible-light-range photosensitizers for sterilization of red blood cells is currently being aggressively investigated in laboratory-scale optical-mechanical systems. Both the photochemical sterilization process and the optical-mechanical system must operate without introducing significant alteration in the properties of the red cells. With successful demonstration of the efficacy and safety of these sterilization techniques, implementation in the blood bank setting will require scale-up to optical-mechanical systems capable of handling approximately 50,000 units daily in 500 - 1,000 blood banks in the United States.

  2. HEMORHEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF PERFLUOROCARBON BASED OXYGEN CARRIER INTERACTION WITH COLLOID PLASMA EXPANDERS AND BLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Diana M.; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A.; Briceño, Juan C.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion based oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in the presence of clinically-used PEs. The rheological behavior of the mixtures was analyzed in parallel with in vivo analysis of blood flow in microvessels using intravital microscopy when administered in a clinically relevant scenario. The interaction between the PFC emulsion and PE with blood produced PFC droplets and red blood cell (RBCs) aggregation, and increased blood viscosity. The PFC droplets formed aggregates when mixed with PEs containing electrolytes, and the aggregation increased with the electrolyte concentration. Mixtures of PFC with PEs that produced PFC aggregates also induced RCBs aggregation when mixed with blood, increasing blood viscosity at low shear rates. The more viscous suspension at low shear rates produced a blunted blood flow velocity profile in vivo relative to non-aggregating mixtures of PFC and PEs. For the PEs evaluated, albumin produced minimal to undetectable aggregation. PFC and PEs interaction with blood can affect sections of the microcirculation with low shear rate (e.g. arterioles, venules, and pulmonary circulation) because aggregates could cause capillary occlusion, decrease perfusion, pulmonary emboli, or focal ischemia. PMID:23606592

  3. Simultaneous measurement of red blood cell aggregation and whole blood coagulation using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Yeom, Eunseop; Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) for simultaneous monitoring of blood coagulation and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. Using a 35-MHz ultrasound scanner, ultrasound speckle data were acquired from whole blood samples of three experimental groups of rats, including 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-treated, noncoagulation and normal control groups. The variations of blood echogenicity, the shape parameters of probability distribution of speckle intensity (skewness and kurtosis) and the correlation coefficient between two consecutive speckle data were calculated as a function of time starting from immediately after taking blood. The blood echogenicity increases rapidly to plateaus at the early stage of measurement for all the experimental groups caused by the formation of RBC aggregates. The DIDS-treated group exhibits the lowest echogenicity level due to the inhibitory effect of DIDS on RBC aggregation. The correlation analysis between consecutive speckle patterns seems to be useful to examine the variation of blood fluidity and the progress of clot formation. Whole blood coagulation is observed to be accelerated by DIDS treatment. In addition, the results of skewness and kurtosis analysis indicated that RBC aggregates may be disrupted during blood coagulation. The present study suggests that HFUS has good potential for simultaneous monitoring of RBC aggregation and blood coagulation to examine the relationship between them.

  4. [Discovery of blood cells in the 17th century].

    PubMed

    Doubek, M

    2001-07-01

    Landmark works of the 17th century concerning observations of blood cells are quoted in the article. "Simple" and successively "compound" microscopes made their appearance in the late 16th century and early 17th century. In 1656, Frenchman Pierre Borel, physician-in-ordinary to the King Louis XIV, who first applied the microscope to medicine described a type of "worn" found in human blood. In 1657, Athanasius Kircher, a Jesuit priest and scientist from Germany, examined blood from plague victims, and described "worms" of plague. In 1661, 1664 and 1665, the blood cells were discerned by Marcello Malpighi. In 1678, the red blood corpuscles was described by Jan Swammerdam of Amsterdam, a Dutch naturalist and physician. The first complete account of the red cells was made by Anthony van Leeuwenhoek of Delft in the last quarter of the 17th century.

  5. Human umbilical cord blood cells and diabetes mellitus: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil; Kuppasani, Kishore; Ende, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for patients with diabetes is an area of great interest to both scientists and clinicians. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) are being increasingly used as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapy for diabetes because these cells can differentiate into pancreatic islet β-cells. Administration of HUCBCs has been shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. The use of autologous HUCBC transfusion in type 1 diabetic children has not shown any benefit. However, "Stem Cell Educator" therapy has shown promise in long term lowering of blood glucose levels in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we will briefly discuss recent advances in HUCBC therapy in the treatment of diabetes and some of its complications.

  6. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient’s health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology. PMID:26600999

  7. Method for determining properties of red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for quantifying the concentration of hemoglobin in a cell, and indicia of anemia, comprises determining the wavelength of the longitudinal mode of a liquid in a laser microcavity; determining the wavelength of the fundamental transverse mode of a red blood cell in the liquid in the laser microcavity; and determining if the cell is anemic from the difference between the wavelength of the longitudinal mode and the fundamental transverse mode. In addition to measuring hemoglobin, the invention includes a method using intracavity laser spectroscopy to measure the change in spectra as a function of time for measuring the influx of water into a red blood cell and the cell's subsequent rupture.

  8. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-01

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  9. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  10. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  11. Amyloid β Levels in Human Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Satoh, Akira; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs) to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid) to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging), implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402 PMID:23166730

  12. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  13. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure allows the recipient to get new stem cells that work properly. Stem cells are found in bone marrow, ... the body doesn't make enough red blood cells or they don't work properly. Certain immune-deficiency diseases that prevent the ...

  14. Red blood cell homeostasis: recognition of distinct types of damaged homologous red blood cells by a mouse macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Singer, J A; Morrison, M; Walker, W S

    1987-06-01

    The mouse macrophage (M phi) cell line IC-21 preferentially ingests a subpopulation of homologous red blood cells (MRBC) from normal mice. This subpopulation presumably bears the so-called transfusion lesion, a consequence of damage acquired during the drawing and processing of blood. To determine if all damaged MRBC were recognized by a common receptor site on IC-21 M phi, we prepared suspensions of MRBC damaged in vitro by treatment with tannic acid and compared the phagocytic uptake of these cells with those bearing the transfusion lesion. Trypsin treatment of IC-21 M phi rendered them unable to recognize MRBC bearing the transfusion lesion; but it had no effect on the uptake of tannic acid-damaged MRBC, showing that IC-21 M phi have separate recognition sites for these two populations of damaged MRBC. PMID:3474332

  15. Toward Rare Blood Cell Preservation for RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vickovic, Sanja; Ahmadian, Afshin; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is driven by various events leading to cell differentiation and disease progression. Molecular tools are powerful approaches for describing how and why these events occur. With the growing field of next-generation DNA sequencing, there is an increasing need for high-quality nucleic acids derived from human cells and tissues-a prerequisite for successful cell profiling. Although advances in RNA preservation have been made, some of the largest biobanks still do not employ RNA blood preservation as standard because of limitations in low blood-input volume and RNA stability over the whole gene body. Therefore, we have developed a robust protocol for blood preservation and long-term storage while maintaining RNA integrity. Furthermore, we explored the possibility of using the protocol for preserving rare cell samples, such as circulating tumor cells. The results of our study confirmed that gene expression was not impacted by the preservation procedure (r(2) > 0.88) or by long-term storage (r(2) = 0.95), with RNA integrity number values averaging over 8. Similarly, cell surface antigens were still available for antibody selection (r(2) = 0.95). Lastly, data mining for fusion events showed that it was possible to detect rare tumor cells among a background of other cells present in blood irrespective of fixation. Thus, the developed protocol would be suitable for rare blood cell preservation followed by RNA sequencing analysis.

  16. Drawings of Blood Cells Reveal People’s Perception of Their Blood Disorder: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramondt, Steven; Cameron, Linda D.; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Kaptein, Adrian A.

    2016-01-01

    Context Sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia are rare but chronic blood disorders. Recent literature showed impaired quality of life (QOL) in people with these blood disorders. Assessing one of the determinants of QOL (i.e. illness perceptions) therefore, is an important next research area. Objective We aimed to explore illness perceptions of people with a blood disorder with drawings in addition to the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (Brief IPQ). Drawings are a novel method to assess illness perceptions and the free-range answers drawings offer can add additional insight into how people perceive their illness. Method We conducted a cross-sectional study including 17 participants with a blood disorder. Participants’ illness perceptions were assessed by the Brief IPQ and drawings. Brief IPQ scores were compared with reference groups from the literature (i.e. people with asthma or lupus erythematosus). Results Participants with SCD or thalassemia perceived their blood disorder as being more chronic and reported more severe symptoms than people with either asthma or lupus erythematosus. In the drawings of these participants with a blood disorder, a greater number of blood cells drawn was negatively correlated with perceived personal control (P<0.05), indicating that a greater quantity in the drawing is associated with more negative or distressing beliefs. Conclusion Participants with a blood disorder perceive their disease as fairly threatening compared with people with other chronic illnesses. Drawings can add additional insight into how people perceive their illness by offering free-range answers. PMID:27123580

  17. Margination of White Blood Cells in Microcapillary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Fornleitner, Julia; Gompper, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Margination of white blood cells (WBCs) towards vessel walls is an essential precondition for their efficient adhesion to the vascular endothelium. We perform numerical simulations with a two-dimensional blood flow model to investigate the dependence of WBC margination on hydrodynamic interactions of blood cells with the vessel walls, as well as on their collective behavior and deformability. We find WBC margination to be optimal in intermediate ranges of red blood cell (RBC) volume fractions and flow rates, while, beyond these ranges, it is substantially attenuated. RBC aggregation enhances WBC margination, while WBC deformability reduces it. These results are combined in state diagrams, which identify WBC margination for a wide range of flow and cell suspension conditions.

  18. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    PubMed

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-01

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  19. Blood sample stability at room temperature for counting red and white blood cells and platelets.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, S A; Posthuma, D; Boomsma, D; Kluft, C

    2002-08-01

    Blood handling required for different cellular variables is different. In a practical setting of blood sampling approximately 4 h separated from the first analysis, we compared the analysis of blood cell variables at this 4-h point with analysis of blood stored for approximately 48 h (over the weekend) at room temperature. Blood was collected from 304 apparently healthy individuals aged between 17 and 70 years, with a female/male ratio of 1.8, in K3EDTA. Measurement was performed with a Beckman Coulter Counter Maxm. In addition to the comparison of the data and their correlation on the two time points, we investigated agreement between the data using analysis according to Bland and Altman. Counts of white and red blood cells and platelets were found stable over time and agreement of data was excellent. Platelet mean volume increased as expected between the two time points from 8.8 to 10.3 fl. The white blood cell subpopulations, however, changed over time with a decrease in neutrophils and monocytes and increases in lymphocytes and eosinophils. Apparently, ageing of the sample resulted in the alteration of certain cell characteristics leading to a change in automated cell classification without changing the total number of cells. Among the preanalytical variables recorded, only the time of the year and gender were found to be minor determinants (r < .25) of some of the differences between approximately 4 and approximately 48 h analysis delay. It is concluded that after storage at room temperature over approximately 48 h counts of red, total white cells, platelets and analysis of platelet volume can be combined in one assay session.

  20. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  1. Notch signaling: from stem cell expansion to improving cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayani, Hector

    2010-08-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells has been a major goal for experimental hematologists and stem cell biologists during the last two decades. The clinical implications of such a procedure are obvious, considering the increasing interest in cell therapy protocols. This is particularly true in the setting of cord blood transplants, in which increased numbers of such primitive cells are needed. The study analyzed in this article indicates that by stimulating the Notch signal transduction pathway in primitive cord blood cells it is possible to significantly increase the numbers of both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Furthermore, infusion of such expanded cells in patients receiving a cord blood transplant results in a significant reduction in the time to myeloid engraftment. The relevance of this study is twofold--on the one hand, it shows that the Notch pathway is involved in the expansion capacity of primitive hematopoietic cells in culture, and on the other hand, it indicates that ex vivo-expanded stem/progenitor cells can have a role in hematopoietic transplantation settings. PMID:21083031

  2. Raman spectroscopy of stored red blood cells: evaluating clinically-relevant biochemical markers in donated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Chad G.; Buckley, Kevin; Chen, Deborah; Schulze, H. G.; Devine, Dana V.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    2015-07-01

    Modern transfusion medicine relies on the safe, secure, and cost-effective delivery of donated red blood cells (RBCs). Once isolated, RBCs are suspended in a defined additive solution and stored in plastic blood bags in which, over time, they undergo chemical, physiological, and morphological changes that may have a deleterious impact on some patients. Regulations limit the storage period to 42 days and the cells do not routinely undergo analytical testing before use. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy to interrogate stored RBCs and we identify metabolic and cell-breakdown products, such as haemoglobin and membrane fragments, that build-up in the blood bags as the cells age. Our work points the way to the development of an instrument which could quickly and easily assess the biochemical nature of stored RBC units before they are transfused.

  3. Separation of large quantities of mononuclear cells from human blood using a blood processor.

    PubMed

    Beaujean, F; Gourdin, M F; Farcet, J P; Le Forestier, C; Bouguet, J; Reyes, F; Duedari, N

    1985-01-01

    A blood processor (IBM 2991) was used to separate lymphocytes from large volumes of blood. The procedure included the centrifugation of 200 ml whole blood on a density gradient. The results of this procedure were compared with those obtained with a manual procedure. Mononuclear cell (MNC) viability was preserved well in the two methods. But with the processor, recovery of MNC was better (63.5 +/- 2.5%) than with manual separation (26.5 +/- 4.1%). Monoclonal antibodies were used to identify the various cell subsets in the MNC fractions. No particular cell selection was observed when MNC fractions were obtained by the separator. In conclusion, the use of a cell separator provided an efficient technique for rapid isolation of large quantities of lymphocytes. PMID:3872489

  4. Overcoming blood shortages: red blood cell and platelet substitutes and membrane modifications.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard J

    2004-03-01

    Blood shortages are increasingly common as the donor base declines and extensive restrictions on blood donation disqualify many donors. Red blood cell (RBC) and platelet substitutes have long been anticipated as alternatives to standard transfusions. However, difficulties in manufacturing, efficacy, and safety have slowed the development of these products. New understanding of the relationship between blood viscosity, oxygen transport, and vasoactivity have led to more effective RBC substitutes, several of which are in advanced clinical trials. In addition, creative approaches to RBC membrane modification, such as the enzymatic cleavage of ABH glycoproteins, may lead to a universal RBC. Advances in the understanding of platelet membrane behavior at low temperatures may lead to extended platelet storage at refrigerator temperatures. Standard transfusions of human RBCs and platelets will not be replaced soon. However, these new products will be a useful alternative for selected clinical applications and will lessen our dependence on our marginally adequate blood supply.

  5. Alpha thalassemia protects sickle cell anemia patients from macro-albuminuria through its effects on red blood cell rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Lamarre, Yann; Romana, Marc; Lemonne, Nathalie; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Tarer, Vanessa; Mougenel, Danielle; Waltz, Xavier; Tressières, Benoît; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    While chronic hemolysis has been suspected to be involved in the development of glomerulopathy in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), no study focused on the implications of blood rheology. Ninety-six adults with SCA at steady state were included in the present cross-sectional study. Three categories were defined: normo-albuminuria (NORMO, n = 41), micro-albuminuria (MICRO, n = 23) and macro-albuminuria (MACRO, n = 32). Blood was sampled to measure hematological and hemorheological parameters, and genomic DNA extraction was performed to detect the presence of α-thalassemia. The prevalence of α-thalassemia was lower in the MACRO group compared with the two other groups. Anemia was more severe in the MACRO compared with the NORMO group leading the former group to exhibit decreased blood viscosity. Red blood cell deformability was lower and red blood cell aggregates strength was greater in the MACRO compared to the two other groups, and this was directly attributed to the lower frequency of α-thalassemia in the former group. Our results show the protective role of α-thalassemia against the development of sickle cell glomerulopathy, and strongly suggest that this protection is mediated through the decrease of anemia, the increase of RBC deformability and the lowering of the RBC aggregates strength.

  6. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  7. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-10-14

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood--without reagents, electricity, or instruments--is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 10(2)/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries.

  8. Differential function of dendritic cells isolated from blood and lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, S; Coates, J P; Kimber, I; Knight, S C

    1994-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) isolated from the lymph nodes or spleens of mice and pulsed with contact sensitizers or protein antigens stimulate primary proliferative responses by syngeneic T cells and responses to alloantigens in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). Using enriched human peripheral blood DC, we attempted to stimulate primary immune responses to contact sensitizers by autologous lymphocytes in vitro. No significant proliferation above background levels or CD69 expression (an early activation antigen on lymphocytes) was detected despite using a wide range of donors, chemicals, antigens and cell concentrations. Culture of DC for up to 5 days in vitro in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-conditioned culture supernatants, or recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) also failed to induce primary proliferative responses to contact sensitizers. Comparisons were made between blood and lymph node DC from mice to explore whether the lack of stimulation was the result of differences between mouse and human DC or between DC isolated from different tissues. DC from lymph nodes stimulated primary responses to contact sensitizers in both blood and lymph node lymphocytes whereas blood DC did not stimulate responses. Both lymph node and blood DC stimulated an allogeneic MLR, although blood DC were less efficient than those from lymph node. The data show that DC from different tissues exhibit variable functional activity. DC from blood and lymph nodes were examined to determine whether surface antigen expression is related to functional activity. Murine blood DC expressed similar levels of LFA-1, LECAM-1 and CD44 compared with lymph node DC but lower levels of MHC class II, B7 and ICAM-1. These results may therefore have important implications for antigen processing and presentation in cells from different tissue compartments. PMID:7835950

  9. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc.

  10. On ultrasound-induced microbubble oscillation in a capillary blood vessel and its implications for the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemair, W.; Tuković, Ž.; Jasak, H.; Poulikakos, D.; Kurtcuoglu, V.

    2012-02-01

    The complex interaction between an ultrasound-driven microbubble and an enclosing capillary microvessel is investigated by means of a coupled, multi-domain numerical model using the finite volume formulation. This system is of interest in the study of transient blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) for drug delivery applications. The compliant vessel structure is incorporated explicitly as a distinct domain described by a dedicated physical model. Red blood cells (RBCs) are taken into account as elastic solids in the blood plasma. We report the temporal and spatial development of transmural pressure (Ptm) and wall shear stress (WSS) at the luminal endothelial interface, both of which are candidates for the yet unknown mediator of BBBD. The explicit introduction of RBCs shapes the Ptm and WSS distributions and their derivatives markedly. While the peak values of these mechanical wall parameters are not affected considerably by the presence of RBCs, a pronounced increase in their spatial gradients is observed compared to a configuration with blood plasma alone. The novelty of our work lies in the explicit treatment of the vessel wall, and in the modelling of blood as a composite fluid, which we show to be relevant for the mechanical processes at the endothelium.

  11. Hematologic Assessment in Pet Rats, Mice, Hamsters, and Gerbils: Blood Sample Collection and Blood Cell Identification.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Nicole M; Moore, David M; Zimmerman, Kurt; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-09-01

    Hamsters, gerbils, rats, and mice are presented to veterinary clinics and hospitals for prophylactic care and treatment of clinical signs of disease. Physical examination, history, and husbandry practice information can be supplemented greatly by assessment of hematologic parameters. As a resource for veterinarians and their technicians, this article describes the methods for collection of blood, identification of blood cells, and interpretation of the hemogram in mice, rats, gerbils, and hamsters.

  12. Computational modeling of red blood cells: A symplectic integration algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Ulf D.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2010-03-01

    Red blood cells can undergo shape transformations that impact the rheological properties of blood. Computational models have to account for the deformability and red blood cells are often modeled as elastically deformable objects. We present a symplectic integration algorithm for deformable objects. The surface is represented by a set of marker points obtained by surface triangulation, along with a set of fiber vectors that describe the orientation of the material plane. The various elastic energies are formulated in terms of these variables and the equations of motion are obtained by exact differentiation of a discretized Hamiltonian. The integration algorithm preserves the Hamiltonian structure and leads to highly accurate energy conservation, hence he method is expected to be more stable than conventional finite element methods. We apply the algorithm to simulate the shape dynamics of red blood cells.

  13. Blood cell manufacture: current methods and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2009-07-01

    Blood transfusion depends on availability of donor material, and concerns over supply and safety have spurred development of methods to manufacture blood from stem cells. Current methods could theoretically yield therapeutic doses of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets. However, due to the very large number of cells required to have any impact on supply (currently 10(19) RBC/year in the US), realization of routine manufacture faces significant challenges. Current yields are orders of magnitude too low for production of meaningful quantities, and the physical scale of the problem is a challenge in itself. We discuss these challenges in relation to current methods and how it might be possible to realize limited 'blood pharming' of neutrophils in the near future.

  14. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  15. Blood cell manufacture: current methods and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2009-07-01

    Blood transfusion depends on availability of donor material, and concerns over supply and safety have spurred development of methods to manufacture blood from stem cells. Current methods could theoretically yield therapeutic doses of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets. However, due to the very large number of cells required to have any impact on supply (currently 10(19) RBC/year in the US), realization of routine manufacture faces significant challenges. Current yields are orders of magnitude too low for production of meaningful quantities, and the physical scale of the problem is a challenge in itself. We discuss these challenges in relation to current methods and how it might be possible to realize limited 'blood pharming' of neutrophils in the near future. PMID:19500866

  16. Isolation and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Mead, Laura E; Prater, Daniel; Yoder, Mervin C; Ingram, David A

    2008-07-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in adult human peripheral blood were originally identified in 1997 by Asahara et al., which challenged the paradigm that vasculogenesis is a process restricted to embryonic development. Since their original identification, EPCs have been extensively studied as biomarkers to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease in human subjects and as a potential cell therapeutic for vascular regeneration. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are a subtype of EPCs, were recently identified from circulating adult and human umbilical cord blood. In contrast to other types of EPCs, which display various monocyte/macrophage phenotypes and functions, ECFCs are characterized by robust proliferative potential, secondary and tertiary colony formation upon replating, and de novo blood vessel formation in vivo when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. In this unit, we describe detailed methodologies for isolation and characterization of ECFCs from both human peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

  17. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  18. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  19. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  20. The functional importance of blood group-active molecules in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anstee, D J

    2011-01-01

    Antigens of 23 of the 30 human blood group systems are defined by the amino acid sequence of red cell membrane proteins. The antigens of DI, RH, RHAG, MNS, GE and CO systems are carried on blood group-active proteins (Band 3, D and CE polypeptides, RhAG, Glycophorins A and B, Glycophorins C and D and Aquaporin 1, respectively) which are expressed at high levels (>200,000 copies/red cell). These major proteins contribute to essential red cell functions either directly as membrane transporters and by providing linkage to the underlying red cell skeleton or by facilitating the membrane assembly of the protein complexes involved in these processes. The proteins expressing antigens of the remaining 17 blood group systems are much less abundant (<20,000 copies/red cell) and their functional importance for the circulating red cell is largely unknown. Human gene knock-outs (null phenotypes) have been described for many of these minor blood group-active proteins, but only absence of Kx glycoprotein has been clearly linked with pathology directly related to the function of circulating red cells. Recent evidence suggesting the normal quality control system for glycoprotein synthesis is altered during the latter stages of red cell production raises the possibility that many of these low abundance blood group-active proteins are vestigial. In sickle cell disease and polycythaemia vera, elevated Lutheran glycoprotein expression may contribute to pathology. Dyserythropoiesis with reduced antigen expression can result from mutations in the erythroid transcription factors GATA-1 and EKLF.

  1. West Nile virus adheres to human red blood cells in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Rios, Maria; Daniel, Sylvester; Chancey, Caren; Hewlett, Indira K; Stramer, Susan L

    2007-07-15

    Background. West Nile virus (WNV) is endemic in the United States. It is transmissible by blood transfusion, and the nation's blood supply is currently screened for WNV. Documented transmission of WNV infection through red blood cell (RBC) units in which the plasma co-component had a low viral load could be explained, in at least 1 instance, by cell-association of WNV; in this case, the RBC unit was released as negative by minipool nucleic acid testing (NAT) performed on plasma but was intermittently NAT-positive when subsequently tested as an individual sample. We hypothesized that a proportion of WNV bound to blood cells and was not measured by NAT performed on plasma samples. We have investigated whether WNV binds to RBCs, leading to reduction of WNV RNA detection by NAT performed on plasma samples.Methods. Equal volumes of leukoreduced RBCs and their corresponding plasma components from 20 blood donors with NAT results that were positive for WNV were tested in 5 replicates by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction TaqMan for WNV. In addition, aliquots from 8 of the RBC units were tested by infectivity assays using Vero cells.Results. The reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay showed that the viral load in the RBC components exceeded that in the corresponding plasma units by 1 order of magnitude. In addition, viruses associated with the RBCs were infectious in Vero cell cultures.Conclusions. These observations reinforce the notion that extraction of viral RNA from whole blood could improve assay sensitivity for blood donor screening and further reduce the residual risk of WNV transmission through transfusion.

  2. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  3. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  4. Filter Characteristics Influencing Circulating Tumor Cell Enrichment from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of filters assays have been described to enrich circulating tumor cells (CTC) based on differences in physical characteristics of blood cells and CTC. In this study we evaluate different filter types to derive the properties of the ideal filter for CTC enrichment. Between 0.1 and 10 mL of whole blood spiked with cells from tumor cell lines were passed through silicon nitride microsieves, polymer track-etched filters and metal TEM grids with various pore sizes. The recovery and size of 9 different culture cell lines was determined and compared to the size of EpCAM+CK+CD45−DNA+ CTC from patients with metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. The 8 µm track-etched filter and the 5 µm microsieve had the best performance on MDA-231, PC3-9 and SKBR-3 cells, enriching >80% of cells from whole blood. TEM grids had poor recovery of ∼25%. Median diameter of cell lines ranged from 10.9–19.0 µm, compared to 13.1, 10.7, and 11.0 µm for breast, prostate and colorectal CTC, respectively. The 11.4 µm COLO-320 cell line had the lowest recovery of 17%. The ideal filter for CTC enrichment is constructed of a stiff, flat material, is inert to blood cells, has at least 100,000 regularly spaced 5 µm pores for 1 ml of blood with a ≤10% porosity. While cell size is an important factor in determining recovery, other factors must be involved as well. To evaluate a filtration procedure, cell lines with a median size of 11–13 µm should be used to challenge the system. PMID:23626725

  5. Filter characteristics influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Frank A W; van Dalum, Guus; Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2013-01-01

    A variety of filters assays have been described to enrich circulating tumor cells (CTC) based on differences in physical characteristics of blood cells and CTC. In this study we evaluate different filter types to derive the properties of the ideal filter for CTC enrichment. Between 0.1 and 10 mL of whole blood spiked with cells from tumor cell lines were passed through silicon nitride microsieves, polymer track-etched filters and metal TEM grids with various pore sizes. The recovery and size of 9 different culture cell lines was determined and compared to the size of EpCAM+CK+CD45-DNA+ CTC from patients with metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. The 8 µm track-etched filter and the 5 µm microsieve had the best performance on MDA-231, PC3-9 and SKBR-3 cells, enriching >80% of cells from whole blood. TEM grids had poor recovery of ∼25%. Median diameter of cell lines ranged from 10.9-19.0 µm, compared to 13.1, 10.7, and 11.0 µm for breast, prostate and colorectal CTC, respectively. The 11.4 µm COLO-320 cell line had the lowest recovery of 17%. The ideal filter for CTC enrichment is constructed of a stiff, flat material, is inert to blood cells, has at least 100,000 regularly spaced 5 µm pores for 1 ml of blood with a ≤10% porosity. While cell size is an important factor in determining recovery, other factors must be involved as well. To evaluate a filtration procedure, cell lines with a median size of 11-13 µm should be used to challenge the system.

  6. Umbilical cord cell banking-implications for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, Jennifer . E-mail: gunning@cf.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    The first successful cord cell transplant to a sibling with Fanconi's anaemia took place 15 years ago. This proven utility of cord blood led to the establishment of cord blood banks both private and public and there are now nearly 100 cord blood banks worldwide. It is estimated that over 200,000 cord blood units (CBU) are held by the private sector and over 160,000 CBU are registered with the largest public cord blood registry. There is a tension between private cord blood banks, which store CBU for autologous or family use, and public banks, which store CBU for unrelated use and the ethics of private cord blood storage has been questioned. But more general ethical questions also arise regarding ownership, consent, confidentiality, costs and quality standards and patenting. In looking at these ethical issues one also needs to look at potential future use of cord blood stem cells. Up until now cord cells have principally been used in the treatment of paediatric blood and immune disorders. Improvements in cell expansion technology will make CBU more appropriate also for treating adults with such disorders. However, it has also been demonstrated that cord blood stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into other types of cells, neuronal, bone, epithelial and muscle which would have a future role to play in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  7. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling. PMID:23213229

  8. Participation of blood vessel cells in human adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pober, Jordan S; Tellides, George

    2012-01-01

    Circulating T cells contact blood vessels either when they extravasate across the walls of microvessels into inflamed tissues or when they enter into the walls of larger vessels in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The blood vessel wall is largely composed of three cell types: endothelial cells lining the entire vascular tree; pericytes supporting the endothelium of microvessels; and smooth muscle cells forming the bulk of large vessel walls. Each of these cell types interacts with and alters the behavior of infiltrating T cells in different ways, making these cells active participants in the processes of immune-mediated inflammation. In this review, we compare and contrast what is known about the nature of these interactions in humans. PMID:22030237

  9. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  10. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  11. Rapid white blood cell detection for peritonitis diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Mei, Zhe; Chiu, Yu-Jui; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    A point-of-care and home-care lab-on-a-chip (LoC) system that integrates a microfluidic spiral device as a concentrator with an optical-coding device as a cell enumerator is demonstrated. The LoC system enumerates white blood cells from dialysis effluent of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. The preliminary results show that the white blood cell counts from our system agree well with the results from commercial flow cytometers. The LoC system can potentially bring significant benefits to end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients that are on peritoneal dialysis (PD).

  12. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Focosi, Daniele; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises.

  13. Molecular control of endothelial cell behaviour during blood vessel morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Shane P.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate vasculature forms an extensive branched network of blood vessels that supplies tissues with nutrients and oxygen. During vascular development, coordinated control of endothelial cell behaviour at the levels of cell migration, proliferation, polarity, differentiation and cell–cell communication is critical for functional blood vessel morphogenesis. Recent data uncover elaborate transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms that fine-tune key signalling pathways (such as the vascular endothelial growth factor and Notch pathways) to control endothelial cell behaviour during blood vessel sprouting (angiogenesis). These emerging frameworks controlling angiogenesis provide unique insights into fundamental biological processes common to other systems, such as tissue branching morphogenesis, mechanotransduction and tubulogenesis. PMID:21860391

  14. The physiologic role of erythrocytes in oxygen delivery and implications for blood storage.

    PubMed

    Benedik, Penelope S; Hamlin, Shannan K

    2014-09-01

    Erythrocytes are not just oxygen delivery devices but play an active metabolic role in modulating microvascular blood flow. Hemoglobin and red blood cell morphology change as local oxygen levels fall, eliciting the release of adenosine triphosphate and nitric oxide to initiate local vasodilation. Aged erythrocytes undergo physical and functional changes such that some of the red cell's most physiologically helpful attributes are diminished. This article reviews the functional anatomy and applied physiology of the erythrocyte and the microcirculation with an emphasis on how erythrocytes modulate microvascular function. The effects of cell storage on the metabolic functions of the erythrocyte are also briefly discussed.

  15. Statistical estimation of red blood cell osmotic damage during cryoprotective agent removal from cryopreserved blood.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liangquan; Ding, Weiping; Ma, Yuncong; Sun, Sijie; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Dayong

    2013-10-01

    Statistical estimation of the osmotic damage of red blood cells (RBCs) during the removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) from cryopreserved blood has been a very difficult issue. In this paper, the discrete mass transfer model developed in our previous work is modified to study the volume variation of individual RBCs and thereby to estimate the osmotic damage of all RBCs statistically during CPA removal by the dilution-concentration method we proposed recently. The model is validated with respect to the experimental results either with or without RBCs. Then, it is used to investigate the effects of blood volume, hematocrit, blood and diluent flow rates on the osmotic damage of RBCs, as well as the washing time of CPAs. Our results show that both the increase of blood flow rates and the decrease of diluent flow rates can bring about a reduction in osmotic damage of RBCs; however, only the former can cause a decrease in the washing time of CPAs. The blood volume could also affect the osmotic damage of RBCs. For a given flow condition, there could exist an optimal blood volume range for the dilution-concentration system. The effect of blood volume could be alleviated by an increase in the dilution region volume. In addition, the osmotic damage of RBCs decreases as the hematocrit decreases. Therefore, in practice, the increase of blood flow rates is the best solution to reduce both the osmotic damage of RBCs and the washing time of CPAs simultaneously. A lower hematocrit in the cryopreserved blood and/or longer tubing in the dilution region are also recommended to achieve better performance for the dilution-concentration method. PMID:24835261

  16. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. Design Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA) or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA. Setting Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013. Participants 60 donors (≥50 years old), self-reported medically healthy. Results Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively). Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5%) or anaerobic (27.8%) species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening. Conclusions Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended. PMID:25751254

  17. Hemorheological implications of perfluorocarbon based oxygen carrier interaction with colloid plasma expanders and blood.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Diana M; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A; Briceño, Juan C; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions used as artificial oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in the presence of clinically-used PEs. The rheological behavior of the mixtures was analyzed in vitro in parallel with in vivo analysis of blood flow in the microcirculation using intravital microscopy, when PEs were administered in a clinically relevant scenario. The interaction between the PFC emulsion and PE with blood produced PFC droplets and red blood cell (RBCs) aggregation and increased blood viscosity in a shear dependent fashion. The PFC droplets formed aggregates when mixed with PEs containing electrolytes, and the aggregation increased with the electrolyte concentration. Mixtures of PFC with PEs that produced PFC aggregates also induced RCBs aggregation when mixed with blood, increasing blood viscosity at low shear rates. The more viscous suspension at low shear rates produced a blunted blood flow velocity profile in vivo compared to nonaggregating mixtures of PFC and PEs. For the PEs evaluated, human serum albumin produced minimal to undetectable aggregation. PFC and PEs interaction with blood can affect sections of the microcirculation with low shear rates (e.g., arterioles, venules, and pulmonary circulation) when used in a clinical setting, because persistent aggregates could cause capillary occlusion, decreased perfusion, pulmonary emboli or focal ischemia.

  18. THE RETICULAR MATERIAL OF DEVELOPING BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cowdry, Edmund V.

    1921-01-01

    Erythroblasts, leucocytes, and lymphocytes resemble other cells of the body in containing a restricted area of fluidity in their cytoplasm. In special preparations this fluid appears in the form of a more or less complicated reticulum which seems to be continually but slowly changing in shape. For convenience the fluid may provisionally be referred to as reticular material, emphasis being laid on its composition rather than its form. As a working hypothesis it is safe to assume that the chemical and physical properties of this material vary in cells of different kinds as well as in different stages in the activity of the same cell. The conclusion that it is "identical" in different cells, because the present crude methods of technique reveal no fundamental differences, would be as incorrect as the statement that the serum of different animals is identical, because no difference is observed on microscopic examination. PMID:19868474

  19. [Changes of blood cell's morphological characteristics and their clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Mestiashvili, I G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is the interpretation of the clinical value of blood cells' (erythrocytes, leukocytes, thrombocytes) morphological characteristics changes taking into the consideration results of our own long-term (1982-2012) investigations as well as literature data. Patients with hematological and nonhematological diseases as well as large groups of Georgia population (about 30.000 persons, in age 2-81) were observed. By Gimsa-Romanovsky method stained blood smears were studied in light microscope. Changes of blood cells' morphological characteristics, observed by us and known in the literature, as well as ones revealed at first in this work, are presented according to the three branches of hemopoiesis. Possible changes of blood cells' morphological characteristics are described in details. Concrete changes in concrete diseases are presented in eight tables. Discussing the results the fact of the revealing of blood cells' morphological changes in some diseases, different by etiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptomatology and treatment, is accentuated. Some examples of the differentiation of different diseases by means of that nuances, which are revealed in microscope and which are not noticeable for the modern techniques, are presented. The significance of some specific changes of blood cells' morphological characteristics for the doubtless diagnostic of some concrete anomalies is shown. The list of changes which are revealed in this work but are not founded in the literature is presented. The conclusion is drawn that the nuances of blood cells` morphological changes revealed in light microscope allow to narrow the spectrum of additional investigations for the establishment of diagnosis.

  20. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries. PMID:26464211

  1. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-Chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries.

  2. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with Tc-99m

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1988-07-05

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available for the reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  3. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with TC-99M

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for the reduction of technetium.

  4. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value <0.05. Results Erythropoietin, when added to red blood cell units, has a half-life >6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 μmol/L; p-value = 0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05). Conclusions Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. PMID:26969770

  5. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Frank A W; van Dalum, Guus; Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2013-01-01

    Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4)∶10(2)∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2) track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  6. Filtration Parameters Influencing Circulating Tumor Cell Enrichment from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Markus; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·104∶102∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC. PMID:23658615

  7. Blood Thixotropy in Patients with Sickle Cell Anaemia: Role of Haematocrit and Red Blood Cell Rheological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Waltz, Xavier; Romana, Marc; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We compared the blood thixotropic/shear-thinning properties and the red blood cells’ (RBC) rheological properties between a group of patients with sickle cell anaemia (SS) and healthy individuals (AA). Blood thixotropy was determined by measuring blood viscosity with a capillary viscometer using a “loop” protocol: the shear rate started at 1 s−1 and increased progressively to 922 s−1 and then re-decreased to the initial shear rate. Measurements were performed at native haematocrit for the two groups and at 25% and 40% haematocrit for the AA and SS individuals, respectively. RBC deformability was determined by ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties by laser backscatter versus time. AA at native haematocrit had higher blood thixotropic index than SS at native haematocrit and AA at 25% haematocrit. At 40% haematocrit, SS had higher blood thixotropic index than AA. While RBC deformability and aggregation were lower in SS than in AA, the strength of RBC aggregates was higher in the former population. Our results showed that 1) anaemia is the main modulator of blood thixtropy and 2) the low RBC deformability and high RBC aggregates strength cause higher blood thixotropy in SS patients than in AA individuals at 40% haematocrit, which could impact blood flow in certain vascular compartments. PMID:25502228

  8. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  9. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood.

  10. A color and shape based algorithm for segmentation of white blood cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow images.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Salim; Ozyurek, Emel; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2014-06-01

    Computer-based imaging systems are becoming important tools for quantitative assessment of peripheral blood and bone marrow samples to help experts diagnose blood disorders such as acute leukemia. These systems generally initiate a segmentation stage where white blood cells are separated from the background and other nonsalient objects. As the success of such imaging systems mainly depends on the accuracy of this stage, studies attach great importance for developing accurate segmentation algorithms. Although previous studies give promising results for segmentation of sparsely distributed normal white blood cells, only a few of them focus on segmenting touching and overlapping cell clusters, which is usually the case when leukemic cells are present. In this article, we present a new algorithm for segmentation of both normal and leukemic cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow images. In this algorithm, we propose to model color and shape characteristics of white blood cells by defining two transformations and introduce an efficient use of these transformations in a marker-controlled watershed algorithm. Particularly, these domain specific characteristics are used to identify markers and define the marking function of the watershed algorithm as well as to eliminate false white blood cells in a postprocessing step. Working on 650 white blood cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow images, our experiments reveal that the proposed algorithm improves the segmentation performance compared with its counterparts, leading to high accuracies for both sparsely distributed normal white blood cells and dense leukemic cell clusters.

  11. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.

  12. Nipah Virus Infects Specific Subsets of Porcine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stachowiak, Beata; Weingartl, Hana M.

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic paramyxovirus, is highly contagious in swine, and can cause fatal infections in humans following transmission from the swine host. The main viral targets in both species are the respiratory and central nervous systems, with viremia implicated as a mode of dissemination of NiV throughout the host. The presented work focused on the role of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the viremic spread of the virus in the swine host. B lymphocytes, CD4−CD8−, as well as CD4+CD8− T lymphocytes were not permissive to NiV, and expansion of the CD4+CD8− cells early post infection was consistent with functional humoral response to NiV infection observed in swine. In contrast, significant drop in the CD4+CD8− T cell frequency was observed in piglets which succumbed to the experimental infection, supporting the hypothesis that antibody development is the critical component of the protective immune response. Productive viral replication was detected in monocytes, CD6+CD8+ T lymphocytes and NK cells by recovery of infectious virus in the cell supernatants. Virus replication was supported by detection of the structural N and the non-structural C proteins or by detection of genomic RNA increase in the infected cells. Infection of T cells carrying CD6 marker, a strong ligand for the activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule ALCAM (CD166) highly expressed on the microvascular endothelial cell of the blood-air and the blood-brain barrier may explain NiV preferential tropism for small blood vessels of the lung and brain. PMID:22303463

  13. Morphological changes in neutron irradiated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Wyle, H R

    1985-01-01

    Living human red blood cells (erythrocytes) were irradiated with a beam of thermal neutrons having a thermal neutron flux of 9.4 X 10(9) neutrons/cm2 per sec corresponding to a dose rate of 5 Gray per hour. The neutron beam was obtained from the thermal neutron facility at the MIT Nuclear Reactor and contained some gamma-ray contamination which contributes approximately 8% of the dose effect. Approximately 92% of the dose effect is due to the neutron radiation. Populations of neutron irradiated red blood cells were examined under scanning electron microscopy to observe morphological changes due to the radiation dose. The thermal neutron doses ranged from zero for controls to 75 Gray, and cell populations were examined at various post-irradiation time periods of 10, 48, and 96 h. A four-stage discoid to spheroid shape transformation of the damaged red blood cells was characterized, and the time dependence of each transformation stage was determined for both unirradiated and irradiated cells. The radiation dose caused an initial dose-dependent shift from Stage 1 to Stage 2 with an associated increase in the transformation rate constants. The thermal neutron doses delivered are considered to be in the low dose range for radiation effects on red blood cells, yet the pronounced effects indicate a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for thermal neutrons.

  14. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  15. State of the science of blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Blood cell labeling can be considered a science in as far as it is based on precise knowledge and can be readily reproduced. This benchmark criterion is applied to all current cell labeling modalities and their relative merits and deficiencies are discussed. Mechanisms are given where they are known as well as labeling yields, label stability, and cell functionality. The focus is on the methodology and its suitability to the clinical setting rather than on clinical applications per se. Clinical results are cited only as proof of efficacy of the various methods. The emphasis is on technetium as the cell label, although comparisons are made between technetium and indium, and all blood cells are covered. 52 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  17. Histomorphometric study on blood cells in male adult ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Marzban Abbasabadi, Behrokh; Majidi, Banafsheh

    2013-01-01

    In order to perform a histomorphometric study of blood cells in male adult ostrich, blood samples were obtained from jugular vein of 10 clinically healthy male adult ostriches (2 - 3 years old). The slides were stained with the Giemsa methods and the smears were evaluated for cellular morphology, with cellular size being determined by micrometry. The findings of this study revealed that the shape of the cell, cytoplasm and nucleus of erythrocytes in male adult ostriches were similar to those in other birds such as quails, chickens, Iranian green-head ducks. PMID:25653798

  18. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, J.; Antonelli, A.; Sfara, C.; Tiemann, B.; Gleich, B.; Magnani, M.; Weizenecker, J.; Borgert, J.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Cytochemical characteristics of blood cells from Brazilian tortoises (Testudines: Testudinidae).

    PubMed

    Martins, G S; Alevi, K C C; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V; Bonini-Domingos, C R

    2016-01-01

    The hematology of wild and captive animals is essential for obtaining details about species and represents a simple method of diagnosing disease and determining prognosis. Few studies have described the morphology of chelonian blood cells, which are more common in sea and freshwater turtle species. Thus, in order to further our understanding and recognition of different chelonian cells types, the present study aimed to describe blood cells from the two species of Brazilian tortoises, Chelonoidis carbonarius and C. denticulatus. Cytochemical analysis of tortoise blood tissue with Panótico®, made it possible to describe all the of the chelonian cell types (with the exception of thrombocytes): erythrocytes, agranular leukocytes (monocytes and lymphocytes), and granular leukocytes (eosinophils, heterophils, basophils, and azurophils). These data are of high importance for establishing hematological profiles of Brazilian tortoises and reptiles. Therefore, based on our results and on comparative analyses with data from the literature for other reptile species, we can conclude that the blood cells described for Brazilian tortoises are found in all species of reptiles that have been analyzed thus far, and may be characterized and used as a comparative parameter between different groups to evaluate the health status of these animals. PMID:27050968

  20. Designer blood: creating hematopoietic lineages from embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Abby L.; Stachura, David L.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit the remarkable capacity to become virtually any differentiated tissue upon appropriate manipulation in culture, a property that has been beneficial for studies of hematopoiesis. Until recently, the majority of this work used murine ES cells for basic research to elucidate fundamental properties of blood-cell development and establish methods to derive specific mature lineages. Now, the advent of human ES cells sets the stage for more applied pursuits to generate transplantable cells for treating blood disorders. Current efforts are directed toward adapting in vitro hematopoietic differentiation methods developed for murine ES cells to human lines, identifying the key interspecies differences in biologic properties of ES cells, and generating ES cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to repopulate adult hosts. The ultimate medical goal is to create patient-specific and generic ES cell lines that can be expanded in vitro, genetically altered, and differentiated into cell types that can be used to treat hematopoietic diseases. PMID:16254136

  1. Chronic HCV Infection Affects the NK Cell Phenotype in the Blood More than in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kroy, Daniela C.; Cheney, Patrick C.; Ghebremichael, Musie; Aneja, Jasneet; Tomlinson, Michelle; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Alter, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Although epidemiological and functional studies have implicated NK cells in protection and early clearance of HCV, the mechanism by which they may contribute to viral control is poorly understood, particularly at the site of infection, the liver. We hypothesized that a unique immunophenotypic/functional NK cell signature exists in the liver that may provide insights into the contribution of NK cells to viral control. Intrahepatic and blood NK cells were profiled from chronically infected HCV-positive and HCV-negative individuals. Baseline expression of activating and inhibitory receptors was assessed, as well as functional responses following stimulation through classic NK cell pathways. Independent of HCV infection, the liver was enriched for the immunoregulatory CD56bright NK cell population, which produced less IFNγ and CD107a but comparable levels of MIP1β, and was immunophenotypically distinct from their blood counterparts. This profile was mostly unaltered in chronic HCV infection, though different expression levels of NKp46 and NKG2D were associated with different grades of fibrosis. In contrast to the liver, chronic HCV infection associated with an enrichment of CD161lowperforinhigh NK cells in the blood correlated with increased AST and 2B4 expression. However, the association of relatively discrete changes in the NK cell phenotype in the liver with the fibrosis stage nevertheless suggests an important role for the NK response. Overall these data suggest that tissue localization has a more pervasive effect on NK cells than the presence of chronic viral infection, during which these cells might be mostly attuned to limiting immunopathology. It will be important to characterize NK cells during early HCV infection, when they should have a critical role in limiting infection. PMID:25148254

  2. Membranotropic photobiomodulation on red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang-Yue; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Song-Hao

    2007-05-01

    To assess modulation of laser on erythrocyte permeability and deformability via cell morphology changes, healthy human echinocytes with shrinking size and high plasmic viscosity due to cellular dehydration were treated with 1 mW, 2 mW, 3 mW, and 5 mW laser power exposure respectively. Image analyzing system on single intact erythrocyte was applied for measuring comprehensive cell morphological parameters (surface area, external membrane perimeter, circle index and elongation index) that were determined by the modulation of erythrocyte water permeability and deformability to detect relationship between erythrocyte water permeability alteration and deformability. Our preliminary experiment showed that exposure under light dose of 5 mW for 5 min could induce more active erythrocyte swelling and deformation. water channel aquaporin-1(AQP-1) was inhibited by the incubation of HgCl II in the presence and absence of 5 mW laser irradiation. The result suggested that osmotic water permeability is a primary factor in the procedure of erythrocyte deformability. In addition, no modulation of laser(5mW) on erythrocyte deformability had been found when the echinocytes were cultured with GDP-β-S (G protein inhibitor).

  3. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creangă, D. E.; Culea, M.; Nădejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  5. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  6. Human umbilical cord blood cell grafts for brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hyuk; Borlongan, Cesar V; Willing, Alison E; Eve, David J; Cruz, L Eduardo; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Chung, Yong-Gu; Sanberg, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Irreversible and permanent damage develop immediately adjacent to the region of reduced cerebral blood perfusion in stroke patients. Currently, the proven thrombolytic treatment for stroke, tissue plasminogen activator, is only effective when administered within 3 h after stroke. These disease characteristics should be taken under consideration in developing any therapeutic intervention designed to widen the narrow therapeutic range, especially cell-based therapy. Over the past several years, our group and others have characterized the therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord blood cells for stroke and other neurological disorders using in vitro and vivo models focusing on the cells' ability to differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells including neural lineage, as well as their ability to produce several neurotrophic factors and modulate immune and inflammatory reaction. Rather than the conventional cell replacement mechanism, we advance alternative pathways of graft-mediated brain repair involving neurotrophic effects resulting from release of various growth factors that afford cell survival, angiogenesis, and anti-inflammation. Eventually, these multiple protective and restorative effects from umbilical cord blood cell grafts may be interdependent and act in harmony in promoting therapeutic benefits for stroke. PMID:19523333

  7. Daily variation in radiosensitivity of circulating blood cells and bone marrow cell density in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mice on a 12/12 light/dark cycle were bled during a twenty-four hour period each week for eight weeks to establish daily values of circulating blood cells. No significant daily variation was found in total red blood cells, hematocrit, or percentage of reticulocytes. A significant (P < 0.001) daily variation was found in total white blood cells, with the minimum occurring at 8 PM and the maximum occurring during the daylight hours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mice were then exposed to 0 R, 20 R, 50 R, or 100 R of x-radiation to determine what dose significantly reduces the total white cell count in circulating blood. It was found that 100 R significantly (P < .05) reduces the total white cell count over a four week period post-exposure. To determine if circulating blood cells and bone marrow cells show a diurnal radiosensitivity, mice were exposed to 100 R or 200 R of x-radiation at noon or midnight. Hematocrits, reticulocyte and white blood cell counts, daily white blood cell rhythm, and bone marrow cell density indicate that these mice were more radiosensitive at night.

  8. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future.

  9. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. PMID:26996518

  10. A spectral and morphologic method for white blood cell classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Chang, Li; Zhou, Mei; Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Guo, Fangmin

    2016-10-01

    The identification of white blood cells is important as it provides an assay for diagnosis of various diseases. To overcome the complexity and inaccuracy of traditional methods based on light microscopy, we proposed a spectral and morphologic method based on hyperspectral blood images. We applied mathematical morphology-based methods to extract spatial information and supervised method is employed for spectral analysis. Experimental results show that white blood cells could be segmented and classified into five types with an overall accuracy of more than 90%. Moreover, the experiments including spectral features reached higher accuracy than the spatial-only cases, with a maximum improvement of nearly 20%. By combing both spatial and spectral features, the proposed method provides higher classification accuracy than traditional methods.

  11. Cord Blood Cells for Developmental Toxicology and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Il’yasova, Dora; Kloc, Noreen; Kinev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Tox21 program initiated a shift in toxicology toward in vitro testing with a focus on the biological mechanisms responsible for toxicological response. We discuss the applications of these initiatives to developmental toxicology. Specifically, we briefly review current approaches that are widely used in developmental toxicology to demonstrate the gap in relevance to human populations. An important aspect of human relevance is the wide variability of cellular responses to toxicants. We discuss how this gap can be addressed by using cells isolated from umbilical cord blood, an entirely non-invasive source of fetal/newborn cells. Extension of toxicological testing to collections of human fetal/newborn cells would be useful for better understanding the effect of toxicants on fetal development in human populations. By presenting this perspective, we aim to initiate a discussion about the use of cord blood donor-specific cells to capture the variability of cellular toxicological responses during this vulnerable stage of human development. PMID:26697419

  12. Detection of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of systemic mastocytosis: diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Teodosio, Cristina; Sanchez-Muñoz, Laura; Álvarez-Twose, Ivan; Mayado, Andrea; Caldas, Carolina; Matito, Almudena; Morgado, José M; Muñoz-González, Javier I; Escribano, Luis; Garcia-Montero, Andrés C; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have found the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of virtually all adult systemic mastocytosis patients once highly sensitive PCR techniques were used; thus, detection of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood has been proposed to be included in the diagnostic work-up of systemic mastocytosis algorithms. However, the precise frequency of the mutation, the biological significance of peripheral blood-mutated cells and their potential association with involvement of bone marrow hematopoietic cells other than mast cells still remain to be investigated. Here, we determined the frequency of peripheral blood involvement by the KIT D816V mutation, as assessed by two highly sensitive PCR methods, and investigated its relationship with multilineage involvement of bone marrow hematopoiesis. Overall, our results confirmed the presence of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of most systemic mastocytosis cases (161/190; 85%)--with an increasing frequency from indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin lesions (29/44; 66%) to indolent systemic mastocytosis with skin involvement (124/135; 92%), and more aggressive disease subtypes (11/11; 100%)--as assessed by the allele-specific oligonucleotide-qPCR method, which was more sensitive (P<.0001) than the peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR approach (84/190; 44%). Although the presence of the KIT mutation in peripheral blood, as assessed by the allele-specific oligonucleotide-qPCR technique, did not accurately predict for multilineage bone marrow involvement of hematopoiesis, the allele-specific oligonucleotide-qPCR allele burden and the peptide nucleic acid-mediated-PCR approach did. These results suggest that both methods provide clinically useful and complementary information through the identification and/or quantification of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of patients suspected of systemic mastocytosis.

  13. Mononuclear cells from a rare blood donor, after freezing under good manufacturing practice conditions, generate red blood cells that recapitulate the rare blood phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Masiello, Francesca; Tirelli, Valentina; Sanchez, Massimo; van den Akker, Emile; Girelli, Gabriella; Marconi, Maurizio; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Rebulla, Paolo; Hashmi, Gazala; Whitsett, Carolyn; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultured red blood cells (cRBCs) from cord blood (CB) have been proposed as transfusion products. Whether buffy-coats discarded from blood donations (AB) may be used to generate cRBCs for transfusion has not been investigated. Study Design and Methods Erythroid progenitor cell content and numbers and blood group antigen profiles of erythroblasts (ERYs) and cRBCs generated in Human Erythroid Massive Amplification (HEMA) culture by CB (n=7) and AB (n=33, three females, three males, one AB with rare blood antigens cryopreserved using CB protocols) were compared. Results Variability was observed both in progenitor cell content (2-fold) and number of ERYs generated (1-log) by CB and AB in HEMA. The average progenitor cell contents of the subset of AB and CB analyzed were similar. AB generated numbers of ERYs 3-times lower (p<0.01) than CB in HEMA containing fetal bovine serum but similar to CB in HEMA containing human proteins. Female AB contained 2-times less (p<0.05) erythroid progenitor cells but generated numbers of ERYs similar to those generated by male AB. Cryopreserved AB with a rare blood group phenotype and shipped to another laboratory generated great numbers of ERYs, 90% of which matured into cRBCs. Blood group antigen expression was consistent with the donor genotype for ERYs generated both by CB and AB but concordant with that of native RBCs only for cells derived from AB. Conclusion Buffy-coats from regular donors, including a donor with rare phenotypes stored under conditions established for CB, are not inferior to CB for the generation of cRBCs. PMID:24004289

  14. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-01

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  15. Hypoxia, hormones, and red blood cell function in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stefanie; Baumann, Rosemarie

    2003-04-01

    The red blood cell function of avian embryos is regulated by cAMP. Adenosine A(2A) and beta-adrenergic receptor activation during hypoxic conditions cause changes in the hemoglobin oxygen affinity and CO(2) transport. Furthermore, experimental evidence suggests a general involvement of cAMP in terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts.

  16. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Y.; Matsuyama, Y.; Little, J. A.; Gurkan, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell’s aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events. PMID:27437432

  17. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Automated Blood Cell Measurements.

    PubMed

    Vagdatli, Eleni; Konstandinidou, Vasiliki; Adrianakis, Nikolaos; Tsikopoulos, Ioannis; Tsikopoulos, Alexios; Mitsopoulou, Kyriaki

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether the electromagnetic fields associated with mobile phones and/or laptops interfere with blood cell counts of hematology analyzers. Random blood samples were analyzed on an Aperture Impedance hematology analyzer. The analysis was performed in four ways: (A) without the presence of any mobile phone or portable computer in use, (B) with mobile phones in use (B1: one mobile, B4: four mobiles), (C) with portable computers (laptops) in use (C1: one laptop, C3: three laptops), and (D) with four mobile phones and three laptops in use simultaneously. The results obtained demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in neutrophil, erythrocyte, and platelet count and an increase in lymphocyte count, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width, notably in the B4 group. Despite this statistical significance, in clinical practice, only the red blood cell reduction could be taken into account, as the mean difference between the A and B4 group was 60,000 cells/µL. In group D, the analyzer gave odd results after 11 measurements and finally stopped working. The combined and multiple use of mobile phones and computers affects the function of hematology analyzers, leading to false results. Consequently, the use of such electronic devices must be avoided.

  18. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Propst-Proctor, S.L.; Dillingham, M.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Goodwin, D.

    1982-08-01

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (/sup 111/In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Red Blood Cell Mechanics and Blood Flow in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Lei, Huan; Caswell, Bruce; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) infected by a Plasmodium parasite in malaria may lose their membrane deformability with a relative membrane stiffening more than ten-fold in comparison with healthy RBCs leading to potential capillary occlusions. Moreover, infected RBCs are able to adhere to other healthy and parasitized cells and to the vascular endothelium resulting in a substantial disruption of normal blood circulation. In the present work, we simulate infected RBCs in malaria using a multiscale RBC model based on the dissipative particle dynamics method, coupling scales at the sub-cellular level with scales at the vessel size. Our objective is to conduct a full validation of the RBC model with a diverse set of experimental data, including temperature dependence, and to identify the limitations of this purely mechanistic model. The simulated elastic deformations of parasitized RBCs match those obtained in optical-tweezers experiments for different stages of intra-erythrocytic parasite development. The rheological properties of RBCs in malaria are compared with those obtained by optical magnetic twisting cytometry and by monitoring membrane fluctuations at room, physiological, and febrile temperatures. We also study the dynamics of infected RBCs in Poiseuille flow in comparison with healthy cells and present validated bulk viscosity predictions of malaria-infected blood for a wide range of parasitemia levels (percentage of infected RBCs with respect to the total number of cells in a unit volume). PMID:22144878

  20. On the birefringence of healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Basu, Himanish; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2013-12-01

    The birefringence of a red blood cell (RBC) is quantitatively monitored as it becomes infected by a malarial parasite. Large changes occur in the cell's refractive index at different stages of malarial infection. The observed rotation of an optically trapped, malaria-infected RBC is not a simple function of shape distortion: the malarial parasite is found to itself exercise a profound influence on the rotational dynamics by inducing stage-specific birefringence. Our measurements shed new light on the competition between shape- and form-birefringence in RBCs. We demonstrate the possibility of using birefringence to establish very early stages of infected parasites and of assessing various factors that contribute to birefringence in normal and infected cells. Our results have implications for the development and use of noninvasive techniques of quantifying changes in cell properties induced by malaria disease pathology.

  1. Levels of linoleate and arachidonate in red blood cells of healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Homa, S T; Belin, J; Smith, A D; Monro, J A; Zilkha, K J

    1980-01-01

    The major fatty acids were measured in total lipid extracts of red blood cells from 23 control subjects and 31 patients with multiple sclerosis. In the healthy control subjects an inverse correlation (r = -0.83) was found between the percentages of linoleate and arachidonate. In the patients such an inverse correlation was not found. The results suggest an abnormality in the red blood cells of patients with multiple sclerosis specifically with regard to the regulation of the relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, and this has implications for the possible treatment of multiple sclerosis with dietary supplements. PMID:7359147

  2. Altered Immune Phenotype in Peripheral Blood Cells of Patients with Scleroderma-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Risbano, Michael G; Meadows, Christina A; Coldren, Christopher D; Jenkins, Tiffany J.; Edwards, Michael G; Collier, David; Huber, Wendy; Mack, Douglas G; Fontenot, Andrew P; Geraci, Mark W; Bull, Todd M

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common and fatal complication of scleroderma that may involve inflammatory and autoimmune mechanisms. Alterations in the gene expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been previously described in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our goal is to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in scleroderma patients with and without pulmonary hypertension as biomarkers of disease. Gene expression analysis was performed on a Microarray Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=10) and without (n=10) pulmonary hypertension. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed in the Microarray Cohort and validated in a Validation Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=15) and without (n=19) pulmonary hypertension by RT-qPCR. We identified inflammatory and immune-related genes including interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) and chemokine receptor 7 as differentially expressed in patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension. Flow cytometry confirmed decreased expression of IL-7R on circulating CD4+ T-cells from scleroderma patients with pulmonary hypertension. Differences exist in the expression of inflammatory and immune-related genes in peripheral blood cells from patients with scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension compared to those with normal pulmonary artery pressures. These findings may have implications as biomarkers to screen at-risk populations for early diagnosis and provide insight into mechanisms of scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20973920

  3. A Systems-Level Interrogation Identifies Regulators of Drosophila Blood Cell Number and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Makhijani, Kalpana; Alexander, Brandy; Perrimon, Norbert; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell number is typically determined by a balance of intracellular signals that positively and negatively regulate cell survival and proliferation. Dissecting these signaling networks facilitates the understanding of normal development and tumorigenesis. Here, we study signaling by the Drosophila PDGF/VEGF Receptor (Pvr) in embryonic blood cells (hemocytes) and in the related cell line Kc as a model for the requirement of PDGF/VEGF receptors in vertebrate cell survival and proliferation. The system allows the investigation of downstream and parallel signaling networks, based on the ability of Pvr to activate Ras/Erk, Akt/TOR, and yet-uncharacterized signaling pathway/s, which redundantly mediate cell survival and contribute to proliferation. Using Kc cells, we performed a genome wide RNAi screen for regulators of cell number in a sensitized, Pvr deficient background. We identified the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Insulin-like receptor (InR) as a major Pvr Enhancer, and the nuclear hormone receptors Ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (usp), corresponding to mammalian Retinoid X Receptor (RXR), as Pvr Suppressors. In vivo analysis in the Drosophila embryo revealed a previously unrecognized role for EcR to promote apoptotic death of embryonic blood cells, which is balanced with pro-survival signaling by Pvr and InR. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrates distinct modes of cell number regulation by EcR and RTK signaling. We define common phosphorylation targets of Pvr and InR that include regulators of cell survival, and unique targets responsible for specialized receptor functions. Interestingly, our analysis reveals that the selection of phosphorylation targets by signaling receptors shows qualitative changes depending on the signaling status of the cell, which may have wide-reaching implications for other cell regulatory systems. PMID:25749252

  4. Mapping viscoelastic properties of healthy and pathological red blood cells at the nanoscale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciasca, G.; Papi, M.; di Claudio, S.; Chiarpotto, M.; Palmieri, V.; Maulucci, G.; Nocca, G.; Rossi, C.; de Spirito, M.

    2015-10-01

    In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic response of red blood cells to mechanical stimuli is crucial to fully understand deformability changes under pathological conditions. However, the typical erythrocyte biconcave shape hints to a complex and intrinsically heterogeneous mechanical response that must be investigated by using probes at the nanoscale level. In this work, the local viscoelastic behaviour of healthy and pathological red blood cells was probed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Our results clearly show that the RBC stiffness is not spatially homogeneous, suggesting a strong correlation with the erythrocyte biconcave shape. Moreover, our nanoscale mapping highlights the key role played by viscous forces, demonstrating that RBCs do not behave as pure elastic bodies. The fundamental role played by viscous forces is further strengthened by the comparison between healthy and pathological (diabetes mellitus) RBCs. It is well known that pathological RBCs are usually stiffer than the healthy ones. Our measures unveil a more complex scenario according to which the difference between normal and pathological red blood cells does not merely lie in their stiffness but also in a different dynamical response to external stimuli that is governed by viscous forces.In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic

  5. Cigarette smoking impairs nitric oxide-mediated cerebral blood flow increase: Implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow is mainly regulated by nitrergic (parasympathetic, postganglionic) nerves and nitric oxide (NO) liberated from endothelial cells in response to shear stress and stretch of vasculature, whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor control is quite weak. On the other hand, peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow are mainly controlled by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves; endothelium-derived NO and nitrergic nerves play some roles as vasodilator factors. Cigarette smoking impairs NO synthesis in cerebral vascular endothelial cells and nitrergic nerves leading to interference with cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in the brain. Smoking-induced cerebral hypoperfusion is induced by impairment of synthesis and actions of NO via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibition and by increased production of oxygen radicals, resulting in decreased actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle. Nicotine acutely and chronically impairs the action of endothelial NO and also inhibits nitrergic nerve function in chronic use. Impaired cerebral blood supply promotes the synthesis of amyloid β that accelerates blood flow decrease. This vicious cycle is thought to be one of the important factors involving in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Quitting smoking is undoubtedly one of the important ways to prevent and delay the genesis or slow the progress of impaired cognitive function and AD. PMID:27530818

  6. Assessment of immune status using blood transcriptomics and potential implications for global health.

    PubMed

    Chaussabel, Damien

    2015-02-01

    The immune system plays a key role in health maintenance and pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. Leukocytes that are present in the blood convey valuable information about the status of the immune system. Blood transcriptomics, which consists in profiling blood transcript abundance on genome-wide scales, has gained in popularity over the past several years. Indeed, practicality and simplicity largely makes up for what this approach may lack in terms of cell population-level resolution. An extensive survey of the literature reveals increasingly widespread use across virtually all fields of medicine as well as across a number of different animal species, including model organisms but also animals of economical importance. Dissemination across such a wide range of disciplines holds the promise of adding a new perspective, breadth or context, to the considerable depth afforded by whole genome profiling of blood transcript abundance. Indeed, it is only through such contextualization that a truly global perspective will be gained from the use of systems approaches. Also discussed are opportunities that may arise for the fields of immunology and medicine from using blood transcriptomics as a common denominator for developing interactions and cooperation across fields of research that have traditionally been and largely remain compartmentalized. Finally, an argument is made for building immunology research capacity using blood transcriptomics platforms in low-resource and high-disease burden settings.

  7. Blood cell counting and classification by nonflowing laser light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Xinhui; Jiang, Dazong; Yeo, Joon Hock

    1999-11-01

    A new non-flowing laser light scattering method for counting and classifying blood cells is presented. A linear charge- coupled device with 1024 elements is used to detect the scattered light intensity distribution of the blood cells. A pinhole plate is combined with the CCD to compete the focusing of the measurement system. An isotropic sphere is used to simulate the blood cell. Mie theory is used to describe the scattering of blood cells. In order to inverse the size distribution of blood cells from their scattered light intensity distribution, Powell method combined with precision punishment method is used as a dependent model method for measurement red blood cells and blood plates. Non-negative constraint least square method combined with Powell method and precision punishment method is used as an independent model for measuring white blood cells. The size distributions of white blood cells and red blood cells, and the mean diameter of red blood cells are measured by this method. White blood cells can be divided into three classes: lymphocytes, middle-sized cells and neutrocytes according to their sizes. And the number of blood cells in unit volume can also be measured by the linear dependence of blood cells concentration on scattered light intensity.

  8. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  9. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  10. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  11. Immune cells control skin lymphatic electrolyte homeostasis and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Helge; Schröder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Jantsch, Jonathan; Kopp, Christoph; Karlsen, Tine V; Boschmann, Michael; Goss, Jennifer; Bry, Maija; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Brenner, Sven; Tenstad, Olav; Nurmi, Harri; Mervaala, Eero; Wagner, Hubertus; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Müller, Dominik N; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Luft, Friedrich C; Harrison, David G; Alitalo, Kari; Titze, Jens

    2013-07-01

    The skin interstitium sequesters excess Na+ and Cl- in salt-sensitive hypertension. Mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cells are recruited to the skin, sense the hypertonic electrolyte accumulation in skin, and activate the tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein (TONEBP, also known as NFAT5) to initiate expression and secretion of VEGFC, which enhances electrolyte clearance via cutaneous lymph vessels and increases eNOS expression in blood vessels. It is unclear whether this local MPS response to osmotic stress is important to systemic blood pressure control. Herein, we show that deletion of TonEBP in mouse MPS cells prevents the VEGFC response to a high-salt diet (HSD) and increases blood pressure. Additionally, an antibody that blocks the lymph-endothelial VEGFC receptor, VEGFR3, selectively inhibited MPS-driven increases in cutaneous lymphatic capillary density, led to skin Cl- accumulation, and induced salt-sensitive hypertension. Mice overexpressing soluble VEGFR3 in epidermal keratinocytes exhibited hypoplastic cutaneous lymph capillaries and increased Na+, Cl-, and water retention in skin and salt-sensitive hypertension. Further, we found that HSD elevated skin osmolality above plasma levels. These results suggest that the skin contains a hypertonic interstitial fluid compartment in which MPS cells exert homeostatic and blood pressure-regulatory control by local organization of interstitial electrolyte clearance via TONEBP and VEGFC/VEGFR3-mediated modification of cutaneous lymphatic capillary function. PMID:23722907

  12. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  13. How to evaluate blood substitutes for endothelial cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Caroline; Menu, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    The most common and widely transplanted tissue worldwide is blood. But concerns about safety and adequacy of blood transfusion have fostered 20 years of research into blood substitutes such as oxygen carriers based on modified hemoglobin (Hb). Chemically modified or genetically engineered Hb developed as oxygen therapeutics are designed to restore blood volume and to correct oxygen deficit due to ischemia in a variety of clinical settings. Uncontrolled oxidative reactions mediated by large amounts of cell-free Hb and their reactions with various oxidant/antioxidant and cell signalling systems emerge as an important pathway of toxicity. Hemoglobin can react with oxygen and NO, leading to the production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. Inside the bloodstream, oxidized Hb and ROS/RNS are in direct contact with endothelial cells (EC). Thus, chain reactions may trigger molecular and cellular biology, causing oxidative stress-related pathologies. This editorial presents an overview of interactions between Hb (modified or not) and EC. We also propose a wide range of techniques and methods to assess oxidative stress and inflammation responses of EC after exposure to Hb. This editorial can serve as a guide to evaluate in vitro toxicity of new Hb molecules.

  14. Stem cell terminology: practical, theological and ethical implications.

    PubMed

    Shanner, Laura

    2002-01-01

    Stem cell policy discussions frequently confuse embryonic and fetal sources of stem cells, and label untested, non-reproductive cloning as "therapeutic." Such misnomers distract attention from significant practical and ethical implications: accelerated research agendas tend to be supported at the expense of physical risks to women, theological implications in a multi-faith community, informed consent for participation in research, and treatment decisions altered by unrealistic expectations.

  15. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  16. Classification of blood cells and tumor cells using label-free ultrasound and photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-08-01

    A label-free method that can identify cells in a blood sample using high frequency photoacoustic and ultrasound signals is demonstrated. When the wavelength of the ultrasound or photoacoustic wave is similar to the size of a single cell (frequencies of 100-500 MHz), unique periodic features occur within the ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectrum that depend on the cell size, structure, and morphology. These spectral features can be used to identify different cell types present in blood, such as red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and circulating tumor cells. Circulating melanoma cells are ideal for photoacoustic detection due to their endogenous optical absorption properties. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals from RBCs, WBCs, and melanoma cells were individually measured in an acoustic microscope to examine how the signals change between cell types. A photoacoustic and ultrasound signal was detected from RBCs and melanoma cells; only an ultrasound signal was detected from WBCs. The different cell types were distinctly separated using the ultrasound and photoacoustic signal amplitude and power spectral periodicity. The size of each cell was also estimated from the spectral periodicity. For the first time, sound waves generated using pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustics have been used to identify and size single cells, with applications toward counting and identifying cells, including circulating melanoma cells. PMID:26079610

  17. Classification of blood cells and tumor cells using label-free ultrasound and photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-08-01

    A label-free method that can identify cells in a blood sample using high frequency photoacoustic and ultrasound signals is demonstrated. When the wavelength of the ultrasound or photoacoustic wave is similar to the size of a single cell (frequencies of 100-500 MHz), unique periodic features occur within the ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectrum that depend on the cell size, structure, and morphology. These spectral features can be used to identify different cell types present in blood, such as red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and circulating tumor cells. Circulating melanoma cells are ideal for photoacoustic detection due to their endogenous optical absorption properties. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals from RBCs, WBCs, and melanoma cells were individually measured in an acoustic microscope to examine how the signals change between cell types. A photoacoustic and ultrasound signal was detected from RBCs and melanoma cells; only an ultrasound signal was detected from WBCs. The different cell types were distinctly separated using the ultrasound and photoacoustic signal amplitude and power spectral periodicity. The size of each cell was also estimated from the spectral periodicity. For the first time, sound waves generated using pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustics have been used to identify and size single cells, with applications toward counting and identifying cells, including circulating melanoma cells.

  18. Generation of suppressive blood cells for control of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Christian; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Jiga, Lucian; Dittmar, Laura; Mohr, Elisabeth; Greil, Johann; Mier, Walter; Becker, Luis E; Lang, Peter; Opelz, Gerhard; Terness, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies in rats showed that incubation of monocytic dendritic cells (DCs) with the chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C (MMC) renders the cells immunosuppressive. Donor-derived MMC-DCs injected into the recipient prior to transplantation prolonged heart allograft survival. Although the generation of DCs is labour-intensive and time-consuming, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be easily harvested. In the present study, we analyse under which conditions DCs can be replaced by PBMCs and examine their mode of action. When injected into rats, MMC-incubated donor PBMCs (MICs) strongly prolonged heart allograft survival. Removal of monocytes from PBMCs completely abrogated their suppressive effect, indicating that monocytes are the active cell population. Suppression of rejection was donor-specific. The injected MICs migrated into peripheral lymphoid organs and led to an increased number of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) markers CD4 and CD25 and forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3). Tolerance could be transferred to syngeneic recipients with blood or spleen cells. Depletion of Tregs from tolerogenic cells abrogated their suppressive effect, arguing for mediation of immunosuppression by CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ Tregs. Donor-derived MICs also prolonged kidney allograft survival in pigs. MICs generated from donor monocytes were applied for the first time in humans in a patient suffering from therapy-resistant rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant. We describe, in the present paper, a simple method for in vitro generation of suppressor blood cells for potential use in clinical organ transplantation. Although the case report does not allow us to draw any conclusion about their therapeutic effectiveness, it shows that MICs can be easily generated and applied in humans.

  19. Abnormal rheology of oxygenated blood in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu; Usami, Shunichi; Bertles, John F.

    1970-01-01

    The viscosity of oxygenated blood from patients with sickle cell anemia (Hb SS disease) was found to be abnormally increased, a property which contrasts with the well recognized viscous aberration produced by deoxygenation of Hb SS blood. Experiments designed to explain this finding led to considerations of deformation and aggregation, primary determinants of the rheologic behavior of erythrocytes as they traverse the microcirculation. Deformability of erythrocytes is in turn dependent upon internal viscosity (i.e. the state and concentration of hemoglobin in solution) and membrane flexibility. Definition of the contribution made by each of these properties to the abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood was made possible by analysis of viscosity measurements, made over a wide range of shear rates and cell concentrations, on Hb SS erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes suspended in Ringer's solution (where aggregation does not occur) and in plasma. Similar measurements were made on the two cell types separated by ultracentrifugation of Hb SS erythrocytes: high density erythrocytes composed of 50 to 70% irreversibly “sickled” cells (ISC) and low density erythrocytes composed of over 95% non-ISC. Under all experimental conditions (hematocrit, shear rate, and suspending medium) the viscosity of ISC exceeds that of normal erythrocytes. The viscosity of non-ISC is elevated only in the absence of aggregation and over intermediate ranges of hematocrit. Analyses of the data reveal (a) an elevated internal viscosity of ISC: (b) a reduced membrane flexibility of both ISC and non-ISC, particularly at low shear rates; and (c) a reduced tendency for aggregation displayed by both cell types. The abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood can be attributed to the altered rheology of ISC and, to a lesser extent, of non-ISC. These studies assign a role to the abnormal rheology of Hb SS erythrocytes in the pathogenesis of sickle cell anemia, even under conditions of complete

  20. Concise Review: Production of Cultured Red Blood Cells from Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the Western world, the volunteer-based collection system covers most transfusion needs, but transient shortages regularly develop and blood supplies are vulnerable to potentially major disruptions. The production of cultured red blood cells from stem cells is slowly emerging as a potential alternative. The various cell sources, the niche applications most likely to reach the clinic first, and some of the remaining technical issues are reviewed here. PMID:23283554

  1. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  2. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  3. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  4. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors.

  5. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors. PMID:20101907

  6. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  7. Umbilical cord blood stem cells for myocardial repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greco, Nicholas; Laughlin, Mary J

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with substantial economic cost. There remains a need for therapeutic improvement for patients refractory to revascularization and those who redevelop occlusions following revascularization. Early evidence linked age-associated reductions in the levels of circulating marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), characterized by expression of early HSC markers CD133 and CD34, with the occurrence of cardiovascular events and associated death. Heart tissue has the endogenous ability to regenerate through the activation of resident cardiac stem cells or through recruitment of a stem cell population from other tissues, such as bone marrow. A number of clinical trials have utilized patient-derived autologous bone marrow-derived cells or whole BM uncultured mononuclear cells (MNC) infused or injected locally to augment angiogenesis. In most cases of treating animal models with human cells, the frequency of stem cell engraftment, the subsequent number of newly generated cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and the augmentation of endogenous microvascular collateralization, either by deposition, transdifferentiation, and/or by cell fusion, appear to be too low to explain the significant cardiac improvement. Initially, it was hypothesized that cell therapy may work by cell replacement mechanisms, but recent evidence suggests alternatively that cell therapy works by providing trophic support to the injured tissues. An alternative hypothesis is that the transplanted stem cells release soluble cytokines and growth factors (i.e., paracrine factors) that function in a paracrine fashion, contributing to cardiac repair and regeneration by inducing cytoprotection and neovascularization. Another hypothesis which may also be operative is that cell therapy may mediate endogenous regeneration by the activation of resident cardiac stem cell. Well-established clinical trials have used cord blood for the treatment of

  8. Effects of chronic kidney disease on blood cells membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Kaderjakova, Z; Lajdova, I; Horvathova, M; Morvova, M; Sikurova, L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is progressive loss of renal function associated among others with increased intracellular calcium concentration. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of CKD on cell membrane properties such as human red blood cell Ca(2+) ATPase activity, lymphocyte plasma membrane P2X(7) receptor expression and function. This could help us in elucidating the origin of increased calcium concentration in blood cells. We found out Ca(2+) ATPase activity is decreased in early stage CKD patients resulting in altered calcium removal from cytoplasm. By means of flow cytometry we assessed that P2X(7) receptor expression on lymphocyte membrane is 1.5 fold increased for CKD patients. Moreover, we detected an increased uptake of ethidium bromide through this receptor in CKD at basal conditions. It means CKD lymphocyte membranes contain more receptors which are more permeable thus allowing increased calcium influx from extracellular milieu. Finally, we can state alterations in blood cell membranes are closely linked to CKD and may be responsible for intracellular calcium accumulation.

  9. 2-D Model for Normal and Sickle Cell Blood Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekleab, Yonatan; Harris, Wesley

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that alters the red blood cell (RBC) structure and function such that hemoglobin (Hb) cannot effectively bind and release oxygen. Previous computational models have been designed to study the microcirculation for insight into blood disorders such as SCD. Our novel 2-D computational model represents a fast, time efficient method developed to analyze flow dynamics, O2 diffusion, and cell deformation in the microcirculation. The model uses a finite difference, Crank-Nicholson scheme to compute the flow and O2 concentration, and the level set computational method to advect the RBC membrane on a staggered grid. Several sets of initial and boundary conditions were tested. Simulation data indicate a few parameters to be significant in the perturbation of the blood flow and O2 concentration profiles. Specifically, the Hill coefficient, arterial O2 partial pressure, O2 partial pressure at 50% Hb saturation, and cell membrane stiffness are significant factors. Results were found to be consistent with those of Le Floch [2010] and Secomb [2006].

  10. Nutritional status, metabolic changes and white blood cells in adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Thatianne Moreira Silva; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Franceschini, Sylvia C.C.; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between the peripheral blood white cells, metabolic changes, and nutritional status of adolescents with and without excess weight and body fat. METHODS: This cross-sectional study evaluated the body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat (%BF) in 362 adolescents from 15 to 19 years of age, of both sexes. White blood cell count, platelet count, uric acid, fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid profile were measured. The inclusion criteria were agreement to participate in the study and signature of the informed consent. Exclusion criteria were: presence of chronic or infectious disease; use of medications that could cause changes in biochemical tests; pregnancy; participation in weight reduction and weight control programs; use of diuretics and laxatives; or the presence of a pacemaker. The following statistical tests were applied: Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Student's t or Mann-Whitney test, Pearson or Spearman correlation tests, and chi-squared test, considering p<0.05. RESULTS: Overweight was observed in 20.7% of adolescents. The total cholesterol (TC) had a higher percentage of inadequacy (52.2%), followed by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (38.4%). There was a positive correlation between white cells and serum lipids, insulin, body fat, and BMI. Monocytes were negatively correlated with BMI, and rods with BMI, body fat, and insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Nutritional status is related to an inflammatory process, and adolescents with excess weight or body fat presented higher amounts of white blood cells. PMID:25510999

  11. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  12. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. Materials and methods RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. Results P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. Discussion RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3. PMID:26674824

  13. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests. PMID:24910468

  14. Early peripheral blood and T-cell chimerism dynamics after umbilical cord blood transplantation supported with haploidentical cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, M; Martínez-Laperche, C; Balsalobre, P; Serrano, D; Anguita, J; Gayoso, J; Díez-Martín, J L; Buño, I

    2014-02-01

    Single-unit umbilical cord blood (CB) SCT is limited by low total nucleated cell (TNC) dose. Co-infusion of CD34+ cells from a third party HLA-mismatched donor, known as dual or haplo-cord transplant, reduces the period of post-transplant neutropenia and related complications. The aim of this study was to analyze the value of early post-transplant peripheral blood (PB) and T cell chimerism after 28 dual transplants regarding CB engraftment. Cumulative incidence of myeloid engraftment at 30 days was 93% with a median time to engraftment of 14 days (10-29). Patients who developed CB graft failure (n=5) showed very low percentages of CB cells on days +14, +21 and +28 with decreasing dynamics. On the other hand, percentages of CB cells in patients who achieved CB engraftment increased over time. Interestingly, such patients showed two distinct chimerism dynamics in PB, but all of them showed a predominance of CB T cells early after SCT with increasing dynamics over time. Early post-transplant chimerism dynamics in PB and T cells predicts CB graft failure enabling rapid therapeutic measures to be applied. On the other hand, early increasing percentages of CB T cells correlates with ultimate CB engraftment.

  15. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bhagirath, Vinai C.; Heddle, Nancy M.; Liu, Yang; Eikelboom, John W.; Liaw, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF) or whole blood filtration (WBF) methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs) have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days) and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF) were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p = 0.0010); fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p = 0.0093). Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p = 0.0031); fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p = 0.024). Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes. PMID:27774338

  16. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P.; Mañú-Pereira, María del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the patients to

  17. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P; Mañú-Pereira, María Del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca(2+) handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca(2+) cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca(2+)-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  18. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P; Mañú-Pereira, María Del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca(2+) handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca(2+) cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca(2+)-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  19. Differentiation of Donor-Derived Cells Into Microglia After Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kakuda, Yumiko; Munemoto, Saori; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Nozaki, Ichiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have indicated that microglia originate from immature progenitors in the yolk sac. After birth, microglial populations are maintained under normal conditions via self-renewal without the need to recruit monocyte-derived microglial precursors. Peripheral cell invasion of the brain parenchyma can only occur with disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Here, we report an autopsy case of an umbilical cord blood transplant recipient in whom cells derived from the donor blood differentiated into ramified microglia in the recipient brain parenchyma. Although the blood-brain barrier and glia limitans seemed to prevent invasion of these donor-derived cells, most of the invading donor-derived ramified cells were maintained in the cerebral cortex. This result suggests that invasion of donor-derived cells occurs through the pial membrane. PMID:26226134

  20. Red blood cell phenotype matching for various ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Badjie, Karafa S W; Tauscher, Craig D; van Buskirk, Camille M; Wong, Clare; Jenkins, Sarah M; Smith, Carin Y; Stubbs, James R

    2011-01-01

    Patients requiring chronic transfusion support are at risk of alloimmunization after red blood cell (RBC) transfusion because of a disparity between donor and recipient antigen profiles. This research explored the probability of obtaining an exact extended phenotype match between blood donors randomly selected from our institution and patients randomly selected from particular ethnic groups. Blood samples from 1,000 blood donors tested by molecular method were evaluated for the predicted phenotype distribution of Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS. A random subsample of 800 donor phenotypes was then evaluated for the probability of obtaining an exact match with respect to phenotype with a randomly selected patient from a particular ethnic group. Overall, there was a greater than 80 percent probability of finding an exact donor-recipient match for the K/k alleles in the Kell system. The probability ranged from 3 percent to 38 percent, depending on the ethnicity and disparities in phenotypic profiles, for the Rh, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS systems. A significant donor-recipient phenotype mismatch ratio exists with certain blood group antigens such that, with current routine ABO and D matching practices, recipients of certain ethnic groups are predisposed to alloimmunization. PMID:22356481

  1. Red blood cell phenotype matching for various ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Badjie, Karafa S W; Tauscher, Craig D; van Buskirk, Camille M; Wong, Clare; Jenkins, Sarah M; Smith, Carin Y; Stubbs, James R

    2011-01-01

    Patients requiring chronic transfusion support are at risk of alloimmunization after red blood cell (RBC) transfusion because of a disparity between donor and recipient antigen profiles. This research explored the probability of obtaining an exact extended phenotype match between blood donors randomly selected from our institution and patients randomly selected from particular ethnic groups. Blood samples from 1,000 blood donors tested by molecular method were evaluated for the predicted phenotype distribution of Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS. A random subsample of 800 donor phenotypes was then evaluated for the probability of obtaining an exact match with respect to phenotype with a randomly selected patient from a particular ethnic group. Overall, there was a greater than 80 percent probability of finding an exact donor-recipient match for the K/k alleles in the Kell system. The probability ranged from 3 percent to 38 percent, depending on the ethnicity and disparities in phenotypic profiles, for the Rh, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS systems. A significant donor-recipient phenotype mismatch ratio exists with certain blood group antigens such that, with current routine ABO and D matching practices, recipients of certain ethnic groups are predisposed to alloimmunization.

  2. Disruption of astrocyte-vascular coupling and the blood-brain barrier by invading glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Robel, Stefanie; Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robert, Stephanie M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet cover the entire cerebral vasculature and serve as exchange sites for ions, metabolites, and energy substrates from the blood to the brain. They maintain endothelial tight junctions that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and release vasoactive molecules that regulate vascular tone. Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors that use the perivascular space for invasion and co-opt existing vessels as satellite tumors form. Here we use a clinically relevant mouse model of glioma and find that glioma cells, as they populate the perivascular space of pre-existing vessels, displace astrocytic endfeet from endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. This causes a focal breach in the BBB. Furthermore, astrocyte-mediated gliovascular coupling is lost, and glioma cells seize control over regulation of vascular tone through Ca2+-dependent release of K+. These findings have important clinical implications regarding blood flow in the tumor-associated brain and the ability to locally deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in disease. PMID:24943270

  3. Blood based cell biopsy for early detection of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cha-Mei; Adams, Daniel; Adams, Diane; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Martin, Stuart; Chumsri, Saranya; Marks, Jeffrey

    Early detection (ED) of cancer holds the promise for less aggressive treatments and better outcome. However, there are few accepted methods for ED. We report on a previously unknown blood cell found specifically in the peripheral blood of many solid tumors. They are defined as Cancer Associated Macrophage-Like cells (CAMLs) and are characterized by large size (25-300 μm) and expression of cancer markers. CAMLs were isolated on precision filters during blood filtration. We conducted prospective studies in breast cancer (BC) to ascertain CAML prevalence, specificity and sensitivity in relation to disease status at clinical presentation. We report on two related but separate studies: 1) the isolation of CAMLs from patients with known invasive BC, compared to healthy volunteers and, 2) a double blind study conducted on women undergoing core needle biopsy to evaluate suspicious breast masses. The studies show that CAMLs are found in all stages of BC and suggest that detection of CAMLs can differentiate patients with BC from those with benign breast conditions and healthy individuals. This non-invasive blood test can be potentially used for ED of BC and other malignancies after validation studies with the advantage of a minimally invasive procedure and longitudinal monitoring. This work was supported by Grants from Maryland TEDCO MTTCF, R01-CA154624 from NIH, KG100240 from Susan G. Komen Foundation, Era of Hope Scholar award from DoD (BC100675), and U01-CA084955 from NCI EDRN.

  4. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process. PMID:27545843

  5. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process. PMID:27545843

  6. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Rodrigo; Buytaert-Hoefen, Kimberley A.; Gonzalez-Romero, Dennisse; Castilla, Joaquin; Hansen, Eric T.; Hlavinka, Dennis; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Soto, Claudio

    2008-12-12

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrP{sup Sc}) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions ({>=}3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  7. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  8. Blood Vessel Maturation in Health and Disease and its Implications for Vascularization of Engineered Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuetao; Evren, Sevan; Nunes, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Engineered blood vessels have often been found to be immature and unstable. Similarly, numerous pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy and cancer are characterized by highly abnormal, defective, hypervascular networks, consisting of immature, leaky, and irregular vessels with a marked loss of perivascular cell coverage. An emerging therapeutic concept in treatment of such vascular diseases and their management is the potential to normalize blood vessels by strengthening the cellular components that form the vascular network. Vessel normalization is characterized by the reduction in the number and size of immature vessels, a decrease in interstitial fluid pressure, and increase in perivascular cell coverage. Understanding the molecular and cellular defects associated with abnormal blood vessels will allow us to find appropriate treatment options that can promote normal blood vessel development. These, in turn, can be applied to improve vessel maturation in engineered tissues. In this review, we describe the major perivascular abnormalities associated with various human diseases and engineered vasculatures and the major advances in obtaining mature vasculatures for translational applications.

  9. Depletion of membrane skeleton in red blood cell vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Iglic, A; Svetina, S; Zeks, B

    1995-01-01

    A possible physical interpretation of the partial detachment of the membrane skeleton in the budding region of the cell membrane and consequent depletion of the membrane skeleton in red blood cell vesicles is given. The red blood cell membrane is considered to consist of the bilayer part and the membrane skeleton. The skeleton is, under normal conditions, bound to the bilayer over its whole area. It is shown that, when in such conditions it is in the expanded state, some cell shape changes can induce its partial detachment. The partial detachment of the skeleton from the bilayer is energetically favorable if the consequent decrease of the skeleton expansion energy is larger than the corresponding increase of the bilayer-skeleton binding energy. The effect of shape on the skeleton detachment is analyzed theoretically for a series of the pear class shapes, having decreasing neck diameter and ending with a parent-daughter pair of spheres. The partial detachment of the skeleton is promoted by narrowing of the cell neck, by increasing the lateral tension in the skeleton and its area expansivity modulus, and by diminishing the attraction forces between the skeleton and the bilayer. If the radius of the daughter vesicle is sufficiently small relative to the radius of the parent cell, the daughter vesicle can exist either completely underlaid with the skeleton or completely depleted of the skeleton. PMID:7669905

  10. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26862318

  11. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect ...

  12. Acoustofluidic, label-free separation and simultaneous concentration of rare tumor cells from white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Maria; Magnusson, Cecilia; Augustsson, Per; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2015-09-15

    Enrichment of rare cells from peripheral blood has emerged as a means to enable noninvasive diagnostics and development of personalized drugs, commonly associated with a prerequisite to concentrate the enriched rare cell population prior to molecular analysis or culture. However, common concentration by centrifugation has important limitations when processing low cell numbers. Here, we report on an integrated acoustophoresis-based rare cell enrichment system combined with integrated concentration. Polystyrene 7 μm microparticles could be separated from 5 μm particles with a recovery of 99.3 ± 0.3% at a contamination of 0.1 ± 0.03%, with an overall 25.7 ± 1.7-fold concentration of the recovered 7 μm particles. At a flow rate of 100 μL/min, breast cancer cells (MCF7) spiked into red blood cell-lysed human blood were separated with an efficiency of 91.8 ± 1.0% with a contamination of 0.6 ± 0.1% from white blood cells with a 23.8 ± 1.3-fold concentration of cancer cells. The recovery of prostate cancer cells (DU145) spiked into whole blood was 84.1 ± 2.1% with 0.2 ± 0.04% contamination of white blood cells with a 9.6 ± 0.4-fold concentration of cancer cells. This simultaneous on-chip separation and concentration shows feasibility of future acoustofluidic systems for rapid label-free enrichment and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells using peripheral venous blood in clinical practice.

  13. Engineering blood vessels by gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarbiv, Gabriel; Preis, Meir; Ben-Yosef, Yaara; Flugelman, Moshe Y

    2007-08-01

    Cardiovascular-related syndromes are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Arterial narrowing and blockage due to atherosclerosis cause reduced blood flow to the brain, heart and legs. Bypass surgery to improve blood flow to the heart and legs in these patients is performed in hundreds of thousands of patients every year. Autologous grafts, such as the internal thoracic artery and saphenous vein, are used in most patients, but in a significant number of patients such grafts are not available and synthetic grafts are used. Synthetic grafts have higher failure rates than autologous grafts due to thrombosis and scar formation within graft lumen. Cell and gene therapy combined with tissue engineering hold a great promise to provide grafts that will be biocompatible and durable. This review describes the field of vascular grafts in the context of tissue engineering using cell and gene therapies.

  14. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Benarroz, M O; Fonseca, A S; Rocha, G S; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M O; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2008-02-01

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99m(99mTc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1 hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  15. Analyzing Illumina Gene Expression Microarray Data Obtained From Human Whole Blood Cell and Blood Monocyte Samples.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Schurmann, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Schramm, Katharina; Ziegler, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Microarray profiling of gene expression is widely applied to studies in molecular biology and functional genomics. Experimental and technical variations make not only the statistical analysis of single studies but also meta-analyses of different studies very challenging. Here, we describe the analytical steps required to substantially reduce the variations of gene expression data without affecting true effect sizes. A software pipeline has been established using gene expression data from a total of 3358 whole blood cell and blood monocyte samples, all from three German population-based cohorts, measured on the Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 BeadChip array. In summary, adjustment for a few selected technical factors greatly improved reliability of gene expression analyses. Such adjustments are particularly required for meta-analyses of different studies. PMID:26614070

  16. Prior chemotherapy does not prevent effective mobilisation by G-CSF of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, E.; Sheridan, W. P.; Watson, D.; Szer, J.; Begley, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the hemopoietic growth factor, G-CSF successfully mobilised progenitor cell populations into the peripheral blood in a population of patients despite intensive pretreatment with chemotherapy. Administration of G-CSF increased the numbers of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) by a median of 76-fold above basal levels. Maximal levels of PBPC were observed on days 5 and 6 after G-CSF treatment. In two patients a second cycle of G-CSF mobilised PBPC to levels comparable with those seen after the first cycle of G-CSF treatment. An earlier hemopoietic cell population (pre-CFC's) was also mobilised with levels increased up to 50-fold above basal levels. Using a standard mononuclear cell leukapheresis technique the PBPC were collected extremely efficiently (essentially 100%) and could be further successfully enriched by separation using a Ficoll gradient. For patients who underwent the optimal collection protocol (i.e. leukapheresis on days 5, 6 and 7) a total of 32 +/- 6 x 10(4) GM-CFC kg-1 were collected. The ability to mobilise PBPC using G-CSF alone and to successfully and efficiently harvest these cells has important implications for the future of transplantation and high dose chemotherapy procedures. PMID:1384644

  17. Overview of bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Poliquin, C M

    1997-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are treatments used with increasing frequency for a growing number of cancers. As technology develops, so, too, does the complexity of nursing care. In addition, as the number of patients who receive BMT or PBSCT increases, more and more nurses will be involved in their care. Knowledge of what problems to anticipate, comprehensive assessment, clear patient and family education, and strong emotional support provide the key to successful patient management.

  18. My passion and passages with red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    This article mainly presents, in sequential panels of time, an overview of my professional involvements and laboratory experiences. I became smitten with red blood cells early on, and this passion remains with me to this day. I highlight certain studies, together with those who performed the work, recognizing that it was necessary to limit the details and the topics chosen for discussion. I am uncertain of the interest a personal account has for others, but at least it's here for the record.

  19. Hemoglobin-based red blood cell substitutes and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Bloch, Kenneth D; Zapol, Warren M

    2009-04-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been studied for decades as red blood cell substitutes. Profound vasoconstrictor effects have limited the clinical utility of HBOCs and are attributable to avid scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Inhaling NO can charge the body's stores of NO metabolites without producing hypotension and can prevent systemic hypertension induced when HBOCs are subsequently infused. Concurrent breathing of low NO doses can prevent pulmonary vasoconstriction after HBOC infusion without augmenting plasma methemoglobinemia.

  20. Peripheral Red Blood Cell Split Chimerism as a Consequence of Intramedullary Selective Apoptosis of Recipient Red Blood Cells in a Case of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism. PMID:25408852

  1. Measuring cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells over blood storage using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Lee, Sangyun; Ji, Misuk; Kim, Kyoohyun; Son, Yonghak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-10-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusions. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1 (CPDA-1). With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements for 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and progressive alterations of stored RBCs. Our results show that stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within two weeks which was accompanied by significant decreases in cell deformability and cell surface area, and increases in sphericity. However, the stored RBCs with CPDA-1 maintained their morphology and deformability for up to 6 weeks.

  2. Measuring cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells over blood storage using quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Ji, Misuk; Kim, Kyoohyun; Son, YongHak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusions. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1 (CPDA-1). With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements for 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and progressive alterations of stored RBCs. Our results show that stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within two weeks which was accompanied by significant decreases in cell deformability and cell surface area, and increases in sphericity. However, the stored RBCs with CPDA-1 maintained their morphology and deformability for up to 6 weeks. PMID:27698484

  3. Disulfide linked pyrazole derivatives inhibit phagocytosis of opsonized blood cells.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Meena K; Scovell, Iain; Neschadim, Anton; Katsman, Yulia; Branch, Donald R; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2013-04-15

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is caused by production of an autoantibody to autologous platelets. ITP can be treated either by reducing platelet destruction or by increasing platelet production. Fcγ receptor mediated phagocytosis of the opsonized blood cells is a well-accepted mechanism for the underlying pathogenesis of ITP and inhibition of this phagocytosis process with small molecules is a potential strategy for the development of drugs against ITP. A broad screen indicated that 4-methyl-1-phenyl-pyrazole derivative (1) could inhibit the phagocytosis of opsonized blood cells with weak potency. We reveal here the discovery of the polysulfide products, synthesis of various 1-phenyl-pyrazole derivatives, and the biological evaluation of pyrazole derivatives as inhibitors of phagocytosis for potential use as therapeutics for ITP. Substitution at C4 of the pyrazole moiety in the disulfide-bridged dimers influenced the potency in the increasing order of 10 ~/= 11~/= 16 < 19 < 20. A novel scaffold, 20 with an IC(50) of 100 nM inhibiting opsonized blood cell phagocytosis was identified as a potential candidate for further studies. Confirmation of the disulfide bridge additionally provides clues for the non-thiol or non-disulfide bridge carrying ligands targeting ITP and other similar disorders.

  4. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in the Human Gastric Mucosa and Blood: Role in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jayaum S.; Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Blanchard, Thomas G.; Patil, Seema A.; Kader, Howard A.; Safta, Anca M.; Morningstar, Lindsay M.; Czinn, Steven J.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent a class of antimicrobial innate-like T cells that have been characterized in human blood, liver, lungs, and intestine. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the presence of MAIT cells in the stomach of children, adults, and the elderly undergoing routine endoscopy and assessed their reactivity to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori – Hp), a major gastric pathogen. We observed that MAIT cells are present in the lamina propria compartment of the stomach and display a similar memory phenotype to blood MAIT cells. We then demonstrated that gastric and blood MAIT cells are able to recognize H. pylori. We found that CD8+ and CD4−CD8− (double negative) MAIT cell subsets respond to H. pylori-infected macrophages stimulation in a MR-1 restrictive manner by producing cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A) and exhibiting cytotoxic activity. Interestingly, we observed that blood MAIT cell frequency in Hp+ve individuals was significantly lower than in Hp−ve individuals. However, gastric MAIT cell frequency was not significantly different between Hp+ve and Hp−ve individuals, demonstrating a dichotomy between blood and gastric tissues. Further, we observed that the majority of gastric MAIT cells (>80%) expressed tissue-resident markers (CD69+ CD103+), which were only marginally present on PBMC MAIT cells (<3%), suggesting that gastric MAIT cells are readily available to respond quickly to pathogens. These results contribute important new information to the understanding of MAIT cells function on peripheral and mucosal tissues and its possible implications in the host response to H. pylori. PMID:26441971

  5. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  6. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells. PMID:26013297

  7. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  8. What to Expect After a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... What To Expect After a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant You’ll stay in the hospital for ... or even months after your blood and marrow stem cell transplant. Your doctors will want to be sure ...

  9. Blood cell lineage in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus (Pisces: Petromyzontidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piavis, George W.; Hiatt, James L.

    1971-01-01

    Blood cell types of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, are described and identified and the lineage of mature circulating cells in peripheral blood is traced to blast cells in the hematopoietic fat body. The fat body appears to be the phylogenetic precursor of bone marrow in higher forms, since blood cells originate and begin maturation in this tissue. Experimental animals were injected first with a hematopoietic stimulant and then (at an experimentally determined time) with pertussis vaccine to release proliferated blood cells into peripheral blood. Peripheral blood for smears was collected by cardiac exsanguination; hematopoietic tissue was extirpated for imprints; and leucocyte preparations were made by a special technique. Blood cells of the sea lamprey are apparently products of at least four distinct blast cells, each of which has a 'one end' maturation process. Results of this investigation support the polyphyletic theory of blood cell formation.

  10. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  11. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  12. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  13. Resting blood lactate in individuals with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Petto, Jefferson; de Jesus, Jaqueline Brito; Vasques, Leila Monique Reis; Pinheiro, Renata Leão Silva; Oliveira, Aila Mascarenhas; Spinola, Kelly Aparecida Borges; Silva, Wellington dos Santos

    2011-01-01

    Background The most common hereditary hemoglobin disorder, affecting 20 million individuals worldwide, is sickle cell disease. The vascular obstruction resulting from the sickling of cells in this disease can produce local hypoxemia, pain crises and infarction in several tissues, including the bones, spleen, kidneys and lungs. Objective To determine red blood group genes in a Brazilian populations. Methods The present study is characterized as a case control study, with the aim of identifying the baseline blood lactate concentration in individuals with hemoglobin SS and SC diseases. One-way ANOVA with the Tukey post-test was used to analyze the results and a p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Calculations were made using the INSTAT statistical program. The graphs were generated using the ORING program. The study sample was composed of 31 men and women residing in the city of Santo Antônio de Jesus, Bahia, Brazil. The individuals were divided into two groups: Group GC of 16 subjects who did not present with any type of structural hemoglobinopathy; and Group GE composed of 15 individuals with ages between 2 and 35 years old, who had the SS and SC genotypes. Sample analyses were performed with 3 mL of blood during fasting. Results The baseline blood lactate concentration of the SS and SC individuals was higher than that of the control group (p<0.001) with means of 4.86 ± 0.95; 3.30 ± 0.33; 1.31 ± 0.08 IU/L for SS, SC and controls, respectively. This corroborates the initial research hypothesis. Conclusion The baseline blood lactate of SS and SC individuals is 3 to 4 times higher than that of healthy subjects, probably due to the fact that these patients have a metabolic deviation to the anaerobic pathway. PMID:23284239

  14. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was performed before and at 1, 2, and 3 hours after ECC commencement. To eliminate bias induced by hematocrit and plasma, all blood samples were adjusted to a hematocrit of 45% using baseline plasma. Blood viscoelasticity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, arterial blood gas analysis, central venous O2 saturation, and lactate were measured. Results The blood viscosity and aggregation index decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC and then remained low during ECC in both groups, but blood elasticity did not change during ECC. Blood viscosity, blood elasticity, plasma viscosity, and the aggregation index were not significantly different in the groups at any time. Hematocrit decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC in both groups due to dilution by the priming solution used. Conclusion After ECC, blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation were not different in the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups in the adult dog model. Furthermore, pulsatile flow did not have a more harmful effect on blood viscoelasticity or RBC aggregation than nonpulsatile flow. PMID:27298790

  15. Leukocyte transport by red blood cells in a microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    A simulation model is used to study the transport of relatively large, spherical, and stiff white blood cells (leukocytes) by the relatively smaller and highly flexible red cell as they flow in the microcirculation. Their interaction dynamics are thought to be an important component of the inflammation response, in which leukocytes bind to the walls of blood vessels. The red cells are modeled in the simulations as highly deformable three-dimensional shells encasing a Newtonian fluid, and the viscous-flow equation is solved via a boundary integral formulation in which the cell shapes discretized by global spectral basis functions. For slow flow rates, it is found that the leukocyte is predominantly adjacent the vessel walls, whereas for faster flow rates this configuration appears to become unstable and the leukocyte traverses the whole vessel in a seemingly random fashion. For the straight round tubes simulated thus far, the stable leukocyte stand-off distance is always beyond the range of the binding molecules that capture it, which suggests that vessel inhomogeneities or interactions with other white cells are needed to create contact and thereby binding with the vessel walls.

  16. Skeleton deformation of red blood cells during tank treading motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Peng, Zhangli

    2012-11-01

    By coupling a fluid-structure interaction algorithm with a three-level multiscale structural model, we simulate the tank treading responses of erythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBC) in shear flows. The fluid motion is depicted within the Stokes-flow framework, and is mathematically formulated with the boundary integral equations. The structural model takes into account the flexible connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton as well as the viscoelastic responses. The concentration of this study is on the transient process involving the development of the local area deformation of the protein skeleton. Under the assumption that the protein skeleton is stress-free in the natural biconcave configuration, our simulations indicate the following properties: (1) During tank treading motions it takes long time for significant area deformations to establish. For cells with diminished connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton (e.g. cells with mutations or defects), the relaxation time will be greatly reduced; (2) Deformations of the skeleton depend on the initial orientation of the cell with respect to the incoming flow; (3) The maximum area expansion occurs around the regions corresponding to the dimples in the original biconcave state; (4) Oscillations in cell geometry (breathing) and orientation (e.g. swinging) are observed. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute under award number R01HL092793.

  17. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects. PMID:25379070

  18. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Healthy and Defective Red Blood Cell Settling in Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Z; Rahnama, M; Jafari, S

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study sedimentation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a plasma-filled tube numerically. Such behaviors are studied for a healthy and a defective cell which might be created due to human diseases, such as diabetes, sickle-cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Flow-induced deformation of RBC is obtained using finite-element method (FEM), while flow and fluid-membrane interaction are handled using lattice Boltzmann (LB) and immersed boundary methods (IBMs), respectively. The effects of RBC properties as well as its geometry and orientation on its sedimentation rate are investigated and discussed. The results show that decreasing frontal area of an RBC and/or increasing tube diameter results in a faster settling. Comparison of healthy and diabetic cells reveals that less cell deformability leads to slower settling. The simulation results show that the sicklelike and spherelike RBCs have lower settling velocity as compared with a biconcave discoid cell. PMID:26926169

  19. Therapeutic implications of autoimmune vitiligo T cells

    PubMed Central

    Oyarbide-Valencia, Kepa; van den Boorn, Jasper G.; Denman, Cecele J.; Li, Mingli; Carlson, Jeremy M.; Hernandez, Claudia; Nishimura, Michael I.; Das, Pranab K.; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease presenting with progressive loss of skin pigmentation. The disease strikes 1% of the world population, generally during teenage years. The progressive loss of melanocytes from depigmenting vitiligo skin is accompanied by cellular infiltrates containing both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Infiltrating cytotoxic T cells with high affinity T cell receptors have likely escaped clonal deletion in the thymus, allowing such T cells to enter the circulation. Through the expression of CLA, these T cells home to the skin where they express type 1-cytokine profiles and mediate melanocyte apoptosis via the granzyme/perforin pathway. T cells found juxtapositionally apposed to remaining melanocytes can be isolated from the skin. Vitiligo T cells have demonstrated reactivity to antigens previously recognized as target antigens for T cells infiltrating melanoma tumors. In a comparison to existing melanoma-derived T cells, vitiligo T cells displayed superior reactivity towards melanoma cells. It is thought that genes encoding the TCRs expressed by vitiligo skin infiltrating T cells can be cloned and expressed in melanoma T cells, thereby generating a pool of circulating T cells with high affinity for their targets that can re-direct the immune response towards the tumor. PMID:16920575

  20. Global methylation profiles in DNA from different blood cell types

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Flom, Julie D; Kappil, Maya; Ferris, Jennifer S; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation measured in white blood cell DNA is increasingly being used in studies of cancer susceptibility. However, little is known about the correlation between different assays to measure global methylation and whether the source of DNA matters when examining methylation profiles in different blood cell types. Using information from 620 women, 217 and 403 women with DNA available from granulocytes (Gran) and total white blood cells (WBC), respectively, and 48 women with DNA available from four different sources [WBC, Gran, mononuclear (MN) and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL)], we compared DNA methylation for three repetitive elements (LINE1, Sat2, Alu) by MethyLight, luminometric methylation assay (LUMA) and [3H]-methyl acceptance assay. For four of the five assays, DNA methylation levels measured in Gran were not correlated with methylation in LCL, MN or WBC; the exception was Sat2. DNA methylation in LCL was correlated with methylation in MN and WBC for the [3H]-methyl acceptance, LINE1 and Alu assays. Methylation in MN was correlated with methylation in WBC for the [3H]-methyl acceptance and LUMA assays. When we compared the five assays to each other by source of DNA, we observed statistically significant correlations ranging from 0.3–0.7 for each cell type with one exception (Sat2 and Alu in MN). Among the 620 women stratified by DNA source, correlations among assays were highest for the three repetitive elements (range 0.39–0.64). Results from the LUMA assay were modestly correlated with LINE1 (0.18–0.20). These results suggest that both assay and source of DNA are critical components in the interpretation of global DNA methylation patterns from WBC. PMID:20890131

  1. [In vitro generation of blood red cells from stem cells: a sketch of the future].

    PubMed

    Mazurier, Christelle; Douay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Human adult pluripotent stem cells, stem cells of embryonic origin and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) provide cellular sources for new promising regenerative medicine approaches. Because these cells can be patient-specific, they allow considering a personalized medicine appropriate to the diagnosis of each. The generation of cultured red blood cells (cRBC) derived from stem cells is emblematic of personalized medicine. Indeed, these cells have the advantage of being selected according to a blood phenotype of interest and they may provide treatments to patients in situation of impossible transfusion (alloimmunized patients, rare phenotypes). Essential progresses have established proof of concept for this approach, still a concept some years ago. From adult stem cells, all steps of upstream research were successfully achieved, including the demonstration of the feasibility of injection into human. This leads us to believe that Red Blood Cells generated in vitro from stem cells will be the future players of blood transfusion. However, although theoretically ideal, these stem cells raise many biological challenges to overcome, although some tracks are identified. PMID:27286576

  2. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  3. Blood bank issues associated with red cell exchanges in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ravindra; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2006-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are prone to develop complications that include stroke, acute chest syndrome, and other crises. Some of these complications require chronic transfusion therapy or red cell exchange (RCE), either for therapeutic or prophylactic reasons. Due to a discrepancy of red cell antigens between African Americans and Caucasians (majority blood donors), the incidence of alloantibody formation is very high, which makes it difficult to find compatible red cell units, especially for urgent RCE. Some of the above conditions require immediate oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, SCD patients undergoing RCE should receive red blood cells with special attributes that include matching for Rh and Kell blood group antigens; RBCs should be fresh in order to provide (1) immediate oxygen delivery and (2) longer surviving cells to reduce the interval between RCE. Also, these units should be pre-storage leukoreduced to prevent febrile non-hemolytic reactions and screened for sickle cell traits to avoid transfusing red cells containing HbS. This requires a concerted effort between the apheresis unit, the local blood bank, and the central blood supplier. PMID:17177280

  4. 76 FR 11491 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... requesting nominations to fill expected vacancies on the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. The Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation was established pursuant to Public Law...

  5. Mesenchymal precursor cells in the blood of normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Zvaifler, N J; Marinova-Mutafchieva, L; Adams, G; Edwards, C J; Moss, J; Burger, J A; Maini, R N

    2000-01-01

    STATEMENT OF FINDINGS: Mesenchymal precursor cells found in the blood (BMPCs) of normal persons adhere to plastic and glass and proliferate logarithmically in DMEM-20% fetal calf serum (FCS) without growth factors. They form cells with fibroblast-like and stromal morphology, which is not affected by eliminating CD34, CD3, or CD14 cells. Osteogenic supplements (dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and beta-glycerophosphate) added to the culture inhibited fibroblast formation, and BMPCs assumed the cuboidal shape of osteoblasts. After 5 days in supplemented medium, the elutriated cells displayed alkaline phosphatase (AP), and the addition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 (1 ng) doubled AP production (P < 0.04). Two weeks later, 30% of the cells were very large and reacted with anti-osteocalcin antibody. The same cultures also contained sudanophlic adipocytes and multinucleated giant cells that stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and vitronectin receptors. Cultured BMPCs immunostain with antibodies to vimentin, type I collagen, and BMP receptors, heterodimeric structures expressed on mesenchymal lineage cells. In addition, BMPCs stain with anti-CD105 (endoglin), a putative marker for bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PMID:11056678

  6. Glutaraldehyde fixation of sodium transport in dog red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C.

    1984-11-01

    The large increase in passive Na flux that occurs when dog red blood cells are caused to shrink is amiloride sensitive and inhibited when Cl is replaced by nitrate or thiocyanate. Activation and deactivation of this transport pathway by manipulation of cell volume is reversible. Brief treatment of the cells with 0.01-0.03% glutaraldehyde can cause the shrinkage-activated transporter to become irreversibly activated or inactivated, depending on the volume of the cells at the time of glutaraldehyde exposure. Thus, if glutaraldehyde is applied when the cells are shrunken, the amiloride-sensitive Na transporter is activated and remains so regardless of subsequent alterations in cell volume. If the fixative is applied to swollen cells, no amount of subsequent shrinkage will turn on the Na pathway. In its fixed state, the activated transporter is fully amiloride sensitive, but it is no longer inhibited when Cl is replaced by thiocyanate. The action of glutaraldehyde thus allows one to dissect the response to cell shrinkage into two phases. Activation of the pathway is affected by anions and is not prevented by amiloride. Once activated and fixed, the anion requirement disappears. Amiloride inhibits movement of Na through the activated transporter. These experiments demonstrate how a chemical cross-linking agent may be used to study the functional properties of a regulable transport pathway.

  7. Loss of T Follicular Helper Cells In the Peripheral Blood Of Patients With Chronic Graft vs. Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David A.; Wang, Hongbo; Aurora, Mukta; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Holton, Shernan G.; Bergerson, Rachel; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Cooley, Sarah; Brunstein, Claudio; Miller, Jeffery S.; Wagner, John E.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    B cell anti-host antibody production plays a central role in chronic graft-vs-host disease (cGVHD). T follicular helper (TFH) cells drive B cell responses and are implicated in this process. Given differences in cGVHD incidence between umbilical cord blood (UCB) and adult donor transplant recipients, we evaluated TFH cell reconstitution kinetics to define graft source differences and their potential pathogenic role in cGVHD. Although we observed significantly fewer TFH cells in the blood of UCB recipients (vs. matched related donors (MRD)) early after transplantation, by 1 year the numbers of TFH cells were similar. Additionally, at both early (day 60) and late (1 year) time points, TFH cell phenotype was predominantly central memory cells in both cohorts. TFH cells were functional and able to produce multiple cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-21) following stimulation. In contrast to mouse models where an enhanced frequency of splenic TFH cells contributes to cGVHD, patients with cGVHD showed significantly depleted circulating TFH cells following both UCB and MRD transplantation. Low numbers of TFH cells early after UCB transplantation could directly contribute to less cGVHD in this cohort. Additionally, systemic therapy (including steroids and calcineurin inhibitors) may contribute to decreases in TFH cells in patients with cGVHD. These data provide further evidence supporting the importance of TFH cells in cGVHD pathogenesis. PMID:26806586

  8. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Henkelman, S; Noorman, F; Badloe, J F; Lagerberg, J W M

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular deterioration at subzero temperatures, its usage have been hampered due to the more complex and labour intensive procedure and the limited shelf life of thawed products. Since the FDA approval of a closed (de) glycerolization procedure in 2002, allowing a prolonged postthaw storage of red blood cells up to 21 days at 2-6°C, cryopreserved red blood cells have become a more utilized blood product. Currently, cryopreserved red blood cells are mainly used in military operations and to stock red blood cells with rare phenotypes. Yet, cryopreserved red blood cells could also be useful to replenish temporary blood shortages, to prolong storage time before autologous transfusion and for IgA-deficient patients. This review describes the main methods to cryopreserve red blood cells, explores the quality of this blood product and highlights clinical settings in which cryopreserved red blood cells are or could be utilized. PMID:25471135

  9. Pyruvate effects on red blood cells during in vitro cardiopulmonary bypass with dogs' blood.

    PubMed

    Gou, DaMing; Tan, HongJing; Cai, HuiJun; Zhou, FangQiang

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the effects of pyruvate (Pyr) on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) in red blood cells (RBCs) during the cardiopulmonary bypass procedure (CPB), blood, 500 mL, was collected from each of 10 healthy dogs (weight 12-18 kg). The blood was divided into two parts (250 mL each) and randomly assigned into the control group (Group C, n = 10) or the Pyr group (Group P, n = 10). The blood was commingled with an equal volume of 0.9% NaCl and pyruvated isotonic solution (Pyr 50 mM) in the extracorporeal circuit in the two groups, respectively. The CPB procedure was fixed at 120 min, and the transferring flow was 4 L/min. Contents of ATP in RBCs, eNOS activities, and NO productions in plasma were measured before CPB and during CPB at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min in both groups. The ATP level, eNOS activity, and NO production were not different prior to CPB between the two groups. A decline of ATP levels was shown in both groups but remained significantly higher in Group P than in Group C at the same time points during in vitro CPB (P < 0.01). Values of eNOS and NO were significantly increased in Group C but markedly reduced in Group P during CPB, compared with pre-CPB (P < 0.01). The CPB procedure significantly damaged dogs' RBCs in the ATP level, eNOS activity, and NO production, in vitro, but Pyr effectively protected RBCs in these functions during CPB. Pyr would be clinically protective for RBCs during CPB.

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  11. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  12. Companion Blood Cells Control Ovarian Stem Cell Niche Microenvironment and Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Van De Bor, Véronique; Zimniak, Geordie; Papone, Lise; Cerezo, Delphine; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Juan, Thomas; Ruggiero, Florence; Noselli, Stéphane

    2015-10-20

    The extracellular matrix plays an essential role for stem cell differentiation and niche homeostasis. Yet, the origin and mechanism of assembly of the stem cell niche microenvironment remain poorly characterized. Here, we uncover an association between the niche and blood cells, leading to the formation of the Drosophila ovarian germline stem cell niche basement membrane. We identify a distinct pool of plasmatocytes tightly associated with the developing ovaries from larval stages onward. Expressing tagged collagen IV tissue specifically, we show that the germline stem cell niche basement membrane is produced by these "companion plasmatocytes" in the larval gonad and persists throughout adulthood, including the reproductive period. Eliminating companion plasmatocytes or specifically blocking their collagen IV expression during larval stages results in abnormal adult niches with excess stem cells, a phenotype due to aberrant BMP signaling. Thus, local interactions between the niche and blood cells during gonad development are essential for adult germline stem cell niche microenvironment assembly and homeostasis.

  13. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction: implication in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Coates, Thomas D

    2013-03-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hemoglobinopathy caused by a single amino acid substitution in the β chain of hemoglobin that causes the hemoglobin to polymerize in the deoxy state. The resulting rigid, sickle-shaped red cells obstruct blood flow causing hemolytic anemia, tissue damage, and premature death. Hemolysis is continual. However, acute exacerbations of sickling called vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) resulting in severe pain occur, often requiring hospitalization. Blood rheology, adhesion of cellular elements of blood to vascular endothelium, inflammation, and activation of coagulation decrease microvascular flow and increase likelihood of VOC. What triggers the transition from steady state to VOC is unknown. This review discusses the interaction of blood rheological factors and the role that autonomic nervous system (ANS) induced vasoconstriction may have in triggering crisis as well as the mechanism of ANS dysfunction in SCD. PMID:23643396

  14. Analysis of White Blood Cell Dynamics in Nailfold Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Bourquard, Aurélien; Butterworth, Ian; Sánchez-Ferro, Alvaro; Giancardo, Luca; Soenksen, Luis; Cerrato, Carolina; Flores, Rafael; Castro-González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Based on video data acquired with low-cost, portable microscopy equipment, we introduce a semi-automatic method to count visual gaps in the blood flow as a proxy for white blood cells (WBC) passing through nailfold capillaries. Following minimal user interaction and a pre-processing stage, our method consists in the spatio-temporal segmentation and analysis of capillary profiles. Besides the mere count information, it also estimates the speed associated with every WBC event. The accuracy of our algorithm is validated through the analysis of two capillaries acquired from one healthy subject. Results are compared with manual counts from four human raters and confronted with related physiological data reported in literature. PMID:26738019

  15. SEM analysis of red blood cells in aged human bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hortolà, P

    1992-08-01

    Mammal red blood cells (RBC) in bloodstains have been previously detected by light microscopy on stone tools from as early as 100,000 +/- 25,000 years ago. In order to evaluate the degree of morphological preservation of erythrocytes in bloodstains, an accidental human blood smear on white chert and several experimental bloodstains on hard substrates (the same stone-white chert; another type of stone-graywacke; a non-stone support-stainless steel), were stored in a room, in non-sterile and fluctuating conditions, for lengths of time ranging from 3 to 18 months. Afterwards, the specimens were coated with gold and examined by a Cambridge Stereoscan 120 scanning electron microscope. Results revealed a high preservation of RBC integrity, with the maintenance of several discocytary shapes, a low tendency to echinocytosis and a frequent appearance of a moon-like erythrocytary shape in the thinner areas of the bloodstains. PMID:1398371

  16. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  18. Chaotic dynamics of red blood cells in oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Cordasco, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A 3D computational study of deformable red blood cells in dilute suspension and subject to sinusoidally oscillating shear flow is considered. It is observed that the cell exhibits either a periodic motion or a chaotic motion. In the periodic motion, the cell reverses its orientation either about the flow direction or about the flow gradient, depending on the initial conditions. In certain parameter range, the initial conditions are forgotten and the cells become entrained in the same sequence of horizontal reversals. The chaotic dynamics is characterized by a nonperiodic sequence of horizontal and vertical reversals, and swings. The study provides the first conclusive evidence of the chaotic dynamics of fully deformable cells in oscillating flow using a deterministic numerical model without the introduction of any stochastic noise. An analysis of the chaotic dynamics shows that chaos is only possible in certain frequency bands when the cell membrane can rotate by a certain amount allowing the cells to swing near the maximum shear rate. We make a novel observation that the occurrence of the vertical or horizontal reversal depends only on whether a critical angle, that is independent of the flow frequency, is exceeded at the instant of flow reversal.

  19. Theory of the sphering of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Tong, P

    1968-02-01

    A rigorous mathematical solution of the sphering of a red blood cell is obtained under the assumptions that the red cells is a fluid-filled shell and that it can swell into a perfect sphere in an appropriate hypotonic medium. The solution is valid for finite strain of the cell membrane provided that the membrane is isotropic, elastic and incompressible. The most general nonlinear elastic stress-strain law for the membrane in a state of generalized plane stress is used. A necessary condition for a red cell to be able to sphere is that its extensional stiffness follow a specific distribution over the membrane. This distribution is strongly influenced by the surface tension in the cell membrane. A unique relation exists between the extensional stiffness, pressure differential, surface tension, and the ratio of the radius of the sphere to that of the undeformed red cell. The functional dependence of this stiffness distribution on various physical parameters is presented. A critique of some current literature on red cell mechanics is presented. PMID:5639934

  20. [Umbilical cord blood as a source of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ines; Golubić Cepulić, Branka

    2006-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a source of the rare but precious primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and progenitor cells that can reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders treated with myeloablative therapy. UCB cells possess an enhanced capacity for progenitor cell proliferation and self-renewal in vitro. UCB is usually discarded, and it exists in almost limitless supply. The blood remaining in the delivered placenta is safely and easily collected and stored. The predominant collection procedure currently practiced involves a relatively simple venipuncture, followed by gravity drainage into a standard sterile anti-coagulant-filled blood bag, using a closed system, similar to the one utilized on whole blood collection. After aliquots have been removed for routine testing, the units are cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen. UCB banks are being established throughout the world and UCB units are collected for allogeneic unrelated and related HSC transplantation. In unrelated cord blood banks donated UCB units are collected and stored for allogeneic use in patients who do not have an identified HLA matched relative. UCB banks report available units to national and international donor registries. The second model of UCB banking is referred to as family banking, where UCB is stored for the benefit of the donor or their family members. After more than one decade of clinical experience, it is currently accepted that UCB transplants, related and unrelated, are equivalent to or might compare favorably with bone marrow (BM) transplants, especially in children. Initial studies of long-term survival in children with both malignant and non-malignant hematologic disorders, who were transplanted with UCB from a sibling donor, demonstrated comparable or superior survival to children who received BM transplantation. One factor that limits the use of UCB transplantation in adult patients is the relatively limited number of

  1. Remote ischemia preconditioning increases red blood cell deformability through red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Kollikowski, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-09-12

    Remote ischemia preconditioning (rIPC), short cycles of ischemia (I) and reperfusion (R) of a region remote from the heart, protects against myocardial I/R injury. This effect is triggered by endothelial derived nitric oxide (NO) production. Red blood cells (RBC) are also capable of NO production and it is hypothesized that the beneficial effect of rIPC in terms of cardioprotection is strengthened by increased RBC dependent NO production and improved RBC function after rIPC maneuver. For this purpose, twenty male participants were subjected to four cycles of no-flow ischemia with subsequent reactive hyperemia within the forearm. Blood sampling and measurement of blood pressures and heart rate were carried out pre intervention, after each cycle and 15 min post intervention at both the non-treated and treated arm. These are the first results that show improved RBC deformability in the treated arm after rIPC cycles 1- 4 caused by significantly increased RBC-NO synthase activation. This in turn was associated to increased NO production in both arms after rIPC cycles 3 + 4. Also, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased after rIPC. The findings lead to the conclusion that the cardioprotective effects associated with rIPC include improvement of the RBC-NOS/NO signaling in RBC.

  2. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  3. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  4. Peripheral Blood Cell Signatures of Plasmodium falciparum Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ibitokou, Samad; Oesterholt, Mayke; Brutus, Laurent; Borgella, Sophie; Agbowaï, Carine; Ezinmègnon, Sèm; Lusingu, John; Schmiegelow, Christentze; Massougbodji, Achille; Deloron, Philippe; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Varani, Stefania; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Fievet, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in placental intervillous spaces causes inflammation and pathology. Knowledge of the profiles of immune cells associated with the physiopathology of pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is scarce. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective study, both in Benin and Tanzania, including ∼1000 pregnant women in each site with systematic follow-up at scheduled antenatal visits until delivery. We used ex vivo flow cytometry to identify peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) profiles that are associated with PAM and anaemia, determining the phenotypic composition and activation status of PBMC in selected sub-groups with and without PAM both at inclusion and at delivery in a total of 302 women. Both at inclusion and at delivery PAM was associated with significantly increased frequencies both of B cells overall and of activated B cells. Infection-related profiles were otherwise quite distinct at the two different time-points. At inclusion, PAM was associated with anaemia, with an increased frequency of immature monocytes and with a decreased frequency of regulatory T cells (Treg). At delivery, infected women presented with significantly fewer plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC), more myeloid DC expressing low levels of HLA-DR, and more effector T cells (Teff) compared to uninfected women. Independent associations with an increased risk of anaemia were found for altered antigen-presenting cell frequencies at inclusion, but for an increased frequency of Teff at delivery. Our findings emphasize the prominent role played by B cells during PAM whenever it arises during pregnancy, whilst also revealing signature changes in other circulating cell types that, we conclude, primarily reflect the relative duration of the infections. Thus, the acute, recently-acquired infections present at delivery were marked by changes in DC and Teff frequencies, contrasting with infections at inclusion, considered chronic in nature, that

  5. Mach-Zehnder interferometer for separation of platelets from red blood cells using dielectrophoretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, M.; Narayan, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, separation of platelets from red blood cells using Mach-Zehnder interferometer is shown using Dielectrophoretics (DEP). The proposed model demonstrates continuous separation of platelets from red blood cells. Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has two arms, in which sensing arm will sense according to the applied voltage and separate the platelets from mixed blood cells. The platelets and the red blood cells will flow in two outlets of MZI. Microfluidic device is used to separate the RBC's and the platelets from the mixed blood cells.

  6. Transport of diseased red blood cells in the spleen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    A major function of the spleen is to remove old and diseased red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties. We investigated this mechanical filtering mechanism by combining experiments and computational modeling, especially for red blood cells in malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD). First, utilizing a transgenic line for 3D confocal live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element modeling, we extracted the mechanical properties of both the RBC membrane and malaria parasites for different asexual malaria stages. Secondly, using a non-invasive laser interferometric technique, we optically measured the dynamic membrane fluctuations of SCD RBCs. By simulating the membrane fluctuation experiment using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model, we retrieved mechanical properties of SCD RBCs with different shapes. Finally, based on the mechanical properties obtained from these experiments, we simulated the full fluid-structure interaction problem of diseased RBCs passing through endothelial slits in the spleen under different fluid pressure gradients using the DPD model. The effects of the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the cytoskeleton and the parasite on the critical pressure of splenic passage of RBCs were investigated separately. This work is supported by NIH and Singapore-MIT Alliance for Science and Technology (SMART).

  7. Vibrational modes of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Martel, P; Calmettes, P; Hennion, B

    1991-02-01

    Equine red blood cells were washed in saline heavy water (2H2O) to exchange the hydrogen atoms of the non-hemoglobin components with deuterons. This led to novel neutron scattering measurements of protein vibrations within a cellular system and permitted a comparison with inelastic neutron scattering measurements on purified horse hemoglobin, either dry or wetted with 2H2O. As a function of wavevector transfer Q and the frequency transfer v the neutron response typified by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, v) was found to be similar for extracted and cellular hemoglobin at low and high temperatures. At 77 K, in the cells, a peak in S(Q, v) due to the protein was found near 0.7 THz, approximately half the frequency of a strong peak in the aqueous medium. Measurements at higher temperatures (170 and 230 K) indicated similar small shifts downwards in the peak frequencies of both components. At 260 K the low frequency component became predominantly quasielastic, but a significant inelastic component could still be ascribed to the aqueous scattering. Near 295 K the frequency responses of both components were similar and centered near zero. When scattering due to water is taken into account it appears that the protein neutron response in, or out of, red blood cells is little affected by hydration in the low frequency regime where Van der Waals forces are thought to be effective. PMID:1849028

  8. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  9. Effects of Malaria Parasite Density on Blood Cell Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kotepui, Manas; Piwkham, Duangjai; PhunPhuech, Bhukdee; Phiwklam, Nuoil; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Duangmano, Suwit

    2015-01-01

    Changes in blood cell parameters are already a well-known feature of malarial infections. To add to this information, the objective of this study was to investigate the varying effects that different levels of parasite density have on blood cell parameters. Patients diagnosed with malaria at Phobphra Hospital, Tak Province, Thailand between January 1st 2009 and January 1st 2012 were recruited as subjects for data collection. Blood cell parameters of 2,024 malaria-infected patients were evaluated and statistically analyzed. Neutrophil and platelet counts were significantly higher, however, RBC count was significantly lower in patients with P. falciparum infection compared to those with P. vivax infection (p<0.0001). Leukocyte counts were also significantly higher in patients with high parasitemia compared to those with low and moderate parasitemia. In terms of differential leukocyte count, neutrophil count was significantly higher in patients with high parasitemia compared to those with low and moderate parasitemia (p<0.0001). On the other hand, both lymphocyte and monocyte counts were significantly lower in patients with high parasitemia (p<0.0001). RBC count and Hb concentration, as well as platelet count were also significantly reduced (p<0.05) and (p<0.0001), respectively. To summarize, patients infected with different malaria parasites exhibited important distinctive hematological parameters, with neutrophil and eosinophil counts being the two hematological parameters most affected. In addition, patients infected with different malarial densities also exhibited important changes in leukocyte count, platelet count and hemoglobin concentration during the infection. These findings offer the opportunity to recognize and diagnose malaria related anemia, help support the treatment thereof, as well as relieve symptoms of severe malaria in endemic regions. PMID:25807235

  10. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E; Ustinov, V D

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  11. Loss of caveolin-1 causes blood-retinal barrier breakdown, venous enlargement, and mural cell alteration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaowu; Fliesler, Steven J; Zhao, You-Yang; Stallcup, William B; Cohen, Alex W; Elliott, Michael H

    2014-02-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and related vascular changes are implicated in several ocular diseases. The molecules and mechanisms regulating BRB integrity and pathophysiology are not fully elucidated. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) ablation results in loss of caveolae and microvascular pathologies, but the role of Cav-1 in the retina is largely unknown. We examined BRB integrity and vasculature in Cav-1 knockout mice and found a significant increase in BRB permeability, compared with wild-type controls, with branch veins being frequent sites of breakdown. Vascular hyperpermeability occurred without apparent alteration in junctional proteins. Such hyperpermeability was not rescued by inhibiting eNOS activity. Veins of Cav-1 knockout retinas exhibited additional pathological features, including i) eNOS-independent enlargement, ii) altered expression of mural cell markers (eg, down-regulation of NG2 and up-regulation of αSMA), and iii) dramatic alterations in mural cell phenotype near the optic nerve head. We observed a significant NO-dependent increase in retinal artery diameter in Cav-1 knockout mice, suggesting that Cav-1 plays a role in autoregulation of resistance vessels in the retina. These findings implicate Cav-1 in maintaining BRB integrity in retinal vasculature and suggest a previously undefined role in the retinal venous system and associated mural cells. Our results are relevant to clinically significant retinal disorders with vascular pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, uveoretinitis, and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  12. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  13. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    PubMed

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016.

  14. Changes in En(a-) human red blood cell membranes during in vivo ageing.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, T; Miyata, Y; Takei, S; Yoshida, R; Ogamo, A; Nakagawa, Y; Kuroda, N; Yanagida, J

    1996-01-01

    The human red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) were characterized by the lack of MN antigens. The red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) which were found in a Japanese family were tested to clarify the changes in membrane surfaces of the red blood cells during in vivo ageing. The contents of sialic acid, glucose, mannose, galactose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine of the red blood cell membranes obtained from the old red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) were significantly lower than those of the young red blood cell membranes. Neither the young nor the old red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) showed the agglutination with Arachis hypogaea (PNA) which was capable of binding to T agglutinogen. It is presumed that En(a-) red blood cells are not exposed to sialidase in vivo. In comparison with the young En(a-) red blood cell membranes, the number and the distribution density of lectin receptor sites on the old ones for Limulus polyphemus (LPA), Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA) were significantly lower. It is thought that En(a-) red blood cell ageing is accompanied by elimination of some sialoglycoconjugates which have affinity for LPA, Con A, WGA and BPA, whereas En(a-) red blood cells lack glycophorin A. PMID:8866734

  15. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy. PMID:26846309

  16. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy.

  17. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r(2)  = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. Am. J. Hematol. 91:912-917, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27263497

  18. CD21(-/low) B cells in human blood are memory cells.

    PubMed

    Thorarinsdottir, K; Camponeschi, A; Cavallini, N; Grimsholm, O; Jacobsson, L; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2016-08-01

    The complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) is part of a complex (CD21/CD19/CD81) acting as a co-receptor to the B cell receptor (BCR). Simultaneous triggering of the BCR and CD21 lowers the threshold for B cell activation. Although CD21 is important, B cells that express low amounts or lack surface CD21 (CD21(-/low) ) are increased in conditions with chronic inflammation, e.g. autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the CD21(-/low) B cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy donors. Here, we show that CD21(-/low) cells represent approximately 5% of B cells in peripheral blood from adults but are barely detectable in cord blood, after excluding transitional B cells. The CD21(-/low) subset can be divided into CD38(-) 24(+) and CD38(-) 24(low) cells, where most of the CD38(-) 24(+) are CD27(+) immunoglobulin (Ig)M(+) IgD(+) and the CD38(-) 24(low) are switched CD27(-) . Expression levels of additional markers, e.g. CD95 and CD62L, are similar to those on classical memory B cells. In contrast to naive cells, the majority of CD21(-/low) cells lack expression of the ABCB1 transporter. Stimulation with a combination of BCR, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7/8 and interleukin (IL)-2 induces proliferation and differentiation of the CD21(-/low) B cells comparable to CD21(+) CD27(+) memory B cells. The response excluding BCR agonist is not on par with that of classical memory B cells, although clearly above that of naive B cells. This is ascribed to a weaker response by the CD38(-) 24(low) subset, implying that some memory B cells require not only TLR but also BCR triggering. We conclude that the CD21(-/low) cells in healthy donors are memory B cells. PMID:27010233

  19. Efficient induction of pluripotent stem cells from menstrual blood.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiaoni; Zhao, Hongxi; Feng, Ruopeng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tai, Dapeng; An, Guangyu; Wen, Jinhua; Tan, Jichun

    2013-04-01

    The technology to reprogram human somatic cells back to pluripotency allows the production of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and holds a great promise for regenerative medicine. Choosing the most suitable cell type for induction and reducing the risk of viral transgene activation, especially oncogene activation, are important for iPSC research. To date, human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) are the most frequent cell source used for iPSC generation, but they have several limitations. An invasive skin biopsy must be performed to obtain HDFs, and HDFs must be cultured for a prolonged period before they can be used for experiments. Thus, in an effort to develop a suitable source for iPSC studies to avoid the limitations mentioned above, we have here identified stromal cells derived from menstrual blood (MenSCs) as suitable candidates. In the present study, we found that MenSCs can be reprogrammed to pluripotent status by doxycycline-inducible lentiviral transduction of OCT4, SOX2, and KLF4. Additionally, we found that MenSCs have a significantly higher reprogramming efficiency than HDFs. The combination of OCT4 and SOX2 is sufficient to reprogram MenSCs into iPSCs without the use of c-MYC or KLF4. The resulting MenSC-iPSCs showed the same characteristics as human embryonic stem cells with regard to morphology, pluripotent markers, gene expression, and the epigenetic status of pluripotent-cell-specific genes. These cells were able to differentiate into various cell types of all 3 germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, MenSCs may be a preferred candidate for generation of iPSCs. PMID:23151296

  20. Design of an automated algorithm for labeling cardiac blood pool in gated SPECT images of radiolabeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, T.J. |; Moore, W.H.; Dhekne, R.D.; Ford, P.V.; Wendt, J.A.; Murphy, P.H.; Ting, Y.

    1996-08-01

    The design of an automated computer algorithm for labeling the cardiac blood pool within gated 3-D reconstructions of the radiolabeled red blood cells is investigated. Due to patient functional abnormalities, limited resolution, and noise, certain spatial and temporal features of the cardiac blood pool that one would anticipate finding in every study are not present in certain frames or with certain patients. The labeling of the cardiac blood pool requires an algorithm that only relies upon features present in all patients. The authors investigate the design of a fully-automated region growing algorithm for this purpose.

  1. Biological effects of the electrostatic field: red blood cell-related alterations of oxidative processes in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Hayk A.; Sahakyan, Gohar V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine activities of pro-/antioxidant enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and oxidative modification of proteins and lipids in red blood cells (RBCs) and blood plasma of rats exposed to electrostatic field (200 kV/m) during the short (1 h) and the long periods (6 day, 6 h daily). Short-term exposure was characterized by the increase of oxidatively damaged proteins in blood of rats. This was strongly expressed in RBC membranes. After long-term action, RBC content in peripheral blood was higher than in control ( P < 0.01) and the attenuation of prooxidant processes was shown.

  2. Rare cancer cell analyzer for whole blood applications: microcytometer cell counting and sorting subcircuits.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, C; Kokoris, M; Nabavi, M; Clemmens, J; Maloney, P; Capadanno, J; Gerdes, J; Battrell, C F

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate sorting of rare cancer cells from blood using a thin ribbon monolayer of cells within a credit-card sized, microfluidic laboratory-on-a-card ("lab card") structure. This enables higher cell throughput per minute thereby speeding up cell interrogation. In this approach, multiple cells are viewed and sorted, not individually, but as a whole cell row or section of the ribbon at a time. Gated selection of only the cell rows containing a tagged rare cell provides enrichment of the rare cell relative to background blood cells. We also designed the cell injector for laminar flow antibody labeling within 20s. The approach combines rapid laminar flow cell labeling with monolayer cell sorting thereby enabling rare cell target detection at sensitivity levels 1000 to 10,000 times that of existing flow cytometers. Using this method, total cell labeling and data acquisition time on card may be reduced to a few minutes compared to 30-60 min for standard flow methods. PMID:16199174

  3. Analysis of Red Blood Cell Behavior in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Haruki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) is a main component of blood accounting for 40 percent in volume, and enclosed by a twodimensional hyper elastic membrane. RBCs strongly influence rheological properties and mass transport of blood. The deformation of RBCs in capillary and at narrowing is also important in considering mechano-transduction of RBCs and hemolysis, though it has not been clarified in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the behavior of a RBC flowing in a narrow tube. To carry out the fluid-structure interaction analysis, we coupled a boundary element method to analyze the velocity of the internal and external fluid with a finite element method to analyze the deformation of the membrane. The boundary element method has good calculation accuracy and its computational cost is low because three-dimensional flow filed can be calculated by a two-dimensional computational mesh. The background flow in a tube is pressure-driven Poiseuille flow. Additionally, to reduce the computational time, we implemented massive parallel computation by using GPUs. The results show that the deformation of a RBC is strongly affected by the Capillary number, which is the ratio of viscous force to the elastic force, radius of the tube, and the initial orientation.

  4. Expression of blood group genes by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Richard; Schnaidt, Martina; Klaffschenkel, Roland A.; Siegel, Georg; Schüle, Michael; Rädlein, Maria Anna; Hermanutz-Klein, Ursula; Ayturan, Miriam; Buadze, Marine; Gassner, Christoph; Danielyan, Lusine; Kluba, Torsten; Northoff, Hinnak; Flegel, Willy A.

    2011-01-01

    Incompatible blood group antigens are highly immunogenic and can cause graft rejections. Focusing on distinct carbohydrate- and protein-based membrane structures, defined by blood group antigens, we investigated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in human serum. The presence of H (CD173), ABO, RhD, RhCE, RhAG, Kell, urea transporter type B (SLC14A1, previously known as JK), and Duffy antigen receptor of chemokines (DARC) was evaluated at the levels of genome, transcriptome and antigen. Fucosyltransferase-1 (FUT1), RHCE, KEL, SLC14A1 (JK) and DARC mRNA were transcribed in MSCs. FUT1 mRNA transcription was lost during differentiation. The mRNA transcription of SLC14A1 (JK) decreased during chondrogenic differentiation, while that of DARC increased during adipogenic differentiation. All MSCs synthesized SLC14A1 (JK) but no DARC protein. However, none of the protein antigens tested occurred on the surface, indicating a lack of associated protein function in the membrane. As A and B antigens are neither expressed nor adsorbed, concerns of ABO compatibility with human serum supplements during culture are alleviated. The H antigen expression by GD2dim+ MSCs identified two distinct MSC subpopulations and enabled their isolation. We hypothesize that GD2dim+H+ MSCs retain a better “stemness”. Because immunogenic blood group antigens are lacking, they cannot affect MSC engraftment in vivo, which is promising for clinical applications. PMID:21418181

  5. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices.

  6. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices. PMID:27424006

  7. [Effect of processed blood volume, leukocyte count and concentration of CD34-positive cells in peripheral blood on efficiency of stem cell apheresis].

    PubMed

    Matic, G B; Ullrich, H; Barlage, S; Rothe, G; Schmitz, G

    1997-01-01

    Despite many published studies no parameter could be identified yet to acceptably and individually predict collection results in stem cell apheresis. We analyzed leukocyte counts and processed blood volume, absolute and relative CD34+ cell counts, and overall collection efficiency in 120 patients with hematological and solid malignancies (354 leukaphereses using the Cobe Spectra cell separator, a median of 3 per patient, span 1-9). Stem cells were mobilized into peripheral blood by conventional chemotherapy followed by daily doses of G-CSF. CD34+ progenitor cell counts were monitored through multiparametric flow cytometry. Blood and collection flows varied in the range of 45-90 ml/min and 0.7-1.5 ml/min, respectively. CD34+ progenitor cells were enriched 38-fold in the apheresis product as compared to peripheral blood at a processed blood volume lower than one total blood volume. Efficiency continuously declined, on to a 25-fold concentration at a processed blood volume above the 3-fold total blood volume. Total collection efficiency, calculated from the absolute content of CD34+ progenitor cells in peripheral blood and apheresis concentrate (a parameter for progenitor cell mobilization during the apheresis), reached a plateau at a processed blood volume above the 3-fold total blood volume. However, variation among individual patients was high. The concentration rate of CD34+ cells at a leukocyte count below 5,000/microliter averaged 50 and declined continuously to 8 at leukocyte counts between 45,000 and 50,000/microliter. To summarize, in 70% of patients with leukocyte counts below 5,000/microliter and CD34+ progenitor cell counts above 10,000/ml, more than 1.5 x 10(6) progenitors per kg body weight could be collected in a single leukapheresis. According to the presented data, the variation in overall collection efficiency is mainly due to: 1) varying mobilization of progenitors during the apheresis procedures itself and 2) dependence on peripheral leukocyte

  8. Could cells from menstrual blood be a new source for cell-based therapies?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man-Jing; Liu, Bin; Xia, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Yong; Lu, Kai-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Human endometrium is a highly regenerative tissue and contains a low number of cells which have high replicative ability and differentiation efficiency. This has been identified by many scientists. When the fresh growth of tissue and blood vessels is shed during each menstrual cycle, some cells with regenerative capabilities are present. Reports have also indicated that these cells possess the capacity to trans-differentiate into mesodermal, ectodermal and endodermal lineages by using standard commercially available culture reagents and methodologies. Given the ease of extraction and pluripotency of this cell population, we propose it as a novel alternative to current cells sources for cell-based therapies. PMID:19101090

  9. Comparison of instruments for investigation of microcirculatory blood flow and red blood cell concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Doherty, Jim; McNamara, Paul; Clancy, Neil T.; Enfield, Joey G.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2009-05-01

    The use of laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI) is well known in the noninvasive investigation of microcirculatory blood flow. This work compares the two techniques with the recently developed tissue viability (TiVi) imaging system, which is proposed as a useful tool to quantify red blood cell concentration in microcirculation. Three systems are evaluated with common skin tests such as the use of vasodilating and vasoconstricting drugs (methlynicotinate and clobetasol, respectively) and a reactive hyperaemia maneuver (using a sphygmomanometer). The devices investigated are the laser Doppler line scanner (LDLS), the laser speckle perfusion imager (FLPI)-both from Moor Instruments (Axminster, United Kingdom)-and the TiVi imaging system (WheelsBridge AB, Linköping, Sweden). Both imaging and point scanning by the devices are used to quantify the provoked reactions. Perfusion images of vasodilatation and vasoconstriction are acquired with both LDLS and FLPI, while TiVi images are acquired with the TiVi imager. Time acquisitions of an averaged region of interest are acquired for temporal studies such as the reactive hyperaemia. In contrast to the change in perfusion over time with pressure, the TiVi imager shows a different response due its measurement of blood concentration rather than perfusion. The responses can be explained by physiological understanding. Although the three devices sample different compartments of tissue, and output essentially different variables, comparisons can be seen between the three systems. The LDLS system proves to be suited to measurement of perfusion in deeper vessels, while FLPI and TiVi showed sensitivity to more superficial nutritional supply. LDLS and FLPI are insensitive to the action of the vasoconstrictor, while TiVi shows the clear boundaries of the reaction. Assessment of the resolution, penetration depth, and acquisition rate of each instrument show complimentary features that should

  10. Blood analyte sensing using fluorescent dye-loaded red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Shao, Xiaole; Cooley, Nicholas; Milanick, Mark A.; Glass, Timothy E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of blood analytes provides crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Due to analyte transporters on red blood cell (RBC) membranes that equilibrate intracellular and extracellular analyte levels, RBCs serve as an attractive alternative for encapsulating analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, the functionalized RBCs may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed sensing system utilizes the ability of the RBCs to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before lysis, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. While at low temperature, analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution diffuse into the perforated RBCs and become entrapped upon restoration of temperature and osmolarity. Since the fluorescent signal from the entrapped dye reports on changes in the analyte level of the extracellular solution via the RBC transporters, interactions between the RBCs and the dye are critical to the efficacy of this technique. In this work, we study the use of a near infrared pH sensitive dye encapsulated within RBCs and assess the ability to measure dye fluorescence in vivo.

  11. Cell differentiation mediated by co-culture of human umbilical cord blood stem cells with murine hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Stecklum, Maria; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Purfürst, Bettina; Siegert, Antje; Keil, Marlen; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, purified human cord blood stem cells were co-cultivated with murine hepatic alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells to compare the effect on endodermal stem cell differentiation by either direct cell-cell interaction or by soluble factors in conditioned hepatic cell medium. With that approach, we want to mimic in vitro the situation of preclinical transplantation experiments using human cells in mice. Cord blood stem cells, cultivated with hepatic conditioned medium, showed a low endodermal differentiation but an increased connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx43, and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) and CK19 expression was monitored by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Microarray profiling indicated that in cultivated cord blood cells, 604 genes were upregulated 2-fold, with the highest expression for epithelial CK19 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). On ultrastructural level, there were no major changes in the cellular morphology, except a higher presence of phago(ly)some-like structures observed. Direct co-culture of AML12 cells with cord blood cells led to less incisive differentiation with increased sex-determining region Y-box 17 (SOX17), Cx32 and Cx43, as well as epithelial CK8 and CK19 expressions. On ultrastructural level, tight cell contacts along the plasma membranes were revealed. FACS analysis in co-cultivated cells quantified dye exchange on low level, as also proved by time relapse video-imaging of labelled cells. Modulators of gap junction formation influenced dye transfer between the co-cultured cells, whereby retinoic acid increased and 3-heptanol reduced the dye transfer. The study indicated that the cell-co-cultured model of human umbilical cord blood cells and murine AML12 cells may be a suitable approach to study some aspects of endodermal/hepatic cell differentiation induction. PMID:25270685

  12. [Comparison of the effect of Cobe Spectra and Fenwal CS 3000 plus blood cell separators in collection of peripheral blood stem cell components].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shen-Miao; Liu, Kai-Yan; Lu, Dao-Pei

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell apheresis effect of Cobe Spectra (Version 6.1) and Fenwal CS 3000 Plus cell separators, fourty-two procedures on twenty donors using Cobe Spectra cell separator and twenty-two procedures on sixteen donors using Fenwal CS 3000 Plus cell separator were retrospectively analyzed. The number of CD34(+) cells collected, the collection efficiency (CE) of CD34(+) cells and the contaminations of red blood cell and platelet in the stem/progenitor cell products of two devices were compared. The results showed that there were no significant differences in the total number of CD34(+) cells collected and the CD34(+) cell CE between the two devices. There were positive correlations between the count of peripheral blood cells including leukocyte, monocyte, hematopoietic progenitor cell and CD34(+) cell after mobilization and the total number of CD34(+) cells collected. The stepwise multiple variable analyses revealed the peripheral blood stem/progenitor cell count emerged as the only significant independent predictive factor for CE. A negative correlation was seen between the peripheral blood monocyte count and the CD34(+) cell CE for the Fenwal CS 3000 Plus. The Fenwal CS 3000 Plus product contained more red blood cells than that of the Cobe Spectra. The decrease in the peripheral platelet count after Fenwal CS 3000 Plus apheresis was also greater. It is concluded that collection efficacy of Cobe Spectra (Version 6.1) and Fenwal CS 3000 Plus was similar. Cobe Spectra shall be used preferably to assure higher CD34(+) cell CE at a high peripheral blood monocyte count. The Cobe Spectra cell separator is better for the donors with mismatched blood type and the donors with thrombocytopenia.

  13. Clinical evaluation of a /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell survival test for in vivo blood compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Dharkar, D.D.; Wahner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Modified red blood cell survival studies with use of 51Cr were performed in three groups of subjects. Group 1 consisted of normal subjects who were given labeled autologous blood, group 2 were subjects in need of blood transfusions and given labeled ABO and Rh crossmatch-compatible blood, and group 3 were patients in need of blood transfusion but in whom problems arose in finding compatible blood. The results of the studies suggest that for patients with blood compatibility problems, normal red blood cell survival values at 1 hour do not exclude the possibility of severe hemolysis 24 hours later. Thus, if a 1-hour test result is normal, the procedure should be extended routinely to 24 hours. Moreover, the test can be used to evaluate the clinical importance of antibodies. We showed that anti-Yka and anti-Lan were clinically significant, but high-titer, low-avidity antibodies, anti-Kna, anti-I, and anti-HI were clinically insignificant in the cases studied. This finding emphasizes the importance of an in vivo test for the final compatibility evaluation in complicated blood replacement problems.

  14. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Serum for Culturing the Supportive Feeder Cells of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ingrungruanglert, Praewphan; Numchaisrika, Pranee; Virutamasen, Pramuan; Phermthai, Tatsanee; Pruksananonda, Kamthorn

    2016-01-01

    Although human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can proliferate robustly on the feeder-free culture system, genetic instability of hPSCs has been reported in such environment. Alternatively, feeder cells enable hPSCs to maintain their pluripotency. The feeder cells are usually grown in a culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) prior to coculture with hPSCs. The use of FBS might limit the clinical application of hPSCs. Recently, human cord blood-derived serum (hUCS) showed a positive effect on culture of mesenchymal stem cells. It is interesting to test whether hUCS can be used for culture of feeder cells of hPSCs. This study was aimed to replace FBS with hUCS for culturing the human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) prior to feeder cell preparation. The results showed that HFFs cultured in hUCS-containing medium (HFF-hUCS) displayed fibroblastic features, high proliferation rates, short population doubling times, and normal karyotypes after prolonged culture. Inactivated HFF-hUCS expressed important genes, including Activin A, FGF2, and TGFβ1, which have been implicated in the maintenance of hPSC pluripotency. Moreover, hPSC lines maintained pluripotency, differentiation capacities, and karyotypic stability after being cocultured for extended period with inactivated HFF-hUCS. Therefore, the results demonstrated the benefit of hUCS for hPSCs culture system. PMID:26839561

  15. Mechanisms of cell death in acute myocardial infarction: pathophysiological implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Zwaan, C.; Daemen, M.J.A.P.; Hermens, W.Th.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to draw attention to the growing list of pathophysiological phenomena occurring in blood, the vessel wall and cardiac tissue during myocardial infarction. A further aim is to point to the complexity of factors, contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the implications for therapy, aimed at limiting myocardial cell death. Not all pathophysiological mechanisms have been elucidated yet, indicating the necessity for further research in this area. In addition we describe interventions which have shown promise in animal studies, those which may show promise in humans, and those which are accepted as therapies of choice. PMID:25696691

  16. Evaluation of an additive solution for preservation of canine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wardrop, K J; Owen, T J; Meyers, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of an additive preservative solution on canine red blood cell posttransfusion viability (PTV) and on selected canine red blood cell biochemical parameters was studied. One unit (450 mL) of blood was collected from 6 clinically normal dogs into the anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose, centrifuged, and the plasma removed. The red blood cells were then suspended in 100 mL of a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution and stored at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were removed for study at 1, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 44 days. The 24-hour PTV of autologous red blood cells was determined using a sodium chromate (51Cr) label. Red blood cell concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and pH were also determined. Canine red blood cell PTV, pH, ATP, and 2,3-DPG concentrations decreased during storage (P < .05). The PTV decreased from 94% using day 1 red blood cells to 80% and 75% using day 37 and day 44 red blood cells, respectively (P < .05). Although the mean PTV of the day 44 stored units equaled the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) minimum standard for human red blood cells, the PTV was substandard in 75% of the day 44 units. The FDA standard was exceeded in 83% of the day 37 units. It was concluded that 37-day-old canine red blood cells preserved with a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution are of acceptable quality for transfusion.

  17. Secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhances wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SEC(PBMC)). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on the backs of C57BL/6J-mice and SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion or controls were applied daily for three days. Morphology and neo-angiogenesis were analyzed by H&E-staining and CD31 immuno-staining, respectively. In vitro effects on diverse skin cells were investigated by migration assays, cell cycle analysis, and tube formation assay. Signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot analysis. Application of SEC(PBMC) on 6 mm punch biopsy wounds significantly enhanced wound closure. H&E staining of the wounds after 6 days revealed that wound healing was more advanced after application of SEC(PBMC) containing emulsion. Furthermore, there was a massive increase in CD31 positive cells, indicating enhanced neo-angiogenesis. In primary human fibroblasts (FB) and keratinocytes (KC) migration but not proliferation was induced. In endothelial cells (EC) SEC(PBMC) induced proliferation and tube-formation in a matrigel-assay. In addition, SEC(PBMC) treatment of skin cells led to the induction of multiple signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and survival. In summary, we could show that emulsions containing the secretome of PBMC derived from healthy individuals accelerates wound healing in a mouse model and induce wound healing associated mechanisms in human primary skin cells. The formulation and use of such emulsions might therefore represent a possible novel option for the treatment of non-healing skin ulcers.

  18. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    PubMed

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field.

  19. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments. PMID:27431921

  20. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments.

  1. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  2. Immunoelectrophoresis of red blood cells performed on microcapillary chips.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Takanori; Ujiie, Tatekazu; Shinbashi, Satomi; Okuda, Tomoko; Horiike, Yasuhiro

    2002-07-01

    Immunoanalysis of blood cells on a microcapillary electrophoresis (nuCE) chip has been studied using sheep erythrocytes (ShE) as an example. Two different buffer solutions, the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and the gelatin veronal buffer (GVB) were examined in regard to the electrokinetic transport behavior of ShE suspended in these solutions inside the rectangular channel engraved on a quartz chip. This clarified two advantages of the use of GVB for on-chip cell electrophoresis: gelatin coatings prevent (i) nonspecific sticking of ShE on the channel wall, and cause (ii) an appreciable reduction in the zeta potential of the wall suppressing the electroosmotic flow of the buffer solution. As a result ShE suspended in the GVB can smoothly migrate from the cathode to the anode, which is the opposite flow direction of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies under the physiological pH condition of 7.4. Based on these results, on-chip capillary cell immunoelectrophoresis of ShE and rabbit anti ShE antibodies (IgG) have been proposed and successfully accomplished using the GVB. It is demonstrated that the variation of the cell migration velocity originating from the change in the surface charge after binding antibodies is applicable to the fast detection of immune reactions and also to single-cell typing.

  3. Red blood cell extrudes nucleus and mitochondria against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Cheng, Jian; Xu, Fei; Chen, Yang-Er; Du, Jun-Bo; Yuan, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Yuan, Shu

    2011-07-01

    Mammal red blood cells (erythrocytes) contain neither nucleus nor mitochondria. Traditional theory suggests that the presence of a nucleus would prevent big nucleated erythrocytes to squeeze through these small capillaries. However, nucleus is too small to hinder erythrocyte deformation. And, there is no sound reason to abandon mitochondria for the living cells. Here, we found that mammal erythrocyte reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels kept stable under diabetes, ischemia reperfusion, and malaria conditions or in vitro sugar/heme treatments, whereas bird erythrocyte ROS levels increased dramatically in these circumstances. Nuclear and mitochondrial extrusion may help mammal erythrocytes to better adapt to high-sugar and high-heme conditions by limiting ROS generation. PMID:21698761

  4. Semiautomatic white blood cell segmentation based on multiscale analysis.

    PubMed

    Dorini, L B; Minetto, R; Leite, N J

    2013-01-01

    This paper approaches novel methods to segment the nucleus and cytoplasm of white blood cells (WBC). This information is the basis to perform higher level tasks such as automatic differential counting, which plays an important role in the diagnosis of different diseases. We explore the image simplification and contour regularization resulting from the application of the Self-Dual Multiscale Morphological Toggle (SMMT), an operator with scale-space properties. To segment the nucleus, the image preprocessing with SMMT has shown to be essential to ensure the accuracy of two well-known image segmentations techniques, namely, watershed transform and Level Set methods. To identify the cytoplasm region, we propose two different schemes, based on granulometric analysis and on morphological transformations. The proposed methods have been successfully applied to a large number of images, showing promising segmentation and classification results for varying cell appearance and image quality, encouraging future works.

  5. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  6. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs. PMID:24836371

  7. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs.

  8. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  9. Bio-inspired Cryo-ink Preserves Red Blood Cell Phenotype and Function during Nanoliter Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Rami El; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyber, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M.W.; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Current red blood cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red blood cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bio-printing approach. PMID:25047246

  10. Tension of red blood cell membrane in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Barthès-Biesel, D.; Salsac, A.-V.; Imai, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2012-11-01

    When a red blood cell (RBC) is subjected to an external flow, it is deformed by the hydrodynamic forces acting on its membrane. The resulting elastic tensions in the membrane play a key role in mechanotransduction and govern its rupture in the case of hemolysis. In this study, we analyze the motion and deformation of an RBC in a simple shear flow and the resulting elastic tensions on the membrane. The large deformation of the red blood cell is modelled by coupling a finite element method to solve the membrane mechanics and a boundary element method to solve the flows of the internal and external liquids. Depending on the capillary number Ca, ratio of the viscous to elastic forces, we observe three kinds of RBC motion: tumbling at low Ca, swinging at larger Ca, and breathing at the transitions. In the swinging regime, the region of the high principal tensions periodically oscillates, whereas that of the high isotropic tensions is almost unchanged. Due to the strain-hardening property of the membrane, the deformation is limited but the membrane tension increases monotonically with the capillary number. We have quantitatively compared our numerical results with former experimental results. It indicates that a membrane isotropic tension O(10-6 N/m) is high enough for molecular release from RBCs and that the typical maximum membrane principal tension for haemolysis would be O(10-4 N/m). These findings are useful to clarify not only the membrane rupture but also the mechanotransduction of RBCs.

  11. Assaying Blood Cell Populations of the Drosophila melanogaster Larva

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Sophia; Alexander, Brandy; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hematopoiesis is regulated by inductive microenvironments (niches). Likewise, in the invertebrate model organism Drosophila melanogaster, inductive microenvironments known as larval Hematopoietic Pockets (HPs) have been identified as anatomical sites for the development and regulation of blood cells (hemocytes), in particular of the self-renewing macrophage lineage. HPs are segmentally repeated pockets between the epidermis and muscle layers of the larva, which also comprise sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In the larva, resident (sessile) hemocytes are exposed to anti-apoptotic, adhesive and proliferative cues from these sensory neurons and potentially other components of the HPs, such as the lining muscle and epithelial layers. During normal development, gradual release of resident hemocytes from the HPs fuels the population of circulating hemocytes, which culminates in the release of most of the resident hemocytes at the beginning of metamorphosis. Immune assaults, physical injury or mechanical disturbance trigger the premature release of resident hemocytes into circulation. The switch of larval hemocytes between resident locations and circulation raises the need for a common standard/procedure to selectively isolate and quantify these two populations of blood cells from single Drosophila larvae. Accordingly, this protocol describes an automated method to release and quantify the resident and circulating hemocytes from single larvae. The method facilitates ex vivo approaches, and may be adapted to serve a variety of developmental stages of Drosophila and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26650404

  12. Imaging morphodynamics of human blood cells in vivo with video-rate third harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Kuo; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    With a video-rate third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy system, we imaged the micro-circulation beneath the human skin without labeling. Not only the speed of circulation but also the morpho-hydrodynamics of blood cells can be analyzed. Lacking of nuclei, red blood cells (RBCs) shows typical parachute-like and hollow-core morphology under THG microscopy. Quite different from RBCs, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appear in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. PMID:23162724

  13. Imaging morphodynamics of human blood cells in vivo with video-rate third harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Kuo; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-11-01

    With a video-rate third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy system, we imaged the micro-circulation beneath the human skin without labeling. Not only the speed of circulation but also the morpho-hydrodynamics of blood cells can be analyzed. Lacking of nuclei, red blood cells (RBCs) shows typical parachute-like and hollow-core morphology under THG microscopy. Quite different from RBCs, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appear in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. PMID:23162724

  14. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  15. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    PubMed

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  16. Exome Sequencing of Neonatal Blood Spots and the Identification of Genes Implicated in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Yu, Kun-Hsing; Oehlert, John; Jeliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Stevenson, David K.; Snyder, Michael; Shaw, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a prevalent severe lung disease of premature infants, has a strong genetic component. Large-scale genome-wide association studies for common variants have not revealed its genetic basis. Objectives: Given the historical high mortality rate of extremely preterm infants who now survive and develop BPD, we hypothesized that risk loci underlying this disease are under severe purifying selection during evolution; thus, rare variants likely explain greater risk of the disease. Methods: We performed exome sequencing on 50 BPD-affected and unaffected twin pairs using DNA isolated from neonatal blood spots and identified genes affected by extremely rare nonsynonymous mutations. Functional genomic approaches were then used to systematically compare these affected genes. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 258 genes with rare nonsynonymous mutations in patients with BPD. These genes were highly enriched for processes involved in pulmonary structure and function including collagen fibril organization, morphogenesis of embryonic epithelium, and regulation of Wnt signaling pathway; displayed significantly elevated expression in fetal and adult lungs; and were substantially up-regulated in a murine model of BPD. Analyses of mouse mutants revealed their phenotypic enrichment for embryonic development and the cyanosis phenotype, a clinical manifestation of BPD. Conclusions: Our study supports the role of rare variants in BPD, in contrast with the role of common variants targeted by genome-wide association studies. Overall, our study is the first to sequence BPD exomes from newborn blood spot samples and identify with high confidence genes implicated in BPD, thereby providing important insights into its biology and molecular etiology. PMID:26030808

  17. Regulation of red blood cell deformability is independent of red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Lauten, Alexander; Hoeppener, Steffen; Goebel, Bjoern; Brenig, Julian; Jung, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2016-09-12

    The aim was to study impacts of mild to severe hypoxia on human red blood cell (RBC)-nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production, protein S-nitrosylation and deformability.Ambient air oxygen concentration of 12 healthy subjects was step-wisely reduced from 20.95% to 16.21%, 12.35%, 10% and back to 20.95%. Additional in vitro experiments involved purging of blood (±sodium nitrite) with gas mixtures corresponding to in vivo intervention.Vital and hypoxia-associated parameters showed physiological adaptation to changing demands. Activation of RBC-NOS decreased with increasing hypoxia. RBC deformability, which is influenced by RBC-NOS activation, decreased under mild hypoxia, but surprisingly increased at severe hypoxia in vivo and in vitro. This was causatively induced by nitrite reduction to NO which increased S-nitrosylation of RBC α- and β-spectrins -a critical step to improve RBC deformability. The addition of sodium nitrite prevented decreases of RBC deformability under hypoxia by sustaining S-nitrosylation of spectrins suggesting compensatory mechanisms of non-RBC-NOS-produced NO.The results first time indicate a direct link between maintenance of RBC deformability under severe hypoxia by non-enzymatic NO production because RBC-NOS activation is reduced. These data improve our understanding of physiological mechanisms supporting adequate blood and, thus, oxygen supply to different tissues under severe hypoxia.

  18. Characterization of the DNA Copy-Number Genome in the Blood of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, William M.; Lewis, Julia M.; Filler, Renata B.; Modi, Badri G.; Carlson, Kacie R.; Reddy, Swapna; Thornberg, Adam; Saksena, Gordon; Umlauf, Sheila; Oberholzer, Patrick A.; Karpova, Maria; Getz, Gad; Mane, Shrikant; Garraway, Levi A.; Dummer, Reinhard; Berger, Carole L.; Edelson, Richard L.; Girardi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a heterogeneous non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that may variably involve the skin, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Malignant burden ranges from cutaneous patches and plaques with little evidence of blood involvement to erythroderma often in association with frank leukemia, as in Sézary syndrome. Toward a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this CD4+ T-cell malignancy, we conducted a high-resolution genomic analysis combining DNA (23 samples) and mRNA (12 samples) data of peripheral blood isolates from CTCL patients across a spectrum of stages. Strikingly, even patients with limited involvement, e.g., normal CD4 counts, contained significant copy-number alterations. Defining genomic characteristics of CTCL blood involvement included gains on 8q and 17q, and deletions on 17p and chromosome 10. A consensus analysis of 108 leukemic CTCL samples demonstrated global similarities among patients with varied blood involvement, narrowing 38 of 62 loci. Toward an annotated framework for in vitro testing, we also characterized genomic alterations in five CTCL cell lines (HH, HUT78, PNO, SeAx, and Sez4), revealing intact core features of leukemic CTCL. Together, these studies produce the most comprehensive view of the leukemic CTCL genome to date, with implications for pathogenesis, molecular classification, and potential future therapeutic developments. PMID:21881587

  19. Dependence of technetium-99m red blood cell labeling efficiency on red cell surface charge.

    PubMed

    Seldin, D W; Simchon, S; Jan, K M; Chien, S; Alderson, P O

    1988-10-01

    The mechanisms by which [99mTc]pertechnetate becomes attached to stannous-primed red blood cells are not known in detail. To study the problem further, the effect of red cell surface charge on labeling efficiency was evaluated. Red cell surface charge was reduced by using the enzyme neuraminidase to remove the terminal charge-bearing sialic acid moiety of the membrane glycoprotein. Forty-five blood samples from six volunteers were treated with neuraminidase for varying lengths of time, resulting in the removal of from 11% to 99% of the normal negative surface charge, as determined from electrophoretic mobility measurements. There was excellent linear correlation between labeling efficiency and the remaining red cell surface charge for values down to 20% of normal (r = 0.89). When surface charge was less than 20% of normal, labeling efficiency was constant at 30%. Eleven blood samples from three donors were divided into two groups that were treated with neuraminidase either before or after they were labeled. The labeling efficiency was independent of the order in which the steps were performed. No evidence for shifting of the radiolabel from the cell membrane to hemoglobin was found. The results suggest that clinical conditions associated with a reduction of sialic acid on the erythrocyte membrane may be one cause of decreased red blood cell labeling efficiency, and that increased membrane permeability for reduced technetium species may be responsible for the decrease.

  20. Effects of increased white blood cell count on endothelin-induced vasoconstriction in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Told, Reinhard; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2012-04-01

    It is known that administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is followed by an increase of white blood cell count. There is evidence from other vascular beds that an increase in white blood cell count impairs blood flow regulation especially in the microcirculation. Whether this also holds true for the ocular circulation is unknown. In the following study we investigated whether an increase in white blood cell count alters the endothelin-1 induced vasoconstriction in humans. Neither granulocyte-colony stimulating factor nor endothelin-1 had any consistent effect on blood pressure, pulse rate or intraocular pressure. Administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor induced a pronounced increase in retinal white blood cell density (p < 0.01). Administration of endothelin-1 decreased choroidal (p < 0.01) and retinal blood flow (p < 0.01). The change in choroidal blood flow in response to endothelin-1 was not altered by pre-treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. By contrast, the decrease in retinal blood flow was more pronounced during an increase in white blood cell count (p = 0.02) when compared to placebo. Our data indicates that during pronounced vasoconstriction, as induced by administration of endothelin-1, vascular regulation can be altered by the number of circulating white blood cells. Whether this effect is caused by an interaction of red and white blood cells in the microcirculation or a yet unknown mechanism needs further investigation.

  1. Automatic localization and feature extraction of white blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vassili A.; Grigoriev, Andrei Y.; Ahn, Hyo-Sok; Myshkin, Nickolai K.

    1995-05-01

    The paper presents a method for automatic localization and feature extraction of white blood cells (WBCs) with color images to develop an efficient automated WBC counting system based on image analysis and recognition. Nucleus blobs extraction consists of five steps: (1) nucleus pixel labeling; (2) filtration of nucleus pixel template; (3) segmentation and extraction of nucleus blobs by region growing; (4) removal of uninterested blobs; and (5) marking of external and internal blob border, and holes pixels. The detection of nucleus pixels is based on the intensity of the G image plane and the balance between G and B intensity. Localized nucleus segments are grouped into a cell nucleus by a hierarchic merging procedure in accordance with their area, shapes and conditions of their spatial occurrence. Cytoplasm segmentation based on the pixel intensity and color parameters is found to be unreliable. We overcome this problem by using an edge improving technique. WBC templates are then calculated and additional cell feature sets are constructed for the recognition. Cell feature sets include description of principal geometric and color properties for each type of WBCs. Finally we evaluate the recognition accuracy of the developed algorithm that is proved to be highly reliable and fast.

  2. Fabrication of cell microintegrated blood vessel constructs through electrohydrodynamic atomization

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Soletti, Lorenzo; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Hong, Yi; Vorp, David A.; Wagner, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradable synthetic matrices that resemble the size scale, architecture and mechanical properties of the native extracellular matrix can be fabricated through electrospinning. Tubular conduits may also be fabricated with properties appropriate for vascular tissue engineering. Achieving large cell infiltrate within the electrospun matrix in vitro remains time consuming and challenging. This difficulty was overcome by electrospraying smooth muscle cells concurrently with electrospinning of a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) small diameter conduit. Constructs were cultured statically or in spinner flasks. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining demonstrated qualitatively uniform SMC integration radially and circumferentially within the conduit after initial static culture. In comparison with static culture, samples cultured in spinner flasks indicated 2.4 times more viable cells present from MTT and significantly larger numbers of SMCs spread within the electrospun fiber networks by H&E image analysis. Conduits were strong and flexible with mechanical behaviors that mimicked those of native arteries, including static compliance of 1.6 ± 0.5 × 10−3 mmHg−1, dynamic compliance of 8.7 ± 1.8 × 10−4 mmHg−1, burst strengths of 1750 ± 220 mmHg, and suture retention. This method to rapidly and efficiently integrate cells into a strong, compliant biodegradable tubular matrix represents a significant achievement as a tissue engineering approach for blood vessel replacement. PMID:17337048

  3. Modeling of Red Blood Cells and Related Spleen Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A key function of the spleen is to clear red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties from the circulation. These abnormal mechanical properties may be due to RBC aging or RBC diseases, e.g., malaria and sickle cell anemia. Specifically, 10% of RBCs passing through the spleen are forced to squeeze into the narrow slits between the endothelial cells, and stiffer cells which get stuck are killed and digested by macrophages. To investigate this important physiological process, we employ three different approaches to study RBCs passage through these small slits, including analytical theory, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation and Multiscale Finite Element Method (MS-FEM). By applying the analytical theory, we estimate the critical limiting geometries RBCs can pass. By using the DPD method, we study the full fluid-structure interaction problem, and compute RBC deformation under different pressure gradients. By employing the MS-FEM approach, we model the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct layers, and focus on the cytoskeleton deformation and the bilayer-skeleton interaction force at the molecular level. Finally the results of these three approaches are compared to each other and correlated to the experimental observations.

  4. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huttenlocher, P.R.; Moohr, J.W.; Johns, L.; Brown, F.D.

    1984-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the /sup 133/Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The /sup 133/Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke.

  5. Fetal anaemia from red blood cell membrane defect and co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring.

    PubMed

    Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee; Tongsong, Theera

    2015-07-27

    The case presented here is an example of hereditary red blood cell membrane defect with a co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring. This case is of an anaemic fetus that presented with isolated ascites at 18 weeks of gestation. Fetal blood analysis revealed abnormal shaped red blood cells. The same pattern of red blood cell morphology was also seen on paternal peripheral blood smear. Intrauterine blood transfusions were given twice to correct fetal anaemia. The fetus showed a good response to the transfusions and was delivered at term with mild anaemia and did not need blood transfusion after birth. This report describes a natural course of red blood cell membrane defect with co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring, indicating that the course of disease was more severe during fetal life. Intrauterine transfusion supported the transition of the fetus through the critical period in utero to a healthier life after birth.

  6. The CD8+ granzyme B+ T-cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy individuals contains activated and apoptosis-prone cells.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Van Der Vliet, H J; Spaeny, L H; Wolbink, A M; Van Diepen, F N; Froelich, C J; Hack, C E; ten Berge, I J

    1998-03-01

    Granzyme B (GrB) has been implicated in induction of apoptosis in target cells. The presence of GrB in peripheral blood CD8+ T cells from healthy individuals was analysed in immunocytochemical and flow cytometric studies. Furthermore, CD8+ GrB- T cells and CD8+ GrB+ T cells were compared regarding phenotypical characteristics and susceptibility to both spontaneous and Fasmediated apoptosis. GrB was expressed by approximately one-fifth of CD8+ T cells. Compared with the CD8+ GrB- T-cell subset, the CD8+ GrB+ T-cell subset contained cells that were relatively more activated and more prone to spontaneous apoptosis. Culturing of cells with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-Fas monoclonal antibody had no additional effect on the number of CD8+ GrB+ T cells undergoing apoptosis. We suggest that the presence of CD8+ GrB+ T cells in peripheral blood from healthy individuals results from immune surveillance or contact with infectious agents, and that spontaneous apoptosis of these cells might serve as a mechanism for their eventual clearance.

  7. Implications of Big Data for cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Dolinski, Kara; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2015-01-01

    “Big Data” has surpassed “systems biology” and “omics” as the hottest buzzword in the biological sciences, but is there any substance behind the hype? Certainly, we have learned about various aspects of cell and molecular biology from the many individual high-throughput data sets that have been published in the past 15–20 years. These data, although useful as individual data sets, can provide much more knowledge when interrogated with Big Data approaches, such as applying integrative methods that leverage the heterogeneous data compendia in their entirety. Here we discuss the benefits and challenges of such Big Data approaches in biology and how cell and molecular biologists can best take advantage of them. PMID:26174066

  8. Extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation: clinical and biological implications of ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, N; Gaggiotti, E; Galli, F

    2005-01-01

    Some lines of evidence have suggested that the challenge to antioxidants and biomolecules provoked by pro-oxidants such as ozone may be used to generate a controlled stress response of possible therapeutic relevance in some immune dysfunctions and chronic, degenerative conditions. Immune and endothelial cells have been proposed to be elective targets of the positive molecular effects of ozone and its derived species formed during blood ozonation. On the bases of these underlying principles and against often prejudicial scepticism and concerns about its toxicity, ozone has been used in autohemotherapy (AHT) for four decades with encouraging results. However, clinical application and validation of AHT have been so far largely insufficient. Latterly, a new and more effective therapeutic approach to ozone therapy has been established, namely extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation (EBOO). This technique, first tested in vitro and then in vivo in sheep and humans (more than 1200 treatments performed in 82 patients), is performed with a high-efficiency apparatus that makes it possible to treat with a mixture of oxygen-ozone (0.5-1 microg/ml oxygen) in 1 h of extracorporeal circulation up to 4800 ml of heparinized blood without technical or clinical problems, whereas only 250 ml of blood can be treated with ozone by AHT. The EBOO technique can be easily adapted for use in hemodialysis also. The standard therapeutic cycle lasts for 7 weeks in which 14 treatment sessions of 1 h are performed. After a session of EBOO, the interaction of ozone with blood components results in 4-5-fold increased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactants and a proportional decrease in plasma protein thiols without any appreciable erythrocyte haemolysis. On the basis of preliminary in vitro evidence, these simple laboratory parameters may represent a useful complement in the routine monitoring of biological compliance to the treatment. The clinical experience gained so far confirms the

  9. Colloidal Properties of Nanoerythrosomes Derived from Bovine Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Hoang, Dao; Bentley, William E; D'Souza, Warren D; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-12

    Liposomes are nanoscale containers that are typically synthesized from lipids using a high-shear process such as extrusion or sonication. While liposomes are extensively used in drug delivery, they do suffer from certain problems including limited colloidal stability and short circulation times in the body. As an alternative to liposomes, we explore a class of container structures derived from erythrocytes (red blood cells). The procedure involves emptying the inner contents of these cells (specifically hemoglobin) and resuspending the empty structures in buffer, followed by sonication. The resulting structures are termed nanoerythrosomes (NERs), i.e., they are membrane-covered nanoscale containers, much like liposomes. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are employed for the first time to study these NERs. The results reveal that the NERs are discrete spheres (∼110 nm diameter) with a unilamellar membrane of thickness ∼4.5 nm. Remarkably, the biconcave disc-like shape of erythrocytes is also exhibited by the NERs under hypertonic conditions. Moreover, unlike typical liposomes, NERs show excellent colloidal stability in both buffer as well as in serum at room temperature, and are also able to withstand freeze-thaw cycling. We have explored the potential for using NERs as colloidal vehicles for targeted delivery. Much like conventional liposomes, NER membranes can be decorated with fluorescent or other markers, solutes can be encapsulated in the cores of the NERs, and NERs can be targeted to specifically bind to mammalian cells. Our study shows that NERs are a promising and versatile class of nanostructures. NERs that are harvested from a patient's own blood and reconfigured for nanomedicine can potentially offer several benefits including biocompatibility, minimization of immune response, and extended circulation time in the body. PMID:26684218

  10. Effect of Strain Rate on the Mechanical Behavior of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the effect of hydrodynamic stress on red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on linear velocity profiles. Microfluidic devices have provided a means to examine the mechanical behavior of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a constriction, with previous work primarily focused on a fixed constriction taper angle and corresponding hydrodynamic strain rate. Here we investigate the effect of strain rate on the stretching dynamics exhibited by RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. Systematic variations in the constriction taper angle allow the strain rate to be precisely tuned, and high speed video yields precise measurements of the corresponding RBC deformations. We demonstrate that maximal RBC stretching occurs at an intermediate constriction taper angle, despite the lower magnitude of the strain rate. We interpret the results in terms of the time integral of the elongational strain rate, and we discuss the implications for shear-induced mechanotransduction.

  11. A comparative study of white blood cell counts and disease risk in carnivores.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Charles L; Gittleman, John L; Antonovics, Janis

    2003-01-01

    In primates, baseline levels of white blood cell (WBC) counts are related to mating promiscuity. It was hypothesized that differences in the primate immune system reflect pathogen risks from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Here, we test for the generality of this result by examining hypotheses involving behavioural, ecological and life-history factors in carnivores. Again, we find a significant correlation in carnivores between mating promiscuity and elevated levels of WBC counts. In addition, we find relationships with measures of sociality, substrate use and life-history parameters. These comparative results across independent taxonomic orders indicate that the evolution of the immune system, as represented by phylogenetic differences in basal levels of blood cell counts, is closely linked to disease risk involved with promiscuous mating and associated variables. We found only limited support for an association between the percentage of meat in the diet and WBC counts, which is consistent with the behavioural and physiological mechanisms that carnivores use to avoid parasite transmission from their prey. We discuss additional comparative questions related to taxonomic differences in disease risk, modes of parasite transmission and implications for conservation biology. PMID:12639313

  12. Osteoclastogenic potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Piacente, Laura; Ciccarelli, Maria; Gigante, Margherita; Gesualdo, Loreto; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, dental abnormalities, and delayed closure of the cranial sutures. In addition, mid-face hypoplasia, short stature, skeletal anomalies and osteoporosis are common. We aimed to evaluate osteoclastogenesis in a child (4 years old), who presented with clinical signs of CCD and who have been diagnosed as affected by deletion of RUNX2, master gene in osteoblast differentiation, but also affecting T cell development and indirectly osteoclastogenesis. The results of this study may help to understand whether in this disease is present an alteration in the bone-resorptive cells, the osteoclasts (OCs). Unfractionated and T cell-depleted Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from patient were cultured in presence/absence of recombinant human M-CSF and RANKL. At the end of the culture period, OCs only developed following the addition of M-CSF and RANKL. Moreover, real-time PCR experiment showed that freshly isolated T cells expressed the osteoclastogenic cytokines (RANKL and TNFα) at very low level, as in controls. This is in accordance with results arising from flow cytometry experiments demonstrating an high percentage of circulating CD4(+)CD28(+) and CD4(+)CD27(+) T cells, not able to produce osteoclastogenic cytokines. Also RANKL, OPG and CTX serum levels in CCD patient are similar to controls, whereas QUS measurements showed an osteoporotic status (BTT-Z score -3.09) in the patient. In conclusions, our findings suggest that the heterozygous deletion of RUNX2 in this CCD patient did not alter the osteoclastogenic potential of PBMCs in vitro.

  13. A fluid-particle interaction method for blood flow with special emphasis on red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fluid-particle interaction algorithm using the distributed Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain method. The application of this method to the numerical investigation of motion and aggregation of red blood cells in two-dimensional microvessels is discussed. The cells are modelled as rigid biconcave-shaped neutrally buoyant particles. The aggregating force between two cells is derived from a Morse type potential function. The cell-cell interaction is coupled with the fluid-cell interaction through a time splitting scheme. Simulation results of multiple red blood cells in Poiseuille flow are presented. Because of its modular nature, this algorithm is applicable to a large class of problems involving the processes of particle aggregation and fluid-particle interaction.

  14. B cell biology: implications for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Anolik, J H

    2013-04-01

    B cells are critical players in the orchestration of properly regulated immune responses, normally providing protective immunity without autoimmunity. Balance in the B cell compartment is achieved through the finely regulated participation of multiple B cell populations with different antibody-dependent and independent functions. Both types of functions allow B cells to modulate other components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Autoantibody-independent B cell functions include antigen presentation, T cell activation and polarization, and dendritic cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines and chemokines and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organization including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Additionally, the functional versatility of B cells enables them to play either protective or pathogenic roles in autoimmunity. In turn, B cell dysfunction has been critically implicated in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies and heterogeneous clinical involvement. Thus, the breakdown of B cell tolerance is a defining and early event in the disease process and may occur by multiple pathways, including alterations in factors that affect B cell activation thresholds, B cell longevity, and apoptotic cell processing. Once tolerance is broken, autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms including immune-complex mediated Type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines including IFNα, TNF and IL-1. The complexity of B cell functions has been highlighted by the variable success of B cell-targeted therapies in multiple autoimmune diseases, including those conventionally viewed as T cell-mediated conditions. Given the widespread

  15. An artificial blood vessel implanted three-dimensional microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Pei, Ying; Xie, Min; Jin, Zi-He; Xiao, Ya-Shi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Yan; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2015-02-21

    Reproducing a tumor microenvironment consisting of blood vessels and tumor cells for modeling tumor invasion in vitro is particularly challenging. Here, we report an artificial blood vessel implanted 3D microfluidic system for reproducing transvascular migration of tumor cells. The transparent, porous and elastic artificial blood vessels are obtained by constructing polysaccharide cellulose-based microtubes using a chitosan sacrificial template, and possess excellent cytocompatibility, permeability, and mechanical characteristics. The artificial blood vessels are then fully implanted into the collagen matrix to reconstruct the 3D microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells. Well-defined simulated vascular lumens were obtained by proliferation of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) lining the artificial blood vessels, which enables us to reproduce structures and functions of blood vessels and replicate various hemodynamic parameters. Based on this model, the adhesion and transvascular migration of tumor cells across the artificial blood vessel have been well reproduced.

  16. [Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated cord blood: report of three cases from the Chilean cord blood bank].

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás; Bertin, Pablo; Pizarro, Isabel; Carmona, Amanda; Guilof, Alejandro; Rojas, Iván; Oyarzún, Enrique

    2013-08-01

    Public cord blood banks are a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients with hematological diseases who lack a family donor and need allogeneic transplantation. In June 2007 we started a cord blood bank with units donated in three maternity wards in Santiago, Chile. We report the first three transplants done with cord blood units form this bank. Cord blood units were obtained by intrauterine collection at delivery. They were depleted of plasma and red cells and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tests for total nucleated cells, CD34 cell content, viral serology, bacterial cultures and HLA A, B and DRB1 were done. Six hundred cord blood units were stored by March 2012. Three patients received allogeneic transplant with cord blood from our bank, two with high risk lymphoblastic leukemia and one with severe congenital anemia. They received conditioning regimens according to their disease and usual supportive care for unrelated donor transplantation until full hematopoietic and immune reconstitution was achieved. The three patients had early engraftment of neutrophils and platelets. The child corrected his anemia and the leukemia patients remain in complete remission. The post-transplant course was complicated with Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and BK virus infection. Two patients are fully functional 24 and 33 months after transplant, the third is still receiving immunosuppression.

  17. All in the Blood: A Review of Aboriginal Australians' Cultural Beliefs About Blood and Implications for Biospecimen Research.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Emma; Greenwood, Ashley; McWhirter, Rebekah E

    2015-10-01

    Public participation in medical research and biobanking is considered key to advances in scientific discovery and translation to improved health care. Cultural concerns relating to blood have been found to affect the participation of indigenous peoples and minorities in research, but such concerns are rarely specified in the literature. This article presents a review of the role of blood in Australian Aboriginal cultures. We discuss the range of meanings and uses of blood in traditional culture, including their use in ceremonies, healing, and sorcery. We draw on more recent literature on Aboriginal Australians and biomedicine to consider how traditional beliefs may be changing over time. These findings provide an empirical basis for researchers and bioethicists to develop culturally grounded strategies to boost the participation of Aboriginal Australians in biomedical research. They also serve as a model for integrating anthropological literature with bioethical concerns that could be applied to other indigenous and minority groups. PMID:26376752

  18. All in the Blood: A Review of Aboriginal Australians' Cultural Beliefs About Blood and Implications for Biospecimen Research.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Emma; Greenwood, Ashley; McWhirter, Rebekah E

    2015-10-01

    Public participation in medical research and biobanking is considered key to advances in scientific discovery and translation to improved health care. Cultural concerns relating to blood have been found to affect the participation of indigenous peoples and minorities in research, but such concerns are rarely specified in the literature. This article presents a review of the role of blood in Australian Aboriginal cultures. We discuss the range of meanings and uses of blood in traditional culture, including their use in ceremonies, healing, and sorcery. We draw on more recent literature on Aboriginal Australians and biomedicine to consider how traditional beliefs may be changing over time. These findings provide an empirical basis for researchers and bioethicists to develop culturally grounded strategies to boost the participation of Aboriginal Australians in biomedical research. They also serve as a model for integrating anthropological literature with bioethical concerns that could be applied to other indigenous and minority groups.

  19. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. PMID:27345938

  20. EVALUATION OF RED BLOOD CELL INDICES RELATED DISORDERS AMONG ELIGIBLE BLOOD DONORS AT THE UNIVERSITI PUTRA MALAYSIA (UPM).

    PubMed

    Riahi, Shahrzad; Mei, I Lai; Idris, Fariddh Binti; George, Elizabeth; Noor, Sabariah Md

    2015-09-01

    Pre-donation screening declarations and hemoglobin (Hb) testing are measures used to determine the quality of donated blood. The copper sulphate (CuSo4) method used to screen for blood abnormalities can give inaccurate results if strict quality control is not applied. Blood donors who are carriers of thalassemia and those with mild iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are usually asymptomatic and frequently missed at blood donation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the red blood cell (RBC) indices related disorders among blood donors who were deemed qualified to donate blood after screening with CuSo4 method. One hundred fifty-eight volunteer blood donors at the Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), who had passed the CuSo4 screening method, were recruited for this study. Their bloods specimens were examined with a complete blood count. Subjects with a low mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) level were examined further by checking a serum ferritin level, Hb quantification, and molecular analysis to examine for common RBC disorders. Fourteen point six percent of subjects had a low Hb level, two (1.3%) had IDA and four (2.5%) had thalassemia or some other hemoglobinopathy. Using a MCH level < 27 pg as a cut-off point, 58 subjects (36.7%) had suspected IDA, thalassemia or some other hemoglobinopathy. Eight point nine percent of subjects with a normal Hb level had thalassemia, and 3.8% had IDA. Malaysia has a high prevalence of thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies. Pre-donation accurate screening is crucial to protect the quality of blood transfusion products. Public education regarding RBC disorders especially among blood donors is important. PMID:26863862

  1. Sensitivity of Hematocrit to Osmotic Effects Induced by Changes in Dialysate Conductivity: Implications for Relative Blood Volume Measurement and Control.

    PubMed

    Schneditz, Daniel; Schilcher, Gernot; Ribitsch, Werner; Zierler, Edda; Jantscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis is accompanied by osmotic perturbations with distinct effects on red blood cell, plasma, and blood volumes. A series of in vitro studies was done to analyze the separate effect on cell volume. Whole porcine blood was circulated through an extracorporeal circulation maintaining a constant blood volume. Hemoconcentration was continuously measured by established optical and ultrasonic online techniques. Osmotic perturbation was performed by variation of dialysate conductivity within the clinical range of 13-15 mS/cm. Blood samples were analyzed using a microcentrifuge and a standard cell counter. As dialysate conductivity increased, centrifuge hematocrit (in %) decreased with a slope of -1.91% per unit of conductivity in mS/cm (r2 = 0.98). At the same time, Coulter-Counter hematocrit slightly decreased only by -0.18% (r2 = 0.53), while optical and ultrasonic hematocrit showed a small increase by 0.44% (r2 = 0.97) and 0.69% (r2 = 0.94) per unit of conductivity in mS/cm. The sensitivity to osmotic perturbation is consistent with theory and with specific characteristics of measuring techniques used in this study. The differences, however, need to be considered when comparing measurements obtained by different techniques. Finally, devices used for relative blood volume measurement in hemodialysis should be insensitive to osmosis-induced changes in red blood cell volume. PMID:24561459

  2. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  3. Red blood cell parameters in antenatal nonsickling hemoglobinopathy screening

    PubMed Central

    Bencaiova, Gabriela; Dapoto, Kristina; Zimmermann, Roland; Krafft, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective To find a hematological parameter and the cut-off level for identification of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in pregnant women. Materials and methods Venous blood samples of 849 women with singleton pregnancies were collected at the first visit. All women who met inclusion criteria were examined for nonsickling hemoglobinopathy. On the basis of the sensitivity and the specificity of different cut-off levels for hematological parameters, we calculated the optimal clinically practicable parameter for screening of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in pregnant women. Results On the basis of the sensitivity and the specificity, the best screening parameters for the identification of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies among nonanemic pregnant women are mean corpuscular volume (MCV) with cut-off ≤80 fL (Youden’s index 91.2%), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) <27.5 pg (Youden’s index 90.7%), and microcytosis (MRC) ≥3% (Youden’s index 90.2%). An analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves and the calculated Youden’s index showed that MCV ≤76 fL, MCH ≤24 pg, or MRC ≥10% are the best red blood cell indices for the screening of nonsickling hemoglobinopathy among anemic women with iron deficiency. Conclusion Our results suggest targeted screening for nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in nonanemic pregnant women with MCV ≤80 fL, MCH ≤27.5 pg, or MRC ≥3% and in anemic women with MCV ≤76 fL, MCH ≤24 pg, or MRC ≥10%. PMID:25914560

  4. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare. PMID:12012283

  5. The blood-testis barrier and its implications for male contraception.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C Yan; Mruk, Dolores D

    2012-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers in the mammalian body. It divides the seminiferous epithelium into the basal and the apical (adluminal) compartments. Meiosis I and II, spermiogenesis, and spermiation all take place in a specialized microenvironment behind the BTB in the apical compartment, but spermatogonial renewal and differentiation and cell cycle progression up to the preleptotene spermatocyte stage take place outside of the BTB in the basal compartment of the epithelium. However, the BTB is not a static ultrastructure. Instead, it undergoes extensive restructuring during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis at stage VIII to allow the transit of preleptotene spermatocytes at the BTB. Yet the immunological barrier conferred by the BTB cannot be compromised, even transiently, during the epithelial cycle to avoid the production of antibodies against meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells. Studies have demonstrated that some unlikely partners, namely adhesion protein complexes (e.g., occludin-ZO-1, N-cadherin-β-catenin, claudin-5-ZO-1), steroids (e.g., testosterone, estradiol-17β), nonreceptor protein kinases (e.g., focal adhesion kinase, c-Src, c-Yes), polarity proteins (e.g., PAR6, Cdc42, 14-3-3), endocytic vesicle proteins (e.g., clathrin, caveolin, dynamin 2), and actin regulatory proteins (e.g., Eps8, Arp2/3 complex), are working together, apparently under the overall influence of cytokines (e.g., transforming growth factor-β3, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α). In short, a "new" BTB is created behind spermatocytes in transit while the "old" BTB above transiting cells undergoes timely degeneration, so that the immunological barrier can be maintained while spermatocytes are traversing the BTB. We also discuss recent findings regarding the molecular mechanisms by which environmental toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A) induce testicular injury via their initial actions at the BTB to elicit

  6. The Blood-Testis Barrier and Its Implications for Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Dolores D.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers in the mammalian body. It divides the seminiferous epithelium into the basal and the apical (adluminal) compartments. Meiosis I and II, spermiogenesis, and spermiation all take place in a specialized microenvironment behind the BTB in the apical compartment, but spermatogonial renewal and differentiation and cell cycle progression up to the preleptotene spermatocyte stage take place outside of the BTB in the basal compartment of the epithelium. However, the BTB is not a static ultrastructure. Instead, it undergoes extensive restructuring during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis at stage VIII to allow the transit of preleptotene spermatocytes at the BTB. Yet the immunological barrier conferred by the BTB cannot be compromised, even transiently, during the epithelial cycle to avoid the production of antibodies against meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells. Studies have demonstrated that some unlikely partners, namely adhesion protein complexes (e.g., occludin-ZO-1, N-cadherin-β-catenin, claudin-5-ZO-1), steroids (e.g., testosterone, estradiol-17β), nonreceptor protein kinases (e.g., focal adhesion kinase, c-Src, c-Yes), polarity proteins (e.g., PAR6, Cdc42, 14-3-3), endocytic vesicle proteins (e.g., clathrin, caveolin, dynamin 2), and actin regulatory proteins (e.g., Eps8, Arp2/3 complex), are working together, apparently under the overall influence of cytokines (e.g., transforming growth factor-β3, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α). In short, a “new” BTB is created behind spermatocytes in transit while the “old” BTB above transiting cells undergoes timely degeneration, so that the immunological barrier can be maintained while spermatocytes are traversing the BTB. We also discuss recent findings regarding the molecular mechanisms by which environmental toxicants (e.g., cadmium, bisphenol A) induce testicular injury via their initial actions at the BTB to

  7. A semi-mechanistic red blood cell survival model provides some insight into red blood cell destruction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Korell, Julia; Duffull, Stephen B

    2013-08-01

    Most mathematical models developed for the survival of haematological cell populations, in particular red blood cells (RBCs), follow the principle of parsimony. They focus on the predominant destruction mechanism of age-related cell death (senescence) and do not account for within subject variability in the RBC lifespan. However, assessment of the underlying physiological destruction mechanisms can be of interest in pathological conditions that affect RBC survival, for example sickle cell anaemia or anaemia of chronic kidney disease. We have previously proposed a semi-mechanistic RBC survival model which accounts for four different types of RBC destruction mechanisms. In this work, it is shown that the proposed model in combination with informative RBC survival data is able to provide a deeper insight into RBC destruction mechanisms. The proposed model was applied in a non-linear mixed effect modelling framework to biotin derived RBC survival data available from literature. Three mechanisms were estimable based on the available data of twelve subjects, including random destruction, senescence and destruction due to delayed failure. It was possible to identify three subjects with a decreased RBC survival in the study population. These three subjects all showed differences in the contribution of the estimated destruction mechanisms: an increased random destruction, versus an accelerated senescence, versus a combination of both.

  8. Depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Neu, Björn; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2002-11-01

    Polymer-induced red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is of current basic science and clinical interest, and a depletion-mediated model for this phenomenon has been suggested; to date, however, analytical approaches to this model are lacking. An approach is thus described for calculating the interaction energy between RBC in polymer solutions. The model combines electrostatic repulsion due to RBC surface charge with osmotic attractive forces due to polymer depletion near the RBC surface. The effects of polymer concentration and polymer physicochemical properties on depletion layer thickness and on polymer penetration into the RBC glycocalyx are considered for 40 to 500 kDa dextran and for 18 to 35 kDa poly (ethylene glycol). The calculated results are in excellent agreement with literature data for cell-cell affinities and with RBC aggregation-polymer concentration relations. These findings thus lend strong support to depletion interactions as the basis for polymer-induced RBC aggregation and suggest the usefulness of this approach for exploring interactions between macromolecules and the RBC glycocalyx. PMID:12414682

  9. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story

    PubMed Central

    de Back, Djuna Z.; Kostova, Elena B.; van Kraaij, Marian; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC). During steady state hematopoiesis, approximately 1010 RBC are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages. PMID:24523696

  10. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Hadinedoushan; Mahroo, Mirahmadian; Abbas, Aflatounian; Firouzeh, Akbari; Nadia, Hatmi

    2004-10-21

    It has been postulated that a proportion of recurrent miscarriage (RM) might be due to immune causes. The objective was to determine whether cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cell is altered in patients with a history of RM. We compared the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, TGFbeta1 and IFNgamma in the supernatant of Phytohemagglutinin stimulated mononuclear cells in 21 women with RM at the time of 3rd or higher abortion (group I), 32 women who were at least 3 months past their 3rd or higher abortion (group II) and 32 pregnant women with no history of abortion (group III). Gestational age was matched between groups I and III. Group I had higher level of IL-2 than group III (P=0.001). Group II showed higher level of IL-2 (P=0.001) and IFNgamma (P=0.015) than group III. The production of IL-10 by mononuclear cells of group III was higher than both group I (P=0.002) and group II (P=0.001). There was no difference in the levels of IL-2, IL-10 and IFNgamma between groups I and II. Also, the levels of IL-4, IL-13, and TGFbeta1 were similar among the groups. The data indicate an elevation of Th1 cytokines in women with RM as compared to normal pregnant women, and IL-10 is an important cytokine in the maintenance of pregnancy.

  11. Blood cell dynamics during hibernation in the European Ground Squirrel.

    PubMed

    Bouma, H R; Strijkstra, A M; Boerema, A S; Deelman, L E; Epema, A H; Hut, R A; Kroese, F G M; Henning, R H

    2010-08-15

    Hibernation is a unique natural model to study large and specific modulation in numbers of leukocytes and thrombocytes, with potential relevance for medical application. Hibernating animals cycle through cold (torpor) and warm (arousal) phases. Previous research demonstrated clearance of leukocytes and thrombocytes from the circulation during torpor, but did not provide information regarding the timing during torpor or the subtype of leukocytes affected. To study the influence of torpor-bout duration on clearance of circulating cells, we measured blood cell dynamics in the European Ground Squirrel. Numbers of leukocytes and thrombocytes decreased within 24h of torpor by 90% and remained unchanged during the remainder of the torpor-bout. Differential counts demonstrated that granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes are all affected by torpor. Although a decreased production might explain the reduced number of thrombocytes, granulocytes and monocytes, this cannot explain the observed lymphopenia since lymphocytes have a much lower turnover rate than thrombocytes, granulocytes and monocytes. In conclusion, although underlying biochemical signaling pathways need to be unraveled, our data show that the leukocyte count drops dramatically after entrance into torpor and that euthermic cell counts are restored within 1.5h after onset of arousal, even before body temperature is fully normalized.

  12. Piperine inhibits cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Chuchawankul, S; Khorana, N; Poovorawan, Y

    2012-01-01

    Piperine, an amide isolated from Piper species (Piperaceae), has been reported to exhibit central nervous system depression, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory activity. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activity of piperine has been demonstrated in mouse carcinomas. However, there is little information available concerning the effect of piperine on humans. We evaluated the immunopharmacological activity of this compound in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to piperine, and cell proliferation was determined by the MTS assay. Piperine significantly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human PBMC proliferation after exposure for 72 h. This compound inhibited PBMC activity, with an IC(50) of 100.73 ± 11.16 μg/mL. Production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was measured using an ELISA assay and RT-PCR. Piperine inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production in the PBMCs. RT-PCR data indicated that IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in PBMCs is suppressed by piperine. This compound significantly inhibited the production of these two cytokines by activated PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, piperine appears to have potential as an immunomodulatory agent for immune system suppression. PMID:22535397

  13. Reprogramming committed murine blood cells to induced hematopoietic stem cells with defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Jonah; Gazit, Roi; Garrison, Brian S.; Guo, Guoji; Saadatpour, Assieh; Mandal, Pankaj K.; Ebina, Wataru; Volchkov, Pavel; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood formation throughout life and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. We show that transient expression of six transcription factors RUNX1T1, HLF, LMO2, PRDM5, PBX1, and ZFP37 imparts multi-lineage transplantation potential onto otherwise committed lymphoid and myeloid progenitors, and myeloid effector cells. Inclusion of MYC-N and MEIS1, and use of polycistronic viruses increase reprogramming efficacy. The reprogrammed cells, designated induced-HSCs (iHSCs), possess clonal multi-lineage differentiation potential, reconstitute stem/progenitor compartments, and are serially transplantable. Single-cell analysis revealed that iHSCs derived under optimal conditions exhibit a gene expression profile that is highly similar to endogenous HSCs. These findings demonstrate that expression of a set of defined factors is sufficient to activate the gene networks governing HSC functional identity in committed blood cells. Our results raise the prospect that blood cell reprogramming may be a strategy for derivation of transplantable stem cells for clinical application. PMID:24766805

  14. Reprogramming committed murine blood cells to induced hematopoietic stem cells with defined factors.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Jonah; Gazit, Roi; Garrison, Brian S; Guo, Guoji; Saadatpour, Assieh; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ebina, Wataru; Volchkov, Pavel; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H; Rossi, Derrick J

    2014-04-24

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood formation throughout life and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. We show that transient expression of six transcription factors Run1t1, Hlf, Lmo2, Prdm5, Pbx1, and Zfp37 imparts multilineage transplantation potential onto otherwise committed lymphoid and myeloid progenitors and myeloid effector cells. Inclusion of Mycn and Meis1 and use of polycistronic viruses increase reprogramming efficacy. The reprogrammed cells, designated induced-HSCs (iHSCs), possess clonal multilineage differentiation potential, reconstitute stem/progenitor compartments, and are serially transplantable. Single-cell analysis revealed that iHSCs derived under optimal conditions exhibit a gene expression profile that is highly similar to endogenous HSCs. These findings demonstrate that expression of a set of defined factors is sufficient to activate the gene networks governing HSC functional identity in committed blood cells. Our results raise the prospect that blood cell reprogramming may be a strategy for derivation of transplantable stem cells for clinical application.

  15. Plasma and red blood cell fatty acids in peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Moser, A B; Jones, D S; Raymond, G V; Moser, H W

    1999-02-01

    The demonstration of abnormal levels of fatty acids or plasmalogens in plasma or red blood cells is key to the diagnosis of peroxisomal disorders. We report the levels of 62 fatty acids and plasmalogens in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), Zellweger syndrome (ZS), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and infantile Refsum disease (IRD), both at baseline and after dietary interventions. "Lorenzo's Oil" therapy in X-ALD normalizes the levels of saturated very long chain fatty acids in plasma, but leads to reduced levels of omega 6 and other omega 3 fatty acids, and requires monitoring and appropriate dietary supplements. Patients with ZS, NALD and IRD have reduced levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) which can be normalized by the oral administration of microencapsulated DHA and AA.

  16. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  17. Cost-effective and rapid blood analysis on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Sencan, Ikbal; Wong, Justin; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Tseng, Derek; Nagashima, Keita; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a compact and cost-effective imaging cytometry platform installed on a cell-phone for the measurement of the density of red and white blood cells as well as hemoglobin concentration in human blood samples. Fluorescent and bright-field images of blood samples are captured using separate optical attachments to the cell-phone and are rapidly processed through a custom-developed smart application running on the phone for counting of blood cells and determining hemoglobin density. We evaluated the performance of this cell-phone based blood analysis platform using anonymous human blood samples and achieved comparable results to a standard bench-top hematology analyser. Test results can either be stored on the cell-phone memory or be transmitted to a central server, providing remote diagnosis opportunities even in field settings.

  18. Smoking, allergy, and the differential white blood cell count.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R G; Gross, E; Joyce, H; Holland, F; Pride, N B

    1985-01-01

    Dutch workers have proposed that people with asthma and those smokers who develop chronic airflow obstruction share a common allergic constitution. To study whether smoking itself is associated with indicators of allergy, we have examined 237 men aged 51-61 years (120 smokers, 73 ex-smokers, and 44 non-smokers) who were recruited to a long term study of lung function in 1974, at which time men with a clinical diagnosis of asthma were excluded. Smokers, ex-smokers, and non-smokers did not differ in personal or family history of allergic disease, but the prevalence of positive responses to skinprick tests was greater in ex-smokers (59%) than in the other two groups (33% and 34%). In men with negative responses to skinprick tests total serum IgE was greater in smokers (log10 mean 1.41 IU/ml) and in ex-smokers (log10 mean 1.53 IU/ml) than in non-smokers (log10 mean 1.12 IU/ml). In men with positive skin test responses serum IgE was similar in the three groups (log10 mean ranging from 1.68 to 1.78 IU/ml). Geometric mean total white cell counts in the peripheral blood were higher in smokers (7.34 X 10(9)/l) than in non-smokers (5.82 X 10(9)/l); the value in ex-smokers (6.16 X 10(9)/l) was intermediate. Absolute blood eosinophil counts were increased in smokers disproportionately to the increase in total white cell count. Thus smoking is associated with small increases in some markers of allergy. These changes are probably acquired after the onset of smoking but sequential studies are required to amplify these cross sectional observations. Smokers whose skin test responses are positive appear more likely to give up smoking. PMID:3969651

  19. Hydrogen ion dynamics in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Tiffert, Teresa; Mauritz, Jakob M A; Seear, Rachel; Esposito, Alessandro; Kaminski, Clemens F; Lew, Virgilio L; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2010-12-15

    Our understanding of pH regulation within red blood cells (RBCs) has been inferred mainly from indirect experiments rather than from in situ measurements of intracellular pH (pH(i)). The present work shows that carboxy-SNARF-1, a pH fluorophore, when used with confocal imaging or flow cytometry, reliably reports pH(i) in individual, human RBCs, provided intracellular fluorescence is calibrated using a 'null-point' procedure. Mean pH(i) was 7.25 in CO(2)/HCO(3)(-)-buffered medium and 7.15 in Hepes-buffered medium, and varied linearly with extracellular pH (slope of 0.77). Intrinsic (non-CO(2)/HCO(3)(-)-dependent) buffering power, estimated in the intact cell (85 mmol (l cell)(-1) (pH unit)(-1) at resting pH(i)), was somewhat higher than previous estimates from cell lysates (50-70 mmol (l cell)(-1) (pH unit)(-1)). Acute displacement of pH(i) (superfusion of weak acids/bases) triggered rapid pH(i) recovery. This was mediated via membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange (the AE1 gene product), irrespective of whether recovery was from an intracellular acid or base load, and with no evident contribution from other transporters such as Na(+)/H(+) exchange. H(+)-equivalent flux through AE1 was a linear function of [H(+)](i) and reversed at resting pH(i), indicating that its activity is not allosterically regulated by pH(i), in contrast to other AE isoforms. By simultaneously monitoring pH(i) and markers of cell volume, a functional link between membrane ion transport, volume and pH(i) was demonstrated. RBC pH(i) is therefore tightly regulated via AE1 activity, but modulated during changes of cell volume. A comparable volume-pH(i) link may also be important in other cell types expressing anion exchangers. Direct measurement of pH(i) should be useful in future investigations of RBC physiology and pathology. PMID:20962000

  20. 75 FR 62843 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... Cell Transplantation. Date and Times: November 15, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Place: Hyatt Regency... Act, as amended) the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises...