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Sample records for blood gas analyzers

  1. Blood Gas Analyzers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Anthony L; Waddell, Lori S

    2016-03-01

    Acid-base and respiratory disturbances are common in sick and hospitalized veterinary patients; therefore, blood gas analyzers have become integral diagnostic and monitoring tools. This article will discuss uses of blood gas analyzers, types of samples that can be used, sample collection methods, potential sources of error, and potential alternatives to blood gas analyzers and their limitations. It will also discuss the types of analyzers that are available, logistical considerations that should be taken into account when purchasing an analyzer, and the basic principles of how these analyzers work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood Gas Analyzer Accuracy of Glucose Measurements.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yafen; Wanderer, Jonathan; Nichols, James H; Klonoff, David; Rice, Mark J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the comparability of glucose levels measured with blood gas analyzers (BGAs) and by central laboratories (CLs). Glucose measurements obtained between June 1, 2007, and March 1, 2016, at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center were reviewed. The agreement between CL and BGA results were assessed using Bland-Altman, consensus error grid (CEG), and surveillance error grid (SEG) analyses. We further analyzed the BGAs' performance against the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2014 draft guidance and 2016 final guidance for blood glucose monitoring and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15197:2013 standard. We analyzed 2671 paired glucose measurements, including 50 pairs of hypoglycemic values (1.9%). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean bias of -3.1 mg/dL, with 98.1% of paired values meeting the 95% limits of agreement. In the hypoglycemic range, the mean bias was -0.8 mg/dL, with 100% of paired values meeting the 95% limits of agreement. When using CEG analysis, 99.9% of the paired values fell within the no risk zone. Similar results were found using SEG analysis. For the FDA 2014 draft guidance, our data did not meet the target compliance rate. For the FDA 2016 final guidance, our data partially met the target compliance rate. For the ISO standard, our data met the target compliance rate. In this study, the agreement for glucose measurement between common BGAs and CL instruments met the ISO 2013 standard. However, BGA accuracy did not meet the stricter requirements of the FDA 2014 draft guidance or 2016 final guidance. Fortunately, plotting these results on either the CEG or the SEG revealed no results in either the great or extreme clinical risk zones. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood gas/pH analyzers.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Blood gas/pH analyzers (BGAs) measure or calculate several physiologic parameters, typically from an arterial blood sample, to assist clinicians in diagnosing, assessing, and monitoring the patient's condition (e.g., respiratory status) and regulating therapy (e.g., ventilation). In this study, we focused on the use of BGAs in two different settings: (1) centralized testing locations that service several different hospital departments or areas and (2) decentralized, sometimes referred to as "point-of-care," testing areas. (Also refer to the Guidance Article, "Point-of-Care' Laboratory Testing: Is Decentralized Testing the Best Alternative for Your Hospital?" in this issue). In this Evaluation, we evaluated seven GBAs from seven manufacturers, examining the appropriateness of each device for use by the two types of potential users: (1) specialized personnel (e.g., medical technologists) experienced in using and maintaining laboratory equipment and (2) nonspecialized personnel (e.g., nurses) who do not have such experience but may be expected to operate the devices in facilities using a decentralized testing program. We rated each unit separately for these two user types to help facilities choose the unit that best fits their testing program. Note that we did not test all capabilities of these units; for example, we did not test electrolyte or other metabolite determinations or the accuracy of derived (i.e., calculated) parameters. Our ratings were based largely on whether a BGA could report erroneous derived parameters. We also considered the level of operator maintenance required, as well as cost and human factors issues, when ranking the units within their ratings group. Only one unit was rated Acceptable for use by either specialized or nonspecialized personnel. The remaining units were rated Conditionally Acceptable because they could present erroneous values for one or two derived parameters. Our conditions of acceptability include (1) that the parameter(s) in

  4. Comparison of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two different blood gas analyzers and a core laboratory analyzer.

    PubMed

    Uyanik, Metin; Sertoglu, Erdim; Kayadibi, Huseyin; Tapan, Serkan; Serdar, Muhittin A; Bilgi, Cumhur; Kurt, Ismail

    2015-04-01

    Blood gas analyzers (BGAs) are important in assessing and monitoring critically ill patients. However, the random use of BGAs to measure blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites increases the variability in test results. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the correlation of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two BGAs and a core laboratory analyzer. A total of 40 arterial blood gas samples were analyzed with two BGAs [(Nova Stat Profile Critical Care Xpress (Nova Biomedical, Waltham, MA, USA) and Siemens Rapidlab 1265 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA)) and a core laboratory analyzer [Olympus AU 2700 autoanalyzer (Beckman-Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA)]. The results of pH, pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂, sodium (Na⁺), potassium (K⁺), calcium (Ca⁺²), chloride (Cl⁻), glucose, and lactate were compared by Passing-Bablok regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. The present study showed that there was negligible variability of blood gases (pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂), K⁺ and lactate values between the blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. However, the differences in pH were modest, while Na⁺, Cl⁻, Ca²⁺ and glucose showed poor correlation according to the concordance correlation coefficient. BGAs and core laboratory autoanalyzer demonstrated variable performances and not all tests met minimum performance goals. It is important that clinicians and laboratories are aware of the limitations of their assays.

  5. Blood Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the 1970's, NASA provided funding for development of an automatic blood analyzer for Skylab at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL devised "dynamic loading," which employed a spinning rotor to load, transfer, and analyze blood samples by centrifugal processing. A refined, commercial version of the system was produced by ABAXIS and is marketed as portable ABAXIS MiniLab MCA. Used in a doctor's office, the equipment can perform 80 to 100 chemical blood tests on a single drop of blood and report results in five minutes. Further development is anticipated.

  6. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  7. How reliable are electrolyte and metabolite results measured by a blood gas analyzer in the ED?

    PubMed

    Uysal, Emin; Acar, Yahya Ayhan; Kutur, Ahmet; Cevik, Erdem; Salman, Necati; Tezel, Onur

    2016-03-01

    Blood gas analysis is a frequently ordered test in emergency departments for many indications. It is a rapid technique that can analyze electrolyte and metabolites in addition to pH and blood gases. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of electrolyte and metabolite results measured by blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. This was a prospective, single-center observational study conducted in a tertiary care center's emergency department. All adult patients requiring arterial/venous blood gas analysis and core laboratory tests together for any purpose were consecutively included in the study between April 2014 and July 2015. Patients younger than 16 years, having any intravenous infusion or blood transfusion prior to sampling, or who were pregnant were excluded. A total of 1094 patients' (male = 547, female = 547) paired blood samples were analyzed. The mean age was 58.10 ± 21.35 years, and there was no difference between arterial and venous sampling groups by age, pH, or sex (P = .93, .56, and .41, respectively). Correlation coefficients for hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, potassium, sodium, and chloride levels measured by blood gas analyzer and core laboratory analyzers were 0.922, 0.896, 0.964, 0.823, 0.854, and 0.791, respectively. Blood gas analysis results were strongly correlated for hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, potassium, and sodium levels but were only moderately correlated for chloride levels. These parameters as measured by a blood gas analyzer seem reliable in critical decision making but must be validated by core laboratory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Portable automatic blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Analyzer employs chemical-sensing electrodes for determination of blood, gas, and ion concentrations. It is rugged, easily serviced, and comparatively simple to operate. System can analyze up to eight parameters and can be modified to measure other blood constituents including nonionic species, such as urea, glucose, and oxygen.

  9. An overlooked aspect on metabolic acidosis at birth: blood gas analyzers calculate base deficit differently.

    PubMed

    Mokarami, Parisa; Wiberg, Nana; Olofsson, Per

    2012-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis (MA) at birth is commonly defined as umbilical cord arterial pH < 7.0 plus base deficit (BD) ≥ 12.0 mmol/L. Base deficit is not a measured entity but is calculated from pH and Pco(2) values, with the hemoglobin (Hb) concentration [Hb] included in the calculation algorithm as a fixed or measured value. Various blood gas analyzers use different algorithms, indicating variations in the MA diagnosis. The objective was therefore to calculate the prevalence of MA in blood and extracellular fluid with algorithms from three blood gas analyzer brands relative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) algorithm. Comparative study. University hospital. Arterial cord blood from 15 354 newborns. Prevalence of MA. Blood was analyzed in a Radiometer ABL 735 analyzer. Base deficit was calculated post hoc with algorithms from CLSI and Corning and Roche blood gas analyzers, and with measured and fixed (9.3 mmol/L) values of [Hb]. The prevalence of BD ≥12.0 mmol/L in blood was with the CLSI algorithm 1.97%, Radiometer 5.18%, Corning 3.84% and Roche 3.29% (CLSI vs. other; McNemar test, p < 0.000001). Likewise, MA prevalences were 0.58, 0.66, 0.64 and 0.64%, respectively (p≤ 0.02). Base deficit ≥ 12.0 mmol/L and MA rates were lower in extracellular fluid than in blood (p≤ 0.002). Algorithms with measured or fixed Hb concentration made no differences to MA rates (p≥ 0.1). The neonatal metabolic acidosis rate varied significantly with blood gas analyzer brand and fetal fluid compartment for calculation of BD. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. [Setting up of 15 POC blood gas analyzers at Montpellier Hosptital (France)].

    PubMed

    Marrocco, Alexandre; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Boularan, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the setting up of 15 blood gas analyzers GEM(®) Premier™ 4000 (IL) at Montpellier hospital. This experience includes analytical characterization (within and between run coefficient of variation) using GSE and GHE IL controls, correlation of 35 samples with a routinely used laboratory blood gas analyzer (Cobas b221, Roche(®)). We shall also develop the training, the habilitation and its follow-up for the user staff (450 people) of the different hospital's units in the aim of the accreditation.

  11. Accuracy of commercial blood gas analyzers for monitoring ionized calcium at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul; Visnick, Helen; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Variable ionized calcium measurements in post filter blood samples during continuous renal replacement therapy (renal dialysis) using regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) have been reported using commercial blood gas analyzers, resulting in analyzer-dependent differences in decisions regarding adjustment of citrate dose. We evaluated accuracy for measurement of iCa at low concentrations by 4 commercial blood gas analyzers using primary reference solutions formulated down to 0.15mmol/l iCa. Of the 4 analyzers tested, GEM Premier 4000 demonstrates acceptable accuracy for iCa measurement with a median deviation of -6.7% (-0.01mmol/l) at 0.15mmol/l, while other analyzers tested show increasingly positive biases from +40% (+0.06mmol/l) to +60% (+0.09mmol/l) relative to target. These relative differences are consistent with discordant results reported for measurement of iCa in blood during RCA. Interference from sodium with measured iCa and carryover from system rinse solution to sample are likely contributors to variability. We conclude the GEM Premier 4000 shows acceptable accuracy for measuring iCa at low concentrations required to control citrate dose during RCA. The method presented here may be used to test accuracy of any blood gas analyzer prior to use in clinical applications requiring measurement of iCa at low concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy and precision of a new, portable, handheld blood gas analyzer, the IRMA.

    PubMed

    Wahr, J A; Lau, W; Tremper, K K; Hallock, L; Smith, K

    1996-07-01

    The accuracy and precision of the new IRMA (Immediate Response Mobile Analysis System, Diametrics, Inc., St. Paul, MN) handheld blood gas analyzer was compared with that of two benchtop blood gas analyzers. The IRMA consists of a notebook-sized machine and disposable cartridges, each containing a pH, a CO2 and an O2 electrode, and provides bedside (point-of-care) blood gas analysis. A total of 172 samples (arterial and mixed venous) were obtained from 25 informed, consenting patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. The pH, PCO2 and PO2 of each sample was determined on four blood gas analyzers: NOVA Statlabs Profile 5 (NOVA Biomedical, Waltham, MA), the ABL-50 (Radiometer, West Lake, OH), and two IRMA machines. Linear regression and bias +/- precision were determined, comparing each of the analyzers with the NOVA. All three machines showed a similar, high degree of correlation with the NOVA for pH, PCO2, and PO2. The bias and precision of the IRMA machines compared with the NOVA was similar to that of the ABL compared with the NOVA for pH (NOVA:ABL -0.005 +/- 0.011; NOVA:IRMA 1 = 0.0026 +/- 0.025; NOVA:IRMA 2 = 0.0021 +/- 0.025), for PCO2 (NOVA:ABL = -1.4 +/- 1.3 mmHg; NOVA: IRMA 1 = -1.3 +/- 1.9 mmHg; NOVA: IRMA 2 = -1.2 +/- 2.1 mmHg) and PO2 (NOVA:ABL = 3.6 +/- 21.1 mmHg; NOVA:IRMA 1 = 3.4 +/- 19.9 mmHg; NOVA:IRMA 2 = 6.3 +/- 20.9 mmHg). The bias found for pH, PCO2, and PO2 was not affected by extremes of temperature (range 25.5-40 degrees C) or hematocrit (range 11-44%) for any machine. The new technology incorporated in the IRMA blood gas analyzer provides results with an accuracy that is similar to that of benchtop analyzers, but with all of the advantages of point-of-care analysis.

  13. Environmental testing of a blood gas/pH and electrolyte analyzer for field hospital use.

    PubMed

    Dubill, P M

    1990-11-01

    In 1983 the U.S. Army Academy of Health Sciences developed a Letter Requirement for a Blood Gas/pH Analyzer for use in Echelon 3 and 4 facilities. Field trials of several nondevelopment items and a subsequent market survey did not produce a suitable instrument. Recently, a relatively small, lightweight, and simple device became commercially available, and was tested for field applicability in accordance with MIL-STD-810D. Results indicated that with minor modifications, the instrument would be sufficiently rugged to withstand the severe storage temperature extremes and transit shock and vibration conditions associated with deployment of field medical materiel.

  14. A two-center evaluation of the blood gas immediate response mobile analyzer (IRMA).

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Del, Buono Laura; Bonini, Pierangelo; Germagnoli, Luca; Ferrero, Carlo A; Pezzo, Mario; Marocchi, Alessandro

    2002-02-01

    The Immediate Response Mobile Analyzer (IRMA) is a selective and portable point-of-care testing (POCT) blood gas, electrolyte and hematocrit (Hct) analyzer. The overall analytical performance was evaluated in a two-center study involving two Italian hospital laboratories, following the guidelines suggested by the manufacturer (based on the NCCLS protocol), after a preliminary evaluation of their formal validity. The IRMA was compared to the analyzers used in the routine laboratory as reference. The considered parameters were pH, pO2, pCO2, Na+, K+, ionized calcium and Hct. When using the aqueous quality control material provided by the manufacturer most of the parameters showed good precision, with the exception of pCO2 and pO2 that showed high CVs on two of the three levels of the aqueous control. We could demonstrate that this imprecision was material-related and was reduced when using a different material (blood equilibrated by tonometry). With tonometred blood for pO2 and pCO2 and the aqueous material for the remaining parameters the CVs were all below 5%, ranging from 0.08% to 2.8%. The IRMA results correlated adequately with the comparison instruments, with the exception of sodium and ionized calcium where contradictory results were obtained in the two centers.

  15. Agreement of serum potassium measured by blood gas and biochemistry analyzer in patients with moderate to severe hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Seyyid Bilal; Genc, Ahmet Bilal; Sipahi, Savas; Yildirim, Mehmet; Cinemre, Behice; Tamer, Ali; Solak, Yalcin

    2016-05-01

    Several studies investigated the agreement between central laboratory biochemistry analyzers and blood gas analyzers for potassium measurements. However, data are scarce when the potassium level is moderate to severely high. We aimed to evaluate the agreement between central laboratory biochemistry analyzers and blood gas analyzer in terms of serum potassium level measurement because differences in potassium at this level translate into very different clinical actions. This was a retrospective medical record review study in which patients who presented to the emergency department and had serum potassium levels ≥6mmol/L were included. Patients who did not have simultaneous potassium measurement by blood gas analyzer were excluded. We included all patients meeting potassium criteria irrespective of their underlying disease or comorbidities. We evaluated agreement between the measurement methods with Pearson correlation, Bland-Altman plot, and Sign test. A total of 118 blood sample pairs were included. The mean serum potassium level measured by biochemistry analyzer was 6.78±0.79mmol/L, whereas it was 6.16±0.86mmol/L by blood gas analyzer (P<.001, Sign test). There was a strong correlation (P<.001, r=0.864) between the 2 methods, but agreement was relatively poor. Blood gas analyzer tended to measure potassium significantly lower than measured by biochemistry analyzer. The mean difference between the methods was 0.62±0.43mmol/L. In patients with moderate to severe hyperkalemia, blood gas analyzer and biochemistry analyzer gives significantly different serum potassium results which may be clinically important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Discrepant post filter ionized calcium concentrations by common blood gas analyzers in CRRT using regional citrate anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Patrik; Kuhn, Sven-Olaf; Stracke, Sylvia; Gründling, Matthias; Knigge, Stephan; Selleng, Sixten; Helm, Maximilian; Friesecke, Sigrun; Abel, Peter; Kallner, Anders; Nauck, Matthias; Petersmann, Astrid

    2015-09-08

    Ionized calcium (iCa) concentration is often used in critical care and measured using blood gas analyzers at the point of care. Controlling and adjusting regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) involves measuring the iCa concentration in two samples: systemic with physiological iCa concentrations and post filter samples with very low iCa concentrations. However, modern blood gas analyzers are optimized for physiological iCa concentrations which might make them less suitable for measuring low iCa in blood with a high concentration of citrate. We present results of iCa measurements from six different blood gas analyzers and the impact on clinical decisions based on the recommendations of the dialysis' device manufacturer. The iCa concentrations of systemic and post filter samples were measured using six distinct, frequently used blood gas analyzers. We obtained iCa results of 74 systemic and 84 post filter samples from patients undergoing RCA for CRRT at the University Medicine of Greifswald. The systemic samples showed concordant results on all analyzers with median iCa concentrations ranging from 1.07 to 1.16 mmol/L. The medians of iCa concentrations for post filter samples ranged from 0.21 to 0.50 mmol/L. Results of >70% of the post filter samples would lead to major differences in decisions regarding citrate flow depending on the instrument used. Measurements of iCa in post filter samples may give misleading information in monitoring the RCA. Recommendations of the dialysis manufacturer need to be revised. Meanwhile, little weight should be given to post filter iCa. Reference methods for low iCa in whole blood containing citrate should be established.

  17. An intelligent prognostic system for analyzing patients with paraquat poisoning using arterial blood gas indexes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Feiyan; Li, Huaizhong; Tong, Changfei; Pan, Zhifang; Li, Jun; Chen, Huiling

    The arterial blood gas (ABG) test is used to assess gas exchange in the lung, and the acid-base level in the blood. However, it is still unclear whether or not ABG test indexes correlate with paraquat (PQ) poisoning. This study investigates the predictive value of ABG tests in prognosing patients with PQ poisoning; it also identifies the most significant indexes of the ABG test. An intelligent machine learning-based system was established to effectively give prognostic analysis of patients with PQ poisoning based on ABG indexes. In the proposed system, an enhanced support vector machine combined with a feature selection strategy was developed to predict the risk status from a pool of 103 patients (56 males and 47 females); of these, 52 subjects were deceased and 51 patients were alive. The proposed method was rigorously evaluated against the real-life dataset in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. Additionally, the feature selection was investigated to identify correlating factors for the risk status. The results demonstrated that there were significant differences in ABG indexes between deceased and alive subjects (p-value <0.01). According to the feature selection, we found that the most important correlated indexes were associated with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2). This study discovered the relationship between ABG test and poisoning degree to provide a new avenue for prognosing PQ poisoning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of a hand-held blood gas analyzer for rapid determination of blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites in intensive care setting.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Antti A M; Lehto, Tiina M; Hedberg, Pirjo S M; Vaskivuo, Tommy E

    2016-04-01

    Intensive care units, operating rooms, emergency departments, and neonatology units need rapid measurements of blood gases, electrolytes, and metabolites. These analyses can be performed in a central laboratory or at the clinic with traditional or compact cassette-type blood gas analyzers such as the epoc blood gas testing system for analyzing whole blood samples at the bedside. In this study, the performance and interchangeability of a hand-held epoc blood gas analyzer was evaluated. The analytical performance of the epoc analyzer was evaluated by determining within-and between-run precisions. The accuracy of the epoc analyzer was assessed by comparing patient results from the device with those obtained with the Siemens Rapidlab 1265 and Rapidpoint RP500 and Siemens Dimension Vista and Sysmex XE-2100 analyzers. The following parameters were measured: pH, pCO2, pO2, Hb (calc), Na+, K+, iCa2+, glucose, and lactate. The CV% of the epoc's between-day imprecision for the various parameters varied from 0.4 to 8.6. The within-run imprecision CV% varied from 0.6 to 5.2. The squared regression coefficient (R2) between the epoc and RL1265 varied from 0.94 to 0.99, with the exception of Na+ and Ca2+ (R2≥0.82). The correlation (R2) of Na+ and K+ between epoc and Dimension Vista was 0.73 and 0.89, respectively. The correlation (R2) of Hb between the epoc and the XE-2100 analyzer was 0.94. With most of the measured blood gas parameters, the epoc analyzer correlated well with reference techniques. The epoc analyzer is suitable for rapid measurement of the blood gases, the electrolytes, and the metabolites in the ICU.

  19. Portable Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Michromonitor M500 universal gas analyzer contains a series of miniature modules, each of which is a complete gas chromatograph, an instrument which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentrations of each gas in the mixture. The system is manufactured by Microsensor Technology, and is used for environmental analysis, monitoring for gas leaks and chemical spills, compliance with pollution laws, etc. The technology is based on a Viking attempt to detect life on Mars. Ames/Stanford miniaturized the system and NIOSH funded further development. Three Stanford researchers commercialized the technology, which can be operated by unskilled personnel.

  20. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  1. Whole blood coagulation analyzers.

    PubMed

    1997-08-01

    Whole blood Coagulation analyzers (WBCAs) are widely used point-of-care (POC) testing devices found primarily in cardiothoracic surgical suites and cardia catheterization laboratories. Most of these devices can perform a number of coagulation tests that provide information about a patient's blood clotting status. Clinicians use the results of the WBCA tests, which are available minutes after applying a blood sample, primarily to monitor the effectiveness of heparin therapy--an anticoagulation therapy used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery, angioplasty, hemodialysis, and other clinical procedures. In this study we evaluated five WBCAs from four suppliers. Our testing focused on the applications for which WBCAs are primarily used: Monitoring moderate to high heparin levels, as would be required, for example, during CPB are angioplasty. For this function, WCBAs are typically used to perform an activated clotting time (ACT) test or, as one supplier refers to its test, a heparin management test (HMT). All models included in this study offered an ACT test or an HMT. Monitoring low heparin levels, as would be required, for example,during hemodialysis. For this function, WBCAs would normally be used to perform either a low-range ACT (LACT) test or a whole blood activated partial thromboplastin time (WBAPTT) test. Most of the evaluated units could perform at least one of these tests; one unit did not offer either test and was therefore not rated for this application. We rated and ranked each evaluated model separately for each of these two applications. In addition, we provided a combined rating and ranking that considers the units' appropriateness for performing both application. We based our conclusions on a unit's performance and humans factor design, as determined by our testing, and on its five-year life-cycle cost, as determined by our net present value (NPV) analysis. While we rated all evaluated units acceptable for each appropriate category, we did

  2. Reliability of the determination of whole-blood oxygen affinity by means of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters.

    PubMed

    Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijistra, W G

    1989-05-01

    Determination of the oxygen affinity of human whole blood with the help of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters is compared with an accurate method for recording hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curves (Clin Chem 1982;28:1287-92). P50 (oxygen tension at half saturation; So2 = 50%) and Hill's n (delta log [So2/(1-So2)]/delta log Po2) were determined in blood of 24 healthy donors. Three slightly different procedures were used for determination of P50 on the basis of Po2, pH, Pco2, and So2 measured with each of four different blood-gas analyzer/oximeter combinations. These methods were not able to discriminate between high and low values for P50 within the normal reference interval, but never failed to detect the high oxygen affinity of blood stored for 12 days, reflected in low values of P50. The methods thus proved suitable for detecting clinically significant deviations in oxygen affinity such as occur in patients with, e.g., abnormal hemoglobins, anemias, or carbon monoxide poisoning. Determination of Hill's n by these methods did not produce useful results.

  3. CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

    1960-02-16

    A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

  4. Comparison of serum sodium levels measured by blood gas analyzer and biochemistry autoanalyzer in patients with hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin

    2016-08-01

    Blood gas analyzer (BGA) electrolyte measurements are frequently used in emergency departments (EDs) pending biochemistry laboratory autoanalyzer (BLA) results. There is lack of data in the literature in terms of agreement of these 2 measurement methods of sodium. We aimed to comprehensively evaluate the agreement in hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia groups. Retrospectively, adult subjects who presented to ED of a tertiary care teaching hospital and had simultaneous BGA and BLA results were included in the study. Blood pairs were grouped into hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia according to BLA results. Agreement of sodium measurements between the methods were evaluated by Bland-Altman plots and Passing and Bablok regression analysis. A total of 2557 blood pairs (1326 males [51.8%]) were included. Median age of the patients was 66 years (18-103). The numbers of patients with hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia were 487 (19%), 1943 (76%), and 127 (5%), respectively. The minimum and maximum serum sodium levels measured by biochemistry analyzer were 106 and 171 mmol/L, respectively. The Pearson linear correlation coefficient between BGA and BLA for sodium measurements were 0.574, 0.358, and 0.562 in hyponatremia, eunatremia, and hypernatremia groups, respectively. The absolute mean difference for the 3 groups was greater than 4 mmol/L. Biochemistry laboratory autoanalyzer tended to measure serum sodium higher than BGA in all sodium groups. Passing and Bablok regression analysis showed significant differences between the 2 methods in all sodium groups. This is the first comprehensive evaluation of agreement between BGA and BLA in distinct sodium groups. Significant differences should be taken into account when these patients are managed in the ED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  6. Implementation of the ABL-90 blood gas analyzer in a ground-based mobile emergency care unit.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Wolsing-Hansen, Jonathan; Nybo, Mads; Maegaard, Christian Ulrik; Jepsen, Søren

    2015-07-30

    Point-of Care analysis is increasingly being applied in the prehospital scene. Arterial blood gas analysis is one of many new initiatives adding to the diagnostic tools of the prehospital physician. In this paper we present a study on the feasibility of the Radiometer ABL-90 in a ground-based Mobile Emergency Care Unit and report on some clinical situations in which the apparatus has proven beneficial.

  7. Collecting and analyzing cord blood gases.

    PubMed

    Riley, R J; Johnson, J W

    1993-03-01

    The analysis of cord blood respiratory gases and acid-base values is an important adjunct for determining the extent and cause of fetal acidosis at delivery. Although the quality and reliability of the blood gas instruments have improved dramatically, constant vigilance still is required and mandated to ensure accurate and precise results. Failure to control the many sampling and analysis variables that affect cord blood gas results will limit their usefulness. Most preanalytic problems become a minor concern when the blood gas analyses are done within a few minutes after obtaining the sample. Comparison of data among centers requires, not only that reference ranges be stated, but also that various corrections or factors that were used to adjust the results be described. Perhaps, a consensus could be reached to establish the optimal method of collection and the best methods for analyzing and reporting the results from cord blood gas and acid-base studies.

  8. Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and test of a breadboard trace gas analyzer (TGA) is documented. The TGA is a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system. The gas chromatograph subsystem employs a recirculating hydrogen carrier gas. The recirculation feature minimizes the requirement for transport and storage of large volumes of carrier gas during a mission. The silver-palladium hydrogen separator which permits the removal of the carrier gas and its reuse also decreases vacuum requirements for the mass spectrometer since the mass spectrometer vacuum system need handle only the very low sample pressure, not sample plus carrier. System performance was evaluated with a representative group of compounds.

  9. Market study: Whole blood analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market survey was conducted to develop findings relative to the commercialization potential and key market factors of the whole blood analyzer which is being developed in conjunction with NASA's Space Shuttle Medical System.

  10. Molecular wake shield gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for measuring and characterizing the ultrahigh vacuum in the wake of an orbiting spacecraft are studied. A high sensitivity mass spectrometer that contains a double mass analyzer consisting of an open source miniature magnetic sector field neutral gas analyzer and an identical ion analyzer is proposed. These are configured to detect and identify gas and ion species of hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon dioxide and any other gas or ion species in the 1 to 46 amu mass range. This range covers the normal atmospheric constituents. The sensitivity of the instrument is sufficient to measure ambient gases and ion with a particle density of the order of one per cc. A chemical pump, or getter, is mounted near the entrance aperture of the neutral gas analyzer which integrates the absorption of ambient gases for a selectable period of time for subsequent release and analysis. The sensitivity is realizable for all but rare gases using this technique.

  11. Adopting European Network for Health Technology Assessments (EunetHTA) core model for diagnostic technologies for improving the accuracy and appropriateness of blood gas analyzers' assessment.

    PubMed

    Franchin, Tiziana; Faggiano, Francesco; Plebani, Mario; Muraca, Maurizio; De Vivo, Liliana; Derrico, Pietro; Ritrovato, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is a successful methodology for meeting clinical expectations of rapid and accurate results. Scientific literature has moreover highlighted and confirmed the necessity of individuating the best technological solution, in accordance with clinical requirements and contextualized to the whole health organization, where it will be implemented. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) can assist in reaching an appropriate and contextualized decision on a health technology. The aim of this study is to adapt a HTA core model for improving the evaluation of a POCT technology: blood gas analyzers. The European Network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) core model for diagnostic technologies was applied for evaluating globally marketed blood gas analyzers. Evaluation elements were defined according to available literature and validated using the Delphi method. A HTA model of 71 issues, subdivided into 26 topics and 10 domains, was obtained by interviewing 11 healthcare experts over two rounds of Delphi questionnaires. Ten context parameters were identified in order to define the initial scenario from which the technology assessment was to begin. The model presented offers a systematic and objective structure for the evaluation of blood gas analyzers, which may play a guidance role for healthcare operators approaching the evaluation of such technologies thus improving, in a contextualized fashion, the appropriateness of purchasing.

  12. Space Shuttle Trace Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dencker, W.

    1975-01-01

    A Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) with the ability to detect the presence of toxic contaminants in the Space Shuttle atmosphere within the subparts-per-million range is under development. The design is a modification of the miniaturized Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) developed for the Viking Mars Lander. An ambient air sample is injected onto the GC column from a constant volume sample loop and separated into individual compounds for identification by the MS. The GC-MS interface consists of an effluent divider and a silver-paladium separator, an electrochemical cell which removes more than 99.99% of the hydrogen carrier gas. The hydrogen is reclaimed and repressurized without affecting the separator efficiency, a feature which enables a considerable weight reduction in the carrier gas supply system.

  13. Space Shuttle Trace Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dencker, W.

    1975-01-01

    A Trace Gas Analyzer (TGA) with the ability to detect the presence of toxic contaminants in the Space Shuttle atmosphere within the subparts-per-million range is under development. The design is a modification of the miniaturized Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) developed for the Viking Mars Lander. An ambient air sample is injected onto the GC column from a constant volume sample loop and separated into individual compounds for identification by the MS. The GC-MS interface consists of an effluent divider and a silver-paladium separator, an electrochemical cell which removes more than 99.99% of the hydrogen carrier gas. The hydrogen is reclaimed and repressurized without affecting the separator efficiency, a feature which enables a considerable weight reduction in the carrier gas supply system.

  14. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, T. P.; Arango, J.; Wolc, A.; Brady, J. V.; Fulton, J. E.; Rubinoff, I.; Ehr, I. J.; Persia, M. E.; O'Sullivan, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm. PMID:26706355

  15. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer.

    PubMed

    Schaal, T P; Arango, J; Wolc, A; Brady, J V; Fulton, J E; Rubinoff, I; Ehr, I J; Persia, M E; O'Sullivan, N P

    2016-02-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm.

  16. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Bo; Lin, Ji; Zhao, Xiao Dong

    2015-01-01

    The emergency departments (EDs) of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available. Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression. The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24). Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and biases

  17. Raman Gas Analyzer (RGA): Natural Gas Measurements.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitry V; Matrosov, Ivan I

    2016-06-08

    In the present work, an improved model of the Raman gas analyzer (RGA) of natural gas (NG) developed by us is described together with its operating principle. The sensitivity has been improved and the number of measurable gases has been expanded. Results of its approbation on a real NG sample are presented for different measurement times. A comparison of the data obtained with the results of chromatographic analysis demonstrates their good agreement. The time stability of the results obtained using this model is analyzed. It is experimentally established that the given RGA can reliably determine the content of all molecular NG components whose content exceeds 0.005% for 100 s; moreover, in this case the limiting sensitivity for some NG components is equal to 0.002%.

  18. Thermal and evolved gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Boynton, W. V.; James, R. L.; Verts, W. T.; Bailey, S. H.; Hamara, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument will perform calorimetry and evolved gas analysis on soil samples collected from the Martian surface. TEGA is one of three instruments, along with a robotic arm, that form the Mars Volatile and Climate Survey (MVACS) payload. The other instruments are a stereo surface imager, built by Peter Smith of the University of Arizona and a meteorological station, built by JPL. The MVACS lander will investigate a Martian landing site at approximately 70 deg south latitude. Launch will take place from Kennedy Space Center in January, 1999. The TEGA project started in February, 1996. In the intervening 24 months, a flight instrument concept has been designed, prototyped, built as an engineering model and flight model, and tested. The instrument performs laboratory-quality differential-scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range of Mars ambient to 1400K. Low-temperature volatiles (water and carbon dioxide ices) and the carbonates will be analyzed in this temperature range. Carbonates melt and evolve carbon dioxide at temperatures above 600 C. Evolved oxygen (down to a concentration of 1 ppm) is detected, and C02 and water vapor and the isotopic variations of C02 and water vapor are detected and their concentrations measured. The isotopic composition provides important tests of the theory of solar system formation.

  19. Effect of the hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier HBOC-201 on laboratory instrumentation: cobas integra, chiron blood gas analyzer 840, Sysmex SE-9000 and BCT.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A; Peek, D; Scholten, R; Moreira, P; Gawryl, M; Clark, T; Westerhuis, L

    1999-01-01

    As part of a clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of the hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrier (HBOC) HBOC-201 (an ultrapurified, stroma-free bovine hemoglobin product, Biopure, Cambridge, MA, USA) on our routine clinical chemistry analyzer (Cobas Integra, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland ), blood gas analyzer (Chiron 840, Chiron Diagnostics Corporation, East Walpole, MA, USA), routine hemocytometry analyzer (Sysmex SE-9000, TOA Medical Electronics Co Ltd., Kobe, Japan), hemostasis analyzer (BCT, Dade-Behring, Marburg, Germany) and bloodbanking system (Dia-Med-ID Micro Typing System, DiaMed AG, Cressier, Switzerland). The maximum tested concentration of HBOC-201 was 65 g/l. Of the 27 routine clinical chemistry tests challenged with HBOC-201, bilirubin-direct, creatine kinase MB-fraction (CK-MB), creatine kinase (CK), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), magnesium and uric acid were influenced by even low concentrations of HBOC-201. These tests were excluded from use on the plasma of patients treated with HBOC-201. Since the non-availability of the cardiac marker CK-MB may lead to problems in acute situations, we introduced the qualitative Trop T-test (Boehringer Mannheim), which was not influenced. The applicability of another nine tests was limited by the concentration of the HBOC-201 in the patients' plasma. No interference of HBOC-201 in routine hemocytometry, hemostasis-analysis and red-blood cell agglutination detection (blood-bank tests) was observed. Although immediate patient-care was not compromised, routine use of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers will have a strong impact on logistical management. The development of robust laboratory tests free from the interference of the pigmented oxygen carriers should therefore precede its introduction into routine transfusion medicine.

  20. Deuterium Gas Analysis by Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shukla, R.; Das, R.; Shyam, A.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen gas is generated by electrolysis method in a compact hydrogen generator. A simple procedure reduces handling and storage of hydrogen cylinders for laboratory applications. In such a system, we are producing deuterium gas from heavy water by electrolysis method. After production of the deuterium gas, we have checked the purity level of the outgoing deuterium from the electrolyser. The test was carried out in a high vacuum system in which one residual gas analyser (RGA) was mounted. The deuterium gas was inserted by one manual gas leak valve in to the vacuum system. In this study, the effect of the emission current of the RGA on the detection of the deuterium was performed. In this paper, we will discuss the detail analysis of the deuterium gas and the effect of the emission current on the partial pressure measurement.

  1. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; McKay, David S.

    1997-01-01

    The instrument consists of five subsystems: (1) a programmable furnace which can be loaded with samples of regolith, (2) a mass spectrometer which detects and measures atmospheric gases or gases evolved during heating, (3) a tank of pressurized gas which can be introduced to the regolith material while detecting and measuring volatile reaction products, (4) a mechanism for dumping the regolith sample and repeating the experiment on a fresh sample, and (5) a data system which controls and monitors the furnace, gas system, and mass spectrometer.

  2. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; McKay, David S.

    1997-01-01

    The instrument consists of five subsystems: (1) a programmable furnace which can be loaded with samples of regolith, (2) a mass spectrometer which detects and measures atmospheric gases or gases evolved during heating, (3) a tank of pressurized gas which can be introduced to the regolith material while detecting and measuring volatile reaction products, (4) a mechanism for dumping the regolith sample and repeating the experiment on a fresh sample, and (5) a data system which controls and monitors the furnace, gas system, and mass spectrometer.

  3. Multiple-tracer gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

  4. Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a computer-aided drawing of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers.

  6. LED-based NDIR natural gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanchenko, Sergey; Baranov, Alexander; Savkin, Alexey; Sleptsov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photodiodes (PDs) was used recently to develop an open path non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) methane analyzer. The first open path detector prototype was constructed using LEDs for measurement and reference channels, accordingly, and first measurements for methane gas have been performed using optical paths of the order of several meters [3]. The natural gas consists of several first alkanes, mainly methane, and it is important to have a possibility of measuring all of them. In the present work we report the results of NDIR measurements for propane-butane mixture and new measurements of methane using LEDs for measurement and reference channels at 2300 and 1700 nm wavelengths, accordingly. The necessity of the double beam scheme is demonstrated and obtained results for methane and propane-butane mixture are compared.

  7. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by a...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid in...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid in...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid in...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid in...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid in...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by a...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by a...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a gas...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen in...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen in...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrogen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrogen in...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1430 - Carbon monoxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. 868.1430 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1430 Carbon monoxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon monoxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous oxide...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An enflurane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of enflurane...

  16. 46 CFR 148.420 - Flammable gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable gas analyzers. 148.420 Section 148.420... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.420 Flammable gas analyzers..., each vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas analyzer...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A halothane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of halothane...

  18. 46 CFR 148.420 - Flammable gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable gas analyzers. 148.420 Section 148.420... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.420 Flammable gas analyzers..., each vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas analyzer...

  19. 46 CFR 148.420 - Flammable gas analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable gas analyzers. 148.420 Section 148.420... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.420 Flammable gas analyzers..., each vessel transporting the material, other than an unmanned barge, must have on board a gas analyzer...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An enflurane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of enflurane...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous oxide...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A halothane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of halothane...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1500 Enflurane gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An enflurane gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A nitrous oxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitrous...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration... Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration... Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of...

  14. Development of an Infrared Fluorescent Gas Analyzer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClatchie, E. A.

    A prototype model low level carbon monoxide analyzer was developed using fluorescent cell and negative chopping techniques to achieve a device superior to state of art NDIR (Nondispersive infrared) analyzers in stability and cross-sensitivity to other gaseous species. It is clear that this type of analyzer has that capacity. The prototype…

  15. Development of an Infrared Fluorescent Gas Analyzer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClatchie, E. A.

    A prototype model low level carbon monoxide analyzer was developed using fluorescent cell and negative chopping techniques to achieve a device superior to state of art NDIR (Nondispersive infrared) analyzers in stability and cross-sensitivity to other gaseous species. It is clear that this type of analyzer has that capacity. The prototype…

  16. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration... Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin... hemoglobin in blood to aid in determining the patient's physiological status. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. Sonic gas analyzer for microbiological metabolic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horta, Miguel A.; Garrett, Steven

    2005-09-01

    A differential open-pipe resonator was built to track changes in gas-mixture concentration. A single miniature loudspeaker simultaneously drives two adjacent ducts at resonance and 180 deg out of phase. The resonant frequency is tracked with a phase-locked loop, using the difference signal from two electret microphones whose sensitivities are balanced by adjustment of the preamplifier gains to provide common-mode rejection of extraneous noise sources (for example, a magnetic stirrer) within the bioreactor. A small change of the gas concentration produces a proportional change of the driving frequency for a given binary mix of gases. This sensor is designed to measure the production of hydrogen or methane from metabolic processes of anaerobic bacteria. Results from an initial set of experiments using helium injection and hydrogen release from a HCl+Zn reaction will be presented. [For Engineering Acoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  18. 21 CFR 868.1690 - Nitrogen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gas chromatography or mass spectrometry. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen gas analyzer. 868.1690 Section 868.1690...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1690 Nitrogen gas analyzer....

  19. A gas filter correlation analyzer for methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.

    1978-01-01

    A fast-response instrument for monitoring CH4 was designed and tested using a modified nondispersive infrared technique. An analysis of the single-beam rotating-cell system is presented along with the signal processing circuit. A calibration of the instrument shows that the technique can be used to measure CH4 concentrations as small as 5 ppm-m and the effects of interfering gases are analyzed.

  20. [Central venous blood gas analysis].

    PubMed

    Marano, Marco; D'Amato, Anna; Guiotto, Giovanna; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The hemodialysis might interfere with patients hemodynamic, as the technique allows a sophisticated game with extra and intravascular fluids. As the cardiocirculatory response could sometimes be unpredictable, it is interesting to collect valuable information by reaching a deep understanding of the tissue metabolism which is mirrored by the blood gas analysis of variations in arterial and central venous blood samples. Particularly interesting are the time course variations of the central venous hemoglobin saturation (ScvO2), which are directly related to the patient with O2-demand as well as to the O2-Delivery (DO2). The ScvO2 is determined by four parameters (cardiac output, Hb concentration, arterial Hb saturation and O2 consumption): If the fluids subtraction during dialysis was about to determine an occult hypoperfusion, the ScvO2 reduction would be a timely warning sign to be considered. Moreover, while the normal veno-arterial PCO2 difference is 2-4 mmHg, whenever a mismatch between O2-demand and DO2arise, a larger v-aPCO2 difference should be observed.

  1. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1620 Halothane gas analyzer....

  2. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1700 - Nitrous oxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. 868.1700 Section 868.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1700 Nitrous oxide gas analyzer. (a...

  4. Sensor gas analyzer for acetone determination in expired air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vitaly V.

    2001-05-01

    Diseases and changes in the way of life change the concentration and composition of the expired air. Our adaptable gas analyzer is intended for the selective analysis of expired air and can be adapted for the solution of current diagnostic and analytical tasks by the user (a physician or a patient). Having analyzed the existing trends in the development of noninvasive diagnostics we have chosen the method of noninvasive acetone detection in expired air, where the acetone concentration correlates with blood and urine glucose concentrations. The appearance of acetone in expired air is indicative of disorders that may be caused not only by diabetes but also be wrong diet, incorrect sportsmen training etc. To control the disorders one should know the acetone concentration in the human body. This knowledge allows one to judge upon the state of the patient, choose a correct diet that will not cause damage to the patient's health, determine sportsmen training efficiency and results and solve the artificial pancreas problem. Our device provide highly accurate analysis, rapid diagnostics and authentic acetone quantification in the patient's body at any time aimed at prediction of the patient's state and assessing the efficiency of the therapy used. Clinical implementation of the device will improve the health and save lives of many thousands of diabetes sufferers.

  5. Arterial and venous blood gas analyses.

    PubMed

    Rieser, Teresa M

    2013-08-01

    Arterial and venous blood gases provide useful information regarding pulmonary function as well as acid-base balance. The goal of this article is to discuss the collection of blood gases, common errors in analysis, and what information can be gleaned from a blood gas analysis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 868.1500 - Enflurane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enflurane gas analyzer. 868.1500 Section 868.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... anesthetic in a gas mixture. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. Rapid evaluation of fibrinogen levels using the CG02N whole blood coagulation analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi; Ono, Yuichi; Mizugaki, Asumi; Katabami, Kenichi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Miyamoto, Daisuke; Wada, Takeshi; Yanagida, Yuichiro; Sawamura, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Rapid evaluation of fibrinogen (Fbg) levels is essential for maintaining homeostasis in patients with massive bleeding during severe trauma and major surgery. This study evaluated the accuracy of fibrinogen levels measured by the CG02N whole blood coagulation analyzer (A&T Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan) using heparinized blood drawn for blood gas analysis (whole blood-Fbg). A total of 100 matched pairs of heparinized blood samples and citrated blood samples were simultaneously collected from patients in the intensive care unit. Whole blood-Fbg results were compared with those of citrated plasma (standard-Fbg). The whole blood coagulation analyzer measured fibrinogen levels within 2 minutes. Strong correlations between standard-Fbg and whole blood-Fbg were observed (ρ = 0.91, p < 0.001). Error grid analysis showed that 88% of the values were clinically acceptable, and 12% were in a range with possible effects on clinical decision-making; none were in a clinically dangerous range without appropriate treatment. Using a fibrinogen cutoff value of 1.5 g/L for standard-Fbg, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of whole blood-Fbg was 0.980 (95% confidence interval 0.951-1.000, p < 0.001). The whole blood coagulation analyzer can rapidly measure fibrinogen levels in heparinized blood and could be useful in critical care settings where excessive bleeding is a concern.

  8. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. Select span gases for the species being continuously combined, other... air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify multiple analyzers at...

  11. Clinical assessment of intraarterial blood gas monitor accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Salim; Spiess, R.; Roby, Paul; Kenny, Margaret

    1993-08-01

    The accuracy of intraarterial blood gas monitoring (IABGM) devices is challenging to assess under routine clinical conditions. When comparing discrete measurements by blood gas analyzer (BGA) to IABGM values, it is important that the BGA determinations (reference method) be as accurate as possible. In vitro decay of gas tensions caused by delay in BGA analysis is particularly problematic for specimens with high arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) values. Clinical instability of blood gases in the acutely ill patient may cause disagreement between BGA and IABGM values because of IABGM response time lag, particularly in the measurement of arterial blood carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). We recommend that clinical assessments of IABGM accuracy by comparison with BGA use multiple bedside BGA instruments, and that blood sampling only occur during periods when IABGM values appear stable.

  12. Raman analyzer for sensitive natural gas composition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rachit; Poonacha, Samhitha; Bekal, Anish; Vartak, Sameer; Weling, Aniruddha; Tilak, Vinayak; Mitra, Chayan

    2016-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is of significant importance in industrial gas analysis due to its unique capability of quantitative multigas measurement, especially diatomics (N2 and H2), with a single laser. This paper presents the development of a gas analyzer system based on high pressure Raman scattering in a multipass Raman cell and demonstrates its feasibility for real-time natural gas analysis. A 64-pass Raman cell operated at elevated pressure (5 bar) is used to create multiplicative enhancement (proportional to number of passes times pressure) of the natural gas Raman signal. A relatively low power 532-nm continuous wave laser beam (200 mW) is used as the source and the signals are measured through a cooled charge-coupled device grating spectrometer (30-s exposure). A hybrid algorithm based on background-correction and least-squares error minimization is used to estimate gas concentrations. Individual gas component concentration repeatability of the order of 0.1% is demonstrated. Further, the applicability of the technique for natural gas analysis is demonstrated through measurements on calibrated gas mixtures. Experimental details, analyzer characterization, and key measurements are presented to demonstrate the performance of the technique.

  13. Studies of deionization and impedance spectroscopy for blood analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Charlotte C.; Li, Nan; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2005-11-01

    Blood analysis provides vital information for health conditions. For instance, typical infection response is correlated to an elevated White Blood Cell (WBC) count, while low Red Blood Cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin and hematocrit are caused by anemia or internal bleeding. We are developing two essential modules, deionization (DI) chip and microfluidic cytometer with impedance spectroscopy flow, for enabling the realization of a single platform miniaturized blood analyzer. In the proposed analyzer, blood cells are preliminarily sorted by Dielectrophoretic (DEP) means into sub-groups, differentiated and counted by impedance spectroscopy in a flow cytometer. DEP techniques have been demonstrated to stretch DNA, align Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) and trap cells successfully. However, DEP manipulation does not function in biological media with high conductivity. The DI module is designed to account for this challenge. H Filter will serve as an ion extraction platform in a microchamber. Sample and buffer do not mix well in micro scale allowing the ions being extracted by diffusion without increasing the volume. This can keep the downstream processing time short. Micro scale hydrodynamic focusing is employed to place single cell passing along the central plane of the flow cytometer module. By applying an AC electrical field, suspended cells are polarized, membrane capacitance C m, cytoplasm conductivity σ c, and cytoplasm permittivity ɛ c will vary as functions of frequency. Tracing back the monitored current, the numbers of individual cell species can be evaluated.

  14. Point-of-care, portable microfluidic blood analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Teimour; Fricke, Todd; Quesenberry, J. T.; Todd, Paul W.; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in MEMS technology have provided an opportunity to develop microfluidic devices with enormous potential for portable, point-of-care, low-cost medical diagnostic tools. Hand-held flow cytometers will soon be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. Despite much interest in miniaturizing commercially available cytometers, they remain costly, bulky, and require expert operation. In this article, we report progress on the development of a battery-powered handheld blood analyzer that will quickly and automatically process a drop of whole human blood by real-time, on-chip magnetic separation of white blood cells (WBCs), fluorescence analysis of labeled WBC subsets, and counting a reproducible fraction of the red blood cells (RBCs) by light scattering. The whole blood (WB) analyzer is composed of a micro-mixer, a special branching/separation system, an optical detection system, and electronic readout circuitry. A droplet of un-processed blood is mixed with the reagents, i.e. magnetic beads and fluorescent stain in the micro-mixer. Valve-less sorting is achieved by magnetic deflection of magnetic microparticle-labeled WBC. LED excitation in combination with an avalanche photodiode (APD) detection system is used for counting fluorescent WBC subsets using several colors of immune-Qdots, while counting a reproducible fraction of red blood cells (RBC) is performed using a laser light scatting measurement with a photodiode. Optimized branching/channel width is achieved using Comsol Multi-Physics™ simulation. To accommodate full portability, all required power supplies (40v, +/-10V, and +3V) are provided via step-up voltage converters from one battery. A simple onboard lock-in amplifier is used to increase the sensitivity/resolution of the pulse counting circuitry.

  15. Undisplayed Bicarbonate ion Concentration in Arterial Blood Gas Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Aditya Balakrishna; Bhalkar, Manjiri Shashank

    2013-12-01

    Blood bicarbonate ion concentration (BcHCO3 (-)) is a vital parameter in the management of acid base disorders. In an arterial blood gas (ABG) analyzer, the BcHCO3 (-) is calculated from the values of pH and pCO2. We received four samples in a span of one year, from December 2011 to November 2012 for arterial blood gas analysis, in which the BcHCO3 (-) was not displayed by the blood gas analyzer. Based on the information available in literature, the formula for calculating the BcHCO3 (-) from pH and pCO2 was obtained and BcHCO3 (-) was calculated in all four samples mentioned above. An attempt was made to establish a clinical correlation between laboratory and clinical data of these patients. All these values of BcHCO3 (-) were above the maximum display limit of our blood gas analyzer, which was 60 mmol/L and hence, they were not displayed. All four patients had chronic respiratory disease and they were taking furosemide and / or dexamethasone. High values of BcHCO3 (-) , sometimes falling beyond the display range of the ABG analyzer, could be observed in patients of chronic respiratory disease, treated with drugs like furosemide and dexamethasone, that result in bicarbonate retention.

  16. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoli

    2004-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas analyzer can be widely used in many fields. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on infrared ray (IR) absorption is presented sufficiently in this paper. Applying Lambert-Beer Law, a novel space-double-beam optical structure is established successfully. The optical structure includes an IR source, a gas cell, a bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 4.26 μm, another bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 3.9 μm, and two IR detectors. Based on Redial Basic Function (RBF) artificial neural network, the measuring model of IR CO 2 analyzer is established with a high accuracy. A dynamic compensation filter is effectively designed to improve the dynamic characteristic of the IR CO 2 analyzer without gas pump. The IR CO 2 analyzer possesses the advantages of high accuracy and mechanical reliability with small volume, lightweight, and low-power consumption. Therefore, it can be used in such relevant fields as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  17. Safe Reduction of Blood Volume in the Blood Gas Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Phillip R; Markewitz, Boaz A

    2016-11-01

    Phlebotomy is a significant cause of iatrogenic anemia in the critical care environment. It is estimated that one-third of all transfusions of packed red blood cells in intensive care units (ICU) result from phlebotomy. The aims of this study were to determine if utilizing the 1mL blood gas syringe for an adult population would impact the rate at which specimens were acceptable for testing and result reporting based on lab specimen rejection criteria; and to compare blood utilization between the 2 different syringes. This study was conducted in 1 of the adult ICUs at the University of Utah Hospital. Over a baseline period a standard adult 3 mL blood gas syringe was utilized. Subsequently the standard adult syringe was replaced by a 1 mL syringe produced by the same manufacturer with the same heparin concentration. The change to the 1 mL syringe had no effect on specimen integrity in regards to laboratory's ability to process the specimen. With use of the 1 mL syringe there was a 60% reduction in the volume of blood drawn compared with the baseline period. Standardizing the 1 mL syringe for Blood Gas Laboratory tests will reduce patient blood loss without appreciably affecting specimen rejection relative to current rates. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Program for computing partial pressures from residual gas analyzer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, D. S.; Giles, C. A.; Merriman, S. H.; Clausing, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for determining the partial pressures of various gases from residual-gas-analyzer data is given. The analysis of the ion currents of 18 m/e spectrometer peaks allows the determination of 12 gases simultaneously. Comparison is made to ion-gage readings along with certain other control information. The output data are presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  19. 21 CFR 868.1620 - Halothane gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Halothane gas analyzer. 868.1620 Section 868.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... infrared or ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. Performance of a blood chemistry analyzer during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, Brian S.; Claassen, Dale E.; Guikema, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of the Vision System Blood Analyzer during parabolic flight on a KC-135 aircraft (NASA 930) has been tested. This fully automated instrument performed flawlessly in these trials, demonstrating its potential for efficient, reliable use in a microgravity environment. In addition to instrument capability, it is demonstrated that investigators could readily fill specially modified test packs with fluid during zero gravity, and that filled test packs could be easily loaded into VISION during an episode of microgravity.

  1. Performance of a blood chemistry analyzer during parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Spooner, B S; Claassen, D E; Guikema, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have tested the performance of the VISION System Blood Analyzer, produced by Abbott Laboratories, during parabolic flight on a KC-135 aircraft (NASA 930). This fully automated instrument performed flawlessly in these trials, demonstrating its potential for efficient, reliable use in a microgravity environment. In addition to instrument capability, we demonstrated that investigators could readily fill specially modified test packs with fluid during zero gravity, and that filled test packs could be easily loaded into VISION during an episode of microgravity.

  2. Blood gas analysis for bedside diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virendra; Khatana, Shruti; Gupta, Pranav

    2013-07-01

    Arterial blood gas is an important routine investigation to monitor the acid-base balance of patients, effectiveness of gas exchange, and the state of their voluntary respiratory control. Majority of the oral and maxillofacial surgeons find it difficult to interpret and clinically correlate the arterial blood gas report in their everyday practice. This has led to underutilization of this simple tool. The present article aims to simplify arterial blood gas analysis for a rapid and easy bedside interpretation. In context of oral and maxillofacial surgery, arterial blood gas analysis plays a vital role in the monitoring of postoperative patients, patients receiving oxygen therapy, those on intensive support, or with maxillofacial trauma with significant blood loss, sepsis, and comorbid conditions like diabetes, kidney disorders, Cardiovascular system (CVS) conditions, and so on. The value of this analysis is limited by the understanding of the basic physiology and ability of the surgeon to interpret the report. Using a systematic and logical approach by using these steps would make the interpretation simple and easy to use for oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

  3. Blood gas analysis for bedside diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Khatana, Shruti; Gupta, Pranav

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas is an important routine investigation to monitor the acid-base balance of patients, effectiveness of gas exchange, and the state of their voluntary respiratory control. Majority of the oral and maxillofacial surgeons find it difficult to interpret and clinically correlate the arterial blood gas report in their everyday practice. This has led to underutilization of this simple tool. The present article aims to simplify arterial blood gas analysis for a rapid and easy bedside interpretation. In context of oral and maxillofacial surgery, arterial blood gas analysis plays a vital role in the monitoring of postoperative patients, patients receiving oxygen therapy, those on intensive support, or with maxillofacial trauma with significant blood loss, sepsis, and comorbid conditions like diabetes, kidney disorders, Cardiovascular system (CVS) conditions, and so on. The value of this analysis is limited by the understanding of the basic physiology and ability of the surgeon to interpret the report. Using a systematic and logical approach by using these steps would make the interpretation simple and easy to use for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. PMID:24665166

  4. Early blood gas abnormalities and the preterm brain.

    PubMed

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C K; Dammann, Olaf; O'Shea, T Michael; Hirtz, Deborah; Schreiber, Michael D; Paneth, Nigel

    2010-10-15

    The authors explored associations between blood gas abnormalities in more than 1,000 preterm infants during the first postnatal days and indicators of neonatal brain damage. During 2002-2004, women delivering infants before 28 weeks' gestation at one of 14 participating institutions in 5 US states were asked to enroll in the study. The authors compared infants with blood gas values in the highest or lowest quintile for gestational age and postnatal day (extreme value) on at least 1 of the first 3 postnatal days with the remainder of the subjects, with separate analyses for blood gas abnormalities on multiple days and for partial pressure of oxygen in the alveolar gas of <35. Outcomes analyzed were ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion on an ultrasound scan in the neonatal intensive care unit, and cerebral palsy, microcephaly, and a low score on a Bayley Scale of Infant Development at 24 months. Every blood gas derangement (hypoxemia, hyperoxemia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and acidosis) was associated with multiple indicators of brain damage. However, for some, the associations were seen with only 1 day of exposure; others were evident with 2 or more days' exposure. Findings suggest that individual blood gas derangements do not increase brain damage risk. Rather, the multiple derangements associated with indicators of brain damage might be indicators of immaturity/vulnerability and illness severity.

  5. Early Blood Gas Abnormalities and the Preterm Brain

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Dammann, Olaf; O'Shea, T. Michael; Hirtz, Deborah; Schreiber, Michael D.; Paneth, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored associations between blood gas abnormalities in more than 1,000 preterm infants during the first postnatal days and indicators of neonatal brain damage. During 2002–2004, women delivering infants before 28 weeks’ gestation at one of 14 participating institutions in 5 US states were asked to enroll in the study. The authors compared infants with blood gas values in the highest or lowest quintile for gestational age and postnatal day (extreme value) on at least 1 of the first 3 postnatal days with the remainder of the subjects, with separate analyses for blood gas abnormalities on multiple days and for partial pressure of oxygen in the alveolar gas of <35. Outcomes analyzed were ventriculomegaly and an echolucent lesion on an ultrasound scan in the neonatal intensive care unit, and cerebral palsy, microcephaly, and a low score on a Bayley Scale of Infant Development at 24 months. Every blood gas derangement (hypoxemia, hyperoxemia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and acidosis) was associated with multiple indicators of brain damage. However, for some, the associations were seen with only 1 day of exposure; others were evident with 2 or more days’ exposure. Findings suggest that individual blood gas derangements do not increase brain damage risk. Rather, the multiple derangements associated with indicators of brain damage might be indicators of immaturity/vulnerability and illness severity. PMID:20807736

  6. Preanalytical considerations in blood gas analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Blood gas testing is a commonly ordered test in hospital settings, where the results almost always have the potential to dictate an immediate or urgent response. The preanalytical steps in testing, from choosing the correct tests to ensuring the specimen is introduced into the instrument correctly, must be perfectly coordinated to ensure that the patient receives appropriate and timely therapy in response to the analytical results. While many of the preanalytical steps in blood gas testing are common to all laboratory tests, such as accurate specimen labeling, some are unique to this testing because of the physicochemical properties of the analytes being measured. The common sources of preanalytical variation in blood gas testing are reviewed here. PMID:23457763

  7. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuous gas analyzer system... species. 1065.309 Section 1065.309 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309...

  8. Expert Assistant For A Clinical Hematology Blood Cell Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Carole; Navlakha, Jainendra K.

    1989-03-01

    The COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments are automated clinical hematology blood cell analyzers which measure the count, volume and population distribution of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, and hemoglobin from patient blood samples. In the clinical laboratory environment, instrument startup consists of a number of component and system checks to assure proper operation and calibration to insure reliable results are produced on patient samples. If a startup check fails, troubleshooting procedures are provided to assist the operator in determining the cause of the error. Troubleshooting requires expertise in instrument operation, troubleshooting procedures and evaluation of the data produced. This expert system is designed and developed to assist the startup diagnostics of COULTER COUNTER Model S Plus Series instruments. The system reads data produced by the instrument and validates it against expected values. If the values are not all correct, then the troubleshooting starts. Troubleshooting is handled for the most common subsystem problems and those which the operator has the equipment and knowledge to handle, problems that are cheapest to fix and problems that are quickest to fix. The expert system restarts the startup sequence whenever troubleshooting has been successful or recommends calling Customer Service when unsuccessful.

  9. Polarized 3He Gas Circulating Technologies for Neutron Analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, David; Hersman, Bill

    2014-12-10

    We describe the development of an integrated system for quasi-continuous operation of a large volume neutron analyzer. The system consists of a non-magnetic diaphragm compressor, a prototype large volume helium polarizer, a surrogate neutron analyzer, a non-depolarizing gas storage reservoir, a non-ferrous valve manifold for handling gas distribution, a custom rubidium-vapor gas return purifier, and wire-wound transfer lines, all of which are immersed in a two-meter external magnetic field. Over the Phase II period we focused on three major tasks required for the successful deployment of these types of systems: 1) design and implementation of gas handling hardware, 2) automation for long-term operation, and 3) improvements in polarizer performance, specifically fabrication of aluminosilicate optical pumping cells. In this report we describe the design, implementation, and testing of the gas handling hardware. We describe improved polarizer performance resulting from improved cell materials and fabrication methods. These improvements yielded valved 8.5 liter cells with relaxation times greater than 12 hours. Pumping this cell with 1500W laser power with 1.25nm linewidth yielded peak polarizations of 60%, measured both inside and outside the polarizer. Fully narrowing this laser to 0.25nm, demonstrated separately on one stack of the four, would have allowed 70% polarization with this cell. We demonstrated the removal of 5 liters of polarized helium from the polarizer with no measured loss of polarization. We circulated the gas through a titanium-clad compressor with polarization loss below 3% per pass. We also prepared for the next phase of development by refining the design of the polarizer so that it can be engineer-certified for pressurized operation. The performance of our system far exceeds comparable efforts elsewhere.

  10. Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer for Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander carries an instrument to heat and sniff samples of Martian soil and ice to analyze some ingredients.

    The Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer will study substances that are converted to gases by heating samples delivered to this instrument by the lander's robotic arm. It provides two types of information. One of its tools, called a differential scanning calorimeter (on the left in this photograph) monitors how much power is required to increase the temperature of the sample at a constant rate. This reveals which temperatures are transition points from solid to liquid and from liquid to gas for ingredients in the sample. The gases that are released, or 'evolved' by this heating then go to a mass spectrometer (on the right), a tool that can identify the chemicals.

  11. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  12. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1997-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGA's are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. This ion concentration information can be interpreted to be representative of the composition of the residual gas in the chamber at the instant of analysis. Typically, test personnel are most interested in tracking the time history of changes in the composition of chamber residual gas to determine the relative cleanliness and the clean-up rate of the test article under vacuum. However, displays of instantaneous RGA data cannot provide test personnel with the preferred time history information. In order to gain an understanding of gas composition trends, a series of plots of individual data snapshots must be analyzed. This analysis is cumbersome and still does not provide a very satisfactory view of residual gas composition trends. A method was devised by the authors to present RCA data in a three-axis format, plotting Atomic Mass Unit (AMU), the Ionization Signal Response (ISR) as amps/torr as a function of AMU, and Time, to provide a clear graphic visualization of trends of changes in ISR with respect to time and AMU (representative of residual gas composition). This graphic visualization method provides a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal vacuum tests. Raw RGA data was extracted from a series of delimited ASCII files and then converted to a data array in a spreadsheet. Consequently, using the 3-D plotting functionality provided by the spreadsheet program, 3-D plots were produced. After devising the data format conversion process, the authors began developing a program to provide real-time 3-D

  13. Inert gas transport in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Baker, A Barry; Farmery, Andrew D

    2011-04-01

    This article establishes the basic mathematical models and the principles and assumptions used for inert gas transfer within body tissues-first, for a single compartment model and then for a multicompartment model. From these, and other more complex mathematical models, the transport of inert gases between lungs, blood, and other tissues is derived and compared to known experimental studies in both animals and humans. Some aspects of airway and lung transfer are particularly important to the uptake and elimination of inert gases, and these aspects of gas transport in tissues are briefly described. The most frequently used inert gases are those that are administered in anesthesia, and the specific issues relating to the uptake, transport, and elimination of these gases and vapors are dealt with in some detail showing how their transfer depends on various physical and chemical attributes, particularly their solubilities in blood and different tissues. Absorption characteristics of inert gases from within gas cavities or tissue bubbles are described, and the effects other inhaled gas mixtures have on the composition of these gas cavities are discussed. Very brief consideration is given to the effects of hyper- and hypobaric conditions on inert gas transport.

  14. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood-gas study as evidence that the miner was totally disabled at death. (e) In the case of a deceased... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section...-gas studies. (a) Blood-gas studies are performed to detect an impairment in the process of...

  15. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T R; Biewer, T M; Klepper, C C; Marcus, C

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  16. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  17. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  18. Assessment of a portable clinical blood analyzer during space flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Davis-Street, J E; Fontenot, T B; Lane, H W

    1997-06-01

    This study was designed to validate the utility of a commercial portable clinical blood analyzer (PCBA) in ground-based studies and on the space shuttle. Ionized calcium, pH, electrolytes, glucose, and hematocrit were determined. Results agreed well with those from traditional laboratory methods, and the PCBA demonstrated good between-day precision for all analytes. In-flight analysis of control samples revealed differences in one analyte (sodium). There were few changes in crew members' results during flight, and these were expected. Potassium increased in flight compared with before flight, and potassium, pH, and hematocrit decreased after flight. Ionized calcium was decreased in flight and on landing day. Changes during flight were likely related to sample collection technique. Postflight changes likely reflected the fluid redistribution that occurs after exposure to weightlessness. These data confirm that the PCBA is a reliable instrument for most analytes, and can provide important medical data in remote locations, such as orbiting spacecraft.

  19. Comparison of two analyzers to determine selected venous blood analytes of Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Rettenmund, Christy L; Heatley, J Jill; Russell, Karen E

    2014-06-01

    Point of care devices can assess electrolyte, blood gas, biochemical, and hematologic values in a critical care setting. Although these devices are commonly used in humans and companion mammals, few studies have assessed their use in avian species. This study compares electrolyte, hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), acid-base, and venous blood gas parameters between the i-STAT and IRMA TruPoint blood gas analysis systems for 35 Quaker parrots. Agreement between the two analyzers and the effect of gender, time lag between sample analysis, and cartridge expiration were evaluated. Male birds had increased Hgb and Hct compared with females, independent of analyzer method. In expired i-STAT cartridges, only glucose significantly increased. Packed cell volume determined by centrifugation was higher than Hct, as calculated by either analyzer. The analyzers had good agreement for total carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, pH, and Hgb, fair agreement for potassium (K), ionized calcium (iCa), venous partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and base excess, and poor agreement for sodium (Na), venous partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), and oxygen saturation (SO2). Values for Na, iCa, PO2, and SO2 were significantly higher on the IRMA than the i-STAT, while K was significantly lower on the IRMA when compared with the i-STAT. The time lag between sample analyses on the i-STAT and IRMA did not be correlate to any analyte changes. Despite these differences, both the i-STAT and the IRMA appear to be acceptable clinical tools in avian critical care, although reference ranges for each analyzer should be created.

  20. Phoenix Mars Mission--the thermal evolved gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, John H; Chaney, Roy C; Hammack, Hilton

    2008-10-01

    The Phoenix spacecraft that was launched to Mars in August 2007 landed safely on the Martian northern arctic region on May 25, 2008. It carried six experiments to study the history of water on the planet and search for organic molecules in the icy subsurface Martian soil. The spacecraft is a lander with an arm and scoop designed to dig a trench though the top soil to reach an expected ice layer near the surface. One of the instruments on board is the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA), which consists of two components, a set of eight very small ovens that will heat samples of the ice soil mixtures from the trench to release imbedded gases and mineral decomposition products, and a mass spectrometer that serves as the analysis tool for the evolved gases, and also for measurements of the composition and isotopic ratios of the gases that comprise the atmosphere of Mars. The mass spectrometer is a miniature magnetic sector instrument controlled by microprocessor-driven power supplies. One feature is the gas enrichment cell that will increase the partial pressures of the noble gases in an atmosphere sample by removing all the active gases, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen, to improve the accuracy of their isotopic ratio measurements.

  1. INGAS: Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System for radioxenon measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost-Mohammadi, V.; Afarideh, H.; Etaati, G. R.; Safari, M. J.; Rouhi, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, Iranian Noble Gas Analyzing System (INGAS) will be introduced. This system is based on beta-gamma coincidence technique and consists of a well-type NaI(Tl) as gamma or X radiation detector and a cylindrical plastic scintillator to detect beta or conversion electron. Standard NIM modules were utilized to detect coincidence events of detectors. Both the beta and gamma detectors were appropriately calibrated. The efficiency curve of gamma detector for volume geometry was obtained by comparing the results of gamma point sources measurements and simulations of GATE V7.0 Monte Carlo code. The performance of detection system was checked by injection of 222Rn and 131mXe gaseous source in the detection cell. The minimum detectable activity of the system for 133Xe is 1.240±0.024 mBq for 24 h measurement time.

  2. Analyzing the influence of combustion gas on a gas turbine by radiation thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Kipngetich, Ketui Daniel

    2015-11-01

    High temperature is the main focus in ongoing development of gas turbines. With increasing turbine inlet temperature, turbine blades undergo complex thermal and structural loading subjecting them to large thermal gradients and, consequently, severe thermal stresses and strain. In order to improve the reliability, safety, and service life of blades, accurate measurement of turbine blade temperature is necessary. A gas turbine can generate high-temperature and high-pressure gas that interferes greatly with radiation from turbine blades. In addition, if the gas along the optical path is not completely transparent, blade temperature measurement is subject to significant measurement error in the gas absorption spectrum. In this study, we analyze gas turbine combustion gases using the κ-distribution method combined with the HITEMP and HITRAN databases to calculate the transmission and emissivity of mixed gases. We propose spectral window methods to analyze the radiation characteristics of high-temperature gas under different spectral ranges, which can be used to select the wavelengths used in multispectral temperature measurement on turbine blades and estimate measurement error in the part of the spectrum with smaller influence (transmission > 0.98).

  3. Comparison of Gas Analyzers for Eddy Covariance: Effects of Analyzer Type and Spectral Corrections on Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonik, P.; Chan, S.; Biraud, S.; Billesbach, D. P.; Bogoev, I.; Conrad, B.; Nottrott, A.; Burba, G. G.; Li, J.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance is widely used to study the exchange of energy and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. The technique requires simultaneous high frequency measurements of three-dimensional wind components and scalars (e.g. water vapor, carbon dioxide). Scalar-measuring sensors can be grouped into open, closed, and enclosed path instruments depending on the length of their inlet tubes (no tube, long tube, and short tube respectively). Open and closed path instruments each have their own benefits and difficulties, so short inlet instruments were recently developed as a hybrid in an attempt to capitalize on the benefits of both. For this study, AmeriFlux deployed five gas analyzers over an irrigated alfalfa field in Davis, CA: open-path LI-COR 7500A, enclosed-path LI-COR 7200, closed-path Picarro G2311-f, open-path Campbell Scientific IRGASON, and enclosed-path Campbell Scientific EC155. Mixing ratios from each analyzer were calculated (when necessary) and compared. By analyzing the power spectrum of each sensor's time series, we found that high frequency attenuation clearly corresponds to the length of the inlet tube. We also paired analyzers with sonic anemometers to calculate integrated fluxes from a cone of wind directions where flow distortion from instrument design and setup was minimal. Without applying spectral corrections, carbon dioxide fluxes generally compared well between sensors (mean difference <5%, max difference 9%), while water vapor fluxes exhibited larger differences (mean difference <13%, max difference 34%) due to tube effects. We found that the water vapor flux comparison improved with the use of spectral corrections (e.g. Massman 2000, 2001; Fratini et al. 2012). The effect of the flux differences was also reflected in the cumulative fluxes over the study period. This direct intercomparison of sensors allowed us to assess the comparability of fluxes obtained using different sensors and correction methods. Information about the effects

  4. [A method of automated blood gas analysis].

    PubMed

    Szillat, P

    1990-01-01

    To determine the primary test parameters pH, pCO2 and pO2 one blood sample smaller than 250 microliters is necessary. In general the computer aided check of analyser's functions ensures a high quality of analytic. Nevertheless measurements can be erroneous. Therefore a control independent of the analyser's one is necessary. Blood equilibrated with defined test gases is recommended as control material for pCO2 and pO2 measurement. For control of pH measurement buffer solutions are to be used. The comparison of several analysers is an alternative method of quality control. The approximated validity of computed parameters is explained by the way of the examples oxygen saturation (O2sat) and oxygen concentration (cO2). To calculate them exactly some complemental informations (P0.5, cHb) would be needed. These informations can not be estimated by blood gas analysis. It is pointed to the different importance of the parameters pO2, O2sat and cO2 for evaluation of lung function and oxygen supply in tissue.

  5. A critical evaluation of automated blood gas measurements in comparative respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Jakobsen, Sashia Lindhøj; Wang, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    Precise measurements of blood gases and pH are of pivotal importance to respiratory physiology. However, the traditional electrodes that could be calibrated and maintained at the same temperature as the experimental animal are increasingly being replaced by new automated blood gas analyzers. These are typically designed for clinical use and automatically heat the blood sample to 37°C for measurements. While most blood gas analyzers allow for temperature corrections of the measurements, the underlying algorithms are based on temperature-effects for human blood, and any discrepancies in the temperature dependency between the blood sample from a given species and human samples will bias measurements. In this study we review the effects of temperature on blood gases and pH and evaluate the performance of an automated blood gas analyzer (GEM Premier 3500). Whole blood obtained from pythons and freshwater turtles was equilibrated in rotating Eschweiler tonometers to a variety of known P(O2)'s and P(CO2)'s in gas mixtures prepared by Wösthoff gas mixing pumps and blood samples were measured immediately on the GEM Premier 3500. The pH measurements were compared to measurements using a Radiometer BMS glass capillary pH electrode kept and calibrated at the experimental temperature. We show that while the blood gas analyzer provides reliable temperature-corrections for P(CO2) and pH, P(O2) measurements were substantially biased. This was in agreement with the theoretical considerations and emphasizes the need for critical calibrations/corrections when using automated blood gas analyzers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gas analyzers to detect nitrogen and sulfur oxides in the gas effluents from heat and electric power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbukin, Alexander A.; Buldakov, Michail A.; Korolev, Boris V.; Korolkov, Vladimir A.; Matrosov, Ivan I.

    1999-11-01

    Three kinds of gas analyzers designed for continuous monitoring of the sulfer and nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases of a power plant are described. The operation of gas analyzers is based on use of laserless UV sources and differential absorption method. High efficiency of gas analyzers developed has been demonstrated under industrial conditions.

  7. Influence of spurious hemolysis on blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Fontana, Rossana; Avanzini, Paola; Sandei, Franca; Ippolito, Luigi

    2013-08-01

    Although the prevalence of hemolyzed samples referred for blood gas analysis is as high as 4%, no studies have assessed the bias introduced by spurious erythrocyte breakdown, nor it is known which parameters are mostly influenced and to what extent. This study was hence planned to assess the influence of spurious hemolysis on venous blood gas analysis. Venous blood was collected from nine healthy volunteers in sodium heparin tubes and divided in two aliquots of 3 mL. The former aliquot was mechanically hemolyzed by aspiration with 0.5 mL insulin syringe equipped with 30 gauge needle. One milliliter of all aliquots was tested for hemoglobin, pH, oxygen partial pressure (pO₂), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO₂), bicarbonate (HCO³⁻), oxygen tension at 50% hemoglobin saturation (p50), oxygen saturation (sO₂), actual base excess (ABE), carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), methemoglobin (metHb), ionized calcium (Ca²⁺) and potassium, on ABL800 flex. The remaining 2 mL of blood were centrifuged, plasma separated and tested for hemolysis index. The concentration of cell-free hemoglobin increased from <0.5 g/L to 8.9±1.5 g/L in hemolyzed aliquots. In hemolyzed blood, significant decreases were found for pH (-0.2%), pO₂ (-4.9%), sO₂ (-4.9%), COHb (-11%) and Ca²⁺ (-7.0%), whereas significant increases were observed for pCO₂ (+4.1%), HCO³⁻ (+1.4%) and potassium (+152%). Clinically meaningful bias was found for pO₂, pCO₂, Ca²⁺ and potassium. Spurious hemolysis is likely to introduce meaningful biases in blood gas analysis, hence manufacturers of blood gas analyzers should develop instrumentation capable of identifying interfering substances in whole blood. The presence of spurious hemolysis should also be suspected whenever test results do not reflect the clinics.

  8. Undergraduate Contributions to Developing New Methods for Analyzing Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Mary L.

    1998-11-01

    At Loyola, undergraduate research is strongly encouraged for students at every stage in college. Since 1988, I have supervised undergraduates with different majors, different physics backgrounds, different grade point averages, and different maturity levels. Their contributions to three experiments will be described. The first student measured the index of refraction of the walls of a tube used to study flows in curved, macroscopic ducts at Reynolds numbers matching arterial blood flow. A second student made preliminary measurements of flows in microfabricated venular bifurcations using confocal microscopy. A third group of students tested optical flow algorithms on digital images of flows in microscopic tubes with latex beads as tracers. This led to velocimetry studies of blood flows in vivo and in vitro.

  9. Implantable blood pressure sensor for analyzing elasticity in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Ayala, Marco; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando; Reyes-Barranca, Alfredo; Sánchez de la Peña, Salvador; Álvarez-Chavez, José A.

    2009-03-01

    MEMS technology could be an option for the development of a pressure sensor which allows the monitoring of several electronic signals in humans. In this work, a comparison is made between the typical elasticity curves of several arteries in the human body and the elasticity obtained for MEMS silicon microstructures such as membranes and cantilevers employing Finite Element analysis tools. The purpose is to identify which types of microstructures are mechanically compatible with human arteries. The goal is to integrate a blood pressure sensor which can be implanted in proximity with an artery. The expected benefits for this type of sensor are mainly to reduce the problems associated with the use of bulk devices through the day and during several days. Such a sensor could give precise blood pressure readings in a continuous or periodic form, i.e. information that is especially important for some critical cases of hypertension patients.

  10. Nanoliter viscometer for analyzing blood plasma and other liquid samples.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Davenport, Robertson D; Burns, Mark A

    2005-01-15

    We have developed a microfabricated nanoliter capillary viscometer that quickly, easily, and inexpensively measures the viscosity of liquids. The measurement of viscosity is based on capillary pressure-driven flow inside microfluidic channels (depth approximately 30 microm and width approximately 300 microm). Accurate and precise viscosity measurements can be made in less than 100 s while using only 600 nL of liquid sample. The silicon-glass hybrid device (18 mm by 15 mm) contains on-chip components that measure the driving capillary pressure difference and the relevant geometrical parameters; these components make the nanoliter viscometer completely self-calibrating, robust, and easy to use. Several different microfabricated viscometers were tested using solutions with viscosities ranging from 1 to 5 cP, a range relevant to biological fluids (urine, blood, blood plasma, etc.). Blood plasma samples collected from patients with the symptoms of hyperviscosity syndrome were tested on the nanoliter capillary viscometer to an accuracy of 3%. Such self-calibrating nanoliter viscometers may have widespread applications in chemical, biological, and medical laboratories as well as in personal health care.

  11. Low-Power Architecture for an Optical Life Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey; Vakhtin, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Analog and digital electronic control architecture has been combined with an operating methodology for an optical trace gas sensor platform that allows very low power consumption while providing four independent gas measurements in essentially real time, as well as a user interface and digital data storage and output. The implemented design eliminates the cross-talk between the measurement channels while maximizing the sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range for each measured gas. The combination provides for battery operation on a simple camcorder battery for as long as eight hours. The custom, compact, rugged, self-contained design specifically targets applications of optical major constituent and trace gas detection for multiple gases using multiple lasers and photodetectors in an integrated package.

  12. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of... approved PMA or declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  13. 21 CFR 868.1120 - Indwelling blood oxyhemoglobin concentration analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... concentration analyzer is a photoelectric device used to measure, in vivo, the oxygen-carrying capacity of... approved PMA or declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in commercial distribution....

  14. A Comparison of Infrared Gas Analyzers Above a Subalpine Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, S. P.; Metzger, S.; Blanken, P.; Burba, G. G.; Swiatek, E.; Li, J.; Conrad, B.

    2014-12-01

    Infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) are a key component in theeddy-covariance measurement of water vapor and carbon dioxide exchangebetween the surface and atmosphere. Historically, closed-path IRGAshave been used for the fast (> 10 Hz) measurement of atmospheric H2Oand CO2. In order to use them in the field, these IRGAs were typicallyhoused in temperature-controlled enclosures or buildings that weretens of meters away from the measurement location. This necessitatedthe use of long tubing and pumps to bring the air sample to the IRGAcell. Attenuation of H2O and CO2 fluctuations within the tubing was apersistent problem with such a setup, especially for H2O. As analternative, open-path IRGAs have frequently been utilized, but thekey trade-offs with the open-path design are: (i) precipitation anddew-related data gaps, and (ii) the need to account for WPL densityeffects. Over the past five years a new type of closed-path IRGA hasemerged which is weather-proof, compact, and low-maintenance. Becauseof its small size, short intake tubing can be used, which places thesampling cell close to the sonic anemometer and reduces high frequencysignal loss. Two such IRGAs are the LI-COR LI-7200 and the CampbellScientific EC155, which is part of the CPEC200 eddy covariance system.The Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux tower has used a LI-COR LI-6262 IRGA tomeasure CO2 fluxes above a subalpine forest since November, 1998.Starting in summer 2013, a LI-7200 (along with an open-path LI-7500)were deployed at 21.5 m on the AmeriFlux tower. In Fall 2013, aEC155/CPEC200 was added so that a side-by-side comparison between allfour IRGAs was possible. The preliminary results presented in ourstudy compare the CO2 and H2O mean and variance measured by each IRGA,the vertical wind statistics from three side-by-side sonicanemometers, as well as the corresponding spectra and cospectra fromthese sensors as well as other important aspects of systemperformance.

  15. A gas chromatographic air analyzer fabricated on a silicon wafer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, S. C.; Jerman, J. H.; Angell, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    A miniature gas analysis system has been built based on the principles of gas chromatography (GC). The major components are fabricated in silicon using photolithography and chemical etching techniques, which allows size reductions of nearly three orders of magnitude compared to conventional laboratory instruments. The chromatography system consists of a sample injection valve and a 1.5-m-long separating capillary column, which are fabricated on a substrate silicon wafer. The output thermal conductivity detector is separately batch fabricated and integrably mounted on the substrate wafer. The theory of gas chromatography has been used to optimize the performance of the sensor so that separations of gaseous hydrocarbon mixtures are performed in less than 10 s. The system is expected to find application in the areas of portable ambient air quality monitors, implanted biological experiments, and planetary probes.

  16. Further development and testing of the metabolic gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Continued development of a metabolic monitor utilizing a mass spectrometer and digital computer to perform measurements and data reduction, is reported. The device prints-out breath-by-breath values for 02 consumption, C02 production, minute volume and tidal volume. The flow is measured by introduction of a tracer gas to the expired gas stream. Design modifications to reduce pressure drop in the flow splitter to one inch of water at 600 liters/min flow and to extend the range of linear flow measurement to 1000 liters/min are discussed.

  17. Blood gas analysis and cooximetry in retired racing Greyhounds

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar-Lopez, Sara; Chisnell, Hope K.; Guillermo Couto, C.; Westendorf-Stingle, Nicole; Marin, Liliana M.; Iazbik, Maria C.; Cooper, Edward S.; Wellman, Maxey L.; Muir, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to evaluate the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin (Hb) in healthy retired racing Greyhounds via cooximetry, and to establish reference intervals for blood gases and cooximetry in this breed. Design Prospective clinical study. Setting University Teaching Hospital. Animals Fifty-seven Greyhounds and 30 non-Greyhound dogs. Interventions Venous blood samples were collected from the jugular vein and placed into heparinized tubes. The samples were analyzed within 30 minutes of collection using a blood gas analyzer equipped with a cooximeter. Measurements and Main Results Greyhounds had significantly higher pH, PO2, oxygen saturation, oxyhemoglobin, total Hb, oxygen content, and oxygen capacity and significantly lower deoxyhemoglobin and P50 when compared with non-Greyhound dogs. Conclusion These findings support the fact that this breed is able to carry a higher concentration of total oxygen in the blood. As reported previously, this breed also has lower P50 and, therefore, high oxygen affinity. In light of recent findings suggesting that in certain tissues a high affinity for oxygen is beneficial, this adaptation may be of benefit during strenuous exercise. PMID:21288290

  18. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1150 - Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure....1150 Indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood carbon dioxide partial pressure PCO2 analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  13. Temporally resolved plasma spectroscopy for analyzing natural gas components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Tsumaki, Naomasa; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2016-09-01

    Temporally resolved plasma spectroscopy has been carried out in two different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/Ar and C2H6/Ar) to explore the possibility of a new gas sensor using plasma emission spectral analysis. In this experiment, a nanosecond-pulsed plasma discharge was applied to observe optical emissions representing the initial molecular structure. It is found that a CH emission intensity in CH4/Ar is higher than that in C2H6/Ar. On the other hand, C2 intensities are almost the same degree between CH4/Ar and C2H6/Ar. This finding indicates that the emission intensity ratio of CH to C2 might be an effective index for a gas analysis. In addition, a time for the highest emission intensities of CH and C2 is several nanoseconds later than that of Ar. This result suggests that spectra from the initial molecular structure may be observed at the early stage of the discharge before molecules are fully dissociated, and this is currently in progress.

  14. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  15. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  16. 40 CFR 1065.309 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.309 Continuous... ambient air drawn into the probe. We recommend you use the final, stabilized analyzer reading as the final... mixing device is recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air....

  17. [Point-of-Care-Monitoring: Blood gas analysis].

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Marx, Gernot

    2010-11-01

    Electrolyte- and acid-base-balance are relevant determinants for metabolic processes whose real time analysis is obligatory particularly in perioperative and intensive care treated patients. Also, the oxygenation status of the blood as a determinant for the oxygen supply of an organism and for the gas exchange is measured. By use of "point-of-care" (POC) monitoring, these important variables of blood gas analysis (BGA) can be measured real-time, potential mechanisms of compensation identified and disorder of homoeostasis reconstituted quickly. This article deals with the presentation of relevant parameters of blood gas analysis, potential pathologies and their treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Blood gas analysis as a determinant of occupationally related disability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.K.; Zaldivar, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Arterial blood gas analysis is one of the criteria used by the Department of Labor to award total and permanent disability for coal workers' pneumoconiosis (Black Lung). We have observed that Black Lung claimants often undergo several blood gas analyses with widely differing results that sometimes range from complete normality to life-threatening hypoxemia in the same subject. We concluded that blood gas analysis in occupationally related disability determination is unreliable, in that quality control and instrumentation are variable; that severe hypoxemia is rare in coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and that such hypoxemia is nonspecific and correlates poorly with breathlessness.

  19. Effects of air bubbles and tube transportation on blood oxygen tension in arterial blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Ying; Kao, Jau Tsuen; Chien, Tzu I; Lee, Tai Fen; Tsai, Keh Sung

    2003-04-01

    Pneumatic tube transport has been reported to aggravate the error in partial pressure of oxygen (PO(2)) measurements caused by air bubbles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of manual and pneumatic tube methods of sample transportation and different amounts of air bubbles on arterial blood gas analysis. Blood gas samples from 15 patients and a pooled wasted blood mixture with 3 different levels of PO(2) were analyzed to determine the effects of air bubbles and manual versus pneumatic tube transportation on PO(2) levels. PO(2) increased significantly in samples containing 10% air bubbles and was exaggerated by pneumatic tube transport (from 115.63 +/- 9.31 mm Hg to 180.51 +/- 11.29 mm Hg, p < 0.001). In samples with low PO(2) ( approximately 30 mm Hg), the measurement was not aberrant regardless of the method of transportation or the amount of air bubbles contained in the specimen. However, in samples with medium and high PO(2) (> 70 mm Hg), aberrances in measurements were noted even with only 0.5% air bubbles and regardless of whether the sample was transported by manual methods or pressurized tube. The increments of PO(2) correlated positively with the amount of air introduced into the specimens. Thus, the measured PO(2) increased 8.13 and 31.77 mm Hg when 0.5% and 10% air bubbles were introduced, respectively, to samples with medium PO(2) (p < 0.05). The interaction between the amount of air bubbles and the method of transportation was significant (p < 0.001). Trapped air in the syringe should be expelled as thoroughly as possible, since the presence of only 1% air bubbles can result in aberrance in PO(2) measurement. Samples for blood gas analysis should be carried in ambient pressure to the laboratory because pneumatic tube delivery systems significantly aggravate the air bubble-related aberrance in PO(2) measurement.

  20. Emergency Department Blood Gas Utilization and Changes in Ventilator Settings.

    PubMed

    Al Ashry, Haitham S; Richards, Jeremy B; Fisher, Daniel F; Sankoff, Jeffrey; Seigel, Todd A; Angotti, Lauren B; Wilcox, Susan R

    2017-09-26

    Mechanically ventilated patients increasingly spend hours in emergency department beds before ICU admission. This study evaluated the performance of blood gases in mechanically ventilated subjects in the emergency department and subsequent changes to mechanical ventilation settings. This was a multi-center, prospective, observational study of subjects ventilated in the emergency department, conducted at 3 academic emergency departments from July 2011 to March 2013. We measured the rate of arterial blood gas (ABG) and venous blood gas (VBG) analysis, and we assessed the associations between the conditions of hypoxemia, hyperoxia, hypercapnia, or acidemia and changes to mechanical ventilator settings. Of 292 ventilated subjects, 17.1% did not have a blood gas sent in the emergency department. Ventilator changes were made significantly more frequently for subjects who had an ABG as the initial blood gas sent in the emergency department (odds ratio 2.70, 95% CI 1.46-4.99, P = .002). However, findings of hypoxemia, hyperoxia, hypercapnia, or acidemia were not correlated with ventilator adjustments. In this prospective observational study of subjects mechanically ventilated in the emergency department, the majority had a blood gas checked while in the emergency department. While ABGs were associated with having changes made to ventilator settings in the emergency department, clinical findings of hypoxemia, hyperoxia, hypercapnia, and acidemia were not. Inattention to blood gas results may lead to missed opportunities in guiding ventilator changes in the emergency department. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Performance of two portable meters and a benchtop analyzer for blood glucose concentration measurement in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Novari, Gianluca

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate performance of a human portable blood glucose meter (PBGM), a veterinary PBGM, and a veterinary benchtop analyzer for measuring blood glucose concentration in rabbits and to evaluate the effect of sample characteristics on their performance. Observational prospective cross-sectional study. Blood samples from 89 pet rabbits. Blood glucose concentration was measured with a human PBGM (n = 89 rabbits), a veterinary PBGM (89), and a benchtop analyzer (32) and compared with results obtained with plasma in a laboratory analyzer (hexokinase method). The human PBGM underestimated blood glucose concentration, had decreased accuracy at high Hcts, and had the lowest total error observed (11.4%). The veterinary PBGM overestimated blood glucose concentration, had decreased accuracy at low Hcts and at high blood glucose concentrations, and had the highest total error (15.5% and 29.8% for canine and feline settings, respectively). The benchtop analyzer had good accuracy and was not influenced by Hct or glucose concentrations. Clinical errors would have occurred in 0% of cases with the human PBGM and with the benchtop analyzer and in 9% (canine setting) to 6.7% (feline setting) of cases with the veterinary PBGM. Results suggested that use of the human PBGM evaluated in this study would be acceptable for point-of-care testing of blood glucose concentration in rabbits when benchtop analyzers are not available. The use of the veterinary PBGM evaluated in this study may alter both treatment and diagnostic decisions because of the overestimation of glucose concentrations in some rabbits.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range validation and drift validation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas analyzer range validation and drift validation. 1065.550 Section 1065.550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Cycles § 1065.550 Gas analyzer range validation and drift validation. (a) Range validation. If an...

  3. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  4. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  5. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  6. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuous gas analyzer system... species. 1065.308 Section 1065.308 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308...

  8. Prediction of arterial blood gas values from venous blood gas values in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) anesthetized with intramuscular medetomidine and zolazepam-tiletamine.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong-Hyuk; Yang, Jeong-Jin; Lee, Lyon; Yeon, Seong-Chan

    2017-09-10

    The objective of this study was to measure differences between arterial and venous blood gas parameters and to evaluate whether arterial blood gas values can be estimated from venous blood in Asiatic black bears (ABBs). Twelve healthy captive ABBs (8 males and 4 females; 8-16 years; 76.8-220 kg) were included in this study. The bears were immobilized with medetomidine and zolazepam-tiletamine using a dart gun. Arterial and venous samples were collected simultaneously at 5 and 35 min after recumbency (5- and 35-min points). Partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), pH, bicarbonate (HCO3(-)), total carbon dioxide (TCO2), oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (SO2) and base excess (BEecf) were analyzed using a portable blood gas analyzer. There was no marked difference in measured and calculated variables over time in both venous and arterial blood except for PO2. However, arterial PO2, SO2 and pH were significantly higher and arterial PCO2, TCO2 and HCO3(-) were lower than those of venous samples at both 5- and 35-min points. In the regression analysis to estimate arterial values from venous values, PCO2, TCO2, HCO3(-), BEecf and pH significantly showed over 0.45 in coefficient of determination value (R(2)), and there were little differences between actual and predicted arterial values. Although there were limits in venous gas values replaced those of arterial blood, if we could not get the arterial samples, the regression formulas for arterial values from venous blood in this study would be useful clinically, except for PO2 and SO2.

  9. History of blood gas analysis. VI. Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, J W; Astrup, P B

    1986-10-01

    Oximetry, the measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in either blood or tissue, depends on the Lambert-Beer relationship between light transmission and optical density. Shortly after Bunsen and Kirchhoff invented the spectrometer in 1860, the oxygen transport function of hemoglobin was demonstrated by Stokes and Hoppe-Seyler, who showed color changes produced by aeration of hemoglobin solutions. In 1932 in Göttingen, Germany, Nicolai optically recorded the in vivo oxygen consumption of a hand after circulatory occlusion. Kramer showed that the Lambert-Beer law applied to hemoglobin solutions and approximately to whole blood, and measured saturation by the transmission of red light through unopened arteries. Matthes in Leipzig, Germany, built the first apparatus to measure ear oxygen saturation and introduced a second wavelength (green or infrared) insensitive to saturation to compensate for blood volume and tissue pigments. Millikan built a light-weight ear "oximeter" during World War II to train pilots for military aviation. Wood added a pneumatic cuff to obtain a bloodless zero. Brinkman and Zijlstra in Groningen, The Netherlands, showed that red light reflected from the forehead could be used to measure oxygen saturation. Zijlstra initiated cuvette and catheter reflection oximetry. Instrumentation Laboratory used multiple wavelengths to measure blood carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin is cuvette oximeters. Shaw devised an eight-wavelength ear oximeter. Nakajima and co-workers invented the pulse oximeter, which avoids the need for calibration with only two wavelengths by responding only to the pulsatile changes in transmitted red and infrared light. Lübbers developed catheter tip and cuvette fiberoptic sensors for oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, and pH.

  10. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  15. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: which blood gas analysis criteria and position should we use for diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Grilo, Israel; Pascasio, Juan Manuel; López-Pardo, Francisco-Jesús; Ortega-Ruiz, Francisco; Tirado, Juan Luis; Sousa, José Manuel; Rodríguez-Puras, María José; Ferrer, María Teresa; Gómez-Bravo, Miguel Ángel; Grilo, Antonio

    2017-10-03

    Different blood gas criteria have been used in the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). Arterial blood gases were prospectively evaluated in 194 cirrhotic candidates for liver transplantation (LT) in the supine and seated position. Three blood gas criteria were analyzed: classic (partial pressure of oxygen [PaO2] < 70 mmHg and/or alveolar-arterial gradient of oxygen [A-a PO2] ≥ 20 mmHg), modern (A-a PO2 ≥ 15 mmHg or ≥ 20 mmHg in patients over 64) and the A-a PO2 ≥ threshold value adjusted for age. The prevalence of HPS in the supine and seated position was 27.8% and 23.2% (classic), 34% and 25.3% (modern) and 22.2% and 19% (adjusted for age), respectively. The proportion of severe and very severe cases increased in a seated position (11/49 [22.4%] vs 5/66 [7.6%], p = 0.02). No difference was observed in the pre-LT, post-LT and overall mortality in patients with HPS, regardless of the criteria used. Obtaining blood gas measurements in the supine position and the use of modern criteria are more sensitive for the diagnosis of HPS. Blood gas analysis with the patient seated detects a greater number of severe and very severe cases. The presence of HPS was not associated with an increase in mortality regardless of blood gas criterion used.

  16. Blood gas values in clamped and unclamped umbilical cord at birth.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Mariarosaria; Seravalli, Viola; Martini, Irene; La Torre, Pasquale; Dani, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    To determine the reliability of the cord blood gas analysis on the unclamped cord compared to the standard technique of sampling on double clamped cord. Prospective observational study conducted on 46 singleton neonates vaginally delivered at term. Matched pairs of umbilical artery and vein blood samples were collected from unclamped cord within 90s after birth and from the same cord after clamping, with the clamping occurring immediately after the first blood collection. A blood gas analysis was performed on each collected sample. Arterial and venous blood samples were analyzed for pH, PO2, pCO2, SaO2, hemoglobin concentration (ctHb) and base excess (BE). The values were compared between the two groups (clamped vs unclamped) using a Wilcoxon test. No significant difference was found in pH, PO2, pCO2, SaO2 and ctHb values on arterial blood between unclamped and clamped cord. The only significant difference was related to BE (p<0.001). For the venous blood, the values of pH, PO2, pCO2 were comparable between unclamped and clamped cord, while the values of SaO2, ctHb and BE were significantly different (p<0.05). No significant difference was found in almost all the arterial blood gas parameters and in the main venous blood gas parameters between unclamped and clamped cord. Sampling of cord blood for gas analysis may be performed on the unclamped cord right after birth without reducing the accuracy of the analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation. PMID:25885983

  18. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation.

  19. Performance evaluation of a high-sensitivity tritium gas monitor using a pulse-shaping analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Yamano, T.; Yamada, K.; Tanaka, M.; Asakura, Y.; Uda, T.

    2008-07-15

    A tritium gas monitor was developed by applying several techniques including pulse shape analysis. The optimum analyzer values were determined for parameters such as the bias (voltage) applied to the detector, counting gas flow rate, and mixing ratio of sample air to counting gas using an enclosed tritium reference source. After applying these optimized parameters, the factor for converting counting rate to tritium concentration was determined by conducting an experiment using tritiated methane gas. Finally, the detection limit of the monitor for air samples containing tritium was determined based on the conversion factor. (authors)

  20. Simulation of operation of multiwave remote gas-analyzer based on NH 3-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, V. A.; Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Smalikho, I. N.; Firsov, K. M.; Maluta, D. D.; Poliakov, G. A.

    2000-03-01

    Numerical analysis of a multiwave path gas-analyzer, based on a NH 3-laser pumped by CO 2-laser radiation, is performed for model detection of concentrations of a series of molecular species such as NH 3, HCN, phosgene, NHO 3, CO 2, and H 2O. The potentialities of the gas analyzer and uncertainty of the gas concentration detection were estimated for a 4 km horizontal atmospheric path. The estimation took into account the absorption of laser radiation by the atmospheric aerosol and molecular gases under study and distortion of the laser beam due to atmospheric turbulence.

  1. Detection of Cervical Cancer Analyzing Blood Samples with Raman Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Solís, J. L.; Rodríguez-López, J.; Martínez-Espinosa, J. C.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Jave-Suárez, L. F.; Aguilar-Lemarroy, A. C.; Vargas-Rodríguez, H.; Martínez-Cano, E.

    2010-05-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to analyze blood biochemistry and hence distinguish between normal and abnormal blood was investigated. The blood samples were obtained from 20 patients who were clinically diagnosed with cervical cancer and 10 healthy volunteer. The imprint was put under the Olympus microscope and several points were chosen for Raman measurement. All spectra were collected at a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM HR800 Raman Spectrometer with NIR 830 nm laser. It is shown that the serum samples from patients with cervical cancer and from the control group can be discriminated when the multivariate statistical methods of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminated Analysis (LDA) is applied to their Raman spectra. The ratios of some band intensities were analyzed and some band ratios were significant and corresponded to proteins, phospholipids, and polysaccharides. The preliminary results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a new technique for the detection using just blood samples.

  2. New whole blood analyzers and their impact on cardiac and critical care.

    PubMed

    Kost, G J

    1993-01-01

    Miniaturized whole blood biosensors, patient-focused hospitals, and rising expectations of patients and physicians are shifting laboratory diagnostics to the point of care. Expanding transplantation and intensive care are increasing the need for rapid test results. Whole blood analysis improves accuracy, eliminates centrifugation, reduces response time, and conserves blood volume. Several hand-held, and over 20 portable or transportable whole blood instruments are now available. Criteria for instrument evaluation include test menus, point-of-care features, analysis time, on-site performance, and information integration. Whole blood analyzers measure several vital indicators (pO2, pCO2, pH, hematocrit, K+, Ca2+, Na+, Cl-, glucose, and lactate) simultaneously in less than 2 min with less than 200 microliters of whole blood. Other in vitro tests are available (Mg2+, osmolality, CO2 content, urea nitrogen, beta-hydroxybutyrate, hemoglobin, coagulation) or under development (HCO3- phosphorus). Some can be monitored in vivo (O2 saturation, pO2, pCO2, pH, glucose) or ex vivo. The clinical impact is demonstrated by ionized calcium, now established in importance for cardiac and neurologic problems, and ionized magnesium, a promising new measurement. The hybrid laboratory (a composite of conventional clinical laboratory and patient-focused testing), performance maps, and quality paths facilitate implementation of new whole blood analyzers for optimal support of cardiac and critical care, and improved patient outcomes (prospects).

  3. The Clinical Significance of Patient Specimen Transport Modality: Pneumatic Tube System Impact on Blood Gas Analytes.

    PubMed

    Carabini, Louanne M; Nouriel, Jacob; Milian, Ricardo Diaz; Glogovsky, Erin R; McCarthy, Robert J; Handler, Thomas G; Ault, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    A pneumatic tube system (PTS) is a cost-effective, rapid transport modality that utilizes induced pressure changes. We evaluated the clinical importance of 2 transport modalities, human courier and PTS, for blood gas specimens. Following open heart surgery, 35 simultaneous pairs of arterial and venous blood gas specimens were analyzed from 20 subjects. Of each pair, one specimen was transported to the blood gas laboratory via a human courier and the other via a SwissLog PTS. Transport modalities were compared using the Bland-Altman limits of agreement method. Compared with the walked specimen, the bias for PaO2 was -8.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -40.0 to 24.5 mm Hg); PaCO2 , -0.94 mm Hg (95% CI, -3.76 to 1.86 mm Hg); PvO2 , -0.60 mm Hg (95% CI, -6.90 to 5.70 mm Hg); PvCO2 , -0.58 mm Hg (95% CI, -3.12 to 1.92 mm Hg) for the PTS specimen. The difference in the PO2 and PCO2 of paired (walked vs tubed) arterial and venous blood gas specimens demonstrated a slight bias. PaO2 values demonstrated the greatest bias, however not clinically important. Thus, PTS transport does not impact clinical interpretations of blood gas values. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Creative ways to teach arterial blood gas interpretation.

    PubMed

    Barnette, LaShonda; Kautz, Donald D

    2013-01-01

    There are many creative ways to teach arterial blood gas interpretation. This article illustrates the use of the stepwise approach, tables, figures, case studies, illustrations, computer-based learning modules, and the tic-tac-toe approach. The authors recommend making several approaches available so students and new critical care nurses can choose the ones that work best for them.

  5. Evaluation of the agreement among three handheld blood glucose meters and a laboratory blood analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentration in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    Acierno, Mark J; Mitchell, Mark A; Schuster, Patricia J; Freeman, Diana; Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David; Tully, Thomas N

    2009-02-01

    To determine the degree of agreement between 3 commercially available point-of-care blood glucose meters and a laboratory analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentrations in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). 20 healthy adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. A 26-gauge needle and 3-mL syringe were used to obtain a blood sample (approx 0.5 mL) from a jugular vein of each parrot. Small volumes of blood (0.6 to 1.5 microL) were used to operate each of the blood glucose meters, and the remainder was placed into lithium heparin microtubes and centrifuged. Plasma was harvested and frozen at -30 degrees C. Within 5 days after collection, plasma samples were thawed and plasma glucose concentrations were measured by means of the laboratory analyzer. Agreement between pairs of blood glucose meters and between each blood glucose meter and the laboratory analyzer was evaluated by means of the Bland-Altman method, and limits of agreement (LOA) were calculated. None of the results of the 3 blood glucose meters agreed with results of the laboratory analyzer. Each point-of-care blood glucose meter underestimated the blood glucose concentration, and the degree of negative bias was not consistent (meter A bias, -94.9 mg/dL [LOA, -148.0 to -41.7 mg/dL]; meter B bias, -52 mg/dL [LOA, -107.5 to 3.5 mg/dL]; and meter C bias, -78.9 mg/dL [LOA, -137.2 to -20.6 mg/dL]). On the basis of these results, use of handheld blood glucose meters in the diagnosis or treatment of Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and other psittacines cannot be recommended.

  6. A sample-to-result system for blood coagulation tests on a microfluidic disk analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Liu, Cheng-Yuan; Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we describe in detail a microfluidic analyzer, which is able to conduct blood coagulation tests using whole blood samples. Sample preparation steps, such as whole blood aliquoting and metering, plasma separation, decanting, and mixing with reagents were performed in sequence through microfluidic functions integrated on a disk. Both prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were carried out on the same platform and the test results can be reported in 5 min. Fifty clinical samples were tested for both PT and aPTT utilizing the microfluidic disk analyzer and the instrument used in hospitals. The test results showed good correlation and agreement between the two instruments. PMID:25332733

  7. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyses at Reduced Pressures: A Mineral Database for the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Lin, I.-C.; Morris, R. V.; Boynton, W. V.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, and sulfates) may be important phases on the surface of Mars. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was part of the Mars Polar Lander payload, was to detect and identify volatile-bearing phases in the Martian regolith. The TEGA instrument is composed of a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) interfaced with an evolved gas analyzer (EGA). The EGA consists of a Herriott cell of a tunable-diode laser (TDL) spectrometer that determines CO, and H2O abundances. The sample chamber in TEGA operates at about 100 mbar (-76 torr) with a N2 carrier gas flow of 0.4 sccm. Essentially no information exists on the effects of reduced pressure on the thermal properties of volatile-bearing minerals. Here we present a database for the thermal behavior of volatile-bearing phases under reduced pressure conditions.

  13. Blood gas analysis in dogs with pulmonary heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Yasuda, K; Sasaki, Y

    1993-04-01

    Blood gases were analyzed in dogs with pulmonary heartworm (HW) disease. The arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) in dogs with mild signs of dirofilariasis (mildly affected group, n = 48, 85.7 +/- 8.2 mmHg) and in dogs with signs of right heart failure (severely affected group, n = 13, 76.4 +/- 11.6 mmHg) was lower (p < 0.01) than in dogs without HW infection (HW-free group, n = 19, 91.5 +/- 7.3 mmHg). Only 2 dogs in the severely affected group had a PaO2 less than 60 mmHg. The arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2, p < 0.01) and mixed venous O2 (p < 0.01) and CO2 (p < 0.01) tensions were lower, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2, p < 0.01) was greater in the severely affected group than in the HW-free and mildly affected groups. Arterial pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were lower (p < 0.01) in both affected groups than in the HW-free groups. The anion gap level was not different among the 3 groups. Serum lactic acid level in the severely affected group was higher (p < 0.01) than in the HW-free and mildly affected groups. However, a slightly higher serum lactic acid concentration was found only in 2 dogs of the severely affected group (3.84 mmol/l and 3.82 mmol/l). The PaO2 (r = -0.62) and AaDO2 (r = 0.66) correlated significantly (p < 0.01) with mean pulmonary arterial pressure. One week after HW removal, blood gases, pH and HCO3- concentration remained unchanged in the mildly affected group. In the severely affected group, blood gas values were the same, but pH and HCO3- concentration improved slightly.

  14. [Application of comparison method in internal quality control of hematology analyzer by using fresh blood].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-jun; Wang, Pei-pei; Li, Xue-fen; Ge, Xia-qin; Tong, Ming; Guo, Xi-chao

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the comparison method on internal control of hematology analyzer by using fresh blood. The hematology analyzer with well function was selected as the reference analyzer, fresh blood samples from healthy subjects were measured by reference analyzer and the values were used to calibrate compared hematology analyzers. The acceptable limits of relative deviation of WBC,RBC, HGB,HCT, PLT were established by comparative experiments during three months. The results of fresh blood samples from patients with low/medium/high levels measured by compared analyzer were compared with those from reference analyzer, the relative deviation of WBC, RBC, HGB, HCT, PLT was calculated respectively. The internal quality control charts in laboratory information system were established, with date as x-axis, relative deviation as y-axis. The acceptable relative deviation limits were set to be +/-2 s, and to be used for laboratory quality control. The relative deviation of WBC, RBC, HGB, HCT, PLT with high, medium, low levels were(0.75+/-2.964)%, (1.19+/-2.488)%,(1.43+/-2.439)%; (-0.39+/-1.327)%, (-0.26+/-1.297)%, (-0.35+/-1.095)%û(-0.43+/-1.393)%, (-0.17+/-1.139)%, (0.24+/-1.166)%û(-.43+/-1.362)%, (-0.36+/-1.381)%, (-0.57+/-1.299)%û(-0.93+/-4.330)%,(0.04+/-4.118)%, (-0.41+/-4.149)%, respectively in 2006. As the second instrument, the compared analyzer was involved in College of American Pathologists Proficiency Testing with satisfactory results, the bias of WBC,RBC, HGB, HCT, PLT were within (-0.5 approximately 5.1)%, (-1.0 approximately 1.6)%, (-1.7 approximately 1.4)%, (-1.5 approximately 1.3)%, (-4.5 approximately 7.4)%, respectively. The quality control on compared hematology analyzer can be effectively, conveniently and economically performed using this method.

  15. [Mathematical model of dispersive infrared gas analyzer based on pyroelectric detector].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-huai; Liu, Jun-hua

    2004-03-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of the pyroelectric detector based on its working principle. The input andoutput mathematical model of DIGA (Dispersive Infrared Gas Analyzer) system with pyroelectric detector was established according to the design principle of DIGA. We have manufactured a novel multi-gas DIGA on the basis of this model, then pointed out several problems that should be taken into account in the design. Application indicates that this model is of considerable practical value for the design, study, performance analysis and further improvement of DIGA.

  16. Comparative study of gas-analyzing systems designed for continuous monitoring of TPP emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'eva, O. E.; Roslyakov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    Determining the composition of combustion products is important in terms of both control of emissions into the atmosphere from thermal power plants and optimization of fuel combustion processes in electric power plants. For this purpose, the concentration of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and sulfur oxides in flue gases is monitored; in case of solid fuel combustion, fly ash concentration is monitored as well. According to the new nature conservation law in Russia, all large TPPs shall be equipped with continuous emission monitoring and measurement systems (CEMMS) into the atmosphere. In order to ensure the continuous monitoring of pollutant emissions, direct round-the-clock measurements are conducted with the use of either domestically produced or imported gas analyzers and analysis systems, the operation of which is based on various physicochemical methods and which can be generally used when introducing CEMMS. Depending on the type and purposes of measurement, various kinds of instruments having different features may be used. This article represents a comparative study of gas-analysis systems for measuring the content of polluting substances in exhaust gases based on various physical and physicochemical analysis methods. It lists basic characteristics of the methods commonly applied in the area of gas analysis. It is proven that, considering the necessity of the long-term, continuous operation of gas analyzers for monitoring and measurement of pollutant emissions into the atmosphere, as well as the requirements for reliability and independence from aggressive components and temperature of the gas flow, it is preferable to use optical gas analyzers for the aforementioned purposes. In order to reduce the costs of equipment comprising a CEMMS at a TPP and optimize the combustion processes, electrochemical and thermomagnetic gas analyzers may also be used.

  17. Performance characteristics of the HemoCue B-Glucose analyzer using whole-blood samples.

    PubMed

    Voss, E M; Cembrowski, G S

    1993-07-01

    We evaluated the HemoCue B-Glucose (HemoCue Inc, Mission Viejo, Calif) analyzer for accuracy, precision, linearity, and recovery. One hundred eighteen capillary whole-blood samples were analyzed in duplicate on the HemoCue B-Glucose and the YSI 2300 STAT Glucose/L-Lactate (Yellow Springs [Ohio] Instruments) analyzers; corresponding plasma glucose levels were measured in duplicate on the Roche Cobas MIRA (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Nutley, NJ) analyzer. Plasma glucose levels were converted to whole-blood equivalent glucose levels by using a factor of 1.11. The following regression equations were obtained: HemoCue = 1.02 (YSI) + 0.19, Sy/x = 0.52, r2 = .984; and HemoCue = 0.98 (whole-blood equivalent glucose levels) + 0.26, Sy/x = 0.55, r2 = .982. Within-run coefficients of variation were 4.0%, 3.5%, 2.2%, and 1.0% at glucose concentrations of 3.9, 5.4, 8.7, and 17.1 mmol/L (71, 97, 156, and 308 mg/dL), respectively. Between-run imprecision and total imprecision using lyopholized materials with three lot numbers of cuvettes were 4.2% and 5.6% at 2.1 mmol/L (37 mg/dL) and 2.4% and 2.7% at 5.2 mmol/L (95 mg/dL), respectively. The HemoCue B-Glucose analyzer displayed linearity between 0 and 22.2 mmol/L (0 and 400 mg/dL), and the percent recovery averaged 98.7% +/- 4.5% (mean +/- SD). The HemoCue B-Glucose analyzer is a rapid, simple, and reliable method for determinations of whole-blood glucose levels.

  18. [Bronchodilator aerosol propellant interferes with an photoacoustic spectrophotometer respiratory gas analyzer].

    PubMed

    Makino, A; Morimoto, Y; Matsumoto, S; Oka, H; Shimizu, K; Miyauchi, Y

    1998-05-01

    A patient with bronchial asthma was scheduled for an operation under nitrous oxide-isoflurane anesthesia. We monitored isoflurane concentrations continuously using an anesthetic gas analyzer (BK 1304). Upon puffing procaterol hydrochloride aerosol for 4 times, the analyzer showed a rapid increase in end-tidal isoflurane concentration. The BK 1304 uses infrared photoacoustic spectrophotometry and it is susceptible to interferences caused by Freon propellants in bronchodilator aerosols. We should take care in monitoring inhalational anesthetics when using aerosols containing Freon propellants.

  19. Field intercomparison of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Burba, G.; Vesala, T.

    2013-06-01

    Performances of four methane gas analyzers suitable for eddy covariance measurements are assessed. The assessment and comparison was performed by analyzing eddy covariance data obtained during summer 2010 (1 April to 26 October) at a pristine fen, Siikaneva, Southern Finland. High methane fluxes with pronounced seasonality have been measured at this fen. The four participating methane gas analyzers are commercially available closed-path units TGA-100A (Campbell Scientific Inc., USA), RMT-200 (Los Gatos Research, USA), G1301-f (Picarro Inc., USA) and an early prototype open-path unit Prototype-7700 (LI-COR Biosciences, USA). The RMT-200 functioned most reliably throughout the measurement campaign, during low and high flux periods. Methane fluxes from RMT-200 and G1301-f had the smallest random errors and the fluxes agree remarkably well throughout the measurement campaign. Cospectra and power spectra calculated from RMT-200 and G1301-f data agree well with corresponding temperature spectra during a high flux period. None of the gas analyzers showed statistically significant diurnal variation for methane flux. Prototype-7700 functioned only for a short period of time, over one month, in the beginning of the measurement campaign during low flux period, and thus, its overall accuracy and season-long performance were not assessed. The open-path gas analyzer is a practical choice for measurement sites in remote locations due to its low power demand, whereas for G1301-f methane measurements interference from water vapor is straightforward to correct since the instrument measures both gases simultaneously. In any case, if only the performance in this intercomparison is considered, RMT-200 performed the best and is the recommended choice if a new fast response methane gas analyzer is needed.

  20. Integrated gas analyzer for complete monitoring of turbine engine test cells.

    PubMed

    Markham, James R; Bush, Patrick M; Bonzani, Peter J; Scire, James J; Zaccardi, Vincent A; Jalbert, Paul A; Bryant, M Denise; Gardner, Donald G

    2004-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is proving to be reliable and economical for the quantification of many gas-phase species during testing and development of gas turbine engines in ground-based facilities such as sea-level test cells and altitude test cells. FT-IR measurement applications include engine-generated exhaust gases, facility air provided as input to engines, and ambient air in and around test cells. Potentially, the traditionally used assembly of many gas-specific single gas analyzers will be eliminated. However, the quest for a single instrument capable of complete gas-phase monitoring at turbine engine test cells has previously suffered since the FT-IR method cannot measure infrared-inactive oxygen molecules, a key operational gas to both air-breathing propulsion systems and test cell personnel. To further the quest, the FT-IR sensor used for the measurements presented in this article was modified by integration of a miniature, solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. Embedded in the FT-IR unit at a location near the long-effective-optical-path-length gas sampling cell, the amperometric oxygen sensor provides simultaneous, complementary information to the wealth of spectroscopic data provided by the FT-IR method.

  1. Rapid helium-air analyzer can measure other binary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, L. T.; Wood, G. M.; Yeager, P. R.

    1964-01-01

    Instrument comprised of an ionization pressure gage and a diaphragm pressure gage consisting of strain gages to make a four-arm bridge, and a ratiometer is constructed for analyzing gas mixtures. The ratio of the outputs of the two gages is proportional to the mixture composition.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range validation and drift validation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cycles § 1065.550 Gas analyzer range validation and drift validation. (a) Range validation. If an... a dry sample measured with a CLD and the removed water is corrected based on measured CO2, CO, THC... interval results or composite brake-specific emissions over the entire duty cycle for drift. For...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.550 - Gas analyzer range verification and drift verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cycles § 1065.550 Gas analyzer range verification and drift verification. (a) Range verification. If an... with a CLD and the removed water is corrected based on measured CO2, CO, THC, and NOX concentrations...-specific emissions over the entire duty cycle for drift. For each constituent to be verified, both sets...

  4. Arterial vs venous blood gas differences during hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristopher Burton; Christmas, Ashley Britton; Heniford, Brant Todd; Sing, Ronald Fong; Messick, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize differences of arterial (ABG) and venous (VBG) blood gas analysis in a rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock. METHODS: Following baseline arterial and venous blood gas analysis, fifty anesthetized, ventilated New Zealand white rabbits were hemorrhaged to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until a state of shock was obtained, as defined by arterial pH ≤ 7.2 and base deficit ≤ -15 mmol/L. Simultaneous ABG and VBG were obtained at 3 minute intervals. Comparisons of pH, base deficit, pCO2, and arteriovenous (a-v) differences were then made between ABG and VBG at baseline and shock states. Statistical analysis was applied where appropriate with a significance of P < 0.05. RESULTS: All 50 animals were hemorrhaged to shock status and euthanized; no unexpected loss occurred. Significant differences were noted between baseline and shock states in blood gases for the following parameters: pH was significantly decreased in both arterial (7.39 ± 0.12 to 7.14 ± 0.18) and venous blood gases (7.35 ± 0.15 to 6.98 ± 0.26, P < 0.05), base deficit was significantly increased for arterial (-0.9 ± 3.9 mEq/L vs -17.8 ± 2.2 mEq/L) and venous blood gasses (-0.8 ± 3.8 mEq/L vs -15.3 ± 4.1 mEq/L, P < 0.05). pCO2 trends (baseline to shock) demonstrated a decrease in arterial blood (40.0 ± 9.1 mmHg vs 28.9 ± 7.1 mmHg) but an increase in venous blood (46.0 ± 10.1 mmHg vs 62.8 ± 15.3 mmHg), although these trends were non-significant. For calculated arteriovenous differences between baseline and shock states, only the pCO2 difference was shown to be significant during shock. CONCLUSION: In this rabbit model, significant differences exist in blood gas measurements for arterial and venous blood after hemorrhagic shock. A widened pCO2 a-v difference during hemorrhage, reflective of poor tissue oxygenation, may be a better indicator of impending shock. PMID:24892020

  5. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard – fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline – second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing. PMID:27812301

  6. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-10-15

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard - fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline - second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing.

  7. Clinical, operational and economic outcomes of point-of-care blood gas analysis in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Paloma; Buno, Antonio; Alvarez-Sala, Rodolfo; Fernandez-Calle, Pilar; Alcaide, Maria Jose; Casitas, Raquel; Garcia-Quero, Cristina; Madero, Rosario; Gomez-Rioja, Ruben; Iturzaeta, Jose Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Arterial blood gas analysis is relevant in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the use of a blood gas analyzer in pulmonology departments improves the clinical, operational and economic outcomes when compared with clinical laboratory measurements. It is an observational prospective study. 112 patients were selected. After specimen collection, the measurement was performed both in pulmonology office as point-of-care and in laboratory. We evaluated clinical outcomes (modification of the indication of long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) according to results, changes in blood gas analysis results, relationship of the partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) obtained in the medical visit and velocity of change of the PaO2, influence of total haemoglobin concentration and the change in PaO2), operational outcomes (turnaround time (TAT) from specimen collection to receiving the blood gas analysis report) and economic outcomes (overall cost per process of patient care). There were discrepancies in the indication of LTOT in 13.4% of patients. All parameters showed changes. PaO2 levels showed changes in 2 ways, though they frequently increase over time. The correlation was not good in the other two clinical outcomes. The median TATs in pulmonology office were 1 min versus 79 in laboratory, with 52 min for specimen preparation and transport and 17 min for TAT intralaboratory. The overall cost for the 112 patients in pulmonology office and laboratory was 16,769.89€ and 22,260.97€ respectively. The use of a blood gas analyzer in a pulmonology office improves clinical, operational and economic outcomes when compared with clinical laboratory. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid Point of Care Analyzer for the Measurement of Cyanide in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Mishra, Santosh K.; Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple, sensitive optical analyzer for the rapid determination of cyanide in blood in point of care applications is described. HCN is liberated by the addition of 20% H3PO4 and is absorbed by a paper filter impregnated with borate-buffered (pH 9.0) hydroxoaquocobinamide Hereinafter called cobinamide). Cobinamide on the filter changes color from orange (λmax = 510 nm) to violet (λmax = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. This color change is monitored in the transmission mode by a light emitting diode (LED) with a 583 nm emission maximum and a photodiode detector. The observed rate of color change increases 10x when the cobinamide solution for filter impregnation is prepared in borate-buffer rather than in water. The use of a second LED emitting at 653 nm and alternate pulsing of the LEDs improve the limit of detection by 4x to ~ 0.5 μM for a 1 mL blood sample. Blood cyanide levels of imminent concern (≥ 10 μM) can be accurately measured in ~ 2 min. The response is proportional to the mass of cyanide in the sample – smaller sample volumes can be successfully used with proportionate change in the concentration LODs. Bubbling air through the blood-acid mixture was found effective for mixing of the acid with the sample and the liberation of HCN. A small amount of ethanol added to the top of the blood was found to be the most effective means to prevent frothing during aeration. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for repetitive determination of blood samples containing 9 μM CN was 1.09% (n=5). The technique was compared blind with a standard microdiffusion-spectrophotometric method used for the determination of cyanide in rabbit blood. The results showed good correlation (slope 1.05, r2 0.9257); independent calibration standards were used. PMID:21553921

  9. Rapid point of care analyzer for the measurement of cyanide in blood.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Mishra, Santosh K; Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R

    2011-06-01

    A simple, sensitive optical analyzer for the rapid determination of cyanide in blood in point of care applications is described. HCN is liberated by the addition of 20% H(3)PO(4) and is absorbed by a paper filter impregnated with borate-buffered (pH 9.0) hydroxoaquocobinamide (hereinafter called cobinamide). Cobinamide on the filter changes color from orange (λ(max) = 510 nm) to violet (λ(max) = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. This color change is monitored in the transmission mode by a light emitting diode (LED) with a 583 nm emission maximum and a photodiode detector. The observed rate of color change increases 10 times when the cobinamide solution for filter impregnation is prepared in borate-buffer rather than in water. The use of a second LED emitting at 653 nm and alternate pulsing of the LEDs improves the limit of detection by 4 times to ~0.5 μM for a 1 mL blood sample. Blood cyanide levels of imminent concern (≥10 μM) can be accurately measured in ~2 min. The response is proportional to the mass of cyanide in the sample: smaller sample volumes can be successfully used with proportionate change in the concentration LODs. Bubbling air through the blood-acid mixture was found effective for mixing of the acid with the sample and the liberation of HCN. A small amount of ethanol added to the top of the blood was found to be the most effective means to prevent frothing during aeration. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for repetitive determination of blood samples containing 9 μM CN was 1.09% (n = 5). The technique was compared blind with a standard microdiffusion-spectrophotometric method used for the determination of cyanide in rabbit blood. The results showed good correlation (slope 1.05, r(2) 0.9257); independent calibration standards were used.

  10. Analyzer for measuring gas contained in the pore space of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz; Skoczylas, Norbert

    2017-10-01

    In the present paper, the authors discussed the functioning of their own analyzer for measuring gas contained in the pore space of high strength rocks. A sample is placed inside a hermetic measuring chamber, and then undergoes impact milling as a result of colliding with the vibrating blade of a knife which is rotationally driven by a high-speed brushless electric motor. The measuring chamber is equipped with all the necessary sensors, i.e. gas, pressure, and temperature sensors. Trial tests involving the comminution of dolomite and anhydrite samples demonstrated that the constructed device is able to break up rocks into grains so fine that they are measured in single microns, and the sensors used in the construction ensure balancing of the released gas. The tests of the analyzer showed that the metrological concept behind it, together with the way it was built, make it fit for measurements of the content and composition of selected gases from the rock pore space. On the basis of the conducted tests of balancing the gases contained in the two samples, it was stated that the gas content of Sample no. 1 was (0.055  ±  0.002) cm3 g‑1, and Sample no. 2 contained gas at atmospheric pressure, composed mostly of air.

  11. Determination of hematopoietic stem cells in peripheral blood by an automated hematology analyzer (SE-9000).

    PubMed

    Takekawa, K; Yamane, T; Hino, M; Tatsumi, N

    1998-12-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of an automated hematology analyzer (SE-9000) for the identification and counting of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). The samples tested were from 14 patients with hematological malignancies. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the subjects before and after a course of chemotherapy. From the leukapheresis sample, CD34+ cells, assumed to be hematopoietic stem cells, were obtained with an immunomagnetic cell separator. The CD34+ cells obtained accumulated in the gate corresponding to low recurrent frequencies of the automated hematology analyzer. This gate shows results of the 'immature information' (IMI) channel. Software for detection of only the cells that accumulated in this gate was therefore developed. With this trial program, the regression coefficient between the percentage of leukocytes from the blood samples that were CD34+ and the percentage of such leukocytes that appeared on the IMI channel was 0.79. With this analyzer, the number of PBSC could be counted in about 80 s. The identification and counting of cells picked up by the IMI channel should be clinically useful for the monitoring of changes in PBSC after chemotherapy for mobilization.

  12. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 79 - Blood-Gas Study Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blood-Gas Study Tables B Appendix B to... COMPENSATION ACT Pt. 79, App. B Appendix B to Part 79—Blood-Gas Study Tables For arterial blood-gas studies... mmHg 65 mmHg or below. Above 50 mmHg Any value. For arterial blood-gas studies performed at...

  13. 28 CFR Appendix B to Part 79 - Blood-Gas Study Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blood-Gas Study Tables B Appendix B to Part 79 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Pt. 79, App. B Appendix B to Part 79—Blood-Gas Study Tables For arterial blood-gas...

  14. Flowcytometric analysis of basophil counts in human blood and inaccuracy of hematology analyzers.

    PubMed

    Ducrest, S; Meier, F; Tschopp, C; Pavlovic, R; Dahinden, C A

    2005-11-01

    Differential leukocyte counts are of proven clinical value, but information about basophil counts in normal and disease conditions is scarce although basophils are regarded as key effector cells in allergy. To establish and validate flowcytometric methods for counting basophils in peripheral human blood, to determine reference values, and to examine the accuracy of two widely used hematology analyzers. Basophils were measured in whole blood by flowcytometry after staining with antibodies against the IL-3-receptor (CD123) or the eotaxin-receptor (CCR3) combined with other markers used for gating or validation purposes. The basophil percentages in 95 healthy adults showed an excellent correlation between the two independent flowcytometric methods, demonstrating that both are accurate and precise. The most robust maker is CCR3, which seems to be sufficient to specifically identify basophils. Normal values of relative and absolute blood basophils counts were 0.22-1.28% and 0.014-0.087 G/L (95% reference intervals), respectively. Basophil counts measured with two hematology analyzers Coulter GEN-S and ADVIA-120 showed no correlation between these instruments. Comparing the data obtained by flowcytometry and the analyzers demonstrate that basophil counts of the GEN-S are erratic, while the ADVIA-120 gives at least an estimation of true basophil numbers. We provide a solid description and validation of a novel and rapid method for the flowcytometric enumeration of basophil in whole blood. The fact that the most heavily used Hematology autoanalyzer gives completely erroneous results could explain why basophils counts have not yet received recognition as a clinically useful diagnostic marker.

  15. Optimal flagging combinations for best performance of five blood cell analyzers.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, M; Goletti, S; Latinne, D; Defour, Jp

    2015-02-01

    Corelab automation needs increasingly more efficient hematology analyzers and algorithms to adequately detect abnormal samples. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of combining flags or to adjust their trigger level to identify positive samples for further detection within a smear. Five hundred and seventeen EDTA samples from patients followed for hematological malignancies were randomly analyzed on Sysmex XE2100 and XN2000, Abbott Cell-Dyn Sapphire, Beckman Coulter DXH800 and Siemens ADVIA 2120. A blood smear as well as a buffy coat was further performed for each of them. Our results shows that depending on the flags, the combinations of them and the thresholds we use, analyzers can provide extremely variable results in their performances for detecting abnormal cells. ADVIA and XN2000 show remarkable performance for blasts detection. DXH800 is the most sensitive for the detection of abnormal lymphocytes, while XN outperforms the market for immature granulocytes and nucleated red blood cell. Flagging performances have been shown to be inconsistent among the different manufacturers. This article should help laboratory professionals in their quest for the best flagging schemes and give them a baseline in the selection of the most appropriate analyzer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Arterial blood gas anomaly in canine hepatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Torisu, Shidow; Kobayashi, Takumi; Mizutani, Shinya; Tsuzuki, Nao; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro; Naganobu, Kiyokazu

    2016-01-01

    Arterial blood gas analysis is an important diagnostic and monitoring tool for respiratory abnormalities. In human medicine, lung complications often occur as a result of liver disease. Although pulmonary complications of liver disease have not been reported in dogs, we have frequently encountered hypoxemia in dogs with liver disorders, especially extrahepatic biliary obstruction. In addition, respiratory disorders account for 20% of perioperative fatalities in dogs. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the respiratory status in dogs with hepatobiliary disease by arterial blood gas analysis. PaO2 and PaCO2 were measured. Alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2), the indicator of gas exchange efficiency, was calculated. Compared to healthy dogs (control group), hepatobiliary disease dogs had significantly lower PaO2 and higher AaDO2. Hypoxemia (PaO2 of ≤80 mmHg) was observed in 28/71 dogs with hepatobiliary disease. AaDO2 was higher (≥30 mmHg) than the control group range (11.6 to 26.4 mmHg) in 32/71 hepatobiliary disease dogs. By classifying type of hepatobiliary disease, dogs with extrahepatic biliary obstruction and chronic hepatitis showed significantly lower PaO2 and higher AaDO2 than in a control group. Dogs with chronic hepatitis also had significantly lower PaCO2. The present study shows that dogs with hepatobiliary disease have respiratory abnormalities more than healthy dogs. Preanesthetic or routine arterial blood gas analysis is likely beneficial to detect the respiratory abnormalities in dogs with hepatobiliary disease, especially extrahepatic biliary obstruction and chronic hepatitis.

  17. Review on Micro-Gas Analyzer Systems: Feasibility, Separations and Applications.

    PubMed

    Lussac, Elodie; Barattin, Regis; Cardinael, Pascal; Agasse, Valerie

    2016-11-01

    Over 30 years, portable systems for fast and reliable gas analysis are at the core of both academic and industrial research. Miniaturized systems can be helpful in several domains. The way to make it possible is to miniaturize the whole gas chromatograph. Micro-system conception by etching silicon channel is well known. The main objective is to obtain similar or superior efficiencies to those obtained from laboratory chromatographs. However, stationary phase coatings on silicon surface and micro-detector conception with a low limit of detection remain a challenge. Developments are still in progress to offer a large range of stationary phases and detectors to meet the needs of analytical scientists. This review covers the recent development of micro-gas analyzers. It focuses on injectors, stationary phases, column designs and detectors reported in the literature during the last three decades. A list of commercially available micro-systems and their performances will also be presented.

  18. Measurement of CO(2) Dissolved in Aqueous Solutions Using a Modified Infrared Gas Analyzer System.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, T E; Smucker, A J

    1983-05-01

    Total dissolved inorganic carbon (SigmaCO(2)) and aqueous carbon dioxide (H(2)CO(3) (*)) in nutrient solutions may be measured by the injection of small gas or liquid samples (1 microliter to 8 milliliters) into a gas stripping column connected in-line with an infrared gas analyzer. The measurement of SigmaCO(2) in solution requires sample acidification, while H(2)CO(3) (*) and gaseous CO(2) are measured without the addition of lactic acid. The standard curve for SigmaCO(2) was linear up to 300 nanomoles CO(2). Maximum sensitivity was approximately 300 picomoles. Measurements of H(2)CO(3) (*) were independent of pH. Consequently, SigmaCO(2) and H(2)CO(3) (*) could be used to calculate the pH, HCO(3) (-), and CO(3) (2-) values of nutrient solutions. Injection and complete analyses required from 0.8 to 2 minutes.

  19. Effects of post-sampling analysis time, type of blood samples and collection tubes on values of blood gas testing.

    PubMed

    Smajić, Jasmina; Kadić, Damira; Hasić, Sabaheta; Serdarević, Nafija

    2015-08-01

    To investigate effects of post-sampling analysis time, a type of blood samples and collection tubes on blood gas testing. This study included 100 patients at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases, Clinical Centre Sarajevo. The partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and carbon dioxide (pCO2), and the oxygen saturation level of hemoglobin (sO2) were analyzed in the arterial blood samples (ABS) and capillary blood samples (CBS) by a potentiometric method using a blood gas analyzer ABL 555 (Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark). Paired measurements of ABS were performed within 15 minutes and after 60 minutes from sampling and compared. The results of CBS obtained within 15 minutes were compared with matching ABS results, as well as the results obtained from CBS within 15 minutes taken into glass and plastic tubes. pO2 and sO2 values were significantly lower after 60 minutes compared to those within 15 minutes in ABS (9.20±1.89 vs. 9.51±1.95 and 91.25±5.03 vs. 92.40±4.5; p<0.01, respectively). Values of pO2 and sO2 in CBS were significantly lower than values obtained in ABS (8.92±2.07 vs. 9.51±1.95 and 91.25±4.86 vs. 92.40±4.50; p<0.01, respectively). Obtained pO2 and sO2 values in CBS in the plastic tubes were higher than those in the glass tubes (8.50±1.98 vs. 7.89±2.0 and 89.66±11.04 vs. 88.23±11.22, p<0.01 respectively). pCO2 blood values were not influenced significantly (p>0.05). The length of post-sampling analysis time, a type of blood samples and collection tubes have significant impact on blood oxygen parameters. Analysis within 15 minutes after blood sampling is considered as appropriate. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  20. Local pulmonary blood flow: control and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, D W; Farhi, L E

    1993-10-01

    We studied the local response of the pulmonary vasculature to combined changes in alveolar PO2 and PCO2 in the right apical lobe (RAL) of six conscious sheep. That lobe inspired an O2-CO2-N2 mixture adjusted to produce one of 12 alveolar gas compositions: end-tidal PCO2 (PETCO2) of 40, 50, and 60 Torr, each coupled with end-tidal PO2 (PETO2) of 100, 75, 50, and 25 Torr. In addition, at each of the four PETO2, the inspired CO2 was set to 0 and PETCO2 was allowed to vary as RAL perfusion changed. The remainder of the lung, which served as control (CL) inspired air. Fraction of the total pulmonary blood flow going to the RAL (%QRAL) was obtained by comparing the methane elimination from the RAL to that of the whole lung, and expressed as a percentage of that fraction at PETCO2 = 40, PETO2 = 100. Cardiac output, pulmonary vascular pressures, and CL gas tensions were unaffected or only minimally affected by changes in RAL gas composition. A drop in PO2 from 100 to 50 Torr decreased local blood flow by 60% in normocapnia and by 66% at a PCO2 of 60. At all levels of oxygenation, an increase in PCO2 from 40 to 60 reduced QRAL by nearly 50%. With these stimulus-response data, we developed a model of gas exchange, which takes into account the effects of test segment size on blood flow diversion. This model predicts that: (1) when the ventilation to one compartment of a two compartment lung is progressively decreased, PAO2 remains above 60 Torr for up to 60% reductions in alveolar ventilation, irrespective of compartment size; (2) the decrease in PAO2 that occurs at altitude is accompanied by a drop in PACO2 that limits the decrease in conductance and minimizes the pulmonary hypertension; and (3) as we stand, local blood flow control by the alveolar gas tensions halves the alveolar-arterial PO2 and PCO2 differences imposed by gravity.

  1. [Blood gas analysis in dogs in veterinary practice. A review].

    PubMed

    Wagner, J; Rieker, T; Siegling-Vlitakis, C

    2015-01-01

    Blood gas analysis is useful to obtain information about acid-base state and gas exchange of the lung. Interpretation is based on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. This approach has its limitations especially in interpretation of complex disturbances of acid-base status and has been complemented by base excess and anion gap. Peter Stewart described a model of quantitative approach to the acid-base disturbances which has been further developed and is known as the strong ion approach. This model differs from the traditional approach in the assessment of metabolic disorders of acid base status. Both models complement each other but also have their advantages and disadvantages. For simple disorders of the acid-base state the Henderson-Hasselbalch approach can be used, however in complex disturbances of acid-base balance, especially with abnormalities of serum albumin and phosphate concentrations, the strong ion approach is recommended. With the understanding of both models and of the clinical presentation of blood gas abnormalities, optimal case management and therapy can be provided.

  2. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements.

    PubMed

    Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Musazay, M S; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-01-01

    A passive "can technique" and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bqm(-2)h(-1) with an average of 1.35+/-1.40 Bqm(-2)h(-1). The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  3. [Gas analyzer "HelicoSense" as a new device for diagnosis of the Helicobacter infection].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A V; Evstratova, Iu S; Novikova, V P; Tkachenko, E I; Khochinskaia, O Iu

    2006-01-01

    According to recommendations of the European Health Committee, noninvasive methods should be preferred for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection in children. Equipment and reagents for respiration diagnostic tests available from foreign manufacturers have rather high cost, which hinders their use in domestic medical institutions. A new noninvasive electrochemical technique for HP detection is based on the use of HelicoSense gas analyzer. 150 patients (100 children 6-17 years old and 50 adults 18-78 years old) participated in mulicenter testing of the developed technique. Chronic gastritis was previously diagnosed by endoscopic and morphological examination in all patients. HP status was studied using bacteriological, serological, and cytological methods, as well as the Helpil test. The obtained results were compared to the results of examination with HelicoSense gas analyzer. Our study showed that HelicoSense gas analyzer provides easy use, patient's safety, and possibility of rapid testing. Its application does not require specially trained medical personnel. The device provides high specificity (86.7%) and high sensitivity (93.7%).

  4. Effects of syringe type and storage conditions on results of equine blood gas and acid-base analysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sarah A; Constable, Peter D; Sen, Ismail; Couëtil, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    To determine effects of syringe type and storage conditions on blood gas and acid-base values for equine blood samples. Blood samples obtained from 8 healthy horses. Heparinized jugular venous blood was equilibrated via a tonometer at 37°C with 12% O(2) and 5% CO(2). Aliquots (3 mL) of tonometer-equilibrated blood were collected in random order by use of a glass syringe (GS), general-purpose polypropylene syringe (GPPS), or polypropylene syringe designed for blood gas analysis (PSBGA) and stored in ice water (0°C) or at room temperature (22°C) for 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, or 120 minutes. Blood pH was measured, and blood gas analysis was performed; data were analyzed by use of multivariable regression analysis. Blood Po(2) remained constant for the reference method (GS stored at 0°C) but decreased linearly at a rate of 7.3 mm Hg/h when stored in a GS at 22°C. In contrast, Po(2) increased when blood was stored at 0°C in a GPPS and PSBGA or at 22°C in a GPPS; however, Po(2) did not change when blood was stored at 22°C in a PSBGA. Calculated values for plasma concentration of HCO(3) and total CO(2) concentration remained constant in the 3 syringe types when blood was stored at 22°C for 2 hours but increased when blood was stored in a GS or GPPS at 0°C. Blood samples for blood gas and acid-base analysis should be collected into a GS and stored at 0°C or collected into a PSBGA and stored at room temperature.

  5. Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Evolved Gas Analysis at Mars Ambient Conditions Using the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, Douglas W.; Quadlander, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Bode, R. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Ward, M. G.; Pathare, A. V.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) combined with evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a well developed technique for the analysis of a wide variety of sample types with broad application in material and soil sciences. However, the use of the technique for samples under conditions of pressure and temperature as found on other planets is one of current C development and cutting edge research. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (MGA), which was designed, built and tested at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Lab (LPL), utilizes DSC/EGA. TEGA, which was sent to Mars on the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander, was to be the first application of DSC/EGA on the surface of Mars as well as the first direct measurement of the volatile-bearing mineralogy in martian soil.

  6. [Evaluation of the blood analyzer Beckman Coulter LH 750: analytic performance, decision rules].

    PubMed

    Amouroux, I; Balay, M; Marfaing-Koka, A

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the new analyzer Beckman Coulter, an instrument dedicated to the cell blood count (CBC) and to the white blood cell (WBC) differential (including nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs)) over a global one month period, with three purposes: 1) evaluation of the analytical performance (precision, reproducibility, contamination, linearity); 2) accuracy of numerical results, by comparison to the laboratory instrument (CBC and WBC diff) or to the blood smear (NRBCs, low platelets); 3) evaluation, in terms of sensitivity and specificity, a set of abnormality messages built from the suspect flags and a few quantitative abnormalities. The analytical performances were found satisfactory. The WBC and platelet ranges of linearity were wider than in the GEN.S, as stated in the system specifications. However, the lack of adequate biological material made impossible the study of the whole mentioned linearity range. The accuracy of the CBC and differential parameters, as well as of reticulocytes, was studied with the Coulter GEN.S as reference instrument. The coefficients of correlation and the regression lines showed that the LH 750 results were similar to the GEN.S results. Furthermore, samples with thrombocytopenia and circulating NRBCs were evaluated and compared to the result obtained with microscopic lecture. The results showed a good relationship between platelets results given by the GEN.S and manual count leading to appropriate decision of transfusion. The correlation between GEN.S and manual count of NRBC was estimated as satisfactory. We used the LH 750 software to create conditional rules on the basis of qualitative and quantitative criteria, in order to define and enter a message system for detection of abnormalities. Our study showed that such a system flagged 95.7% of morphological abnormalities with a rate of unnecessary slide review (absence of any morphological abnormality on the blood smear) estimated at 8.3%. Furthermore, in 86% of the abnormalities

  7. Lack of harmonization of red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Evaluation of four hematological analyzers.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Pavesi, Fernanda; Bardi, Mirco; Pipitone, Silvia

    2014-08-01

    To assess analytical imprecision and comparability of red blood cell distribution width (RDW) on Abbott Sapphire, Mindray BC6800, Siemens Advia 2120 and Sysmex XE-5000. Within-run imprecision was assessed on three pools and comparability using 132 inpatient samples. The imprecision of RDW was comprised between 0.3 and 1.2%, but the values exhibited broad variation among different analyzers, with bias exceeding the desirable quality specifications. Harmonization of RDW is still an unmet need. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a Miniaturized and Portable Methane Analyzer for Natural Gas Leak Walking Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural gas leak walking surveys have been conducted with devices that are based on technologies such as flame ionization detector (FID), IR-based spectrometer and IR camera. The sensitivity is typically on the ppm level. The low sensitivity means the device cannot pick up leaks far from it, and more time is spent surveying the area before pinpointing the leak location. A miniaturized methane analyzer has been developed to significantly improve the sensitivity of the device used in walking surveys to detect natural gas leaks at greater distance. ABB/LGR's patented Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is utilized to offer rugged and highly sensitive methane detection in a portable package. The miniaturized package weighs 13.5 lb, with a 4-hour rechargeable battery inside. The precision of the analyzer for methane is 2 ppb at 1 second. The analyzer operates at 10 Hz and its flow response time is 3 seconds for measurements through a 1-meter long sampling wand to registering on the data stream. The data can be viewed in real-time on a tablet or a smartphone. The compact and simplified package of the methane analyzer allows for more efficient walking surveys. It also allows for other applications that require low-power, low-weight and a portable package. We present data from walking surveys to demonstrate its ability to detect methane leaks.

  9. Portable simultaneous multiple analyte whole-blood analyzer for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Schembri, C T; Ostoich, V; Lingane, P J; Burd, T L; Buhl, S N

    1992-09-01

    We describe a portable clinical chemistry analyzer for point-of-care measurements of multiple analytes in less than 10 min from approximately 40 microL of whole blood (fingerstick or venous). Whole blood is applied directly to a 7.9-cm-diameter, single-use plastic rotor containing liquid diluent and greater than or equal to 4-12 tests in the form of 1- to 2-mm-diameter dry reagent beads. The reagent/rotor is immediately placed in a portable instrument along with a ticket/label results card. As the instrument spins the rotor, capillary and rotational forces process the blood into diluted plasma, distribute the patient's diluted sample to cuvettes containing the reagent beads, and mix the diluted sample with the reagents. The instrument monitors the chemical reactions optically at nine wavelengths; sample volume and temperature are also measured optically. The calibration data for each reagent are read from a bar code on the periphery of each rotor. The instrument processes all the measurements to calculate, store, print, and communicate the results. Each reagent/rotor contains an enzymatic control that must be within a defined range before the results from that analysis are reported.

  10. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-12-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This final technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two additional wells were selected for remediation and included into the study. Furthermore, the remediation results of wells that were a part of the study group of wells are also described.

  11. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-10-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This eight quarterly technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two to three additional wells will be selected for remediation for inclusion into the study. The results of the additional remediations will be included in the final report.

  12. Design, fabrication, assembly and delivery of a laboratory prototype of a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreisman, W. S.; Torney, F. L.; Roehrig, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a wide mass range residual gas analyzer which will be one component of an integrated real time contamination monitor system are described. The instrument has been developed and tested to the laboratory prototype phase, demonstrating the performance that can be expected from a flight instrument of similar design. The instrument's analyzer is of the quadrupole type and a cold cathode ion source is employed as the ionizer. The associated electronics supply all necessary operating and mass sweep voltages for the ionizer, analyzer and electron multiplier ion detector. The instrument features a very fast linear electrometer with automatic range changing. The full mass range of 2 to 300 amu is automatically and repetitively scanned every sixty seconds and suitable telemetry outputs are provided for intensity and mass identification as well as a digital identification of the electrometer range.

  13. Determination of beta-hydroxybutyrate in blood and urine using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Huda M A; Cooper, Gail A A

    2009-10-01

    Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is considered a potential biomarker for alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). A robust and sensitive method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of BHB in postmortem blood and urine using deuterated gamma-hydroxybutyrate as an internal standard. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following liquid-liquid extraction and silyl derivatization. The limits of detection and lower limits of quantification in blood and urine were 2 and 7 mg/L and 2 and 6 mg/L, respectively. The interday and intraday precision was measured by coefficients of variation for blood and urine and ranged from 1.0 to 12.4% for quality control samples spiked at 50 and 300 mg/L. The linear range of 50-500 mg/L resulted in an average correlation of R(2) > 0.99, and the average extraction recoveries in blood and urine were >or= 82% and >or= 59%, respectively. BHB remains stable in blood spiked at a concentration of 300 mg/L for 15 days when stored within a refrigerator (2-5 degrees C). Postmortem blood and urine samples were analyzed using the validated method for cases where the deceased had a history of chronic alcohol abuse to establish the use of BHB as a potential marker of AKA.

  14. Evaluation of Portable Multi-Gas Analyzers for use by Safety Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, D. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Bardel, D. N.

    1998-01-01

    During confined space entry operations as well as Shuttle-safing operations, United Space Alliance (USA)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) safety personnel use a variety of portable instrumentation to monitor for hazardous levels of compounds such as nitrogen dioxide (N%), monomethylhydrazine (NMM), FREON 21, ammonia (NH3), oxygen (O2), and combustibles (as hydrogen (H2)). Except for O2 and H2, each compound is monitored using a single analyzer. In many cases these analyzers are 5 to 10 years old and require frequent maintenance. In addition, they are cumbersome to carry and tend to make the job of personnel monitoring physically taxing. As part of an effort to upgrade the sensor technology background information was requested from a total of 27 manufacturers of portable multi-gas instruments. A set of criteria was established to determine which vendors would be selected for laboratory evaluation. These criteria were based on requests made by USA/NASA Safety personnel in order to meet requirements within their respective areas for confined-space and Shuttle-safing operations. Each of the 27 manufacturers of multi-gas analyzers was sent a copy of the criteria and asked to fill in the appropriate information pertaining to their instrumentation. Based on the results of the sensor criteria worksheets, a total of 9 vendors out of 27 surveyed manufacturers were chosen for evaluation. Each vendor included in the final evaluation process was requested to configure each of two analyzers with NO2, NH3, O2, and combustible sensors. A set of lab tests was designed in order to determine which of the multi-gas instruments under evaluation was best suited for use in both shuttle and confined space operations. These tests included linearity/repeatability, zero/span drift response/recovery, humidity, interference, and maintenance. At the conclusion of lab testing three vendors were selected for additional field testing. Based on the results of both the lab and

  15. Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in human placenta and cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, M.; Saito, H.; Wakisaka, I.

    1986-10-01

    Gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in placenta, maternal blood, cord blood, and milk were carried out. Trichlorobiphenyl, tetrachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorobiphenyls, and hexachlorobiphenyls were identified by the mass chromatogram and the mass spectra. Some minor peaks of PCBs were identified by gas chromatography. The relationship between the PCB concentration in placenta and that in milk is different in each PCB congener. The higher the chlorine content of the PCB congener, the more significant the correlation. No significant but a low negative correlation exists between the concentration of some PCB congeners in the placenta and that in cord blood. On the other hand, a significant linear correlation exists between the concentration of hexachlorobenzene in the placenta and that in cord blood. The transplacental transport of each PCB congener varied depending upon its chemical nature. Trichlorobiphenyl and tetrachlorobiphenyl were more transferable than hexachlorobiphenyls. The results show that the placenta and cord blood are useful human samples to analyze the body burden of environmental pollutants and to estimate their transfer from mother to fetus.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous... adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the probe. We recommend you use the final... gases diluted in air. You may use a multi-gas span gas, such as NO-CO-CO2-C3H8-CH4, to verify...

  17. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This seventh quarterly technical progress report further describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the methodology to analyze the group of wells where recent problems have occurred utilizing the data gathering forms. This report also describes the methodology to select the two wells with the greatest potential for increase and also having the most frequently occurring problem. Finally, this report describes the preliminary results of the remediation applied to the two wells selected. Two wells selected and analyzed from a twenty-four well study group indicated that their current abnormal production decline was attributable to fluid build-up in the wellbore. Subsequent remediation work of putting both wells on pump to reduce fluid build-up in the well bore decreased the flowing bottom hole pressure and increased gas production dramatically.

  18. AARC clinical practice guideline: blood gas analysis and hemoximetry: 2013.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael D; Walsh, Brian K; Sittig, Steve E; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2013-10-01

    We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library database for articles published between January 1990 and December 2012. The update of this clinical practice guideline is based on 237 clinical trials, 54 reviews, and 23 meta-analyses on blood gas analysis (BGA) and hemoximetry. The following recommendations are made following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scoring system. BGA and hemoximetry are recommended for evaluating a patient's ventilatory, acid-base, and/or oxygenation status. BGA and hemoximetry are suggested for evaluating a patient's response to therapeutic interventions. BGA and hemoximetry are recommended for monitoring severity and progression of documented cardiopulmonary disease processes. Hemoximetry is recommended to determine the impact of dyshemoglobins on oxygenation. Capillary BGA is not recommended to determine oxygenation status. Central venous BGA and hemoximetry are suggested to determine oxygen consumption in the setting of early goal-directed therapies. For the assessment of oxygenation, a peripheral venous P(O2) is not recommended as a substitute for an arterial blood measurement (P(aO2)). It is not recommended to use venous P(CO2) and pH as a substitute for arterial blood measurement of P(aCO2) and pH. It is suggested that hemoximetry is used in the detection and evaluation of shunts during diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

  19. Analysis of intraosseous blood samples using an EPOC point of care analyzer during resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Crystal Ives; Darracq, Michael; Young, Megann

    2017-03-01

    In the early phases of resuscitation in a critically ill patient, especially those in cardiac arrest, intravenous (IV) access can be difficult to obtain. Intraosseous (IO) access is often used in these critical situations to allow medication administration. When no IV access is available, it is difficult to obtain blood for point of care analysis, yet this information can be crucial in directing the resuscitation. We hypothesized that IO samples may be used with a point of care device to obtain useful information when seconds really do matter. Patients presenting to the emergency department requiring resuscitation and IO placement were prospectively enrolled in a convenience sample. 17 patients were enrolled. IO and IV samples obtained within five minutes of one another were analyzed using separate EPOC® point of care analyzers. Analytes were compared using Bland Altman Plots and intraclass correlation coefficients. In this analysis of convenience sampled critically ill patients, the EPOC® point of care analyzer provided results from IO samples. IO and IV samples were most comparable for pH, bicarbonate, sodium and base excess, and potentially for lactic acid; single outliers for bicarbonate, sodium and base excess were observed. Intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent for sodium and reasonable for pH, pO2, bicarbonate, and glucose. Correlations for other variables measured by the EPOC® analyzer were not as robust. IO samples can be used with a bedside point of care analyzer to rapidly obtain certain laboratory information during resuscitations when IV access is difficult. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radioimmunological screening and gas chromatographic determination of morphine and related narcotic analgesics in post mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Cimbura, G; Koves, E

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive, reproducible, and relatively specific procedure is presented for the screening, identification, and quantitation of morphine, hydromorphone, codeine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone in autopsy blood. The drugs are isolated from whole blood by adsorption on an XAD-2 resin slurry and subsequent elution with an organic solvent mixture. Part of the resin extract is screened for morphine and related cross-reacting compounds by a commercially available radioimmunoassay (RIA) and the remainder of the same extract is analyzed by gas chromatography using a nitrogen/phosphorus detector (GC/NP). The procedure has been used frequently in forensic toxicological casework. Since toxic blood concentrations of hydrocodone have not been well documented, the results of toxicological examination of two fatalities involving this drug are presented.

  1. Extremely sensitive CWA analyzer based on a novel optical pressure sensor in photoacoustic gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Jyrki K.; Koskinen, Vesa; Uotila, Juho; Kauppinen, Ismo K.

    2004-12-01

    Major improvement into the sensitivity of broadband Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers, used in gas analysis, can be achieved by a photoacoustic detection system, which bases on a recently introduced optical pressure sensor. The sensor is a cantilever-type microphone with interferometric measurement of its free end displacement. By using a preliminary prototype of the photoacoustic gas detector, equipped with the proposed sensor and a black body radiation source, a detection limit in the sub-ppb range was obtained for e.g. methane gas. The limit, obtained in non-resonant operation mode, is very close to the best photoacoustic results achieved with powerfull laser sources and by exploiting the cell resonances. It is also orders of magnitude better than any measurement with a black body radiation source. Furthermore, the ultimate sensitivity leads on to very small detection limits also for several chemical warfare agents (CWA) e.g. sarin, tabun and mustard. The small size of the sensor and its great thermal stability enables the construction of an extremely sensitive portable CWA analyzer in the near future.

  2. Novel and rapid enumeration method of peripheral blood stem cells using automated hematology analyzer.

    PubMed

    Tanosaki, R; Kumazawa, T; Yoshida, A; Oguni, S; Nakano, A; Yamagata, S; Takahashi, N; Kurosawa, S; Kim, S W; Yamashita, T; Mori, S; Heike, Y; Fukuda, T; Hamaguchi, Y; Tsuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The number of infused CD34(+) cells is crucial to the success of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). Here, we present, for the first time, a new method of enumerating hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) for PBSCT. This novel method is based on hemolysis and chemical staining, followed by flow cytometry-based optical detection, conducted using an automated hematology analyzer (XN series, Sysmex). CD34(+) cells and HPCs were compared in 76 granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized blood or apheresis samples taken from healthy donors (n = 18) or patients undergoing autologous PBSCT (n = 6). There was a strong correlation between the numbers of HPCs and CD34(+) cells (R(2)  = 0.958). The expected total number of HPCs in the final products, which was estimated from HPCs in pre-apheresis PB or mid-apheresis products, also correlated well with the total number of CD34(+) cells in the final products. The change in HPCs in PB closely resembled that of CD34(+) cells during mobilization. Experiments using immunomagnetic beads suggested that the majority of CD34(+) cells existed in HPCs, and vice versa. Hematopoietic progenitor cells may serve as surrogates for CD34(+) cells in PBSCT. However, further investigations are required to verify this. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liukang; McDermitt, Dayle; Anderson, Tyler; Riensche, Brad; Komissarov, Anatoly; Howe, Julie

    2012-02-01

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been

  4. Correlation of Venous Blood Gas and Pulse Oximetry With Arterial Blood Gas in the Undifferentiated Critically Ill Patient.

    PubMed

    Zeserson, Eli; Goodgame, Ben; Hess, J Daniel; Schultz, Kristine; Hoon, Cynthia; Lamb, Keith; Maheshwari, Vinay; Johnson, Steven; Papas, Mia; Reed, James; Breyer, Michael

    2016-06-09

    Blood gas analysis is often used to assess acid-base, ventilation, and oxygenation status in critically ill patients. Although arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis remains the gold standard, venous blood gas (VBG) analysis has been shown to correlate with ABG analysis and has been proposed as a safer less invasive alternative to ABG analysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of VBG analysis plus pulse oximetry (SpO2) with ABG analysis. We performed a prospective cohort study of patients in the emergency department (ED) and intensive care unit (ICU) at a single academic tertiary referral center. Patients were eligible for enrollment if the treating physician ordered an ABG. Statistical analysis of VBG, SpO2, and ABG data was done using paired t test, Pearson χ(2), and Pearson correlation. There were 156 patients enrolled, and 129 patients completed the study. Of the patients completing the study, 53 (41.1%) were in the ED, 41 (31.8%) were in the medical ICU, and 35 (27.1%) were in the surgical ICU. The mean difference for pH between VBG and ABG was 0.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.04) with a Pearson correlation of 0.94. The mean difference for pCO2 between VBG and ABG was 4.8 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: 3.7-6.0 mm Hg) with a Pearson correlation of 0.93. The SpO2 correlated well with PaO2 (the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood) as predicted by the standard oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In this population of undifferentiated critically ill patients, pH and pCO2 on VBG analysis correlated with pH and pCO2 on ABG analysis. The SpO2 correlated well with pO2 on ABG analysis. The combination of VBG analysis plus SpO2 provided accurate information on acid-base, ventilation, and oxygenation status for undifferentiated critically ill patients in the ED and ICU. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Relationships among ventilation-perfusion distribution, multiple inert gas methodology and metabolic blood-gas tensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A S; Patterson, R W; Kaufman, R D

    1987-12-01

    The retention equations upon which the Multiple Inert Gas Method is based are derived from basic principles using elementary algebra. It is shown that widely disparate distributions produce indistinguishable sets of retentions. The limits of resolution of perfused compartments in the VA/Q distribution obtainable by the use of the multiple inert gas method are explored mathematically, and determined to be at most shunt and two alveolar compartments ("tripartite" distribution). Every continuous distribution studied produced retentions indistinguishable from those of its unique "matching" tripartite distribution. When a distribution is minimally specified, it is unique. Any additional specification (increased resolution--more compartments) of the distribution results in the existence of an infinitude of possible distributions characterized by indistinguishable sets of retention values. No further increase in resolution results from the use of more tracers. When sets of retention values were extracted from published multiple inert gas method continuous distributions, and compared with the published "measured" retention sets, substantial differences were found. This illustrates the potential errors incurred in the practical, in vivo application of the multiple inert gas method. In preliminary studies, the tripartite distribution could be determined with at least comparable accuracy by blood-gas (oxygen, carbon dioxide) measurements.

  6. Prognostic significance of arterial blood gas analysis in the early evaluation of paraquat poisoning patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changbao; Zhang, Xigang

    2011-10-01

    To examine the utility of arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) in early evaluation of prognosis in paraquat poisoning. Our aim was to summarize the case data of 138 patients poisoned with oral paraquat treated in the Emergency Department of 307 Hospital of the Chinese People's Liberation Army from June 2009 to Sept. 2010, and analyze the correlations between various indices of arterial blood gas analysis (including pH, PO(2), PCO(2), base excess [BE], HCO(3)(-)) to prognosis and blood PQ concentration of patients presenting within 24 h after taking paraquat. PCO(2), HCO(3)(-) and BE values in deceased patients were significantly lower than those in surviving patients, p values 0.0003, <0.0001, <0.0001; PCO(2), HCO(3)(-) and BE values in patients who died in < 3 d were significantly lower than those in those who died in 3-7 d and 7 d after taking paraquat (p < 0.0001). The results of Cox Regression Analysis showed that there was correlation between paraquat amount, blood paraquat concentration and BE values and patients' survival time; the larger the absolute BE value was, the higher the death rate. Nevertheless, there were no correlations between early pH or PO(2) and prognosis in these patients. BE values may be a reliable index in early evaluation of prognosis in paraquat poisoning.

  7. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood-Gas Tables C Appendix C to Part 718... PNEUMOCONIOSIS Pt. 718, App. C Appendix C to Part 718—Blood-Gas Tables The following tables set forth the values... tables are met: (1) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites up to 2,999 feet above...

  8. Regional gastric mucosal blood flow measurements by hydrogen gas clearance in the anesthetized rat and rabbit.

    PubMed

    Leung, F W; Guth, P H; Scremin, O U; Golanska, E M; Kauffman, G L

    1984-07-01

    Hydrogen gas clearance using 3% hydrogen in air and platinum contact electrodes was employed for measuring antral and corpus mucosal blood flow in anesthetized animals. Significantly greater antral than corpus mucosal blood flow was consistently demonstrated. Corpus but not antral mucosal blood flow showed a significant dose-related increase with intravenous pentagastrin. Vasopressin induced a significant dose-related decrease in both antral and corpus mucosal blood flow. Simultaneous measurement of basal corpus mucosal blood flow by hydrogen gas clearance and of gastric mucosal blood flow by aminopyrine clearance gave similar values, but the changes with intravenous pentagastrin or vasopressin measured by aminopyrine clearance were of a much higher order of magnitude. Hydrogen gas clearance, however, reflected changes in left gastric artery blood flow much more closely than did aminopyrine clearance. Therefore, we conclude that the hydrogen gas clearance technique as described is valid for measuring regional gastric mucosal blood flow. It is safe and has potential application in human studies.

  9. Reducing pain associated with arterial punctures for blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Linda; Stephenson, Mary; Huber, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Arterial punctures for arterial blood gases (ABGs) analysis are described as the most painful laboratory procedure and are performed without the benefit of pain management. This study originated from one nurse's concern about the level of pain her hospitalized patients endured when she drew their ABGs. A review of the literature found that ABG pain relief has not been studied in hospitalized patients. Therefore, this study explored the question "Can the pain of arterial blood gas draws be reduced through the use of infiltration with a local anesthetic agent?" This study compared the pain scores of 40 hospitalized patients who received either no intervention or one of three analgesic interventions (infiltration of 0.7 ml 1% lidocaine, 0.7 ml buffered 1% lidocaine, or 0.7 ml of bacteriostatic saline at the arterial puncture site). Results showed that, although lidocaine and buffered lidocaine are effective in reducing the pain associated with the arterial puncture, plain lidocaine was the only intervention in which the pain rating score for the overall experience was significantly diminished. This study is limited by partial randomization, small sample size, and patient duress; however, it provides a foundation for further nursing research that explores methods to reduce the pain associated with this very painful procedure. Future studies should be directed at larger, diverse populations, multiple operators, and comparison of interventions to topical analgesics and nonpharmacological measures. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of delayed umbilical cord clamping on blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Valero, Javier; Desantes, Domingo; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Rubio, Juan; Diago Almela, Vicente J; Perales, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    To ascertain if there are differences in umbilical cord blood gas analysis between immediate and delayed cord clamping. In a prospective observational study on 60 vaginally delivered healthy term newborns, we sampled umbilical cord blood immediately after delivery and at the time umbilical cord pulsation spontaneously ceased. There were significant decreases in pH, oxygen saturation (sO(2)), glycemia, oxygen content (ctO(2)), bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) and base excess (BE). Lactate and [Formula: see text] increased. Delayed cord clamping pH correlated with immediate cord clamping pH, [Formula: see text] , ctHb, sO(2) and time (r(2)=0.77, p<0.000). Delayed cord clamping lactate was associated with immediate cord clamping lactate and time (r(2)=0.83, p<0.000). Delayed BE was associated with previous pH, lactate, glycemia, ctHb and time (r(2)=0.83, p<0.000). Delayed cord clamping alters acid-base parameters and lactate values compared to immediate cord clamping. Those variations depend mainly on time, prior pH and lactate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  12. A simple inexpensive gas phase chemiluminescence analyzer for measuring trace levels of arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mrinal K; Hossain, Zafreen A; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-01-01

    An inexpensive sensitive gas-phase chemiluminescence (GPCL) based analyzer for arsenic is described; this device utilizes manual fluid dispensing operations to reduce size, weight and cost. The analyzer in its present form has a limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) of 1.0 microg/L total inorganic As (peak heightbased, 3 mL sample). The system was used to measure low level arsenic in tap water samples from Texas and New Mexico and compared with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as those from an automated GPCL analyzer. Good correlations were observed. Higher levels of As (50-500 microg/L, As(III), As(V) and mixtures thereof) were spiked into local tap water; the recoveries ranged from 95 +/- 2% to 101 +/- 1%. A single instrument weighs less than 3 kg, consumes <25 W in power, can be incorporated in a briefcase and constructed for <$US $1000. It is easily usable in the field.

  13. Fast Methane Measurements Using a Novel Laser-based Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, D.; Gupta, M.; Owano, T.; Provencal, R.; Ricci, K.; O'Keefe, A.

    2005-12-01

    Methane has increased significantly with human population levels. Pre-1750 ice core data indicates that pre-industrialization levels were ~700 ppbv, while current levels are ~1745 ppbv. In current budget estimates of atmospheric CH4, major contributors include both natural (wetlands) and anthropogenic sources (energy, landfills, ruminants, biomass burning, rice agriculture). The strengths of these sources vary spatially and temporally. Estimates of emissions from wetlands are also uncertain due to the extreme variability of these ecosystems. Because methane lifetime is relatively long (8.4 years), atmospheric variations in concentration are small and accuracy in measurement is important for understanding spatial and temporal variability. We report on the application and independent performance characterization of a novel gas analyzer based on cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy. The Analyzer was used for the measurements of methane in ambient air for eddy correlation flux measurements and for chamber flux measurements. The Analyzer provided continuous measurements at data rates up to 20 Hz and a replicate precision of better than 2 ppbv in a 1 second measurement time.

  14. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.308 - Continuous gas analyzer system-response and updating-recording verification-for gas analyzers not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications § 1065.308 Continuous..., the gas concentrations must be adjusted to account for the dilution from ambient air drawn into the... recommended when blending span gases diluted in N2 with span gases diluted in air. You may use a...

  17. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the 1998 Mars Polar Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Lorenz, R. D.; Bailey, S. H.; Williams, M. S.; Hamara, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer is an instrument in the MVACS (Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor) payload on the 1998 Mars Polar Lander. It is due to reach the layered terrain at around 70S latitude on Mars in December 1999. The instrument will heat soil samples acquired with a robotic arm to determine their volatile content with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and an evolved gas analyzer (EGA). Instrument Objectives: The instrument aims to measure the volatile content of the martian soil at depth, specifically to determine the water and CO2 content. These greenhouse gases may be present in large quantities as ices and locked chemically in the soil, particularly at high latitudes. Understanding the martian climate history and the future resource potential of Mars requires that we measure the abundance of volatile-bearing material in the soil and the minerals with which they are associated. Secondary objectives include the identification of other minerals and the detection of oxidizing compounds in the soil. Instrument Description: The instrument comprises a set of eight thermal analyzers, each of which will be used only once. Each analyzer has two identical ovens, one for the sample and one (empty) for a reference. The DSC identifies the temperature and enthalpy of phase transitions by carefully determining the difference in the energy required to heat the reference and sample ovens at a controlled rate. The DSC digitally controls the duty cycle of the power to the ovens to maintain each of them at the programmed ramp temperature. The output of the DSC is simply the difference in power required by the two ovens. The EGA analyzes the evolved gases as the ovens are heated to provide knowledge of correlated gas release associated with the phase transitions. The correlated gas release will aid in the identification of the phase responsible for the phase transition. The EGA will determine water and CO, contents via a high-resolution tunable diode laser

  18. Evaluation of Four Veterinary Hematology Analyzers for Bovine and Ovine Blood Counts for In Vitro Testing of Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ina Laura; Friedmann, Yasmin; Jones, Alyssa; Thornton, Catherine

    2016-04-18

    Small affordable automated hematology analyzers that produce rapid and accurate complete blood cell counts are a valuable tool to researchers developing blood-handling medical devices, such as ventricular assist devices, for in vitro safety assessments. In such studies, it is common to use the blood of large animals such as cattle and sheep. However, the commercially available instruments have not been evaluated for their ability to measure the blood counts of these animals. In this study, we compare, for the first time, four veterinary analyzers for blood counts on bovine and ovine blood samples. We look at ease of use, repeatability and agreement with a view to inform researchers of the benefits of these instruments in routine measurement of ovine and bovine bloods during in vitro testing. Complete blood cell counts and a three-part differential (granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes) were measured by each of the instruments, and the results compared to those obtained from two additional analyzers used in a reference laboratory. Repeatability and agreement were evaluated using the Bland-Altman method; bias and 95% limits of agreement between the instruments, and between the instruments and two reference instruments, were used to evaluate instrument performance. In summary, there are advantages and disadvantages with all instruments. Of the four instruments tested, the repeatability and agreement was fairly similar for all instruments except one instrument which cannot be recommended for bovine or ovine blood counts.

  19. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-04-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This sixth quarter technical progress report further describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the development of data gathering forms for tubing plunger wells, casing plunger wells, pumping wells, and swab or flow wells. This report also further describes the methodology to select a group of wells for field review utilizing data gathering forms further developed during this quarter.

  20. Low cost methodologies to analyze and correct abnormal production decline in stripper gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    James, J.; Huck, G.; Knobloch, T.

    2000-04-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the causes of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be researched and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This second quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to develop data collection forms of pertinent information to assist in analysis of problem wells. The report also describes the procedures to categorize individual well problems. Finally, the report summarizes the frequency of individual well problems.

  1. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research program is to develop and deliver a procedure guide of low cost methodologies to analyze and correct problems with stripper wells experiencing abnormal production declines. A study group of wells will provide data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the historic frequency of the cases of the production problems. Once the most frequently occurring causes of the production problems are determined, data collection forms and decision trees will be designed to cost-effectively diagnose these problems and suggest corrective action. Finally, economic techniques to solve the most frequently occurring problems will be research and implemented. These systematic methodologies and techniques will increase the efficiency of problem assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This fifth quarterly technical report describes the data reduction and methodology to develop diagnostic tools to evaluate the cause of declines in problem wells, specifically addressing the development of data gathering forms for tubing plunger wells, casing plunger wells, pumping wells, and swab or flow wells. This report also describes the methodology to select a group of wells for field review utilizing data gathering forms developed during this quarter.

  2. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  3. Summary of Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Niles, P. B.; Hoffman, J.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect evolved volatiles and organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS) that can detect masses in the 2 to 140 dalton range [1]. Five Martian soils were individually heated to 1000 C in the DSC ovens where evolved gases from mineral decompostion products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil.

  4. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  5. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  6. The comparison of heparinized insulin syringes and safety-engineered blood gas syringes used in arterial blood gas sampling in the ED setting (randomized controlled study).

    PubMed

    Baskın, Sevcan Baki; Oray, Neşe Çolak; Yanturalı, Sedat; Bayram, Başak

    2014-05-01

    The arterial blood gas measurement process is a painful and invasive procedure, often uncomfortable for both the patient and the physician. Because the patient-related factors that determine the difficulty of the process cannot be controlled, the physician-related factors and blood gas measurement techniques are a modifiable area of improvement that ought to be considered. Many hospitals use insulin syringes or syringes washed with heparin for the purpose of blood gas measurement because they do not have blood gas-specific syringes. In this prospective cross-sectional study, we aimed to compare safety-engineered blood gas syringes and conventional heparinized syringes used during the arterial blood gas extraction process in terms of ease of operation, the physician-patient satisfaction, laboratory appropriateness, and complications. Our study included patients whose arterial blood gas needed to be measured in the emergency department and who agreed to participate in the study. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. The arterial blood gas of the patients from the first group was measured by using conventional heparinized syringes, whereas safety-engineered blood gas syringes were used to measure the arterial blood gas of the patients from the second group. The groups were compared in terms of demographic data, the number of attempts, the physician and patient satisfaction, early and late-term complications, and laboratory appropriateness of the taken sample. A total of 550 patients were included in our study in a 2-month study period. There were no significant differences between patients in terms of sex, age, weight, height, body mass index, and wrist circumference. In addition, the number of attempts (P=.489), patients' pain level during the procedure (P=.145), and the degree of difficulty of the procedure according to the patient (P=.109) and physician (P=.554) were not significantly different between the groups. After arterial blood gas extraction

  7. Appropriate timing of blood sampling for blood gas analysis in the ventilated rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sei, Kiguna; Fujita, Masanori; Okawa, Shinpei; Hirasawa, Takeshi; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Sasa, Hidenori; Furuya, Kenichi; Ishihara, Miya

    2016-12-01

    Arterial and venous blood gas analyses (BGAs) are essential to evaluate devices that measure biological oxygenation. The appropriate timing of blood sampling for BGA after respiratory rate (RR) change in animal experiments has not been reported. This study investigated the appropriate timing of blood sampling for BGA in ventilated rabbits and whether venous samples are an alternative to arterial samples. Under general anesthesia, 14 rabbits (body weight, 3.02 ± 0.09 kg) were ventilated and their RR was changed (40/min, 30/min, and 20/min). Blood was sampled through cervical arterial and venous catheters. Experiment 1: in seven rabbits, arterial BGA was measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after the RR change. Experiment 2: in seven different rabbits, simultaneous arterial and venous BGA were measured at 0, 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after the RR change. Oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and saturation (SO2) of the arterial blood stabilized 0.5 min after the RR changed. In venous BGA, no index stabilized during observation. The arterial and venous values of the carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2) and pH had significant correlations (arterial PCO2 = 0.9316 × venous PCO2-4.4425 [r = 0.9178]; arterial pH = 1.0835 × venous pH-0.5795 [r = 0.9453]). In ventilated rabbits, arterial PO2 and SO2 stabilized in 0.5 min. No venous value stabilized after the RR change. Only the PCO2 and pH of venous samples may be an alternative to arterial samples under the defined formula. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of collecting blood into plastic heparinised vacutainer tubes and storage conditions on blood gas analysis values in horses.

    PubMed

    Noël, P G; Couëtil, L; Constable, P D

    2010-11-01

    Plastic heparinised vacutainer tubes are used for blood gas analysis in horses. This collection method may not be ideal because influx of atmospheric O(2) through the permeable plastic wall of the vacutainer tube and loss of CO(2) into the gas phase above the blood sample should increase blood PO(2) and decrease PCO(2), respectively. To determine the effects of collecting blood into plastic vacutainer tubes and storage conditions on blood gas analysis values. Blood was obtained from 6 healthy horses and tonometered at 37 °C with 12% O(2) and 5% CO(2). Three ml aliquots of tonometered blood were collected using a glass syringe or vacutainer tube and stored in iced water or at room temperature for 0, 5, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min. Blood samples from vacutainer tubes were collected aerobically (tube opened for 5 s) or anaerobically (tube remained closed). Blood gas analysis was performed in duplicate using a Radiometer ABL5. Data was analysed using repeated measures analysis of variance and P < 0.05 was significant. Compared to the glass syringe, tonometered blood collected in vacutainer tubes had an immediate, significant, sustained and marked increase in PO(2) and an immediate, significant, transient but small decrease in PCO(2). Blood PO(2) and PCO(2) were higher when vacutainer tubes were stored in iced water instead of at room temperature. Measured blood pH and calculated values for plasma bicarbonate and total CO(2) concentration and base excess of extracellular fluid were similar when blood was collected in glass syringes or vacutainer tubes and values were not altered by storage temperature or time. Plastic heparinised vacutainer tubes should not be used to collect samples for measurement of blood PCO(2) and PO(2). Vacutainer tubes provide an accurate method for measuring plasma bicarbonate concentration, total CO(2) concentration and base excess. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  9. [An evaluation of automated hematology analyzers in detecting abnormal blood cells].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Miyachi, H; Kawada, T; Ono, H; Gondo, K; Seki, T; Ikeda, M; Ando, Y

    1991-09-01

    We report the usefulness and capability of two hematology analyzers with different principles in characterization of abnormal cells such as immature granulocytes and blasts. We studied a total 1635 specimens which included 69 cases with hematopoietic malignancies. THMS H-1 (Technicon Instruments) and NE-8000 (Toa Instruments) were used as analyzers. An effort was made to determine the sensitivity and specificity of positive abnormal cell flag in comparison with the presence of abnormal cells seen on a manual differential. True positive rate for immature granulocytes in H-1 and NE were 43% and 30%, respectively. False positive rate for immature granulocytes in H-1 and NE were 0.01% and 0.03%, respectively. With both analysers, cases with low percentage of immature granulocytes generated negative flag for abnormal cells. True positive rate for blasts in H-1 and NE were 74% and 65%, respectively. False positive rate for blasts in H-1 and NE were 1.8% and 0.2%, respectively. With both instruments, in all cases with blast count over 100/microliters, blasts were detected. Only H-1 detected the cases with blast counts less than 100/microliters. In H-1 all cases with ATL, one case with AMMoL and another with ALL generated negative blast flag. Upon morphologic examination, these blasts were found to be large and peroxidase negative with convoluted and irregularly shaped nuclei. On the other hand, NE detected blasts regardless of those morphology. In conclusion, Both instruments are useful in screening abnormal blood cells, while their unique capability must be considered.

  10. Evaluation of four hematology and a chemistry portable benchtop analyzers using non-human primate blood.

    PubMed

    Snider, C L; Dick, E J; McGlasson, D L; Robbins, M C; Sholund, R L; Bommineni, Y R; Hubbard, G B

    2009-12-01

    Near patient testing (NPT) and point-of-care testing (POCT) using portable benchtop analyzers has become necessary in many areas of the medical community, including biocontainment. We evaluated the Beckman AcT diff, Abaxis Vetscan HMII (two instruments), Abbott Cell-Dyn 1800, and Abaxis Vetscan VS2 for within-run precision and correlation to central laboratory instruments using non-human primates blood. Compared with the central laboratory instruments, the Beckman AcT diff correlated on 80%; the HMII instruments on 31% and 44%, the CD1800 on 31%, and the VS2 on 71% of assays. For assays with published manufacturers precision guidelines, the AcT diff met all nine, the HMII instruments met one and six of six, and the CD 1800 met one of six. Laboratories using NPT/POCT must test their individual instruments for precision and correlation, identify assays that are reliable, and exclude or develop supplemental procedures for assays that are not.

  11. Evaluation of Four Hematology and a Chemistry Portable Benchtop Analyzers Using Nonhuman Primate Blood

    PubMed Central

    Snider, C. L.; Dick, E. J.; McGlasson, D. L.; Robbins, M. C.; Sholund, R. L.; Bommineni, Y. R.; Hubbard, G. B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Near patient testing (NPT) and point-of-care testing (POCT) using portable benchtop analyzers has become necessary in many areas of the medical community, including biocontainment. Methods: We evaluated the Beckman AcT diff, Abaxis Vetscan HMII (2 instruments), Abbott Cell-Dyn 1800, and Abaxis Vetscan VS2 for within-run precision and correlation to central laboratory instruments using NHP blood. Results: Compared to the central laboratory instruments, the Beckman AcT diff correlated on 80%; the HMII instruments on 31% and 44%, the CD1800 on 31%, and the VS2 on 71% of assays. For assays with published manufacturers precision guidelines, the AcT diff met all nine, the HMII instruments met one and six of six, and the CD 1800 met one of six. Conclusions: Laboratories using NPT/POCT must test their individual instruments for precision and correlation, identify assays that are reliable, and exclude or develop supplemental procedures for assays that are not. PMID:19793178

  12. Comparison of total nucleated cell measurements of UC blood samples using two hematology analyzers.

    PubMed

    Eichler, H; Seetharaman, S; Latta, M; Kurtz, Jw; Moroff, G

    2004-01-01

    The total nucleated cell (TNC) content of umbilical cord blood (UCB) units currently serves as the most important measure for determining suitability for transplantation. Hence it is important that TNC measurements are performed in an accurate manner. TNC content is evaluated routinely by hematology analyzers (HA) as WBC counts. The objective of the study was to compare TNC content utilizing two different HA, one utilizing an impedance channel and optical channel, and the other using only an optical channel. The HA utilized in this study used two different modes of operation for lysis, regular mode (RM) and extended lysis mode (ELM). Cell-Dyn 3200 (CD3.2) utilizes optical technology for WBC measurements, involving WBC optical count (WOC) and nuclear optical count (NOC), whereas the Cell-Dyn 3700 (CD3.7) utilizes both the impedance (WIC) and optical technology (WOC) for WBC measurements. TNC content was determined with 17 identical samples using CD3.2 in one laboratory and CD3.7 in the other laboratory. Cord blood samples processed to concentrate nucleated cells by either of the laboratories were sent by overnight courier and assays were performed on the same day by both laboratories. For CD3.7, the WOC values were consistently lower than the WIC using the regular mode, but showed no significant differences (P>0.05). The WIC and WOC values were comparable on using the ELM and RM. For CD3.2, WOC values using RM and NOC values using ELM showed no significant differences (P>0.05), even though the WOC measurement was lower than the NOC values for most samples. The best comparison of TNC measurement between the two HA could be achieved by comparing CD3.7-WIC with CD3.2-NOC values. The results were equivalent (P>0.05) and 12 of 17 samples had equal to or less than 10% difference (mean 9.5%). TNC measurements of UCB samples were essentially identical using the WIC channel of the Cell-Dyn 3700 and the NOC channel of the Cell-Dyn 3200.

  13. Temperature correction of arterial blood-gas parameters: A comparative review of methodology.

    PubMed

    Andritsch, R F; Muravchick, S; Gold, M I

    1981-09-01

    The need for accurate clinical diagnosis and appropriate intervention requires that a modern blood-gas laboratory have the means to correct for significant discrepancies between patient temperature and the temperature at which in vitro blood samples are analyzed. Recent advances in mini- and microcomputer technology permit application of any or all of the correction formulas above at modest cost and minimal inconvenience (See the Appendix). An expanded program for a TI-59 desk-top calculator and P-100C printer which gives labeled hard-copy readout of temperature-corrected pH, PCO2, PO2, and hemoglobin saturation values, as well as bicarbonate concentration and in vivo base excess is in daily clinical use in our operating room and is available from the authors upon request.

  14. EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED GAS ANALYZER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS IN POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable Fourier transform infrared gas analyzer with a photoacoustic detector performed reliably during pollution prevention research at two industrial facilities. It exhibited good agreement (within approximately 6%) with other analytical instruments (dispersive infrared and ...

  15. EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED GAS ANALYZER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS IN POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable Fourier transform infrared gas analyzer with a photoacoustic detector performed reliably during pollution prevention research at two industrial facilities. It exhibited good agreement (within approximately 6%) with other analytical instruments (dispersive infrared and ...

  16. [When is a venous blood gas analysis sufficient in the emergency department?

    PubMed

    van Exsel, J A J M; Simons, S O; Kramers, C; Heijdra, Y F

    2017-01-01

    Blood gas analysis plays an important role in the initial assessment of a patient in the emergency ward. We present three different patient cases to illustrate when to opt for a venous or an arterial blood gas analysis. Arterial punctures are more painful and carry a higher risk of complications compared to venous punctures. It is possible to use a venous blood gas to screen for acute acid/base disturbances. Ventilatory compensation or anion gap cannot be calculated reliably with a venous blood gas. On the other hand, the diagnosis diabetic keto-acidosis can be made with a venous blood gas; this mode of sampling can also be used for lactate measurement at the emergency department as an independent prognostic marker for mortality. Venous blood gas analyses are not able to assess oxygenation. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive alternative for arterial blood gas sampling. The use of a venous blood gas to assess a patient's ventilation is limited, whereas it can be used to diagnose carbomonoxide intoxication or methaemoglobinaemia.

  17. Development of a Contingency Gas Analyzer for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Bill; Carney, Kenneth; Steiner, George; OHarra, William; Lewis, John

    2010-01-01

    NASA's experience with electrochemical sensors in a hand-held toxic gas monitor serves as a basis for the development of a fixed on-board instrument, the Contingency Gas Analyzer (CGA), for monitoring selected toxic combustion products as well as oxygen and carbon dioxide on the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Oxygen and carbon dioxide are major components of the cabin environment and accurate measurement of these compounds is critical to maintaining a safe working environment for the crew. Fire or thermal degradation events may produce harmful levels of toxic products, including carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and hydrogen chloride (HCl) in the environment. These three components, besides being toxic in their own right, can serve as surrogates for a panoply of hazardous combustion products. On orbit monitoring of these surrogates provides for crew health and safety by indicating the presence of toxic combustion products in the environment before, during and after combustion or thermal degradation events. Issues identified in previous NASA experiences mandate hardening the instrument and components to endure the mechanical and operational stresses of the CEV environment while maintaining high analytical fidelity. Specific functional challenges involve protecting the sensors from various anticipated events- such as rapid pressure changes, low cabin pressures, and extreme vibration/shock exposures- and extending the sensor lifetime and calibration periods far beyond the current state of the art to avoid the need for on-orbit calibration. This paper focuses on lessons learned from the earlier NASA hardware, current testing results, and engineering solutions to the identified problems. Of particular focus will be the means for protecting the sensors, addressing well known cross-sensitivity issues and the efficacy of a novel self monitoring mechanism for extending sensor calibration periods.

  18. Development of an In-Situ Data Logging System for Multiple Trace Gas Analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, John R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2008-09-01

    A field deployable in-situ data logging system was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for trace gases including carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides including nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and odd nitrogens (NO/NO2/NOx). On-line data acquisition and calibration are essential to analysis of observables and data integrity. As such, a program was written to control the communication between the data logger and each analyzer in Logger Net, a program used to communicate with the data logger. Analog outputs were collected by a CR-23X Campbell data logger between July 2, 2007 and August 7, 2007 in Richland, Washington, with data being averaged every minute. A dynamic calibrator was used to calibrate the instruments using a gas standard with NIST-certified concentration. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s HYSPLIT model was used to create a backward and forward trajectory of air during an episode of peak O3 to determine pollutant sources and sinks. Data collected through the duration of the sampling period revealed several observations. Concentrations of all trace gases were low, due in part to the scarcity of pollutant sources in the region. The average SO2 reading was less than 0.05 ppb over the period, whereas mixing ratios of 1-20 ppb are more common in rural-suburban environments. NO, NO2, and NOx averaged 0.3, 12.2, and 12.8 ppb, respectively, while the average CO was 228.5 ppb. Typical O3 in similar environments peaks at 80-150 ppb, but the highest mixing ratio of O3 observed was less than 45 ppb. HYSPLIT offered no apparent source for additional pollutants during the high O3 episode, but increased photochemistry due to high temperatures would explain the increase in O3. Both SO2 and NO readings registered near the detection limit of the instruments, and displayed a trend similar to background noise. The development of the data logging and display system for key trace gas species is an

  19. Improved Eddy Flux Measurements by Open-Path Gas Analyzer and Sonic Anemometer Co-Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A novel instrument design combines the sensing paths of an open-path gas analyzer and a 3-D sonic anemometer and integrates the sensors in a single aerodynamic body. Common electronics provide fast-response, synchronized measurements of wind vector, sonic temperature, CO2 and H2O densities, and atmospheric pressure. An instantaneous CO2 mixing ratio, relative to dry air, is computed in real time. The synergy of combined sensors offers an alternative to the traditional density-based flux calculation method historically used for standalone open-path analyzers. A simple method is described for a direct, in-situ, mixing-ratio-based flux calculation. The method consists of: (i) correcting sonically derived air temperature for humidity effects using instantaneous water vapor density and atmospheric pressure measurements, (ii) computing water vapor pressure based on water-vapor density and humidity-corrected sonic temperature, (iii) computing fast-response CO2 mixing ratio based on CO2 density, sonic temperature, water vapor, and atmospheric pressures, and (iv) computing CO2 flux from the covariance of the vertical wind speed and the CO2 mixing ratio. Since CO2 mixing ratio is a conserved quantity, the proposed method simplifies the calculations and eliminates the need for corrections in post-processing by accounting for temperature, water-vapor, and pressure-fluctuation effects on the CO2 density. A field experiment was conducted using the integrated sensor to verify performance of the mixing-ratio method and to quantify the differences with density-derived CO2 flux corrected for sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The pressure term of the density corrections was also included in the comparison. Results suggest that the integrated sensor with co-located sonic and gas sensing paths and the mixing-ratio-based method minimize or eliminate the following uncertainties in the measured CO2 flux: (i) correcting for frequency-response losses due to spatial separation of measured

  20. Radial artery pseudoaneurysm: A rare complication after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal Nitin; Gandhi, Shruti P; Sutariya, Harsh C

    2016-10-01

    With a reported incidence of 0.048%, radial artery pseudoaneurysm (PA) is a rare but serious complication of arterial cannulation. We report a case of PA developing after a single puncture of the right radial artery for arterial blood-gas analysis diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound in young male patient. The development of PA after puncture of radial artery for continuous blood pressure monitoring and serial blood-gas analysis has been reported in the past; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is only one case report of development of PA after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis is reported in the past.

  1. Eddy Covariance Measurements of Methane Flux Using an Open-Path Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Anderson, T.; Zona, D.; Schedlbauer, J.; Anderson, D.; Eckles, R.; Hastings, S.; Ikawa, H.; McDermitt, D.; Oberbauer, S.; Oechel, W.; Riensche, B.; Starr, G.; Sturtevant, C.; Xu, L.

    2008-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential of about 23 times that of carbon dioxide over a 100-year cycle (Houghton et al., 2001). Measurements of methane fluxes from the terrestrial biosphere have mostly been made using flux chambers, which have many advantages, but are discrete in time and space and may disturb surface integrity and air pressure. Open-path analyzers offer a number of advantages for measuring methane fluxes, including undisturbed in- situ flux measurements, spatial integration using the Eddy Covariance approach, zero frequency response errors due to tube attenuation, confident water and thermal density terms from co-located fast measurements of water and sonic temperature, and remote deployment due to lower power demands in the absence of a pump. The prototype open-path methane analyzer is a VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser)-based instrument. It employs an open Herriott cell and measures levels of methane with RMS noise below 6 ppb at 10 Hz sampling in controlled laboratory environment. Field maintenance is minimized by a self-cleaning mechanism to keep the lower mirror free of contamination. Eddy Covariance measurements of methane flux using the prototype open-path methane analyzer are presented for the period between 2006 and 2008 in three ecosystems with contrasting weather and moisture conditions: (1) Fluxes over a short-hydroperiod sawgrass wetland in the Florida Everglades were measured in a warm and humid environment with temperatures often exceeding 25oC, variable winds, and frequent heavy dew at night; (2) Fluxes over coastal wetlands in an Arctic tundra were measured in an environment with frequent sub-zero temperatures, moderate winds, and ocean mist; (3) Fluxes over pacific mangroves in Mexico were measured in an environment with moderate air temperatures high winds, and sea spray. Presented eddy covariance flux data were collected from a co-located prototype open-path methane analyzer, LI-7500, and

  2. [Investigation of reference intervals of blood gas and acid-base analysis assays in China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the upper and lower limits and their sources of reference intervals in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays. The data of reference intervals were collected, which come from the first run of 2014 External Quality Assessment (EQA) program in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays performed by National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL). All the abnormal values and errors were eliminated. Data statistics was performed by SPSS 13.0 and Excel 2007 referring to upper and lower limits of reference intervals and sources of 7 blood gas and acid-base analysis assays, i.e. pH value, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. Values were further grouped based on instrument system and the difference between each group were analyzed. There were 225 laboratories submitting the information on the reference intervals they had been using. The three main sources of reference intervals were National Guide to Clinical Laboratory Procedures [37.07% (400/1 079)], instructions of instrument manufactures [31.23% (337/1 079)] and instructions of reagent manufactures [23.26% (251/1 079)]. Approximately 35.1% (79/225) of the laboratories had validated the reference intervals they used. The difference of upper and lower limits in most assays among 7 laboratories was moderate, both minimum and maximum (i.e. the upper limits of pH value was 7.00-7.45, the lower limits of Na+ was 130.00-156.00 mmol/L), and mean and median (i.e. the upper limits of K+ was 5.04 mmol/L and 5.10 mmol/L, the upper limits of PCO2 was 45.65 mmHg and 45.00 mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), as well as the difference in P2.5 and P97.5 between each instrument system group. It was shown by Kruskal-Wallis method that the P values of upper and lower limits of all the parameters were lower than 0.001, expecting the lower limits of Na+ with P value 0.029. It was shown by Mann-Whitney that the statistic differences were found among instrument

  3. Effects of intravaginally inserted controlled-release dinoprostone and oxytocin for labor induction on umbilical cord blood gas parameters

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Hüseyin Levent; Kabacaoğlu, Gökalp; Seçen, Elçin İşlek; Üstüner, Işık; Yeğin, Gülin; Avşar, Ayşe Filiz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of oxytocin and dinoprostone used in labor induction on fetal blood gas parameters. Material and Methods: This prospective randomized trial involved 108 women who completed 37 gestational weeks and who required labor induction prior to normal vaginal birth. Labor was induced in 57 women with an intravenous low dose oxytocin regimen and in 51 with intravaginal dinoprostone (PGE2). Following childbirth, umbilical artery blood gas was analyzed, with pH, pCO2, pO2, HCO3 and base excess (BE) compared in the two groups. Results: Mean age and obstetrical data (gravidity, parity, gestational weeks and birthweight) were similar in the two groups (p>0.05). All infants had 1 and 5 minute APGAR scores ≥7. Umbilical artery blood pH was similar in the oxytocin and dinoprostone groups (7.31±0.07 vs. 7.31±0.05, p=0.780), as were the other blood gas parameters (pCO2, pO2, base excess and HCO3; p>0.05 each). Conclusion: Induction of labor with either oxytocin or dinoprostone in women with uncomplicated term pregnancies had no adverse effects on umbilical artery blood gas parameters. PMID:24592052

  4. Analyzing the Impact of Residential Building Attributes, Demographic and Behavioral Factors on Natural Gas Usage

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, Olga V.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2011-03-03

    study attempts to bridge that gap by analyzing behavioral data and investigate the applicability of additive nonparametric regression to this task. This study evaluates the impact of 31 regressors on residential natural gas usage. The regressors include weather, economic variables, demographic and behavioral characteristics, and building attributes related to energy use. In general, most of the regression results were in line with previous engineering and economic studies in this area. There were, however, some counterintuitive results, particularly with regard to thermostat controls and behaviors. There are a number of possible reasons for these counterintuitive results including the inability to control for regional climate variability due to the data sanitization (to prevent identification of respondents), inaccurate data caused by to self-reporting, and the fact that not all relevant behavioral variables were included in the data set, so we were not able to control for them in the study. The results of this analysis could be used as an in-sample prediction for approximating energy demand of a residential building whose characteristics are described by the regressors in this analysis, but a certain combination of their particular values does not exist in the real world. In addition, this study has potential applications for benefit-cost analysis of residential upgrades and retrofits under a fixed budget, because the results of this study contain information on how natural gas consumption might change once a particular characteristic or attribute is altered. Finally, the results of this study can help establish a relationship between natural gas consumption and changes in behavior of occupants.

  5. Mars Phoenix Scout Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Database: Thermal Database Development and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Niles, P. B.; Stein, T. C.; Hamara, D.; Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Lander mission in 2008 examined the history of water, searched for organics, and evaluated the potential for past/present microbial habitability in a martian arctic ice-rich soil [1]. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument measured the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and detected volatile bearing mineralogy (perchlorate, carbonate, hydrated mineral phases) in the martian soil [2-7]. The TEGA data are archived at the Planetary Data System (PDS) Geosciences Node but are reported in forms that require further processing to be of use to the non-TEGA expert. The soil and blank TEGA thermal data are reported as duty cycle and must be converted to differential power (mW) to allow for enthalpy calculations of exothermic/endothermic transitions. The exothermic/endothermic temperatures are also used to determine what phases (inorganic/organic) are present in the sample. The objectives of this work are to: 1) Describe how interpretable thermal data can be created from TEGA data sets on the PDS and 2) Provide additional thermal data interpretation of two Phoenix soils (Baby Bear, Wicked Witch) and include interpretations from three unreported soils (Rosy Red 1, 2, and Burning Coals).

  6. Assessing Atmospheric CO2 Entrapped in Clay Nanotubes using Residual Gas Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Maity, Abhijit; Pradhan, Manik; Jana, Subhra

    2016-02-16

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high-vacuum chamber has been explored to measure atmospheric CO2 entrapped in aminosilane-modified clay nanotubes. Ambient CO2 uptake efficacy together with stability of these novel adsorbents composed of both primary and/or secondary amine sites has been demonstrated at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy of the RGA-based mass spectrometry technique toward atmospheric CO2 measurement has been substantiated with a laser-based optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of atmospheric CO2 on amine-functionalized clay nanotubes followed the fractional-order kinetic model compared to that of the pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order rate equations. The efficiency along with stability of these novel adsorbents has also been demonstrated by their repetitive use for CO2 capture in the oxidative environment. Our findings thus point to a fundamental study on the atmospheric CO2 adsorption by amine-loaded adsorbents using an easy handling and low-cost benchtop RGA-based mass spectrometer, opening a new strategy for CO2 capture and sequestering study.

  7. A Fast Exhaust-Gas Analyzer for the ITER Fusion Experiment Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Carlson, E. P.; Moschella, J. J.; Hazelton, R C; Keitz, M D; Gardner, Walter L

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a first demonstration of a radio-frequency (RF)-excited optical gas analyzer (RF-OGA) designed to quantitatively measure minority species inside the neutralization region of the ITER fusion experiment divertor. The sensor head, which creates its own plasma excitation and plasma light emission, is designed to operate in a strong magnetic field, and the RF coupling leads to bright light emission. It also allows for operation at low voltages, avoiding the radiation-enhanced breakdowns expected when high voltages are present in the ITER environment. Furthermore, the preferred sensor head features full isolation of the metal RF electrodes from the induced plasma. This "electrodeless" operation will permit long operation without frequent maintenance. The testing of a first experimental RF-OGA with an electrodeless design in a strong (similar to 2-T) magnetic field showed a mostly linear response of the He I-6678 angstrom line emission to the He concentration in a hydrogen background, which would produce a He concentration measurement accurate to within 2% of the helium-to-hydrogen ratio.

  8. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Dispersant Data for BP Spil/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations.From May 18-June 6, 2010, EPA??s TAGA buses monitored for the two chemicals found in the COREXIT dispersants that have the highest potential to get into the air in any significant amounts: EGBE (2-butoxyethanol) and dipropylene glycol monobutyl ether. In addition to being found in the COREXIT dispersants, these compounds are found in cleaning products and coatings. As a result, we have not beeen able to identify the source of the measured compounds. The TAGA buses detected very low levels of these chemicals in the air, at a limited number of the locations sampled along the Gulf Coast. The levels found were well below those that are likely to cause health effects, and suggest that the use of dispersants on the oil spill would not have a significant impact on air quality on land.

  9. Data Processing for Making Eddy Covariance Methane Flux Measurement with Laser-Based CH4 Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Burba, G. G.; McDermitt, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    First we will discuss the fundamental difference in the theory of operation between NDIR (Non-dispersive Infrared) based and laser-based gas analyzer. Taking LI-7500A (an open-path CO2 gas analyzer) as an example for a NDIR-based gas analyzer, the wavelength of the infrared radiation for making the gas concentration measurement is from 4.20 to 4.34 μm which includes many absorption lines. While the LI-7700 (an open-path methane gas analyzer) is a laser-based analyzer. It uses a single absorption line at 1.651 μm to make the methane concentration measurement. It employs a Herriott cell configuration with mirror spacing of 0.47 m and a total optical path length of 28.2 m. Methane density is measured using wavelength modulation spectroscopy. As a result, the measured methane density is affected by sensible heat and latent heat flux, and also by spectroscopic effects (e.g., line broadening) due to changes in temperature and water vapor content. Here we propose a new procedure to account for spectroscopic effects. Since both density effects and spectroscopic effects are predictable with the ideal gas law and HITRAN respectively, the spectroscopic effect can be incorporated into WPL correction. In this paper, we will discuss the details of this new procedure to account for the spectroscopic effect in the methane flux calculation. Field experiment results will be presented to show the accuracy of this new procedure.

  10. [Study on online self-calibration technique for trace gas analyzer based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2010-04-01

    After decades of development, the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) became one of the most promising techniques for online trace gas analyzing in process industry. Limited by its principle, the measurement result of TDLAS system is seriously affected by temperature and gas pressure variation. For this reason, most TDLAS systems employed temperature and pressure sensors, which can provide information for partly correcting the error. Theoretically, the gas absorption theory itself is not perfect enough to give an analytical relation between the measurement error and the temperature & pressure variation. Practically, temperature and pressure sensors are not available in some harsh working condition. To address these problems, an online self-calibration technique with a reference gas cell is proposed to compensate temperature and pressure variation induced measurement error in a TDLAS system. More specifically, a reference gas cell filled with known proportion target gas is placed on site, surrounded by working gas to be measured. The main body of the gas cell is made from a stainless tube, one end is a silica glass window and the other end is a reflector. A pressure bellows is connected to the middle of the stainless tube by a branch conduit. The pressure bellows can adaptively deform to keep the pressure balance between the inside and outside gas. Thereby, the temperature and pressure inside the reference cell are equal to that of the gas outside. To ensure the similarity between the reference gas cell and working gas cell, they share the same laser diode source and signal processing circuit. In one working cycle, the TDLAS system obtains the absorption spectrum of both gas cells synchronously. Then the concentration of the trace gas can be easily obtained by calculating the absorption intensity proportion of both absorption spectra without considering the affection of temperature and pressure. The principle, design, and experiments of this

  11. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises (1) a whole blood sample disc, (2) a serum sample disc, (3) a sample preparation rotor, and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc in capillary tubes filled by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analytical rotor for analysis by conventional methods.

  12. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1985-08-05

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises: (1) a whole blood sample disc; (2) a serum sample disc; (3) a sample preparation rotor; and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analyticaly rotor for conventional methods. 5 figs.

  13. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection.

  14. Blood gas analysis, blood saturation and chosen parameters of spirometric examination in NSCLC patients undergoing chemotherapy and pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tokarski, Sławomir; Tokarska, Kamila; Schwarz, Ewa; Obrebska, Agnieszka; Mejer, Anna; Kowalski, Jan

    2014-04-01

    In industrialized countries lung cancer is associated with highest mortality among carcinoma. Progression of the disease is associated with diminished tolerance for physical activities, aggravated dyspnea and lowering of life quality. The aim of study was the evaluation of blood gas, blood saturation and chosen parameters of spirometric examination in NSCLC patients undergoing chemotherapy and pulmonary rehabilitation. Analysis of capillary blood was done using RapidPoint 405 Siemens device. Spirometric examination was done using PNEUMO abcMED device. Forty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC were subjected to the examination. This included 38 men and 11 women aged between 46-75 years (mean age 63 +/- 7.5 years) who were separated into two groups: group I--25 patients undergoing standard chemotherapy (group C); group II--24 patients undergoing standard chemotherapy and pulmonary rehabilitation (group CK). All patients were subjected to blood gas analysis, blood saturation analysis and spirometric examination twice, before and after first-line chemotherapy Increase of pO2 and SaO2 in blood, and FEV1 and FVC in spirometric examination was significantly higher in patients undergoing pulmonary rehabilitation and chemotherapy (group II) (p < 0.05) in comparison to NSCLC patients undergoing only chemotherapy (group I). Pulmonary rehabilitation of NSCLC patients undergoing first-line chemotherapy results in improvement of indicators of blood gas, blood saturation analysis and chosen parameters of spirometric analysis. Pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with lung cancer seems to be an important form of supplementary treatment.

  15. Blood gas partition coefficient and pulmonary extraction ratio for propofol in goats and pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossherr, M; Hengstenberg, A; Dibbelt, L; Igl, B-W; Noel, R; Knesebeck, A v d; Schmucker, P; Gehring, H

    2009-10-01

    The interpretation of continuously measured propofol concentration in respiratory gas demands knowledge about the blood gas partition coefficient and pulmonary extraction ratio for propofol. In the present investigation we compared both variables for propofol between goats and pigs during a propofol anaesthesia. In ten goats and ten pigs, expired alveolar gas and arterial and mixed venous blood samples were simultaneously drawn during total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol. The blood gas partition coefficient and pulmonary extraction ratio were calculated for both species. Non-parametric methods were used for statistical inference. The blood gas partition coefficient ranged between 7000 and 646,000 for goats and between 17,000 and 267,000 for pigs. The pulmonary extraction ratio ranged between 32.9% and 98.1% for goats and was higher for pigs, which ranged between -106.0% and 39.0%. The blood gas partition coefficient for propofol exceeded those for other known anaesthetic compounds so that it takes longer to develop a steady-state. The different pulmonary extraction rates in two species suggest that there are different ways to distribute propofol during the lung passage on its way from the blood to breathing gas. This species-specific difference has to be considered for methods using the alveolar gas for monitoring the propofol concentration in plasma.

  16. Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer: Differential Scanning Calorimeter and Mass Spectrometer Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Scout Phoenix lander will land in the north polar region of Mars in May, 2008. One objective of the Phoenix lander is to search for evidence of past life in the form of molecular organics that may be preserved in the subsurface soil. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was developed to detect these organics by coupling a simultaneous differential thermal analyzer (SDTA) with a mass spectrometer. Martian soil will be heated to approx.1000 C and potential organic decomposition products such as CO2, CH4 etc. will be examined for with the MS. TEGA s SDTA will also assess the presence of endothermic and exothermic reactions that are characteristic of soil organics and minerals as the soil is heated. The MS in addition to detecting organic decompositon products, will also assess the levels of soil inorganic volatiles such as H2O, SO2, and CO2. Organic detection has a high priority for this mission; however, TEGA has the ability to provide valuable insight into the mineralogical composition of the soil. The overall goal of this work is to develop a TEGA database of minerals that will serve as a reference for the interpretation of Phoenix-TEGA. Previous databases for the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander (MPL)-TEGA instrument only went to 725 C. Furthermore, the MPL-TEGA could only detect CO2 and H2O while the Phoenix-TEGA MS can examine up to 144 atomic mass units. The higher temperature Phoenix-TEGA SDTA coupled with the more capable MS indicates that a higher temperature database is required for TEGA interpretation. The overall goal of this work is to develop a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) database of minerals along with corresponding MS data of evolved gases that can used to interpret TEGA data during and after mission operations. While SDTA and DSC measurement techniques are slightly different (SDTA does not use a reference pan), the results are fundamentally similar and thus DSC is a useful technique in providing comparative data for the TEGA

  17. Combining SPECT medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics for analyzing blood and dialysate flow in hemodialyzers.

    PubMed

    Eloot, S; D'Asseler, Y; De Bondt, P; Verdonck, R

    2005-07-01

    For a better insight in dialyzer efficiency with respect to local mass transport in a low flux dialyzer (Fresenius F6HPS), blood and dialysate flow distributions were visualized with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, which were validated with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. To visualize blood-side flow while avoiding transport through the fiber membrane, a bolus of 99m-Technetium labeled MAA (Macro Aggregated Albumin) was injected in the flow using an electronic valve. Water was used to simulate blood, but flow rate was adjusted according to laws of dynamic similarity to account for the viscosity difference (factor 2.75). For the visualization of dialysate flow, a bolus of 99m-Technetium labeled DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic Acid) was injected, while pressurized air in the blood compartment avoided transmembrane flow. For each test series, 3D acquisitions were made on a two respectively three-headed SPECT camera. By evaluating the images at different time steps, dynamic 3D intensity plots were obtained, which were further used to derive local flow velocities. Additionally, three-dimensional CFD models were developed for simulating the overall blood and dialysate flow, respectively. In both models,the whole fiber compartment was defined as a porous medium with overall axial and radial permeability derived theoretically and from in vitro tests. With the imaging as well as with the computational technique, a homogeneous blood flow distribution was found, while vortices and fluid stagnation were observed in the dialyzer inlet manifold. The non-homogeneous dialysate distribution, as found with SPECT imaging, implies the occurrence of non-efficient sites with respect to mass transfer. The discrepancy between the dialysate results of both techniques indicated that the assumption of a constant fiber bundle permeability in the CFD model was too optimistic. In conclusion, medical imaging techniques like SPECT are very helpful to validate

  18. Determination of paraldehyde by gas chromatography in whole blood from children.

    PubMed

    Githiga, Isaiah M; Muchohi, Simon N; Ogutu, Bernhards R; Newton, Charles R J C; Otieno, Godfrey O; Gitau, Evelyn N; Kokwaro, Gilbert O

    2004-06-15

    A rapid, sensitive and selective gas chromatographic method with flame ionization detection was developed for the determination of paraldehyde in small blood samples taken from children. Whole blood samples (300 microl) collected in a 3 ml Wheaton glass sample vial were spiked with acetone (internal standard: 15 ng) followed by addition of concentrated hydrochloric acid. The mixture was heated in the sealed airtight sample vial in a water bath (96 Celsius; 5 min) to depolymerize paraldehyde to acetaldehyde. A 2 ml aliquot of the headspace was analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector using a stainless steel column (3 m x 4 mm i.d.) packed with 10% Carbowax 20 M/ 2% KOH on 80/100 Chromosorb WAW. Calibration curves were linear from 1.0-20 microg (r2>0.99). The limit of detection was 1.5 microg/ml, while relative mean recoveries at 2 and 18 microg were 105.6 +/- 8.4 and 101.2 +/- 5.9%, respectively (n = 10 for each level). Intra- and inter-assay relative standard deviations at 2, 10 and 18 microg were <15%. There was no interference from other drugs concurrently used in children with severe malaria, such as anticonvulsants (diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbitone), antipyretics/analgesics (paracetamol and salicylate), antibiotics (gentamicin, chloramphenicol, benzyl penicillin) and antimalarials (chloroquine, quinine, proguanil, cycloguanil, pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine). The method was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic studies of paraldehyde in children with convulsions associated with severe malaria.

  19. Field evaluation of a portable blood lead analyzer in workers living at a high altitude: a follow-up investigation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lauralynn; Ashley, Kevin; Jones, Robert L; Deddens, James A

    2004-12-01

    Field-portable instruments can offer expeditious analytical results to health professionals in field settings and in areas lacking laboratory infrastructure. This study further evaluated an electroanalytical field-portable instrument, which rapidly analyzes blood lead concentrations. A portable anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) instrument was evaluated utilizing paired samples from 243 employees working at an elevation of approximately 3,800 meters in Peru. Each worker donated two venous blood samples, one of which was analyzed by the ASV device and the other by a reference analytical method, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). According to the GFAAS results, the mean blood lead concentration measured was 46(+/-16) mug/dl; this was significantly greater than the mean ASV measurement of 32(+/-11) mug/dl (paired t-test; P < 0.0001). The accuracy of the ASV estimation decreased as the measured blood lead concentration increased. The results from this investigation were significantly different from the previous study, which was conducted near sea level. The exact causes for the discrepancies between the portable ASV results from the two studies are unclear, but are thought to be related to differences in blood chemistry between the Midwestern United States and Peruvian Andes worker cohorts. Portable ASV blood lead measurements from populations living at high altitudes should be viewed with caution. Am. J. Ind. Med. 46:656-662, 2004. Published 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Blood lead levels of wild Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) and black scoters (Melanitta nigra) in Alaska using a portable blood lead analyzer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Corrine S.; Luebbert, Joanne; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Schamber, Jason L.; Rosenberg, Daniel H.

    2006-01-01

    Sea duck populations are declining in Alaska. The reasons for the decline are not known; environmental lead exposure is one suspected cause. Thirty wild Steller's eider ducks (Polysticta stelleri) and 40 wild black scoter ducks (Melanitta nigra) were tested for blood lead levels using a portable blood lead analyzer (LeadCare; ESA, Inc., Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824, USA). Sixty-seven and one-tenth percent of the sea ducks had undetectable blood lead levels, 30.0% had values indicating normal or background lead exposure, and 2.9% had values indicating lead exposure. None of the birds had values indicating lead toxicity, and no birds demonstrated clinical signs of toxicity. Birds in areas with higher human population density had higher blood lead levels than those in less densely populated areas. This is the first time a portable blood lead analyzer has been utilized with sea ducks in a field setting. Because it provides immediate results, it is valuable as a screening tool for investigators carrying out surgical procedures on birds in the field as well as establishing baseline blood lead data on sea ducks. Lead exposure does occur in wild sea ducks, and the study indicates that additional research is needed in order to determine the role environmental lead plays in declining sea duck populations.

  1. Penile rehabilitation with a vacuum erectile device in an animal model is related to an antihypoxic mechanism: blood gas evidence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao-Cheng; Yang, Wen-Li; Zhang, Jun-Lan; Dai, Yu-Tian; Wang, Run

    2013-05-01

    Our previous study showed that vacuum erectile device (VED) therapy has improved erectile function in rats with bilateral cavernous nerve crush (BCNC) injuries. This study was designed to explore the mechanism of VED in penile rehabilitation by analyzing cavernous oxygen saturation (SO2) and to examine the effect of VED therapy on preventing penile shrinkage after BCNC. Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: group 1, sham surgery; group 2, BCNC; and group 3, BCNC+VED. Penile length and diameter were measured on a weekly basis. After 4 weeks of therapy, the penile blood was extracted by three methods for blood gas analysis (BGA): method 1, cavernous blood was aspirated at the flaccid state; method 2, cavernous blood was aspirated at the traction state; and method 3, cavernous blood was aspirated immediately after applying VED. SO2 values were tested by the blood gas analyzer. The results showed that VED therapy is effective in preventing penile shrinkage induced by BCNC (Penile shortening: BCNC group 1.9±1.1 mm; VED group 0.3±1.0 mm; P<0.01. Penile diameter reduction: BCNC group 0.28±0.14 mm; VED group 0.04±0.14 mm; P<0.01). The mean SO2±s.d. values were increased by VED application (88.25%±4.94%) compared to the flaccid (76.53%±4.16%) or traction groups (78.93%±2.56%) (P<0.05). The calculated blood constructs in the corpus cavernosum right after VED application were 62% arterial and 38% venous blood. These findings suggest that VED therapy can effectively preserve penile size in rats with BCNC injury. The beneficial effect of VED therapy is related to antihypoxia by increasing cavernous blood SO2.

  2. Umbilical Arterial Blood Gas and Perinatal Outcome in the Second Twin according to the Planned Mode of Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji Young; Yoon, Won Sik; Lee, Gui Se Ra; Kim, Sa Jin; Shin, Jong Chul; Park, In Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare umbilical arterial gas parameters in the second twin of twin pregnancies according to the mode of delivery Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of twin deliveries after 34 weeks of gestation for 3 years. Excluding the cases which underwent emergency cesarean delivery during trial of labor, a total of 79 twin gestations had umbilical arterial blood gas values available and were and divided into cesarean delivery group (N=40) and vaginal delivery group (N=39). The mean differences of umbilical arterial blood parameters and the Apgar score between the first and second twin in each pregnancy were compared according the mode of delivery. Results: The differences of umbilical arterial gas parameters between twin siblings showed no significant difference according to the mode of delivery. With regard to the 1 minute and 5 minute Apgar scores, the differences between twin siblings are significantly increased in vaginal delivery group compared to cesarean delivery group (p=0.048, and p=0.038, respectively). In comparing the 28 cases delivered vaginally with an inter-twin delivery interval < 10 minutes and 40 cases delivered by cesarean section, no significant differences were observed in the umbilical arterial gas parameters and Apgar scores. Conclusion: The inter-twin umbilical arterial blood gas parameters according to the mode of delivery showed no difference. For twin deliveries, it is relatively safe to plan for a vaginal delivery, but an effort should be made to reduce the inter-twin delivery interval time. PMID:22135609

  3. Evaluation of a new handheld point-of-care blood gas analyser using 100 equine blood samples.

    PubMed

    Bardell, David; West, Eleanor; Senior, J Mark

    2016-07-07

    To determine whether the Enterprise point-of-care blood analysis system (EPOC) produces results in agreement with two other blood gas analysers in regular clinical use (i-STAT and Radiometer ABL77) and to investigate the precision of the new machine when used with equine whole blood. Prospective, randomized, non-blinded, comparative laboratory analyser study. Horses admitted to a university teaching hospital requiring arterial or venous blood gas analysis as part of their routine clinical management. One hundred equine blood samples were run immediately, consecutively and in randomized order on three blood gas analysers. Results of variables common to all three analysers were tested for agreement and compared with guidelines used in human medicine. These require 80% of results from the test analyser to fall within a defined range or percentage of results from the comparator devices to achieve acceptability. Additionally, 21 samples were run twice in quick succession on the EPOC analyser to investigate precision. Agreement targets were not met for haematocrit, haemoglobin and base excess for either i-STAT or ABL77 analysers. EPOC precision targets were not met for partial pressure of carbon dioxide, ionized calcium, haematocrit and haemoglobin. Overall comparative performance of the EPOC was good to excellent for pH, oxygen tension, potassium, bicarbonate and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin, but marginal to poor for other parameters. The EPOC may be useful in performing analysis of equine whole blood, but trend analysis of carbon dioxide tension, ionized calcium, haematocrit and haemoglobin should be interpreted with caution. The EPOC should not be used interchangeably with other blood gas analysers. © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  4. Evaluation of a new handheld point-of-care blood gas analyser using 100 equine blood samples.

    PubMed

    Bardell, David; West, Eleanor; Mark Senior, J

    2017-02-22

    To determine whether the Enterprise point-of-care blood analysis system (EPOC) produces results in agreement with two other blood gas analysers in regular clinical use (i-STAT and Radiometer ABL77) and to investigate the precision of the new machine when used with equine whole blood. Prospective, randomized, non-blinded, comparative laboratory analyser study. Horses admitted to a university teaching hospital requiring arterial or venous blood gas analysis as part of their routine clinical management. One hundred equine blood samples were run immediately, consecutively and in randomized order on three blood gas analysers. Results of variables common to all three analysers were tested for agreement and compared with guidelines used in human medicine. These require 80% of results from the test analyser to fall within a defined range or percentage of results from the comparator devices to achieve acceptability. Additionally, 21 samples were run twice in quick succession on the EPOC analyser to investigate precision. Agreement targets were not met for haematocrit, haemoglobin and base excess for either i-STAT or ABL77 analysers. EPOC precision targets were not met for partial pressure of carbon dioxide, ionized calcium, haematocrit and haemoglobin. Overall comparative performance of the EPOC was good to excellent for pH, oxygen tension, potassium, bicarbonate and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin, but marginal to poor for other parameters. The EPOC may be useful in performing analysis of equine whole blood, but trend analysis of carbon dioxide tension, ionized calcium, haematocrit and haemoglobin should be interpreted with caution. The EPOC should not be used interchangeably with other blood gas analysers. Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood gas analysis of the coronary sinus in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianghua; Shan, Chunfang; Zhang, Y U; Zhou, Xianhui; Li, Jinxin; Li, Yaodong; Xing, Qiang; Tang, Baopeng

    2015-05-01

    The difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal cardiac function and those with heart failure (HF), and the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac ejection fraction (EF) are poorly understood. By establishing a control group composed of individuals with normal cardiac function, the present study aimed to determine the difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal and abnormal cardiac function, as well as the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF. A total of 34 patients with normal cardiac function were enrolled in the control group and 44 patients with HF were enrolled in the experimental group. Blood samples from the aortic root, femoral vein and coronary sinus (CS) were collected from each patient. All the blood samples were subjected to blood gas analysis. The partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation obtained from the peripheral vein and CS of patients with HF were lower than those in patients with normal cardiac function. In each patient with HF, the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF was analyzed using multi-linear correlation and regression analyses. Cardiac oxygen consumption negatively correlated with cardiac EF (R=-0.336, P=0.026). Furthermore, linear regression analysis suggested that cardiac EF had a significant effect on cardiac oxygen consumption (y = 82.906-0.483×, P=0.026). In conclusion, myocardial oxygen consumption is greater in individuals with HF compared to those with normal cardiac function. The cardiac EF affects myocardial oxygen consumption in patients with HF.

  6. Effectiveness of the Stewart Method in the Evaluation of Blood Gas Parameters.

    PubMed

    Gezer, Mustafa; Bulucu, Fatih; Ozturk, Kadir; Kilic, Selim; Kaldirim, Umit; Eyi, Yusuf Emrah

    2015-03-01

    In 1981, Peter A. Stewart published a paper describing his concept for employing Strong Ion Difference. In this study we compared the HCO3 levels and Anion Gap (AG) calculated using the classic method and the Stewart method. Four hundred nine (409) arterial blood gases of 90 patients were collected retrospectively. Some were obtained from the same patients in different times and conditions. All blood samples were evaluated using the same device (ABL 800 Blood Gas Analyzer). HCO3 level and AG were calculated using the Stewart method via the website AcidBase.org. HCO3 levels, AG and strong ion difference (SID) were calculated using the Stewart method, incorporating the parameters of age, serum lactate, glucose, sodium, and pH, etc. According to classic method, the levels of HCO3 and AG were 22.4±7.2 mEq/L and 20.1±4.1 mEq/L respectively. According to Stewart method, the levels of HCO3 and AG were 22.6±7.4 and 19.9±4.5 mEq/L respectively. There was strong correlation between the classic method and the Stewart method for calculating HCO3 and AG. The Stewart method may be more effective in the evaluation of complex metabolic acidosis.

  7. Human Renovascular Disease: Estimating Fractional Tissue Hypoxia to Analyze Blood Oxygen Level–dependent MR

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Ahmed; Crane, John; Glockner, James F.; Herrmann, Sandra M. S.; Friedman, Hannah; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional kidney hypoxia, measured by using blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, correlates with renal blood flow (RBF), tissue perfusion, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) better than regionally selected region of interest–based methods. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board according to a HIPAA-compliant protocol, with written informed consent. BOLD MR imaging was performed in 40 patients with atherosclerotic RAS (age range, 51–83 years; 22 men, 18 women) and 32 patients with essential hypertension (EH) (age range, 26–85 years; 19 men, 13 women) during sodium intake and renin-angiotensin blockade. Fractional kidney hypoxia (percentage of entire axial image section with R2* above 30 sec−1) and conventional regional estimates of cortical and medullary R2* levels were measured. Stenotic and nonstenotic contralateral kidneys were compared for volume, tissue perfusion, and blood flow measured with multidetector computed tomography. Statistical analysis was performed (paired and nonpaired t tests, linear regression analysis). Results: Stenotic RBF was reduced compared with RBF of contralateral kidneys (225.2 mL/min vs 348 mL/min, P = .0003). Medullary perfusion in atherosclerotic RAS patients was lower than in EH patients (1.07 mL/min per milliliter of tissue vs 1.3 mL/min per milliliter of tissue, P = .009). While observer-selected cortical R2* (18.9 sec−1 [stenosis] vs 18.5 sec−1 [EH], P = .07) did not differ, fractional kidney hypoxia was higher in stenotic kidneys compared with kidneys with EH (17.4% vs 9.6%, P < .0001) and contralateral kidneys (7.2%, P < .0001). Fractional hypoxia correlated inversely with blood flow (r = −0.34), perfusion (r = −0.3), and GFR (r = −0.32). Conclusion: Fractional tissue hypoxia rather than cortical or medullary R2* values used to assess

  8. Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

  9. [Condition setting for the measurement of blood coagulation factor XIII activity using a fully automated blood coagulation analyzer, COAGTRON-350].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Nobuko; Kaneko, Makoto; Tanabe, Kumiko; Jyona, Masahiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-12-01

    The automated laboratory analyzer COAGTRON-350 (Trinity Biotech) is used for routine and specific coagulation testing for the detection of fibrin formation utilizing either mechanical principles (ball method) or photo-optical principles, chromogenic kinetic enzyme analysis, and immune-turbidimetric detection systems in one benchtop unit. In this study, we demonstrated and established a parameter for the measurement of factor XIII (FXIII) activity using Berichrom FXIII reagent and the COAGTRON-350 analyzer. The usual protocol used for this reagent, based on the handling method, was slightly modified for this device. The analysis showed that fundamental study for the measurement of FXIII activity under our condition setting was favorable in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and correlation with another assays. Since FXIII is the key enzyme that plays important roles in hemostasis by stabilizing fibrin formation, the measurement of FXIII is essential for the diagnosis of bleeding disorders. Therefore, FXIII activity assessment as well as a routine coagulation testing can be conducted simultaneously with one instrument, which is useful in coagulopathy assessment.

  10. Angiostrongylosis-related restrictive pneumopathy assessed by arterial blood gas analysis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Csöndes, Judit; Majoros, Gábor; Lajos, Zoltán; Psáder, Roland; Vajdovich, Péter; Manczur, Ferenc; Máthé, Ákos

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary angiostrongylosis was diagnosed by the Baermann method and larval identification from faecal and bronchoalveolar lavage samples in a five-month- old male mongrel dog with dyspnoea and cough. Arterial blood gas analysis indicated arterial hypoxaemia and restrictive pneumopathy. In addition to the palliative treatment, fenbendazole was administered (50 mg/kg/24 h per os) for 14 days. The respiratory signs subsided within a short time clinically, but serial arterial blood gas analysis demonstrated an ongoing ventilation disorder. Repeated haematology, thoracic radiography, bronchoscopy and blood gas analysis were performed to follow the course of the disease. The most severe eosinophilia was detected after the beginning of the anthelmintic therapy, and the arterial pO2 level was permanently low. Arterial blood gas analysis provided the most adequate information about the course of the pneumopathy and it greatly facilitated the patient's medical management.

  11. Comparison of gas analyzers for quantifying eddy covariance fluxes- results from an irrigated alfalfa field in Davis, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Biraud, S.; Polonik, P.; Billesbach, D.; Hanson, C. V.; Bogoev, I.; Conrad, B.; Alstad, K. P.; Burba, G. G.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The eddy covariance technique requires simultaneous, rapid measurements of wind components and scalars (e.g., water vapor, carbon dioxide) to calculate the vertical exchange due to turbulent processes. The technique has been used extensively as a non-intrusive means to quantify land-atmosphere exchanges of mass and energy. A variety of sensor technologies and gas sampling designs have been tried. Gas concentrations are commonly measured using infrared or laser absorption spectroscopy. Open-path sensors directly sample the ambient environment but suffer when the sample volume is obstructed (e.g., rain, dust). Closed-path sensors utilize pumps to draw air into the analyzer through inlet tubes which can attenuate the signal. Enclosed-path sensors are a newer, hybrid of the open- and closed-path designs where the sensor is mounted in the environment and the sample is drawn through a short inlet tube with short residence time. Five gas analyzers were evaluated as part of this experiment: open-path LI-COR 7500A, enclosed-path LI-COR 7200, closed-path Picarro G2311-f, open-path Campbell Scientific IRGASON, and enclosed-path Campbell Scientific EC155. We compared the relative performance of the gas analyzers over an irrigated alfalfa field in Davis, CA. The field was host to a range of ancillary measurements including below-ground sensors, and a weighing lysimeter. The crop was flood irrigated and harvested monthly. To compare sensors, we evaluated the half-hour mean and variance of gas concentrations (or mole densities). Power spectra for the gas analyzers and turbulent fluxes (from a common sonic anemometer) were also calculated and analyzed. Eddy covariance corrections will be discussed as they relate to sensor design (e.g., density corrections, signal attenuation).

  12. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  13. The value of venous blood gas analysis in the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Jawad Ibrahim; Razak, Manal Khudder Abdul; Hussein, Ahmed Amer Abdul

    2017-06-15

    Newer blood gas analyzers have the ability to report electrolyte values and glucose in addition to pH, so this diagnostic process could be condensed in diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We aimed to assess the accuracy of the venous blood gas (VBG) analysis with electrolytes for diagnosing DKA. This study prospectively identified a convenience sample of (60 patients) presented with DKA and tested their VBG and serum electrolytes. The diagnosis of DKA was made according to American Diabetes Association criteria. Serum chemistry electrolyte values were considered to be the criterion standard. Sensitivity and specificity of VBG electrolytes results were compared against this standard. In addition, correlation coefficients for individual electrolytes between VBG electrolytes and laboratory chemistry electrolytes were calculated. Paired VBG and serum chemistry panels were available for 60 patients, only 49 patients were included, In this study; 20% of cases were newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. The total number of diabetic ketoacidosis was 14 patients (28.5%). The sensitivity and specificity of the VBG and electrolytes for diagnosing DKA was 92.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]=89% to 99%) and 97.1% (95% CI=92% to 100%), respectively. Correlation coefficients between VBG and serum chemistry were 0.91, 0.47, 0.61, 0.65, and 0.58 for blood sugar, sodium, potassium, chloride, and creatinine respectively. Findings of this study offer preliminary support for the possibility of using VBG sample rather than VBG sample and serum chemistry electrolytes together to rule out diabetic ketoacidosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Hemodilution during venous gas embolization improves gas exchange, without altering V(A)/Q or pulmonary blood flow distributions.

    PubMed

    Deem, S; McKinney, S; Polissar, N L; Hedges, R G; Swenson, E R

    1999-12-01

    Isovolemic anemia results in improved gas exchange in rabbits with normal lungs but in relatively poorer gas exchange in rabbits with whole-lung atelectasis. In the current study, the authors characterized the effects of hemodilution on gas exchange in a distinct model of diffuse lung injury: venous gas embolization. Twelve anesthetized rabbits were mechanically ventilated at a fixed rate and volume. Gas embolization was induced by continuous infusion of nitrogen via an internal jugular venous catheter. Serial hemodilution was performed in six rabbits by simultaneous withdrawal of blood and infusion of an equal volume of 6% hetastarch; six rabbits were followed as controls over time. Measurements included hemodynamic parameters and blood gases, ventilation-perfusion (V(A)/Q) distribution (multiple inert gas elimination technique), pulmonary blood flow distribution (fluorescent microspheres), and expired nitric oxide (NO; chemoluminescence). Venous gas embolization resulted in a decrease in partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and an increase in partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), with markedly abnormal overall V(A)/Q distribution and a predominance of high V(A)/Q areas. Pulmonary blood flow distribution was markedly left-skewed, with low-flow areas predominating. Hematocrit decreased from 30+/-1% to 11+/-1% (mean +/- SE) with hemodilution. The alveolar-arterial PO2 (A-aPO2) difference decreased from 375+/-61 mmHg at 30% hematocrit to 218+/-12.8 mmHg at 15% hematocrit, but increased again (301+/-33 mmHg) at 11% hematocrit. In contrast, the A-aPO2 difference increased over time in the control group (P < 0.05 between groups over time). Changes in PaO2 in both groups could be explained in large part by variations in intrapulmonary shunt and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2); however, the improvement in gas exchange with hemodilution was not fully explained by significant changes in V(A)/Q or pulmonary blood flow distributions, as quantitated

  15. Crowdsourcing Malaria Parasite Quantification: An Online Game for Analyzing Images of Infected Thick Blood Smears

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Asier; Frean, John

    2012-01-01

    Background There are 600,000 new malaria cases daily worldwide. The gold standard for estimating the parasite burden and the corresponding severity of the disease consists in manually counting the number of parasites in blood smears through a microscope, a process that can take more than 20 minutes of an expert microscopist’s time. Objective This research tests the feasibility of a crowdsourced approach to malaria image analysis. In particular, we investigated whether anonymous volunteers with no prior experience would be able to count malaria parasites in digitized images of thick blood smears by playing a Web-based game. Methods The experimental system consisted of a Web-based game where online volunteers were tasked with detecting parasites in digitized blood sample images coupled with a decision algorithm that combined the analyses from several players to produce an improved collective detection outcome. Data were collected through the MalariaSpot website. Random images of thick blood films containing Plasmodium falciparum at medium to low parasitemias, acquired by conventional optical microscopy, were presented to players. In the game, players had to find and tag as many parasites as possible in 1 minute. In the event that players found all the parasites present in the image, they were presented with a new image. In order to combine the choices of different players into a single crowd decision, we implemented an image processing pipeline and a quorum algorithm that judged a parasite tagged when a group of players agreed on its position. Results Over 1 month, anonymous players from 95 countries played more than 12,000 games and generated a database of more than 270,000 clicks on the test images. Results revealed that combining 22 games from nonexpert players achieved a parasite counting accuracy higher than 99%. This performance could be obtained also by combining 13 games from players trained for 1 minute. Exhaustive computations measured the parasite

  16. Leptin integrates vertebrate evolution: from oxygen to the blood-gas barrier.

    PubMed

    Torday, J S; Powell, F L; Farmer, C G; Orgeig, S; Nielsen, H C; Hall, A J

    2010-08-31

    The following are the proceedings of a symposium held at the Second International Congress for Respiratory Science in Bad Honnef, Germany. The goals of the symposium were to delineate the blood-gas barrier phenotype across vertebrate species; to delineate the interrelationship between the evolution of the blood-gas barrier, locomotion and metabolism; to introduce the selection pressures for the evolution of the surfactant system as a key to understanding the physiology of the blood-gas barrier; to introduce the lung lipofibroblast and its product, leptin, which coordinately regulates pulmonary surfactant, type IV collagen in the basement membrane and host defense, as the cell-molecular site of selection pressure for the blood-gas barrier; to drill down to the gene regulatory network(s) involved in leptin signaling and the blood-gas barrier phenotype; to extend the relationship between leptin and the blood-gas barrier to diving mammals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A fast LC-APCI/MS method for analyzing benzodiazepines in whole blood using monolithic support.

    PubMed

    Bugey, Aurélie; Rudaz, Serge; Staub, Christian

    2006-03-07

    A simple and fast procedure was developed for the simultaneous determination of eight benzodiazepines (BZDs) in whole blood using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). Sample pretreatment was carried out using a simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with n-butylchloride, and chromatographic separation was performed using a monolithic silica column to speed up the analytical process. APCI and electrospray ionization (ESI) were compared. Whereas both ionization techniques appeared suitable for BZDs, APCI was found to be slightly more sensitive, especially for the determination of frequently low-dosed compounds. The method was validated according to the guidelines of the "Société Française des Sciences et Techniques Pharmaceutiques" (SFSTP) in the concentration range of 2.5-500 microg/L. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 2.5 microg/L for all the compounds. Validation data including linearity, precision, and trueness were obtained, allowing subtherapeutic quantification of frequently low-dosed BZDs. The high selectivity of the mass spectrometer, along with the properties of the monolithic support, allowed unequivocal analysis of the eight compounds in less than 5 min. To demonstrate the potential of the method, it was used for the analysis of benzodiazepines in postmortem blood samples.

  18. Blood cholesterol screening in several environments using a portable, dry-chemistry analyzer and fingerstick blood samples. Lipid Research Clinics Cholesterol Screening Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bradford, R H; Bachorik, P S; Roberts, K; Williams, O D; Gotto, A M

    1990-01-01

    A multicenter study of blood cholesterol screening was performed in several typical environments, such as community sites (shopping malls and a supermarket), health care sites, work sites, a blood bank and a school. Cholesterol was measured with a portable, dry-chemistry analyzer using capillary blood obtained by fingerstick. Data are reported from a total of 13,824 participants, spanning the entire age spectrum. Overall, 25% of screened subjects had blood cholesterol levels above the age-specific cutpoints used in the current study. Although in the aggregate this screening experience very closely approximates the expected level of referrals, the proportion of referred screened subjects differed significantly among the 5 types of screening environments and by gender. Follow-up telephone interviews indicated that 53% of referrals had initiated a physician contact. More than 75% of those who had seen a physician reported that the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia had been confirmed, and almost 72% had been prescribed a diet. A large proportion of referred screened subjects reported having modified their diet, particularly when recommended to do so by a physician. This study has yielded encouraging evidence that physicians gave referred screened subjects appropriate initial advice for managing hypercholesterolemia. The new technology for blood cholesterol measurement evaluated in the current study has proven to be a feasible and reliable means for measuring blood cholesterol in typical screening settings.

  19. Current Developments in Analyzing Food Volatiles by Multidimensional Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Schmarr, Hans-Georg; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Bicchi, Carlo

    2017-02-02

    This paper presents current developments and future perspectives on the spread of advanced analytical tasks in the field of food volatile analysis. The topics outlined comprise (a) recent advances on miniaturized sampling techniques; (b) the potential and challenges of multidimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection for volatile identification and quantitation in samples with complex matrices;

  20. A multivariate statistical analysis approach to analyze gas chromatography-olfactometry data of tangerine hybrids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gas chromatography (GC) hyphenated with olfactometry (O) when a human subject smells the effluent of the GC is a useful technique to identify aroma activity of volatile compounds in a food. Many techniques have been developed, based on olfactory thresholds (CHARM analysis, AEDA), or based on psychop...

  1. A programmable palm-size gas analyzer for use in micro-autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordenker, Robert J. M.; Wise, Kensall D.

    2012-06-01

    Gas analysis systems having small size, low power, and high selectivity are badly needed for defense (detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents), homeland security, health care, and environmental applications. This paper presents a palm-size gas chromatography system having analysis times of 5-50sec, detection limits less than 1ppb, and an average power dissipation less than one watt. It uses no consumables. The three-chip fluidic system consists of a preconcentrator, a 25cm-3m separation column, and a chemi-resistive detector and is supported by a microcomputer and circuitry for programmable temperature control. The entire system, including the mini-pump and battery, occupies less than 200cc and is configured for use on autonomous robotic vehicles.

  2. Design of a diagnostic residual gas analyzer for the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Biewer, T. M.; Graves, Van B; Andrew, P.; Marcus, Chris; Shimada, M.; Hughes, S.; Boussier, B.; Johnson, D. W.; Gardner, W. L.; Hillis, D. L.; Vayakis, G.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the ITER diagnostics having reached an advanced design stage is a diagnostic RGA for the divertor, i.e. residual gas analysis system for the ITER divertor, which is intended to sample the divertor pumping duct region during the plasma pulse and to have a response time compatible with plasma particle and impurity lifetimes in the divertor region. Main emphasis is placed on helium (He) concentration in the ducts, as well as the relative concentration between the hydrogen isotopes (H2, D2, T2). Measurement of the concentration of radiative gases, such as neon (Ne) and nitrogen (N2), is also intended. Numerical modeling of the gas flow from the sampled region to the cluster of analysis sensors, through a long (~8m long, ~110mm diameter) sampling pipe terminating in a pressure reducing orifice, confirm that the desired response time (~1s for He or D2) is achieved with the present design.

  3. Gas analyzer for continuous monitoring of trace level methanethiol by microchannel collection and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Kuwahara, Haruka; Kajiwara, Hidetaka; Hirota, Kazutoshi; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2014-09-02

    The highly odorous compound methanethiol, CH3SH, is commonly produced in biodegradation of biomass and industrial processes, and is classed as 2000 times more odorous than NH3. However, there is no simple analytical method for detecting low parts-per-billion in volume ratio (ppbv) levels of CH3SH. In this study, a micro gas analysis system (μGAS) was developed for continuous or near real time measurement of CH3SH at ppbv levels. In addition to a commercial fluorescence detector, a miniature high sensitivity fluorescence detector was developed using a novel micro-photomultiplier tube device. CH3SH was collected by absorption into an alkaline solution in a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber and then mixed with the fluorescent reagent, 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-fluoro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-F). Gaseous CH3SH was measured without serious interference from other sulfur compounds or amines. The limits of detection were 0.2ppbv with the commercial detector and 0.3ppbv with the miniature detector. CH3SH produced from a pulping process was monitored with the μGAS system and the data agreed well with those obtained by collection with a silica gel tube followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The portable system with the miniature fluorescence detector was used to monitor CH3SH levels in near-real time in a stockyard and it was shown that the major odor component, CH3SH, presented and its concentration varied dynamically with time.

  4. A geospatial web portal for sharing and analyzing greenhouse gas data derived from satellite remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Yu, Bailang; Chen, Zuoqi; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Yan; Wu, Jianping; Wu, Bin; Ge, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Greenhouse gas data collected by different institutions throughout the world have significant scientific values for global climate change studies. Due to the diversity of data formats and different specifications of data access interfaces, most of those data should be first downloaded onto a local machine before they can be used. To overcome this limitation, we present a geospatial web portal for sharing and analyzing greenhouse gas data derived from remote sensing images. As a proof-of-concept, a prototype has also been designed and implemented. The workflow of the web portal contains four processes: data access, data analysis, results visualization, and results output. A large volume of greenhouse gas data have been collected, described, and indexed in the portal, and a variety of data analysis services, such as calculating the temporal variation of regionally averaged column CO2 values and analyzing the latitudinal variations of globally averaged column CO2 values, are integrated into this portal. With the integrated geospatial data and services, researchers can collect and analyze greenhouse gas data online, and can preview and download the analysis results directly from the web portal. The geospatial web portal has been implemented as a web application, and we also used a study case to illustrate this framework.

  5. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S; Livingstone, David M; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  6. Determination of Natural In Vivo Noble-Gas Concentrations in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tomonaga, Yama; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Livingstone, David M.; Tomonaga, Geneviève; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry. PMID:24811123

  7. Gas chromatographic determination of pentachlorophenol in human blood and urine

    SciTech Connect

    Atuma, S.S.; Okor, D.I.

    1985-09-01

    The extraction, identification and quantification of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in human blood and urine are of great importance for monitoring human exposure to this environmental chemical. Although reports abound in the literature on PCP residues, toxicity and environmental fate, there is hardly any information on its existence in the developing tropical countries, particularly in Nigeria. There is therefore the need to survey the status of PCP in Nigerian environment with a view to establishing the potential health hazards resulting from its bioaccumulation. This paper reports a preliminary survey of the residue levels of PCP in human blood and urine of the general population in Bendel State of Nigeria.

  8. A pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer for use in studies of gas/solid systems. First technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.E.

    1993-09-22

    A TG-151 Thermogravimetric Experimental Station, which measures and records weight changes of a solid material over a wide dynamic temperature range at a wide range of pressures in controlled environments, was purchased from Cahn Instruments, Inc. The TG-151 permits temperature to be programmed to follow a precise temperature profile of ramp and/or isothermal segments while monitoring the changes in weight of solid samples exposed to a gaseous environment of specified composition at a preset pressure. Weight and temperature measurements are made at user-specified time intervals and total time (up to 48 hours). Data are stored on the disk of a dedicated computer. The data can be processed by a data analysis program or exported to spreadsheet programs. The pressure vessel is designed to operate in vacuum to 10{sup {minus}5} torr and over a wide range of pressures. At normal room temperature, the TG-151 can operate up to 100 atm and at 1273 K, it can operate up to 70 atm. The null balance has a sensitivity of 10 micrograms, capacity up to 100 grams, and a dynamic range of 10{sup 6}:1. Both reducing and oxidizing environments can be established in the reaction chamber. For our specific needs the instrument had to be slightly modified to allow for two reactant gas streams to enter the pressure vessel at prescribed times. This required the purchase and installation of a gas blending system. The gas blending system permits coal and char samples to be heated at a specified rate to a desired temperature in an inert environment before the sample is exposed to an oxidizing environment.

  9. Could We Apply a NeuroProcessor For Analyzing a Gas Response Of Multisensor Arrays?

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoev, V. V.; Musatov, V. Yu.; Maschenko, A. A.; Varegnikov, A. S.; Chrizostomov, A. A.; Kiselev, I.; Schneider, T.; Bruns, M.; Sommer, M.

    2009-05-23

    We describe an effort of implementation of hardware neuroprocessor to carry out pattern recognition of signals generated by a multisensor microarray of Electronic Nose type. The multisensor microarray is designed with the SnO{sub 2} thin film segmented by co-planar electrodes according to KAMINA (KArlsruhe Micro NAse) E-nose architecture. The response of this microarray to reducing gases mixtured with a synthetic air is processed by principal component analysis technique realized in PC (Matlab software) and the neural microprocessor NeuroMatrix NM6403. It is shown that the neuroprocessor is able to successfully carry out a gas-recognition algorithm at a real-time scale.

  10. Fast-response gas analyzer by the use of an infrared hollow fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Okubo, Yuri; Kato, Tomoki

    2005-05-01

    A fast-response infrared spectrometer was constructed by using an AgI/Ag-coated hollow fibre and a PtSi CCD sensor array. The infrared transmitting hollow fibre was employed as a gas-flow cell to reduce both sample volume and sampling time. The infrared beam that passed the hollow fibre was diffracted by a grating, and was detected by the sensor array with a 1/60-s frame time. Spectra of flowing CH4 and CO2 gases were measured successfully in the 3-4-μm wavelength range.

  11. Impaired clinical utility of sequential patient GEM blood gas measurements associated with calibration schedule.

    PubMed

    Cembrowski, George S; Xu, Qian; Cembrowski, Adam R; Mei, Junyi; Sadrzadeh, Hossein

    2017-03-18

    Within- and/or between-instrument variation may falsely indicate patient trends or obscure real trends. We employ a methodology that transforms sequential intra-patient results into estimates of biologic and analytic variation. We previously derived realistic biologic variation (sb) of blood gas (BG) and hematology analytes. We extend this methodology to derive the imprecision of two GEM 4000 BG analyzers. A laboratory data repository provided arterial BG, electrolyte and metabolite results generated by two GEM 4000s on ICU patients in 2012-2013. We tabulated consecutive pairs of intra-patient results separated by increasing time interval between consecutive tests. The average between pair variations were regressed against time with the y-intercept representing the sum of the biologic variation and short term analytic variation: yo(2)=sb(2)+sa(2). Using an equivalent equation for the Radiometer ABL, the imprecision of the two GEMs was calculated: saGEM=(yoGEM(2)-yoABL(2)+saABL(2))(1/2). This analysis was performed for nearly all measurements, regardless of time as well for values obtained over two 12h mutually exclusive periods, starting either at 2am or 2pm. Regression graphs were derived from 1800 patients' blood gas results with least 10,000 data pairs grouped into 2h intervals. The calculated saGEM exceed the directly measured saABL with many GEM sigma ratios of biologic variation/analytic variation being close to unity. All of the afternoon saGEM exceeded their morning counterparts with pH, pCO2, K and bicarbonate being statistically significant. For many analytes, the average analytical variation of tandem GEMs approximates the biologic variation, indicating impaired clinical usefulness of tandem sequential measurements. A significant component of this variation is due to increased variation of the GEMs between 2pm and 2am. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Prospective correlation of arterial vs venous blood gas measurements in trauma patients☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Rudkin, Scott E.; Kahn, Christopher A.; Oman, Jennifer A.; Dolich, Matthew O.; Lotfipour, Shahram; Lush, Stephanie; Gain, Marla; Firme, Charmaine; Anderson, Craig L.; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to assess if venous blood gas (VBG) results (pH and base excess [BE]) are numerically similar to arterial blood gas (ABG) in acutely ill trauma patients. Methods We prospectively correlated paired ABG and VBG results (pH and BE) in adult trauma patients when ABG was clinically indicated. A priori consensus threshold of clinical equivalence was set at ± less than 0.05 pH units and ± less than 2 BE units. We hypothesized that ABG results could be predicted by VBG results using a regression equation, derived from 173 patients, and validated on 173 separate patients. Results We analyzed 346 patients and found mean arterial pH of 7.39 and mean venous pH of 7.35 in the derivation set. Seventy-two percent of the paired sample pH values fell within the predefined consensus equivalence threshold of ± less than 0.05 pH units, whereas the 95% limits of agreement (LOAs) were twice as wide, at −0.10 to 0.11 pH units. Mean arterial BE was −2.2 and venous BE was −1.9. Eighty percent of the paired BE values fell within the predefined ± less than 2 BE units, whereas the 95% LOA were again more than twice as wide, at −4.4 to 3.9 BE units. Correlations between ABG and VBG were strong, at r2 = 0.70 for pH and 0.75 for BE. Conclusion Although VBG results do correlate well with ABG results, only 72% to 80% of paired samples are clinically equivalent, and the 95% LOAs are unacceptably wide. Therefore, ABG samples should be obtained in acutely ill trauma patients if accurate acid-base status is required. PMID:22169587

  13. Optimized design of substrate-integrated hollow waveguides for mid-infrared gas analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Paula Regina; Flávio da Silveira Petruci, João; Wilk, Andreas; Alves Cardoso, Arnaldo; Milton Raimundo, Ivo, Jr.; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-09-01

    Design and analytical performance studies are presented for optimizing a new generation of hollow waveguides suitable for quantitative gas sensing—the so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). Taking advantage of a particularly compact Fourier transform infrared spectrometer optimized iHWG geometries are investigated toward the development of a multi-constituent breath analysis tool compatible for usage, e.g., in exhaled mouse breath analysis. Three different iHWG geometries were compared, i.e., straight, meandering one-turn and meandering two-turn waveguide channels aiming at maximizing the related analytical figures-of-merit including the achievable limits of detection for selected exemplary analytes. In addition, efficient coupling of infrared (IR) radiation into straight iHWGs was investigated using integrated optical funnel structures. Calibration functions of butane in nitrogen serving as IR-transparent matrix gas were established and compared for the various iHWG geometries. Given the tidal volume of exhaled breath (EB) samples ranging from a few hundreds of milliliters (human, swine) to a few hundreds of microliters (mouse), it is essential for any given analysis to select an appropriate waveguide geometry and volume yet maintaining (i) a compact footprint ensuring hand-held instrumentation, (ii) modular exchange of the iHWG according to the analysis requirement yet with constant device format, and (iii) enabling inline/online measurement capabilities toward continuous EB diagnostics.

  14. Gas-liquid chromatography in routine processing of blood cultures for detecting anaerobic bacteraemia.

    PubMed Central

    Reig, M; Molina, D; Loza, E; Ledesma, M A; Meseguer, M A

    1981-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was performed on 233 positive blood cultures and findings were compared with culture results. Obligate anaerobic bacteria were recovered from 78 out of 79 blood cultures containing butyric or iso-valeric acids, or both; from 28 out of 69 blood cultures containing succinic acid; and from only one out of 41 blood cultures containing succinic but not butyric or iso-valeric acid. Good correlations (88%) were found for the recovery of anaerobic bacteria and the detection of butyric and/or iso-valeric acids. Detecting volatile fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography performed on blood cultures at the first signs of growth can therefore provide an early and reliable indication of the presence of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:7014645

  15. Evaluation of a transcutaneous blood gas monitoring system in critically ill dogs.

    PubMed

    Holowaychuk, Marie K; Fujita, Hiroshi; Bersenas, Alexa M E

    2014-01-01

    To describe the use of a transcutaneous blood gas monitoring system in critically ill dogs, determine if transcutaneous and arterial blood gas values have good agreement, and verify if clinical or laboratory variables are correlated with differences between transcutaneous and arterial blood gas measurements. Prospective observational study. University teaching hospital ICU. Twenty-three client-owned dogs. In critically ill dogs undergoing arterial blood gas monitoring, a transcutaneous blood gas monitor was used to measure transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PtcCO2 ) and transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (PtcO2 ) values 30 minutes after sensor placement, which were compared to PaCO2 and PaO2 values measured simultaneously. Clinical and laboratory variables were concurrently recorded to determine if they were correlated with the difference between transcutaneous and arterial blood gas measurements. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean bias of 4.6 ± 26.3 mm Hg (limits of agreement [LOA]: -46.9/+56.1 mm Hg) between PtcO2 and PaO2 and a mean bias of 9.3 ± 8.5 mm Hg (LOA: -7.5/+26.0 mm Hg) between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 . The difference between PtcCO2 -PaCO2 was strongly negatively correlated with HCO3 (-) (r(2) = 0.52, P < 0.001) and PaCO2 (r(2) = 0.58, P < 0.001) and weakly positively correlated with diastolic blood pressure (r(2) = 0.21, P = 0.044), whereas the difference between PtcCO2 -PaCO2 was moderately negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure (r(2) = 0.33, P = 0.008). Agreement between transcutaneous and arterial PO2 and PCO2 measurements in these critically ill dogs was inferior to that reported in similar adult and pediatric human studies. The transcutaneous monitor consistently over-estimated PaO2 and PaCO2 and should not be used to replace arterial blood gas measurements in critically ill dogs requiring blood gas interpretation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  16. Sampling errors in pH and blood gas analysis--an evaluation of three new arterial blood samplers.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, A S; Dryburgh, F J; Ralston, S H

    1986-05-01

    We have tested the accuracy, acceptability and general performance of three recently-marketed samplers for arterial blood gas measurement (the Corning Arterial Blood Sampler, the Concord 'Pulsator' and the Sarstedt 'Monovette'). All three greatly reduce or eliminate the error of venous sampling, and the Corning and Sarstedt samplers eliminate the risk of dilution of the sample by excess heparin solution. A positive bias in pO2 measurement, more marked at higher levels, was demonstrated with the Concord and Sarstedt samplers, and the latter carry a slightly increased risk of cross-infection. None of the samplers completely overcame potential sampling errors.

  17. Evaluation of an electrolyte analyzer for measurement of ionized calcium and magnesium concentrations in blood, plasma, and serum of dogs.

    PubMed

    Unterer, Stefan; Lutz, Hans; Gerber, Bernhard; Glaus, Tony M; Hässig, Michael; Reusch, Claudia E

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate an electrolyte analyzer for measurement of ionized calcium (Ca(i)) and magnesium (Mg(i)) concentrations in blood, plasma, and serum; investigate the effect of various factors on measured values; and establish reference ranges for Ca(i) and Mg(i) in dogs. 30 healthy adult dogs of various breeds. Precision in a measurement series, day-to-day precision, and linearity were used to evaluate the analyzer. The effects of exposure of serum samples to air, type of specimen (blood, plasma, or serum), and storage temperature on sample stability were assessed. Reference ranges were established with anaerobically handled serum. The coefficient of variation for precision in a measurement series was < or = 1.5% for both electrolytes at various concentrations. The Ca(i) and Mg(i) concentrations were significantly lower in aerobically handled serum samples, compared with anaerobically handled samples. The Ca(i) and Mg(i) concentrations differed significantly among blood, plasma, and serum samples. In anaerobically handled serum, Ca(i) was stable for 24 hours at 22 degrees C, 48 hours at 4 degrees C, and 11 weeks at -20 degrees C; Mg(i) was stable for 8 hours at 22 degrees C, < 24 hours at 4 degrees C, and < 1 week at -20 degrees C. In anaerobically handled serum, reference ranges were 1.20 to 1.35 mmol/L for Ca(i) and 0.42 to 0.58 mmol/L for Mg(i). The electrolyte analyzer was suitable for determination of Ca(i) and Mg(i) concentrations in dogs. Accurate results were obtained in anaerobically handled serum samples analyzed within 8 hours and kept at 22 degrees C.

  18. Analyzing the blood-brain barrier: the benefits of medical imaging in research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Chassidim, Yoash; Vazana, Udi; Prager, Ofer; Veksler, Ronel; Bar-Klein, Guy; Schoknecht, Karl; Fassler, Michael; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Shelef, Ilan

    2015-02-01

    A dysfunctional BBB is a common feature in a variety of brain disorders, a fact stressing the need for diagnostic tools designed to assess brain vessels' permeability in space and time. Biological research has benefited over the years various means to analyze BBB integrity. The use of biomarkers for improper BBB functionality is abundant. Systemic administration of BBB impermeable tracers can both visualize brain regions characterized by BBB impairment, as well as lead to its quantification. Additionally, locating molecular, physiological content in regions from which it is restricted under normal BBB functionality undoubtedly indicates brain pathology-related BBB disruption. However, in-depth research into the BBB's phenotype demands higher analytical complexity than functional vs. pathological BBB; criteria which biomarker based BBB permeability analyses do not meet. The involvement of accurate and engineering sciences in recent brain research, has led to improvements in the field, in the form of more accurate, sensitive imaging-based methods. Improvements in the spatiotemporal resolution of many imaging modalities and in image processing techniques, make up for the inadequacies of biomarker based analyses. In pre-clinical research, imaging approaches involving invasive procedures, enable microscopic evaluation of BBB integrity, and benefit high levels of sensitivity and accuracy. However, invasive techniques may alter normal physiological function, thus generating a modality-based impact on vessel's permeability, which needs to be corrected for. Non-invasive approaches do not affect proper functionality of the inspected system, but lack in spatiotemporal resolution. Nevertheless, the benefit of medical imaging, even in pre-clinical phases, outweighs its disadvantages. The innovations in pre-clinical imaging and the development of novel processing techniques, have led to their implementation in clinical use as well. Specialized analyses of vessels' permeability

  19. Effects of age and blood pressure on the retinal arterial wall, analyzed using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Muraoka, Yuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-07-20

    The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of the vasculature is a promising early marker of retinal microvascular changes. Recently, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) enabled direct and noninvasive visualization of the arterial wall. Using AOSLO, we analyzed the correlation between age and WLR in 51 normal subjects. In addition, correlations between blood pressure and WLR were analyzed in 73 subjects (51 normal subjects and 22 hypertensive patients). WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively). In the normal and hypertensive groups, WLR showed a strong correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.65, P < 0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements. WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

  20. Effects of age and blood pressure on the retinal arterial wall, analyzed using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Muraoka, Yuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of the vasculature is a promising early marker of retinal microvascular changes. Recently, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) enabled direct and noninvasive visualization of the arterial wall. Using AOSLO, we analyzed the correlation between age and WLR in 51 normal subjects. In addition, correlations between blood pressure and WLR were analyzed in 73 subjects (51 normal subjects and 22 hypertensive patients). WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = −0.12, P = 0.41, respectively). In the normal and hypertensive groups, WLR showed a strong correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.65, P < 0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements. WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure. PMID:26192115

  1. bpshape wk4: a computer program that implements a physiological model for analyzing the shape of blood pressure waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocasio, W. C.; Rigney, D. R.; Clark, K. P.; Mark, R. G.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We describe the theory and computer implementation of a newly-derived mathematical model for analyzing the shape of blood pressure waveforms. Input to the program consists of an ECG signal, plus a single continuous channel of peripheral blood pressure, which is often obtained invasively from an indwelling catheter during intensive-care monitoring or non-invasively from a tonometer. Output from the program includes a set of parameter estimates, made for every heart beat. Parameters of the model can be interpreted in terms of the capacitance of large arteries, the capacitance of peripheral arteries, the inertance of blood flow, the peripheral resistance, and arterial pressure due to basal vascular tone. Aortic flow due to contraction of the left ventricle is represented by a forcing function in the form of a descending ramp, the area under which represents the stroke volume. Differential equations describing the model are solved by the method of Laplace transforms, permitting rapid parameter estimation by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Parameter estimates and their confidence intervals are given in six examples, which are chosen to represent a variety of pressure waveforms that are observed during intensive-care monitoring. The examples demonstrate that some of the parameters may fluctuate markedly from beat to beat. Our program will find application in projects that are intended to correlate the details of the blood pressure waveform with other physiological variables, pathological conditions, and the effects of interventions.

  2. bpshape wk4: a computer program that implements a physiological model for analyzing the shape of blood pressure waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocasio, W. C.; Rigney, D. R.; Clark, K. P.; Mark, R. G.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We describe the theory and computer implementation of a newly-derived mathematical model for analyzing the shape of blood pressure waveforms. Input to the program consists of an ECG signal, plus a single continuous channel of peripheral blood pressure, which is often obtained invasively from an indwelling catheter during intensive-care monitoring or non-invasively from a tonometer. Output from the program includes a set of parameter estimates, made for every heart beat. Parameters of the model can be interpreted in terms of the capacitance of large arteries, the capacitance of peripheral arteries, the inertance of blood flow, the peripheral resistance, and arterial pressure due to basal vascular tone. Aortic flow due to contraction of the left ventricle is represented by a forcing function in the form of a descending ramp, the area under which represents the stroke volume. Differential equations describing the model are solved by the method of Laplace transforms, permitting rapid parameter estimation by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Parameter estimates and their confidence intervals are given in six examples, which are chosen to represent a variety of pressure waveforms that are observed during intensive-care monitoring. The examples demonstrate that some of the parameters may fluctuate markedly from beat to beat. Our program will find application in projects that are intended to correlate the details of the blood pressure waveform with other physiological variables, pathological conditions, and the effects of interventions.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of a CNT forest integrated micromechanical resonator for a rarefied gas analyzer in a medium vacuum atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Koji; Matsumoto, Ryu; Tsutsui, Ryota; Kishihara, Hiroyuki; Matsuzuka, Naoki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Isono, Yoshitada

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the development of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) forest integrated micromechanical resonator working as a rarefied gas analyzer for nitrogen (N2) and hydrogen (H2) gases in a medium vacuum atmosphere. The resonant response is detected in the form of changes in the resonant frequency or damping effects, depending on the rarefied gas species. The carbon nanotube (CNT) forest on the resonator enhances the effective specific surface area of the resonator, such that the variation of the resonant frequency and the damping effect based on the gas species increase significantly. We developed the fabrication process for the proposed resonator, which consists of standard micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) processes and high-density CNT synthesis on the resonator mass. The high-density CNT synthesis was realized using multistep alternate coating of two types of ferritin proteins that act as catalytic iron particles. Two devices with different CNT densities were fabricated and characterized to evaluate the effect of the surface area of the CNT forest on the resonant response as a function of gas pressures ranging from 0.011 to 1 Pa for N2 and H2. Considering the damping effect, we found that the device with higher density was able to distinguish N2 and H2 clearly, whereas the device with lower density showed no difference between N2 and H2. We confirmed that a larger surface area showed a higher damping effect. These results were explained based on the kinetic theory of gases. In the case of resonant frequency, the relative resonant frequency shift increased with gas pressure and surface area because of the adsorption of gas molecules on the resonator surfaces. Higher density CNT forest adsorbed more gas molecules on the surfaces. The developed CNT forest integrated micromechanical resonator could successfully detect N2 and H2 gases and distinguish between them under pressures of 1 Pa.

  4. Genetic and phenotypic relationships between blood gas parameters and ascites-related traits in broilers.

    PubMed

    Closter, A M; van As, P; Groenen, M A M; Vereijken, A L J; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H

    2009-03-01

    Ascites, also called pulmonary hypertension syndrome, is a metabolic disorder in chickens that have an insufficient pulmonary vascular capacity. The tendency of broilers to develop ascites is heritable, and successful selection against this susceptibility would benefit from good and easy-to-measure indicator traits. Blood gas parameters have been suggested as indicator traits for ascites susceptibility. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to estimate the heritability of blood gas parameters and the genetic and phenotypic correlations between blood gas parameters, heart ratio (postmortem indicator for ascites), and BW at 2 different ages. For this purpose, blood gas parameters, including the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in venous blood (pvCO(2)), the partial pressure of oxygen in venous blood (pvO(2)), and blood oxygen saturation, were measured at an average age of 22 d in nearly 3,000 broilers. To challenge the resistance of the birds to ascites, they were kept under cold conditions. Heritability for heart ratio was 0.43, and the heritability estimates were low: 0.02 for pvCO(2), 0.03 for pvO(2), and 0.07 for blood oxygen saturation. The estimated heritability for pH was 0.15, for bicarbonate was 0.19, and for total carbon dioxide content was 0.19. The genetic correlations between heart ratio and total carbon dioxide content (0.31 +/- 0.15) and between heart ratio and bicarbonate (0.31 +/- 0.15) were moderate and positive. For pvO(2), the genetic correlation with heart ratio was stronger and negative (-0.62 +/- 0.21); however, this correlation could not be estimated accurately because of the low heritability of pvO(2). For pvCO(2), the genetic correlation with the heart ratio was close to zero (-0.04 +/- 0.45). Phenotypic correlations between traits were, in general, similar to the genetic correlations. Heritabilities for blood gas parameters and the genetic correlations between blood gas parameters and the heart ratio estimated in the present study

  5. Pulsatile Flow and Gas Transport of Blood over an Array of Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kit Yan

    2005-11-01

    In the artificial lung, blood passes through an array of micro-fibers and the gas transfer is strongly dependent on the flow field. The blood flow is unsteady and pulsatile. We have numerically simulated pulsatile flow and gas transfer of blood (modeled as a Casson fluid) over arrays of cylindrical micro-fibers. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are assumed to be in local equilibrium with hemoglobin in blood; and the carbon dioxide facilitated oxygen transport is incorporated into the model by allowing the coupling of carbon dioxide partial pressure and oxygen saturation. The pulsatile flow inputs considered are the sinusoidal and the cardiac waveforms. The squared and staggered arrays of arrangement of the cylinders are considered in this study. Gas transport can be enhanced by: increasing the oscillation frequency; increasing the Reynolds number; increasing the oscillation amplitude; decreasing the void fraction; the use of the cardiac pulsatile input. The overall gas transport is greatly enhanced by the presence of hemoglobin in blood even though the non-Newtonian effect of blood tends to decrease the size and strength of vortices. The pressure drop is also presented as it is an important design parameter confronting the heart.

  6. The relation between spirometric measurements and arterial blood gas analysis in patients with chronic airflow obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shibel, Elaine M.; Moser, Kenneth M.

    1970-01-01

    Spirometric studies and arterial blood gas analyses were statistically evaluated in 75 patients with chronic airways obstruction to determine whether any spirometric parameters can predict arterial blood gas status. Radioactive lung scans, both ventilation (using 133Xe gas) and perfusion (using 131I-MAA), were performed in selected patients. In all 75 patients as one group, no spirometric parameter correlated with resting arterial blood gases. Comparing spirometric values with arterial blood studies during exercise, 5% carbon dioxide breathing and 100% oxygen breathing revealed no consistently predictive correlation coefficients. Ventilation and perfusion lung scanning revealed that in patients whose ventilation/perfusion (V̇/Q) `match' was good, arterial blood gases approached normal, while hypoxaemia and/or hypercapnia were present when V̇/Q relationships were disturbed. Spirometry measures static and dynamic lung volumes, reflecting the mechanical and structural status of the lung-bellows system. Arterial blood gas status is conditioned by severe factors, including V̇/Q relationship, and can be determined accurately only by measurement in each individual patient. Images PMID:5489184

  7. [The practice of neonatal umbilical blood gas analysis in the "Alsace" regional French perinatal network].

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, F; Akladios, C Y; Sananes, N; Gaudineau, A; Langer, B

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of neonatal well-being is paramount in delivery rooms. For that purpose, it is recommended in France to carry out a systematic neonatal umbilical cord blood gas analysis. The aim of this study is to evaluate how umbilical cord blood gas sampling is realised, analysed and interpreted by midwives in a French regional perinatal network. We conducted a survey focused on randomly selected midwives partitioning in different maternities that constitute the "Alsace" regional perinatal network. A questionnaire concerning the modalities of umbilical cord blood sampling, its analysis and the interpretation of results was used during interviews with included midwives. Fifty-one midwives were included in the study (15.8% of whom were working in delivery rooms). Only 13% of maternities constituting the perinatal network did not realise systematic neonatal umbilical cord blood analysis. Among interviewed midwives, 78.4% reported umbilical cord clamping after the first breath of the child. Among the midwives included, 86.3% of them realise sampling from the umbilical artery and 29.4% from both umbilical artery and vein. For 86.3% of interviewed midwives, the leitmotif of realising umbilical blood sampling was medico-legal. More than two third of included midwives interpret blood gas taking into account two parameters (either pH and base excess, or lactate). They settled at 7.0-7.2, the limit below which a newborn might present sequelae. This study shows that the neonatal umbilical cord blood gas analysis at birth is almost systematic in this regional French perinatal network. It is realised primarily for medico-legal purpose. However, there are significant variations in sampling procedures and interpretation. This should lead to the establishment within each maternity of a neonatal umbilical cord blood gas sampling protocol along with a midwifery training program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas and acid-base balance in ovine venous blood.

    PubMed

    Hussein, H A; Aamer, A A

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted to +4 ºC (Group I, n = 10), at RT of about 22-25 ºC (Group II, n = 10) and in an incubator adjusted to 37 ºC (Group III, n = 10) for up to 48 h. Blood samples were analysed for blood gas and acid-base indices at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of storage. In comparison to the baseline value (0), there were significant decreases of blood pH of samples stored at RT and in the incubator after 1 h (p<0.05), the pH value of refrigerated blood samples exhibited insignificant changes during the study (p<0.05). Mean values of pCO2 showed a significant increase in Group I and Group III after 1 h then a progressive decrease after 12 h in all Groups. Mean pO2 values were significantly higher for Group I after 2 h and for Groups II and III after 1 h (p<0.05). In general, base excess decreased significantly for all the groups during the study especially in Groups II and III. In comparison with baseline values, in all groups, bicarbonate (HCO3) increased between 1 h and 6 h (p<0.05), and later decreased at the end of the study (p<0.05). In conclusion, status of acid-base indices of the samples stored at refrigerator and RT were found within normal reference range and it may be of clinical diagnostic use for up to 6 h.

  9. Blood gas analysis of the coronary sinus in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANGHUA; SHAN, CHUNFANG; ZHANG, YU; ZHOU, XIANHUI; LI, JINXIN; LI, YAODONG; XING, QIANG; TANG, BAOPENG

    2015-01-01

    The difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal cardiac function and those with heart failure (HF), and the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac ejection fraction (EF) are poorly understood. By establishing a control group composed of individuals with normal cardiac function, the present study aimed to determine the difference in cardiac oxygen consumption between individuals with normal and abnormal cardiac function, as well as the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF. A total of 34 patients with normal cardiac function were enrolled in the control group and 44 patients with HF were enrolled in the experimental group. Blood samples from the aortic root, femoral vein and coronary sinus (CS) were collected from each patient. All the blood samples were subjected to blood gas analysis. The partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation obtained from the peripheral vein and CS of patients with HF were lower than those in patients with normal cardiac function. In each patient with HF, the association between cardiac oxygen consumption and cardiac EF was analyzed using multi-linear correlation and regression analyses. Cardiac oxygen consumption negatively correlated with cardiac EF (R=-0.336, P=0.026). Furthermore, linear regression analysis suggested that cardiac EF had a significant effect on cardiac oxygen consumption (y = 82.906–0.483×, P=0.026). In conclusion, myocardial oxygen consumption is greater in individuals with HF compared to those with normal cardiac function. The cardiac EF affects myocardial oxygen consumption in patients with HF. PMID:26137240

  10. Unconjugated morphine in blood by radioimmunoassay and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spiehler, V; Brown, R

    1987-07-01

    Morphine, the active metabolite of heroin, is rapidly inactivated by glucuronidation at the 3 carbon. Unconjugated (pharmacologically active) morphine was measured in postmortem blood by radioimmunoassay using an antibody-coated tube kit. The kit shows less than 0.2% cross-reactivity with codeine and morphine-glucuronide. Unconjugated morphine concentrations were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using deuterated morphine as the internal standard. The blood was precipitated with 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl), centrifuged, and decanted. The supernatant was then either diluted (unhydrolyzed) or heated to 100 degrees C, 30 min (hydrolyzed), followed by a wash with 4:1 chloroform:isopropranol. The upper aqueous layer was then saturated with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and extracted with 4:1 chloroform:isopropranol. The organic layer was evaporated, derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFA), and analyzed by selected ion monitoring (SIM) GC/MS. Comparison of the results for unconjugated morphine by radioimmunoassay and unhydrolyzed morphine by GC/MS gave a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98, n = 100. Unconjugated morphine ranged from 0 to 100% of total morphine with a mean of 42%, n = 200, for heroin or morphine involved deaths. Review of 56 putative rapid deaths gave a mean of 68% unconjugated morphine with a range of 26 to 100%. The ratio of unconjugated to total morphine was found to be stable in postmortem blood after more than a year of storage at room temperature, within the precision of the method.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE I-STAT PORTABLE CLINICAL ANALYZER FOR MEASUREMENT OF IONIZED CALCIUM AND SELECTED BLOOD CHEMISTRY VALUES IN ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS).

    PubMed

    Tarbert, Danielle K; Behling-Kelly, Erica; Priest, Heather; Childs-Sanford, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Thei-STAT® portable clinical analyzer (PCA) provides patient-side results for hematologic, biochemical, and blood gas values when immediate results are desired. This analyzer is commonly used in nondomestic animals; however, validation of this method in comparison with traditional benchtop methods should be performed for each species. In this study, the i-STAT PCA was compared with the Radiometer ABL 800 Flex benchtop analyzer using 24 heparinized whole blood samples obtained from healthy E. maximus . In addition, the effect of sample storage was evaluated on the i-STAT PCA. Analytes evaluated were hydrogen ion concentration (pH), glucose, potassium (K(+)), sodium (Na(+)), bicarbonate (HCO3(-)), total carbon dioxide (TCO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), and ionized calcium (iCa(2+)). Statistical analysis using correlation coefficients, Passing-Bablok regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots found good agreement between results from samples run immediately after phlebotomy and 4 hr postsampling on the i-STAT PCA with the exception of K(+), which is known to change with sample storage. Comparison of the results from the two analyzers at 4 hr postsampling found very strong or strong correlation in all values except K(+), with statistically significant bias in all values except glucose and PCO2. Despite bias, mean differences assessed via Bland-Altman plots were clinically acceptable for all analytes excluding K(+). Within the reference range for iCa(2+), the iCa(2+) values obtained by the i-STAT PCA and Radiometer ABL 800 Flex were close in value, however in light of the constant and proportionate biases detected, overestimation at higher values and underestimation at lower values of iCa(2+) by the i-STAT PCA would be of potential concern. This study supports the use of the i-STAT PCA for the evaluation of these analytes, with the exception of K(+), in the Asian elephant.

  12. Analytic performance of the PENTRA 80 automated blood cell analyzer for the evaluation of normal and pathologic WBCs.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, María E; Tabernero, María D; García-Marcos, María A; Orfao, Alberto

    2005-02-01

    We evaluated performance of the ABX PENTRA 80 (ABX Diagnostics, Montpellier, France) hematology analyzer in enumerating the most frequent subsets of WBCs in peripheral blood, atypical lymphocytes (ALYs), and large immature cells (LICs) by comparing results with those obtained by manual microscopic counts, another hematology analyzer, and flow cytometric immunophenotyping. Identification and enumeration of neutrophils and lymphocytes with the PENTRA 80 showed high correlation with all 3 reference methods (R2 > or = 0.92 and R2 > or = 0.88, respectively); quantification of eosinophils showed good correlation with the other analyzer and flow cytometric immunophenotyping (R2 > or = 0.70); lower correlation coefficients were found for comparisons with conventional microscopy (R2 > or = 0.50). For monocytes, lower but acceptable correlation and agreement were found; marginal correlation was found for basophils. The PENTRA 80 also showed good performance in detecting LICs but was less effective for the identification of ALYs in relatively low frequencies in abnormal peripheral blood samples. We found good performance of the 5-part leukocyte differential analyses for the PENTRA 80, especially for enumeration of neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and LICs.

  13. Evaluation of the Microsemi CRP, an automated hematology analyzer for rapid 3-part WBC differential and CRP using whole blood.

    PubMed

    Nomura, N; Saito, K; Ikeda, M; Yuasa, S; Pastore, M; Chabert, C; Kono, E; Sakai, A; Tanaka, H; Ikemoto, T; Takubo, T

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the basic performance of Microsemi CRP, an unique automated hematology analyzer which can simultaneously measure CBC including 3-part WBC differential (3-Diff) and CRP using whole blood treated with EDTA-2K anticoagulant. We found that it produced generally the acceptable results for all parameters performed (repeatability, reproducibility, linearity, interference effect, carry over, and correlation) using control materials, fresh human whole bloods, and serum samples. CBC data examined using Microsemi CRP showed the good correlation with the previous model, Micros CRP200 (r ≧ 0.9), and also those obtained using the routine analyzer, ADVIA 2120i (r ≧ 0.989). Concerning the 3-Diff, both GRA (%) and LYM (%) showed the excellent correlation coefficient between Microsemi CRP and Micros CRP200 (r ≧ 0.992) as well as ADVIA 2120i (r ≧ 0.957). MON (%) showed good correlation between Microsemi CRP and Micros CRP200 (r = 0.959), but lower correlation between Microsemi CRP and ADVIA 2120 i (r = 0.471). CRP data showed the good correlation with HITACHI7600 (r ≧ 0.997) and Micros CRP200 (r ≧ 0.997). From these findings, we concluded that Microsemi CRP seemed the convenient laboratory analyzer in the setting of point of care testing (POCT) especially at NICU or primary care unit. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Blood infection with Enterobacter aerogenes--an unusual cause of portal vein gas.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Afshan

    2011-01-01

    Portal vein gas was once thought of as an invariably fatal condition. Now, with the availability of better equipment and expertise, the condition is more frequently diagnosed. A case of fever with rigors is presented and on ultrasound and CT examination was found to have portal venous gas which resolved with adequate antibiotic treatment. Blood culture revealed growth of gram negative bacillus; Enterobacter aerogenes. Patient was investigated further for portal vein gas, and although no other cause for the development of portal vein gas was found, she was treated with antibiotics and showed an immediate response. The aim of this case report is to highlight the benign causes of portal vein gas as well as to discuss the causes which warrant immediate surgery. Portal vein gas may herald a more ominous condition, which if intercepted in its course may result in complete cure.

  15. Possible Calcite and Magnesium Perchlorate Interaction in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument detected a calcium carbonate phase decomposing at high temperatures (approx.700 C) from the Wicked Witch soil sample [1]. TEGA also detected a lower temperature CO2 release between 400 C and 680 C [1]. Possible explanations given for this lower temperature CO2 release include thermal decomposition of Mg or Fe carbonates, a zeolitictype desorption reaction, or combustion of organic compounds in the soil [2]. The detection of 0.6 wt % soluble perchlorate by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on Phoenix [3] has implications for the possibility of organic molecules in the soil. Ming et al. [4] demonstrated that perchlorates could have oxidized organic compounds to CO2 in TEGA, preventing detection of their characteristic mass fragments. Here, we propose that a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate present in martian soil reacted to produce the 400 C - 680 C TEGA CO2 release. The parent salts of the perchlorate on Mars are unknown, but geochemical models using WCL data support the possible dominance of Mg-perchlorate salts [5]. Mg(ClO4)2 6H2O is the stable phase at ambient martian conditions [6], and breaks down at lower temperatures than carbonates giving off Cl2 and HCl gas [7,8]. Devlin and Herley [7] report two exotherms at 410-478 C and 473-533 C which correspond to the decomposition of Mg(ClO4)2.

  16. Should blood gas analysis be part of the diagnostic workup of short children? Auxological data and blood gas analysis in children with renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Mul, D; Grote, F K; Goudriaan, J R; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; Wit, J M; Oostdijk, W

    2010-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a rare cause of growth failure, therefore it is uncertain whether routine screening with blood gas analysis of short infants and children is cost-effective. To investigate the clinical, growth and laboratory parameters in children with RTA to estimate the possible value of laboratory screening for this disorder in infants and children referred for short stature according to a recent guideline. Retrospective chart analysis of 30 children diagnosed between 1978 and 2005 in The Netherlands and 3 centers in Belgium. The current guideline for short stature detected 33% of children with RTA. Assuming a pre-test probability of RTA of 0.6 per 100,000 births, the likelihood ratio of poor growth was 58 and 17 below and above 3 years, respectively. Sensitivity was 17/30 and 12/24 for a -2.0 SDS cutoff for weight and body mass index, respectively. In infants and toddlers diagnosed before 3 years of age, the mean weight loss was 1.5 SD, and 0.8 SDS in older children. In short children >3 years RTA was extremely rare, always associated with clinical symptoms, and rarely detected by blood gas analysis. According to our data a decreasing weight SDS for age is a sufficient indication to perform blood gas analysis in children <3 years of age, particularly in the presence of additional clinical features, whereas it can be omitted in short children >3 years of age. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Lifetime-based portable instrument for blood gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Trznadel, Karolina; Oechs, Karin; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-06-01

    A portable, compact device for measuring blood gases by using the fluorescence decay time as the information carrier is presented. The instrument is based on solid state technology only, thus using LEDs for excitation and a photodiode as detector. A capillary coated on its inner surface with different sensing membranes serves as a sample compartment and an optical sensor element simultaneously. Furthermore, due to inhomogeneous waveguiding in the capillary walls, only the fluorescent light is guided. Technical details of the electronic circuit, the optical design and the instrumental performance will be discussed.

  18. Phagocytosis of bovine blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes after ozone gas administration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ducusin, Rio John T; Nishimura, Masakazu; Sarashina, Takao; Uzuka, Yuji; Tanabe, Shigeyuki; Otani, Masayuki

    2003-04-01

    To determine the effects of ozone on the phagocytosis of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), ozone gas was administered in vitro on the blood and milk of healthy lactating cows, cows with acute mastitis, and cows with milk fever. In the blood of healthy dairy cattle, although there was no significant effect of ozone gas on the viability of the leukocytes, phagocytosis of PMNs significantly decreased. In contrast, ozone gas administration in vitro significantly increased phagocytosis of PMNs from the blood of cows with acute mastitis and milk fever, and from mastitic milk. These findings showed that ozone administration in vitro has positive and negative effects on bovine PMN phagocytosis, depending on the health status of the animal.

  19. [Measurement of regional blood flow using hydrogen gas generated by electrolysis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Koshu, K; Endo, S; Takaku, A; Saito, T

    1981-10-01

    Electrolytically generated hydrogen gas used to measure local blood flow by Stosseck et al. The data obtained by their method, however, did not correlated well with that obtained by original Aukland's method, hydrogen clearance method. We have tried to record the concentration of hydrogen gas after electrolytic generation of hydrogen gas at the white matter of the mongrel dogs. As a result, we found that its curves could be approximated to monoexponential curves during the first several minutes. This fact was also noticed in the experiment, in which circulation had been stopped due to cardiac arrest. A simple equation to calculate the regional blood flow was brought out through the approximation mentioned above. The values calculated by this new equation correlated well with that obtained by original hydrogen clearance method. This new method to detect the regional blood flow is simple and easy. Therefore it may contribute to some experiments, especially to the experiments with small animals.

  20. Evaluation of the Performance of the Wuhan Cubic 3100P Coal Gas Analyzer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Electrochemical Detector H2 Hydrogen LQL Lower Quantitation Limit mL/min Milliliters per minute MS Mass Spectroscopy NDIR Non-Dispersive Infrared...to detect CH4, CO, CO2, H2, O2, and higher hydrocarbons (CnHm). It uses Non-Dispersive Infrared ( NDIR ) to measure CH4, CnHm, CO, and CO2. It uses...hydrogen, the analyzer uses a software algorithm to correct the TCD reading for the other gases detected by NDIR and ECD. The purpose of this testing

  1. Evaluation of NO(x) flue gas analyzers for accuracy and their applicability for low-concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Steven; Glenn, Chuck; Logan, Tim; Vu, Bac; Walsh, Mike; Williams, Pat

    2003-06-01

    The requirements of the Texas State Implementation Plan of the U.S. Clean Air Act for the Houston-Galveston Ozone Nonattainment Area stipulate large reductions in oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emissions. A large number of sources at Dow Chemical Co. sites within the nonattainment area may require the addition of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) for online analysis of NO(x), CO, and O2. At the outset of this work, it was not known whether the analyzers could accurately measure NO(x) as low as 2 ppm. Therefore, NO(x) CEMS analyzers from five different companies were evaluated for their ability to reliably measure NO(x) in the 2-20 ppm range. Testing was performed with a laboratory apparatus that accurately simulated different mixtures of flue gas and, on a limited basis, simulated a dual-train sampling system on a gas turbine. The results indicate that this method is a reasonable approach for analyzer testing and reveal important technical performance aspects for accurate NO(x) measurements. Several commercial analyzers, if installed in a CEMS application with sampling conditioning components similar to those used in this study, can meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's measurement data quality requirements for accuracy.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of venous blood gas electrolytes for identifying diabetic ketoacidosis in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Menchine, Michael; Probst, Marc A; Agy, Chad; Bach, Dianne; Arora, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has traditionally required a venous blood gas (VBG) to obtain serum pH and a serum chemistry panel to obtain electrolyte values. Because newer blood gas analyzers have the ability to report electrolyte values and glucose in addition to pH, this diagnostic process could theoretically be condensed. However, neither the diagnostic accuracy of the VBG for DKA nor the agreement between the VBG electrolytes and the serum chemistry electrolytes, including sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate, has been evaluated in the context of acute hyperglycemia. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of VBG electrolytes for diagnosing DKA using serum chemistry electrolytes measures as the criterion standard and to describe the correlation between VBG and serum chemistry electrolytes in a sample of hyperglycemic patients seen in the emergency department (ED). The authors prospectively identified a convenience sample of ED patients with serum blood glucose ≥ 250 mg/dL and examined their paired VBG and serum chemistry electrolytes. The diagnosis of DKA was made by using American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria including serum glucose ≥ 250 mg/dL, serum anion gap > 10 mEq/L, bicarbonate ≤ 18 mEq/L, serum pH ≤ 7.30, and presence of ketosis. Serum chemistry electrolyte values were considered to be the criterion standard. Diagnostic test characteristics of VBG electrolytes including sensitivity and specificity were compared against this standard. In addition, correlation coefficients for individual electrolytes and anion gap between VBG and chemistry electrolytes were calculated. Paired VBG and serum chemistry panels were available for 342 patients, of whom 46 (13.5%) had DKA. The sensitivity and specificity of the VBG electrolytes for diagnosing DKA was 97.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 88.5% to 99.9%) and 100% (95% CI = 98.8% to 100%), respectively. One case of DKA was missed by the VBG. Correlation coefficients between VBG

  3. A gas-phase chemiluminescence-based analyzer for waterborne arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Idowu, A.D.; Dasgupta, P.K.; Genfa, Z.; Toda, K.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    We show a practical sequential injection/zone fluidics-based analyzer that measures waterborne arsenic. The approach is capable of differentiating between inorganic As(III) and As(V). The principle is based on generating AsH 3 from the sample in a confined chamber by borohydride reduction at controlled pH, sparging the chamber to drive the AsH3 to a small reflective cell located atop a photomultiplier tube, allowing it to react with ozone generated from ambient air, and measuring the intense chemiluminescence that results. Arsine generation and removal from solution results in isolation from the sample matrix, avoiding the pitfalls encountered in some solution-based analysis techniques. The differential determination of As(III) and As(V) is based on the different pH dependence of the reducibility of these species to AsH3. At pH ???1, both As(III) and As(V) are quantitatively converted to arsine in the presence of NaBH4. At a pH of 4-5, only As(III) is converted to arsine. In the present form, the limit of detection (S/N = 3) is 0.05 ??g/L As at pH ???1 and 0.09 ??g/L As(III) at pH ???4-5 for a 3-mL sample. The analyzer is intrinsically automated and requires 4 min per determination. It is also possible to determine As(III) first at pH 4.5 and then determine the remaining As in a sequential manner; this requires 6 min. There are no significant practical interferences. A new borohydride solution formulation permits month-long reagent stability. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  4. Analytical performance of the Abaxis Piccolo Xpress® point of care analyzer in whole blood, serum, and plasma.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazunori; Glaser, Laurel; Nardiello, Mary; Richardson, Shaun; Ramanathan, Lakshmi V; Carlow, Dean C

    2015-12-01

    To examine the analytical performance of 14 comprehensive metabolic panel analytes on the Abaxis Piccolo Xpress® Point of Care analyzer in serum, plasma, and whole blood. Precision was evaluated by running two levels of control material over multiple days. Linearity was evaluated using material provided by the manufacturer and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) linearity surveys. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing the results from 60 patient specimens on the Piccolo Xpress® with the Ortho Vitros® 5600 analyzer. The method comparison was performed on all three specimen types intended for use on the Piccolo Xpress®: serum, heparinized plasma, and whole blood. Manufacturer suggested reference ranges for all 14 analytes were tested in serum and plasma specimens from 23 healthy volunteers. High precision (CV ≤ 10%) was noted for all the analytes. Linearity was found to span the clinically useful range for all analytes. The method comparison demonstrated minimal proportional bias and good correlation for most of the analytes in all three matrices tested. The only exceptions were for sodium and total CO2, for which either significant proportional bias and/or poor correlation was noted in all three matrices. Significant bias was noted for AST in serum as well as for total bilirubin in plasma and whole blood. The Piccolo Xpress® allows for the delivery of CMP results in a footprint small enough to be stored in a biological safety cabinet, while providing satisfactory performance for the majority of analytes. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Surftherm: A program to analyze thermochemical and kinetic data in gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

    1994-06-01

    This report documents the Surftherm program that analyzes transport coefficient, thermochemical- and kinetic rate information in complex gas-phase and surface chemical reaction mechanisms. The program is designed for use with the Chemkin (gas-phase chemistry) and Surface Chemkin (heterogeneous chemistry) programs. It was developed as a ``chemist`s companion`` in using the Chemkin packages with complex chemical reaction mechanisms. It presents in tabular form detailed information about the temperature and pressure dependence of chemical reaction rate constants and their reverse rate constants, reaction equilibrium constants, reaction thermochemistry, chemical species thermochemistry and transport properties. This report serves as a user`s manual for use of the program, explaining the required input and the output.

  6. Beam-path gas analyzer based on a tunable CO/sub 2/ laser with frequency doubling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu.M.; Voevodin, V.G.; Gribenyukov, A.I.; Davydov, V.N.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kapitanov, V.A.; Lezina, T.D.; Struchebrov, G.A.; Khmel'nitskii, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to bring the high power and versatility of carbon dioxide lasers to bear on atmospheric measurements for pollutants such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur dioxide, the authors propose parametric frequency converters for carbon dioxide laser radiation in the spectral range required. Field measurements are discussed of the densities of a number of atmospheric gas components, including CO, and of the transparency of the atmosphere to beam paths using a beam-path gas analyzer containing a frequency doubler for a carbon dioxide laser based on the zinc phosphide-germanium phosphide monocrystal. The KAMAK MERA-60 computer system 23 does programmed tuning of the carbon dioxide laser radiation wavelength by rotation of a diffraction grating.

  7. Evaluation of phase doppler particle analyzer for measuring dense sprays from a gas turbine fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, G.; Bachalo, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) for measuring sprays produced by fuel injectors. The instrument was subjected to several tests at simulated spray and combustion chamber operating conditions. Light beam attenuations produced by contaminated windows and optical-path length through the spray were insignificant sources of error. Off-axis forward and off-axis back scatter measurements were made and demonstrated good agreement. As expected, increased laser power was required for the back scatter measurements. Line averaged measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) were determined and compared to Fraunhofer diffraction measurements. The results were in agreement to within 5 percent. Although the instrument has a relatively large dynamic range of 35, size distributions at different ranges needed to be combined to cover the very large size ranges produced by the injector operating at off design conditions. Simultaneous drop size, velocity, and number density measurements produced by the instrument provide the information needed for combustor development and modeling of the air-fuel mixing processes.

  8. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this

  9. Performance Evaluation of a New, Tunable-Diode Laser Trace-Gas Analyzer for Isotope Ratios of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    Newly available interband cascade lasers (ICLs) have enabled the development of a family of tunable-diode laser trace-gas analyzers that do not require liquid nitrogen to cool the laser. The lasers are available in the 3000 to 6000 nm range, providing access to the strong mid-infrared absorption lines for important gases such as methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide. These ICLs are fabricated with distributed feedback to improve their stability and spectroscopic quality. A recently released trace-gas analyzer for carbon dioxide isotopes (TGA200A, Campbell Scientific, Inc.) was evaluated for short- and long-term precision using Allan variance. Accuracy and linearity of CO2 mole fraction was assessed with a set of seven NOAA standard reference gases ranging from 298.35 to 971.48 ppm. Dilution of high-concentration CO2 with CO2-free air demonstrated the linearity of isotope ratio measurements beyond 1000 ppm CO2. Two analyzer variants were tested: one for CO2, δ13C and δ18O; and the other for CO2 and δ13C at enhanced precision.

  10. [Quantitative determination of strychnine in blood and urine by gas chromatography with mass-selective detector].

    PubMed

    Kataev, S S; Krylova, E A

    2010-01-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of strychnine in biological fluids by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry is proposed. The preparation of samples for the analysis included extraction of strychnine from blood and urine with the use of AccuBond(II) EVIDEX cartridges for solid-phase extraction and SPEC MP3 disks respectively. The efficiency of extraction was estimated at 0.05 mg/l for blood and 0.02 mg/l for urine. The detection limit was 0.10 mg/l in blood and 0.05 mg/l in urine.

  11. Blood/Gas partition coefficients for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in a clinically relevant patient population.

    PubMed

    Esper, Tobias; Wehner, Markus; Meinecke, Claus-Dieter; Rueffert, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The blood/gas partition coefficient of a certain volatile anesthetic is of clinical importance because it determines its velocity of uptake into and elimination from the body of a patient and thus its pharmacokinetic behavior. To date, the blood/gas partition coefficients of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane have been measured in small numbers of subjects or in particular study groups, for example, healthy volunteers, patients experiencing a common kind of disease, or mothers immediately after giving birth. The objective of this study was to determine the blood/gas partition coefficients of these volatile anesthetics at 37°C in a larger clinically relevant and adult patient population. Furthermore, we tested whether age, gender, body mass index, hemoglobin concentration, or hematocrit had an influence on the coefficients. Blood samples were taken from 120 fasting operative patients with ASA physical status I to III and aged 19 to 86 years. All subjects were randomly enrolled in study groups for the separate determinations of the blood/gas partition coefficients of isoflurane (n = 41), sevoflurane (n = 41), and desflurane (n = 38) by headspace gas chromatography. To check the quality of the measurements, we determined the distilled water/gas partition coefficients of those anesthetics and compared them with previously published values. We found a blood/gas partition coefficient of 1.45 ± 0.12 (mean ± SD) for isoflurane, 0.74 ± 0.06 for sevoflurane, and 0.57 ± 0.04 for desflurane. Values of this study are 5.07%, 12.12%, and 7.55% higher for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, respectively, than the previously published mean values (all P ≤ 0.001). There were only trends for small correlations between the blood/gas partition coefficient of isoflurane and hemoglobin concentration (Pearson r = 0.32; P = 0.041) and hematocrit (r = 0.37; P = 0.016). We found no other potentially significant correlations of the partition coefficients with patient age

  12. A Volatile Organic Analyzer for Space Station - Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Brokenshire, John; Cumming, Colin; Overton, ED; Carney, Ken; Cross, Jay; Eiceman, Gary; James, John

    1992-01-01

    An on-board Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA), an essential component of the Environmental Health System (EHS) air-quality monitoring strategy, is described. The strategy is aimed at warning the crew and ground personnel if volatile compounds exceed safe exposure limits. The VOA uses a combination of gas chromatography (GC) and ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) for environmental monitoring and analysis. It is concluded that the VOA dual-mode detection capability and the ion mobilities in the drift region are unique features that can assist in the resolution of coeluting GC peaks. The VOA is capable of accurately identifying and quantifying target compounds in a complex mixture.

  13. Robotic Arm Camera Image of the South Side of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (Door TA4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is shown with one set of oven doors open and dirt from a sample delivery. After the 'seventh shake' of TEGA, a portion of the dirt sample entered the oven via a screen for analysis. This image was taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or 18th Martian day of the mission.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Robotic Arm Camera Image of the South Side of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (Door TA4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is shown with one set of oven doors open and dirt from a sample delivery. After the 'seventh shake' of TEGA, a portion of the dirt sample entered the oven via a screen for analysis. This image was taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or 18th Martian day of the mission.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Effect of stratified inequality of blood flow on gas exchange in liquid-filled lungs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Maloney, J. E.; Castle, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation set out to answer two questions: (1) are the distal alveoli in the terminal lung units less well perfused than the proximal alveoli, i.e., is there stratification of blood flow; and (2) if so, does this enhance gas exchange in the presence of stratified inequality of ventilation. Excised dog lungs were ventilated with saline and perfused with blood. Following single inspirations of xenon 133 in saline and various periods of breath holding, the expired xenon concentration against volume was measured and it confirmed marked stratified inequality of ventilation under these conditions. By measuring the rate of depletion of xenon from alveoli during a period of blood flow, we showed that the alveoli which emptied at the end of expiration had 16% less blood flow than those exhaling earlier. However, by measuring the xenon concentration in pulmonary venous blood, we found that about 10% less tracer was transferred from the alveoli into the blood when the inspired xenon was stratified within the respiratory zone. Thus while stratification of blood flow was confirmed, it was shown to impair rather than enhance the efficiency of gas transfer.

  16. CASE REPORT Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Forearm Following Blood Gas Analysis Postthrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bisarya, Kamal; George, Samuel; El Sallakh, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an important condition with potentially serious consequences if not diagnosed and treated promptly. This report highlights a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm after radial artery blood gas analysis in a patient who had been thrombolyzed for a pulmonary embolus. Methods/Case Report: We present a case of a 54-year-old lady, admitted and treated for a pulmonary embolism with tenecteplase for thrombolysis. As per routine management, she had taken an arterial blood gas sample, which caused hematoma in the wrist and a few hours later developed pain and a tense right forearm being diagnosed with compartment syndrome. She underwent fasciotomies and subsequent split skin grafting. We discuss the different etiologies of compartment syndrome, clinical signs, and available investigations as well as immediate and definitive management options including fasciotomy techniques. We present the latest literature on the subject and extract valuable learning points from this case. With the common use of thrombolysis for the management of a myocardial infarction or pulmonary embolus, compartment syndrome is an uncommon but potentially associated problem. Furthermore, with blood gas sampling being part of daily clinical practice and a potential cause of this condition, the compartment syndrome becomes iatrogenic and potentiates serious litigation. As many junior doctors are performing blood gas analysis postthrombolysis, they need to assess patients adequately and realize the risk of possible sequelae such as compartment syndrome in this group and inform patients of such complications.

  17. Robustness of arterial blood gas analysis for assessment of respiratory safety pharmacology in rats.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Garth T; Hummel, Michele; Boulet, Jamie; Beyenhof, Jessica D; Strenkowski, Bryan; John, Janet Dell; Knappenberger, Terri; Maselli, Harry; Koetzner, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Whole body plethysmography using unrestrained animals is a common technique for assessing the respiratory risk of new drugs in safety pharmacology studies in rats. However, wide variations in experimental technique make cross laboratory comparison of data difficult and raise concerns that non-appropriate conditions may mask the deleterious effects of test compounds - in particular with suspected respiratory depressants. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the robustness of arterial blood gas analysis as an alternative to plethysmography in rats. We sought to do this by assessing the effect of different vehicles and times post-surgical catheterization on blood gas measurements, in addition to determining sensitivity to multiple opioids. Furthermore, we determined intra-lab variability from multiple datasets utilizing morphine and generated within a single lab and lastly, inter-lab variability was measured by comparing datasets generated in two separate labs. Overall, our data show that arterial blood gas analysis is a measure that is both flexible in terms of experimental conditions and highly sensitive to respiratory depressants, two key limitations when using plethysmography. As such, our data strongly advocate the adoption of arterial blood gas analysis as an investigative approach to reliably examine the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on blood gas, electrolyte balance, and pH in feedlot cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood gas, electrolyte balance and pH in feedlot cattle. Black-hided steers and heifers (n=96) were sourced from a commercial feedlot and transported to the Texas Tech University Beef Center in New Deal, TX. C...

  19. Cardiac Morphology and Function, and Blood Gas Transport in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Wang, Yong; Meissner, Joachim D.; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have studied cardiac and respiratory functions of aquaporin-1-deficient mice by the Pressure-Volume-loop technique and by blood gas analysis. In addition, the morphological properties of the animals' hearts were analyzed. In anesthesia under maximal dobutamine stimulation, the mice exhibit a moderately elevated heart rate of < 600 min−1 and an O2 consumption of ~0.6 ml/min/g, which is about twice the basal rate. In this state, which is similar to the resting state of the conscious animal, all cardiac functions including stroke volume and cardiac output exhibited resting values and were identical between deficient and wildtype animals. Likewise, pulmonary and peripheral exchange of O2 and CO2 were normal. In contrast, several morphological parameters of the heart tissue of deficient mice were altered: (1) left ventricular wall thickness was reduced by 12%, (2) left ventricular mass, normalized to tibia length, was reduced by 10–20%, (3) cardiac muscle fiber cross sectional area was decreased by 17%, and (4) capillary density was diminished by 10%. As the P-V-loop technique yielded normal end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes, the deficient hearts are characterized by thin ventricular walls in combination with normal intraventricular volumes. The aquaporin-1-deficient heart thus seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the wild-type heart by a reduced left-ventricular wall thickness and an increased diffusion distance between blood capillaries and muscle mitochondria. While under the present quasi-resting conditions these morphological alterations have no consequences for cardiac function, we expect that the deficient hearts will show a reduced maximal cardiac output. PMID:27252655

  20. Venous blood gas analytes during isoflurane anesthesia in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Gardhouse, Sara M; Eshar, David; Bello, Nora; Mason, Diane

    2015-08-15

    To describe changes in venous blood gas analytes during isoflurane anesthesia in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Prospective study. 16 black-tailed prairie dogs. Black-tailed prairie dogs were placed in an anesthesia chamber for induction of general anesthesia, which was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen delivered via mask. Immediately following anesthetic induction, a venous blood sample was obtained from the medial saphenous vein; a second venous blood sample was obtained just prior to anesthetic gas shutoff. An evaluation of venous blood gas analytes was performed on each sample. General linear mixed models with repeated measures were used for data analyses. Median anesthetic time was 90 minutes (range, 60 to 111 minutes). A significant increase from immediately after induction to completion of anesthesia was observed in Pco2 and mean blood chloride ion, BUN, and creatinine concentrations. A decrease in Po2, mean blood pH, and anion gap was observed from induction of anesthesia to completion. No significant differences during anesthesia were observed in mean base excess or blood bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, blood glucose, lactate, and total CO2 concentrations. No complications occurred during or after anesthesia for any animal. Examination of prairie dogs often requires general anesthesia, with isoflurane currently the inhalation agent of choice. Results suggested respiratory acidosis and relative azotemia may occur during isoflurane anesthesia of prairie dogs. Given the increased risk associated with anesthesia in small mammals and the propensity for respiratory disease in prairie dogs, insight into physiologic changes associated with isoflurane anesthesia in healthy prairie dogs can aid in perioperative evaluation and anesthetic monitoring in this rodent species.

  1. Changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and blood flow during hypoxic gas ventilation therapy in HLHS and CoA/IAA complex with markedly increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Toiyama, Kentaro; Hamaoka, Kenji; Oka, Tatsujiro; Kobayashi, Naho; Noritake, Kanae; Kato, Ryuichi; Kawai, Yoko; Ozawa, Seiichiro; Nishida, Masashi; Itoi, Toshiyuki

    2010-10-01

    Hypoxic gas ventilation therapy has recently been performed to prevent post-birth increased pulmonary blood flow in cases of congenital heart diseases with increased pulmonary blood flow. However, how the oxygen supply to the tissues changes during breathing a hypoxic gas mixture, remains unknown. The changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and blood supply during hypoxic gas ventilation therapy using a nitrogen gas mixture were studied. Cerebral regional oxygen saturation (cerebral rSO(2)) was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, and changes in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow and an index of vascular resistance (RI) were assessed in 8 consecutive patients having congenital heart diseases with increased pulmonary blood flow. In all patients, urinary volume increased significantly, and the respiratory rate showed a clear decrease. Percutaneous oxygen saturation showed no significant change. The average of cerebral rSO(2) was 67.3% before hypoxic gas ventilation, but increased to 69.4%, 69.1%, and 70.7% within 1, 12, and 24 h after initiation of treatment, respectively. MCA blood flow significantly increased in the diastolic phase, and RI significantly improved from 0.80 to 0.68 within 12 h after initiation of therapy. These results indicate that hypoxic gas ventilation therapy does not decrease cerebral oxygen saturation, but safely improves the cerebral blood supply in cases of congenital heart diseases with increased pulmonary blood flow. 

  2. [Evaluation of a new blood gas analysis system: RapidPoint 500(®)].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Thierry; Cabrolier, Nadège; Bardonnet, Karine; Davani, Siamak

    2013-01-01

    We present here evaluation of a new blood gas analysis system, RapidPoint 500(®) (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics). The aim of this research was to compare the ergonomics and analytical performances of this analyser with those of the RapidLab 1265 for the following parameters: pH, partial oxygen pressure, partial carbon dioxide pressure, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, lactate and the CO-oximetry parameters: hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, methemoglobin, reduced hemoglobin, neonatal bilirubin; as well as with the Dimension Vista 500 results for chloride and glucose. The Valtec protocol, recommended by the French Society of Clinical Biology (SFBC), was used to analyze the study results. The experiment was carried out over a period of one month in the Department of medical biochemistry. One hundred sixty five samples from adult patients admitted to the ER or hospitalized in intensive care were tested. The RapidPoint 500(®) was highly satisfactory from an ergonomic point of view. Intra-and inter- assay coefficients of variation (CV) with the three control levels were below those recommended by the SFBC for all parameters, and the comparative study gave coefficients of determination higher than 0.91. Taken together, the RapidPoint 500(®) appears fully satisfactory in terms of ergonomics and analytical performance.

  3. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  4. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  5. Rapid identification of pork for halal authentication using the electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nurjuliana, M; Che Man, Y B; Mat Hashim, D; Mohamed, A K S

    2011-08-01

    The volatile compounds of pork, other meats and meat products were studied using an electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer (GCMS-HS) for halal verification. The zNose™ was successfully employed for identification and differentiation of pork and pork sausages from beef, mutton and chicken meats and sausages which were achieved using a visual odor pattern called VaporPrint™, derived from the frequency of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector of the electronic nose. GCMS-HS was employed to separate and analyze the headspace gasses from samples into peaks corresponding to individual compounds for the purpose of identification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for data interpretation. Analysis by PCA was able to cluster and discriminate pork from other types of meats and sausages. It was shown that PCA could provide a good separation of the samples with 67% of the total variance accounted by PC1.

  6. Evaluation of three point-of-care meters and a portable veterinary chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentrations in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Higbie, Christine T; Eshar, David; Bello, Nora M

    2015-06-01

    To compare blood glucose concentrations of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) measured by use of a variety of portable analyzers with results from a laboratory biochemistry analyzer. Venous blood samples (3 mL) obtained from each of 16 healthy black-tailed prairie dogs. A portion of each blood sample was used to measure glucose concentrations by use of an amperometric human point-of-care glucometer and a colorimetric species-specific portable blood glucose meter designed for veterinary use with both canine (code 5) and feline (code 7) settings. The remainder of each blood sample was placed into 2 tubes (one contained lithium heparin and the other contained no anticoagulant). A portable veterinary chemistry analyzer (PVCA) and a handheld analyzer were used to measure glucose concentration in heparinized blood. Serum glucose concentration was measured in the remaining portion by use of a biochemistry analyzer. A general linear mixed models approach was used to compare glucose concentrations and measurement bias obtained with the various measurement methods. Measurement bias and differences in mean glucose concentrations were apparent with all measurement methods. In particular, the veterinary glucometer, whether used on the canine or feline setting, overestimated mean glucose concentrations, whereas the human glucometer, PVCA, and handheld analyzer underestimated mean glucose concentrations relative to the concentration obtained with the biochemistry analyzer. Results indicated that none of the measurement methods provided consistently accurate blood glucose concentrations of black-tailed prairie dogs, compared with values determined with a biochemistry analyzer.

  7. The Search for Water and Other Volatiles in Martian Surface Materials: The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Musselwhite, D. S.; Bailey, S. H.; Bode, R. C.; Quadlander, G.; Kerry, K. E.; Ward, M. G.; Lorenz, R. D.; Pathare, A. V.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile-bearing minerals and phases (e.g., Fe-oxyhydroxides, phyllosilicates, carbonates, sulfates, palagonites, glasses) may be important components of the Martian regolith. However, essentially no information exists on the mineralogical composition of volatile-bearing phases in the regolith. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which was part of the Mars Polar Lander payload, was to determine the abundances of two of the most important volatile compounds (i.e., water and carbon dioxide) in the martian soil and to identify the minerals or phases that harbor these volatiles. The TEGA instrument was composed of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) interfaced with evolved gas analysis (EGA). The EGA consisted of a Herriott cell of a tunable-diode laser (TDL) spectrometer that determines CO2 and H2O abundances. The sample chamber was to operate at about 100 mbar (-76 torr) with a N2 carrier gas flow of 0.4 sccm. Specifications of TEGA are described in detail elsewhere in this volume.

  8. Application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in analyzing pharmacokinetics and distribution of deltamethrin in miniature pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pan; Fan, Sai; Zou, Jian Hong; Miao, Hong; Li, Jing Guang; Zhang, Guo Wen; Wu, Yong Ning

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the pharmacokinetics and distribution profiles of deltamethrin in miniature pig tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Pharmacokinetics and distribution of deltamethrin in blood and tissues of 30 miniature pigs were studied by GC-MS after oral administration of deltamethrin (5 mg/kg bw). Data were processed by 3P97 software. The serum deltamethrin level was significantly lower in tissues than in blood of miniature pigs. The AUC0-72 h, Cmax, of deltamethrin were 555.330 ± 316.987 ng h/mL and 17.861 ± 11.129 ng/mL, respectively. The Tmax, of deltamethrin was 6.004 ± 3.131 h. The metabolism of deltamethrin in miniature pigs is fit for a one-compartment model with a weighting function of 1/C2. Deltamethrin is rapidly hydrolyzed and accumulated in miniature pig tissues. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  9. Central venous blood gas and acid-base status in conscious dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Jun; ITAMI, Takaharu; ISHIZUKA, Tomohito; FUKUI, Sho; MIYOSHI, Kenjirou; SANO, Tadashi; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reference level of central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and clinical efficacy of central venous blood gas analysis, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, pH, oxygen saturation, base excess (B.E.) and HCO3 concentration were compared between simultaneously obtained central venous and arterial blood samples from conscious healthy 6 dogs and 5 cats. Comparisons between arteriovenous samples were performed by a paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. Between arteriovenous samples, B.E. showed good agreement, but there were significant differences in other parameters in the dogs, and no good agreement was detected in cats. The ScvO2 in dogs and cats were 82.3 ± 3.5 and 62.4 ± 13.5%, respectively. Central venous blood gas analysis is indispensable, especially in cats. PMID:25754649

  10. Central venous blood gas and acid-base status in conscious dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Jun; Itami, Takaharu; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Fukui, Sho; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2015-07-01

    To determine the reference level of central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) and clinical efficacy of central venous blood gas analysis, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, pH, oxygen saturation, base excess (B.E.) and HCO3 concentration were compared between simultaneously obtained central venous and arterial blood samples from conscious healthy 6 dogs and 5 cats. Comparisons between arteriovenous samples were performed by a paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. Between arteriovenous samples, B.E. showed good agreement, but there were significant differences in other parameters in the dogs, and no good agreement was detected in cats. The ScvO2 in dogs and cats were 82.3 ± 3.5 and 62.4 ± 13.5%, respectively. Central venous blood gas analysis is indispensable, especially in cats.

  11. Analyzer for measurement of nitrogen oxide concentration by ozone content reduction in gas using solid state chemiluminescent sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelibanov, V. P.; Ishanin, G. G.; Isaev, L. N.

    2014-05-01

    Role of nitrogen oxide in ambient air is described and analyzed. New method of nitrogen oxide concentration measurement in gas phase is suggested based on ozone concentration measurement with titration by nitrogen oxide. Research of chemiluminescent sensor composition is carried out on experimental stand. The sensor produced on the base of solid state non-activated chemiluminescent composition is applied as ozone sensor. Composition is put on the surface of polymer matrix with developed surface. Sensor compositions includes gallic acid with addition of rodamine-6G. Model of interaction process between sensor composition and ozone has been developed, main products appeared during reaction are identified. The product determining the speed of luminescense appearance is found. This product belongs to quinone class. Then new structure of chemiluminescent composition was suggested, with absence of activation period and with high stability of operation. Experimental model of gas analyzer was constructed and operation algorithm was developed. It was demonstrated that developed NO measuring instrument would be applied for monitoring purposes of ambient air. This work was partially financially supported by Government of Russian Federation, Grant 074-U01

  12. Umbilical cord blood acid-base and gas analysis after early versus delayed cord clamping in neonates at term.

    PubMed

    De Paco, Catalina; Florido, Jesús; Garrido, Mari Carmen; Prados, Sonia; Navarrete, Luis

    2011-05-01

    To compare umbilical cord acid-base status and blood gas analysis between umbilical cords clamped within 10 s and at 2 min of delivery. A total of 158 healthy full-term mothers were randomly assigned to an early clamping (<10 s post-delivery, n = 79) or delayed clamping (2 min post-delivery, n = 79) group. After application of inclusion criteria, umbilical vein blood acid-base status and gases were analyzed in 65 early clamped and 51 delayed clamped cords. Fewer cases could be examined in the umbilical artery: 55 cords in the early clamping group and 44 in the delayed one. Acid-base and gas analysis results did not significantly differ between the groups in the umbilical vein or umbilical artery, with the exception of a higher (p < 0.001) mean umbilical artery pO(2) value in the delayed versus early clamping group. No significant differences in umbilical vein or artery pCO(2) or HCO(3) (-) values were observed between the early and delayed clamp groups. A delay of 2 min before umbilical cord clamping does not significantly change acid-base and gas analysis results, with the exception of a higher mean umbilical artery pO(2) value in the delayed clamping group.

  13. Correlation between some arterial and venous blood gas parameters in healthy newborn Martina Franca donkey foals from birth to 96 hours of age.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, A; Contri, A; Gloria, A; Veronesi, M C; Sfirro, M P; Parrillo, S; Robbe, D

    2017-01-01

    In neonatology, blood gas analysis is a useful tool in the evaluation of the health of newborns and plays a key role in early detection of critically ill subjects. Because blood gas analysis parameters have not previously been studied in any depth in donkey foals, this study was performed on 16 healthy Martina Franca donkey foals born after an uncomplicated delivery. Arterial and venous blood samples were collected at 5 minutes and at 12, 24, 72, and 96 hours of age. Blood gas analysis was performed by a portable analyzer, measuring arterial and venous total carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), oxygen partial pressure (pO2), oxygen saturation (sO2), bicarbonate, base excess (BE), pH, and lactate (LT). Lower blood pH values, pO2 and sO2, and a higher level of lactate were found at birth in comparison with subsequent sampling times. This moderate acidotic profile disappeared at 12 hours, when all the parameters became constant until the end of the study period. As expected, significant differences between arterial and venous blood gas parameters related to the oxygenation, such as pO2 and sO2, and partially carbon dioxide partial pressure were found, whereas total carbon dioxide, pH, BE, and LT were comparable in arterial and venous blood samples. For these latter parameters, the highly significant correlation between arterial and venous findings suggests that venous samples could be an acceptable alternative to the arterial sample for blood gas analysis in newborn donkey foals, when the oxygenation status of the patient is not the first goal of patient analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitive determination of methomyl in blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as its oxime tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivative.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Kudo, K; Imamura, T; Suzuki, T; Ikeda, N

    1998-08-25

    A sensitive, selective and reliable method was developed to determine methomyl ¿methyl-N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]-thioacetimidate¿, a carbamate insecticide in human blood, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dimethylglyoxime served as an internal standard (I.S.). Methomyl in the blood was converted to its oxime form by sodium hydroxide. The solution made acidic with hydrochloric acid was poured into a column packed with Extrelut. Methomyloxime and I.S. were eluted from the column with a mixture of dichloromethane-ethyl acetate-chloroform (65:25:10), transformed to tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the electron impact mode. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range from 1 ng/g to 100 ng/g and 100 ng/g to at least 5000 ng/g. The lower limit of detection was 0.5 ng/g. The absolute recoveries were 72-93% and within-day coefficients of variation were 3.1-5.6% at blood concentrations of 10 and 1000 ng/g. Two practical forensic applications are described.

  15. Evaluation of the impedance analyzer PocH-100iV Diff for analysis of canine and feline blood.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Natali B; Nakagawa, Julia; Dunker, Cathrin; Failing, Klaus; Moritz, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    An automated impedance-based in-house hematology analyzer, the PocH-100iV Diff, which provides a 3-part leukocyte differential count that includes eosinophils, recently has been introduced. The aims of this study were to validate results from the PocH-100iV Diff for dogs and cats and evaluate the impact of the anticoagulant used and sample storage conditions. Blood samples collected in K(3) EDTA from 153 cats and 150 dogs were included in the comparison study. The reference analyzer was the ADVIA 2120 hematology analyzer, and manual differential leukocyte counts and PCV were the manual reference methods. Coefficients of variation were < 3% except for platelet counts and feline differential and eosinophil counts. Correlation between analyzers was good to excellent except for hemoglobin (HGB) concentration in dogs and RBC indices for both species. Biases were close to 0 except for MCHC and platelet counts. Correlation with manual counts was good for lymphocytes and OTHR cells (combined neutrophil and monocyte counts) and fair and poor for feline and canine eosinophil counts, respectively. Estimated sensitivity and specificity for detection of eosinophilia were, respectively, 50% and 98% for cats and 34% and 77% for dogs. A significant anticoagulant effect was seen for MCV in cats and for HCT, MCH, MCHC, and platelet, OTHR, and eosinophil counts in dogs. RBC and WBC counts, HGB concentration, and MCH were stable for 72 h. HCT, MCV, MCHC, and platelet counts were affected by sample storage (dogs > cats; 22°C > 4°C). The PocH-100iV Diff is a suitable in-house instrument. A strength is its specific, but moderately sensitive, detection of feline eosinophils. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. Nitric oxide added to the sweep gas infusion reduces local clotting formation in adult blood oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Tevaearai, H T; Mueller, X M; Tepic, S; Cotting, J; Boone, Y; Montavon, P M; von Segesser, L K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. We analyzed the effect of direct infusion of NO into adult blood oxygenators on local clot formation. Nonheparinized calves in a control group (n = 3) and NO group (n = 4) were connected to a jugulocarotid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; centrifugal pump) for 6 hours. The venous line and pumphead were heparin coated, whereas the oxygenator, the heat exchanger, and the arterial line were not. A total of 80 ppm of NO was mixed with the sweep gas infusion in the NO group. The pressure gradient through the oxygenator (deltaP.Ox.) was monitored, and its evolution was compared between groups. Oxygenators membranes were analyzed and photographed, allowing for calculation of the percentage of surface area covered with clots by using a computer image analysis program. The deltaP.Ox. reached a plateau of 193 +/- 26% of the basal value in the NO group after 120 minutes, whereas a similar plateau of 202 +/- 22% was reached after only 20 minutes in the control group (p < 0.05). The surface area of the oxygenator covered with clots was significantly reduced in the NO group (0.54 +/- 0.41%) compared with the control group (5.78 +/- 3.80%, p < 0.05). However, general coagulation parameters were not modified by local NO administration. The activated coagulation time remained stable between 110 and 150 seconds in both groups (p = not significant [ns]), and there were no differences in hematocrit, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or fibrinogen between groups during the 6 hours of CPB. Thus, the mixed infusion of a continuous low dose of NO into adult oxygenators during prolonged CPB prevented local clot formation, whereas the general coagulation pattern remained unchanged.

  17. Impact of arterial blood gas analysis in disability evaluation of the bituminous coal miner with simple pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, C.L.; Roy, T.M.; Dow, F.T.; Anderson, W.H. )

    1992-04-01

    The Department of Labor has set guidelines for the use of resting arterial blood gas analysis in determination of total and permanent disability for coal workers' pneumoconiosis. To determine the prevalence with which bituminous coal miners fall below the arterial tensions of both oxygen and carbon dioxide published in the Federal Register, we studied 1012 miners who had both reproducible spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis as part of their disability evaluation. Eighty-seven percent of impaired miners could be identified by the spirometric criteria. Thirteen percent of impaired bituminous coal miners had acceptable pulmonary function but were eligible for black lung benefits by the blood gas guidelines. This population would have been missed if blood gas analysis were excluded from the evaluation process. On the other hand, approximately 25% of the blood gas analyses that were performed could be eliminated if a policy was adopted to do this test only on miners with spirometry that exceed the federal guidelines.

  18. Performance evaluation of the Sysmex XN-1000 hematology analyzer in assessment of the white blood cell count differential in pediatric specimens.

    PubMed

    Becker, P-H; Fenneteau, O; Da Costa, L

    2016-02-01

    The automated XN-1000 hematology analyzer enables to perform a blood cell count and a leukocyte differential. When abnormal cells were detected, a flag was generated by the analyzer and a manual microscopic examination of the corresponding blood film was performed. We compared the white blood cell differentials provided by the automated hematology analyzer XN-1000 in a pediatric population (n = 765) with those obtained through microscopic examination by cytologists and those obtained using a previous version of this analyzer, the XE-2100. Leukocytes count as well as flags sensitivity and specificity was analyzed. The leukocytes count provided by the analyzer is in good accordance with the differential obtained by manual count in children older than 3 months. The sensitivity for blast detection is 99% and the detection of reactive cells is 63%. The flag specificity remains low (<35%) for blood samples collected from infants between 8 days and 2 years of age, but increases up to 67% thereafter. The results obtained with the XN-1000 analyzer show an improvement in comparison with those obtained with the XE-2100 analyzer. The automated WBC differential provided by the XN-1000 analyzer in the pediatric setting is accurate, but a meticulous microscopic examination of blood smears remains necessary for infants up to 3 months of age to validate the analyzer flags. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Performance evaluation of the Sysmex XE-5000 hematology analyzer for white blood cell analysis in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Perné, Andrea; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Womastek, Irene; Haushofer, Alexander; Szekeres, Thomas; Schwarzinger, Ilse

    2012-02-01

    The newest generation hematology analyzer, Sysmex XE-5000 (Sysmex Corporation, Kobe, Japan) is equipped with an improved body fluid analysis mode. To evaluate the applicability of the XE-5000 analyzer to white blood cell (WBC) analysis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A total of 425 routinely collected, consecutive CSF samples were included in the study. For a comparison of total WBC counts, the results of routine chamber counts were grouped into categories of 0 to 5 (n  =  330), >5 to 10 (n  =  36), >10 to 50 (n  =  39), >50 to 200 (n  =  15), and >200 (n  =  5) WBC/µL. Microscopic differential counts were performed using cytospins from 276 samples. Results were grouped according to the percent content of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells, 0% to 25% (n  =  263), >25% to 50% (n  =  7), >50% to 75% (n  =  3), and >75% to 100% (n  =  3) of WBC. Corresponding results of XE-5000 analysis were matched to these particular count categories. For total WBC counts, the proportions of samples correctly classified by the XE-5000 from the percentage groups described above were 88%, 47%, 72%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. After the two lowest count categories were combined into one range of 0 to 10 WBC/µL, matches increased to 95%. For PMN counts in the 0% to 25% group, 37% of samples were misclassified by the XE-5000. Conversely, for samples with microscopic PMN counts of more than 25%, there was a trend toward underestimation by the XE-5000. Mismatches were most pronounced in samples with fewer than 10 WBC/µL. The Sysmex XE-5000 hematology analyzer yields valid total CSF cell counts and may be considered an acceptable alternative to the traditional chamber method, even for samples with low WBC counts. However, it cannot be recommended as a suitable alternative for manual differential cytologic workup.

  20. Comparing laser-based open- and closed-path gas analyzers to measure methane fluxes using the eddy covariance method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detto, M.; Verfaillie, J.; Anderson, F.; Xu, L.; Baldocchi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Closed- and open-path methane gas analyzers are used in eddy covariance systems to compare three potential methane emitting ecosystems in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (CA, USA): a rice field, a peatland pasture and a restored wetland. The study points out similarities and differences of the systems in field experiments and data processing. The closed-path system, despite a less intrusive placement with the sonic anemometer, required more care and power. In contrast, the open-path system appears more versatile for a remote and unattended experimental site. Overall, the two systems have comparable minimum detectable limits, but synchronization between wind speed and methane data, air density corrections and spectral losses have different impacts on the computed flux covariances. For the closed-path analyzer, air density effects are less important, but the synchronization and spectral losses may represent a problem when fluxes are small or when an undersized pump is used. For the open-path analyzer air density corrections are greater, due to spectroscopy effects and the classic Webb-Pearman-Leuning correction. Comparison between the 30-min fluxes reveals good agreement in terms of magnitudes between open-path and closed-path flux systems. However, the scatter is large, as consequence of the intensive data processing which both systems require. ?? 2011.

  1. Improving the validity of peripheral venous blood gas analysis as an estimate of arterial blood gas by correcting the venous values with SvO₂.

    PubMed

    Lemoël, Fabien; Govciyan, Sandra; El Omri, Mouna; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Levraut, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral venous blood gas (pVBG) analysis in replacement of arterial blood gas (ABG) is limited by the unpredictable differences between arterial and venous values, especially for PCO2 and pH (ΔPCO2 and ΔpH). We hypothesized that, using the theoretical relationship linking SvO2 and blood flow, we could diminish the effect of local circulatory conditions on ΔPCO2 and ΔpH and thereby increase pVBG validity. This was a prospective cross-sectional study performed in emergency patients requiring a blood gas analysis in which ABG and pVBG were performed simultaneously. The data of 50 randomly selected patients (model group) were used for developing two equations to correct PvCO2 and pHv according to the peripheral SvO2 (SpvO2) level. The formulas derived were PvCO2cor = PvCO2 - 0.30 × (75 - SpvO2), and pHvcor = pHv + 0.001 × (75 - SpvO2). The validity of the corrected values was then tested on the remaining population (validation group). There were 281 patients included in the study, mainly for dyspnea. ΔPCO2 and ΔpH were strongly correlated with SpvO2 (r(2) = 0.62 and r(2) = 0.53, respectively, p < 0.001). Using the data of the model group, we developed equations that we applied on the validation group. We found that the corrected values were more valid than the raw values for detecting a PaCO2 > 45 mm Hg (AUC ROC = 0.96 ± 0.01 vs. 0.89 ± 0.02, p < 0.001), a PaCO2 < 35 mm Hg (AUC = 0.95 ± 0.02 vs. 0.84 ± 0.03, p < 0.001), a pHa < 7.35 (AUC = 0.97 ± 0.01 vs. 0.95 ± 0.02, p < 0.05), or a pHa > 7.45 (AUC = 0.91 ± 0.02 vs. 0.81 ± 0.04, p < 0.001). The variability of ΔPCO2 and ΔpH is significantly lowered when the venous values are corrected according to the SpvO2 value, and pVBG is therefore more accurate and valid for detecting an arterial abnormality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitation of dissolved gas content in emulsions and in blood using mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Grimley, Everett; Turner, Nicole; Newell, Clayton; Simpkins, Cuthbert; Rodriguez, Juan

    2011-06-01

    Quantitation of dissolved gases in blood or in other biological media is essential for understanding the dynamics of metabolic processes. Current detection techniques, while enabling rapid and convenient assessment of dissolved gases, provide only direct information on the partial pressure of gases dissolved in the aqueous fraction of the fluid. The more relevant quantity known as gas content, which refers to the total amount of the gas in all fractions of the sample, can be inferred from those partial pressures, but only indirectly through mathematical modeling. Here we describe a simple mass spectrometric technique for rapid and direct quantitation of gas content for a wide range of gases. The technique is based on a mass spectrometer detector that continuously monitors gases that are rapidly extracted from samples injected into a purge vessel. The accuracy and sample processing speed of the system is demonstrated with experiments that reproduce within minutes literature values for the solubility of various gases in water. The capability of the technique is further demonstrated through accurate determination of O(2) content in a lipid emulsion and in whole blood, using as little as 20 μL of sample. The approach to gas content quantitation described here should greatly expand the range of animals and conditions that may be used in studies of metabolic gas exchange, and facilitate the development of artificial oxygen carriers and resuscitation fluids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitation of dissolved gas content in emulsions and in blood using mass spectrometric detection

    PubMed Central

    Grimley, Everett; Turner, Nicole; Newell, Clayton; Simpkins, Cuthbert; Rodriguez, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Quantitation of dissolved gases in blood or in other biological media is essential for understanding the dynamics of metabolic processes. Current detection techniques, while enabling rapid and convenient assessment of dissolved gases, provide only direct information on the partial pressure of gases dissolved in the aqueous fraction of the fluid. The more relevant quantity known as gas content, which refers to the total amount of the gas in all fractions of the sample, can be inferred from those partial pressures, but only indirectly through mathematical modeling. Here we describe a simple mass spectrometric technique for rapid and direct quantitation of gas content for a wide range of gases. The technique is based on a mass spectrometer detector that continuously monitors gases that are rapidly extracted from samples injected into a purge vessel. The accuracy and sample processing speed of the system is demonstrated with experiments that reproduce within minutes literature values for the solubility of various gases in water. The capability of the technique is further demonstrated through accurate determination of O2 content in a lipid emulsion and in whole blood, using as little as 20 μL of sample. The approach to gas content quantitation described here should greatly expand the range of animals and conditions that may be used in studies of metabolic gas exchange, and facilitate the development of artificial oxygen carriers and resuscitation fluids. PMID:21497566

  4. Prediction of the hematocrit of dried blood spots via potassium measurement on a routine clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Stove, Veronique V; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2013-01-02

    The potential of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling as an alternative for classical venous sampling is increasingly recognized, with multiple applications in, e.g., therapeutic drug monitoring and toxicology. Although DBS sampling has many advantages, it is associated with several issues, the hematocrit (Hct) issue being the most widely discussed challenge, given its possible strong impact on DBS-based quantitation. Hitherto, no approaches allow Hct prediction from nonvolumetrically applied DBS. Following a simple and rapid extraction protocol, K(+) levels from 3 mm DBS punches were measured via indirect potentiometry, using the Roche Cobas 8000 routine chemistry analyzer. The extracts' K(+) concentrations were used to calculate the approximate Hct of the blood used to generate DBS. A linear calibration line was established, with a Hct range of 0.19 to 0.63 (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ, to upper limit of quantification, ULOQ). The procedure was fully validated; the bias and imprecision of quality controls (QCs) at three Hct levels and at the LLOQ and ULOQ was less than 5 and 12%, respectively. In addition, the influence of storage (pre- and postextraction), volume spotted, and punch homogeneity was evaluated. Application on DBS from patient samples (n = 111), followed by Bland and Altman, Passing and Bablok, and Deming regression analysis, demonstrated a good correlation between the "predicted Hct" and the "actual Hct". After correcting for the observed bias, limits of agreement of ±0.049 were established. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated assay reproducibility. In conclusion, potassium levels in extracts from 3 mm DBS punches can be used to get a good prediction of the Hct, one of the most important "unknowns" in DBS analysis.

  5. Using venous blood gas analysis in the assessment of COPD exacerbations: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Tricia M; Hearson, Glenn; Housley, Gemma; Reynolds, Catherine; Kinnear, William; Harrison, Tim W; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Shaw, Dominick E

    2016-03-01

    Identifying acute hypercapnic respiratory failure is crucial in the initial management of acute exacerbations of COPD. Guidelines recommend obtaining arterial blood samples but these are more difficult to obtain than venous. We assessed whether blood gas values derived from venous blood could replace arterial at initial assessment. Patients requiring hospital treatment for an exacerbation of COPD had paired arterial and venous samples taken. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to assess agreement between arterial and venous pH, CO2 and HCO3-. The relationship between SpO2 and SaO2 was assessed. The number of attempts and pain scores for each sample were measured. 234 patients were studied. There was good agreement between arterial and venous measures of pH and HC)3- (mean difference 0.03 and -0.04, limits of agreement -0.05 to 0.11 and -2.90 to 2.82, respectively), and between SaO2 and SpO2 (in patients with an SpO2 of >80%). Arterial sampling required more attempts and was more painful than venous (mean pain score 4 (IQR 2-5) and 1 (IQR 0-2), respectively, p<0.001). Arterial sampling is more difficult and more painful than venous sampling. There is good agreement between pH and HCO3- values derived from venous and arterial blood, and between pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas oxygen saturations. These agreements could allow the initial assessment of COPD exacerbations to be based on venous blood gas analysis and pulse oximetry, simplifying the care pathway and improving the patient experience. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Using venous blood gas analysis in the assessment of COPD exacerbations: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, Tricia M; Hearson, Glenn; Housley, Gemma; Reynolds, Catherine; Kinnear, William; Harrison, Tim W; Kelly, Anne-Maree; Shaw, Dominick E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Identifying acute hypercapnic respiratory failure is crucial in the initial management of acute exacerbations of COPD. Guidelines recommend obtaining arterial blood samples but these are more difficult to obtain than venous. We assessed whether blood gas values derived from venous blood could replace arterial at initial assessment. Methods Patients requiring hospital treatment for an exacerbation of COPD had paired arterial and venous samples taken. Bland–Altman analyses were performed to assess agreement between arterial and venous pH, CO2 and . The relationship between SpO2 and SaO2 was assessed. The number of attempts and pain scores for each sample were measured. Results 234 patients were studied. There was good agreement between arterial and venous measures of pH and (mean difference 0.03 and −0.04, limits of agreement −0.05 to 0.11 and −2.90 to 2.82, respectively), and between SaO2 and SpO2 (in patients with an SpO2 of >80%). Arterial sampling required more attempts and was more painful than venous (mean pain score 4 (IQR 2–5) and 1 (IQR 0–2), respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Arterial sampling is more difficult and more painful than venous sampling. There is good agreement between pH and values derived from venous and arterial blood, and between pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas oxygen saturations. These agreements could allow the initial assessment of COPD exacerbations to be based on venous blood gas analysis and pulse oximetry, simplifying the care pathway and improving the patient experience. PMID:26628461

  7. Intrapartum intrauterine fetal demise with normal umbilical cord blood gas values at birth.

    PubMed

    Benson, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    A case is presented in which a fetus was delivered by cesarean section for failure to progress and a "nonreassuring heart rate tracing" in which the Apgar scores were unexpectedly 0 at 1, 5, and 10 minutes. Resuscitation was unsuccessful after 30 minutes. The venous cord gas was normal and the arterial blood gas was not consistent with intrapartum asphyxia. At the time of surgery, the placenta appeared grossly normal. The autopsy was entirely normal. This case raises questions about our understanding of intrauterine fetal demise and suggests an approach to future research.

  8. Hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of barbiturates in whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rafael Menck; de Lima, Diógenes Saulo; Seulin, Saskia Carolina; Leyton, Vilma; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Muñoz, Daniel Romero; Osselton, Michael David; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2012-12-01

    Here, we present a method for measuring barbiturates (butalbital, secobarbital, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital) in whole blood samples. To accomplish these measurements, analytes were extracted by means of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction in the three-phase mode. Hollow-fiber pores were filled with decanol, and a solution of sodium hydroxide (pH 13) was introduced into the lumen of the fiber (acceptor phase). The fiber was submersed in the acidified blood sample, and the system was subjected to an ultrasonic bath. After a 5 min extraction, the acceptor phase was withdrawn from the fiber and dried under a nitrogen stream. The residue was reconstituted with ethyl acetate and trimethylanilinium hydroxide. An aliquot of 1.0 μL of this solution was injected into the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, with the derivatization reaction occurring in the hot injector port (flash methylation). The method proved to be simple and rapid, and only a small amount of organic solvent (decanol) was needed for extraction. The detection limit was 0.5 μg/mL for all the analyzed barbiturates. The calibration curves were linear over the specified range (1.0 to 10.0 μg/mL). This method was successfully applied to postmortem samples (heart blood and femoral blood) collected from three deceased persons previously exposed to barbiturates. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The use of gas chromatography to analyze compositional changes of fatty acids in rat liver tissue during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fisk, Helena L; West, Annette L; Childs, Caroline E; Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2014-03-13

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a highly sensitive method used to identify and quantify the fatty acid content of lipids from tissues, cells, and plasma/serum, yielding results with high accuracy and high reproducibility. In metabolic and nutrition studies GC allows assessment of changes in fatty acid concentrations following interventions or during changes in physiological state such as pregnancy. Solid phase extraction (SPE) using aminopropyl silica cartridges allows separation of the major lipid classes including triacylglycerols, different phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters (CE). GC combined with SPE was used to analyze the changes in fatty acid composition of the CE fraction in the livers of virgin and pregnant rats that had been fed various high and low fat diets. There are significant diet/pregnancy interaction effects upon the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid content of liver CE, indicating that pregnant females have a different response to dietary manipulation than is seen among virgin females.

  10. Analyzing salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin a utilizing thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jermain, John D; Evans, Hiram K

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, Salvia divinorum has become a major focus by state legislatures throughout the United States looking to prohibit the sale of the psychoactive plant. After researching testing procedures presented in the literature and those employed by crime laboratories throughout the country, it was decided that thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were the methods to use to analyze plant material for salvinorin A. With TLC, salvinorin A was detected from extracted plant material and was easily distinguishable from 13 other Salvia species as well as Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). When using GC/MS, salvinorin A was best extracted from plant material with chloroform at ambient temperature when using a nonpolar solvent and acetone at ambient temperature when using a polar solvent. By utilizing these techniques, criminalists are now able to confirm the presence of salvinorin A in a submitted plant material suspected to be Salvia divinorum.

  11. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Vinayak Umarji, Arun

    2015-03-15

    Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide – carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ∼7 nm and ∼95 m{sup 2}/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO{sub 2} thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  12. Temperature, density, and composition in the disturbed thermosphere from Esro 4 gas analyzer measurements - A global model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacchia, L. G.; Slowey, J. W.; Von Zahn, U.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of density measurements of Ar, N2, O, and He made at 280 km with the gas analyzer aboard the polar-orbiting satellite Esro 4 has yielded a global model of the variations in temperature, density, and composition that occur in the disturbed thermosphere. In the model the increase of temperature over quiet conditions is a nonlinear function of the planetary geomagnetic index, its latitude profile being approximated by a fourth-power sin phi law, where phi is the 'invariant' magnetic latitude. A density wave proceeding from high latitudes is approximated by a fourth power cos phi law. A strong nonlinearity in the relation between the temperature variations and the variations in the height of the homopause explains a previously found behavioral difference in the variation of atomic oxygen during magnetic storms and during periods of sustained geomagnetic activity.

  13. Analysis of whole blood samples with low gas flow inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sascha; Künnemeyer, Jens; Terborg, Lydia; Trümpler, Stefan; Günsel, Andreas; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Karst, Uwe; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Low gas flow ICP-OES with a total argon consumption below 0.7 L/min is introduced for the analysis of trace elements in blood samples to investigate the influence of samples containing an organic solvent in a demanding matrix on the performance of this plasma for the first time. Therefore, gadolinium was determined in human plasma samples and mercury in red blood cells, human plasma, and precipitated plasma protein fraction. Limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be in the low microgram per liter range for the analytes and the accuracy of the method was assessed by comparison with a conventional Fassel-type torch-based ICP-OES. It was proven that the low gas flow ICP-OES leads to comparable results with the instrument based on the Fassel-type torch.

  14. [Point care testing in blood gas and electrolyte analysis : examples of implementation and cost analysis].

    PubMed

    Magny, E; Beaudeux, J-L; Launay, J-M

    2003-01-01

    An increasing proportion of laboratories manage and organize point of care testing (POCT). The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation made at Lariboisière hospital for three remote blood gas analysers. The most important aspect in this achievement is the comprehensive computerization, making possible real time management of POCT in agreement with the Point of Care unit Management team. In addition, we present a running cost analysis, comparing three Blood gas systems (Rapidlab860, Rapidpoint 400--Bayer Diagnostics and i-Stat Abbott Diagnostics). This study indicates that cost per test hugely varies based on the daily sample demand. In addition to analytical and organizational items, the clinical chemist should consider the testing demand as a key factor in choosing an analyser for POCT.

  15. Effects of gravity and blood volume shifts on cardiogenic oscillations in respired gas.

    PubMed

    Montmerle, Stéphanie; Linnarsson, Dag

    2005-09-01

    During the cardiac cycle, cardiogenic oscillations of expired gas (x) concentrations (COS([x])) are generated. At the same time, there are heart-synchronous cardiogenic oscillations of airway flow (COS(flow)), where inflow occurs during systole. We hypothesized that both phenomena, although primarily generated by the heartbeat, would react differently to the cephalad blood shift caused by inflation of an anti-gravity (anti-G) suit and to changes in gravity. Twelve seated subjects performed a rebreathing-breath-holding-expiration maneuver with a gas mixture containing O2 and He at normal (1 G) and moderately increased gravity (2 G); an anti-G suit was inflated to 85 mmHg in each condition. When the anti-G suit was inflated, COS(flow) amplitude increased (P = 0.0028) at 1 G to 186% of the control value without inflation (1-G control) and at 2 G to 203% of the control value without inflation (2-G control). In contrast, the amplitude of COS of the concentration of the blood-soluble gas O2 (COS([O2/He])), an index of the differences in pulmonary perfusion between lung units, declined to 75% of the 1-G control value and to 74% of the 2-G control value (P = 0.0030). There were no significant changes in COS(flow) or COS([O2/He]) amplitudes with gravity. We conclude that the heart-synchronous mechanical agitation of the lungs, as expressed by COS(flow), is highly dependent on peripheral-to-central blood shifts. In contrast, COS([blood-soluble gas]) appears relatively independent of this mechanical agitation and seems to be determined mainly by differences in intrapulmonary perfusion.

  16. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,999 feet above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg) Arterial PO2 equal to or less than (mm Hg) 25 or below... above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg) Arterial PO2 equal to or less than (mm Hg) 25 or below 70 26 69... Any value. (3) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites 6,000 feet or more above...

  17. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,999 feet above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg) Arterial PO2 equal to or less than (mm Hg) 25 or below... above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg) Arterial PO2 equal to or less than (mm Hg) 25 or below 70 26 69... Any value. (3) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites 6,000 feet or more above...

  18. 20 CFR Appendix C to Part 718 - Blood-Gas Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...,999 feet above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg) Arterial PO2 equal to or less than (mm Hg) 25 or below... above sea level: Arterial PCO2 (mm Hg) Arterial PO2 equal to or less than (mm Hg) 25 or below 70 26 69... Any value. (3) For arterial blood-gas studies performed at test sites 6,000 feet or more above...

  19. An optimized two-step derivatization method for analyzing diethylene glycol ozonation products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ran; Duan, Lei; Jiang, Jingkun; Hao, Jiming

    2017-03-01

    The ozonation of hydroxyl compounds (e.g., sugars and alcohols) gives a broad range of products such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids. This study developed and optimized a two-step derivatization procedure for analyzing polar products of aldehydes and carboxylic acids from the ozonation of diethylene glycol (DEG) in a non-aqueous environment using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Experiments based on Central Composite Design with response surface methodology were carried out to evaluate the effects of derivatization variables and their interactions on the analysis. The most desirable derivatization conditions were reported, i.e., oximation was performed at room temperature overnight with the o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxyl amine to analyte molar ratio of 6, silylation reaction temperature of 70°C, reaction duration of 70min, and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide volume of 12.5μL. The applicability of this optimized procedure was verified by analyzing DEG ozonation products in an ultrafine condensation particle counter simulation system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Measurements of Flow Distortion within the IRGASON Integrated Sonic Anemometer and CO_2/H_2O Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    Wind-tunnel and field measurements are analyzed to investigate flow distortion within the IRGASON integrated sonic anemometer and CO_2/H_2O gas analyzer as a function of wind speed, wind direction and attack angle. The wind-tunnel measurements are complimentary to the field measurements, and the dependence of the wind-tunnel mean-wind-component flow-distortion errors on wind direction agrees well with that of the field measurements. The field measurements exhibit significant overestimation of the crosswind variance and underestimation of the momentum flux with respect to an adjacent CSAT3 sonic, as well as a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy from the streamwise wind component to the cross-stream wind components. In contrast, we find attenuation of only a few percent in the vertical velocity variance and the vertical flux of sonic temperature. The attenuation of the fluxes appears to be caused to a large extent by decorrelation between the horizontal and vertical-velocity components and between the vertical velocity and sonic temperature. Additional flow distortion due to transducer shadowing reduces to some extent the overestimation, but also increases the underestimation of the IRGASON turbulence statistics.

  1. Study of Fuel Ratios on the Fusion Reactivity in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device Using a Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupakar Murali, S.; Santarius, John F.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2009-09-01

    Gridded Inertial Electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices are of interest due to their flexibility in burning advanced fuels, their tuning ability of the applied voltage to the reaction cross-section. Although this device is not suitable for power production in its present form, it does have several near term applications. The number of applications of this device increases with increasing fusion reactivity. These devices are simple to operate but are inherently complicated to understand and an effort to incrementally understand the device to improve its operational efficiency is underway at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Of all the parameters under study we are focusing on the effects of flow rate and flow ratio on the fusion reactivity in the present paper. Experiments were conducted to understand the influence of fuel flow ratio on the fusion reactions. The residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to study the impurity concentration as the flow ratio was changed. It was observed that the higher flow rate resulted in reduced impurity levels and hence an increase in fusion rate. Several different species of gases were detected, some of these molecules formed inside the RGA analyzer. The flow ratio scan revealed that the optimum mixture of D2 with 3He to be D2:3He::1:2 for maximum D-3He fusion rate.

  2. Gas chromatographic/thermal energy analyzer method for N-nitrosodibenzylamine in hams processed in elastic rubber netting.

    PubMed

    Pensabene, J W; Fiddler, W

    1994-01-01

    We previously described a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure for determining volatile nitrosamines in hams processed in elastic rubber nettings. This same procedure was found to successfully isolate N-nitrosodibenzylamine (NDBzA), a semivolatile nitrosamine. This nitrosamine may form as a result of the reformulated rubber now used in nettings. Reformulation became necessary because of the reported presence of N-nitrosodibutylamine in both the old nettings and on the exterior portion of commercial hams. After SPE, NDBzA was quantitated by using a gas chromatographic (GC) system interfaced to a nitrosamine-specific chemiluminescence detector [thermal energy analyzer (TEA)]. The GC system was equipped with a heated interface external to the TEA furnace to facilitate quantitation of NDBzA. With separation on a packed column, the method can be used to analyze 10 volatile nitrosamines and NDBzA. Repeatability of the method for NDBzA was found to be 2.1 ppb, and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 10.6%. Analysis of 18 commercial hams from 9 different producers, purchased from local retailers, indicated that 12 were positive for NDBzA (range, 2.6-128.5 ppb). NDBzA was confirmed by GC/mass spectrometry.

  3. Graphical arterial blood gas visualization tool supports rapid and accurate data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Doig, Alexa K; Albert, Robert W; Syroid, Noah D; Moon, Shaun; Agutter, Jim A

    2011-04-01

    A visualization tool that integrates numeric information from an arterial blood gas report with novel graphics was designed for the purpose of promoting rapid and accurate interpretation of acid-base data. A study compared data interpretation performance when arterial blood gas results were presented in a traditional numerical list versus the graphical visualization tool. Critical-care nurses (n = 15) and nursing students (n = 15) were significantly more accurate identifying acid-base states and assessing trends in acid-base data when using the graphical visualization tool. Critical-care nurses and nursing students using traditional numerical data had an average accuracy of 69% and 74%, respectively. Using the visualization tool, average accuracy improved to 83% for critical-care nurses and 93% for nursing students. Analysis of response times demonstrated that the visualization tool might help nurses overcome the "speed/accuracy trade-off" during high-stress situations when rapid decisions must be rendered. Perceived mental workload was significantly reduced for nursing students when they used the graphical visualization tool. In this study, the effects of implementing the graphical visualization were greater for nursing students than for critical-care nurses, which may indicate that the experienced nurses needed more training and use of the new technology prior to testing to show similar gains. Results of the objective and subjective evaluations support the integration of this graphical visualization tool into clinical environments that require accurate and timely interpretation of arterial blood gas data.

  4. Evaluation of two point-of-care meters and a portable chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentrations in juvenile white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Burdick, Stacy; Mitchell, Mark A; Neil, Johanna; Heggem, Brittany; Whittington, Julia; Acierno, Mark J

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate agreement of blood glucose concentrations measured in juvenile white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) by use of 2 point-of-care (POC) blood glucose meters and 1 portable chemistry analyzer with values obtained in serum by use of a standard laboratory chemistry analyzer, and to evaluate agreement between results obtained with the 2 POC meters. Prospective evaluation study. 14 venous blood samples from 14 healthy white-tailed deer fawns. Blood glucose concentration was measured with each of 2 POC meters. The remainder of the sample was divided into 2 tubes (1 that contained lithium heparin and 1 with no anticoagulant). Glucose concentration in anticoagulated whole blood was measured with the portable analyzer. Serum was collected from the remaining sample for measurement of glucose concentrations with the laboratory analyzer. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement. Agreement between POC blood glucose meters and the laboratory analyzer was poor; mean values for bias were 2.9 mg/dL (95% limits of agreement [LOA], -70.2 to 76.0 mg/dL) and -30.8 mg/dL (95% LOA, -111.6 to 49.9 mg/dL), respectively. Agreement between the 2 POC meters was also poor (bias, 31.0 mg/dL; 95% LOA, -47.2 to 109.2 mg/dL). Agreement between the portable analyzer and the laboratory analyzer was good (bias, -1.6 mg/dL; 95% LOA, -15.3 to 12.1 mg/dL). Results suggested that the POC blood glucose meters used in this study are not appropriate for measurement of blood glucose concentrations in juvenile white-tailed deer.

  5. The use of blood gas parameters to predict ascites susceptibility in juvenile broilers.

    PubMed

    van As, P; Elferink, M G; Closter, A M; Vereijken, A; Bovenhuis, H; Crooijmans, R P M A; Decuypere, E; Groenen, M A M

    2010-08-01

    Ascites syndrome is a metabolic disorder found in modern broilers that have insufficient pulmonary vascular capacity. Commercial breeding programs have heavily focused on high growth rate, which led to fast-growing chickens, but as a negative consequence, the incidence of ascites syndrome increased. However, not all birds with a high growth rate will suffer from ascites syndrome, which might indicate a genetic susceptibility to ascites. Information on blood gas parameters measured early in life and their relation to ascites susceptibility is expected to contribute to identification on the cause of ascites syndrome. In this study, several physiological parameters, such as blood gas parameters [pH, partial pressure of CO(2) in venous blood (pvCO(2)), and partial pressure of O(2) in venous blood], hematocrit, electrolytes (Na(+), Ca(2+), and K(+)), metabolites (lactate and glucose), were measured at d 11 to 12 of age from 100 female and 100 male broilers. From d 14 onward, the birds were challenged to provoke the development of ascites syndrome. Our results showed that high pvCO(2) values together with low pH values (males) or high pH values (females) in the venous blood of juvenile broilers coincided with ascites. Therefore, blood pvCO(2) and pH in both juvenile male and female broilers seem to be critical factors in ascites pathophysiology and can be used as phenotypic traits to predict ascites susceptibility in juvenile broilers at d 11 to 12. A prediction model was built on a subpopulation of the broilers without any loss in sensitivity (0.52) and specificity (0.78) when applied to the validation population. The parameter sex was included in the prediction model because levels of pvCO(2) and pH that associated with ascites susceptibility are different between males and females. Commercial breeders can include these phenotypic traits in their genetic selection programs to reduce the incidence of ascites syndrome.

  6. Analysis of acetylene in blood and urine using cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Hara, Kenji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Takamoto, Mutsuo; Matsusue, Aya; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-09-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of acetylene in blood and urine samples was investigated. Using cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), acetylene was measured with isobutane as the internal standard in the headspace method, which revealed a linear response over the entire composite range with an excellent correlation coefficient, both in blood (R = 0.9968, range = 5.39-43.1 microg/ml) and urine (R = 0.9972, range = 2.16-10.8 microg/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) for blood ranged from 2.62 to 11.6% for intra-day and 4.55 to 10.4% for inter-day. The CV for urine ranged from 2.38 to 3.10% for intra-day and 4.83 to 11.0% for inter-day. The recovery rate as an index of accuracy ranged from 83 to 111%. The present method showed good reliability, and is also simple and rapid. In actual samples from a charred cadaver due to acetylene explosion, the measured concentrations of acetylene by this method were 21.5 microg/ml for femoral vein blood, 17.9 microg/ml for right atrial blood, 25.5 microg/ml for left atrial blood and 7.49 microg/ml for urine. Quantification of acetylene provides important information, because the acetylene concentration is a vital reaction or sign. For example, when acetylene is filled in a closed space and then explodes, in antemortem explosion, the blood acetylene concentration of the cadaver might be significant. On the other hand, in postmortem explosion, acetylene is not detected in blood. Furthermore, when several victims are involved in one explosion, comparison of the sample concentrations can also provide useful information to establish the conditions at the accident scene; therefore, the present method is useful in forensics.

  7. Sample Processing technique onboard ExoMars (MOMA) to analyze organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Brault, A.; Pinnick, V.; Siljeström, S.; Raulin, F.; Steininger, H.; Goesmann, F.; MOMA Team

    2011-12-01

    With the aim of separating and detecting organic compounds from Martian soil onboard the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars 2018 upcoming joint ESA/NASA mission, we have developed three different space compatible sample preparation techniques compatible with space missions, able to extract and analyze by GC-MS a wide range of volatile and refractory compounds, including chirality analysis. Then, a sample processing utilizing three derivatization/extraction reactions has been carried out. The first reaction is based on a silyl reagent N-Methyl-N- (Tert-Butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) [1], the second one, N,N-Dimethylformamide Dimethylacetal (DMF-DMA) [2,3] is dedicated to the chirality detection and the third one is a thermochemolysis based on the use of tetramethylammoniumhydroxide (TMAH). The sample processing system is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of the oven ranges from 20 to 900 °C. The extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 5 to 20 min. Then, the chemical derivatization of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil sample by using a derivatyization capsule which contains a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the targeted molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any thermal degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. Thermochemolysis is directly performed in the oven at 400°C during 5 min with a 25% (w/w) methanol solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Then, pyrolysis in the presence of TMAH allows both an efficient cleavage of polar bonds and the subsequent methylation of COOH, OH and NH2 groups, hence

  8. Mismatch of arterial and central venous blood gas analysis during haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Theusinger, Oliver M; Thyes, Caroline; Frascarolo, Philippe; Schramm, Sebastian; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R

    2010-10-01

    Arterial base excess and lactate levels are key parameters in the assessment of critically ill patients. The use of venous blood gas analysis may be of clinical interest when no arterial blood is available initially. Twenty-four pigs underwent progressive normovolaemic haemodilution and subsequent progressive haemorrhage until the death of the animal. Base excess and lactate levels were determined from arterial and central venous blood after each step. In addition, base excess was calculated by the Van Slyke equation modified by Zander (BE(z)). Continuous variables were summarized as mean +/- SD and represent all measurements (n = 195). Base excess according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards for arterial blood was 2.27 +/- 4.12 versus 2.48 +/- 4.33 mmol(-l) for central venous blood (P = 0.099) with a strong correlation (r(2) = 0.960, P < 0.001). Standard deviation of the differences between these parameters (SD-DIFBE) did not increase (P = 0.355) during haemorrhage as compared with haemodilution. Arterial lactate was 2.66 +/- 3.23 versus 2.71 +/- 2.80 mmol(-l) in central venous blood (P = 0.330) with a strong correlation (r(2) = 0.983, P < 0.001). SD-DIFLAC increased (P < 0.001) during haemorrhage. BE(z) for central venous blood was 2.22 +/- 4.62 mmol(-l) (P = 0.006 versus arterial base excess according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards) with strong correlation (r(2) = 0.942, P < 0.001). SD-DIFBE(z)/base excess increased (P < 0.024) during haemorrhage. Central venous blood gas analysis is a good predictor for base excess and lactate in arterial blood in steady-state conditions. However, the variation between arterial and central venous lactate increases during haemorrhage. The modification of the Van Slyke equation by Zander did not improve the agreement between central venous and arterial base excess.

  9. Can venous blood gas analysis be used for predicting seizure recurrence in emergency department?

    PubMed Central

    Kılıc, Turgay Yılmaz; Yesilaras, Murat; Atilla, Ozge Duman; Sever, Mustafa; Aksay, Ersin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epileptic seizures account for 1%–2% of all admissions of patients to the emergency department (ED). The present study aimed to determine whether venous blood pH, bicarbonate, base excess, and lactate levels taken within 1 hour of the last seizure episode help to determine seizure recurrence in emergency departments. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) between January and July, 2012. Patients who were admitted to the emergency department consecutively were included in the study if they were 14 years or older and within 1 hour after last seizure. Demographics, seizure type, use of antiepileptic drugs, observation period at the emergency department, seizure recurrence, pH, bicarbonate, base excess, and lactate levels from venous blood gas analysis were determined. RESULTS: A total of 94 patients aged 14 years or older were included in the study. Of these patients, 10.6% (n=10) experienced recurrent seizures in the observation period at the emergency department. To predict recurrent seizures in ED, threshold venous blood gas values were determined as follows: pH<7.245 [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44–96), negative predictive value 96.9% (95%CI: 88.3–99.4)], bicarbonate<17.1 mmol/L [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44–96), negative predictive value 97% (95%CI: 89–99.5)], base excess<–11.1 mEq/L [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44–96), negative predictive value 97% (95%CI: 89–99)], and lactate>7.65 mmol/L [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44–96), negative predictive value 96.6% (95%CI: 87–99)]. CONCLUSION: If venous blood gas analysis is made on pH, base excess, lactate and bicarbonate immediately one hour after the last epileptic seizure episode, it is possible to predict whether the patient will have seizure recurrence. PMID:25225582

  10. Can venous blood gas analysis be used for predicting seizure recurrence in emergency department?

    PubMed

    Kılıc, Turgay Yılmaz; Yesilaras, Murat; Atilla, Ozge Duman; Sever, Mustafa; Aksay, Ersin

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures account for 1%-2% of all admissions of patients to the emergency department (ED). The present study aimed to determine whether venous blood pH, bicarbonate, base excess, and lactate levels taken within 1 hour of the last seizure episode help to determine seizure recurrence in emergency departments. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) between January and July, 2012. Patients who were admitted to the emergency department consecutively were included in the study if they were 14 years or older and within 1 hour after last seizure. Demographics, seizure type, use of antiepileptic drugs, observation period at the emergency department, seizure recurrence, pH, bicarbonate, base excess, and lactate levels from venous blood gas analysis were determined. A total of 94 patients aged 14 years or older were included in the study. Of these patients, 10.6% (n=10) experienced recurrent seizures in the observation period at the emergency department. To predict recurrent seizures in ED, threshold venous blood gas values were determined as follows: pH<7.245 [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44-96), negative predictive value 96.9% (95%CI: 88.3-99.4)], bicarbonate<17.1 mmol/L [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44-96), negative predictive value 97% (95%CI: 89-99.5)], base excess<-11.1 mEq/L [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44-96), negative predictive value 97% (95%CI: 89-99)], and lactate>7.65 mmol/L [sensitivity 80% (95%CI: 44-96), negative predictive value 96.6% (95%CI: 87-99)]. If venous blood gas analysis is made on pH, base excess, lactate and bicarbonate immediately one hour after the last epileptic seizure episode, it is possible to predict whether the patient will have seizure recurrence.

  11. Blood cyanide determination in two cases of fatal intoxication: comparison between headspace gas chromatography and a spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Veniero; Arnoldi, Sebastiano; Casagni, Eleonora; Dell'acqua, Lucia; Pecoraro, Chiara; Froldi, Rino

    2007-11-01

    Blood samples of two cases were analyzed preliminarily by a classical spectrophotometric method (VIS) and by an automated headspace gas chromatographic method with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (HS-GC/NPD). In the former, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was quantitatively determined by measuring the absorbance of chromophores forming as a result of interaction with chloramine T. In the automated HS-GC/NPD method, blood was placed in a headspace vial, internal standard (acetonitrile) and acetic acid were then added. This resulted in cyanide being liberated as HCN. The spectrophotometric (VIS) and HS-GC/NPD methods were validated on postmortem blood samples fortified with potassium cyanide in the ranges 0.5-10 and 0.05-5 mug/mL, respectively. Detection limits were 0.2 mug/mL for VIS and 0.05 mug/mL for HS-GC/NPD. This work shows that results obtained by means of the two procedures were insignificantly different and that they compared favorably. They are suitable for rapid diagnosis of cyanide in postmortem cases.

  12. Comparison of a human portable glucometer and an automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentration in pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Noémie M.; Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Larrat, Sylvain; Brown, Dorothy C.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor agreement and correlation with the laboratory analyzer (bias, −0.13 mmol/L; level of agreement, −2.0 to 3.6 mmol/L, concordance correlation coefficient 0.665). The relative sensitivity and specificity of the portable blood glucometer for detection of hypoglycemia were 100% (95% CI: 66% to 100%) and 50% (95% CI: 20% to 80%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 67% (95% CI: 39% to 87%) and 100% (95% CI: 46% to 100%), respectively. Based on these results, clinicians are advised to be cautious when considering the results from this handheld glucometer in pet ferrets, and blood glucose concentrations should be determined with a laboratory analyzer validated for this species. PMID:25183894

  13. Comparison of a human portable glucometer and an automated chemistry analyzer for measurement of blood glucose concentration in pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Summa, Noémie M; Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Larrat, Sylvain; Brown, Dorothy C

    2014-09-01

    This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor agreement and correlation with the laboratory analyzer (bias, -0.13 mmol/L; level of agreement, -2.0 to 3.6 mmol/L, concordance correlation coefficient 0.665). The relative sensitivity and specificity of the portable blood glucometer for detection of hypoglycemia were 100% (95% CI: 66% to 100%) and 50% (95% CI: 20% to 80%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 67% (95% CI: 39% to 87%) and 100% (95% CI: 46% to 100%), respectively. Based on these results, clinicians are advised to be cautious when considering the results from this handheld glucometer in pet ferrets, and blood glucose concentrations should be determined with a laboratory analyzer validated for this species.

  14. Identification and differentiation of dragon's blood in works of art using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Ursula; Dietemann, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Dragon's blood is a common but non-specific name for red-coloured resins that are produced by various plants, particularly exudations from plant species belonging to the genera Dracaena and Daemonorops. Although dragon's blood is mentioned in historic sources as a colourant, it has hardly ever been identified in real artworks. This paper reports the identification and discrimination of dragon's blood produced by Dracaena cinnabari, Dracaena draco as well as Daemonorops draco and Daemonorops micracantha by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) within the context of a routine analysis of binding media used in works of art. The detection of specific flavonoid marker compounds in both underivatised and methylated methanol extracts provided the first evidence for the use of dragon's blood from all four species in various works of art from the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries. Dragon's blood was mainly used as a red colourant in gold lacquers as well as translucent glazes and paints, e.g. in reverse-glass paintings (Hinterglasmalerei).

  15. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  16. [Determination of methamphetamine in human blood using microwave extraction-gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongfeng; Gu, Xuexin; Wang, Jifen; Ni, Weigui; Li, Wenjun; Li, Ying

    2007-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of methamphetamine (MAM) in human blood using microwave extraction-gas chromatography (GC). To improve the extraction efficiency, experimental parameters on the extraction, including such as extraction solvent and its amount, pH value of blood sample, extraction time and temperature were investigated. Comparing with conventional liquid-liquid extraction method, the microwave extraction showed better efficiency under the optimal conditions. The optimal conditions were as follows: the pH of blood sample at 13, ethyl acetate as extraction solvent, extraction at 30 degrees C for 8 min. The average recovery of MAM with this extraction method was 81.4%, and the relative standard deviation was 6.4%. The limit of detection was 220 microg/L for MAM in the blood. Using this method, MAM need not be derivatized and can be separated from the matrix. The results indicate that the developed method is rapid, accurate and sensitive, and can be used for the determination of MAM in blood samples.

  17. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P; Aramendi, José F; Gorostiaga, Esteban M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of -0.18% and -0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5-6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8-9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise.

  18. Determination of volatile N-nitrosamines in irradiated fermented sausage by gas chromatography coupled to a thermal energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Ahn, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Yook, Hong-Sun; Han, Sang-Bae

    2004-10-29

    Volatile N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) in irradiated pepperoni and salami sausages were determined using a gas chromatography coupled to a thermal energy analyzer (GC-TEA). These fermented sausages with aerobic or vacuum packaging were irradiated at 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy, and then stored for 4 weeks at 4 degrees C. Both NDMA and NPYR in the fermented sausage were significantly reduced by irradiation. The vacuum packaging showed significantly lower (P < 0.05) N-nitrosamine levels than that of the aerobic ones. After storage, the contents of NDMA and NPYR in the irradiated sausage were lower than those of the non-irradiated control. Results indicated that a high dose of irradiation (>10 kGy) was needed to reduce the carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in the fermented sausage during storage and the GC-TEA analysis was effective in determining the N-nitrosamines in irradiated meats even at low trace levels.

  19. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P.; Aramendi, José F.; Gorostiaga, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of −0.18% and −0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5–6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8–9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise. PMID:26578980

  20. Evolution of bubbles from gas micronuclei formed on the luminal aspect of ovine large blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Marmur, A

    2013-08-01

    It has been shown that tiny gas nanobubbles form spontaneously on a smooth hydrophobic surface submerged in water. These nanobubbles were shown to be the source of gas micronuclei from which bubbles evolved during decompression of silicon wafers. We suggest that the hydrophobic inner surface of blood vessels may be a site of nanobubble production. Sections from the right and left atria, pulmonary artery and vein, aorta, and superior vena cava of sheep (n=6) were gently stretched on microscope slides and exposed to 1013 kPa for 18 h. Hydrophobicity was checked in the six blood vessels by advancing contact angle with a drop of saline of 71±19°, with a maximum of about 110±7° (mean±SD). Tiny bubbles ~30 μm in diameter rose vertically from the blood vessels and grew on the surface of the saline, where they were photographed. All of the blood vessels produced bubbles over a period of 80 min. The number of bubbles produced from a square cm was: in the aorta, 20.5; left atrium, 27.3; pulmonary artery, 17.9; pulmonary vein, 24.3; right atrium, 29.5; superior vena cava, 36.4. More than half of the bubbles were present for less than 2 min, but some remained on the saline-air interface for as long as 18 min. Nucleation was evident in both the venous (superior vena cava, pulmonary artery, right atrium) and arterial (aorta, pulmonary vein, left atrium) blood vessels. This newly suggested mechanism of nucleation may be the main mechanism underlying bubble formation on decompression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    PubMed

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  2. Analyzing Circle of Willis blood flow in ischemic stroke patients through 3D Stroke Arterial Flow Estimation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Aichi; Viñuela, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Background The objective of ischemic stroke (IS) treatment is to achieve revascularization in cerebral arteries to restore blood flow. However, there is no available method to extract arterial flow data from clinical CTA images. We developed 3D Stroke Arterial Flow Estimation (SAFE), which provides blood flow data throughout the Circle of Willis based on 3D CTA and allows comparison of arterial flow distribution in the brain. Methods We implemented a newly developed 3D vascular reconstruction algorithm for clinical stroke CTA images. Based on the patient-specific vascular structure, SAFE calculates time-resolved blood flow information for the entire Circle of Willis and allows quantitative flow study of IS cases. Clinical IS cases are presented to demonstrate the feasibility. Four patients with CTA images and CT perfusion data were studied. To validate the SAFE analysis, correlation analysis comparing blood flow at the MCA, ICA, and BA was performed. Results Different blood flow patterns were found in individual IS patients. Altered flow patterns and high collateral flow rates were found near occlusions in all cases. Quantitative comparison of blood flow data showed that SAFE obtained flow data and CTP were significantly correlated and provide complementary information about cerebral blood flow for individual patients. Conclusions We present SAFE analysis for collecting detailed time-resolved cerebral arterial flow data in the entire Circle of Willis for IS. Further study with more cases may be important to test the clinical utilization of SAFE and helpful to the study of the underlying hemodynamics of stroke.

  3. Determination of dimethyl trisulfide in rabbit blood using stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Erica; Maslamani, Nujud; Petrikovics, Ilona; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2016-08-26

    Cyanide poisoning by accidental or intentional exposure poses a severe health risk. The current Food and Drug Administration approved antidotes for cyanide poisoning can be effective, but each suffers from specific major limitations concerning large effective dosage, delayed onset of action, or dependence on enzymes generally confined to specific organs. Dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), a sulfur donor that detoxifies cyanide by converting it into thiocyanate (a relatively nontoxic cyanide metabolite), is a promising next generation cyanide antidote. Although a validated analytical method to analyze DMTS from any matrix is not currently available, one will be vital for the approval of DMTS as a therapeutic agent against cyanide poisoning. Hence, a stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the analysis of DMTS from rabbit whole blood. Following acid denaturation of blood, DMTS was extracted into a polydimethylsiloxane-coated stir bar. The DMTS was then thermally desorbed from the stir bar and analyzed by GC-MS. The limit of detection of DMTS using this method was 0.06μM with dynamic range from 0.5-100μM. For quality control standards, the precision, as measured by percent relative standard deviation, was below 10%, and the accuracy was within 15% of the nominal concentration. The method described here will allow further investigations of DMTS as a promising antidote for cyanide poisoning.

  4. Comparing fetal scalp lactate and umbilical cord arterial blood gas values.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Thea; Beckmann, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Fetal scalp lactate has been shown to be as effective as scalp pH in predicting fetal outcomes. However, there is limited clinical evidence to demonstrate a strong correlation with fetal acidaemia at birth. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of fetal scalp lactate and umbilical cord arterial blood gas values sampling, as it is used in clinical practice. A retrospective cohort study was performed on 661 term (≥37 weeks) births where a fetal scalp lactate sample was taken during labour. Cases were excluded where either the lactate was taken greater than 1 h prior to delivery, incomplete cord gas analyses were available, or a sentinel hypoxic event occurred prior to delivery. The final data set included 229 microvolume scalp lactate measurements which were compared with neonatal paired cord blood gas values taken at delivery. A fetal scalp lactate measurement of ≥4.8 mmol/L had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 1% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% in predicting umbilical artery pH ≤7.00, and a PPV of 5% and a NPV of 98% in predicting umbilical artery pH ≤7.10. The sensitivity and specificity for these values were 100%, 23% and 90%, 23%, respectively. Fetal scalp lactate microsampling has a strong negative predictive value for fetal acidaemia at birth. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Effects of crystalline menthol on blood metabolites in Holstein steers and in vitro volatile fatty acid and gas production.

    PubMed

    Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Aperce, C C; Alvarado-Gilis, C A; Higgins, J J; Drouillard, J S

    2016-03-01

    Fifty-two Holstein steers (573 ± 9.92 kg BW) were used to determine if oral administration of crystalline menthol would induce changes in endogenous secretions of IGF-1 and circulating concentrations of glucose, lactate, and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN). Steers were blocked by BW and assigned within block to treatment. Treatments consisted of 0, 0.003, 0.03, or 0.3% crystalline menthol (DM basis) added to the diet. Animals were housed in individual, partially covered pens equipped with feed bunks and automatic water fountains. On d 1 of the experiment, blood samples were obtained via jugular venipuncture at 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after feeding. Treatment administration commenced on d 2, and blood samples were again drawn at 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after feeding. This blood-sampling schedule was repeated on d 9, 16, 23, and 30. Plasma was analyzed for PUN, glucose, and lactate concentrations. Serum was used to analyze IGF-1 concentration. Body weights were measured on d 1, 9, 16, 23, and 30. To accompany the live animal phase, in vitro fermentations were performed using ruminal fluid cultures. Measurements included VFA concentrations and fermentative gas production for cultures containing crystalline menthol at 0, 0.003, 0.03, or 0.3% of substrate DM. Addition of menthol to the diet of steers resulted in a treatment × day interaction ( < 0.01) for concentrations of IGF-1, PUN, and plasma glucose. Cattle fed 0 and 0.003% menthol had greater serum IGF-1 concentrations on d 2 compared with steers fed 0.03% menthol. Steers fed 0% menthol had greater serum IGF-1 concentrations on d 9 compared with steers fed 0.03 and 0.3% menthol, whereas no differences were observed on d 23 or 30. Plasma glucose was similar among treatments until d 23, when steers supplemented with 0.03% menthol had lower glucose concentrations. Plasma urea nitrogen concentrations were not different among treatments; however, PUN concentrations varied by day. A linear response was detected for BW ( = 0

  6. Blood gas tensions in adult asthma: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Troels; Johansen, Peter; Dahl, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    The last half-century has seen substantial changes in asthma treatment and care. We investigated whether arterial blood gas parameters in acute and non-acute asthma have changed historically. We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies reporting P(aO2) , P(aCO2) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s, percentage of predicted (FEV1%). For each of the blood gas parameters, meta-regression analyses examined its association with four background variables: the publication year, mean FEV1%, mean age and female fraction in the respective studies. After screening, we included 43 articles comprising 61 datasets published between 1967 and 2013. In studies of habitual-state asthma, mean P(aO2) was positively associated with the publication year (p = 0.001) and negatively with mean age (p < 0.01). Mean P(aCO2) showed a positive association with publication year (p = 0.001) and a negative association with female fraction (p < 0.05). In acute asthma studies, blood gas levels were unassociated with publication year and mean age, mean P(aO2) was positively associated with FEV1% (p < 0.05) whereas mean P(aCO2) showed a negative association with FEV1% (p < 0.05) for studies with mean FEV1% <40. In neither acute nor habitual-state studies was mean arterial pH associated with any of the predictor variables. In studies of habitual-state asthma, mean reported P(aO2) and P(aCO2) levels were found to have increased since 1967. In acute asthma studies, mean P(aO2) and P(aCO2) were associated with mean FEV1% but not with either publication year or patient age.

  7. Benzene poisoning, clinical and blood abnormalities in two Brazilian female gas station attendants: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Fábio; Lima, Simone; Pinheiro, Tayná; Silvestre, Rafaele Tavares; Otero, Ubirani Barros; Tabalipa, Marianne Medeiros; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Ornellas, Maria Helena; Liehr, Thomas; Alves, Gilda

    2017-01-18

    Brazilian gas station workers are chronically exposed to benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX) during their working time. Describe below two cases of latin female gas station workers with benzene poisoning symptoms and miscarriage history. In both cases were identified complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) with fluorescence in situ hybridization, applied to whole chromosome paints by chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. The lower natural killer cell (NK) cells have also been observed in cases correspondents, especially the rare type of NK (NKbright) in their peripheral blood cells. It is known that acquired chromosomal aberrations are positively correlated with cancer and reproductive risk. In concordance, lower NK cytotoxicity increases the risk for cancer, as well. Thus, this is the first study providing hints on a possible causative relation of lower NK cytotoxicity and increase rates of chromosomal rearrangements including CCRs.

  8. Morphometry of the extremely thin pulmonary blood-gas barrier in the chicken lung.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rebecca R; Fu, Zhenxing; West, John B

    2007-03-01

    The gas exchanging region in the avian lung, although proportionally smaller than that of the mammalian lung, efficiently manages respiration to meet the high energetic requirements of flapping flight. Gas exchange in the bird lung is enhanced, in part, by an extremely thin blood-gas barrier (BGB). We measured the arithmetic mean thickness of the different components (endothelium, interstitium, and epithelium) of the BGB in the domestic chicken lung and compared the results with three mammals. Morphometric analysis showed that the total BGB of the chicken lung was significantly thinner than that of the rabbit, dog, and horse (54, 66, and 70% thinner, respectively) and that all layers of the BGB were significantly thinner in the chicken compared with the mammals. The interstitial layer was strikingly thin in the chicken lung ( approximately 86% thinner than the dog and horse, and 75% thinner than rabbit) which is a paradox because the strength of the BGB is believed to come from the interstitium. In addition, the thickness of the interstitium was remarkably uniform, unlike the mammalian interstitium. The uniformity of the interstitial layer in the chicken is attributable to a lack of the supportive type I collagen cable that is found in mammalian alveolar lungs. We propose that the surrounding air capillaries provide additional structural support for the pulmonary capillaries in the bird lung, thus allowing the barrier to be both very thin and extremely uniform. The net result is to improve gas exchanging efficiency.

  9. [Prehospital arterial blood gas analysis after collapse connected to triathlon participation].

    PubMed

    Ettrup-Christensen, Asbjørn; Amstrup-Hansen, Louise; Zwisler, Stine T

    2017-05-01

    Long-distance athletes are at risk of serious fluid and electrolyte disturbances, such as hypernatraemia (dehydration). Recently, cases of serious morbidity have been reported, due to acute exercise-associated hyponatraemia, which can advance to encephalopathy. An arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) was drawn from collapsed athletes at the championship of full-distance triathlon 2015, and different electrolyte imbalances were found. Our findings show that prehospital ABG can assist in differentiating the cause of collapse, and presumably, targeted treatment can be initiated already on scene.

  10. [Gas chromatography in quantitative analysis of hydrocyanic acid and its salts in cadaveric blood].

    PubMed

    Iablochkin, V D

    2003-01-01

    A direct gas chromatography method was designed for the quantitative determination of cyanides (prussic acid) in cadaveric blood. Its sensitivity is 0.05 mg/ml. The routine volatile products, including substances, which emerge due to putrefaction of organic matters, do not affect the accuracy and reproducibility of the method; the exception is H-propanol that was used as the internal standard. The method was used in legal chemical expertise related with acute cyanide poisoning (suicide) as well as with poisoning of products of combustion of nonmetals (foam-rubber). The absolute error does not exceed 10% with a mean quadratic deviation of 0.0029-0.0033 mg.

  11. Idiopathic scoliosis. Gas exchange and the age dependence of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed Central

    Kafer, E R

    1976-01-01

    The aims were to examine the gas exchange and arterial blood gas abnormalities among patients with scoliosis, and the correlation of these abnormalities with age and severity of deformity. Means among 51 patients were as follows: age 25.4 +/- 17.5 yr, angle of scoliosis 80.2 +/- 29.9 (SD), vital capacity 1.94 +/- 0.91 (SD) (i.e. 60.6 +/- 19.2% of predicted), PaO2 85.8 +/- 12.0 (SD), PaCO2 42.4 +/- 8.0, physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio 0.438 +/- 0.074 (SD), and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference breathing air 14.9 +/- 8.9 (SD). Statistically significant correlations were as follows: the PaCO2 and physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio increased with age, and the PaO2 and alveolar ventilation decreased with age. The PaO2, alveolar ventilation, and tidal volume were inversely related to the angle of scoliosis and directly related to the vital capacity, precent predicted vital capacity, and the compliance of the respiratory system. The physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio and the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference were inversely related to the vital capacity, percent predicted vital capacity, and the compliance of the respiratory system. PaCO2 was directly related to the elastance of the respiratory system. We conclude that ventilation-blood flow maldistribution as a result of deformity of the rib cage was the primary abnormality in gas exchange, and that with age there was progressive deterioration in gas exchange. The age-dependent increase in PaCO2 and decrease in alveolar ventilation were due to the increasing physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio and failure of a compensatory increase in ventilation. PMID:965490

  12. Sensitive determination of xylenes in whole blood by capillary gas chromatography with cryogenic trapping.

    PubMed

    Hattori, H; Iwai, M; Kurono, S; Yamada, T; Watanabe-Suzuki, K; Ishii, A; Seno, H; Suzuki, O

    1998-11-06

    A new and sensitive method for measurement of o-, m- and p-xylenes in human whole blood by capillary gas chromatography (GC) with cryogenic trapping is presented. After heating 0.5 ml of whole blood and 0.5 ml of distilled water containing the xylenes and aniline (internal standard, I.S.) in a 4.0-ml vial at 100 degrees C for 30 min, 2 ml of the headspace vapor was drawn into a glass syringe. All vapor was introduced through the GC port into an AT-Wax middle-bore capillary column in the splitless mode at an oven temperature of 5 degrees C to trap the entire analytes, and the oven temperature was then programmed up to 180 degrees C. The present conditions gave sharp peaks for xylenes and aniline (I.S.), and low background noises for whole blood samples; the peaks of p- and m-xylenes showed about 90% separation with the AT-Wax column. As much as 41.0-46.3% of xylenes, which had been spiked to whole blood could be recovered. The calibration curves showed linearity in the range of 0.1-0.5 microg/0.5 ml of whole blood. The detection limit was estimated to be about 10 ng/0.5 ml. The coefficients of intra-day and inter-day variations for xylenes were not greater than 9.38%. The data for actual detection of xylenes in post-mortem blood of self-ignition suicide cases by the present method were also presented.

  13. Convenient headspace gas chromatographic determination of azide in blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Meatherall, Robert; Palatnick, Wes

    2009-10-01

    Azide in human blood and plasma samples was derivatized with propionic anhydride in a headspace vial without prior sample preparation. The reaction proceeds quickly at room temperature to form propionyl azide. A portion of the headspace was assayed by gas chromatography with a nitrogen-phosphorus detector. In the heated injector of the gas chromatograph, the propionyl azide undergoes thermal rearrangement, forming ethyl isocyanate, which is subsequently chromatographed and detected. Propionitrile was used as the internal standard. The method is linear to at least 20 microg/mL. Limit of quantitation was 0.04 microg/mL, and the within-run coefficient of variation was 5.6% at 1 microg/mL. There was no interference from cyanide. A fatality report in which blood and plasma azide concentrations from a 59-year-old man were monitored for 24 h following the ingestion of an unknown amount of sodium azide is presented. The patient became critically ill after his self-inflicted sodium azide ingestion. He was intubated and treated with vasopressors and aggressive supportive care, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy, in the intensive care facility but died from neurological brain damage secondary to anoxia. On admission, 1.4 h after ingestion, his azide level was 5.6 microg/mL (blood); shortly thereafter, it had risen to 13.7 microg/mL (plasma) and, subsequently, was projected to have been eliminated by 16.7 h. No azide was detected in the postmortem blood and vitreous humor.

  14. Does venous blood gas analysis provide accurate estimates of hemoglobin oxygen affinity?

    PubMed

    Huber, Fabienne L; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Goede, Jeroen S; Bloch, Konrad E

    2013-04-01

    Alterations in hemoglobin oxygen affinity can be detected by exposing blood to different PO2 and recording oxygen saturation, a method termed tonometry. It is the gold standard to measure the PO2 associated with 50 % oxygen saturation, the index used to quantify oxygen affinity (P50Tono). P50Tono is used in the evaluation of patients with erythrocytosis suspected to have hemoglobin with abnormal oxygen affinity. Since tonometry is labor intensive and not generally available, we investigated whether accurate estimates of P50 could also be obtained by venous blood gas analysis, co-oximetry, and standard equations (P50Ven). In 50 patients referred for evaluation of erythrocytosis, pH, PO2, and oxygen saturation were measured in venous blood to estimate P50Ven; P50Tono was measured for comparison. Agreement among P50Ven and P50Tono was evaluated (Bland-Altman analysis). Mean P50Tono was 25.8 (range 17.4-34.1) mmHg. The mean difference (bias) of P50Tono-P50Ven was 0.5 mmHg; limits of agreement (95 % confidence limits) were -5.2 to +6.1 mmHg. The sensitivity and specificity of P50Ven to identify the 25 patients with P50Tono outside the normal range of 22.9-26.8 mmHg were 5 and 77 %, respectively. We conclude that estimates of P50 based on venous blood gas analysis and standard equations have a low bias compared to tonometry. However, the precision of P50Ven is not sufficiently high to replace P50Tono in the evaluation of individual patients with suspected disturbances of hemoglobin oxygen affinity.

  15. Agreement and Correlation between Arterial and Central Venous Blood Gas Following Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilivand, Masoumeh; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Najafi, Farid; Abdi, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    Arterial blood sampling, used to assess patients in acute conditions, may result in complications such as thrombosis and embolism. However, it can be replaced by venous blood sampling, but there is a dearth of information on this. To assess the correlation and agreement between the arterial and central venous blood gases analyses in patients undergoing elective Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery. In this cross-sectional study, 100 ICU patients undergoing elective CABG surgery were recruited. 2 mm arterial and a 2 mm venous blood samples were obtained from each patient's arterial and central venous lines, respectively. To predict Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) values based on central Venous Blood Gas (VBG) values, the linear regression analysis was used and for evaluating their agreement Bland-Altman method was used. In total of 200 samples were obtained. The mean and Standard Deviation (SD) of age was 58.9±9.1 years and 51% of the participants were female. There was a strong correlation between ABG and central VBG values regarding pH, partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide (PCO2), Bicarbonate (HCO3) and Base Excess (BE) (r= 0.73, r=0.74, r=0.67 and r=0.71, respectively; p<0.001); however, the correlation between the arterial and venous Partial Pressure of Oxygen (PO2) and Oxygen Saturation (SO2) was moderate (r=0.29, p=0.005 and r=0.27, p=0.006, respectively). The Bland-Altman analysis showed an excellent agreement between all the variables (p<0.001). Central VBG analysis cannot replace ABG analysis in measuring exact PO2 status, necessitating arterial sampling in some matters, but with respect to the accuracy of pulse oximetry measurements in determining the exact PO2 status, for the rest of the indices a central VBG rather than an ABG can be utilised for determining patient's acid-base status. Particularly in patients who are hospitalised for a long time and have a central venous catheter in place like patients who have undergone CABG, thus reducing the risk and

  16. Finite-sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel: Non-Newtonian effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.

    2008-09-01

    We have numerically investigated the axisymmetric motion of a finite-sized nearly occluding air bubble through a shear-thinning Casson fluid flowing in blood vessels of circular cross section. The numerical solution entails solving a two-layer fluid model—a cell-free layer and a non-Newtonian core together with the gas bubble. This problem is of interest to the field of rheology and for gas embolism studies in health sciences. The numerical method is based on a modified front-tracking method. The viscosity expression in the Casson model for blood (bulk fluid) includes the hematocrit [the volume fraction of red blood cells (RBCs)] as an explicit parameter. Three different flow Reynolds numbers, Reapp=ρlUmaxd/μapp , in the neighborhood of 0.2, 2, and 200 are investigated. Here, ρl is the density of blood, Umax is the centerline velocity of the inlet Casson profile, d is the diameter of the vessel, and μapp is the apparent viscosity of whole blood. Three different hematocrits have also been considered: 0.45, 0.4, and 0.335. The vessel sizes considered correspond to small arteries, and small and large arterioles in normal humans. The degree of bubble occlusion is characterized by the ratio of bubble to vessel radius (aspect ratio), λ , in the range 0.9⩽λ⩽1.05 . For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effects are taken into account. Both horizontal and vertical vessel geometries have been investigated. Many significant insights are revealed by our study: (i) bubble motion causes large temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the “endothelial cell” (EC) surface lining the blood vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it, and passes it by; (ii) rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress (+ → - → +) imparted to the cell surface during bubble motion; (iii) large shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are ascribable to the development of a recirculation vortex at the rear of the bubble

  17. Finite-sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel: non-Newtonian effects.

    PubMed

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S; Eckmann, David M

    2008-09-01

    We have numerically investigated the axisymmetric motion of a finite-sized nearly occluding air bubble through a shear-thinning Casson fluid flowing in blood vessels of circular cross section. The numerical solution entails solving a two-layer fluid model--a cell-free layer and a non-Newtonian core together with the gas bubble. This problem is of interest to the field of rheology and for gas embolism studies in health sciences. The numerical method is based on a modified front-tracking method. The viscosity expression in the Casson model for blood (bulk fluid) includes the hematocrit [the volume fraction of red blood cells (RBCs)] as an explicit parameter. Three different flow Reynolds numbers, Reapp=rholUmaxdmicroapp , in the neighborhood of 0.2, 2, and 200 are investigated. Here, rhol is the density of blood, Umax is the centerline velocity of the inlet Casson profile, d is the diameter of the vessel, and microapp is the apparent viscosity of whole blood. Three different hematocrits have also been considered: 0.45, 0.4, and 0.335. The vessel sizes considered correspond to small arteries, and small and large arterioles in normal humans. The degree of bubble occlusion is characterized by the ratio of bubble to vessel radius (aspect ratio), lambda , in the range 0.9< or =lambda< or =1.05 . For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effects are taken into account. Both horizontal and vertical vessel geometries have been investigated. Many significant insights are revealed by our study: (i) bubble motion causes large temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the "endothelial cell" (EC) surface lining the blood vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it, and passes it by; (ii) rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress (+ --> - --> +) imparted to the cell surface during bubble motion; (iii) large shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are ascribable to the development of a recirculation vortex at the

  18. Dual beam Doppler FD-OCT system with integrated Dynamic Vessel Analyzer and rotatable beams to measure total retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Werkmeister, René M.; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-03-01

    We present a method capable of measuring the total retinal blood flow in arteries and veins based on dual beam Fourierdomain Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with a fundus camera based Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Incorporating a Dynamic vessel analyzer into the system not only gives a live image of the fundus - it also allows determining the vessels' diameter precisely during the OCT measurement, which is necessary for the determination of the blood flow. While dual beam systems with fixed detection plane allow only vessels with certain orientations to be measured, the detection plane of our system can be rotated by 90°. This ensures that the blood's velocity can be measured in all vessels around the optic nerve head. The results of the total blood flow measurements are in the same range as previously published data. Additionally, the high degree of conformity between the measured venous and arterial flow corroborated the system's validity. For larger vessels, the logarithmic values of vessel diameter and blood flow were found to be related linearly with a regression coefficient of around 3, which is in accordance with Murray's law. For smaller vessels (diameter below 60 μm), the values diverge from the linear dependence. The high sensitivity and the good agreement with published data suggest a high potential for examining the retinal blood flow in patients with ocular diseases.

  19. Distinct immunological mechanisms of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade revealed by analyzing TCR usage in blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lidia; Harview, Christina; Emerson, Ryan; Wang, Xiaoyan; Mok, Stephen; Homet, Blanca; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Koya, Richard C; Robins, Harlan; Tumeh, Paul C; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Targeting immune inhibitory receptors has brought excitement, innovation and hope to cancer patients. Our recent work revealed the immunological effects of blocking the CTLA4 and PD-1 immune checkpoints on T cell receptor usage among peripheral blood cells, and further uncovers how the expansion of the T cell repertoire matches the immunotoxicity profile of the therapy. PMID:25083336

  20. Microbubble gas volume: A unifying dose parameter in blood-brain barrier opening by focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kang-Ho; Fan, Alexander C.; Hinkle, Joshua J.; Newman, Joshua; Borden, Mark A.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2017-01-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles is being developed to transiently, locally and noninvasively open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for improved pharmaceutical delivery. Prior work has demonstrated that, for a given concentration dose, microbubble size affects both the intravascular circulation persistence and extent of BBB opening. When matched to gas volume dose, however, the circulation half-life was found to be independent of microbubble size. In order to determine whether this holds true for BBB opening as well, we independently measured the effects of microbubble size (2 vs. 6 µm diameter) and concentration, covering a range of overlapping gas volume doses (1-40 µL/kg). We first demonstrated precise targeting and a linear dose-response of Evans Blue dye extravasation to the rat striatum for a set of constant microbubble and ultrasound parameters. We found that dye extravasation increased linearly with gas volume dose, with data points from both microbubble sizes collapsing to a single line. A linear trend was observed for both the initial sonication (R2=0.90) and a second sonication on the contralateral side (R2=0.68). Based on these results, we conclude that microbubble gas volume dose, not size, determines the extent of BBB opening by focused ultrasound (1 MHz, ~0.5 MPa at the focus). This result may simplify planning for focused ultrasound treatments by constraining the protocol to a single microbubble parameter - gas volume dose - which gives equivalent results for varying size distributions. Finally, using optimal parameters determined for Evan Blue, we demonstrated gene delivery and expression using a viral vector, dsAAV1-CMV-EGFP, one week after BBB disruption, which allowed us to qualitatively evaluate neuronal health. PMID:28042323

  1. The impact of introducing universal umbilical cord blood gas analysis and lactate measurement at delivery.

    PubMed

    White, Christopher R H; Doherty, Dorota A; Newnham, John P; Pennell, Craig E

    2014-02-01

    There is growing support for umbilical cord blood gas analysis (UCBGA) to be conducted at delivery. A recent study in a tertiary level obstetric unit found that universal UCBGA was associated with improved perinatal outcomes, but there is less evidence of benefit in lower-risk environments. In such settings, lactate analysis may be a suitable alternative. This study evaluated the introduction of universal UCBGA into a secondary obstetric unit and universal umbilical cord lactate analysis program into primary and secondary units. After education, universal UCBGA or lactate analysis was introduced into one primary and two secondary level obstetric units. Univariate and adjusted analysis assessed changes in UCBGA values and Apgar scores over the study period. There were no significant changes in mean blood gas and lactate values at any centre following introduction of universal UCBGA or lactate analysis. However, there was at the primary level obstetric unit a significant reduction in the proportion of neonates with moderate to severe elevations in umbilical artery lactate values. There was a non-significant reduction in arterial pH values less than 7.10 at the secondary metropolitan centre. The data presented in this study suggest that the benefits of introducing UCBGA into a tertiary obstetric centre may be reproduced in a primary obstetric centre within 12 months of implementation. Larger studies are required in secondary units to assess infrequent adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Increases in Whole Blood Glucose Measurements Using Optically Based Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Analyzers Due to Extreme Canadian Winters

    PubMed Central

    Cembrowski, George C.; Smith, Barbara; O'Malley, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Temperature and humidity have been reported to influence the results of whole blood glucose (WBG) measurements. Methods To determine whether patient WBG values were affected by seasonal variation, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 3 years' worth of weekly averages of patient WBG in five Edmonton hospitals. Results In all five hospitals, the winter WBG averages were consistently higher than the summer WBG averages, with the differences varying between 5% and 9%. Whole blood glucose averages were negatively correlated with the outside temperature. This seasonal variation was not observed in weekly patient averages of specimens run in a central hospital laboratory. Interpretation It is probable that the seasonal variation of WBG arises from the very low indoor humidities that are associated with external subzero temperatures. These increases in WBG in cold weather may be due to limitations in the WBG measuring systems when operated in decreased humidities and/or increased evaporation of the blood sample during the blood glucose measurement process. The implications of this seasonal variation are significant in that it (1) introduces increased variability in patient WBG, (2) may result in increased glucose-lowering therapy during periods of external cold and low indoor humidity, and (3) confounds evaluations of WBG meter technology in geographic regions of subzero temperature and low indoor humidity. To mitigate the risk of diagnosing and treating factitious hyperglycemia, the humidity of patient care areas must be strictly controlled. PMID:20144309

  3. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  4. Earlobe arterialized capillary blood gas analysis in the intensive care unit: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Earlobe arterialized capillary blood gas analysis can be used to estimate arterial gas content and may be suitable for diagnosis and management of critically ill patients. However, its utility and applicability in the ICU setting remains unexplored. Methods A prospective observational validation study was designed to evaluate this technique in a cohort of mechanically ventilated adult critically ill patients admitted to a polyvalent ICU. Precision and agreement between capillary gas measures and arterial references was examined. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) diagnosis capabilities with the proposed technique were also evaluated. Finally, factors associated with sampling failure were explored. Results Fifty-five patients were included into this study. Precision of capillary samples was high (Coefficient of Variation PO2 = 9.8%, PCO2 = 7.7%, pH = 0.3%). PO2 measures showed insufficient agreement levels (Concordance Correlation Coefficient = 0.45; bias = 12 mmHg; percentage of error = 19.3%), whereas better agreement was observed for PCO2 and pH (Concordance Correlation Coefficient = 0.94 and 0.93 respectively; depreciable bias; percentage of error 11.4% and 0.5% respectively). The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing ARDS were 100% and 92.3% using capillary gasometric measures. Sampling was unsuccessful in 43.6% of cases due to insufficient blood flow. Age > 65 years was independently associated with failure (odds ratio = 1.6), however hemodynamic failure and norepinephrine treatment were also influencing factors. Conclusions Earlobe capillary blood gas analysis is precise and can be useful for detecting extreme gasometrical values. Diagnosis of ARDS can be done accurately using capillary measurements. Although this technique may be insufficient for precise management of patients in the ICU, it has the potential for important benefits in the acute phase of various critical conditions and in other

  5. Earlobe arterialized capillary blood gas analysis in the intensive care unit: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vaquer, Sergi; Masip, Jordi; Gili, Gisela; Gomà, Gemma; Oliva, Joan Carles; Frechette, Alexandre; Evetts, Simon; Russomano, Thais; Artigas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Earlobe arterialized capillary blood gas analysis can be used to estimate arterial gas content and may be suitable for diagnosis and management of critically ill patients. However, its utility and applicability in the ICU setting remains unexplored. A prospective observational validation study was designed to evaluate this technique in a cohort of mechanically ventilated adult critically ill patients admitted to a polyvalent ICU. Precision and agreement between capillary gas measures and arterial references was examined. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) diagnosis capabilities with the proposed technique were also evaluated. Finally, factors associated with sampling failure were explored. Fifty-five patients were included into this study. Precision of capillary samples was high (Coefficient of Variation PO2 = 9.8%, PCO2 = 7.7%, pH = 0.3%). PO2 measures showed insufficient agreement levels (Concordance Correlation Coefficient = 0.45; bias = 12 mmHg; percentage of error = 19.3%), whereas better agreement was observed for PCO2 and pH (Concordance Correlation Coefficient = 0.94 and 0.93 respectively; depreciable bias; percentage of error 11.4% and 0.5% respectively). The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing ARDS were 100% and 92.3% using capillary gasometric measures. Sampling was unsuccessful in 43.6% of cases due to insufficient blood flow. Age > 65 years was independently associated with failure (odds ratio = 1.6), however hemodynamic failure and norepinephrine treatment were also influencing factors. Earlobe capillary blood gas analysis is precise and can be useful for detecting extreme gasometrical values. Diagnosis of ARDS can be done accurately using capillary measurements. Although this technique may be insufficient for precise management of patients in the ICU, it has the potential for important benefits in the acute phase of various critical conditions and in other critical care arenas, such as in emergency

  6. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  7. Practical Perspectives On The In-Vitro And In-Vivo Evaluation Of A Fiber Optic Blood Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansmann, Douglas R.; Gehrich, John L.

    1988-06-01

    in-vitro blood gas analyzer.

  8. Comparative physiology of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier: the unique avian solution.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2009-12-01

    Two opposing selective pressures have shaped the evolution of the structure of the blood-gas barrier in air breathing vertebrates. The first pressure, which has been recognized for 100 years, is to facilitate diffusive gas exchange. This requires the barrier to be extremely thin and have a large area. The second pressure, which has only recently been appreciated, is to maintain the mechanical integrity of the barrier in the face of its extreme thinness. The most important tensile stress comes from the pressure within the pulmonary capillaries, which results in a hoop stress. The strength of the barrier can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. In addition, the stress is minimized in mammals and birds by complete separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Remarkably, the avian barrier is about 2.5 times thinner than that in mammals and also is much more uniform in thickness. These advantages for gas exchange come about because the avian pulmonary capillaries are unique among air breathers in being mechanically supported externally in addition to the strength that comes from the structure of their walls. This external support comes from epithelial plates that are part of the air capillaries, and the support is available because the terminal air spaces in the avian lung are extremely small due to the flow-through nature of ventilation in contrast to the reciprocating pattern in mammals.

  9. Comparative physiology of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier: the unique avian solution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Two opposing selective pressures have shaped the evolution of the structure of the blood-gas barrier in air breathing vertebrates. The first pressure, which has been recognized for 100 years, is to facilitate diffusive gas exchange. This requires the barrier to be extremely thin and have a large area. The second pressure, which has only recently been appreciated, is to maintain the mechanical integrity of the barrier in the face of its extreme thinness. The most important tensile stress comes from the pressure within the pulmonary capillaries, which results in a hoop stress. The strength of the barrier can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. In addition, the stress is minimized in mammals and birds by complete separation of the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Remarkably, the avian barrier is about 2.5 times thinner than that in mammals and also is much more uniform in thickness. These advantages for gas exchange come about because the avian pulmonary capillaries are unique among air breathers in being mechanically supported externally in addition to the strength that comes from the structure of their walls. This external support comes from epithelial plates that are part of the air capillaries, and the support is available because the terminal air spaces in the avian lung are extremely small due to the flow-through nature of ventilation in contrast to the reciprocating pattern in mammals. PMID:19793953

  10. [Evaluation of the heterogeneous immunoassay (ACMIA) for the measurement of blood cyclosporin on the Behring dimension RXL clinical chemistry analyzer].

    PubMed

    Morand, K; Huet, E; Blanchet, B; Astier, A; Hulin, A

    2003-01-01

    We propose an evaluation of a new heterogeneous immunoassay of cyclosporin on RXL HM Dimension (Dade Behring) for therapeutic cyclosporin monitoring in whole-blood patients transplant. The pretreatment step is performed automatically into the apparatus while it is a manual step with EMIT. Linearity, intra- and inter-day precision, limit of quantification, precision and accuracy of dilution steps and stability into the equipment were studied. We realized the comparison between ACMIA and EMIT methods on whole-blood patients transplant recipients. Heterogeneous immunoassay showed a good linearity between 0 and 500 ng/mL, intra- and inter-day precision with coefficient of variation inferior to 7.2%. We observed reproducible and accurate dilutions of high concentrations (500 to 2,000 ng/mL). The correlation with EMIT technique was correct for different type of transplant (n=55).

  11. Optical analysis of lithium carbonate: towards the development of a portable lithium blood level analyzer for bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    May, J M; Hickey, M; Triantis, I; Palazidou, E; Kyriacou, P A

    2014-01-01

    Lithium medication is the gold standard of treatment in Bipolar Disorder patients, preventing and reducing mood swings and suicidality. However, despite its effectiveness, it is a potentially hazardous drug requiring regular monitoring of blood levels to ensure toxic levels are not reached. This paper describes the first steps towards developing a new portable device that can be used by Bipolar Disorder patients to facilitate the analysis of lithium blood levels at home. Solutions of lithium carbonate have been optically fingerprinted using a high-end spectrophotometer. Preliminary measurements indicate that while the visible to near infrared region of the absorption spectra fall heavily within the water band, measurements in the Ultraviolet region show a strong distinction between different lithium concentrations. The optical spectra of Lithium in the 220 nm to 230 nm region demonstrated the ability to differentiate between concentrations representing those found in patients.

  12. Umbilical cord blood gas content, postnatal state of neonates, and lactation after caesarean and natural childbirth.

    PubMed

    Lepucka, M; Goluda, M; Hirnle, L

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the number of Caesarean sections (C-section) has been rapidly increasing. One of the reasons behind this is the fact that the scope of indications for these operations is still widening. The purpose of this article was to present a comparative analysis of the umbilical cord blood gas content, the state of infants, assessed by the Apgar score, and the course of lactation after elective C-sections or natural childbirth. We found that PO2 in the cord blood after natural delivery was appreciably higher than that after C-section. The neonates delivered in a natural way also had an appreciably better Apgar score compared with those after C-section. Compared to mothers who delivered their babies in a natural way, it takes a longer time for C-sectioned women to commence breastfeeding. We conclude that a lower PO2 level in the umbilical cord blood in women subjected to C-section may stem from breathing disorders in neonates at the time of delivery. The way of ending pregnancy has an apparent influence on adaptive abilities of infants to live outside mother's womb.

  13. Gas chromatograph-surface acoustic wave for quick real-time assessment of blood/exhaled gas ratio of propofol in humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhang, X L; Liu, L; Chen, Y; Piao, M Y; Zhang, F J; Wu, W D; Zhong, Y B; Sun, K; Zou, Y C; Zhang, X; Wang, D; Wang, P; Yan, M

    2014-11-01

    Although pilot studies have reported that exhaled propofol concentrations can reflect intraoperative plasma propofol concentrations in an individual, the blood/exhaled partial pressure ratio RBE varies between patients, and the relevant factors have not yet been clearly addressed. No efficient method has been reported for the quick evaluation of RBE and its association with inter-individual variables. We proposed a novel method that uses a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor combined with a fast gas chromatograph (GC) to simultaneously detect propofol concentrations in blood and exhaled gas in 28 patients who were receiving propofol i.v. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model was established to simulate propofol concentrations in exhaled gas and blood after a bolus injection. Simulated propofol concentrations for exhaled gas and blood were used in a linear regression model to evaluate RBE. The fast GC-SAW system showed reliability and efficiency for simultaneous quantitative determination of propofol in blood (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.994, P<0.01) and exhaled gas (R(2)=0.991, P<0.01). The evaluation of RBE takes <50 min for a patient. The distribution of RBE in 28 patients showed inter-individual differences in RBE (median 1.27; inter-quartile range 1.07-1.59). Fast GC-SAW, which analyses samples in seconds, can perform both rapid monitoring of exhaled propofol concentrations and fast analysis of blood propofol concentrations. The proposed method allows early determination of the coefficient RBE in individuals. Further studies are required to quantify the distribution of RBE in a larger cohort and assess the effect of other potential factors. ChiCTR-ONC-13003291. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  15. Evaluation of venous blood gas levels, blood chemistry and haemocytometric parameters in milk fed veal calves at different periods of livestock cycle.

    PubMed

    Giambelluca, S; Fiore, E; Sadocco, A; Gianesella, M; Vazzana, I; Orefice, T; Morgante, M

    2016-12-01

    An evaluation of blood chemistry profile in relation to specific stages of livestock cycle can help better understand variations in physiological conditions in order to adjust management systems to animal needs. In addition to basal hematological investigation, the acid-base balance and blood gases are essential tools in evaluating metabolism in calves. The relationship between blood gas parameters, diet and growth should be further investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in acid-base status, blood gases, serum chemistry and hematological parameters in veal calves at different periods of livestock cycle. One hundred twenty-eight healthy cross breeding calves were enrolled in a farm in North-East Italy. Blood samplings were carried out from the jugular vein on day 1 (t1), 60 (t2) and 150 (t3) after arrival. Blood gas analysis was performed and hematological parameters were evaluated. One-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test were performed to assess differences between blood parameter values at the different periods. The main differences in blood gas parameter levels during the livestock cycle concerned pH, Base Excess and HCO3 with higher values recorded in t3. Urea, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and bilirubin mean values were significantly higher in t1 than in t2 and t3. Aspartate aminotransferase increased from t1 to t2 and t3. Alkaline Phosphatase was higher in t2. Fe levels severely dropped in t2 and in t3, and the decrease led to a restrained but significant reduction in haemoglobin values. A correspondent decrease in the other haemocytometric parameters was found.

  16. Lactate study using umbilical cord blood: agreement between Lactate Pro hand-held devices with blood gas analyser and evaluation of lactate stability over time.

    PubMed

    Su, Tina Y; Reece, Mifanwy; Chua, Seng C

    2013-08-01

    Lactate measurements have become increasingly preferred over pH analysis in the evaluation of fetal acidaemia in labour. In a busy labour ward, often the umbilical cord may be sampled late and as a result yield unreliable lactate values. To investigate the agreement of hand-held device Lactate Pro with a reference method blood gas analyser and evaluate the stability of umbilical cord lactate values over time. Prospective study carried out at elective caesarean section. Sixteen umbilical cords were double clamped immediately after delivery with paired arterial and venous blood samples collected by an independent researcher, at varying time intervals, and processed by two Lactate Pro devices and a reference method blood gas analyser. A significant difference of -0.41 to 0.10 mmol/L was found when different groups of Lactate Pro devices were compared with blood gas analyser at lactate values up to 5.70 mmol/L, with average lactate value of 2.45 mmol/L. Over time, there is progressive rise in lactate samples obtained from the umbilical cord. Lactate Pro devices have a significant difference, but when used in clinical practice on cord blood after delivery, this is unlikely to be meaningful. In intrapartum fetal surveillance, a systematic overestimation might lead to unnecessary intervention. It is possible to retrospectively predict the likely level of lactate at birth in delayed cord samples. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Haematological, blood gas and acid-base values in the Galgo Español (Spanish greyhound).

    PubMed

    Mesa-Sanchez, I; Zaldivar-Lopez, S; Couto, C G; Gamito-Gomez, A; Granados-Machuca, M M; Lopez-Villalba, I; Galan-Rodriguez, A

    2012-07-01

    Haematologic profiles, electrolyte concentrations, blood gas values and acid-base balance have been studied and reported in healthy greyhounds; however, there is only one study published on blood gas values in Galgos Españoles. Because of their purported common origins with greyhounds (same group and class), it was hypothesised that Galgos Españoles also have differences in haematologic values, electrolyte concentrations, blood gas values and acid-base balance compared to other non-sporting breeds. Venous blood samples from 30 Galgos Españoles and 20 dogs from different breeds were collected, and complete blood counts, electrolyte concentrations, blood gas values and acid-base balance were measured. From the 24 parameters analysed, 5 had statistically significant differences (P<0·05). Galgos Españoles had higher haematocrit (P<0·001), haemoglobin concentration (P=0·003), erythrocyte count (P=0·016) and pH (P=0·03), and lower platelet count (P=0·005), than those in other-breed dogs. These results confirm that significant haematologic differences exist in Galgos Españoles when compared with other dogs, although these differences are not as striking as in greyhounds. Practitioners need to be aware of these breed-specific differences in order to make accurate diagnoses in Galgos Españoles. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  18. Radon-gas extraction and counting system for analyzing radon and radium in groundwater in seismically active areas

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.

    1980-12-08

    A high concentration of radon in groundwater has attracted recent attention as a precursor of seismic activity. We have constructed a system that extracts and counts radon gas from solid, liquid, and gas samples. The radon is extracted in a closed system onto activated charcoal. The desorbed radon is then measured in a phosphored acrylic cell by scintillation counting of gross alpha radiation. The efficiency of the total system (extraction plus counting) is 90 +- 3% or better. Compact design and sturdy construction make the system completely portable and well suited to field operations in remote loations. Results are given for radon and radium in groundwaters in the Livermore area.

  19. Blood-gas and circulatory changes during total knee replacement. Role of the intramedullary alignment rod.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, N R; Chandler, H P; Danylchuk, K; Matta, E B; Sunder, N; Siliski, J M

    1990-01-01

    The use of an intramedullary alignment rod in the distal part of the femur is an important step in performing total knee-replacement arthroplasty. On the basis of our observation of a sudden decrease in oxygen saturation in some patients after insertion of the rod, a prospective study was done of the circulatory and blood-gas changes that were associated with insertion in thirty-five patients. We examined the effects of the use of an eight-millimeter solid alignment rod, with and without venting; an eight-millimeter fluted alignment rod, with venting; and an eight-millimeter fluted or solid alignment rod, inserted through a 12.7-millimeter drill-hole, but without other venting. A statistically significant reduction in oxygen saturation, arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), and end-tidal carbon-dioxide tension (PETCO2) occurred after insertion of both solid and fluted eight-millimeter alignment rods through an eight-millimeter hold in both vented and unvented femoral canals, in association with a significant increase (p less than 0.01) in intramedullary pressure. Bone-marrow contents and fat were retrieved from samples of blood from the right atrium, indicating that embolization of marrow contents had occurred during insertion of the alignment rod. A small decrease in systemic blood pressure and heart rate also occurred. These changes were completely eliminated by the use of a 12.7-millimeter drill-hole as the entry site of the eight-millimeter fluted rod. We concluded that insertion of an intramedullary alignment rod in the femur causes embolization of marrow contents, which decreases arterial oxygen tension, oxygen saturation, end-tidal carbon-dioxide tension, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Calculating CO2 and H2O eddy covariance fluxes from an enclosed gas analyzer using an instantaneous mixing ratio 2159

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eddy covariance flux research has relied on open- or closed-path gas analyzers for producing estimates of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O). The two instruments have had different challenges that have led to development of an enclosed design that is intended to max...