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Sample records for blood interferon-gamma assay

  1. Diagnosis of Coxiella burnetii Infection: Comparison of a Whole Blood Interferon-Gamma Production Assay and a Coxiella ELISPOT

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, Teske; Limonard, Gijs J. M.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; Bouwman, John J. M.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje; Sprong, Tom; van Deuren, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of ongoing or past infection with Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, relies heavily on serology: the measurement of C. burnetii-specific antibodies, reflecting the host’s humoral immune response. However, cell-mediated immune responses play an important, probably even more relevant, role in infections caused by the intracellular C. burnetii bacterium. Recent studies have investigated interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) based assays, including a whole-blood IFN-γ production assay and a Coxiella enzyme-linked immunospot (Coxiella ELISPOT), as potential diagnostic tools for Q fever diagnosis. Both are in-house developed assays using stimulating antigens of different origin. The main objective of this study was to compare the test performance of the IFN-γ production assay and the Coxiella ELISPOT for detecting a cellular immune response to C. burnetii in Q fever patients, and to assess the correlation between both assays. To that end, both tests were performed in a well-defined patient group of chronic Q fever patients (n = 16) and a group of healthy seronegative individuals (n = 17). Among patients, both the Coxiella ELISPOT and the IFN-γ production assay detected positive response in 14/16. Among controls, none were positive in the Coxiella ELISPOT, whereas the IFN-γ production assay detected positive results in 1/17 and 3/17, when using Henzerling and Nine Mile as stimulating antigens, respectively. These results suggest the Coxiella ELISPOT has a somewhat higher specificity than the IFN-γ production assay when Nine Mile is used as antigen stimulus. The assays showed moderate correlation: the Spearman correlation coefficient r ranged between 0.37–0.60, depending on the antigens used. Further investigation of the diagnostic potential for C. burnetii infection of both assays is warranted. PMID:25084353

  2. Comparison of Tuberculin Activity in the Interferon-gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis still represent a serious regulatory and health concern in a variety of countries. Early diagnosis using the in vitro interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) assay has been applied for more than a decade. Briefly, IFN-gamma responses in whole blood cultures stimulated w...

  3. Comparison of Tuberculin Activity in the Interferon-gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis still represent a serious regulatory and health concern in a variety of countries. Early diagnosis using the in vitro interferon gamma (IFN-g) assay has been applied for more than a decade. Briefly, IFN-g responses in whole blood cultures stimulated with puri...

  4. Development of a lion-specific interferon-gamma assay.

    PubMed

    Maas, M; van Kooten, P J S; Schreuder, J; Morar, D; Tijhaar, E; Michel, A L; Rutten, V P M G

    2012-10-15

    The ongoing spread of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in African free-ranging lion populations, for example in the Kruger National Park, raises the need for diagnostic assays for BTB in lions. These, in addition, would be highly relevant for zoological gardens worldwide that want to determine the BTB status of their lions, e.g. for translocations. The present study concerns the development of a lion-specific IFN-γ assay, following the production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for lion interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Recombinant lion IFN-γ (rLIFN-γ) was produced in mammalian cells and used to immunize mice to establish hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies. These were used to develop a sensitive, lion IFN-γ-specific capture ELISA, able to detect rLIFN-γ to the level of 160 pg/ml. Recognition of native lion IFN-γ was shown in an initial assessment of supernatants of mitogen stimulated whole blood cultures of 11 known BTB-negative lions. In conclusion, the capture ELISA shows potential as a diagnostic assay for bovine tuberculosis in lions. Preliminary results also indicate the possible use of the test for other (feline) species.

  5. Population tailored modification of tuberculosis specific interferon-gamma release assay

    PubMed Central

    Horvati, Kata; Bősze, Szilvia; Gideon, Hannah P.; Bacsa, Bernadett; Szabó, Tamás G.; Goliath, Rene; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Hudecz, Ferenc; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Wilkinson, Katalin A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Blood-based Interferon-Gamma Release Assays (IGRA) identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) sensitisation with increased specificity, but sensitivity remains impaired in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. The QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test contains peptide 38–55 of Rv2654c, based on data indicating differential recognition between tuberculosis patients and BCG vaccinated controls in Europe. We aimed to fine map the T cell response to Rv2654c with the view of improving sensitivity. Methods Interferon-gamma ELISpot assay was used in HIV uninfected persons with latent and active tuberculosis to map peptide epitopes of Rv2654c. A modified IGRA was tested in two further groups of 55 HIV uninfected and 44 HIV infected persons, recruited in South Africa. Results The most prominently recognised peptide was between amino acids 51–65. Using p51-65 to boost the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay, the quantitative performance of the modified IGRA increased from 1.83 IU/ml (IQR 0.30–7.35) to 2.83 (IQR 0.28–12.2; p = 0.002) in the HIV uninfected group. In the HIV infected cohort the percentage of positive responders increased from 57% to 64% but only after 3 months of ART (p = ns). Conclusions Our data shows the potential to population tailor detection of MTB sensitization using specific synthetic peptides and interferon-gamma release in vitro. PMID:26632326

  6. Bovine Tuberculosis: Analyzing the Parameters of the Interferon Gamma Assay and Improved Diagnosis with New Antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB), a zoonotic disease with a major economic impact, continues to be a significant problem with a global perspective. The BOVIGAM® interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) assay constitutes a laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is widely used complementary to the tuberculin skin test....

  7. Early detection of Toxoplasma gondii-infected cats by interferon-gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing; El-Ashram, Saeed; Liu, Xian-Yong; Suo, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Felines, the only definitive hosts that shed the environmentally-durable oocysts, are the key in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii to all warm-blooded animals. They seroconvert as late as the third week and begin to shed oocysts as early as 3-8 days after being fed tissue cysts. Early detection of Toxoplasma-infected cats is crucial to evaluate Toxoplasma-contaminated environment and potential risks to public health. Moreover, it is fundamental for Toxoplasma infection control. Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is a blood-based test assessing the presence of IFN-γ released by the T-lymphocytes directed against specific antigens, which is an ideal assay for early detection of Toxoplasma-infected cats. Here, cats were orally infected with the tissue cysts and blood was collected for toxoplasmic antigen stimulation, and the released IFN-γ was measured by ELISA. Results showed that Toxoplasma-infection was detected by IGRA as early as 4 days post-infection (dpi); while serum Toxoplasma IgM and IgG were detected by ELISA at 10 dpi and 14 dpi, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that IGRA-positive and ELISA-negative samples revealed an early Toxoplasma infection in cats, indicating a new strategy for the early diagnosis of Toxoplasma infection by combining IGRA and ELISA. Therefore, IGRA could emerge as a reliable diagnostic tool for the exploration of cat toxoplasmosis prevalence and its potential risks to public health.

  8. The elephant interferon gamma assay: a contribution to diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants.

    PubMed

    Angkawanish, T; Morar, D; van Kooten, P; Bontekoning, I; Schreuder, J; Maas, M; Wajjwalku, W; Sirimalaisuwan, A; Michel, A; Tijhaar, E; Rutten, V

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) has been shown to be the main causative agent of tuberculosis in elephants worldwide. M. tb may be transmitted from infected humans to other species including elephants and vice versa, in case of prolonged intensive contact. An accurate diagnostic approach covering all phases of the infection in elephants is required. As M. tb is an intracellular pathogen and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses are elicited early after infection, the skin test is the CMI assay of choice in humans and cattle. However, this test is not applicable in elephants. The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) assay is considered a good alternative for the skin test in general, validated for use in cattle and humans. This study was aimed at development of an IFN-γ assay applicable for diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants. Recombinant elephant IFN-γ (rEpIFN-γ) produced in eukaryotic cells was used to immunize mice and generate the monoclonal antibodies. Hybridomas were screened for IFN-γ-specific monoclonal antibody production and subcloned, and antibodies were isotyped and affinity purified. Western blot confirmed recognition of the rEpIFN-γ. The optimal combination of capture and detection antibodies selected was able to detect rEpIFN-γ in concentrations as low as 1 pg/ml. The assay was shown to be able to detect the native elephant IFN-γ, elicited in positive-control cultures (pokeweed mitogen (PWM), phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin (PMA/I)) of both Asian and African elephant whole-blood cultures (WBC). Preliminary data were generated using WBC from non-infected elephants, a M. tb infection-suspected elephant and a culture-confirmed M. tb-infected elephant. The latter showed measurable production of IFN-γ after stimulation with ESAT6/CFP10 PPDB and PPDA in concentration ranges as elicited in WBC by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC)-specific antigens in other species. Hence, the IFN-γ assay presented potential as a diagnostic tool for the

  9. Executive Summary of the Guidelines for the Use of interferon-gamma Release Assays in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guide-line for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health.

  10. Executive Summary of the Guidelines for the Use of interferon-gamma Release Assays in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guide-line for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health. PMID:27424071

  11. Tuberculin Skin Tests versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Tuberculosis Screening among Immigrant Visa Applicants.

    PubMed

    Chuke, Stella O; Yen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Laserson, Kayla F; Phuoc, Nguyen Huu; Trinh, Nguyen An; Nhung, Duong Thi Cam; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Qui, An Dang; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Loan, Le Thien Huong; Jones, Warren G; Whitworth, William C; Shah, J Jina; Painter, John A; Mazurek, Gerald H; Maloney, Susan A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Use of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) as part of tuberculosis (TB) screening among immigrants from high TB-burden countries has not been fully evaluated. Methods. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTBI) based on TST, or the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G), was determined among immigrant applicants in Vietnam bound for the United States (US); factors associated with test results and discordance were assessed; predictive values of TST and QFT-G for identifying chest radiographs (CXRs) consistent with TB were calculated. Results. Of 1,246 immigrant visa applicants studied, 57.9% were TST positive, 28.3% were QFT-G positive, and test agreement was 59.4%. Increasing age was associated with positive TST results, positive QFT-G results, TST-positive but QFT-G-negative discordance, and abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. Positive predictive values of TST and QFT-G for an abnormal CXR were 25.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Conclusion. The estimated prevalence of MTBI among US-bound visa applicants in Vietnam based on TST was twice that based on QFT-G, and 14 times higher than a TST-based estimate of MTBI prevalence reported for the general US population in 2000. QFT-G was not better than TST at predicting abnormal CXRs consistent with TB.

  12. Tuberculin Skin Tests versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Tuberculosis Screening among Immigrant Visa Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Chuke, Stella O.; Yen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Laserson, Kayla F.; Phuoc, Nguyen Huu; Trinh, Nguyen An; Nhung, Duong Thi Cam; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Qui, An Dang; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Loan, Le Thien Huong; Jones, Warren G.; Whitworth, William C.; Shah, J. Jina; Painter, John A.; Mazurek, Gerald H.; Maloney, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Use of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) as part of tuberculosis (TB) screening among immigrants from high TB-burden countries has not been fully evaluated. Methods. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTBI) based on TST, or the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G), was determined among immigrant applicants in Vietnam bound for the United States (US); factors associated with test results and discordance were assessed; predictive values of TST and QFT-G for identifying chest radiographs (CXRs) consistent with TB were calculated. Results. Of 1,246 immigrant visa applicants studied, 57.9% were TST positive, 28.3% were QFT-G positive, and test agreement was 59.4%. Increasing age was associated with positive TST results, positive QFT-G results, TST-positive but QFT-G-negative discordance, and abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. Positive predictive values of TST and QFT-G for an abnormal CXR were 25.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Conclusion. The estimated prevalence of MTBI among US-bound visa applicants in Vietnam based on TST was twice that based on QFT-G, and 14 times higher than a TST-based estimate of MTBI prevalence reported for the general US population in 2000. QFT-G was not better than TST at predicting abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. PMID:24738031

  13. Novel assay to detect increased level of neutralizing anti-interferon gamma autoantibodies in non-tuberculous mycobacterial patients.

    PubMed

    Shima, Kenjiro; Sakagami, Takuro; Tanabe, Yoshinari; Aoki, Nobumasa; Moro, Hiroshi; Koya, Toshiyuki; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Ei-ichi; Narita, Ichiei

    2014-01-01

    Subjects exposed to non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species do not always develop an active disease, which likely reflects underlying host susceptibility factors. Recent reports have shown that anti interferon gamma (IFN-γ) neutralizing autoantibodies (IFN-γ Ab) are associated with the development of disseminated NTM in patients without known evidence of immunodeficiency. The purpose of this study is to establish the screening method if subjects have IFN-γ Ab. Whole blood was obtained from patients with disseminated NTM, those with pulmonary NTM, and healthy controls. The neutralizing capacity to IFN-γ activity was assessed as an inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activation of Transcription 1 (STAT-1) phosphorylation in leukocyte after stimulation with exogenous IFN-γ by flow cytometer. The strength of phosphorylation was described as STAT1 phosphorylation index. Antigen capture assay was performed to measure the relative titer of Immunoglobulin-G fraction of IFN-γ Ab. STAT1 phosphorylation by IFN-γ was significantly inhibited in the leukocytes from patients with disseminated NTM compared to that in healthy subjects, while this inhibition was not observed in patients with pulmonary NTM. All subjects with inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation had high titer of Immunoglobulin-G that reacted with IFN-γ in the antigen capture assay. The measurement of STAT1 phosphorylation index in whole blood leukocytes and antigen capture assay are simple and useful method for detection of anti-IFN-γ neutralizing autoantibodies, and is valuable in the pathophysiological diagnosis of disseminated NTM patients without obvious immunodeficiency.

  14. Updated guidelines for using Interferon Gamma Release Assays to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection - United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Gerald H; Jereb, John; Vernon, Andrew; LoBue, Phillip; Goldberg, Stefan; Castro, Kenneth

    2010-06-25

    n 2005, CDC published guidelines for using the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G) (Cellestis Limited, Carnegie, Victoria, Australia) (CDC. Guidelines for using the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, United States. MMWR;54[No. RR-15]:49-55). Subsequently, two new interferon gamma (IFN- gamma) release assays (IGRAs) were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as aids in diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection, both latent infection and infection manifesting as active tuberculosis. These tests are the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) (Cellestis Limited, Carnegie, Victoria, Australia) and the T-SPOT.TB test (T-Spot) (Oxford Immunotec Limited, Abingdon, United Kingdom). The antigens, methods, and interpretation criteria for these assays differ from those for IGRAs approved previously by FDA. For assistance in developing recommendations related to IGRA use, CDC convened a group of experts to review the scientific evidence and provide opinions regarding use of IGRAs. Data submitted to FDA, published reports, and expert opinion related to IGRAs were used in preparing these guidelines. Results of studies examining sensitivity, specificity, and agreement for IGRAs and TST vary with respect to which test is better. Although data on the accuracy of IGRAs and their ability to predict subsequent active tuberculosis are limited, to date, no major deficiencies have been reported in studies involving various populations. This report provides guidance to U.S. public health officials, health-care providers, and laboratory workers for use of FDA-approved IGRAs in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection in adults and children. In brief, TSTs and IGRAs (QFT-G, QFT-GIT, and T-Spot) may be used as aids in diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection. They may be used for surveillance purposes and to identify persons likely to benefit from treatment. Multiple additional recommendations are provided that address quality control, test

  15. Luminescence switch-on assay of interferon-gamma using a G-quadruplex-selective iridium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng; He, Bingyong; Yang, Chao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-11-18

    In this study, we synthesized a series of 9 luminescent iridium(III) complexes and studied their ability to function as luminescent probes for G-quadruplex DNA. The iridium(III) complex 8 [Ir(pbtz)2(dtbpy)]PF6 (where pbtz = 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole; dtbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine) showed high selectivity for G-quadruplex DNA over single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, and was subsequently utilized for the development of a label-free oligonucleotide-based assay for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), an important biomarker for a range of immune and infectious diseases, in aqueous solution. We further demonstrated that this assay could monitor IFN-γ levels even in the presence of cellular debris. This assay represents the first G-quadruplex-based assay for IFN-γ detection described in the literature.

  16. The Effectiveness of Screening with Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in a University Health Care Setting with a Diverse Global Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Samantha J.; Golbeck, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This analysis examined the effectiveness of utilizing interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) technology in a TB (TB) screening program at a university. Participants: Participants were 2299 students at a Montana university who had presented to the university health center for TB screening during 2012 and 2013. Methods: A retrospective…

  17. Cigarette-Smoking Intensity and Interferon-Gamma Release Assay Conversion among Persons Who Inject Drugs: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Gallardo, Manuel; Lozada, Remedios; Abramovitz, Daniela; Burgos, Jose Luis; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Novotny, Thomas E.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Garfein, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed data from a longitudinal cohort study of persons who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico, to explore whether cigarette smoking increases the risk of interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) conversion. PWID were recruited using respondent driven sampling (RDS). QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay conversion was defined as interferon-gamma concentrations <0.35 IU/mL at baseline and ≥0.7 IU/mL at 18 months. We used multivariable Poisson regression adjusted for RDS weights to estimate risk ratios (RRs). Of 129 eligible participants, 125 (96.9%) smoked at least one cigarette during followup with a median of 11 cigarettes smoked daily, and 52 (40.3%) had QFT conversion. In bivariate analysis, QFT conversion was not associated with the number of cigarettes smoked daily (P = 0.716). Controlling for age, gender, education, and alcohol use, the RRs of QFT conversion for smoking 6–10, 11–15, and ≥16 cigarettes daily compared to smoking 0–5 cigarettes daily were 0.9 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5–1.6), 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3–1.2), and 0.7 (95% CI, 0.3–1.6), respectively. Although this study did not find an association between self-reported smoking intensity and QFT conversion, it was not powered sufficiently to negate such an association. Larger longitudinal studies are needed to fully explore this relationship. PMID:23304497

  18. Use of ESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion protein in the bovine interferon-gamma ELISPOT assay for diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Sugumar; Veerasami, Maroudam; Appana, Gangadharrao; Chandran, Dev; Das, Dipankar; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2012-09-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic bacterial disease, and a major animal health problem with zoonotic implications. Screening of mycobacterial infections in bovines is traditionally done using the single intradermal tuberculin test. Though the test is widely used, it has its own disadvantages and they include its inability to distinguish between pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacterial infections owing to its low specificity. Furthermore, the associated operative difficulties of this test have driven the quest for discovery of new antigens and diagnostic assays leading to the development of the interferon (IFN)- test. Presently, combinatorial testing using the skin test and the interferon gamma assays are being used in the diagnosis of BTB in various control and surveillance programs. In this study, we report the cloning, expression and purification of ESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion protein and its further use in the development of the IFN- gamma ELISPOT assay for accurate diagnosis of BTB in cattle. The BTB diagnosis employing the ELISPOT assay was evaluated using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from culture positive and culture negative cattle. The ELISPOT assay showed higher specificity and sensitivity in detecting BTB when a recombinant ESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion protein was used. The present study indicated that the usefulness of the fusion protein can replace the ESAT-6, CFP-10 or combination of both proteins for detecting BTB in IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. PMID:22691409

  19. Inflammatory markers and clinical characteristics for predicting persistent positivity of interferon gamma release assay in dialysis population

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2016-01-01

    The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is useful for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), however the rate of negative conversion is high, especially in dialysis patients. Few studies have focused on predicting persistently positive patients who are at high risk of tuberculosis reactivation. We screened dialysis patients, and used QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) to identify LTBI. Of the 157 participants who had initially positive QFT-GIT, 82 had persistently positivity and 75 had negative conversion. The persistently positive group were younger, more were current smokers, and had higher plasma level of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) and QFT-GIT responses than the negative conversion group. Multivariate logistic regression for persistent positivity revealed that high plasma sTREM-1 and QFT-GIT response, young age and TB contact history were independent factors. Currently smoking had borderline significance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve using the multi-factor model was 0.878, higher than 0.821 by QFT-GIT response of 0.95 IU/ml. In conclusion, dialysis patients with persistent LTBI status may be associated with a young age, high plasma sTREM-1, strong QFT-GIT response, currently smoking, and TB contact history. If resources are limited, these five predictors can be used to prioritize QFT-GIT-positive dialysis patients for LTBI treatment. PMID:27703202

  20. Tuberculosis contact investigation using interferon-gamma release assay with chest x-ray and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Akira; Fujii, Tatsuya; Mimura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Masao; Suzuki, Shinya; Kyoto, Yukishige; Uwabe, Yasuhide; Maeda, Shinji; Mori, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2010, 6 members of the Japanese Eastern Army, who had completed the same training program, were diagnosed with active tuberculosis (TB) on different occasions. The Ministry of Defense conducted a contact investigation of all members who had come into contact with the infected members. The purpose of this study was to verify the efficacy of the TB screening protocol used in this investigation. A total of 884 subjects underwent interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) and chest X-ray. The 132 subjects who were IGRA positive or with X-ray findings suggestive of TB subsequently underwent chest computer tomography (CT). Chest CT was performed for 132 subjects. Based on CT findings, 24 (2.7%) subjects were classified into the active TB group, 107 (12.1%) into the latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) group, and 753 (85.2%) into the non-TB group. The first 2 groups underwent anti-TB therapy, and all 3 groups were followed for 2 years after treatment. Although one subject in the active TB group experienced relapse during the follow-up period, no patient in the LTBI or non-TB groups developed TB. IGRA and chest X-ray, followed by chest CT for those IGRA positive or with suspicious X-ray findings, appears to be an effective means of TB contact screening and infection prevention.

  1. Screening for latent tuberculosis in Norwegian health care workers: high frequency of discordant tuberculin skin test positive and interferon-gamma release assay negative results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) presents globally a significant health problem and health care workers (HCW) are at increased risk of contracting TB infection. There is no diagnostic gold standard for latent TB infection (LTBI), but both blood based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used. According to the national guidelines, HCW who have been exposed for TB should be screened and offered preventive anti-TB chemotherapy, but the role of IGRA in HCW screening is still unclear. Methods A total of 387 HCW working in clinical and laboratory departments in three major hospitals in the Western region of Norway with possible exposure to TB were included in a cross-sectional study. The HCW were asked for risk factors for TB and tested with TST and the QuantiFERON®TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT). A logistic regression model analyzed the associations between risk factors for TB and positive QFT or TST. Results A total of 13 (3.4%) demonstrated a persistent positive QFT, whereas 214 (55.3%) had a positive TST (≥ 6 mm) and 53 (13.7%) a TST ≥ 15 mm. Only ten (4.7%) of the HCW with a positive TST were QFT positive. Origin from a TB-endemic country was the only risk factor associated with a positive QFT (OR 14.13, 95% CI 1.37 - 145.38, p = 0.026), whereas there was no significant association between risk factors for TB and TST ≥ 15 mm. The five HCW with an initial positive QFT that retested negative all had low interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses below 0.70 IU/ml when first tested. Conclusions We demonstrate a low prevalence of LTBI in HCW working in hospitals with TB patients in our region. The “IGRA-only” seems like a desirable screening strategy despite its limitations in serial testing, due to the high numbers of discordant TST positive/IGRA negative results in HCW, probably caused by BCG vaccination or boosting due to repetitive TST testing. Thus, guidelines for TB screening in HCW should be updated in order to

  2. Evaluation of the Immune Response to Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Among BCG Vaccinated Children in East of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Mohamed Refaat; Zidan, Alaa Ebrahim; El-Saadny, Hosam Fathi; Ramadan, Raghdaa Abdelaziz; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Amin, Ezzat Kamel; Mohamed, Marwa Zakaria; Abdelsamad, Nahla Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) vaccination is used routinely in most of countries, especially developing one. The efficacy of the BCG vaccination generally decreases with time. The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a most popular diagnostic test for suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) in children till now, but it has many false positives. The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is more specific than TST for detection of childhood TB, as it is more specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Evaluate the interferon gamma response and TST reaction in BCG vaccinated children in east of Egypt. 150 children were included in the study aged 1 month to 12 years; the collected data from the children included, full history taking, clinical examination, examination for the presence or absence of BCG scar under direct light. All the children had performed TST, IGRA. TST was done for all studied group reveal 51.3% with size of reaction <5 mm, 39.3% with size of reaction = 5 to 9 mm while 9.3% with size of reaction ≥10 mm. Mean size of reaction was 4.07 mm. Interferon gamma release assay was done for all studied group reveal 5 children (3.3%) with positive test. There was significant difference between the size of TST reaction and age (P < 0.01) with old children were more frequent to show positive reaction. Also, children with age range 1 month to 1 year were frequently have negative IGRA test, while children with age range 4 years to 12 years were frequently have positive test (P < 0.01). There was moderate agreement between IGRA and TST results (Kappa [κ] = 0.475). With high agreement between IGRA and TST results in children with absent BCG scar (κ = 1000). Therefore, Interferon gamma release assays have higher specificity and lower cross-reactions with BCG vaccination and nontuberculous Mycobacteraie than TST. PMID:27124042

  3. Interferon-Gamma Release Assays for the Diagnosis of Active Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Renfang; Wang, Jiangrong; Liu, Li; Zheng, Yufang; Shen, Yinzhong; Qi, Tangkai; Lu, Hongzhou

    2011-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have provided a new method for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. However, the role of IGRAs for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB), especially in HIV-infected patients remains unclear. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases to identify studies published in January 2001–July 2011 that evaluated the evidence of using QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB (T-SPOT) on blood for the diagnosis of active TB in HIV-infected patients. Results The search identified 16 eligible studies that included 2801 HIV-infected individuals (637 culture confirmed TB cases). The pooled sensitivity for the diagnosis of active TB was 76.7% (95%CI, 71.6–80.5%) and 77.4% (95%CI, 71.4–82.6%) for QFT-GIT and T-SPOT, respectively, while the specificity was 76.1% (95%CI, 74.0–78.0%) and 63.1% (95%CI, 57.6–68.3%) after excluding the indeterminate results. Studies conducted in low/middle income countries showed slightly lower sensitivity and specificity when compared to that in high-income countries. The proportion of indeterminate results was as high as 10% (95%CI, 8.8–11.3%) and 13.2% (95%CI, 10.6–16.0%) for QFT-GIT and T-SPOT, respectively. Conclusion IGRAs in their current formulations have limited accuracy in diagnosing active TB in HIV-infected patients, and should not be used alone to rule out or rule in active TB cases in HIV-infected patients. Further modification is needed to improve their accuracy. PMID:22069472

  4. Tuberculosis screening of new hospital employees: compliance, clearance to work time, and cost using tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Foster-Chang, Sarah A; Manning, Mary L; Chandler, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Selection of the most suitable test(s) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection should be based on purpose, setting, effectiveness, and cost. Two tests are available to screen for latent TB: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the more recent interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). Based on the administrative, logistic, and technical ease of use, an IGRA trial was initiated by the occupational health department at an urban Veteran's Administration health care facility for TB screening of new employees. As a result, new employees completing the pre-placement process within the organization's designated 14 days increased from 77% to 97%, new employee clearance to work time decreased from 13.18 to 5.91 days, and new employee TB screening costs were reduced by 40%. The IGRA is an acceptable alternative to the TST and has significant potential to improve the process of pre-placement TB screening. PMID:25207587

  5. Performance of Interferon-Gamma and IP-10 Release Assays for Diagnosing Latent Tuberculosis Infections in Patients with Concurrent Malaria in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Drabe, Camilla H; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Helleberg, Marie; Nyagonde, Nyagonde; Rose, Michala V; Francis, Filbert; Theilgaard, Ola P; Asbjørn, Jens; Amos, Ben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-04-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to detect cellular immune recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis The chemokine IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is an alternative diagnostic biomarker to IFN-γ. Several conditions interfere with IGRA test performance. We aimed to assess the possible influence of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the IGRA test QuantiFERON-TB GOLD® In-Tube (QFT) test and an in-house IP-10 release assay. In total, 241 Tanzanian adults were included; 184 patients with uncomplicated malaria (88 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] coinfected) and 57 HIV-infected patients without malaria infection. Malaria was treated with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®). QFT testing was performed before initiation of malaria treatment and at days 7 and 42. In total, 172 patients completed follow-up. IFN-γ and IP-10 was measured in QFT supernatants. We found that during malaria infection IFN-γ and IP-10 levels in the unstimulated samples were elevated, mitogen responsiveness was impaired, and CD4 cell counts were decreased. These alterations reverted after malaria treatment. Concurrent malaria infection did not affect QFT test results, whereas there were more indeterminate IP-10 results during acute malaria infection. We suggest that IGRA and IP-10 release assay results of malaria patients should be interpreted with caution and that testing preferably should be postponed until after malaria treatment.

  6. Optimization of interferon gamma ELISPOT assay to detect human cytomegalovirus specific T-cell responses in solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Abate, Davide; Saldan, Alda; Forner, Gabriella; Tinto, Daniel; Bianchin, Alice; Palù, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Assessing the CMV specific CMI in transplant subjects represents a promising strategy to determine the risk of infection on individual basis. In this study 61 adult CMV IgG seropositive solid organ transplant recipients were examined in order to improve the efficacy of CMI detection. For this purpose, pair-wise comparisons were conducted comparing positive control stimuli PWM and PMA/iono and CMV stimuli, pp65 peptide pool and whole CMV particle. Rosette pre-depletion of blood was also investigated for detecting CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses using the IFN-g ELISPOT assay. In the time-points 30-180 days after transplantation, PMA/iono produced statistically significant higher responses compared to PWM, probably because PMA/iono activation pathway is independent from the effect of immunosuppressive drugs. The data showed that 11% of transplant patients displayed very low or undetectable responses to pp65 peptide pool antigen while having sustained high responses to whole CMV particle. In addition, in all the subjects analyzed, CMI responses to CMV particle produced a statistically significant higher number of spots compared to pp65 peptide pool antigen. Rosette pre-depletion of whole blood proved to be effective in detecting CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses similarly to flow cytometry. Taken together, the following recommendations are suggested to optimize the CMV-ELISPOT for transplantation settings: (1) use PMA/iono as positive control; (2) whole virus particle should be used to avoid peptide-related false negative responses; (3) a rosette pre-depletion step may be useful to detect CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses.

  7. Interferon Gamma in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Kima, Peter E.; Soong, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of some of the host responses during Leishmania infections that are regulated by IFN-γ. In addition, studies that explore the nature of parasite-derived molecular mediators that might affect the host response to IFN-γ are also discussed. PMID:23801993

  8. Interferon gamma in leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Kima, Peter E; Soong, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of some of the host responses during Leishmania infections that are regulated by IFN-γ. In addition, studies that explore the nature of parasite-derived molecular mediators that might affect the host response to IFN-γ are also discussed.

  9. Blood Culture and Stimulation Conditions for the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Cervids by the Cervigam Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitogen and antigen induced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses of peripheral blood leukocytes from cervids were evaluated using a commercial, whole blood assay for the cytokine (Cervigam trademark, Prionics AG). Whole blood was from Mycobacterium bovis-infected white-tailed deer and reindeer, M....

  10. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis outbreak in an Italian prison: tolerance of pyrazinamide plus levofloxacin prophylaxis and serial interferon gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Bedini, A; Garlassi, E; Stentarelli, C; Petrella, S; Meacci, M; Meccugni, B; Meschiari, M; Franceschini, E; Cerri, S; Brasacchio, A; Rumpianesi, F; Richeldi, L; Mussini, C

    2016-07-01

    The optimal treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in subjects exposed to multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) remains unclear, and the change in response of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QTB-IT) test during and after treatment is unknown. Between May 2010 and August 2010, 39 prisoners at the 'Casa Circondariale' of Modena, Italy, were exposed to a patient with active pulmonary MDR TB. All contacts were tested with the tuberculin skin test and QTB-IT. Upon exclusion of active TB, subjects positive to both tests were offered 6 months' treatment with pyrazinamide (PZA) and levofloxacin (LVX). QTB-IT testing was repeated at 3 and 6 months after initial testing in all subjects who were offered LTBI treatment. Seventeen (43.5%) of 39 subjects tested positive to both tuberculin skin test and QTB-IT test, and 12 (70.5%) agreed to receive therapy with PZA and LVX at standard doses. Only five (41.6%) of 12 subjects completed 6 months' treatment. Reasons for discontinuation were asymptomatic hepatitis, gastritis and diarrhoea. The QTB-IT values decreased in all subjects who completed the treatment, in two (33%) of six of those who received treatment for less than 3 months and in one (50%) of two patients who discontinued therapy after 3 months. The QTB-IT test results never turned negative. Despite the small number of subjects, the study confirmed that PZA plus LVX is a poorly tolerated option for MDR LTBI treatment. We observed a large degree of variation in the results of the QTB-IT test results among participants. The study confirmed that the interferon gamma release assay is not a reliable tool for monitoring the treatment of MDR LTBI in clinical practice. PMID:27222718

  11. The Clinical Usefulness of Tuberculin Skin Test versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis in HIV Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ayubi, Erfan; Doosti-Irani, Amin; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Sani, Mohadeseh; Nazarzadeh, Milad; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is becoming increasingly concerning due to the increasing the HIV epidemic, which have increased the risk for reactivation to active tuberculosis (TB) infection. LTBI is diagnosed by tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). Objectives The aim of the present study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published papers on the agreement (kappa) between TST and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) tests for diagnosis of LTBI in HIV patient. Methods Electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Elsevier/Scopus and Embase/Ovid were reviewed up Jan. 2016. We performed a random effect model meta-analysis for estimation of pooled Kappa between the two methods of diagnosis. Meta regression was used for assessing potential heterogeneity and Egger’s test was used for assessing small study effect and publication bias. Results The initial search strategy produced 6744 records. Of them, 23 cross-sectional studies met the inclusion criteria and 20 studies entered in meta-analysis. The pooled kappa was and prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) were 0.37 (95% CI: 0.28, 0.46) and 0.59 (0.49, 0.69). The discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ was more than TST+/QFT-GIT-. Kappa estimate between two tests was linearly associated with age and prevalence index and inversely associated with bias index. Conclusion Fair agreement between TST and QFT-GIT makes it difficult to know whether TST is as useful as the QFT-GIT in HIV-infected patients. The higher discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ in compared to TST+/QFT-GIT- can induce the higher sensitivity of QFT-GIT for diagnosis LTBI in HIV patients. Disagreement between two tests can be influenced by error in measurements and prevalence of HIV. PMID:27622293

  12. Interleukin-1 beta, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Enayati, Samaneh; Seifirad, Soroush; Amiri, Parvin; Abolhalaj, Milad; Mohammad -Amoli, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several inflammatory mediators have been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in un-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) gene expression were evaluated in angiography confirmed patients with and without CAD in a case-control study using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS A significant increase (P = 0.030) in IL-1β gene expression was found in patients with CAD [median interquartile range (IQR) = 4.890 (6.084)] compared to patients without CAD [median (IQR) = 1.792 (3.172)]. Despite the increase in IFN-γ gene expression in patients with CAD [median (IQR) = 1.298 (3.896)] versus patients without CAD [median (IQR) = 0.841 (2.79)], there was not statistically significant difference (P = 0.990). CONCLUSION Our results provide evidence for possible association between IL-1β and development of atherosclerosis as a crucial cytokine that induce a network of signaling pathways. This finding if proved in future would suggest IL-1β as a potent therapeutic target in CAD. PMID:26715931

  13. Interferon Gamma Release Assay versus Tuberculin Skin Testing among Healthcare Workers of Highly Diverse Origin in a Moderate Tuberculosis Burden Country

    PubMed Central

    Al Hajoj, Sahal; Varghese, Bright; Datijan, Alria; Shoukri, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Ali; Alkhenizan, Abdallah; AlSaif, Abdulaziz; Althawadi, Sahar; Fernandez, Grace; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCW’s) are always at an increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB) infection. In Saudi Arabia, Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) has not been evaluated as a screening tool for latent TB infection (LTBI) among HCW’s considering their high demographic diversity. During February 2012 to January 2015 a cross sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary care center with maximum demographically diverse staff population in the capital city-Riyadh. After a short interview and consenting, all the candidates were subjected to tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB gold In-tube test (QFT). A logistic regression analysis was carried out for establishing the associations between putative risk factors and the diagnostic tests. The candidates were classified according to geographical origin and a detailed analysis was conducted on the impact of their origin towards the results of TST and QFT. Of the 1595 candidates enrolled, 90.6% were BCG vaccinated, female (67.9%) and mainly nurses (53.2%). Candidates with high risk of suspected or confirmed TB patient exposure were 56.1% and 76.5% of them had <10 year’s work experience. TST positivity was observed in 503 (31.5%) candidates, while QFT was positive among 399 (25%). Majority of the candidates were non-Saudi (83%) and predominantly (52.4%) from Western Pacific region. Concordant results were obtained in 14.2% of positive cases and 57.7% negative cases. The disagreements between the two tests were relatively high (kappa co-efficient-0.312±0.026, p value- <0.00001) as TST positive/QFT negative discordance was 54.8% while TST negative/QFT positive discordance was 15.7%. Age of the candidates, BCG vaccination, and South East Asian origin were associated with TST positivity while Occupational TB exposure and geographical origin of the candidates were associated with QFT positivity. A regular follow up on recently TST converted candidates showed no progression to active TB. The putative

  14. Interferon Gamma Release Assay versus Tuberculin Skin Testing among Healthcare Workers of Highly Diverse Origin in a Moderate Tuberculosis Burden Country.

    PubMed

    Al Hajoj, Sahal; Varghese, Bright; Datijan, Alria; Shoukri, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Ali; Alkhenizan, Abdallah; AlSaif, Abdulaziz; Althawadi, Sahar; Fernandez, Grace; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCW's) are always at an increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB) infection. In Saudi Arabia, Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) has not been evaluated as a screening tool for latent TB infection (LTBI) among HCW's considering their high demographic diversity. During February 2012 to January 2015 a cross sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary care center with maximum demographically diverse staff population in the capital city-Riyadh. After a short interview and consenting, all the candidates were subjected to tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB gold In-tube test (QFT). A logistic regression analysis was carried out for establishing the associations between putative risk factors and the diagnostic tests. The candidates were classified according to geographical origin and a detailed analysis was conducted on the impact of their origin towards the results of TST and QFT. Of the 1595 candidates enrolled, 90.6% were BCG vaccinated, female (67.9%) and mainly nurses (53.2%). Candidates with high risk of suspected or confirmed TB patient exposure were 56.1% and 76.5% of them had <10 year's work experience. TST positivity was observed in 503 (31.5%) candidates, while QFT was positive among 399 (25%). Majority of the candidates were non-Saudi (83%) and predominantly (52.4%) from Western Pacific region. Concordant results were obtained in 14.2% of positive cases and 57.7% negative cases. The disagreements between the two tests were relatively high (kappa co-efficient-0.312±0.026, p value- <0.00001) as TST positive/QFT negative discordance was 54.8% while TST negative/QFT positive discordance was 15.7%. Age of the candidates, BCG vaccination, and South East Asian origin were associated with TST positivity while Occupational TB exposure and geographical origin of the candidates were associated with QFT positivity. A regular follow up on recently TST converted candidates showed no progression to active TB. The putative factors

  15. Interferon Gamma Release Assay versus Tuberculin Skin Testing among Healthcare Workers of Highly Diverse Origin in a Moderate Tuberculosis Burden Country.

    PubMed

    Al Hajoj, Sahal; Varghese, Bright; Datijan, Alria; Shoukri, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Ali; Alkhenizan, Abdallah; AlSaif, Abdulaziz; Althawadi, Sahar; Fernandez, Grace; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCW's) are always at an increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB) infection. In Saudi Arabia, Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) has not been evaluated as a screening tool for latent TB infection (LTBI) among HCW's considering their high demographic diversity. During February 2012 to January 2015 a cross sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary care center with maximum demographically diverse staff population in the capital city-Riyadh. After a short interview and consenting, all the candidates were subjected to tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB gold In-tube test (QFT). A logistic regression analysis was carried out for establishing the associations between putative risk factors and the diagnostic tests. The candidates were classified according to geographical origin and a detailed analysis was conducted on the impact of their origin towards the results of TST and QFT. Of the 1595 candidates enrolled, 90.6% were BCG vaccinated, female (67.9%) and mainly nurses (53.2%). Candidates with high risk of suspected or confirmed TB patient exposure were 56.1% and 76.5% of them had <10 year's work experience. TST positivity was observed in 503 (31.5%) candidates, while QFT was positive among 399 (25%). Majority of the candidates were non-Saudi (83%) and predominantly (52.4%) from Western Pacific region. Concordant results were obtained in 14.2% of positive cases and 57.7% negative cases. The disagreements between the two tests were relatively high (kappa co-efficient-0.312±0.026, p value- <0.00001) as TST positive/QFT negative discordance was 54.8% while TST negative/QFT positive discordance was 15.7%. Age of the candidates, BCG vaccination, and South East Asian origin were associated with TST positivity while Occupational TB exposure and geographical origin of the candidates were associated with QFT positivity. A regular follow up on recently TST converted candidates showed no progression to active TB. The putative factors

  16. Effects of Culture Conditions and Tuberculin Source on Interferon-gamma Production in Whole Blood Cultures from Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BOVIGAM® interferon (IFN) - gamma assay constitutes an ante-mortem, in vitro laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is used complementary to the tuberculin skin test. The assay is performed in two stages: firstly, whole blood is cultured with antigens stimulating blood leucocytes to produce IFN-...

  17. Effects of Culture Conditions and Tuberculin Source on Interferon-gamma production in Whole Blood Cultures from Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BOVIGAM® interferon (IFN) - gamma assay constitutes an ante-mortem, in vitro laboratory-based tuberculosis test and is used complementary to the tuberculin skin test. The assay is performed in two stages: firstly, whole blood is cultured with antigens stimulating blood leucocytes to produce IFN...

  18. Interferon-gamma as an adjuvant in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, A W; Devey, M E; Brown, I N; Richards, C E; Playfair, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have compared interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) with saponin and interleukin-1 (IL-1) as adjuvants for a blood-stage malaria vaccine in mice with various immunological abnormalities. IFN-gamma was particularly effective in Biozzi low antibody responder mice, mice selectively bred to produce antibody of low affinity, and mice depleted of CD4+ T cells. IFN-gamma and other cytokines may be safe adjuvants for use in human immunodeficiency states. PMID:2504662

  19. Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M A G; Spina, F G; Weckx, L Y; Lederman, H M; De Moraes-Pinto, M I

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6-30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0-24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0-60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI.

  20. Biotin supplementation increases expression of genes encoding interferon-gamma, interleukin-1beta, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, and decreases expression of the gene encoding interleukin-4 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Silke; Eudy, James D; Zempleni, Janos

    2003-03-01

    Stimulation of immune cells by antigens triggers changes in the transcription of genes encoding cytokines and other proteins; these changes in gene expression are part of the normal immune response. Previous studies have provided evidence that biotin status may affect secretion of cytokines by immune cells. Here we determined whether biotin supplementation affects gene expression in human immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy adults before and after supplementation with 8.8 micro mol biotin/d for 21 d. Cells were cultured ex vivo with concanavalin A for 21 h to simulate stimulation with antigens. Expression of genes that play roles in cytokine metabolism, cell proliferation, signal transduction, stress response, apoptosis and biotin homeostasis was quantified by using DNA microarrays and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The abundance of mRNA encoding interferon-gamma, interleukin-1beta, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase was 4.3, 5.6 and 8.9 times greater, respectively, after supplementation with biotin compared with before supplementation. In contrast, the abundance of mRNA encoding interleukin-4 was 6.8 times greater before supplementation than after supplementation. These data suggest that biotin supplementation affects gene expression in human immune cells. Effects of biotin on gene expression are likely to modulate the response of immune cells to antigens.

  1. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVI) produce reduced levels of interleukin-4, interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma, but proliferate normally upon activation by mitogens.

    PubMed Central

    Pastorelli, G; Roncarolo, M G; Touraine, J L; Peronne, G; Tovo, P A; de Vries, J E

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of 11 patients with CVI produced reduced levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) upon activation by mitogens as compared with those secreted by PBL of healthy donors. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by PBL of a series of 15 patients with CVI was also reduced. Decreased levels of IL-4 or IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were not only observed after activation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) at concentrations of 10 and 1 micrograms/ml, but also after activation by concanavalin A (Con A, 10 micrograms/ml). Longitudinal studies indicated that this defective lymphokine production was consistent upon testing periods up to 5 months. No correlation between reduced IL-4, IL-2 or IFN-gamma production was observed. PBL of patients that produced reduced levels of one lymphokine generally secreted normal levels of the other two lymphokines. Despite the reduced synthesis of the T cell growth factors IL-2 and IL-4, the proliferative responses of the PBL of the patients were in the normal range, which is compatible with the finding that IL-2 and IL-4 have synergistic effects on lymphocyte proliferation, particularly when one of these lymphokines is present at suboptimal concentrations. Since IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma can act as B cell growth and differentiation factors, our data suggest that the reduced synthesis of these lymphokines may contribute to the deficient immunoglobulin production in patients with CVI. PMID:2515013

  2. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities.

  3. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities. PMID:26617014

  4. Improved Performance of the Interferon Gamma (IFN-gamma) Assay with Alternative Antigens for Stimulation of Whole Blood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) is a zoonotic disease that affects cattle worldwide and has a significant economic impact on the livestock industry. Although the disease has been effectively eliminated in many countries and regions, it is increasingly re...

  5. Bovine Tuberculosis: Effect of the Tuberculin Skin Test on In vitro Interferon gamma Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a disease of zoonotic and economic importance. In many countries, control is based on test and slaughter policies and/or abattoir surveillance. For testing, cell mediated immune- (CMI-) based assays (i.e., Tuberculin skin test (TST) supplemented by the interferon gamma (...

  6. ImuVert activation of natural killer cytotoxicity and interferon gamma production via CD16 triggering.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Rundles, S; Pearson, F C

    1990-01-01

    The effect and mechanism of action of ImuVert, a new biological response modifier consisting of ribosomes and natural membrane vesicles of Serratia marcescens, on endogenous natural killer (NK) cells and activated NK activity has been analyzed. The studies showed that endogenous NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal cell donors was significantly increased (P less than 0.03) against K562, U937, and Molt-4 target cells. PBMC from cord blood of newborn infants lacking NK activity were upregulated (1.5-4 fold over endogenous NK activity) by ImuVert. Other studies showed that the abnormal NK activity of PBMC from patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was significantly augmented in vitro (P less than 0.01) by ImuVert. ImuVert strongly stimulated interferon gamma production and in combination with interleukin 2 produced synergistically enhanced interferon gamma production and greater cytotoxicity than that induced by either alone. Studies on lymphocyte differentiation antigen expression following treatment with ImuVert indicated that ImuVert triggers interferon gamma production through binding the low affinity IgG Fc receptor, type III, CD16. The studies suggest that ImuVert may trigger interferon gamma production by binding to the Fc receptor and that the amplitude of the ensuing reaction and the ability of ImuVert to induce cytotoxicity in a setting where this activity has been down regulated is based on the absence of suppressor activation or direct contra suppressor activity.

  7. Interleukin-4 enhances interferon-gamma synthesis but inhibits development of interferon-gamma-producing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, A; Kemeny, D M

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is antagonistic for many of the activities of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and, as well as suppressing the development of T-helper type-1 (Th1) cells, has been reported to block directly the synthesis of IFN-gamma in human lymphocytes. However, IL-4 transgenic mice produce increased amounts of IFN-gamma as well as IL-4. We have compared the ability of rat IL-4 to regulate IFN-gamma secretion in short-term cultures of spleen cells with its effect on the differentiation of T lymphocytes into IFN-gamma-producing, or Th1-type, cells. Normal rat spleen cells were stimulated using a variety of mitogens and ovalbumin antigen, with or without IL-4, for 12-24 hr and the levels of IFN-gamma in the supernatants measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that when normal rat splenocytes were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or concavalin A (Con A), IL-4 enhanced secretion of IFN-gamma after 12-24 hr. This enhancement was also apparent when splenocytes from animals immunized 10 days previously with alum-precipitated ovalbumin were stimulated with ovalbumin in vitro, and appeared to be mediated primarily via CD+ T cells. In contrast, when spleen cells were maximally stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, addition of IL-4 had no effect on the amount of IFN-gamma secreted. When splenocytes were stimulated with Con A for 4 days in the presence of IL-4, and restimulated with PMA and ionomycin, IFN-gamma secretion was greatly suppressed. Our results indicate that IL-4 exerts differential effects on IFN-gamma secretion and on the development of IFN-gamma-producing lymphocytes. PMID:7558122

  8. Interferon-gamma released by gluten-stimulated celiac disease-specific intestinal T cells enhances the transepithelial flux of gluten peptides.

    PubMed

    Bethune, Michael T; Siegel, Matthew; Howles-Banerji, Samuel; Khosla, Chaitan

    2009-05-01

    Celiac sprue is a T-cell-mediated enteropathy elicited in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary gluten proteins. To initiate and propagate inflammation, proteolytically resistant gluten peptides must be translocated across the small intestinal epithelium and presented to DQ2-restricted T cells, but the effectors enabling this translocation under normal and inflammatory conditions are not well understood. We demonstrate that a fluorescently labeled antigenic 33-mer gluten peptide is translocated intact across a T84 cultured epithelial cell monolayer and that preincubation of the monolayer with media from gluten-stimulated, celiac patient-derived intestinal T cells enhances the apical-to-basolateral flux of this peptide in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The permeability-enhancing activity of activated T-cell media is inhibited by blocking antibodies against either interferon-gamma or its receptor and is recapitulated using recombinant interferon-gamma. At saturating levels of interferon-gamma, activated T-cell media does not further increase transepithelial peptide flux, indicating the primacy of interferon-gamma as an effector of increased epithelial permeability during inflammation. Reducing the assay temperature to 4 degrees C reverses the effect of interferon-gamma but does not reduce basal peptide flux occurring in the absence of interferon-gamma, suggesting active transcellular transport of intact peptides is increased during inflammation. A panel of disease-relevant gluten peptides exhibited an inverse correlation between size and transepithelial flux but no apparent sequence constraints. Anti-interferon-gamma therapy may mitigate the vicious cycle of gluten-induced interferon-gamma secretion and interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of gluten peptide flux but is unlikely to prevent translocation of gluten peptides in the absence of inflammatory conditions.

  9. Varicella-zoster virus-specific, cell-mediated immunity with interferon-gamma release assay after vaccination of college students with no or intermediate IgG antibody response.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kihei; Itoh, Yuri; Fujii, Akihide; Kitagawa, Seiko; Ogita, Satoko; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-02-01

    This study measured Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and antibodies to clarify immune response after vaccination in 68 college students with negative or intermediate IgG antibody status. The enrolled numbers of negative, intermediate, and positive VZV-IgG antibody were 27, 41, and 28 students, respectively. The positive rates of CMI were 3.7% (1/27), 41.5% (17/41), and 96.4% (27/28) before vaccination, respectively. After vaccination, the IgG antibody titers became significantly higher in the intermediate IgG group compared to those in the negative IgG group (P < 0.01), but CMI did not differ significantly between the two groups. Ninety-three percent (38/41) of the intermediate IgG antibody group and 41% (11/27) of the negative IgG antibody group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.0001). When subjects were divided into negative, intermediate, and positive CMI by interferon-gamma values before vaccination, the IgG antibody and interferon-gamma values increased significantly in the positive CMI group compared to the negative CMI group after vaccination (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). All (17/17) of positive CMI group and 61% (27/44) of negative CMI group became positive for the IgG antibody after vaccination (P < 0.01). Ninety-four percent (16/17) of positive CMI group and 59% (28/44) of negative CMI group became positive for CMI after vaccination (P < 0.05). Ninety-six percent (22/23) of the subjects with a history of vaccination became IgG seropositive after a second dose of vaccination, but 22% (5/23) of them remained negative for CMI. CMI is valuable information to identify potential non-responders to vaccination and to predict risk of clinical VZV infection.

  10. MOLECULAR CLONING, SEQUENCING, EXPRESSION AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF GIANT PANDA (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) INTERFERON-GAMMA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Wang, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Bao-Qin; Zhu, Xiao-Fu; Wu, Xu-Jin; Ma, Qing-Yi; Chen, De-Kun

    2012-06-29

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is an endangered species and indigenous to China. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is the only member of type □ IFN and is vital for the regulation of host adapted immunity and inflammatory response. Little is known aboutthe FN-γ gene and its roles in giant panda.In this study, IFN-γ gene of Qinling giant panda was amplified from total blood RNA by RT-CPR, cloned, sequenced and analysed. The open reading frame (ORF) of Qinling giant panda IFN-γ encodes 152 amino acidsand is highly similar to Sichuan giant panda with an identity of 99.3% in cDNA sequence. The IFN-γ cDNA sequence was ligated to the pET32a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 competent cells. Expression of recombinant IFN-γ protein of Qinling giant panda in E. coli was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Biological activity assay indicated that the recombinant IFN-γ protein at the concentration of 4-10 µg/ml activated the giant panda peripheral blood lymphocytes,while at 12 µg/mlinhibited. the activation of the lymphocytes.These findings provide insights into the evolution of giant panda IFN-γ and information regarding amino acid residues essential for their biological activity.

  11. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based-on interferon-gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Wei; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease constituted a long-term menace to public health. According to World Health Organization (WHO), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infected nearly a third of people of the world. There is about one new TB occurrence every second. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with susceptibility to TB, and interferongamma release assays (IGRA) is considered to be the best alternative of tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Although significant progress has been made with regard to the design of enzyme immunoassays for IFN-γ, adopting this assay is still labor-intensive and time-consuming. To alleviate these drawbacks, we used IFN-γ antibody to facilitate the detection of IFN-γ. An experimental verification on the performance of IGRA was done in this research. We developed two biosensor configurations, both of which possess high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid IFN-γ diagnoses. The first is the electrochemical method. The second is a circular polarization interferometry configuration, which incorporates two light beams with p-polarization and s-polarization states individually along a common path, a four photo-detector quadrature configuration to arrive at a phase modulated ellipsometer. With these two methods, interaction between IFN-γ antibody and IFN-γ were explored and presented in detail.

  12. Interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma augment anticolon antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, T; Ohara, M; Watanabe, M; Kanai, T; Takaishi, H; Hayashi, A; Hosoda, Y; Ogata, H; Iwao, Y; Aiso, S

    1993-01-01

    In vitro effects of cytokines and therapeutic drugs on antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by anticolon antibody were investigated in serum samples from patients with ulcerative colitis. A 51Cr release assay was used to examine ADCC activity with the colon cancer cell line, colo 205, as the target and peripheral blood mononuclear cells as the effector. High ADCC activity was shown in 13 of 32 (41%) patients with ulcerative colitis. This ADCC activity was inhibited by protein A treatment of the serum samples. Interleukin 2 (IL2) activated effector cells could enhance ADCC activity, but interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of effector cells. Treatment of target cells with IFN-gamma increased the vulnerability of these cells to ADCC with a large increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on their surface. Monoclonal antibodies to ICAM-1 inhibited this IFN-gamma enhanced ADCC activity. Interestingly, prednisolone (PSL) reduced ADCC activity, but sulphasalazine (SASP) or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) did not. These results suggest that IL2 and IFN-gamma could enhance colonic epithelial cell injury mediated by the ADCC mechanism in ulcerative colitis and that ADCC enhanced by cytokines is restored by PSL treatment. PMID:8100205

  13. Interferon Gamma as a Biomarker of Exposure to Enteric Viruses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was selected as a biomarker for viral exposure. Twelve-week-old BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with Coxsackievirus B3 or B4 diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mice were injected with PBS only. Four months after viral infectio...

  14. Spreading depression transiently disrupts myelin via interferon-gamma signaling.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Aya D; Mitchell, Heidi M; Kunkler, Phillip E; Klauer, Neal; Kraig, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura are clinically correlated and both show imaging changes suggestive of myelin disruption. Furthermore, cortical myelin loss in the cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis enhances susceptibility to spreading depression, the likely underlying cause of migraine with aura. Since multiple sclerosis pathology involves inflammatory T cell lymphocyte production of interferon-gamma and a resulting increase in oxidative stress, we tested the hypothesis that spreading depression disrupts myelin through similar signaling pathways. Rat hippocampal slice cultures were initially used to explore myelin loss in spreading depression, since they contain T cells, and allow for controlled tissue microenvironment. These experiments were then translated to the in vivo condition in neocortex. Spreading depression in slice cultures induced significant loss of myelin integrity and myelin basic protein one day later, with gradual recovery by seven days. Myelin basic protein loss was abrogated by T cell depletion, neutralization of interferon-gamma, and pharmacological inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2. Conversely, one day after exposure to interferon-gamma, significant reductions in spreading depression threshold, increases in oxidative stress, and reduced levels of glutathione, an endogenous neutral sphingomyelinase-2 inhibitor, emerged. Similarly, spreading depression triggered significant T cell accumulation, sphingomyelinase activation, increased oxidative stress, and reduction of gray and white matter myelin in vivo. Myelin disruption is involved in spreading depression, thereby providing pathophysiological links between multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura. Myelin disruption may promote spreading depression by enhancing aberrant excitability. Thus, preservation of myelin integrity may provide novel therapeutic targets for migraine with aura.

  15. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 links the steroid and interferon gamma response pathways.

    PubMed

    Tzortzakaki, Eleni; Spilianakis, Charalambos; Zika, Eleni; Kretsovali, Androniki; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    We show here that steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) is a coactivator of MHC class II genes that stimulates their interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated expression. SRC-1 interacts physically with the N-terminal activation domain of CIITA through two regions: one central [extending from amino acids (aa) 360-839] that contains the nuclear receptors binding region and one C-terminal (aa 1138-1441) that contains the activation domain 2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that SRC-1 recruitment on the class II promoter is enhanced upon IFNgamma stimulation. Most importantly, SRC-1 relieves the inhibitory action of estrogens on the IFNgamma-mediated induction of class II genes in transient transfection assays. We provide evidence that inhibition by estradiol is due to multiple events such as slightly reduced recruitment of CIITA and SRC-1 and severely inhibited assembly of the preinitiation complex.

  16. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 links the steroid and interferon gamma response pathways.

    PubMed

    Tzortzakaki, Eleni; Spilianakis, Charalambos; Zika, Eleni; Kretsovali, Androniki; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    We show here that steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) is a coactivator of MHC class II genes that stimulates their interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated expression. SRC-1 interacts physically with the N-terminal activation domain of CIITA through two regions: one central [extending from amino acids (aa) 360-839] that contains the nuclear receptors binding region and one C-terminal (aa 1138-1441) that contains the activation domain 2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that SRC-1 recruitment on the class II promoter is enhanced upon IFNgamma stimulation. Most importantly, SRC-1 relieves the inhibitory action of estrogens on the IFNgamma-mediated induction of class II genes in transient transfection assays. We provide evidence that inhibition by estradiol is due to multiple events such as slightly reduced recruitment of CIITA and SRC-1 and severely inhibited assembly of the preinitiation complex. PMID:12933903

  17. Effect of flight in mission SL-3 on interferon-gamma production by rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.; Williams, J. A.; Mandel, A. D.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    Rats flown in Space Shuttle mission SL-3 were sacrificed after flight and spleens were removed. Cultures of spleen cells were challenged with the mitogen concanavalin-A to attempt to induce interferon-gamma. Most control, ground-based rats had spleen cells that produced moderate titers of interferon-gamma. Spleen cells from flown rats did not produce interferon-gamma in most cases, and one flown rat produced minimally detectable amounts of interferon. These data suggest that interferon-gamma production was inhibited in rats flown in mission SL-3 immediately upon return to earth.

  18. Spreading Depression Transiently Disrupts Myelin via Interferon-gamma Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pusic, Aya D.; Mitchell, Heidi M.; Kunkler, Phillip E.; Klauer, Neal; Kraig, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura are clinically correlated and both show imaging changes suggestive of myelin disruption. Furthermore, cortical myelin loss in the cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis enhances susceptibility to spreading depression, the likely underlying cause of migraine with aura. Since multiple sclerosis pathology involves inflammatory T cell lymphocyte production of interferon-gamma and a resulting increase in oxidative stress, we tested the hypothesis that spreading depression disrupts myelin through similar signaling pathways. Rat hippocampal slice cultures were initially used to explore myelin loss in spreading depression, since they contain T cells, and allow for controlled tissue microenvironment. These experiments were then translated to the in vivo condition in neocortex. Spreading depression in slice cultures induced significant loss of myelin integrity and myelin basic protein one day later, with gradual recovery by seven days. Myelin basic protein loss was abrogated by T cell depletion, neutralization of interferon-gamma, and pharmacological inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase-2. Conversely, one day after exposure to interferon-gamma, significant reductions in spreading depression threshold, increases in oxidative stress, and reduced levels of glutathione, an endogenous neutral sphingomyelinase-2 inhibitor, emerged. Similarly, spreading depression triggered significant T cell accumulation, sphingomyelinase activation, increased oxidative stress, and reduction of grey and white matter myelin in vivo. Myelin disruption is involved in spreading depression, thereby providing pathophysiological links between multiple sclerosis and migraine with aura. Myelin disruption may promote spreading depression by enhancing aberrant excitability. Thus, preservation of myelin integrity may provide novel therapeutic targets for migraine with aura. PMID:25500111

  19. Interferon Gamma Assay for the Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contact Irene Schiller Prionics AG Wagistrasse 27A CH-8952 Schlieren Switzerland irene.schiller@prionics.com Introduction Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a zoonotic disease with a major economic impact, continues to be a significant problem with a global perspective and increasing prevalence in vario...

  20. Computer simulations of human interferon gamma mutated forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilkova, E.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Petkov, P.; Markov, S.; Ilieva, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the general framework of the computer-aided drug design, the method of molecular-dynamics simulations is applied for investigation of the human interferon-gamma (hIFN-γ) binding to its two known ligands (its extracellular receptor and the heparin-derived oligosaccharides). A study of 100 mutated hIFN-γ forms is presented, the mutations encompassing residues 86-88. The structural changes are investigated by comparing the lengths of the α-helices, in which these residues are included, in the native hIFN-γ molecule and in the mutated forms. The most intriguing cases are examined in detail.

  1. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture.

  2. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture. PMID:26412530

  3. Use of Piezoelectric Immunosensors for Detection of Interferon-Gamma Interaction with Specific Antibodies in the Presence of Released-Active Forms of Antibodies to Interferon-Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Don, Elena; Farafonova, Olga; Pokhil, Suzanna; Barykina, Darya; Nikiforova, Marina; Shulga, Darya; Borshcheva, Alena; Tarasov, Sergey; Ermolaeva, Tatyana; Epstein, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    In preliminary ELISA studies where released-active forms (RAF) of antibodies (Abs) to interferon-gamma (IFNg) were added to the antigen-antibody system, a statistically significant difference in absorbance signals obtained in their presence in comparison to placebo was observed. A piezoelectric immunosensor assay was developed to support these data and investigate the effects of RAF Abs to IFNg on the specific interaction between Abs to IFNg and IFNg. The experimental conditions were designed and optimal electrode coating, detection circumstances and suitable chaotropic agents for electrode regeneration were selected. The developed technique was found to provide high repeatability, intermediate precision and specificity. The difference between the analytical signals of RAF Ab samples and those of the placebo was up to 50.8%, whereas the difference between non-specific controls and the placebo was within 5%–6%. Thus, the piezoelectric immunosensor as well as ELISA has the potential to be used for detecting the effects of RAF Abs to IFNg on the antigen-antibody interaction, which might be the result of RAF’s ability to modify the affinity of IFNg to specific/related Abs. PMID:26791304

  4. Use of Piezoelectric Immunosensors for Detection of Interferon-Gamma Interaction with Specific Antibodies in the Presence of Released-Active Forms of Antibodies to Interferon-Gamma.

    PubMed

    Don, Elena; Farafonova, Olga; Pokhil, Suzanna; Barykina, Darya; Nikiforova, Marina; Shulga, Darya; Borshcheva, Alena; Tarasov, Sergey; Ermolaeva, Tatyana; Epstein, Oleg

    2016-01-20

    In preliminary ELISA studies where released-active forms (RAF) of antibodies (Abs) to interferon-gamma (IFNg) were added to the antigen-antibody system, a statistically significant difference in absorbance signals obtained in their presence in comparison to placebo was observed. A piezoelectric immunosensor assay was developed to support these data and investigate the effects of RAF Abs to IFNg on the specific interaction between Abs to IFNg and IFNg. The experimental conditions were designed and optimal electrode coating, detection circumstances and suitable chaotropic agents for electrode regeneration were selected. The developed technique was found to provide high repeatability, intermediate precision and specificity. The difference between the analytical signals of RAF Ab samples and those of the placebo was up to 50.8%, whereas the difference between non-specific controls and the placebo was within 5%-6%. Thus, the piezoelectric immunosensor as well as ELISA has the potential to be used for detecting the effects of RAF Abs to IFNg on the antigen-antibody interaction, which might be the result of RAF's ability to modify the affinity of IFNg to specific/related Abs.

  5. Use of Piezoelectric Immunosensors for Detection of Interferon-Gamma Interaction with Specific Antibodies in the Presence of Released-Active Forms of Antibodies to Interferon-Gamma.

    PubMed

    Don, Elena; Farafonova, Olga; Pokhil, Suzanna; Barykina, Darya; Nikiforova, Marina; Shulga, Darya; Borshcheva, Alena; Tarasov, Sergey; Ermolaeva, Tatyana; Epstein, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    In preliminary ELISA studies where released-active forms (RAF) of antibodies (Abs) to interferon-gamma (IFNg) were added to the antigen-antibody system, a statistically significant difference in absorbance signals obtained in their presence in comparison to placebo was observed. A piezoelectric immunosensor assay was developed to support these data and investigate the effects of RAF Abs to IFNg on the specific interaction between Abs to IFNg and IFNg. The experimental conditions were designed and optimal electrode coating, detection circumstances and suitable chaotropic agents for electrode regeneration were selected. The developed technique was found to provide high repeatability, intermediate precision and specificity. The difference between the analytical signals of RAF Ab samples and those of the placebo was up to 50.8%, whereas the difference between non-specific controls and the placebo was within 5%-6%. Thus, the piezoelectric immunosensor as well as ELISA has the potential to be used for detecting the effects of RAF Abs to IFNg on the antigen-antibody interaction, which might be the result of RAF's ability to modify the affinity of IFNg to specific/related Abs. PMID:26791304

  6. Inhibited interferon-gamma but normal interleukin-3 production from rats flown on the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Gould, C L; Lyte, M; Williams, J; Mandel, A D; Sonnenfeld, G

    1987-10-01

    Rats were flown on Space Shuttle SL-3 for 1 week. When spleen cells were removed from these rats and challenged with concanavalin-A, interferon-gamma production was severely inhibited, while interleukin-3 production was unaffected compared to ground-based control rats. These data indicate that there is a defect in interferon-gamma production in rats that have been exposed to spaceflight. This defect could contribute to, and be one reason for, immunosuppression observed after spaceflight.

  7. Inhibited interferon-gamma but normal interleukin-3 production from rats flown on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Cheryl L.; Lyte, Mark; Williams, Joann; Mandel, Adrian D.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Rats were flown on Space Shuttle SL-3 for one week. When spleen cells were removed from these rats and challenged with concanavalin-A, interferon-gamma production was severely inhibited, while interleukin-3 production was unaffected compared to ground-based control rats. These data indicate that there is a defect in interferon-gamma production in rats that have been exposed to spaceflight. This defect could contribute to, and be one reason for, immunosuppression observed after spaceflight.

  8. Interferon-Gamma Directly Mediates Developmental Biliary Defects

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shuang; EauClaire, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common identifiable hepatobiliary disease affecting infants, in which there are defects in intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts and progressive fibrosis. Activation of interferon-gamma (IFNγ) appears to be critical in both patients with BA and in rodent models of BA. We have recently reported a zebrafish model of biliary disease that shares features with BA, in which inhibition of DNA methylation leads to intrahepatic biliary defects and activation of IFNγ target genes. Here we report that ifng genes are hypomethylated and upregulated in zebrafish larvae treated with azacytidine (azaC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation. Injection of IFNγ protein into developing zebrafish larvae leads to biliary defects, suggesting that activation of the IFNγ pathway is sufficient to cause developmental biliary defects. These defects are associated with decreased cholangiocyte proliferation and with a decrease in the expression of vhnf1 (hnf1b, tcf2), which encodes a homeodomain protein with previously reported roles in biliary development in multiple models. These results support an importance of IFNγ in mediating biliary defects, and also demonstrate the feasibility of direct injection of intact protein into developing zebrafish larvae. PMID:23448251

  9. Interferon gamma induces retrograde dendritic retraction and inhibits synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Jung; Beck, Hiroko Nagasawa; Lein, Pamela J; Higgins, Dennis

    2002-06-01

    The expression of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) increases after neural injury, and it is sustained in chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. To understand how exposure to this proinflammatory cytokine might affect neural function, we examined its effects on cultures of neurons derived from the central and peripheral nervous systems. IFNgamma inhibits initial dendritic outgrowth in cultures of embryonic rat sympathetic and hippocampal neurons, and this inhibitory effect on process growth is associated with a decrease in the rate of synapse formation. In addition, in older cultures of sympathetic neurons, IFNgamma also selectively induces retraction of existing dendrites, ultimately leading to an 88% decrease in the size of the arbor. Dendritic retraction induced by IFNgamma represents a specific cellular response because it occurs without affecting axonal outgrowth or cell survival, and it is not observed with tumor necrosis factor alpha or other inflammatory cytokines. IFNgamma-induced dendritic retraction is associated with the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), and expression of a dominant-negative STAT1 construct attenuates the inhibitory effect of IFNgamma. Moreover, retrograde dendritic retraction is observed when distal axons are selectively exposed to IFNgamma. These data imply that IFNgamma-mediated STAT1 activation induces both dendritic atrophy and synaptic loss and that this occurs both at the sites of IFNgamma release and at remote loci. Regressive actions of IFNgamma on dendrites may contribute to the neuropathology of inflammatory diseases.

  10. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  11. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  12. Clinical factors influencing phenotype of HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells and HCMV-induced interferon-gamma production after allogeneic stem cells transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gayoso, Inmaculada; Cantisán, Sara; Cerrato, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Joaquín; Martin, Carmen; Solana, Rafael; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Torre-Cisneros, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In this work, we characterized the phenotype and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) production of HCMV-specific T cells using QuantiFERON-HCMV assay in 26 patients 6 months after HSCT. We analysed whether these two parameters were associated with clinical variables. Our results showed that the patients receiving stem cells from donors ≥40 years old were 12 times more likely to have HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells with "differentiated phenotype" (CD45RA+CCR7+ ≤6.7% and CD28+ ≤30%) than patients grafted from donors <40 years old (OR = 12; P = 0.014). In addition, a detectable IFN-γ production in response to HCMV peptides (cutoff 0.2 IU/mL IFN-γ; "reactive" QuantiFERON-HCMV test) was statistically associated with HCMV replication after transplantation (OR = 11; P = 0.026), recipients ≥40 versus <40 years old (OR = 11; P = 0.026), and the use of peripheral blood versus bone marrow as stem cell source (OR = 17.5; P = 0.024). In conclusion, donor age is the only factor significantly associated with the presence of the "differentiated phenotype" in HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, whereas HCMV replication after transplantation, recipient age, and stem cell source are the factors associated with the production of IFN-γ in response to HCMV epitopes.

  13. Increased expression of the inflammatory chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 9/monokine induced by interferon-gamma in lymphoid tissues of rhesus macaques during simian immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Todd A; Fallert, Beth A; Pfeifer, Melanie E; Sanghavi, Sonali; Capuano, Saverio; Rajakumar, Premeela; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Day, Richard; Fuller, Craig L; Schaefer, Todd M

    2002-05-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell trafficking during immune inductive and effector activities, and dysregulation of their expression might contribute to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and the related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). To understand better the effects of SIV infection on lymphoid tissues in rhesus macaques, we examined chemokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns by using DNA filter array hybridization. Of the 34 chemokines examined, the interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible chemokine CXC chemokine ligand 9/monokine induced by interferon-gamma (CXCL9/Mig) was one of the most highly up-regulated chemokines in rhesus macaque spleen tissue early after infection with pathogenic SIV. The relative levels of expression of CXCL9/Mig mRNA in spleen and lymph nodes were significantly increased after infection with SIV in both quantitative image capture and analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, in situ hybridization for CXCL9/Mig mRNA revealed that the patterns of expression were altered after SIV infection. Associated with the increased expression of CXCL9/Mig were increased numbers of IFN-gamma mRNA-positive cells in tissues and reduced percentages of CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR) 3(+)/CD3(+) and CXCR3(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes in peripheral blood. We propose that SIV replication in vivo initiates IFN-gamma-driven positive-feedback loops in lymphoid tissues that disrupt the trafficking of effector T lymphocytes and lead to chronic local inflammation, thereby contributing to immunopathogenesis.

  14. IL-4 and interferon-gamma production in children with atopic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M; Kemp, A; Varigos, G

    1993-01-01

    In vitro studies have implicated reciprocal roles for IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the regulation of IgE production. As elevated IgE is a major feature of atopic disease, an important question is whether an imbalance of IL-4 and IFN-gamma is present in vivo. The production of IL-4 and IFN-gamma in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from atopic children was examined to determine if there is an increased production of IL-4 and/or a reduced production of IFN-gamma. Highly atopic children with IgE > 600 U/ml produced significantly more IL-4 and less IFN-gamma in vitro than age-matched non-atopic controls. Production of IL-4 and IFN-gamma in mildly atopic children was equivalent to controls. These findings indicate that highly atopic children have an imbalance of IL-4 and IFN-gamma production and that the degree of imbalance relates to severity of the atopic state. The ratio of in vitro IL-4: IFN-gamma production correlated positively with serum IgE, which suggests that the balance of these two cytokines is a factor in the regulation of IgE, in vivo. It remains to be determined whether this imbalance of IL-4 and IFN-gamma in the highly atopic children is the cause or result of the disease process. PMID:8467557

  15. Retinyl Palmitate Supplementation Modulates T-bet and Interferon Gamma Gene Expression in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh Honarvar, Niyaz; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Abdolahi, Mina; Abedi, Elahe; Bitarafan, Sama; Koohdani, Fariba; Siassi, Feridoun; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Chahardoli, Reza; Zareei, Mahnaz; Salehi, Eisa; Geranmehr, Maziyar; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin A derivatives such as retinoic acid may improve the impaired balance of CD4+ T cells in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. This study is a double-blind randomized trial to evaluate the effect of vitamin A (as form of retinyl palmitate) supplementation on multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to two groups. Both groups were followed for 6 months. The experimental group received 25,000 IU of retinyl palmitate daily, while the control group received a placebo. Before and after the study, the expression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and T-bet genes was evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients by RT-PCR. The results showed that after 6 months of supplementation, expression of IFN-γ and T-bet was significantly decreased. These data suggest that retinyl palmitate supplementation can modulate the impaired balance of Th1 and Th2 cells and vitamin A products that may be involved in the therapeutic mechanism of vitamin A in MS patients. This study provides information regarding the decreased gene expression of IFN-γ and T-bet in MS by retinyl palmitate supplementation. PMID:27122150

  16. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Taj Ali; Mazhar, Humaira; Saleha, Shamim; Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  17. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  18. Tumor immunization. Improved results after vaccine modified with recombinant interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Lieberman, M D; Reynolds, J V; Williams, N; Ziegler, M M; Daly, J M

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a 3-day in vitro culture of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 with 500 U/mL of recombinant interferon gamma resulted in a protective crossreactivity to parent C1300. Twenty A/J mice received either a vaccine of 1 x 10(6) irradiated C1300 tumor cells intradermally or an equivalent inoculum of C1300 that had been incubated in recombinant interferon gamma (C1300*). One week later, all animals were rechallenged with 1 x 10(6) viable C1300. Animals immunized with C1300* had a significantly delayed early tumor incidence that translated into a survival advantage for the group. At the time of tumor rechallenge, a significantly increased level of nonspecific systemic immunity was conferred by the C1300* immunization. Thus, modification of tumor with recombinant interferon gamma before introduction as a vaccine may improve that vaccine's protective capability.

  19. Human chromosomes 6 and 21 are required for sensitivity to human interferon. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, V.; Rashidbaigi, A.; Jones, C.; Tischfield, J.A.; Shows, T.B.; Pestka, S.

    1987-06-01

    The human interferon ..gamma.. receptor has previously been assigned to chromosome 6. Chromosome 6 also encodes HLA, the human class I major histocompatibility antigens. However, the presence of chromosome 6 in hamster-human hybrids is by itself insufficient to confer sensitivity to human immune interferon as measured by the induction of human HLA. Human chromosome 21 was found to be the second chromosome essential for HLA inducibility. Similar results were found with mouse-human somatic cell hybrids. Thus, at least two steps are involved in the action of human interferon ..gamma..: the binding of interferon ..gamma.. to its receptor coded by chromosome 6 and the linkage of this binding event through a factor coded by chromosome 21 to trigger biological action. Both of these steps are species-specific.

  20. Interleukin-28B polymorphisms and interferon gamma inducible protein-10 serum levels in seronegative occult hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Carreño, Vicente

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphisms upstream interleukin (IL)-28B gene and serum levels of interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) are associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance. Patients with seronegative occult HCV infection are anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA negative but have viral RNA in liver and abnormal values of liver enzymes. We examined if the rs12979860 polymorphism of IL-28B and serum IP-10 levels differ between chronic and seronegative occult CV infection. IL-28B polymorphism was determined with allele specific TaqMan probes in total DNA isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and IP-10 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum from 99 patients with seronegative occult HCV infection and 130 untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C. IL-28B genotypes were also determined in 54 healthy volunteers. Prevalence of the IL-28B CC genotype was significantly higher in seronegative occult HCV infection (52/99; 52.5%) than in chronic hepatitis C (32/130; 24.6%, P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (19/54: 32.5%, P = 0.039). Among patients with seronegative occult HCV infection, HCV-RNA load in liver was significantly lower in those with the IL-28B CC genotype than in those with CT + TT genotypes (2.8 × 10(5)  ± 5.8 × 10(4) vs. 4.1 × 10(5)  ± 5.9 × 10(4)  copies/μg of total RNA respectively; P = 0.023). Mean serum IP-10 levels were significantly lower in patients with seronegative occult HCV infection than in patients with chronic hepatitis C (160.8 ± 17.9 vs. 288.7 ± 13.3 pg/ml respectively; P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the host immune response plays an important role in seronegative occult HCV infection in comparison with chronic hepatitis C.

  1. Challenges in the development of an immunochromatographic interferon-gamma test for diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Claudia M; Kalantri, Yatiraj; Schumacher, Samuel G; Michael, Joy S; Shankar, Deepa; Saxena, Arvind; Sriram, Natarajan; Balamugesh, Thangakunam; Luo, Robert; Pollock, Nira R; Pai, Madhukar; Christopher, Devasahayam J

    2013-01-01

    Existing diagnostic tests for pleural tuberculosis (TB) have inadequate accuracy and/or turnaround time. Interferon-gamma (IFNg) has been identified in many studies as a biomarker for pleural TB. Our objective was to develop a lateral flow, immunochromatographic test (ICT) based on this biomarker and to evaluate the test in a clinical cohort. Because IFNg is commonly present in non-TB pleural effusions in low amounts, a diagnostic IFNg-threshold was first defined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for IFNg in samples from 38 patients with a confirmed clinical diagnosis (cut-off of 300 pg/ml; 94% sensitivity and 93% specificity). The ICT was then designed; however, its achievable limit of detection (5000 pg/ml) was over 10-fold higher than that of the ELISA. After several iterations in development, the prototype ICT assay for IFNg had a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval (CI): 50-83) and a specificity of 94% (95% CI: 81-99%) compared to ELISA on frozen samples. Evaluation of the prototype in a prospective clinical cohort (72 patients) on fresh pleural fluid samples, in comparison to a composite reference standard (including histopathological and microbiologic test results), showed that the prototype had 65% sensitivity (95% CI: 44-83) and 89% specificity (95% CI: 74-97). Discordant results were observed in 15% of samples if testing was repeated after one freezing and thawing step. Inter-rater variability was limited (3%; 1 out of 32). In conclusion, despite an iterative development and optimization process, the performance of the IFNg ICT remained lower than what could be expected from the published literature on IFNg as a biomarker in pleural fluid. Further improvements in the limit of detection of an ICT for IFNg, and possibly combination of IFNg with other biomarkers such as adenosine deaminase, are necessary for such a test to be of value in the evaluation of pleural tuberculosis. PMID:24376880

  2. Effects of chicken interferon Gamma on Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFN') during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFN' wit...

  3. INTERFERON-GAMMA STIMULATING ACTIVITIES OF THE FRACTIONATED NEOSPORA CANINUM TACHYZOITE LYSATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, causing bovine abortion worldwide. Our recent research showed that N. caninum tachyzoite lysate elicits production of the T cell cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-g) by both bovine and murine T cells, which may be critical to host protec...

  4. Clinical Factors Influencing Phenotype of HCMV-Specific CD8+ T Cells and HCMV-Induced Interferon-Gamma Production after Allogeneic Stem Cells Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cantisán, Sara; Cerrato, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Joaquín; Martin, Carmen; Solana, Rafael; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Torre-Cisneros, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In this work, we characterized the phenotype and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) production of HCMV-specific T cells using QuantiFERON-HCMV assay in 26 patients 6 months after HSCT. We analysed whether these two parameters were associated with clinical variables. Our results showed that the patients receiving stem cells from donors ≥40 years old were 12 times more likely to have HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells with “differentiated phenotype” (CD45RA+CCR7+ ≤6.7% and CD28+ ≤30%) than patients grafted from donors <40 years old (OR = 12; P = 0.014). In addition, a detectable IFN-γ production in response to HCMV peptides (cutoff 0.2 IU/mL IFN-γ; “reactive” QuantiFERON-HCMV test) was statistically associated with HCMV replication after transplantation (OR = 11; P = 0.026), recipients ≥40 versus <40 years old (OR = 11; P = 0.026), and the use of peripheral blood versus bone marrow as stem cell source (OR = 17.5; P = 0.024). In conclusion, donor age is the only factor significantly associated with the presence of the “differentiated phenotype” in HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, whereas HCMV replication after transplantation, recipient age, and stem cell source are the factors associated with the production of IFN-γ in response to HCMV epitopes. PMID:23424600

  5. Evaluation of the interferon-γ assay on blood collected at exsanguination of cattle under field conditions for surveillance of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Okafor, C C; Grooms, D L; Bolin, S R; Averill, J J; Kaneene, J B

    2014-12-01

    Development of point of concentration (POC) surveillance strategies for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) would facilitate global efforts to eradicate bTB. The interferon-gamma (IFNγ) assay can detect IFNγ responses to Mycobacterium bovis in blood collected at commencement of exsanguination (COE) of experimentally challenged cattle but has not been evaluated under field conditions. The current study was aimed at determining (i) whether blood collected at COE of cattle at slaughter, under field conditions, is practical to obtain and useful for identifying cattle as IFNγ positive for bTB, (ii) whether the results of the IFNγ assay obtained at COE reliably compare with results obtained from live animals in the field, and (iii) whether the identified animal(s) originated from bTB-infected or bTB-exposed herds. Cattle from three risk groups were used: the highest risk group consisted of 49 cattle from 3 bTB-infected herds; the medium risk group consisted of 24 cattle from a potentially exposed herd; and the lowest risk group consisted of 60 cattle from herds with no known history of bTB exposure. The IFNγ assay was performed on blood collected both before stunning and at COE of cattle at slaughter. An enhanced slaughter inspection for gross lesions consistent with bTB was performed on all cattle. In addition, lymph nodes were cultured for M. bovis for cattle that tested positive for bTB via the IFNγ assay and for most cattle that tested negative for bTB. Cattle, both with and without lesions consistent with bTB, were identified as positive for bTB by the IFNγ assay using blood collected at COE, but none of the positive cattle originated from the lowest risk group. The current study demonstrates that blood collected at COE of cattle is both a practical and moderately reliable sample for accessing bTB infection using the IFNγ assay.

  6. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7500 - Whole blood hemoglobin assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Whole blood hemoglobin assays. 864.7500 Section... blood hemoglobin assays. (a) Identification. A whole blood hemoglobin assay is a device consisting or... hemoglobin content of whole blood for the detection of anemia. This generic device category does not...

  11. Autocrine secretion of interferon gamma negatively regulates homing of immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Flaishon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Lantner, F; Lider, O; Alon, R; Levo, Y; Flavell, R A; Shachar, I

    2000-11-01

    The mechanism by which immature B cells are sequestered from encountering foreign antigens present in lymph nodes or sites of inflammation, before their final maturation in the spleen, has not been elucidated. We show here that immature B cells fail to home to the lymph nodes. These cells can actively exclude themselves from antigen-enriched sites by downregulating their integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin. This inhibition is mediated by interferon gamma secretion. Perturbation of interferon gamma activity in vivo leads to the homing of immature B cells to the lymph nodes. This is the first example of autocrine regulation of immune cell migration to sites of foreign antigen presentation. PMID:11067886

  12. Salivary Interferon Gamma and Interleukin-4 Levels in Patients Suffering from Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Hossein; Robati, Maryam; Yousefimanesh, Hojatollah; Ghafourian Boroujerdnia, Mehri; Nadripour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease. Immunological factor may act as etiological factor. The cellular immune cells such as T cells are impor- tant in pathogenesis. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) are secreted by T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the cor- relation between salivary levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 with OLP. Materials and Methods This case control study included sixty three Iranian OLP patients who were selected from the Department of Oral Medicine of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences from January to July 2013. An equal number of healthy volunteers were also selected as a control group. The OLP patients were then divided into two follow- ing sub-groups: reticular (n=30) and erythematous/ulcerative (n=33). All patients had no systemic disease and received no medication. IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in whole unstimulated saliva (WUS) were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Data analysis was done using t test, ANOVA, least significant difference (LSD) test, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Reticular OLP patients showed higher salivary IFN-γ (7.74 ± 0.09 pg/ml ) and IL-4 (3.876 ± 0.05 pg/ml) levels compared with the control group, indicating that difference was significant. Salivary IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio significantly increased compared with control group (P=0.042). Salivary IFN-γ and IL-4 levels between sub-groups (re- ticular and erythematous/ulcerative) were not significantly different (2.6 ± 0.06 and 2.3 ± 0.05, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusion Salivary IFN-γ and IL-4 levels were increased in OLP patients. An increase of salivary IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in OLP patients showed that Th1 might have a dominant role in the OLP pathogenesis. PMID:26464828

  13. Natural cytotoxic activity in multiple sclerosis patients: defects in IL-2/interferon gamma-regulatory circuit.

    PubMed

    Braakman, E; van Tunen, A; Meager, A; Lucas, C J

    1986-11-01

    In order to determine the factors underlying the impaired natural cytotoxic (NC) activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, we have analysed the interleukin 2 (IL-2)-interferon gamma-(IFN gamma)-NC activity regulatory circuit in 40 MS patients and 40 matched healthy controls. Exogenous recombinant IFN gamma (rIFN gamma) enhanced NC activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) derived from MS patients and controls equally well. In contrast, PBL from MS patients showed a significantly lower increase of NC activity in response to IL-2 than healthy controls. This defect in responsiveness was independent of the dose of IL-2. Even at the highest dose of rIL-2 (1000 U/ml), MS patients showed a decreased response. PBL from MS patients required a 2 to 10 times higher dose of IL-2 to reach NC activity levels comparable to controls. In healthy individuals IL-2 can act upon both Fc gamma R+ and Fc gamma R- NC precursor cells. The decreased responsiveness to IL-2 is not confined to one subpopulation of IL-2-responsive precursor cells because depletion of Fc gamma R+ cells before culture in the presence of IL-2 revealed no significant differences in the contribution of Fc gamma R+ precursor cells to the IL-2 enhanced NC activity between MS patients and controls. Also the number of IL-2-responsive precursor cells appeared to be normal since the number of Fc gamma R+ cells in MS patients and controls was comparable. PBL from MS patients produced significantly lower amounts of IFN gamma upon stimulation with IL-2. Analysis of the different parameters of the regulatory circuit at the population level showed, both for patients and controls, a significant correlation between IFN gamma production and increase of NC activity induced by IL-2. Also the endogenous NC activity and IFN gamma production, both in patients and controls, were correlated. At the individual level, defects in NC activity could not be linked to another parameter of the regulatory circuit.

  14. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  19. Interferon-gamma Genetic Polymorphism and Expression in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Yu, Hong-Ren; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Huang, Fu-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. IFNG gene encoding interferon (IFN)-γ, produced by natural killer cells and T cells, has been suggested to play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of Kawasaki disease. The aim of this study was to examin the correlation of gene polymorphisms of the IFNG gene and plasma levels of IFN-γ in KD patients and their outcomes. A total of 950 subjects (381 KD and 569 controls) were recruited. Three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2069718, rs1861493, rs2069705) were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL), coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. Plasma IFN-γ levels were also measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Polymorphisms of the IFNG gene were significantly different between the normal controls and KD patients. The G allele of rs1861493 conferred a better response to IVIG treatment in KD patients. AA allele frequencies of rs1861493 were also associated with a significantly higher risk of CAA in KD patients. Furthermore, the plasma IFN-γ level was lower in the AA allele than in the GG allele of rs1861493 both before and after IVIG treatment in KD patients. This study provides the first evidence supporting an association between IFNG gene polymorphisms, susceptibility of KD, IVIG responsiveness, and plasma IFN-γ levels in KD patients. PMID:27124053

  20. Circulating Interferon-Gamma Levels Are Associated with Low Body Weight in Newly Diagnosed Kenyan Non-Substance Using Tuberculosis Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shaviya, Nathan; Budambula, Valentine; Webale, Mark K.; Were, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Although interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and adiponectin are key immunopathogenesis mediators of tuberculosis, their association with clinical manifestations of early stage disease is inconclusive. We determined interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and adiponectin levels in clinically and phenotypically well-characterised non-substance using new pulmonary tuberculosis patients (n = 13) and controls (n = 14) from Kenya. Interferon-gamma levels (P < 0.0001) and interferon-gamma to interleukin-10 (P < 0.001) and interferon-gamma to adiponectin (P = 0.027) ratios were elevated in tuberculosis cases. Correlation analyses in tuberculosis cases showed associations of interferon-gamma levels with body weight (ρ = −0.849; P < 0.0001), body mass index (ρ = 0.664; P = 0.013), hip girth (ρ = −0.579; P = 0.038), and plateletcrit (ρ = 0.605; P = 0.028); interferon-gamma to interleukin-10 ratio with diastolic pressure (ρ = −0.729; P = 0.005); and interferon-gamma to adiponectin ratio with body weight (ρ = −0.560; P = 0.047), body mass index (ρ = −0.604; P = 0.029), and plateletcrit (ρ = 0.793; P = 0.001). Taken together, our results suggest mild-inflammation in early stage infection characterised by upregulation of circulating interferon-gamma production in newly infected TB patients. PMID:26880909

  1. Interferon-Gamma and Interlukin-4 Patterns in BALB/c Mice Suffering From Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Treated With Cantharidin

    PubMed Central

    Maroufi, Yahya; Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh; Dalimi, Abdolhosein; Sharifi, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a health problem in the world. Lesions should be treated on cosmetically or functionally important sites, such as the face and hands. Cantharidin is a terpenoid compound produced naturally by beetles of Meloidae and Oedemeridae families. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the effect of cantharidin on Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) lesions and IFN-γ and IL-4 patterns in infected BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: Infected BALB/c mice were divided into five groups as: untreated (control group), eucerin-treated and 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.5% cantharidin-treated. Lesions diameter was measured by Vernier caliper every three days for four weeks. Cytokines levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using U-CyTech kit. Results: The results indicated that treatment with cantharidin exacerbates lesions compared with the controls, except for 0.05% cantharidin dose that restrained lesion growth significantly. Interferon gamma level in cantharidin-treated groups was significantly less than that of the control group. But interlukin-4 level was similar among the groups. Conclusions: The current study results indicated that high doses of cantharidin exacerbates leishmaniasis lesion, but low dose of cantharidin inhibits lesion growth. PMID:25371808

  2. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of interferon gamma in response to natural Chlamydia infection in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Marina; Pavasovic, Ana; Prentis, Peter J; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-09-25

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a key Th1 cytokine, with a principal role in the immune response against intracellular organisms such as Chlamydia. Along with being responsible for significant morbidity in human populations, Chlamydia is also responsible for wide spread infection and disease in many animal hosts, with reports that many Australian koala subpopulations are endemically infected. An understanding of the role played by IFNγ in koala chlamydial diseases is important for the establishment of better prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against chlamydial infection in this host. A limited number of IFNγ sequences have been published from marsupials and no immune reagents to measure expression have been developed. Through preliminary analysis of the koala transcriptome, we have identified the full coding sequence of the koala IFNγ gene. Transcripts were identified in spleen and lymph node tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that koala IFNγ is closely related to other marsupial IFNγ sequences and more distantly related to eutherian mammals. To begin to characterise the role of this important cytokine in the koala's response to chlamydial infection, we developed a quantitative real time PCR assay and applied it to a small cohort of koalas with and without active chlamydial disease, revealing significant differences in expression patterns between the groups. Description of the IFNγ sequence from the koala will not only assist in understanding this species' response to its most important pathogen but will also provide further insight into the evolution of the marsupial immune system.

  3. Interferon-gamma but not TNF alpha promotes neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of murine adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, Galaxy; Goldshmit, Yona; Turnley, Ann M

    2004-05-01

    Neural trauma, such as traumatic brain injury or stroke, results in a vigorous inflammatory response at and near the site of injury, with cytokine production by endogenous glial cells and invading immune cells. Little is known of the effect that these cytokines have on neural stem cell function. Here we examine the effects of two inflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), on adult neural stem cells. Neural stem cells grown in the presence of either cytokine failed to generate neurospheres. Cytotoxicity assays showed that TNF alpha but not IFN gamma was toxic to the neural stem cells under proliferative conditions. Under differentiating conditions, neither cytokine was toxic; however, IFN gamma enhanced neuronal differentiation, rapidly increasing beta III-tubulin positive cell numbers 3-4 fold and inhibiting astrocyte generation. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth and the number of neurites per neuron was enhanced in cells differentiated in the presence of IFN gamma. Therefore, both inflammatory cytokines examined have substantial, but different effects on neural stem cell function and suggests that regulation of the inflammatory environment following brain injury may influence the ability of neural stem cells to repair the damage. PMID:15081598

  4. Negative transcriptional regulation of the interferon-gamma promoter by glucocorticoids and dominant negative mutants of c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Cippitelli, M; Sica, A; Viggiano, V; Ye, J; Ghosh, P; Birrer, M J; Young, H A

    1995-05-26

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is an immunoregulatory cytokine expressed in large granular lymphocytes and T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying IFN-gamma gene transcription have not been fully defined. Here, we analyze the mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of IFN-gamma promoter activity by the glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone. Cotransfection assays performed in Jurkat T cells demonstrated that the activity of the initial 108 base pairs of the IFN-gamma promoter was down-regulated in the presence of dexamethasone. Furthermore, utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift analysis, we identified activator protein 1 AP-1-cAMP response element binding protein-activating transcription factor (CREB-ATF) binding elements situated in positions of the IFN-gamma promoter previously identified as essential for promoter activity. Moreover, dominant negative mutants of the c-Jun proto-oncogene were able to mimic the same down-regulatory effect exerted by dexamethasone, and mutations that abolished the binding of the AP-1 CREB-ATF factors were able to block the glucocorticoid effect. These results suggest a model involving the inhibition of IFN-gamma AP-1 CREB-ATF DNA binding complexes as one of the mechanisms involved in the negative regulatory action of glucocorticoids on IFN-gamma gene expression and support the relevance of AP-1 CREB-ATF binding factors during the transcriptional activation of the IFN-gamma promoter in T cells. PMID:7759501

  5. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium haemophilum skeletal disease in a patient with interferon-gamma deficiency.

    PubMed

    Otome, O; O'Reilly, M; Lim, L

    2015-10-01

    Disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is rare in immunocompetent adults. Anti-interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) autoantibodies have recently been associated with NTM infections, particularly in patients of Asian ethnicity. We describe a case of disseminated Mycobacterium haemophilum skeletal infection due to anti IFN-γ autoantibodies in a 71-year-old Cambodian man. He responded to a combination of anti-mycobacterial antibiotics without requirement for immunomodulator therapy. Testing for acquired IFN-γ deficiency due to IFN-γ autoantibodies should be considered when standard tests for immunodeficiency are negative in patients with unusual or severe opportunistic infections, including NTM.

  7. Disposable surface plasmon resonance aptasensor with membrane-based sample handling design for quantitative interferon-gamma detection.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Chang, Chia-Chen; Chu-Su, Yu; Wei, Shih-Chung; Zhao, Xi-hong; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2014-08-21

    ELISA and ELISPOT methods are utilized for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) to detect the IFN-γ secreted by T lymphocytes. However, the multi-step protocols of the assays are still performed with laboratory instruments and operated by well-trained people. Here, we report a membrane-based microfluidic device integrated with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor to realize an easy-to-use and cost effective multi-step quantitative analysis. To conduct the SPR measurements, we utilized a membrane-based SPR sensing device in which a rayon membrane was located 300 μm under the absorbent pad. The basic equation covering this type of transport is based on Darcy's law. Furthermore, the concentration of streptavidin delivered from a sucrose-treated glass pad placed alongside the rayon membrane was controlled in a narrow range (0.81 μM ± 6%). Finally, the unbound molecules were removed by a washing buffer that was pre-packed in the reservoir of the chip. Using a bi-functional, hairpin-shaped aptamer as the sensing probe, we specifically detected the IFN-γ and amplified the signal by binding the streptavidin. A high correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained, in the range from 0.01 to 100 nM. A detection limit of 10 pM was achieved within 30 min. Thus, the SPR assay protocols for IFN-γ detection could be performed using this simple device without an additional pumping system. PMID:24931052

  8. Gut Microbiota in Type 2 Diabetes Individuals and Correlation with Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein1 and Interferon Gamma from Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Centre in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Pushpanathan, Premalatha; Srikanth, Padma; Seshadri, Krishna G.; Selvarajan, Sribal; Pitani, Ravi Shankar; Kumar, Thomas David; Janarthanan, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity are associated with changes in gut microbiota and characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) are proinflammatory cytokines which play an important role in the development of T2DM. We undertook this study to analyze the gut microbiota of T2DM and nondiabetic subjects and to determine the profile of MCP 1 and IFNγ in the same subjects attending a tertiary care center in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods: The study included 30 subjects with clinical details. Stool and blood samples were collected from all the subjects. DNA was extracted from fecal samples and polymerase chain reaction was done using fusion primers. Metagenomic analysis was performed using ion torrent sequencing. The reads obtained were in FASTA format and reported as operational taxonomic units. Human MCP 1 and IFNγ enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed for 23 serum samples. Results: The study consisted of 30 subjects; 17 were T2DM and 13 were nondiabetics. The gut microbiota among T2DM consisted predominantly of Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia and Prevotella, when compared with the nondiabetic group with predominantly Gram positive organisms suchas Faecalibacterium, Eubacterium, and Bifidobacterium. The mean MCP-1 values in the diabetic group were 232.8 pg/ml and in the nondiabetic group 170.84 pg/ml. IFNγ (mean 385.5 pg/ml) was raised in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) group of 6.5–7.5% which was statistically significant. Association of Escherichia with T2DM and association of Bifidobacteria in the nondiabetics were also statistically significant. Conclusion: Escherichia counts were elevated in T2DM with HbA1c of 6.5–8.5% which was statistically significant suggesting that lipopolysaccharides present in the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria may be responsible for low-grade inflammation as evidenced by elevated MCP-1 and IFNγ levels in T

  9. Interferon-gamma increases hPepT1-mediated uptake of di-tripeptides including the bacterial tripeptide fMLP in polarized intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Buyse, Marion; Charrier, Laetitia; Sitaraman, Shanthi; Gewirtz, Andrew; Merlin, Didier

    2003-11-01

    Interferon-gamma causes a global phenotypic switch in intestinal epithelial function, in which enterocytes become immune accessory cells. The phenotypic switch is characterized by a down-regulation of membrane transporters and up-regulation of immune accessory molecules in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the effect of interferon-gamma on the intestinal epithelia di-tripeptide hPepT1 transporter has not been investigated. In this study we demonstrate that 1) interferon-gamma increases di-tripeptide uptake in dose- and time-dependent manner in model intestinal epithelia (Caco-2 BBE cell monolayers), 2) the increase in di-tripeptides induced by interferon-gamma is hPepT1 mediated, 3) interferon-gamma does not affect the hPept1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels 4) interferon-gamma increases the intracellular pH and consequently enhances the H+-electrochemical gradient across apical plasma membrane in model intestinal epithelia (Caco2-BBE monolayers). We suggest that interferon-gamma could increase the hPepT1 mediated di-tripeptides uptake in inflamed epithelial cells. Under these conditions, interferon-gamma will increase the intracellular amount of such diverse prokaryotic and eucaryotic small di-tripeptides in inflamed epithelial cells. The intracellular accumulation of such di-tripeptides may be important in enterocytes becoming immune accessory cells.

  10. High-level production of recombinant chicken interferon-gamma by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, K; Lowenthal, J W; O'Neil, T E; Ebisu, S; Takagi, H; Moore, R J

    2001-10-01

    Cytokines, such as interferon-gamma have been shown to have adjuvant and growth promoting activity in poultry and livestock and have the potential to be used as alternatives to antibiotics. We have developed an efficient system for commercial-scale synthesis of recombinant chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) using Brevibacillus choshinensis as the host for protein production. The ChIFN-gamma expression vector, pNCIFN, was constructed using the novel Escherichia coli-B. choshinensis shuttle vector, pNCMO2. ChIFN-gamma expression was optimized by investigating different culture conditions and different host B. choshinensis mutants. The highest level of production was observed using the B. choshinensis HPD31-MB2 strain grown at 30 degrees C, where ChIFN-gamma was produced at approximately 300-500 mg/L. ChIFN-gamma was also produced as a His-tagged fusion protein by using the pNCHis-IFN expression vector, a derivative of pNCMO2. The protein was constitutively secreted into the culture supernatant and could be partially purified in a single step using a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. This recombinant His-ChIFN-gamma was shown to have the same biological activity as native ChIFN-gamma. PMID:11570852

  11. In Vivo Interrelationship between Insulin Resistance and Interferon Gamma Production: Protective and Therapeutic Effect of Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, Heba Abdelghany; Elshehawy, Ashraf Abdelhamed; Elsayed, Mohammad Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate if there is a relation between insulin resistance incidence and inhibition of interferon gamma production or not. Firstly, insulin resistance was induced by high fat diet (HFD) intake for 6 weeks. Secondly, berberine was used as protective/curative compound for insulin resistance. Results revealed that feeding rats HFD for 6 weeks developed features of insulin resistance (IR) syndrome. These features presented in increased body weight, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia (with increased LDL-cholesterol and decreased HDL-cholesterol), and hypertriglyceridemia. Level of antioxidant enzymes in HFD group was higher than in normal one. Also there was an increasing in level of proinflammatory cytokines as interleukin- (IL-) 6 and IL-12 in HFD group. Feeding rats HFD for 6 weeks also decreased level of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The decreased level of IFN-γ has been shown to predict infection with infectious diseases especially viral infection. Treatment and protection with berberine 50 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks were found to be effective against the features of insulin resistance syndrome, improved levels of insulin resistance parameters, lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IFN-γ. PMID:27642351

  12. In Vivo Interrelationship between Insulin Resistance and Interferon Gamma Production: Protective and Therapeutic Effect of Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, Heba Abdelghany; Elshehawy, Ashraf Abdelhamed; Elsayed, Mohammad Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate if there is a relation between insulin resistance incidence and inhibition of interferon gamma production or not. Firstly, insulin resistance was induced by high fat diet (HFD) intake for 6 weeks. Secondly, berberine was used as protective/curative compound for insulin resistance. Results revealed that feeding rats HFD for 6 weeks developed features of insulin resistance (IR) syndrome. These features presented in increased body weight, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia (with increased LDL-cholesterol and decreased HDL-cholesterol), and hypertriglyceridemia. Level of antioxidant enzymes in HFD group was higher than in normal one. Also there was an increasing in level of proinflammatory cytokines as interleukin- (IL-) 6 and IL-12 in HFD group. Feeding rats HFD for 6 weeks also decreased level of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The decreased level of IFN-γ has been shown to predict infection with infectious diseases especially viral infection. Treatment and protection with berberine 50 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks were found to be effective against the features of insulin resistance syndrome, improved levels of insulin resistance parameters, lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IFN-γ.

  13. In Vivo Interrelationship between Insulin Resistance and Interferon Gamma Production: Protective and Therapeutic Effect of Berberine.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohammad Ahmad; Ghareeb, Doaa Ahmad; Sahyoun, Heba Abdelghany; Elshehawy, Ashraf Abdelhamed; Elsayed, Mohammad Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate if there is a relation between insulin resistance incidence and inhibition of interferon gamma production or not. Firstly, insulin resistance was induced by high fat diet (HFD) intake for 6 weeks. Secondly, berberine was used as protective/curative compound for insulin resistance. Results revealed that feeding rats HFD for 6 weeks developed features of insulin resistance (IR) syndrome. These features presented in increased body weight, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia (with increased LDL-cholesterol and decreased HDL-cholesterol), and hypertriglyceridemia. Level of antioxidant enzymes in HFD group was higher than in normal one. Also there was an increasing in level of proinflammatory cytokines as interleukin- (IL-) 6 and IL-12 in HFD group. Feeding rats HFD for 6 weeks also decreased level of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The decreased level of IFN-γ has been shown to predict infection with infectious diseases especially viral infection. Treatment and protection with berberine 50 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks were found to be effective against the features of insulin resistance syndrome, improved levels of insulin resistance parameters, lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IFN-γ. PMID:27642351

  14. The DNA-induced protective immunity with chicken interferon gamma against poultry coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Ali A; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Roufeng; Song, Hongyan; Ruirui, Zhang; Chengyu, Lei; Li, Xiangrui

    2010-08-01

    The immunogenicity of Eimeria acervulina cSZ-2 and chicken interferon gamma was observed against Eimeria tenella challenge. The chickens were randomly divided into six groups of 24 chicks each. Three groups of chickens were injected with DNA vaccines pVAX1-cSZ2, pVAX1-chIFN-gamma and pVAX1-cSZ2-chIFN-gamma two times (at days 14 and 21) at a dose of 100 microg intramuscularly. Three other groups were kept as control and injected with TE buffer (10 mM Tris-HCl pH 7.6 and 1 mM EDTA). One week following the booster dose, all chickens except the non-infected, non-vaccinated control group were inoculated orally with 5 x 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. Seven days post challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered for cecal lesion scoring and oocyst counts. The results demonstrated that cSZ-2 in combination with interferon gamma can protect chickens from coccidiosis by significantly decreasing body weight loss and oocyst excretion reflecting partial protection against E. tenella infection, and further studies are necessary to test for protection against other Eimeria species.

  15. Activation of human monocyte-derived macrophages cultured on Teflon: response to interferon-gamma during terminal maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Andreesen, R; Gadd, S; Brugger, W; Löhr, G W; Atkins, R C

    1988-05-01

    Macrophages (M phi) are potential antitumor effector cells derived from circulating blood monocytes (mo). Most studies on human mo/M phi biology and function have been performed using immature mo precursor cells. However, the conclusions drawn may be questionable, as mo have to undergo terminal differentiation before they reach relevant tissue sites of inflammation and immune reaction. We have analyzed the ability of mo-derived, teflon-cultured M phi to respond to activating stimuli with an increased tumor cytotoxic effector cell function using recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IFN-alpha 2, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin(IL) 2, IL 1 alpha, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as mediator molecules. It could be shown that the response of M phi to the most potent activator molecule, IFN-gamma, depends on the terminal differentiation from the mo stage to the mature M phi. Whereas adherent mo could be activated only moderately, M phi increased their cytotoxicity by a factor of up to 400. IFN-gamma activation positively correlated with the effector cell number, the time of incubation and the dosage used. Activation did not depend on the presence of LPS, and was lost within 24 to 48 h. LPS itself activated cells only in the microgram range. IFN-alpha 2 activated M phi only at a two log higher concentration than IFN-gamma; GM-CSF was only slightly effective, whereas M phi incubation with IL 1 alpha or IL 2 did not result in M phi activation. Thus, the ability of human M phi to become activated appears to be a function of cellular maturation and is acquired during the terminal step of M phi differentiation. Teflon-cultured M phi could facilitate studies of the activation of human M phi and may be more suitable cells for adoptive immunotherapy in cancer patients than blood monocytes. PMID:3136081

  16. [Differential growth inhibition of mycobacteria by interferon-gamma-or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-treated murine peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Tomioka, H; Saito, H

    1996-11-01

    Growth inhibition of the intracellular mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. fortuitum, and M. chelonae subsp. abscessus by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)- or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-treated murine peritoneal macrophages elicited by proteose peptone was studied in vitro. Macrophages were infected with slowly growing mycobacteria and the extracellular mycobacteria were washed out. Then, macrophages were treated with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha at a concentration of 10 to 1000 U/ml for 2 days. In another experiment, macrophages were pretreated with these cytokines for 1 day then infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria as before. Macrophages were cultured with or without IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha for additional day. Mycobacterial growth was assessed by determination of colony-forming units on 7H11 agar plates after destruction of the macrophages. Stimulation of macrophages with IFN-gamma reduced the growth of mycobacteria. However, except for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, growth was not inhibited by macrophages treated with TNF-alpha. IFN-gamma seems to be an important cytokine for the activation of mycobactericidal mechanisms in murine macrophages. Stimulation with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha and subsequent phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis or M. intracellulare increased O2- production, which was assayed by the method of cytochrome C reduction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-triggered-O2- production was also elevated by the cytokine pretreatment of the macrophages, suggesting that mycobacterial growth inhibition did not parallel the production of reactive oxygen intermediates in TNF alpha-activated murine peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that bactericidal mechanisms of murine macrophages against nontuberculous mycobacteria may not depend on reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8958673

  17. The function of TLR4 in interferon gamma or interleukin-13 exposed and lipopolysaccharide stimulated gingival epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Beklen, A; Sarp, A S; Uckan, D; Tsaous Memet, G

    2014-10-01

    Gingival epithelial cells are part of the first line of host defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) serve important immune and nonimmune functions. We investigated how interferon gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin 13 (IL-13) are involved in the TLR4 ligand-induced regulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8) effects on gingival epithelial cells. We used immunohistochemistry to localize TLR4 in ten healthy and ten periodontitis tissue specimens. Gingival epithelial cells then were primed with Th1 cytokine (INF-γ) or Th2 cytokine (IL-13) before stimulation with Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect the level of IL-8 secretion in cell culture supernatants. Although both healthy and periodontitis gingival tissue samples expressed TLR4, the periodontitis samples showed more intense expression on gingival epithelial cells. Gingival epithelial cell cultures were primed with either INF-γ or IL-13 before stimulation with TLR4 ligand. Supernatants from co-stimulated epithelial cells exhibited IL-8 production in opposite directions, i.e., as one stimulates the release, the other reduces the release. INF-γ significantly increased TLR4 function, whereas IL-13 significantly decreased TLR4 function, i.e., production of IL-8. Pathogen associated molecular pattern-LPS, shared by many different periodonto-pathogenic bacteria, activates the gingival epithelial cells in a TLR-dependent manner. Diminished or increased TLR function in gingival epithelial cells under the influence of different Th cell types may protect or be harmful due to the altered TLR signaling.

  18. Interferon-Gamma Increases Endothelial Permeability by Causing Activation of p38 MAP Kinase and Actin Cytoskeleton Alteration.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chin Theng; Fong, Lai Yen; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Yong, Yoke Keong; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2015-07-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is known to potentiate the progression of inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and atherosclerosis. IFN-γ has been found to disrupt the barrier integrity of epithelial and endothelial cell both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanisms of IFN-γ underlying increased endothelial cell permeability have not been extensively elucidated. We reported that IFN-γ exhibits a biphasic nature in increasing endothelial permeability. The changes observed in the first phase (4-8 h) involve cell retraction and rounding in addition to condensed peripheral F-actin without a significant change in the F-/G-actin ratio. However, cell elongation, stress fiber formation, and an increased F-/G-actin ratio were noticed in the second phase (16-24 h). Consistent with our finding from the permeability assay, IFN-γ induced the formation of intercellular gaps in both phases. A delayed phase of increased permeability was observed at 12 h, which paralleled the onset of cell elongation, stress fiber formation, and increased F-/G-actin ratio. In addition, IFN-γ stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation over a 24 h period. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase by SB203580 prevented increases in paracellular permeability, actin rearrangement, and increases in the F-/G-actin ratio caused by IFN-γ. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase is activated in response to IFN-γ and causes actin rearrangement and altered cell morphology, which in turn mediates endothelial cell hyperpermeability. The F-/G-actin ratio might be involved in the regulation of actin distribution and cell morphology rather than the increased permeability induced by IFN-γ.

  19. Interferon-gamma gene polymorphism influences the frequency of a Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection in young women.

    PubMed

    Eleutério, José; Teles, Rosiane A; Linhares, Iara M; Normand, Neil; Witkin, Steven S

    2015-11-01

    Cervicitis associated with Chlamydia trachomatis is frequent worldwide, but the factors determining susceptibility to infection remain incompletely determined. We evaluated whether a functional single nucleotide polymorphism at position +874 in the gene coding for interferon gamma (rs2430561) influenced the likelihood of having a cervical C. trachomatis infection. This was a cross-sectional study of 142 sexually-active women attending a general gynaecology service on the outskirts of the city of Fortaleza in northeastern Brazil between August 2011 and August 2012. Endocervical swabs were evaluated for C. trachomatis DNA using hybrid capture. DNA from buccal swabs was utilised for detection of the interferon gamma 874 T/A single nucleotide polymorphism by gene amplification, endonuclease digestion and gel electrophoresis. Nineteen women (13.4%) were positive for C. trachomatis in their cervix. Positivity was 21.7% in women with the A,A genotype versus 7.0% in women with one or two T alleles (p = 0.0227). The variant T allele frequency, associated with elevated interferon gamma production, was 36.2% in women who were negative for C. trachomatis as opposed to 18.4% in women who were positive for a cervical infection with this organism (p = 0.0415). Possession of the T allele at position +874 in the gene coding for interferon gamma is associated with a reduced likelihood of a C. trachomatis cervical infection.

  20. Soluble HLA class I antigen secretion by normal lymphocytes: relationship with cell activation and effect of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Brieva, J A; Villar, L M; Leoro, G; Alvarez-Cermeño, J C; Roldán, E; Gonzalez-Porqué, P

    1990-01-01

    HLA class I antigens are thought to be integral membrane proteins. However, soluble forms of these molecules have been detected. Our laboratory has recently shown that the predominant form of these soluble proteins present in human serum, spleen tissue and culture supernatant of activated lymphocytes exhibits molecular weight and structure similar to classical HLA class I antigens, but lacks HLA A or B polymorphic determinants. In the present study, the secretion of such soluble proteins by lymphocytes has been further explored. Phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated normal lymphocytes secrete considerable quantities of soluble HLA (sHLA) class I proteins. This secretion seems to be a general property of lymphocytes, since activation of T as well as B cells by appropriate mitogens equally induce sHLA I secretion. Lymphocytes require RNA and protein synthesis, but not DNA synthesis, for the secretion to occur. Kinetic studies reveal that maximal sHLA I secretion precedes the peak of DNA synthesis by 24 h. In vitro stimulation with antigens or alloantigens also provokes sHLA I secretion. Moreover, this phenomenon has also been detected for in vivo-activated lymphocytes, as enhanced spontaneous sHLA I secretion was observed in cultures of low-density blastic B and T cells, and of blood lymphocytes obtained from normal subjects who had received a booster immunization 5 days earlier. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases the expression of membrane-bound class I antigens but does not induce any sHLA I secretion, suggesting that both molecules are under different regulatory mechanisms. Our results indicate that human lymphocytes, upon stimulation, actively secrete considerable amounts of a soluble form of these biologically relevant proteins. PMID:2122936

  1. Serum profile of cytokines interferon gamma and interleukin-10 in ewes subjected to artificial insemination by cervical retraction.

    PubMed

    Alvares, C T G; Cruz, J F; Romano, C C; Brandão, F Z

    2016-04-15

    This study evaluated the influence of artificial insemination (AI) by cervical retraction (CRI) on serum levels of interferon gamma (IFNγ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in ewes. Synchronized pluriparous Santa Inês ewes were subjected to natural mating (NM, n = 8) and AI, which was performed for a fixed time (55 ± 1 hour) by CRI (n = 8) or laparoscopy (n = 8). Ewes were classified as pregnant, with return to estrus (RE) or with embryonic loss (EL). Blood samples were collected on Day 0, Day 3, Day 5, Day 12, and Day 17 (Day 0 = AI/NM) for progesterone dosage and cytokines were quantified from Day 0 to Day 12. Progesterone levels were constant, except for a decrease in ewes with RE at Day 17 (P < 0.05). Regardless of the reproductive method used, there was no difference in the IFNγ and IL-10 levels at any time, with averages of 642.1, 713.2, and 741.2 pg/mL for IFNγ and 667.1, 616.8, and 721.1 pg/mL for IL-10 when using CRI, laproscopy, and NM, respectively. Regarding the physiological status, ewes with EL had lower serum levels of IFNγ and IL-10 than pregnant ewes and ewes with RE, regardless of the reproductive method used, with averages of 769.1, 714.9, and 555.7 pg/mL for IFNγ and 713.8, 699.3, and 578.7 pg/mL for IL-10 in pregnant ewes, ewes with RE and EL, respectively (P < 0.01). In conclusion, AI by CRI in Santa Inês ewes does not alter the profile of serum cytokines IFNγ and IL-10 and does not induce an inflammatory reaction that can compromise pregnancy.

  2. Characterization and Inductive Expression Analysis of Interferon Gamma-Related Gene in the Indian Major Carp, Rohu (Labeo rohita).

    PubMed

    Swain, Banikalyan; Basu, Madhubanti; Lenka, Saswati S; Das, Surajit; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Samanta, Mrinal

    2015-05-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is one of the key cytokines that plays a major role against viral and intracellular bacterial infection. In addition to the IFN-γ gene, teleost fish possess a second copy known as IFN-γ-related (IFN-γrel) gene. This report describes structural and functional properties of IFN-γrel gene in the Indian major carp, rohu (Labeo rohita), a commercially important freshwater fish species in the Indian subcontinent. The rohu IFN-γrel gene consisted of four exons with three intervening introns and phylogenetically closely related to grass carp. The full-length IFN-γrel cDNA comprised 927 bp nucleotides with a single open reading frame of 504 bp, encoding 167 amino acids (aa) polypeptide with a signal peptide of 24 aa. The mature rohu IFN-γrel protein was 143 aa with a predicted molecular weight of 16.85 kDa. Basal expression analysis of IFN-γrel showed its wide range of expression in all examined tissues: The highest was in the skin and the lowest was in the liver. In response to LPS, poly I:C, iE-DAP, muramyl dipeptide stimulations, and bacterial infections, IFN-γrel gene expression was significantly (p<0.05) induced in treated fish tissues as compared with their control. The IFN-γrel was expressed as recombinant protein (rIFN-γrel) and confirmed through western blot. Stimulation of peripheral blood leukocytes with rIFN-γrel protein resulted in the activation of IFN-γ receptor and marked induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression. These results together may suggest the important role of IFN-γrel as an antimicrobial cytokine in fish.

  3. Skin CD4+ T cells produce interferon-gamma in vitro in response to streptococcal antigens in chronic plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, D W; Baker, B S; Ovigne, J M; Hardman, C; Powles, A V; Fry, L

    2000-03-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that group A streptococcal antigen reactive T cells are present in the skin lesions of chronic plaque psoriasis. To determine the cytokine profile (interferon-gamma, interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) of these T cells in response to streptococcal antigens, T cell lines were cultured from untreated lesional skin of 13 patients with chronic plaque psoriasis and 12 patients with other inflammatory skin diseases. T cell lines were incubated with or without a sonicated heat-killed mixture of group A streptococcal isolates for 18 h in the presence of a transport inhibitor, stained for surface CD4 or CD8 and intracellular cytokine expression, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Psoriatic T cell lines were grown from 10 of 13 patients and were predominately CD4+ (64%-85%) with 10%-32% CD8+ T cells. Variable numbers of CD4+ T cells produced interferon-gamma (0.8%-35%, median 13.9) in eight of 10 T cell lines (p < 0.02). In contrast, CD4+ T cells in five of 12 T cell lines obtained from disease controls did not produce or produced minimal interferon-gamma in response to group A streptococcal isolates; this was significantly different from the psoriatic T cell lines (p < 0.05). Small numbers of interleukin-10 positive (0.8%-1.3%) and interleukin-4 positive (2.1%-2.5%) CD4+ T cells induced by group A streptococcal isolates were also present in two out of five and three out of five psoriatic T cell lines, respectively. This was significantly less in each case than the numbers of CD4+/interferon-gamma+ T cells (p < 0.05). Cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells were rarely observed. These findings demonstrate that a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells in chronic plaque psoriasis skin lesions produces interferon-gamma in response to streptococcal antigens and may be relevant to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  4. Interferon Gamma: Influence on Neural Stem Cell Function in Neurodegenerative and Neuroinflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Apurva; Ganesan, Priya; O’Donnell, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFNγ), a pleiotropic cytokine, is expressed in diverse neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. Its protective mechanisms are well documented during viral infections in the brain, where IFNγ mediates non-cytolytic viral control in infected neurons. However, IFNγ also plays both protective and pathological roles in other central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Of the many neural cells that respond to IFNγ, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), the only pluripotent cells in the developing and adult brain, are often altered during CNS insults. Recent studies highlight the complex effects of IFNγ on NSPC activity in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that mediate these effects, and the eventual outcomes for the host, are still being explored. Here, we review the effects of IFNγ on NSPC activity during different pathological insults. An improved understanding of the role of IFNγ would provide insight into the impact of immune responses on the progression and resolution of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27774000

  5. Missense splice variant (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val) of interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1) coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis - a screen of osteoarticular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Szwed, Aleksander; Walter, Mark R.; Kołban, Maciej; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Clark, Jeremy S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, dominant partial interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFN-γ-R1) susceptibility to environmental mycobacteria was found with IFNGR1 deletions or premature stop. Our aim was to search for IFNGR1 variants in patients with mycobacterial osteoarticular lesions. Biopsies from the patients were examined for acid-fast bacilli, inflammatory cell infiltration, and mycobacterial niacin. Mycobacterial rRNA was analyzed using a target-amplified rRNA probe test. Peripheral-blood-leukocyte genomic DNA was isolated from 19 patients using the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, and all IFNGR1 exons were sequenced using an ABIPRISM 3130 device. After the discovery of an exon 5 variant, a Polish newborn population sample (n = 100) was assayed for the discovered variant. Splice sites and putative amino acid interactions were analyzed. All patients tested were positive for mycobacteria; one was heterozygous for the IFNGR1 exon 5 single-nucleotide-missense substitution (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val). No other variant was found. The splice analysis indicated the creation of an exonic splicing silencer, and alternatively, molecular graphics indicated that the p.Ile183Val might alter beta-strand packing (loss of van der Waals contacts; Val183/Pro205), possibly altering the IFN-γ-R1/IFN-γ-R2 interaction. The probability of non-deleterious variant was estimated as <10%. Heterozygous IFNGR1:p.Ile183Val (frequency 0.003%) was found to be coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The small amount of variation detected in the patients with osteoarticular lesions indicates that screens should not yet be restricted: Intronic variants should be analyzed as well as the other genes affecting Type 1 T-helper-cell-mediated immunity.

  6. Bovine Tuberculosis: Effect of the Tuberculin Skin Test on the Interferon Gamma Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a disease of zoonotic and economic importance. Despite intensive eradication efforts over decades, bTB continues to be a problem with global perspective. The control of bTB is based on a test and slaughter policy and/or abattoir surveillance. Two types of tu...

  7. Diagnostic Performance of Interferon-Gamma Releasing Assay in HIV-Infected Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Ming; Hua, Wenhao; Wang, Huizhu; Wei, Ting; Jiao, Yanmei; Sun, Guizhen; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Active tuberculosis infection represents a very common and significant threat to HIV-infected patients. But measures to accurately detect it are limited. Objective To compare and analyze the diagnostic efficacy of T-SPOT.TB alone and in combination with TST in HIV-infected patients in China. Method TST (tuberculin skin test) and T-SPOT.TB were performed on 131 HIV-infected patients admitted in Beijing You’an Hospital and Beijing Ditan Hospital between Oct, 2010 and Jul, 2012, who were initially diagnosed as suspected ATB (active TB). The patients were further categorized into ATB and Not ATB based on clinical and cultural evidences. The performance of TST and T-SPOT.TB were analyzed and compared. Results The sensitivity and specificity of T-SPOT.TB were 41.3% and 94.6%, respectively, both higher than TST (12.9% and 91.8%). By combining T-SPOT.TB and TST, the sensitivity did not increase, but specificity was elevated to 100%. TST, T-SPOT.TB and their combinations all performed better in patients with extra-pulmonary diseases than with pulmonary disorders. False-positive T-SPOT.TB results were found to be associated with history of prior TB. In addition, concomitant bacterial infections and low CD4 counts were associated with increased ATB risk. Conclusions T-SPOT.TB is superior in screening ATB in HIV-infected patients in China over traditional TST. Additional TST would help to confirm a positive T-SPOT.TB result. Both tests work better for patients with extra-pulmonary conditions. PMID:23936478

  8. Mucosal Molecular Pattern of Tissue Transglutaminase and Interferon Gamma in Suspected Seronegative Celiac Disease at Marsh 1 and 0 Stages

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Enzo; Amoruso, Annacinzia; Giorgio, Floriana; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Piscitelli, Domenico; Buffelli, Francesca; Fiore, Maria G.; Mongelli, Antonio; Castellaneta, Nicola M.; Giangaspero, Antonio; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Montenegro, Lucia; Di Leo, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: In celiac disease (CD), there is increased mRNA coding for tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and interferon gamma (IFNγ). In seronegative celiac patients, the mucosal immune complexes anti-tTG IgA/tTG are found. We assayed tTG- and IFNγ-mRNA in the mucosa of patients with a clinical suspicion of seronegative CD and correlated the values with intraepithelial CD3 lymphocytes (IELs). Materials and Methods: Distal duodenum specimens from 67 patients were retrieved and re-evaluated for immunohistochemically proven CD3 IELs. Five 10 μm sections were used for the extraction and assay of tTG and IFNγ coding mRNA levels using reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Samples from 15 seropositive CD patients and 15 healthy subjects were used as positive and negative controls. Results were expressed as fold-change. Results: Our series was divided into three groups based on IEL count: >25 (14 patients: group A), 15–25 (26 patients: group B), and 0–15 (27 patients: Group C). tTG-mRNA levels were (mean ± SD): CD = 9.8 ± 2.6; group A = 10.04 ± 4.7; group B = 4.99 ± 2.3; group C = 2.26 ± 0.8, controls = 1.04 ± 0.2 (CD = group A > group B > group C = controls). IFNα-mRNA levels were: CD = 13.4 ± 3.6; group A = 7.28 ± 3.6; group B = 4.45 ± 2.9; group C = 2.06 ± 1.21, controls = 1.04 ± 0.4. Conclusions: Our results suggest that tTG- and IFNγmRNA levels are increased in both seropositive and potential seronegative patients with CD, showing a strong correlation with the CD3 IEL count at stage Marsh 1. An increase in both molecules is found even when IELs are in the range 15–25 (Marsh 0), suggesting the possibility of a “gray zone” inhabited by patients which should be closely followed up in gluten-related disorders. PMID:26655133

  9. Proliferative and antiproliferative effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell lines derived from cervical and ovarian malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mutch, D.G.; Massad, L.S.; Kao, M.S.; Collins, J.L. )

    1990-12-01

    Four human cell lines derived from cervical carcinomas (ME-180, SiHa, HT-3, and MS751) and three human cell lines derived from ovarian carcinomas (SK-OV-3, Caov-3, and NIH:OVCAR-3) were analyzed in vitro to determine the effect of recombinant interferon-gamma and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell growth and survival. The effects of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and both interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell growth were measured after 24 and 72 hours of incubation by the incorporation of chromium 51. The results of this analysis showed that all seven cell lines were resistant to the antiproliferative action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, that the growth of most cell lines was inhibited by interferon-gamma by 72 hours of incubation, and that after 72 hours of incubation all cell lines demonstrated a synergistic antiproliferative response to the combination of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, the effects of these cytokines on cell growth were found to differ among cell lines and varied with the concentration and the duration of incubation. The growth of one cell line (Caov-3) was stimulated by both tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma. These results suggest that the clinical effects of these cytokines on the growth of gynecologic cancers may be more complex than previously supposed.

  10. Interferon-{gamma} and NF-{kappa}B mediate nitric oxide production by mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, I.; Ozaki, K. . E-mail: ozakikat@jichi.ac.jp; Sato, K.; Meguro, A.; Tatara, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Nagai, T.; Muroi, K.; Ozawa, K. . E-mail: kozawa@ms2.jichi.ac.jp

    2007-04-20

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to have an immunosuppressive effect. Previously, we demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is one of the immunomodulatory mediators of MSCs. We herein show that primary mouse bone marrow MSCs and three cell lines that mimic MSCs suppress both differentiation and proliferation in Th1 condition, whereas the suppression in Th2 condition is mild. NO production is inversely correlated with T cell proliferation in Th1 and Th2 conditions. NO is highly induced in Th1 and minimally induced in Th2. Moreover, an inhibitor of NO synthase restores both proliferation and interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) production in Th1 condition. Furthermore, an anti-IFN-{gamma} antibody strongly inhibits NO production and an inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B reduces the level of induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in MSCs. Taken together, our results suggest that NO plays a significant role in the modification of Th1 and Th2 differentiation by MSCs, and that both IFN-{gamma} and NF-{kappa}B are critical for NO production by MSCs.

  11. Suppression and augmentation of rat adjuvant arthritis with monoclonal anti-interferon-gamma antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Wiesenberg, I; Van der Meide, P H; Schellekens, H; Alkan, S

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a monoclonal antibody (MoAb DB-1), which neutralized rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), on the induction and progression of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats induced by intraplantar injection of Freund's complete adjuvant was studied. The animals were treated intraperitoneally with MoAb DB-1 (0.3-5 mg) for various times. Prophylactic treatment with MoAb DB-1, starting 2 days prior to arthritis induction, inhibited oedema in both the injected and non-injected hind paws and delayed joint destruction as shown by radiography. However, despite continued MoAb treatment, the disease progressed. High doses of MoAb DB-1 exacerbated the disease. A control MoAb of the same isotype did not have significant effects on adjuvant arthritis. Therapeutic treatment with the MoAb DB-1 starting 8 days after arthritis induction caused only slight and short-lived inhibitory effects. IFN-gamma appears to be a critical lymphokine for the development of adjuvant arthritis. PMID:12412757

  12. Phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma for treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, E H; Rosen, S T; Norris, D B; Roenigk, H H; Saks, S R; Bunn, P A

    1990-02-01

    Recombinant human interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) was used for the treatment of 16 patients with various stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). All patients had been previously treated with standard topical and/or systemic therapies, and some had received experimental treatment with retinoids, recombinant human interferon alfa-2a (rIFN-alpha 2a), or radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies; most patients had an advanced stage of disease. Objective partial responses (PRs) were noted in five patients (31%) and lasted 3 months to greater than 32 months (median, 10 mo). One of these five patients had previously had disease progression after an initial PR with rIFN-alpha 2a. Six other patients (38%) showed minor or mixed responses. The most common side effects of rIFN-gamma included fever, weight loss, mild neutropenia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and elevated hepatic transaminases. Additionally, one episode of nephrotic syndrome and one cutaneous allergic reaction were noted. None of the toxic effects were life threatening, and all were reversible. These results suggest that rIFN-gamma has efficacy in the treatment of CTCL refractory to rIFN-alpha 2a.

  13. Structural similarity between the p17 matrix protein of HIV-1 and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Matthews, S; Barlow, P; Boyd, J; Barton, G; Russell, R; Mills, H; Cunningham, M; Meyers, N; Burns, N; Clark, N

    1994-08-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) matrix protein, p17, forms the outer shell of the core of the virus, lining the inner surface of the viral membrane. The protein has several key functions. It orchestrates viral assembly via targeting signals that direct the gag precursor polyprotein, p55, to the host cell membrane and it interacts with the transmembrane protein, gp41, to retain the env-encoded proteins in the virus. In addition, p17 contains a nuclear localization signal that directs the preintegration complex to the nucleus of infected cells. This permits the virus to infect productively non-dividing cells, a distinguishing feature of HIV and other lentiviruses. We have determined the solution structure of p17 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a root-mean square deviation for the backbone of the well-defined regions of 0.9 A. It consists of four helices connected by short loops and an irregular, mixed beta-sheet which provides a positively charged surface for interaction with the inner layer of the membrane. The helical topology is unusual; the Brookhaven protein database contains only one similar structure, that of the immune modulator interferon-gamma.

  14. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H A; Tynan, Graham A; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jones, Sarah A; Corr, Sinéad C; Bernard, Nicholas J; Hughes, Mark M; Corcoran, Sarah E; O'Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Neill, Luke A J; Lavelle, Ed C; Keane, Joseph

    2016-02-16

    Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26885859

  15. Detection of Interferon gamma using graphene and aptamer based FET-like electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Farid, Sidra; Meshik, Xenia; Choi, Min; Mukherjee, Souvik; Lan, Yi; Parikh, Devanshi; Poduri, Shripriya; Baterdene, Undarmaa; Huang, Ching-En; Wang, Yung Yu; Burke, Peter; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2015-09-15

    One of the primary goals in the scientific community is the specific detection of proteins for the medical diagnostics and biomedical applications. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with the tuberculosis susceptibility, which is one of the major health problems globally. We have therefore developed a DNA aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor that is used for the detection of IFN-γ with high selectivity and sensitivity. A graphene monolayer-based FET-like structure is incorporated on a PDMS substrate with the IFN-γ aptamer attached to graphene. Addition of target molecule induces a change in the charge distribution in the electrolyte, resulting in increase in electron transfer efficiency that was actively sensed by monitoring the change in current from the device. Change in current appears to be highly sensitive to the IFN-γ concentrations ranging from nanomolar (nM) to micromolar (μM) range. The detection limit of our IFN-γ electrochemical biosensor is found to be 83 pM. Immobilization of aptamer on graphene surface is verified using unique structural approach by Atomic Force Microscopy. Such simple and sensitive electrochemical biosensor has potential applications in infectious disease monitoring, immunology and cancer research in the future.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress modulates the response of myelinating oligodendrocytes to the immune cytokine interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2005-05-23

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is believed to contribute to immune-mediated demyelinating disorders by targeting the myelin-producing oligodendrocyte, a cell known to be highly sensitive to the disruption of protein synthesis and to the perturbation of the secretory pathway. We found that apoptosis induced by IFN-gamma in cultured rat oligodendrocytes was associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress also accompanied oligodendrocyte apoptosis and hypomyelination in transgenic mice that inappropriately expressed IFN-gamma in the central nervous system (CNS). Compared with a wild-type genetic background, the enforced expression of IFN-gamma in mice that were heterozygous for a loss of function mutation in pancreatic ER kinase (PERK) dramatically reduced animal survival, promoted CNS hypomyelination, and enhanced oligodendrocyte loss. PERK encodes an ER stress-inducible kinase that phosphorylates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha and specifically maintains client protein homeostasis in the stressed ER. Therefore, the hypersensitivity of PERK+/- mice to IFN-gamma implicates ER stress in demyelinating disorders that are induced by CNS inflammation. PMID:15911877

  17. Interferon-gamma inhibits central nervous system remyelination through a process modulated by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Kemper, April; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2006-05-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is believed to play a deleterious role in the immune-mediated demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis. Here we have exploited transgenic mice that ectopically express IFN-gamma in a temporally controlled manner in the CNS to specifically study its effects on remyelination in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. CNS delivery of IFN-gamma severely suppressed remyelination in both models and impaired the clinical recovery of the mice experiencing EAE. These observations correlated with a dramatic reduction of oligodendroglial repopulation in the demyelinated lesions. Moreover, we found that in cuprizone-treated mice the detrimental actions of IFN-gamma were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in remyelinating oligodendrocytes. Compared with a wild-type genetic background, the presence of IFN-gamma in mice heterozygous for a loss of function mutation in the pancreatic ER kinase (PERK), a kinase that responds specifically to ER stress, further reduced the percentage of remyelinated axons and oligodendrocyte numbers in cuprizone-induced demyelinated lesions. Thus, these data suggest that IFN-gamma is capable of inhibiting remyelination in demyelinated lesions and that ER stress modulates the response of remyelinating oligodendrocytes to this cytokine. PMID:16504972

  18. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. Images PMID:2531896

  19. Interferon-gamma receptor 1 promoter polymorphisms: population distribution and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Ding, Li; Sullivan, Rachel; Enyedi, Balasz; Yim, Jae-Joon; Cook, James L; Musser, James M; Holland, Steven M

    2004-07-01

    Different polymorphisms have been described in the minimal promoter region (MPR) of the interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1), a molecule that plays a critical role in mycobacterial control. We sequenced the IFNGR1 MPR from African American, Caucasian and Korean controls, and from mycobacteria-infected patients. Six different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the IFNGR1 MPR. The three ethnic groups showed different SNP distribution patterns, but no significant differences were detected between mycobacterial cases and controls. Two polymorphisms were found in all populations (G-611A, T-56C). We cloned the four allelic variants (var) of haplotype G-611A/T-56C into a luciferase reporter vector and determined their promoter activity. Polymorphisms at position -611 had a stronger effect on the promoter activity than those at position -56, and constructs carrying G-611 produced a stronger promoter activity than -611A constructs. The IFNGR1 MPR is a polymorphic region with at least two SNPs influencing its activity, but these are not associated with increased mycobacterial susceptibility.

  20. Interferon-gamma coordinates CCL3-mediated neutrophil recruitment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonville, Cynthia A; Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Gao, Jiliang; Prussin, Calman; Foster, Barbara; Rosenberg, Helene F; Domachowske, Joseph B

    2009-01-01

    Background We have shown previously that acute infection with the respiratory pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), results in local production of the proinflammatory chemokine, CCL3, and that neutrophil recruitment in response to PVM infection is reduced dramatically in CCL3 -/- mice. Results In this work, we demonstrate that CCL3-mediated neutrophil recruitment is coordinated by interferon-gamma (IFNγ). Neutrophil recruitment in response to PVM infection was diminished five-fold in IFNγ receptor gene-deleted mice, although neutrophils from IFNγR -/- mice expressed transcripts for the CCL3 receptor, CCR1 and responded functionally to CCL3 ex vivo. Similarly, in the absence of PVM infection, CCL3 overexpression alone could not elicit neutrophil recruitment in the absence of IFNγ. Interestingly, although supplemental IFNγ restored neutrophil recruitment and resulted in a sustained weight loss among CCL3-overexpressing IFNγ -/- mice, CCL3-mediated neutrophil recruitment alone did not result in the pulmonary edema or respiratory failure characteristic of severe viral infection, suggesting that CCL3 and IFN-γ together are sufficient to promote neutrophil recruitment but not pathologic activation. Conclusion Our findings reveal a heretofore unrecognized hierarchical interaction between the IFNγ and CCL3, which demonstrate that IFNγ is crucial for CCL3-mediated neutrophil recruitment in vivo. PMID:19298652

  1. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Wilson, Tenisha D.; Johnson, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1−/−) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function. PMID:24391643

  2. Interferon. gamma. response region in the promoter of the human DPA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhi; Sugawara, Minoru; Ponath, P.D.; Wessendorf, L.; Banerji, J.; Li, Yi; Strominger, J.L. )

    1990-12-01

    The interferon {gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) response region of the human class II major histocompatibility complex gene, DPA, has been localized to a 52-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment in the proximal promotor at {minus}107 to {minus}55 bp after transfection into HeLa cells of a series of 5{prime}, 3{prime}, and gap deletion mutants linked to a reporter gene, human growth hormone, as well as of synthetic oligonucleotides fused to the heterologous promoter thymidine kinase. The 52-mer sequence contains the X and Y box elements conserved in all class II genes; their presence is indispensable for IFN-{gamma} inducibility. Furthermore, an additional 5 bp immediately 5{prime} of the X box of the DPA gene are necessary and sufficient for IFN-{gamma} induction. This region may contain an IFN-{gamma} response element. A closely related sequence has also been found in the vicinity of the critical deletion sites of three other well-studied class II gene promoters, all of which require a much longer sequence 5{prime} of the X box. A fourth element, the W element, located about 15 bp 5{prime} of the X box in all class II genes, is clearly of little importance in IFN-{gamma} inducibility of the DPA gene.

  3. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of interferon-gamma in the large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruan-Ni; Su, Yong-Quan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Qiao, Ying; Mao, Yong; Ke, Qiao-Zhen; Han, Kun-Huang; Zheng, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-She; Wu, Chang-Wen

    2015-10-01

    The large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea is an important mariculture fish species in China, and the bacterium Vibrio harveyi (V. harveyi) and the ciliate protozoan Cryptocaryon irritans (C. irritans) are the two major pathogens in its aquaculture sector. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) plays important roles in regulating both innate and cell mediated immune responses as an inflammatory cytokine. In this study, we obtained the nucleotide sequence of IFN-γ from the large yellow croaker (LcIFN-γ). The phylogenetic relationship tree of 18 available IFN-γ genes was constructed based on their sequences. Expression analyses in 10 various tissues were conducted after the croaker challenged with V. harveyi and C. irritans, respectively. Real time PCR analysis showed that the expression of LcIFN-γ was observed broadly in health individuals. After injected with V. harveyi, the 10 tissues had a higher expression of IFN-γ at the first day (1 d); only spleen, muscle, intestine, heart and skin had higher expressions after infected with C. irritans at 1 d. Major immune tissues (skin, gill, head kidney and spleen) and detoxification tissue (liver) were sampled at 0 h, 6 h, 1 d, 2 d, 3 d, 4 d, 5 d and 7 d to understand the expression trends of LcIFN-γ after challenged with C. irritans. The expressions of LcIFN-γ in skin and gill (the primary immune organs) showed a clear correlative relationship with the life cycle of C. irritans.

  4. Phasic Treatment with Interferon Gamma Stimulates Release of Exosomes that Protect Against Spreading Depression.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Aya D; Kraig, Richard P

    2015-10-01

    The detrimental effects of T-cell-secreted interferon gamma (IFNγ) on oxidative stress (OS) and demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) are well recognized. Recently, we demonstrated that IFNγ-mediated damage to myelin also increases susceptibility to spreading depression (SD; the likely basis of migraine with aura). However, before onset of MS, induction of physiological levels of IFNγ, like that produced by environmental enrichment (EE), protects against demyelination and OS. Accordingly, we focused on the potential for physiological levels of IFNγ to protect against SD. EE, which occurs with a moderate and phasic increase in proinflammatory cytokines, reduces migraine frequency. Thus, we applied phasic or pulsed IFNγ to brain slice cultures to emulate EE. This treatment reduced OS, increased myelin basic protein, a marker for myelin, and reduced susceptibility to SD. Building on our research on exosomes in EE-based neuroprotection, we found that IFNγ stimulation of slice cultures induced release of exosomes, likely from the microglia that produce the same protective effects as IFNγ treatment when applied to naive cultures. Finally, nasal administration of IFNγ to rats recapitulated in vitro effects, reducing OS, increasing myelin, and reducing SD. These results support phasic IFNγ signaling as a therapeutic target for prevention of SD and, by extension, migraine.

  5. Potential mechanisms of cytosolic calcium modulation in interferon-gamma treated U937 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Jon B.; Mcleish, Kenneth R.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Dean, William L.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) to alter cytoplasmic Ca(2+) content in the monocytelike cell line U937 was investigated, using a slow Ca-channel blocker, diltiazem. In addition, the Ca-ATPase and the Ca-uptake activities were measured in isolated U937 membranes, together with the effect of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) upon the Ca(2+) release from Ca-loaded membranes. The addition of 50 U/ml INF-gamma to U937 cultures was found to increase internal Ca(2+) by about 100 percent within 3 min. The increase was significantly reduced by incubation in Ca-free buffer or by the addition of diltiazem. A crude membrane preparation from U937 cells was found to contain significant amounts of Ca-ATPase activity and to sequester Ca(2+) to a level of 8 nmol/mg in 30 sec; the addition of IP3 induced release of a portion of the sequestered Ca(2+) which was then resequestered. The results suggest that IFN-gamma causes an increase of cytoplasmic Ca(2+), in part, by the IP3-induced release from the internal storage sites and, in part, from the entry of extracellular Ca through slow channels.

  6. A Common Variant in the Adaptor Mal Regulates Interferon Gamma Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Sheedy, Frederick J; Harris, James; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Lee, Jinhee; West, Kim; McDermott, Eva Palsson; Smyth, Alicia; Gleeson, Laura E; Coleman, Michelle; Martinez, Nuria; Hearnden, Claire H A; Tynan, Graham A; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jones, Sarah A; Corr, Sinéad C; Bernard, Nicholas J; Hughes, Mark M; Corcoran, Sarah E; O'Sullivan, Mary; Fallon, Ciara M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Golenbock, Douglas; Gordon, Stephen V; O'Neill, Luke A J; Lavelle, Ed C; Keane, Joseph

    2016-02-16

    Humans that are heterozygous for the common S180L polymorphism in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor Mal (encoded by TIRAP) are protected from a number of infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), whereas those homozygous for the allele are at increased risk. The reason for this difference in susceptibility is not clear. We report that Mal has a TLR-independent role in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor signaling. Mal-dependent IFN-γ receptor (IFNGR) signaling led to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation and autophagy. IFN-γ signaling via Mal was required for phagosome maturation and killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The S180L polymorphism, and its murine equivalent S200L, reduced the affinity of Mal for the IFNGR, thereby compromising IFNGR signaling in macrophages and impairing responses to TB. Our findings highlight a role for Mal outside the TLR system and imply that genetic variation in TIRAP may be linked to other IFN-γ-related diseases including autoimmunity and cancer.

  7. Single electrode biosensor for simultaneous determination of interferon gamma and lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianfei; Song, Daimin; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Min; Gui, Rijun; Xia, Lin; Bi, Sai; Xia, Yanzhi; Li, Yanhui; Xia, Linhua

    2015-06-15

    Simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers holds great promise for acute leukemia evaluation. Here, a novel biosensor is developed for simultaneous electrochemical detection of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and lysozyme (Lys) based on aptamer recognition by coupling "signal-on" and "signal-off" modes. On one Au electrode, two kinds of signaling probes labeled by the thiolated ferrocene (Fc)- and methy blue (MB)- were designed to hybridize with IFN-γ and Lys aptamers respectively to form partial complementary DNA duplexes. In the presence of IFN-γ and Lys, the target-aptamer interaction led to the release of aptamer from duplex DNA structure. The single-stranded signaling probes thus suffered from the conformation changes, which resulted in the decreased (or increased) oxidation peak current of Fc (or MB) according to the "signal-off (or signal-on)" mode. Electrodes were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under the optimized conditions, the signal changes were quantified using square wave voltammetry (SWV). This proposed biosensor for IFN-γ and Lys possessed linear detection range from 0.01 to 10 nM and 0.1 to 100 nM, with the detection limits of 1.14×10(-3) nM and 0.0164 nM, respectively. Moreover, this biosensor was readily regenerated and proved successful toward the practical analysis. The proposed strategy could provide more integrated and reliable information for acute leukemia evaluation.

  8. Cloning and biological characterization of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Premraj, Avinash; Sreekumar, E; Rasool, T J

    2006-02-01

    Interferon-gamma, a major immunomodulatory cytokine, of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was characterized at molecular level. Complementary DNA and essential promoter region were cloned and sequenced, and functional recombinant protein was expressed in bacterial system. The cDNA has 97.8% nucleotide identity with 11-nucleotide and four-amino acid variations, and the essential promoter region has 98.4% identity with five-nucleotide variations and a four-nucleotide deletion in comparison with the corresponding bovine sequences. All the major promoter elements such as NF IL-2 like motif, cyclosporin sensitive binding element and GATA motif are strictly conserved. Recombinant buffalo-IFN-gamma expressed in bacterial system reacted with an anti-bovine-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody in Western blot and showed antiviral activity against buffalo pox virus in cultured Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells by inhibiting virus induced cytopathic effect. The study shows high level sequence similarity of IFN-gamma among ruminants. In view of the immunomodulatory and antiviral activities of IFN-gamma, this molecule will be useful in better understanding of the immune system of water buffaloes.

  9. Purification and characterization of the human interferon-. gamma. receptor from placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, J.; Sheehan, K.C.F.; Chance, C.; Thomas, M.L.; Schreiber, R.D. )

    1988-07-01

    Purification of the human interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) receptor was facilitated by identification of human placenta as a large-scale receptor source. When analyzed in radioligand binding experiments, intact placental membranes and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins expressed 1.3 and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 12} receptors per mg of protein, respectively, values that were 13-163 times greater than that observed for U937 membranes. Two protocols were followed to purify the IFN-{gamma} receptor from octyl glucoside-solubilized membranes: (i) sequential affinity chromatography over wheat germ agglutinin- and INF-{gamma}-Sepharose and (ii) affinity chromatography over columns containing receptor-specific monoclonal antibody and wheat germ agglutinin. Both procedures resulted in fully active preparations that were 70-90% pure. Purified receptor migrated as a single molecular species of 90 kDa either when analyzed on silver-stained NaDodSO{sub 4}/polyacrylamide gels or when subjected to electrophoretic transfer blot analysis using a labeled IFN-{gamma} receptor-specific monoclonal antibody. The identity of the 90-kDa component as the receptor was confirmed by demonstrating its ability to specifically bind {sup 125}I-labeled IFN-{gamma} following NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. The ligand binding site, the epitope for the receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, and all of the N-linked carbohydrate could be localized to the 55-kDa domain of the molecule.

  10. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  11. Evaluation of a visualization assay for blood on forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Lepez, Trees; Van Hoofstat, David; Deforce, Dieter

    2015-05-01

    In forensics, bloodstains on dark fabrics might be invisible for the naked eye. Although several visualization, presumptive, and confirmatory blood tests have been developed, all have one or more disadvantages, especially on DNA analysis. We report here the use of a visualization assay that can visually detect blood drops up to 1/20 dilution. In this assay, the fabric is placed between two wet filter papers and covered by glass surfaces on both sides. Pressure is applied on the glass surfaces in which bloodstains transfer onto the filter papers through capillary forces. Detected stains can be tested with other more sensitive presumptive blood tests performed on the filter paper. Even more, DNA analysis can be performed on the transferred bloodstains. The presented visualization assay is easy to perform, extremely cheap, requires little hands on time, and does not affect bloodstain pattern analysis.

  12. Interferences from blood collection tube components on clinical chemistry assays.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Raffick A R; Remaley, Alan T

    2014-01-01

    Improper design or use of blood collection devices can adversely affect the accuracy of laboratory test results. Vascular access devices, such as catheters and needles, exert shear forces during blood flow, which creates a predisposition to cell lysis. Components from blood collection tubes, such as stoppers, lubricants, surfactants, and separator gels, can leach into specimens and/or adsorb analytes from a specimen; special tube additives may also alter analyte stability. Because of these interactions with blood specimens, blood collection devices are a potential source of pre-analytical error in laboratory testing. Accurate laboratory testing requires an understanding of the complex interactions between collection devices and blood specimens. Manufacturers, vendors, and clinical laboratorians must consider the pre-analytical challenges in laboratory testing. Although other authors have described the effects of endogenous substances on clinical assay results, the effects/impact of blood collection tube additives and components have not been well systematically described or explained. This review aims to identify and describe blood collection tube additives and their components and the strategies used to minimize their effects on clinical chemistry assays.

  13. Interferences from blood collection tube components on clinical chemistry assays

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Raffick A.R.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Improper design or use of blood collection devices can adversely affect the accuracy of laboratory test results. Vascular access devices, such as catheters and needles, exert shear forces during blood flow, which creates a predisposition to cell lysis. Components from blood collection tubes, such as stoppers, lubricants, surfactants, and separator gels, can leach into specimens and/or adsorb analytes from a specimen; special tube additives may also alter analyte stability. Because of these interactions with blood specimens, blood collection devices are a potential source of pre-analytical error in laboratory testing. Accurate laboratory testing requires an understanding of the complex interactions between collection devices and blood specimens. Manufacturers, vendors, and clinical laboratorians must consider the pre-analytical challenges in laboratory testing. Although other authors have described the effects of endogenous substances on clinical assay results, the effects/impact of blood collection tube additives and components have not been well systematically described or explained. This review aims to identify and describe blood collection tube additives and their components and the strategies used to minimize their effects on clinical chemistry assays. PMID:24627713

  14. Augmentation of the human monocyte/macrophage chemiluminescence response during short-term exposure to interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Bates, E J; Kowanko, I C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of short-term (30 min) pre-incubation of human monocytes and macrophages (3-day cultured monocytes) with leucocyte-derived human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) were examined. Pre-incubation of either monocytes or macrophages with rTNF-alpha or IFN-gamma (100 U/5 x 10(5) cells) augmented their respiratory burst to formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP), measured by the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assay. In addition, both cell types showed a burst of respiratory activity in the presence of rTNF-alpha or IFN-gamma only. The effects of IFN-gamma were removed by adsorption with an anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody and those of rTNF-alpha were abolished by heating at 100 degrees C, or by the addition of anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody. The results demonstrate that both IFN-gamma and rTNF-alpha are stimulators of monocytes and macrophages, and rapidly alter the capacity of the cells to respond to fMLP, which binds to cell surface receptors. PMID:2113442

  15. Treatment of murine macrophages with murine interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha enhances uptake and intracellular killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Pierangeli, S S; Sonnenfeld, G

    1993-01-01

    Murine interferon-gamma (MuIFN-gamma) and murine tumour necrosis-alpha (MuTNF-alpha) are known to be potent immunomodulators of several aspects of the immune response, and they have been shown to exert profound effects on macrophages and monocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of MuIFN-gamma and MuTNF-alpha on the phagocytosis (uptake and intracellular killing) of opsonized Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unstimulated peritoneal macrophages obtained from CBA/c mice were exposed to different concentrations of recombinant forms of the cytokines (rMuIFN-gamma and rMuTNF-alpha) for different periods of time. Phagocytosis was assayed using different concentrations of opsonized Ps. aeruginosa. In all cases the pretreatment of the cells with the cytokines increased significantly the uptake and the intracellular killing of bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. rMuTNF-alpha was effective only at 1000 U/ml. Combined treatment with the cytokines showed a less than additive effect with rMuIFN-gamma and rMuTNF-alpha at concentrations of 10 U/ml and 100 U/ml. In the in vivo experiments, peritoneal macrophages obtained from rMuIFN-gamma- or rMuTNF-alpha-treated mice showed enhancement of the intracellular killing of opsonized bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:8348741

  16. Expression of biologically active recombinant equine interferon-gamma by two different baculovirus gene expression systems using insect cells and silkworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Donglai; Murakami, Kenji; Liu, Nihong; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Kokuho, Takehiro; Inumaru, Shigeki; Matsumura, Tomio; Kondo, Takashi; Nakano, Katsushige; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2002-10-21

    The full-length equine interferon-gamma (eIFN-gamma) cDNA, including the secretion signal peptide coding region, was recloned into baculovirus transfer vector pAcYM1. This vector was co-transfected with Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA or hybrid nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA into Spodoptera frugiperda cells. The recombinant viruses, named AcEIFN-gamma and HyEIFN-gamma, were then recovered. Recombinant eIFN-gamma (reIFN-gamma) was accumulated in the culture fluid of the AcEIFN-gamma or HyEIFN-gamma infected Tricoplusia ni -derived cell line, BTI TN 5B1-4, and hemolymph of HyEIFN-gamma infected silkworm larvae. These reIFN-gamma forms were shown to be 14, 16, 18 and 20kDa proteins, and glycosylated as confirmed by SDS-PAGE and tunicamycin treatment. Both reIFN-gamma proteins, showed high-level biological activities to vesicular stomatitis virus by cytopathic effect reduction assay, and MHC class II antigen induction on the equine fetal kidney-78 cell line. PMID:12445800

  17. Production of biologically active recombinant bovine interferon-gamma by two different baculovirus gene expression systems using insect cells and silkworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Uchiyama, A; Kokuho, T; Mori, Y; Sentsui, H; Yada, T; Tanigawa, M; Kuwano, A; Nagaya, H; Ishiyama, S; Kaki, H; Yokomizo, Y; Inumaru, S

    2001-01-01

    The full-length bovine interferon-gamma (bIFN-gamma) cDNA, including the secretion signal peptide coding region was recloned into baculovirus transfer vectors pAcYM1 and pBm050. These vectors were co-transfected with Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) or Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) DNA into Spodoptera frugiperda cells (SF21AE) and Bombyx mori cells (BmN), respectively. The recombinant viruses, named AcBIFN-gamma and BmBIFN-gamma, were then recovered. Recombinant bIFN-gamma (rbIFN-gamma) was accumulated in the culture fluid of AcBIFN-gamma-infected Trichoplusia ni cells and BmBIFN-gamma-infected silkworm larvae. These rbIFN-gamma forms were shown to be glycosylated 20 and 22 kDa proteins as confirmed by SDS-PAGE and tunicamycin treatment. These products were sensitive to cystein proteinase. Both rbIFN-gamma proteins, showed high-level biological activities by plaque reduction assay using vesicular stomatitis virus, and MHC class II antigen induction on bovine macrophage cells. PMID:11145838

  18. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  19. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor. PMID:2530216

  20. Demonstration and partial characterization of the interferon-gamma receptor on human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Celada, A; Allen, R; Esparza, I; Gray, P W; Schreiber, R D

    1985-01-01

    Radioiodinated recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) bound to human monocytes, U937, and HL60 cells in a specific, saturable, and reversible manner. At 4 degrees C, the different cell types bound 3,000-7,000 molecules of IFN gamma, and binding was of comparable affinity (Ka = 4-12 X 10(8) M-1). No change in the receptor was observed after monocytes differentiated to macrophages or when the cell lines were pharmacologically induced to differentiate. The functional relevance of the receptor was validated by the demonstration that receptor occupancy correlated with induction of Fc receptors on U937. Binding studies using U937 permeabilized with digitonin showed that only 46% of the total receptor pool was expressed at the cell surface. The receptor appears to be a protein, since treatment of U937 with trypsin or pronase reduced 125I-IFN gamma binding by 87 and 95%, respectively. At 37 degrees C, ligand was internalized, since 32% of the cell-associated IFN gamma became resistant to trypsin stripping. Monocytes degraded 125I-IFN gamma into trichloroacetic acid-soluble counts at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C, at an approximate rate of 5,000 molecules/cell per h. The receptor was partially characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of purified U937 membranes that had been incubated with 125I-IFN gamma. After cross-linking, the receptor-ligand complex migrated as a broad band that displayed an Mr of 104,000 +/- 18,000 at the top and 84,000 +/- 6,000 at the bottom. These results thereby define and partially characterize the IFN gamma receptor of human mononuclear phagocytes. Images PMID:2934408

  1. Topical Non-Invasive Gene Delivery using Gemini Nanoparticles in Interferon-gamma-deficient Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Badea,I.; Wettig, S.; Verrall, R.; Foldvari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous gene therapy, although a promising approach for many dermatologic diseases, has not progressed to the stage of clinical trials, mainly due to the lack of an effective gene delivery system. The main objective of this study was to construct and evaluate gemini nanoparticles as a topical formulation for the interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}) gene in an IFN-{gamma}-deficient mouse model. Nanoparticles based on the gemini surfactant 16-3-16 (NP16-DNA) and another cationic lipid cholesteryl 3{beta}-(-N-[dimethylamino-ethyl] carbamate) [Dc-chol] (NPDc-DNA) were prepared and characterized. Zetasizer measurement indicated a bimodal distribution of 146 and 468 nm average particle sizes for the NP16-DNA ({zeta}-potential +51 mV) nanoparticles and monomodal distribution of 625 nm ({zeta}-potential +44 mV) for the NPDc-DNA. Circular dichroism studies showed that the gemini surfactant compacted the plasmid more efficiently compared to the Dc-chol. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements revealed structural polymorphism in the NP16-DNA nanoparticles, with lamellar and Fd3m cubic phases present, while for the NPDc-DNA two lamellar phases could be distinguished. In vivo, both topically applied nanoparticles induced higher gene expression compared to untreated control and naked DNA (means of 0.480 and 0.398 ng/cm{sup 2} vs 0.067 and 0.167 ng/cm{sup 2}). However, treatment with NPDc-DNA caused skin irritation, and skin damage, whereas NP16-DNA showed no skin toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated that topical cutaneous gene delivery using gemini surfactant-based nanoparticles in IFN-{gamma}-deficient mice was safe and may provide increased gene expression in the skin due to structural complexity of NP16 nanoparticles (lamellar-cubic phases).

  2. Mechanism underlying defective interferon gamma-induced IDO expression in non-obese diabetic mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Moeen Rezakhanlou, Alireza; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) can locally suppress T cell-mediated immune responses. It has been shown that defective self-tolerance in early prediabetic female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can be attributed to the impaired interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)- induced IDO expression in dendritic cells of these animals. As IFN-γ can induce IDO in both dendritic cells and fibroblasts, we asked the question of whether there exists a similar defect in IFN-γ-induced IDO expression in NOD mice dermal fibroblasts. To this end, we examined the effect of IFN-γ on expression of IDO and its enzymatic activity in NOD dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that fibroblasts from either prediabetic (8 wks of age) female or male, and diabetic female or male (12 and 24 wks of age respectively) NOD mice failed to express IDO in response to IFN-γ treatment. To find underlying mechanisms, we scrutinized the IFN- γ signaling pathway and investigated expression of other IFN-γ-modulated factors including major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and type I collagen (COL-I). The findings revealed a defect of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation in NOD cells relative to that of controls. Furthermore, we found an increase in MHC-I and suppression of COL-I expression in fibroblasts from both NOD and control mice following IFN-γ treatment; indicating that the impaired response to IFN-γ in NOD fibroblasts is specific to IDO gene. Finally, we showed that an IFN-γ-independent IDO expression pathway i.e. lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated-c-Jun kinase is operative in NOD mice fibroblast. In conclusion, the findings of this study for the first time indicate that IFN-γ fails to induce IDO expression in NOD dermal fibroblasts; this may partially be due to defective STAT1 phosphorylation in IFN-γ-induced-IDO signaling pathway.

  3. A-Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17 Enzymatically Degrades Interferon-gamma

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Maiko; Wada, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Katsumata, Yuta; Makihira, Seicho; Kawai, Toshi; Taubman, Martin A.; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a pleiotropic cytokine that exerts anti-tumor and anti-osteoclastogenic effects. Although transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of IFN-γ is well understood, subsequent modifications of secreted IFN-γ are not fully elucidated. Previous research indicates that some cancer cells escape immune surveillance and metastasize into bone tissue by inducing osteoclastic bone resorption. Peptidases of the a-disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family are implicated in cancer cell proliferation and tumor progression. We hypothesized that the ADAM enzymes expressed by cancer cells degrades IFN-γ and attenuates IFN-γ-mediated anti-tumorigenic and anti-osteoclastogenic effects. Recombinant ADAM17 degraded IFN-γ into small fragments. The addition of ADAM17 to the culture supernatant of stimulated mouse splenocytes decreased IFN-γ concentration. However, ADAM17 inhibition in the stimulated mouse T-cells prevented IFN-γ degradation. ADAM17-expressing human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 also degraded recombinant IFN-γ, but this was attenuated by ADAM17 inhibition. Degraded IFN-γ lost the functionality including the inhibititory effect on osteoclastogenesis. This is the first study to demonstrate the extracellular proteolytic degradation of IFN-γ by ADAM17. These results suggest that ADAM17-mediated degradation of IFN-γ may block the anti-tumorigenic and anti-osteoclastogenic effects of IFN-γ. ADAM17 inhibition may be useful for the treatment of attenuated cancer immune surveillance and/or bone metastases. PMID:27573075

  4. Effects of Chicken Interferon Gamma on Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Dunwoody, Robert P.; Marcano, Valerie; Diel, Diego G.; Williams, Robert J.; Gogal, Robert M.; Brown, Corrie C.; Miller, Patti J.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFNγ) during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFNγ with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) antigens were evaluated for their ability to enhance the avian immune response and their protective capacity upon challenge with virulent NDV. These systems consisted of: 1) a DNA vaccine expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion (F) protein co-administered with a vector expressing the chIFNγ gene for in ovo and booster vaccination, 2) a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing the chIFNγ gene (rZJ1*L/IFNγ) used as a live vaccine delivered in ovo and into juvenile chickens, and 3) the same rZJ1*L/IFNγ virus used as an inactivated vaccine for juvenile chickens. Co-administration of chIFNγ with a DNA vaccine expressing the F protein resulted in higher levels of morbidity and mortality, and higher amounts of virulent virus shed after challenge when compared to the group that did not receive chIFNγ. The live vaccine system co-delivering chIFNγ did not enhanced post-vaccination antibody response, nor improved survival after hatch, when administered in ovo, and did not affect survival after challenge when administered to juvenile chickens. The low dose of the inactivated vaccine co-delivering active chIFNγ induced lower antibody titers than the groups that did not receive the cytokine. The high dose of this vaccine did not increase the antibody titers or antigen-specific memory response, and did not reduce the amount of challenge virus shed or mortality after challenge. In summary, regardless of the delivery system, chIFNγ, when administered simultaneously with the vaccine antigen, did not enhance Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:27409587

  5. Low-dose interferon gamma renders neuroblastoma more susceptible to interleukin-2 immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Lieberman, M D; Reynolds, J V; Shou, J; Ziegler, M M; Daly, J M

    1991-04-01

    Neuroblastoma remains a common and deadly childhood tumor, resistant to both surgical and chemo/radiotherapeutic intervention in its advanced stages. The role of immunotherapy in such cancers has yet to be defined. In previous work, we found that the addition of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) to 3-day in vitro tissue cultures of the murine neuroblastoma C1300, led not only to the tumor's increased cell surface expression of the immunologically important major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen, but also to an increased susceptibility of such modified tumor to subsequent lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell lysis. In this study, we sought to determine the in vivo applicability of these findings. Initial dose-response studies helped define a regimen of rIFN-gamma's administration that upregulated MHC class I without activating host natural killer (NK) activity. A/J mice bearing 7-day-old subcutaneous C1300 were randomized to receive daily morning injections of either 0, 25,000, 50,000, or 100,000 U of rIFN-gamma intraperitoneally for 6 days. Animals were killed at days 3, 6, and 9 after initiation of rIFN-gamma therapy, and tumors were excised, digested, and stained for both MHC class I and II expression. At the time of sacrifice, splenocytes from each animal were tested for NK cytotoxicity toward YAC (an NK-sensitive lymphoma) and C1300. These studies defined 3 days of therapy with 25,000 U as a "priming" dose that increased expression of class I with minimal impact on NK activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Anti-inflammatory cytokines in asthma and allergy: interleukin-10, interleukin-12, interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, F

    2001-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine derived from CD4+ T-helper type 2 (T(H2)) cells identified as a suppressor of cytokines from T-helper type 1(T(H1)) cells. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is produced by B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, and primarily regulates T(H1) cell differentiation, while suppressing the expansion of T(H2) cell clones. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a product of T(H1) cells and exerts inhibitory effects on T(H2) cell differentiation. These cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergies. In this context, IL-12 and IFN-gamma production in asthma have been found to be decreased, and this may reduce their capacity to inhibit IgE synthesis and allergic inflammation. IL-10 is a potent inhibitor of monocyte/macrophage function, suppressing the production of many pro-inflammatory cytokines. A relative underproduction of IL-10 from alveolar macrophages of atopic asthmatics has been reported. Therapeutic modulation of T(H1)/T(H2) imbalance in asthma and allergy by mycobacterial vaccine, specific immunotherapy and cytoline-guanosine dinucleotide motif may lead to increases in IL-12 and IFN-gamma production. Stimulation of IL-10 production by antigen-specific T-cells during immunotherapy may lead to anergy through inhibition of CD28-costimulatory molecule signalling by IL-10s anti-inflammatory effect on basophils, mast cells and eosinophils. PMID:11405550

  7. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor.

  8. Effects of Chicken Interferon Gamma on Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Dunwoody, Robert P; Marcano, Valerie; Diel, Diego G; Williams, Robert J; Gogal, Robert M; Brown, Corrie C; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    More effective vaccines are needed to control avian diseases. The use of chicken interferon gamma (chIFNγ) during vaccination is a potentially important but controversial approach that may improve the immune response to antigens. In the present study, three different systems to co-deliver chIFNγ with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) antigens were evaluated for their ability to enhance the avian immune response and their protective capacity upon challenge with virulent NDV. These systems consisted of: 1) a DNA vaccine expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion (F) protein co-administered with a vector expressing the chIFNγ gene for in ovo and booster vaccination, 2) a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing the chIFNγ gene (rZJ1*L/IFNγ) used as a live vaccine delivered in ovo and into juvenile chickens, and 3) the same rZJ1*L/IFNγ virus used as an inactivated vaccine for juvenile chickens. Co-administration of chIFNγ with a DNA vaccine expressing the F protein resulted in higher levels of morbidity and mortality, and higher amounts of virulent virus shed after challenge when compared to the group that did not receive chIFNγ. The live vaccine system co-delivering chIFNγ did not enhanced post-vaccination antibody response, nor improved survival after hatch, when administered in ovo, and did not affect survival after challenge when administered to juvenile chickens. The low dose of the inactivated vaccine co-delivering active chIFNγ induced lower antibody titers than the groups that did not receive the cytokine. The high dose of this vaccine did not increase the antibody titers or antigen-specific memory response, and did not reduce the amount of challenge virus shed or mortality after challenge. In summary, regardless of the delivery system, chIFNγ, when administered simultaneously with the vaccine antigen, did not enhance Newcastle disease virus vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:27409587

  9. Development of an aptamer beacon for detection of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Tuleuova, Nazgul; Jones, Caroline N; Yan, Jun; Ramanculov, Erlan; Yokobayashi, Yohei; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Traditional antibody-based affinity sensing strategies employ multiple reagents and washing steps and are unsuitable for real-time detection of analyte binding. Aptamers, on the other hand, may be designed to monitor binding events directly, in real-time, without the need for secondary labels. The goal of the present study was to design an aptamer beacon for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based detection of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)--an important inflammatory cytokine. Variants of DNA aptamer modified with biotin moieties and spacers were immobilized on avidin-coated surfaces and characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The SPR studies showed that immobilization of aptamer via the 3' end resulted in the best binding IFN-gamma (K(d) = 3.44 nM). This optimal aptamer variant was then used to construct a beacon by hybridizing fluorophore-labeled aptamer with an antisense oligonucleotide strand carrying a quencher. SPR studies revealed that IFN-gamma binding with an aptamer beacon occurred within 15 min of analyte introduction--suggesting dynamic replacement of the quencher-complementary strand by IFN-gamma molecules. To further highlight biosensing applications, aptamer beacon molecules were immobilized inside microfluidic channels and challenged with varying concentration of analyte. Fluorescence microscopy revealed low fluorescence in the absence of analyte and high fluorescence after introduction of IFN-gamma. Importantly, unlike traditional antibody-based immunoassays, the signal was observed directly upon binding of analyte without the need for multiple washing steps. The surface immobilized aptamer beacon had a linear range from 5 to 100 nM and a lower limit of detection of 5 nM IFN-gamma. In conclusion, we designed a FRET-based aptamer beacon for monitoring of an inflammatory cytokine-IFN-gamma. In the future, this biosensing strategy will be employed to monitor dynamics of cytokine production by the immune cells.

  10. Interferon-gamma enhances megakaryocyte colony-stimulating activity in murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuji-Takayama, K; Tahata, H; Harashima, A; Nishida, Y; Izumi, N; Fukuda, S; Ohta, T; Kurimoto, M

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated previously that interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) accelerates platelet recovery in mice with 5-FU induced-marrow aplasia in vivo. However, the mechanism for the regulation of megakaryocyte development induced by IFN-gamma in bone marrow cells in vivo remains unknown. To further study the effects of IFN-gamma on megakaryocyte development, various steps during IFN-gamma-mediated accelerated differentiation of the megakaryocytes were investigated in serum-free cultures of murine bone marrow cells in vitro. IFN-gamma markedly induced acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, a marker of murine megakaryocytic cells, accompanied by increased colony formation of the megakaryocyte lineage. A prominent increase in megakaryocyte number was observed after IFN-gamma treatment. All of these effects were dependent on the presence of IL-3, and, therefore, these results suggest that IFN-gamma acts as a megakaryocyte potentiator (Meg-POT). However, IFN-gamma did not enhance megakaryocyte maturation with respect to increase in cell size. The effects of IFN-gamma on megakaryocyte maturation were similar to those observed after treatment with higher doses of IL-3 alone. Meg-POT is defined as a factor that induces megakaryocyte maturation. Since IFN-gamma enhanced IL-3-dependent megakaryocyte colony formation and proliferation rather than megakaryocyte maturation, the effects on megakaryocyte development, which were induced by IFN-gamma treatment, seem to be different from the effects of a Meg-POT. We, therefore, propose a new function for IFN-gamma as an enhancer of megakaryocyte colony-stimulating factor activity. The effect of IFN-gamma in vitro appears to correlate well with the acceleration of platelet recovery in vivo.

  11. Primary human adult lung epithelial cells in vitro: response to interferon-gamma and cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, L; Dominguez, M; Yacoub, M

    1993-01-01

    Primary human adult lung epithelial cells (ALEC) were established in culture using the most distal parts of the lung to avoid the airways. Immunocytochemical peroxidase staining and semiquantitative flow cytometry were used to characterize the cells in conjunction with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The cells showed a constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens, patchy expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and a weak patchy expression of MHC class II antigens (detected using immunocytochemical staining). Incubation of the primary ALEC with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (250 U/ml) stimulated an up-regulation of the expression of these three antigens to varying degrees; expression of MHC class I antigens and ICAM-1 molecules showed an up-regulation at 10 hr after the start of the treatment, reaching a peak at 48 hr, maintaining it for the next 24 hr and then, steadily and progressively, losing it towards the end of the experiment at 96 hr. Expression of HLA-DR showed an up-regulation at 17 hr after the start of the treatment, reaching a peak at 72 hr and maintaining it for the next 24 hr. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of ALEC in culture caused an up-regulation of expression of class I antigens and ICAM-1, but not DR. However, when the infected cells were incubated with IFN-gamma, an up-regulation in the expression of DR took place. Therefore, within the micro-environment of the transplanted lung the presence of cytokines (IFN-gamma) produced by infiltrating activated mononuclear cells, may render the lung epithelial cells capable of acting as antigen-presenting cells, expressing high levels of class I antigens, ICAM-1 and class II antigens, activating CD8 and CD4 cells thus playing a major part in the process of rejection of the lung allograft; themselves becoming a primary target in the process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8099565

  12. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-01-01

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7692452

  13. Deficiency of interferon-gamma or its receptor promotes colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Song, Zhiyu; Chu, Jiahui; Qu, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    Genetic variations in interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and its receptor (IFNγR) subunits are closely associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and survival after diagnosis. However, the role of loss of IFN-γ or IFNγR function in the pathogenesis of CRC remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous IFN-γ deficiency in adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc)-mediated intestinal tumor by developing a variant of Apc(Min/+) mice. The Apc(Min/+)IFN-γ(+/-) mice presented with increased number and size of adenomas, and 41.7% of these mice developed adenocarcinoma. Molecular analyses of the adenomas suggested that heterozygous deletion of IFN-γ promoted EGFR/Erk1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In vitro, IFN-γ administration inhibited Apc-mutated HT-29 colon cancer cell proliferation and had no effect on the proliferation of HCT-116 colon cancer cells that express wild-type Apc. Besides, we challenged HT-29 cells with small interfering RNA targeting one of its receptor subunits IFNγR1. We found that knockdown of IFNγR1 in HT-29 cells stimulated cell proliferation and colony formation, which was also related to the regulation of EGFR/Erk1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, our results strongly support the notion that IFN-γ and IFNγR1 act as a rate-limiting factor in the development of CRC, uncovering a novel role for them in cancer biology.

  14. A-Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17 Enzymatically Degrades Interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Maiko; Wada, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Katsumata, Yuta; Makihira, Seicho; Kawai, Toshi; Taubman, Martin A; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a pleiotropic cytokine that exerts anti-tumor and anti-osteoclastogenic effects. Although transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of IFN-γ is well understood, subsequent modifications of secreted IFN-γ are not fully elucidated. Previous research indicates that some cancer cells escape immune surveillance and metastasize into bone tissue by inducing osteoclastic bone resorption. Peptidases of the a-disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family are implicated in cancer cell proliferation and tumor progression. We hypothesized that the ADAM enzymes expressed by cancer cells degrades IFN-γ and attenuates IFN-γ-mediated anti-tumorigenic and anti-osteoclastogenic effects. Recombinant ADAM17 degraded IFN-γ into small fragments. The addition of ADAM17 to the culture supernatant of stimulated mouse splenocytes decreased IFN-γ concentration. However, ADAM17 inhibition in the stimulated mouse T-cells prevented IFN-γ degradation. ADAM17-expressing human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-453 also degraded recombinant IFN-γ, but this was attenuated by ADAM17 inhibition. Degraded IFN-γ lost the functionality including the inhibititory effect on osteoclastogenesis. This is the first study to demonstrate the extracellular proteolytic degradation of IFN-γ by ADAM17. These results suggest that ADAM17-mediated degradation of IFN-γ may block the anti-tumorigenic and anti-osteoclastogenic effects of IFN-γ. ADAM17 inhibition may be useful for the treatment of attenuated cancer immune surveillance and/or bone metastases. PMID:27573075

  15. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  16. T helper cell-mediated interferon-gamma expression after human parvovirus B19 infection: persisting VP2-specific and transient VP1u-specific activity.

    PubMed

    Franssila, R; Auramo, J; Modrow, S; Möbs, M; Oker-Blom, C; Käpylä, P; Söderlund-Venermo, M; Hedman, K

    2005-10-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a small non-enveloped DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid consisting of proteins of only two species, the major protein VP2 and the minor protein VP1. VP2 is contained within VP1, which has an additional unique portion (VP1u) of 227 amino acids. We determined the ability of eukaryotically expressed parvovirus B19 virus-like particles consisting of VP1 and VP2 in the ratio recommended for vaccine use, or of VP2 alone, to stimulate, in an HLA class II restricted manner, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to proliferate and to secrete interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-10 cytokines among recently and remotely B19 infected subjects. PBMC reactivity with VP1u was determined specifically with a prokaryotically expressed VP1u antigen. In general, B19-specific IFN-gamma responses were stronger than IL-10 responses in both recent and remote infection; however, IL-10 responses were readily detectable among both groups, with the exception of patients with relapsed or persisting symptoms who showed strikingly low IL-10 responses. Whereas VP1u-specific IFN-gamma responses were very strong among the recently infected subjects, the VP1u-specific IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses were virtually absent among the remotely infected subjects. The disappearance of VP1u-specific IFN-gamma expression is surprising, as B-cell immunity against VP1u is well maintained.

  17. T helper cell-mediated interferon-gamma expression after human parvovirus B19 infection: persisting VP2-specific and transient VP1u-specific activity

    PubMed Central

    Franssila, R; Auramo, J; Modrow, S; Möbs, M; Oker-Blom, C; Käpylä, P; Söderlund-Venermo, M; Hedman, K

    2005-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a small non-enveloped DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid consisting of proteins of only two species, the major protein VP2 and the minor protein VP1. VP2 is contained within VP1, which has an additional unique portion (VP1u) of 227 amino acids. We determined the ability of eukaryotically expressed parvovirus B19 virus-like particles consisting of VP1 and VP2 in the ratio recommended for vaccine use, or of VP2 alone, to stimulate, in an HLA class II restricted manner, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to proliferate and to secrete interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-10 cytokines among recently and remotely B19 infected subjects. PBMC reactivity with VP1u was determined specifically with a prokaryotically expressed VP1u antigen. In general, B19-specific IFN-γ responses were stronger than IL-10 responses in both recent and remote infection; however, IL-10 responses were readily detectable among both groups, with the exception of patients with relapsed or persisting symptoms who showed strikingly low IL-10 responses. Whereas VP1u-specific IFN-γ responses were very strong among the recently infected subjects, the VP1u-specific IFN-γ and IL-10 responses were virtually absent among the remotely infected subjects. The disappearance of VP1u-specific IFN-γ expression is surprising, as B-cell immunity against VP1u is well maintained. PMID:16178856

  18. Expression and characterization of recombinant interferon gamma (IFN-γ) from the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) and its effect on Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Peña, M. T.; Adams, J. E.; Adams, L. B; Gillis, T. P.; Williams, D. L.; Spencer, J. S.; Krahenbuhl, J. L; Truman, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    Armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) manifest the full histopathological spectrum of leprosy, and are hosts of choice for in vivo propagation of Mycobacterium leprae. Though potentially useful as a model of leprosy pathogenesis, few armadillo specific reagents exist. We have identified a region of high homology to the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) of other mammals within the recently published armadillo whole genomic sequence. cDNA was made from ConA-stimulated armadillo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), amplified, and cloned into a pET expression vector for transformation and over-expression in E. coli. The recombinant protein (rDnIFN-γ) was characterized by western blot and its biological function confirmed with biosassays including intracellular killing of Toxoplasma gondii and induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase activity. In using rIFN-γ to activate macrophages from mice, humans or armadillos, similar to humans, rIFN-γ-activated armadillo MΦ did not produce nitrite and or inhibit the viability of M. leprae in vitro. Conversely, murine rIFN-γ-activated mouse MΦ produced high levels of nitrite and killed intracellular M. leprae in vitro. These data indicate that the response of armadillo MΦto rDnIFN-γ is similar to that which occurs in humans, and demonstrates a potentially important value of the armadillo as a model in leprosy research. PMID:18558493

  19. Characterization of the oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced major histocompatibility complex class I and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, M; Lantz, M; MacGregor, R D; Garovoy, M R; Hunt, C A

    1994-10-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II genes and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) are regulated by interferon-gamma in a variety of cell types. We have previously shown that the oligodeoxynucleotide 5'-GGG GTT GGT TGT GTT GGG TGT TGT GT-RNH2 (oligo I) inhibits the interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of MHC Class I and ICAM-1 proteins in the K562 cell line. We have now investigated the mechanism of action of oligo I and report that it acts by inhibiting the binding of interferon-gamma to cells. We also show that the dose-response curves, the selectivity profile, and the kinetics of oligo I are consistent with this novel mechanism of action. The dose-response curves for oligo I, obtained using antibodies against the MHC Class I heavy chain, beta 2-microglobulin, or ICAM-1, are almost superimposable at each observation time. MHC Class I induction by 6400 units/ml interferon-alpha or interferon-beta or ICAM-1 enhancement by 800 units/ml tumor necrosis factor-alpha is not inhibited by oligo I. However, the synergistic induction of MHC Class I by mixtures of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma is inhibited. Oligo I belongs to a class of active oligodeoxynucleotides that inhibits interferon-gamma-induced MHC Class I and ICAM-1 in K562 cells. The activity and potency is sequence-dependent, but remarkably different sequences can have comparable effects. The activity of oligo I in the HeLa S3 cell line inhibits the interferon-gamma-mediated enhancement of both ICAM-1 and MHC Class II DR and the interferon-gamma-mediated reduction in transferrin receptor expression. Thus, oligo I appears to specifically inhibit interferon-gamma-induced changes in protein expression, which is consistent with oligo I acting at an early step(s) in the induction process. Taken together, our results show that oligo I exerts its effects by inhibiting the association of interferon-gamma with the cell surface, which is a novel mechanism of action for

  20. In vivo evidence for interferon-gamma-mediated homeostatic mechanisms in small intestine of the NHE3 Na+/H+ exchanger knockout model of congenital diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Woo, Alison L; Gildea, Lucy A; Tack, Leslie M; Miller, Marian L; Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E; Finkelman, Fred D; Hassett, Daniel J; Shull, Gary E

    2002-12-13

    Mice lacking NHE3, the major absorptive Na(+)/H(+) exchanger in the intestine, are the only animal model of congenital diarrhea. To identify molecular changes underlying compensatory mechanisms activated in chronic diarrheas, cDNA microarrays and Northern blot analyses were used to compare global mRNA expression patterns in small intestine of NHE3-deficient and wild-type mice. Among the genes identified were members of the RegIII family of growth factors, which may contribute to the increased absorptive area, and a large number of interferon-gamma-responsive genes. The latter finding is of particular interest, since interferon-gamma has been shown to regulate ion transporter activities in intestinal epithelial cells. Serum interferon-gamma was elevated 5-fold in NHE3-deficient mice; however, there was no evidence of inflammation, and unlike conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, levels of other cytokines were unchanged. In addition, quantitative PCR analysis showed that up-regulation of interferon-gamma mRNA was localized to the small intestine and did not occur in the colon, spleen, or kidney. These in vivo data suggest that elevated interferon-gamma, produced by gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the small intestine, is part of a homeostatic mechanism that is activated in response to the intestinal absorptive defect in order to regulate the fluidity of the intestinal tract. PMID:12370192

  1. Interferon-Gamma Receptor Signaling Plays an Important Role in Restraining Murine Ovarian Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Guanglin; Leigh, Nicholas D.; Du, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Li; Cao, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell-derived cytotoxic pathways have been implicated in antitumor immune responses. The goal of this study is to characterize how these cytotoxic pathways influence ovarian cancer development. We have utilized the TgMISIIR-TAg transgenic mouse model which expresses the transforming SV40 TAg in the ovary, leading to spontaneous development of ovarian tumors that closely mimic human epithelial ovarian cancer. To test how perforin (Prf1), granzyme B (GzmB) and interferon-gamma (IFNg) impact tumor occurrence and progression, we bred the TgMISIIR-TAg transgene into Prf1−/−, GzmB−/−, and IFNgR1−/− mice. The transgenic females developed peritoneal tumors at 9–15 weeks and succumbed at 184 ± 37 days of age with 100% penetrance (n=41). Knockout of these cytotoxic genes does not affect tumor occurrence. However, loss of function in the IFNg signaling pathway significantly expedited tumor progression with all of the IFNg R1−/− TgMISIIR-TAg females succumbing to tumor outgrowth at 167 ± 27 days of age (p=0.0074, n=24). In contrast, loss of function of Prf1 or GzmB did not significantly impact tumor progression and host survival. Since tumor cells in the IFNg R1−/− TgMISIIR-TAg mice are IFNg R1 deficient, we used the implantable MOSEC (mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell) tumor line to validate that IFNg R signaling in host immune cells but not in tumor cells impacts tumor progression. Indeed, when the IFNg -responsive MOSEC cells were inoculated, IFNg R1−/− mice exhibited significantly higher tumor burden compared to WT mice. Furthermore, a MOSEC-splenocyte co-culture system confirmed that IFNg R1−/− immune cells were less effective than WT immune cells in controlling MOSEC tumor growth in vitro. Together, these results indicate that the IFNg R signaling pathway plays an important role in restraining murine ovarian tumor progression.

  2. Association of Interferon Gamma +874T/A Polymorphism and Leukemia Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhitong; Sun, Yifan; Zhu, Shengbo; Tang, Shifu; Liu, Chunming; Qin, Wenzhou

    2016-03-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) has antitumor and antiproliferative effects, and previous studies indicated IFN-γ +874T/A (rs2430561) polymorphism were related to the risk of many types of cancer. However, the association between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and leukemia risk remained controversial.We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement (PRISMA). Electronic database of Embase, Pubmed, and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible articles published up to December 13, 2015. The association between genetic polymorphisms and leukemia risk was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).A total of 8 studies amounting to 420 patients and 767 control subjects were retrieved for this study. Although associations between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and overall leukemia risks were lacking, decreased chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) risk was detected in the allelic model (T vs A, OR=0.660, 95%CI = 0.483-0.902, P = 0.009, I = 0.0% and P = 0.863 for heterogeneity), the codominant model (TT vs AA, OR = 0.472, 95%CI = 0.247-0.902, P = 0.023, I = 0.0% and P = 0.994 for heterogeneity), and dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 0.457, 95%CI = 0.285-0.734, P = 0.001, I = 40.3% and P = 0.195 for heterogeneity) by using fixed-effect model separately. On the contrary, results indicated T carries have an increased chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) risk in dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 1.783, 95%CI = 1.236-2.573, P = 0.002, I = 19.0% and P = 0.295 for heterogeneity).This study suggests IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism are related to CML and CLL risk. In addition, our work also points out IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism may play dual contrasting role in leukemia risk. PMID:27015189

  3. Sources of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in early immune response to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Thäle, Carsten; Kiderlen, Albrecht F

    2005-01-01

    Early, innate production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a critical step in immunological defense against certain pathogens such as intracellular bacteria (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes), viruses and fungi. While activated T cells and activated natural killer (NK) cells were initially thought to be the only relevant source of IFN-gamma, macrophages (Mphi) and dendritic cells can also be stimulated to produce IFN-gamma in vitro under certain conditions. However, a convincing analysis at single cell level of the source(s) of IFN-gamma in the early immune response to an acute bacterial infection is still missing. In the light of controversial literature, the work presented here aimed to clarify the role of NK cells and other components of the innate cellular immune system in the early IFN-gamma production, thereby avoiding in vitro artifacts whenever possible. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 (wild type (WT)) and T and B cell-deficient C57BL/6 rag-1(-/-) (RAG) mice were infected intravenously with a pathogenic strain of L. monocytogenes. Leukocyte populations of spleen and liver were discriminated by characteristic surface markers and analyzed for intracellular interleukin (IL)-12 and IFN-gamma using flow cytometry. These cells have not been restimulated in vitro nor sorted before analysis. In RAG mice, at least, a large NK1.1+ cell population produced IFN-gamma 19 h p.i. No MHC class II+ population co-expressed intracellular IFN-gamma at this time point. For comparison with the immunocompetent situation, syngeneic WT mice were also infected and sacrificed 9, 19, and 29 h later. At 9 h p.i., the situation resembled that of uninfected mice. At 19 and 29 h p.i. it was again the NK1.1+ population that contained most of the IFN-gamma-positive events. MHC II + CD 19- Mphi/dendritic cells and MHC II+ CD19+ B cells did not co-express intracellular IFN-gamma at these time points. CD3+ T cells were also found to contain intracellular IFN-gamma; most were also CD8+ and some CD4+. These

  4. Association of Interferon Gamma +874T/A Polymorphism and Leukemia Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhitong; Sun, Yifan; Zhu, Shengbo; Tang, Shifu; Liu, Chunming; Qin, Wenzhou

    2016-03-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) has antitumor and antiproliferative effects, and previous studies indicated IFN-γ +874T/A (rs2430561) polymorphism were related to the risk of many types of cancer. However, the association between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and leukemia risk remained controversial.We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement (PRISMA). Electronic database of Embase, Pubmed, and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible articles published up to December 13, 2015. The association between genetic polymorphisms and leukemia risk was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).A total of 8 studies amounting to 420 patients and 767 control subjects were retrieved for this study. Although associations between IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism and overall leukemia risks were lacking, decreased chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) risk was detected in the allelic model (T vs A, OR=0.660, 95%CI = 0.483-0.902, P = 0.009, I = 0.0% and P = 0.863 for heterogeneity), the codominant model (TT vs AA, OR = 0.472, 95%CI = 0.247-0.902, P = 0.023, I = 0.0% and P = 0.994 for heterogeneity), and dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 0.457, 95%CI = 0.285-0.734, P = 0.001, I = 40.3% and P = 0.195 for heterogeneity) by using fixed-effect model separately. On the contrary, results indicated T carries have an increased chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) risk in dominant model (TT + TA vs AA, OR = 1.783, 95%CI = 1.236-2.573, P = 0.002, I = 19.0% and P = 0.295 for heterogeneity).This study suggests IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism are related to CML and CLL risk. In addition, our work also points out IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism may play dual contrasting role in leukemia risk.

  5. Interferon Gamma, but not Calcitriol Improves the Osteopetrotic Phenotypes in ADO2 Mice.

    PubMed

    Alam, Imranul; Gray, Amie K; Acton, Dena; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita L; Reilly, Austin M; Econs, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    ADO2 is a heritable osteosclerotic disorder that usually results from heterozygous missense dominant negative mutations in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7). ADO2 is characterized by a wide range of features and severity, including multiple fractures, impaired vision due to secondary bony overgrowth and/or the lack of the optical canal enlargement with growth, and osteonecrosis/osteomyelitis. The disease is presently incurable, although anecdotal evidence suggests that calcitriol and interferon gamma-1b (IFN-G) may have some beneficial effects. To identify the role of these drugs for the treatment of ADO2, we utilized a knock-in (G213R mutation in Clcn7) ADO2 mouse model that resembles the human disease. Six-week-old ADO2 heterozygous mice were administered vehicle (PBS) or calcitriol or IFN-G 5 times per week for 8 weeks. We determined bone phenotypes using DXA and μCT, and analyzed serum biochemistry and bone resorption markers. ADO2 mice treated with all doses of IFN-G significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the increase of whole body aBMD and distal femur BV/TV gain in both male and female compared to the vehicle group. In contrast, mice treated with low and medium doses of calcitriol showed a trend of higher aBMD and BV/TV whereas high dose calcitriol significantly (p<0.05) increased bone mass compared to the vehicle group. The calcium and phosphorus levels did not differ between vehicle and IFN-G or calcitriol treated mice; however, we detected significantly (p<0.05) elevated levels of CTX/TRAP5b ratio in IFN-G treated mice. Our findings indicate that while IFN-G at all doses substantially improved the osteopetrotic phenotypes in ADO2 heterozygous mice, calcitriol treatment at any dose did not improve the phenotype and at high dose further increased bone mass. Thus, use of high dose calcitriol therapy in ADO2 patients merits serious reconsideration. Importantly, our data support the prospect of a clinical trial of IFN-G in ADO2 patients.

  6. Interferon Gamma, but not Calcitriol Improves the Osteopetrotic Phenotypes in ADO2 Mice.

    PubMed

    Alam, Imranul; Gray, Amie K; Acton, Dena; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita L; Reilly, Austin M; Econs, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    ADO2 is a heritable osteosclerotic disorder that usually results from heterozygous missense dominant negative mutations in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7). ADO2 is characterized by a wide range of features and severity, including multiple fractures, impaired vision due to secondary bony overgrowth and/or the lack of the optical canal enlargement with growth, and osteonecrosis/osteomyelitis. The disease is presently incurable, although anecdotal evidence suggests that calcitriol and interferon gamma-1b (IFN-G) may have some beneficial effects. To identify the role of these drugs for the treatment of ADO2, we utilized a knock-in (G213R mutation in Clcn7) ADO2 mouse model that resembles the human disease. Six-week-old ADO2 heterozygous mice were administered vehicle (PBS) or calcitriol or IFN-G 5 times per week for 8 weeks. We determined bone phenotypes using DXA and μCT, and analyzed serum biochemistry and bone resorption markers. ADO2 mice treated with all doses of IFN-G significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the increase of whole body aBMD and distal femur BV/TV gain in both male and female compared to the vehicle group. In contrast, mice treated with low and medium doses of calcitriol showed a trend of higher aBMD and BV/TV whereas high dose calcitriol significantly (p<0.05) increased bone mass compared to the vehicle group. The calcium and phosphorus levels did not differ between vehicle and IFN-G or calcitriol treated mice; however, we detected significantly (p<0.05) elevated levels of CTX/TRAP5b ratio in IFN-G treated mice. Our findings indicate that while IFN-G at all doses substantially improved the osteopetrotic phenotypes in ADO2 heterozygous mice, calcitriol treatment at any dose did not improve the phenotype and at high dose further increased bone mass. Thus, use of high dose calcitriol therapy in ADO2 patients merits serious reconsideration. Importantly, our data support the prospect of a clinical trial of IFN-G in ADO2 patients. PMID:25943708

  7. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  8. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  9. Interferon gamma regulation of de novo protein synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts in culture is anatomic site dependent.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Higgins, P J

    1993-03-01

    The propensity of the skin of the lower anterior leg to be involved in Graves' dermopathy prompted an examination of the specific protein synthesis and response to interferon gamma in cultured fibroblasts from this area. Confluent cultures from normal skin of the lower leg and from the abdomen of the same three donors were pulse labeled with [35S]methionine for 3 h and subjected to two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Protein spots were mapped using a computer-driven program and the relative densities of the resolvable spots analyzed. Fibroblasts from the two anatomic sites display distinct patterns of de novo protein synthesis. Of the 157 abundant spots arbitrarily chosen for analysis, 31% varied substantially in levels of expression between the sites. A number of proteins appear to be expressed only in cultures derived from one of the two anatomic sites. Interferon gamma (100 U/ml) present in the culture medium for 48 h influenced the abundance of a number of proteins in a site-specific manner. Among them, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 was induced three to five times in the leg cultures, whereas this same polypeptide was down-regulated in abdominal fibroblasts. A 54-kD protein was induced in interferon-treated cultures from both sites at least 50 times. It appears that fibroblasts from different regions of the integument are intrinsically distinct in terms of both their protein synthetic programs and their responses to cytokines.

  10. Effect of Moderate Exercise on Serum Interferon-Gamma and Interleukin-17 Levels in the Morphine Withdrawal Period

    PubMed Central

    Heidarianpour, Ali; Vahidian Rezazadeh, Majid; Zamani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug addiction triggers the infliction of a variety of diseases. Various subjects have indicated that during the withdrawal syndrome period, the immune system is weakened. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the changes in serum levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) during the morphine withdrawal syndrome induced by 8 weeks of moderate exercise and their effects on the immune system function. Materials and Methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats (220 ± 10 g) were divided into four groups (n = 6): healthy control (HC), addicted control (AC), healthy trained (HT), and addicted trained (AT) groups. AC and AT groups were made addicted to morphine sulfate (0.4 mg/mL) in 21 days. To ensure their dependence on morphine, naloxone (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into the body of a number of the rats. HT and AT groups were made to run on a treadmill 5 days per week for 8 weeks while time and speed gradually increased. Both prior to the exercises and 24 hours after the last training session, blood samples were collected from all the animals, and serum IFN-γ and IL-17 serum levels were measured using the ELISA method. This research was performed at the Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, Iran. Results After 8 weeks of exercise, a significant increase was observed in the serum IFN-γ level in the HT group (251.17 ± 13.045) in comparison with the HC group (234 ± 12.884) (P = 0.045). Furthermore, the serum IFN-γ level in the AT group (218.33 ± 5.164) in comparison to the AC group (190.67 ± 8.477) showed a significant increase (P = 0.000). In addition, the serum level of IFN-γ in the HT group showed a significant increase compared to the AT group (P = 0.000). After 8 weeks of exercise, there was a significant decrease in the serum IL-17 level in the HT group (22.67 ± 4.46) compared with the HC group (38.17 ± 7.68) (P = 0.005). In addition, a significant decrease was observed in serum IL-17 in the AT group (42.17 ± 7.41) in comparison

  11. Effect of Moderate Exercise on Serum Interferon-Gamma and Interleukin-17 Levels in the Morphine Withdrawal Period

    PubMed Central

    Heidarianpour, Ali; Vahidian Rezazadeh, Majid; Zamani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug addiction triggers the infliction of a variety of diseases. Various subjects have indicated that during the withdrawal syndrome period, the immune system is weakened. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the changes in serum levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) during the morphine withdrawal syndrome induced by 8 weeks of moderate exercise and their effects on the immune system function. Materials and Methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats (220 ± 10 g) were divided into four groups (n = 6): healthy control (HC), addicted control (AC), healthy trained (HT), and addicted trained (AT) groups. AC and AT groups were made addicted to morphine sulfate (0.4 mg/mL) in 21 days. To ensure their dependence on morphine, naloxone (3 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into the body of a number of the rats. HT and AT groups were made to run on a treadmill 5 days per week for 8 weeks while time and speed gradually increased. Both prior to the exercises and 24 hours after the last training session, blood samples were collected from all the animals, and serum IFN-γ and IL-17 serum levels were measured using the ELISA method. This research was performed at the Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, Iran. Results After 8 weeks of exercise, a significant increase was observed in the serum IFN-γ level in the HT group (251.17 ± 13.045) in comparison with the HC group (234 ± 12.884) (P = 0.045). Furthermore, the serum IFN-γ level in the AT group (218.33 ± 5.164) in comparison to the AC group (190.67 ± 8.477) showed a significant increase (P = 0.000). In addition, the serum level of IFN-γ in the HT group showed a significant increase compared to the AT group (P = 0.000). After 8 weeks of exercise, there was a significant decrease in the serum IL-17 level in the HT group (22.67 ± 4.46) compared with the HC group (38.17 ± 7.68) (P = 0.005). In addition, a significant decrease was observed in serum IL-17 in the AT group (42.17 ± 7.41) in comparison

  12. Multiple myeloma oncogene 1 (MUM1)/interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) upregulates monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG) gene expression in B-cell malignancy.

    PubMed

    Uranishi, M; Iida, S; Sanda, T; Ishida, T; Tajima, E; Ito, M; Komatsu, H; Inagaki, H; Ueda, R

    2005-08-01

    MUM1 (multiple myeloma oncogene 1)/IRF4 (interferon regulatory factor 4) is a transcription factor that is activated as a result of t(6;14)(p25;q32) in multiple myeloma. MUM1 expression is seen in various B-cell lymphomas and predicts an unfavorable outcome in some lymphoma subtypes. To elucidate its role in B-cell malignancies, we prepared MUM1-expressing Ba/F3 cells, which proliferated until higher cellular density than the parental cells, and performed cDNA microarray analysis to identify genes whose expression is regulated by MUM1. We found that the expression of four genes including FK506-binding protein 3 (FKBP3), the monokine induced by interferon-gamma(MIG), Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule (Faim) and Zinc-finger protein 94 was altered in the MUM1-expressing cells. We then focused on MIG since its expression was immediately upregulated by MUM1. In reporter assays, MUM1 activated the MIG promoter in cooperation with PU.1, and the interaction between MUM1 and the MIG promoter sequence was confirmed. The expression of MIG was correlated with that of MUM1 in B-CLL cell lines, and treatment with neutralizing antibodies against MIG and its receptor, CXCR3, slightly inhibited the proliferation of two MUM1-expressing lines. These results suggest that MUM1 plays roles in the progression of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia by regulating the expression of various genes including MIG. Leukemia (2005) 19, 1471-1478. doi:10.1038/sj.leu.2403833; published online 16 June 2005.

  13. The radiosensitizing effect of immunoadjuvant OM-174 requires cooperation between immune and tumor cells through interferon-gamma and inducible nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Law, Kalun; Storme, Guy A.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To explore whether antitumor immunoadjuvant OM-174 can stimulate immune cells to produce interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and thereby radiosensitize tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes from BALB/c mice were stimulated by OM-174 at plasma-achievable concentrations (0.03-3 {mu}g/mL), and afterward analyzed for the expression and secretion of IFN-{gamma} by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Stimulated splenocytes were used as a source of IFN-{gamma} to radiosensitize hypoxic EMT-6 tumor cells through the cytokine-inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Results: OM-174 activated the production of IFN-{gamma} at high levels that reached 70 ng/mL in normoxia (21% oxygen) and 27 ng/mL in tumor-relevant hypoxia (1% oxygen). This caused up to 2.1-fold radiosensitization of EMT-6 tumor cells, which was associated with the iNOS-mediated production of the radiosensitizing molecule nitric oxide, as confirmed by accumulation of its oxidative metabolite nitrite, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Both iNOS activation and radiosensitization were counteracted by neutralizing antibodies against IFN-{gamma}. The same mechanism of radiosensitization through the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway was identified for IL-12 + IL-18, which are known to mediate IFN-{gamma} responses. Hypoxia displayed a dual effect on the immune-tumor cell interaction, by downregulating the expression of the IFN-{gamma} gene while upregulating iNOS at transcriptional level. Conclusion: Immunoadjuvant OM-174 is an efficient radiosensitizer of tumor cells through activation of the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway in immune cells. This finding indicates a rationale for combining immunostimulatory and radiosensitizing strategies and extends the potential therapeutic applications of OM-174.

  14. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Ceftriaxone Assay

    PubMed Central

    Page-Sharp, Madhu; Nunn, Troy; Salman, Sam; Moore, Brioni R.; Batty, Kevin T.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically and/or ethically problematic. In this study, we aimed to develop, validate, and apply a DBS ceftriaxone assay. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) DBS ceftriaxone assay was assessed for matrix effects, process efficiency, recovery, variability, and limits of quantification (LOQ) and detection (LOD). The effects of hematocrit, protein binding, red cell partitioning, and chad positioning were evaluated, and thermal stability was assessed. Plasma, DBS, and cell pellet ceftriaxone concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and plasma concentration-time profiles of DBS and plasma ceftriaxone were incorporated into population PK models. The LOQ and LOD for ceftriaxone in DBS were 0.14 mg/liter and 0.05 mg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations (r > 0.95, P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were similar. At 35°C, 21°C, 4°C, −20°C, and −80°C, ceftriaxone retained >95% initial concentrations in DBS for 14 h, 35 h, 30 days, 21 weeks, and >11 months, respectively. The present DBS ceftriaxone assay is robust and can be used as a surrogate for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including in studies of young children and of those in remote or resource-poor settings. PMID:26438505

  15. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time. PMID:25189281

  16. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time.

  17. Cross-modulation by transforming growth factor beta in human tuberculosis: suppression of antigen-driven blastogenesis and interferon gamma production.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, C S; Hussain, R; Toossi, Z; Dawood, G; Shahid, F; Ellner, J J

    1996-01-01

    In tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-stimulated T-cell responses are depressed transiently, whereas antibody levels are increased. Lymphoproliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Pakistani tuberculosis (TB) patients to both mycobacterial and candidal antigens were suppressed by approximately 50% when compared to healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive household contacts. Production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) in response to PPD also was depressed by 78%. Stimulation with PPD and the 30-kDa alpha antigen of MTB (30-kDa antigen) induced greater secretion of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), but not interleukin 10 (IL-10) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), by PBMCs from TB patients compared to healthy contacts. The degree of suppression correlated with the duration of treatment; patients treated for <1 month had significantly lower T-cell blastogenesis and IFN-gamma production and higher levels of TGF-beta than did patients treated for >1 month. Neutralizing antibody to TGF-beta normalized lymphocyte proliferation in response to PPD, partially restored blastogenesis to candidal antigen, and significantly increased PPD-stimulated production of IFN-gamma in TB patients but not in contacts. Neutralizing antibody to IL-10 augmented, but did not normalize, T-cell responses to both PPD and candida in TB patients and candidal antigen in contacts. TGF-beta, produced in response to MTB antigens, therefore plays a prominent role in down-regulating potentially protective host effector mechanisms and looms as an important mediator of immunosuppression in TB. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8622912

  18. Production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human T-cell clones expressing different forms of the gamma delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A

    1990-12-01

    Panels of human T-cell clones bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor (TcR) were obtained from peripheral blood and decidual tissue and maintained in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). TcR V gamma and V delta gene expression was determined in 40 TcR delta 1+ clones using the gamma delta T-cell subset markers Ti gamma A and delta TCS1, in conjunction with Southern blot analysis using TcR J gamma and J delta probes. gamma delta T-cell clones, together with control alpha beta T-cell clones derived from the same lymphocyte populations, were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) tested using specific ELISA. Many clones representative of the major peripheral V gamma 9/V delta 2J1 subset produced high amounts of both cytokines and mean levels were not significantly different from those produced by alpha beta T-cell clones. Panels of clones expressing V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1 produced significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha than clones not expressing V delta 2J1 and those expressing V delta 1J1. There was no relationship between levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha produced by individual gamma delta T-cell clones and also no relationship between their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity and levels of either cytokine. There was a significant tendency for gamma delta T-cell clones to produce more TNF-alpha than IFN-gamma in comparison to alpha beta T-cell clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of the reported differences in distribution in vivo of V delta 1J1+ and V delta 2J1+ cells.

  19. Induction of assembly of MHC class I heavy chains with beta 2microglobulin by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Klar, D; Hämmerling, G J

    1989-01-01

    Assembly of histocompatibility class I heavy chains with beta 2microglobulin (beta 2m) is known to be necessary for cell surface expression. Studies on the H-2 class I deficient but interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) inducible fibrosarcoma BC2 and the lung carcinoma CMT 64.5 showed that after transfection with allogeneic H-2 class I genes the class I proteins are expressed, but only intracellularly and not on the cell surface. In spite of the presence of beta 2m in the cells no association of the transfected class I chain with beta 2m was observed. However, stimulation with IFN-gamma induced assembly and subsequent surface expression. These findings show that the assembly of class I heavy chains with beta 2m is not a spontaneous event but appears to be regulated by cellular mechanisms the nature of which is still unknown. Images PMID:2498080

  20. Production of interferon-gamma by in vivo tumor-sensitized T cells: Association with active antitumor immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Bursuker, I.; Pearce, M.T. )

    1990-02-01

    The state of active immunity to Meth A fibrosarcoma in mice immunized with an admixture of Meth A cells and Propionibacterium acnes is associated with possession by the host of spleen cells capable of producing interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) upon in vitro restimulation with irradiated tumor cells. The ability of spleen cells from immunized mice to produce IFN-gamma in response to irradiated Meth A cells decays as active antitumor immunity is replaced by a state of immunological memory. The IFN-producing cells are L3T4+Ly2+, cyclophosphamide-sensitive and radiosensitive T cells, as determined by their sensitivity to corresponding monoclonal antibodies and complement. The induction of IFN-gamma production by in vivo tumor-sensitized T cells is tumor specific, in that spleen cells from mice immunized against Meth A fibrosarcoma can produce IFN in response to irradiated Meth A cells but not in response to another syngeneic tumor M109 lung carcinoma.

  1. Real-time cytotoxicity assays in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ching-Wen; Lo, Yen-Ting; Liu, Hong; Hsiao, Sonny C

    2014-01-01

    A live cell-based whole blood cytotoxicity assay (WCA) that allows access to temporal information of the overall cell cytotoxicity is developed with high-throughput cell positioning technology. The targeted tumor cell populations are first preprogrammed to immobilization into an array format, and labeled with green fluorescent cytosolic dyes. Following the cell array formation, antibody drugs are added in combination with human whole blood. Propidium iodide (PI) is then added to assess cell death. The cell array is analyzed with an automatic imaging system. While cytosolic dye labels the targeted tumor cell populations, PI labels the dead tumor cell populations. Thus, the percentage of target cancer cell killing can be quantified by calculating the number of surviving targeted cells to the number of dead targeted cells. With this method, researchers are able to access time-dependent and dose-dependent cell cytotoxicity information. Remarkably, no hazardous radiochemicals are used. The WCA presented here has been tested with lymphoma, leukemia, and solid tumor cell lines. Therefore, WCA allows researchers to assess drug efficacy in a highly relevant ex vivo condition. PMID:25406660

  2. Real-time Cytotoxicity Assays in Human Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Hsiao, Sonny C.

    2014-01-01

    A live cell-based whole blood cytotoxicity assay (WCA) that allows access to temporal information of the overall cell cytotoxicity is developed with high-throughput cell positioning technology. The targeted tumor cell populations are first preprogrammed to immobilization into an array format, and labeled with green fluorescent cytosolic dyes. Following the cell array formation, antibody drugs are added in combination with human whole blood. Propidium iodide (PI) is then added to assess cell death. The cell array is analyzed with an automatic imaging system. While cytosolic dye labels the targeted tumor cell populations, PI labels the dead tumor cell populations. Thus, the percentage of target cancer cell killing can be quantified by calculating the number of surviving targeted cells to the number of dead targeted cells. With this method, researchers are able to access time-dependent and dose-dependent cell cytotoxicity information. Remarkably, no hazardous radiochemicals are used. The WCA presented here has been tested with lymphoma, leukemia, and solid tumor cell lines. Therefore, WCA allows researchers to assess drug efficacy in a highly relevant ex vivo condition. PMID:25406660

  3. Comparison of peptide cocktails and purified protein derivatives for use in the Bovigam assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, the Bovigam™ assay is used as an official complementary test within the bovine tuberculosis eradication program. This assay measures Interferon-gamma (IFN-') produced by lymphocytes in response to specific antigens. The objectives of the present study were to compare in vitro antigen prep...

  4. Ultraviolet B radiation-mediated inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced keratinocyte activation is independent of interleukin-10 and other soluble mediators but associated with enhanced intracellular suppressors of cytokine-signaling expression.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Markus; Holzmann, Ruth; Sterry, Wolfram; Wolk, Kerstin; Truppel, Andreas; Piazena, Helmut; Schonbein, Christiane; Sabat, Robert; Asadullah, Khusru

    2003-10-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation represents a well-established treatment modality for inflammatory skin diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of ultraviolet B radiation-induced keratinocyte insensitivity towards interferon-gamma. Flow cytometric analyses indicated that ultraviolet B radiation temporarily inhibits the interferon-gamma-induced activation of primary keratinocyte and HaCaT cells as measured by reduced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) and HLA-DR upregulation. Western blot experiments have suggested that this is mediated by the ultraviolet B radiation-induced inhibition of signal transduction and transcription factor-1 phosphorylation. Neither interleukin-10 neutralization nor interleukin-10 addition had any effect on the ultraviolet B radiation-induced inhibition of interferon-gamma induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. Furthermore, the supernatant from ultraviolet B-irradiated cells failed to inhibit the interferon-gamma-induced CD54 and HLA-DR upregulation in nonradiated HaCaT cells. Moreover, irradiated cells from whom the supernatant was withdrawn 4 h after irradiation still showed a diminished interferon-gamma-induced response after 24 h. Thus, not soluble but intracellular factors might be involved in the ultraviolet B radiation-induced inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced keratinocyte activation. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of members of suppressors of cytokine-signaling (SOCS) molecules using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found a fast and strong upregulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3 but not of SOCS2 after ultraviolet B radiation. Similarly, ultraviolet B radiation induced the expression of these particular SOCS molecules in lesional psoriatic skin. As SOCS molecules are known inhibitors of signal transduction and transcription factor phosphorylation, which is essential for interferon-gamma-induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and HLA-DR upregulation, this may explain the interferon-gamma

  5. Requirement for natural killer cell-produced interferon gamma in defense against murine cytomegalovirus infection and enhancement of this defense pathway by interleukin 12 administration

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells contributes to early defense against murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Although NK cells can mediate in vivo protection against MCMV, the mechanism by which they do so has not been defined. The studies presented here evaluate cytokine production by NK cells activated during MCMV infection and the role of NK cell-produced cytokines in early in vivo antiviral defenses. Experiments with normal C57BL/6, T cell-deficient C57BL/6 nude, and severe combined immunodeficient mice lacking T and B cells demonstrated that both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production were induced at early times after infection with MCMV. Conditioned media samples prepared with cells from these mice, on day 2 after infection, produced 11-43 pg/million cells of IFN-gamma and 12-19 pg/million cells of TNF as evaluated by specific protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Studies in the NK- and T cell-deficient mouse line, E26, in mice that had been depleted in vivo of NK cells by treatment with antibodies eliminating NK cells, anti-asialo ganglio-N- tetraosylceramide or anti-NK1.1, and with populations of cells that had been depleted of NK cells by complement treatment with the anti-NK cell antibody, SW3A4, demonstrated that NK cells were solely responsible for the IFN-gamma but were not required for TNF production. The in vivo absence of NK cells was accompanied by increased viral hepatitis and viral replication in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, as well as decreased survival time of immunodeficient mice. In vivo treatments with antibodies neutralizing IFN-gamma demonstrated that this factor contributed to the NK cell-mediated antiviral defense and reduced the measured parameters of viral defense to levels indistinguishable from those observed in NK cell-deficient mice. These effects appeared to be independent of cytolytic activity, as NK cells isolated from anti-IFN-gamma-treated mice mediated

  6. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible.

  7. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs.

  8. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs. PMID:17105733

  9. Monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG/CXCL9) is an independent prognostic factor in newly diagnosed myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bolomsky, Arnold; Schreder, Martin; Hübl, Wolfgang; Zojer, Niklas; Hilbe, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Immune suppression is a hallmark of multiple myeloma (MM), but data on soluble factors involved in the fate of immune effector cells are limited. The CXCR3-binding chemokine monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG/CXCL9) has been associated with tumor progression, immune escape, and angiogenesis in several malignancies. We here aimed to evaluate the prognostic relevance of MIG in MM. MIG serum levels were significantly elevated in newly diagnosed MM patients (n = 105) compared to patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS; n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 37). MIG expression in stromal compartments but not purified MM cells correlated with serum levels. High MIG serum levels were significantly associated with established prognostic markers (international staging system: R = 0.25, p = 0.001; age: R = 0.47, p < 0.0001; lactate-dehydrogenase: R = 0.34, p = 0.0005) and poor overall survival (OS) (median OS 17.0 months vs. not reached, p < 0.001). A similar association was found for CXCL10 and CXCL11. Multivariate regression analysis indicated MIG as an independent prognostic factor of OS. PMID:26999330

  10. Proteoglycan expression in bleomycin lung fibroblasts: role of transforming growth factor-beta(1) and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Roughley, Peter J; Ludwig, Mara S

    2002-10-01

    Bleomycin (BM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis involves excess production of proteoglycans (PGs). Because transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) promotes fibrosis, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) inhibits it, we hypothesized that TGF-beta(1) treatment would upregulate PG production in fibrotic lung fibroblasts, and IFN-gamma would abrogate this effect. Primary lung fibroblast cultures were established from rats 14 days after intratracheal instillation of saline (control) or BM (1.5 units). PGs were extracted and subjected to Western blot analysis. Bleomycin-exposed lung fibroblasts (BLF) exhibited increased production of versican (VS), heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and biglycan (BG) compared with normal lung fibroblasts (NLF). Compared with NLF, BLF released significantly increased amounts of TGF-beta(1). TGF-beta(1) (5 ng/ml for 48 h) upregulated PG expression in both BLF and NLF. Incubation of BLF with anti-TGF-beta antibody (1, 5, and 10 microg/ml) inhibited PG expression in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of BLF with IFN-gamma (500 U. ml(-1) x 48 h) reduced VS, HSPG, and BG expression. Furthermore, IFN-gamma inhibited TGF-beta(1)-induced increases in PG expression by these fibroblasts. Activation of fibroblasts by TGF-beta(1) promotes abnormal deposition of PGs in fibrotic lungs; downregulation of TGF-beta(1) by IFN-gamma may have potential therapeutic benefits in this disease. PMID:12225958

  11. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible. PMID:26795364

  12. NADH oxidase-dependent CD39 expression by CD8(+) T cells modulates interferon gamma responses via generation of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Aiping; Moss, Alan; Rothweiler, Sonja; Longhi, Maria Serena; Wu, Yan; Junger, Wolfgang G; Robson, Simon C

    2015-11-09

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ)-producing CD8(+) T cells (Tc1) play important roles in immunological disease. We now report that CD3/CD28-mediated stimulation of CD8(+) T cells to generate Tc1 cells, not only increases IFNγ production but also boosts the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and augments expression of CD39. Inhibition of NADPH oxidases or knockdown of gp91phox in CD8(+) T cells abrogates ROS generation, which in turn modulates JNK and NFκB signalling with decreases in both IFNγ levels and CD39 expression. CD39(+)CD8(+) T cells substantially inhibit IFNγ production by CD39(-)CD8(+) T cells via the paracrine generation of adenosine, which is operational via adenosine type 2A receptors. Increases in numbers of CD39(+)CD8(+) T cells and associated enhancements in ROS signal transduction are noted in cells from patients with Crohn's disease. Our findings provide insights into Tc1-mediated IFNγ responses and ROS generation and link these pathways to CD39/adenosine-mediated effects in immunological disease.

  13. Association between interferon gamma 13-CA-repeats polymorphism and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a population of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Kaifei; Yan, Zhaohui; Shuang, Yu; Sun, Jinsong; Tao, Shudong; Fu, Wenyuan; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Interferon Gamma gamma (IFN-γ) 13-CA-repeats polymorphism is associated with a variety of diseases; here we report its association with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) metastasis in a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 220 NPC patients in the northern China. The results showed that the distributions of CA13-/CA13-genotypes were significantly higher in the patients with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05) and distant metastasis (P<0.001); there was a significant difference between NPC patients with stage I+II and those with stage III+IV regarding CA13+/CA13-(P<0.001) and CA13-/CA13- genotypes (P<0.001); further analysis showed a more pronounced difference between NPC patients with stage I+II+III and those with stage IV for CA13-/CA13-genotype (P<0.001), whereas no difference was found for CA13+/CA13- genotype (P=0.790). Thus, we identify that IFN-γ 13-CA-repeat polymorphism is significantly associated with the metastasis of NPC, which may provide insights into its prognosis and individualized treatment. PMID:26261644

  14. Recombinant human interferon-gamma reconstitutes defective phagocyte function in patients with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Sechler, J M; Malech, H L; White, C J; Gallin, J I

    1988-01-01

    Monocytes from 19 of 30 patients with the classic phenotype of chronic granulomatous disease of childhood (CGD) responded to 3 days of treatment in culture with recombinant human interferon-gamma (rHuIFN-gamma) at 100 units/ml by producing superoxide after stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Cells from 15 of 16 patients with cytochrome b-positive CGD (15 with autosomal and 1 with X chromosome-linked inheritance) and cells from 4 of 14 patients with cytochrome b-negative CGD (13 with X chromosome-linked and 1 with autosomal recessive inheritance) responded. Subcutaneous rHuIFN-gamma (0.01-0.05 mg/m2) administered as a single dose, daily or every other day, for five or six doses to 3 patients whose phagocytes responded to rHuIFN-gamma in vitro resulted in significant improvement in phagocyte bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus and increases in superoxide production. Studies on 1 patient's cells indicated the increases in superoxide production correlated with increased membrane cytochrome b. The effects of rHuIFN-gamma persisted for more than a week following cessation of therapy. Thus, we have demonstrated a partial correction in vivo of these CGD patients' phagocyte defect with rHuIFN-gamma. Moreover, the data suggest that a significant proportion of patients with CGD will respond to rHuIFN-gamma with augmentation of phagocyte microbicidal function. Images PMID:2838849

  15. TLR2/6 agonists and interferon-gamma induce human melanoma cells to produce CXCL10.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, Ileana S; Wang, Ena; Deacon, Donna H; Olson, Walter C; Bao, Yongde; Slingluff, Craig L

    2015-09-15

    Clinical approaches to treat advanced melanoma include immune therapies, whose benefits depend on tumor-reactive T-cell infiltration of metastases. However, most tumors lack significant immune infiltration prior to therapy. Selected chemokines promote T-cell migration into tumors; thus, agents that induce these chemokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) may improve responses to systemic immune therapy. CXCL10 has been implicated as a critical chemokine supporting T-cell infiltration into the TME. Here, we show that toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can induce chemokine production directly from melanoma cells when combined with IFNγ treatment. We find that TLR2 and TLR6 are widely expressed on human melanoma cells, and that TLR2/6 agonists (MALP-2 or FSL-1) synergize with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) to induce production of CXCL10 from melanoma cells. Furthermore, melanoma cells and immune cells from surgical specimens also respond to TLR2/6 agonists and IFNγ by upregulating CXCL10 production, compared to treatment with either agent alone. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for inducing CXCL10 production directly from melanoma cells, with TLR2/6 agonists +IFNγ and raise the possibility that intratumoral administration of these agents may improve immune signatures in melanoma and have value in combination with other immune therapies, by supporting T-cell migration into melanoma metastases.

  16. Pressure- and temperature-induced unfolding and aggregation of recombinant human interferon-gamma: a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Koen; Haelewyn, Joost; Meersman, Filip; De Ley, Marc; Heremans, Karel

    2003-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the secondary structure of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-gamma) and its biologically inactive truncated form rhIFN-Delta C15 has been studied using Fourier-transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy. In situ observation of the pressure-induced changes using the diamond anvil cell shows that the alpha-helical structure is mainly transformed into disordered structure at high pressure. Increasing pressure also induces the formation of a gel. Addition of 0.5 M MgCl(2) significantly reduces the pressure stability. Releasing the pressure below 300 MPa results in the formation of intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheets, which is seldom observed. This suggests that the intermolecular beta-sheet of rhIFN-gamma is stabilized by electrostatic interactions that are disrupted at high pressure. For comparison we also studied the effect of temperature. Temperature-induced changes reflect extensive transformation of alpha-helical structure into intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheet, as is usually observed for most proteins. PMID:12425720

  17. Interferon-gamma produced by microglia and the neuropeptide PACAP have opposite effects on the viability of neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Johanna; Koivuniemi, Raili; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is part of many neurological disorders and immune reactions may influence neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) contributing to the disease process. Our knowledge about the interplay between different cell types in brain inflammation are not fully understood. It is important to know the mechanisms and factors involved in order to enhance regeneration and brain repair. We show here that NPCs express receptors for interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), and IFNgamma activates the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) protein-1. IFNgamma reduced cell proliferation in NPCs by upregulation of the cell cycle protein p21 as well as induced cell death of NPCs by activating caspase-3. Studies of putative factors for rescue showed that the neuropeptide, Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) increased cell viability, the levels of p-Bad and reduced caspase-3 activation in the NPCs. Medium from cultured microglia contained IFNgamma and decreased the viability of NPCs, whilst blocking with anti-IFNgamma antibodies counteracted this effect. The results show that NPCs are negatively influenced by IFNgamma whereas PACAP is able to modulate its action. The interplay between IFNgamma released from immune cells and PACAP is of importance in brain inflammation and may affect the regeneration and recruitment of NPCs in immune diseases. The observed effects of IFNgamma on NPCs deserve to be taken into account in human anti-viral therapies particularly in children with higher rates of brain stem cell proliferation.

  18. Ex vivo programming of dendritic cells by mitochondria-targeted nanoparticles to produce interferon-gamma for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marrache, Sean; Tundup, Smanla; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2013-08-27

    One of the limitations for clinical applications of dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy is the low potency in generating tumor antigen specific T cell responses. We examined the immunotherapeutic potential of a mitochondria-targeted nanoparticle (NP) based on a biodegradable polymer and zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) photosensitizer (T-ZnPc-NPs). Here, we report that tumor antigens generated from treatment of breast cancer cells with T-ZnPc-NPs upon light stimulation activate DCs to produce high levels of interferon-gamma, an important cytokine considered as a product of T and natural killer cells. The remarkable ex vivo DC stimulation ability of this tumor cell supernatant is a result of an interleukin (IL)-12/IL-18 autocrine effect. These findings contribute to the understanding of how in situ light activation amplifies the host immune responses when NPs deliver the photosensitizer to the mitochondria and open up the possibility of using mitochondria-targeted-NP-treated, light-activated cancer cell supernatants as possible vaccines.

  19. Clinical and diagnostic developments of a gamma interferon release assay for use in bovine tuberculosis control programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently the Bovigam assay is used as an official supplemental test within the bovine tuberculosis eradication program. This assay measures interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) produced by lymphocytes in response to specific antigens. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate two Mycobacterium ...

  20. Interferon-gamma increased epithelial barrier function via upregulating claudin-7 expression in human submandibular gland duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ayumi; Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are necessary for salivary gland function and may serve as indicators of salivary gland epithelial dysfunction. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized fibro-inflammatory condition which disrupts the TJ associated epithelial barrier. The salivary glands are one of the most frequently involved organs in IgG4-RD, however, changes of the TJ associated epithelial barrier in salivary gland duct epithelium is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of TJs in human submandibular gland ductal epithelial cells (HSDECs) in normal and IgG4-RD. We examined submandibular gland (SMG) tissue from eight control individuals and 22 patients with IgG4-RD and established an HSDEC culture system. Immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were performed. Claudin-4, claudin-7, occludin, and JAM-A were expressed at the apical side of the duct epithelium in submandibular gland (SMG) tissue and at the cell borders in HSDECs of normal and IgG4-RD. The expression and distribution of TJs in SMG tissue were not different in control individuals and patients with IgG4-RD in vivo and in vitro. Although interferon-gamma (IFNγ) generally disrupts the integrity and function of TJs, as manifested by decreased epithelial barrier function, IFNγ markedly increased the epithelial barrier function of HSDECs via upregulation of claudin-7 expression in HSDECs from patients with IgG4-RD. This is the first report showing an IFNγ-dependent increase in epithelial barrier function in the salivary gland duct epithelium. Our results provide insights into the functional significance of TJs in salivary gland duct epithelium in physiological and pathological conditions, including IgG4-RD.

  1. Interferon Gamma Gene Polymorphism (+874 T > A) and Chronic Hepatitis B in the Population of Gorgan, North-Eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Nadia; Shahbazi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Based on differences in individual immune responses to the hepatitis B virus (HBV), between 5% and 10% of patients become persistently infected with the virus, which leads to the determination of chronic HBV. Cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ) are secretory proteins that play important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Functional studies have demonstrated that the IFN + 874A/T gene polymorphism can increase or decrease the overall expression of IFN-gamma (γ) and ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. Objectives This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the IFN-γ + 874 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to chronic HBV infection. Methods Polymorphism detection analysis was performed on 598 subjects from North-Eastern Iran. The IFN-γ gene polymorphism (+ 874A/T) was genotyped through a specific sequence primer polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR). Results The frequencies of the AA, AT, and TT genotypes were 31%, 51%, and 18% in the chronic HBV patient group, and 40%, 45%, and 15% in the healthy control group, respectively. However, a lack of association of the + 874 polymorphism in the IFN-γ gene of those with chronic HBV infection was found. Evaluation of HBV association with this polymorphism was significant under the dominant genetic model (P = 0.04). Conclusions Ultimately, no association could be characterized between the polymorphism in IFN-γ + 874A/T and susceptibility to chronic HBV infection in this segment of the Iranian population (P > 0.05). PMID:27800132

  2. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  3. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  4. TIM-3 Genetic Variations Affect Susceptibility to Osteoarthritis by Interfering with Interferon Gamma in CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Ren, Yanjun; Peng, Dayong; Yuan, Zhen; Shan, Shiying; Sun, Huaqiang; Yan, Xinfeng; Xiao, Hong; Li, Guang; Song, Haihan

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis, in which T cell responses and cytokines may play critical roles in the development of the disease. TIM-3 may affect immune responses and is correlated with decreased expression of interferon gamma (INF-γ) in CD4+ T cells. In the current study, we investigated the association between polymorphisms in the TIM-3 gene and susceptibility to OA. Two polymorphisms in TIM-3, -574G/T and +4259T/G polymorphisms, were identified in OA cases and healthy donors by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Data revealed that the prevalence of TIM-3 +4259T/G genotype was significantly elevated in OA patients than in the healthy donors after adjustment (Odds ratio [OR] = 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-5.11, P < 0.001). Similarly, the TIM-3 +4259G allele presented a positive association with the risk of OA after adjustment (OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.29-4.82, P = 0.003). The TIM-3 -574G/T polymorphism did not show any correlation with the disease. We further examined whether the two TIM-3 polymorphisms could affect INF-γ expression in CD4+ T cells. Data revealed that subjects carrying polymorphic +4259TG genotype had significantly higher mRNA and protein levels of INF-γ in CD4+ T cells compared to wild-type GG genotype (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). These results indicated that TIM-3 polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to OA possibly by upregulating INF-γ expression in CD4+ T cells.

  5. Interferon-gamma-induced dephosphorylation of STAT3 and apoptosis are dependent on the mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Peng . E-mail: fangp@ohsu.edu; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G.

    2006-05-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma}) exhibits diverse biological activities, including control of cell growth and tumor suppression. Here, we report that the treatment of M12 cells, a human metastatic prostate cancer cell line, with IFN-{gamma}, resulted in marked inhibition of cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. These effects were not seen with either IFN-{alpha} or IFN-{beta}. M12 cells, like many other human cancer cells, contain constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). The basal levels of both Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are also markedly elevated in M12 cells. Strikingly, IFN-{gamma}-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition of M12 cells were associated with persistent suppression of the constitutive tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3 (pY-STAT3). The IFN-{gamma}-induced dephosphorylation of pY-STAT3, however, was inhibited when the mTOR pathway was specifically blocked by rapamycin. Inhibition of PI-3K with low-dose LY294002, or MAPK with PD98059 also suppressed the mTOR/p70 S6k pathway, and correlated with the blockage of IFN-{gamma}-induced dephosphorylation of pY-STAT3. Simultaneously, treatment with LY294002, PD98059, or rapamycin abolished IFN-{gamma}-induced apoptosis in M12 cells. The inhibition of the mTOR pathway, however, did not affect IFN-{gamma}-induced activation of STAT1 pathway, and suppression of STAT1 expression by siRNA had no effect on IFN-{gamma}-induced dephosphorylation of pY-STAT3. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an intact mTOR pathway is critical for IFN-{gamma}-induced suppression of pY-STAT3 and apoptosis. Our study thus provides novel insights into the contributions of signaling pathways other than the classical JAK/STAT1 pathway in the anti-proliferative, proapoptotic actions of IFN-{gamma}.

  6. Interferon-gamma increased epithelial barrier function via upregulating claudin-7 expression in human submandibular gland duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ayumi; Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are necessary for salivary gland function and may serve as indicators of salivary gland epithelial dysfunction. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a newly recognized fibro-inflammatory condition which disrupts the TJ associated epithelial barrier. The salivary glands are one of the most frequently involved organs in IgG4-RD, however, changes of the TJ associated epithelial barrier in salivary gland duct epithelium is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the regulation and function of TJs in human submandibular gland ductal epithelial cells (HSDECs) in normal and IgG4-RD. We examined submandibular gland (SMG) tissue from eight control individuals and 22 patients with IgG4-RD and established an HSDEC culture system. Immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were performed. Claudin-4, claudin-7, occludin, and JAM-A were expressed at the apical side of the duct epithelium in submandibular gland (SMG) tissue and at the cell borders in HSDECs of normal and IgG4-RD. The expression and distribution of TJs in SMG tissue were not different in control individuals and patients with IgG4-RD in vivo and in vitro. Although interferon-gamma (IFNγ) generally disrupts the integrity and function of TJs, as manifested by decreased epithelial barrier function, IFNγ markedly increased the epithelial barrier function of HSDECs via upregulation of claudin-7 expression in HSDECs from patients with IgG4-RD. This is the first report showing an IFNγ-dependent increase in epithelial barrier function in the salivary gland duct epithelium. Our results provide insights into the functional significance of TJs in salivary gland duct epithelium in physiological and pathological conditions, including IgG4-RD. PMID:26956365

  7. Use of a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing interferon gamma for post-exposure protection against vaccinia and ectromelia viruses.

    PubMed

    Holechek, Susan A; Denzler, Karen L; Heck, Michael C; Schriewer, Jill; Buller, R Mark; Legrand, Fatema A; Verardi, Paulo H; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2013-01-01

    Post-exposure vaccination with vaccinia virus (VACV) has been suggested to be effective in minimizing death if administered within four days of smallpox exposure. While there is anecdotal evidence for efficacy of post-exposure vaccination this has not been definitively studied in humans. In this study, we analyzed post-exposure prophylaxis using several attenuated recombinant VACV in a mouse model. A recombinant VACV expressing murine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was most effective for post-exposure protection of mice infected with VACV and ectromelia virus (ECTV). Untreated animals infected with VACV exhibited severe weight loss and morbidity leading to 100% mortality by 8 to 10 days post-infection. Animals treated one day post-infection had milder symptoms, decreased weight loss and morbidity, and 100% survival. Treatment on days 2 or 3 post-infection resulted in 40% and 20% survival, respectively. Similar results were seen in ECTV-infected mice. Despite the differences in survival rates in the VACV model, the viral load was similar in both treated and untreated mice while treated mice displayed a high level of IFN-γ in the serum. These results suggest that protection provided by IFN-γ expressed by VACV may be mediated by its immunoregulatory activities rather than its antiviral effects. These results highlight the importance of IFN-γ as a modulator of the immune response for post-exposure prophylaxis and could be used potentially as another post-exposure prophylaxis tool to prevent morbidity following infection with smallpox and other orthopoxviruses.

  8. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of interferon-gamma-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) gene from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Pan, Dequan; Cui, Shuge; Su, Tianfeng; Qiu, Lihua; Zhu, Caiyan; Jiang, Shigui

    2010-09-01

    Interferon-gamma-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is an important thiol reductase, involved in class, MHC-restricted antigen processing by catalyzing disulfide bond reduction in mammals. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of pearl oyster Pinctada fucata GILT (designated as poGILT). The poGILT cDNA was 1273bp long and consisted of a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 24bp, a 3'-UTR of 484bp with two cytokine RNA instability motifs (ATTTA), and an open reading frame (ORF) of 765bp encoding a polypeptide of 254 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 28.9kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 7.4. The N-terminus of the poGILT was found to have a putative signal peptide with a cleavage site amino acid position at 19-20. SMART analysis showed that the poGILT contained a GILT active-site C(69)PDC(72) motif and a GILT signature motif C(115)QHGKEECIGNLIETC(130). Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the poGILT with other known GILT sequences by MatGAT software revealed that the poGILT shared 42.9-67.3% similarity and 22.9-49.8% identity to the other known GILT sequences. The expression level of poGILT mRNA was higher in digestive gland, moderate in adductor muscle, gills, gonad, intestine and mantle, and lower in hemocytes. The poGILT mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in gill and digestive gland after LPS or V. alginolyticus stimulation, respectively. These results suggested that the poGILT was a constitutively expressed acute-phase protein, the expression of which can be enhanced after LPS or V. algrinolyticus stimulation, perhaps involved in the innate immune response of pearl oyster.

  9. Roles of myeloperoxidase and GAPDH in interferon-gamma production of GM-CSF-dependent macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma is highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and may have an important role in atherogenesis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), the most abundant protein in neutrophils, is a marker of plaque vulnerability and a possible bridge between inflammation and cardiovascular disease. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the role of neutrophil activation in atherosclerosis. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IFN-gamma protein by GM-CSF-dependent-macrophages was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation with MPO. GM-CSF enhanced macrophage expression of the mannose receptor (CD206), which is involved in MPO uptake. MPO increased IFN-gamma production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of macrophages with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for CD206 or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-2 attenuated IFN-gamma production, while siRNA for ERK-1 did not. GAPDH is known to bind to adenylate/uridylate (AU)-rich elements of RNA and may influence IFN-gamma protein expression by binding to the AU-rich element of IFN-gamma mRNA. Interestingly, pretreatment with siRNA for GAPDH significantly reduced IFN-gamma production by macrophages, while it did not affect TF protein expression. In conclusion, MPO upregulates IFN-gamma production by GM-CSF-dependent-macrophages via the CD206/ERK-2 signaling pathway, while silencing GAPDH reduces IFN-gamma production. PMID:27441256

  10. Oligodendrocytes exhibit selective expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling genes and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 independent inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced toxicity in response to leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Emery, B; Butzkueven, H; Snell, C; Binder, M; Kilpatrick, T J

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in the death of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS. Previous studies have indicated that the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor prevents the cytotoxic effects of interferon-gamma on oligodendrocytes in vitro, and the death of oligodendrocytes in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Members of a recently characterized family of proteins, the suppressors of cytokine signaling, have been demonstrated to mediate negative cross-talk between cytokines, with induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins by one cytokine inhibiting the activity of a second. Here, we assess whether induction of members of the suppressors of cytokine signaling family could explain the antagonistic biological effects of leukemia inhibitory factor and interferon-gamma upon oligodendrocytes. It is found that leukemia inhibitory factor rapidly and strongly induces the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling-3 in cultured rat oligodendrocytes, whereas interferon-gamma weakly induces the expression of both suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 and 3. Pre-treatment of oligodendrocytes with leukemia inhibitory factor does not prevent the subsequent phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 by interferon-gamma indicating that the leukemia inhibitory factor inhibition of interferon-gamma toxicity in oligodendrocytes is mediated by a suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 independent mechanism.

  11. Automated Triplex (HBV, HCV and HIV) NAT Assay Systems for Blood Screening in India.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Manoj Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review is confined to triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays to be used on fully automated platform. Around the world, these assays are being used at various transfusion medicine centres or blood banks to screen blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV. These assay systems can screen up to 1000 blood units for HBV, HCV and HIV simultaneously in a day. This area has been dominated by mainly two manufacturers: M/s Gen-Probe-Novartis and M/s Roche Molecular Systems. The triplex NAT assay systems of both manufacturers are licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. There is not much awareness about the technology and procedures used in these assays. The main objective of this review is to create awareness about the technology and procedure of these assays. PMID:27042485

  12. Measurement of dabigatran in standardly used clinical assays, whole blood viscoelastic coagulation, and thrombin generation assays.

    PubMed

    van Ryn, Joanne; Grottke, Oliver; Spronk, Henri

    2014-09-01

    Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, is increasingly used clinically as one of the new oral anticoagulants. This review summarizes the assays available to measure its activity and includes the relative sensitivity of the different assays for this agent. In addition to plasma-based clotting tests, assays commonly used in surgical/emergency settings, such as activated clotting time and thromboelastometry/thromboelastography, are reviewed. In addition, the thrombin generation assay is discussed as an important method to determine the potential risk of thrombosis or bleeding and its relevance to the measurement of direct thrombin inhibitors. PMID:25168938

  13. Refolding and single-step purification of porcine interferon-gamma from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies. Conditions for reconstitution of dimeric IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroeck, K; Martens, E; D'Andrea, S; Billiau, A

    1993-07-15

    Recombinant porcine interferon-gamma, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, was found to accumulate in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. The influence of various physicochemical parameters on refolding was investigated using 6 M guanidine/HCl-solubilised inclusion bodies which had been purified by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose step gradient. It appeared that the yield of reconstitution of denatured protein reached 60-70% under optimum conditions, i.e. at an intermediary guanidine/HCl concentration of 0.5 M and at a protein concentration of 10-20 microM (0 degrees C). Since intermediary guanidine/HCl concentrations at 0.5-1.65 M increasingly promoted off-pathway formation of soluble aggregates and at 0.5-0.2 M progressively promoted precipitation, maximal recovery of biologically active protein required a twofold transition in the surrounding guanidine/HCl concentration (6 M-->0.5 M-->0 M). A single additional size-exclusion chromatographic step yielded a final product that was > 99.5% pure, had specific antiviral activity > 10(7) U/mg protein and contained < or = 25 pg/ml endotoxin. Cross-linking by means of disulfosuccinimidyl tartarate revealed that the refolded protein possessed a dimeric structure. Furthermore, we have characterized three different molecular species of recombinant porcine interferon-gamma that are formed under non-optimal refolding conditions (1 M guanidine/HCl) and that differ from each other in specific activity, size and stability. One of these converts irreversibly into dimeric interferon-gamma in a temperature-dependent manner and is therefore considered as a productive folding intermediate.

  14. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  15. Interferon-gamma potentiates NMDA receptor signaling in spinal dorsal horn neurons via microglia–neuron interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Yamanaka, Manabu; Nishio, Naoko; Tsutsui, Shunji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Munehito; Nakatsuka, Terumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Glia–neuron interactions play an important role in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokne →cytokine Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is upregulated in the dorsal horn after peripheral nerve injury, and intrathecal IFNγ administration induces mechanical allodynia in rats. A growing body of evidence suggests that IFNγ might be involved in the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but its effects on the spinal dorsal horn are unclear. We performed blind whole-cell patch-clamp recording to investigate the effect of IFNγ on postsynaptic glutamate-induced currents in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of spinal cord slices from adult male rats. Results IFNγ perfusion significantly enhanced the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia gelatinosa neurons, but did not affect AMPA-induced currents. The facilitation of NMDA-induced current by IFNγ was inhibited by bath application of an IFNγ receptor-selective antagonist. Adding the Janus activated kinase inhibitor tofacitinib to the pipette solution did not affect the IFNγ-induced facilitation of NMDA-induced currents. However, the facilitatory effect of IFNγ on NMDA-induced currents was inhibited by perfusion of the microglial inhibitor minocycline. These results suggest that IFNγ binds the microglial IFNγ receptor and enhances NMDA receptor activity in substantia gelatinosa neurons. Next, to identify the effector of signal transmission from microglia to dorsal horn neurons, we added an inhibitor of G proteins, GDP-β-S, to the pipette solution. In a GDP-β-S–containing pipette solution, IFNγ-induced potentiation of the NMDA current was significantly suppressed after 30 min. In addition, IFNγ-induced potentiation of NMDA currents was blocked by application of a selective antagonist of CCR2, and its ligand CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents. Conclusion Our findings suggest that IFNγ enhance the amplitude of NMDA-induced inward currents in substantia

  16. DNA methylation of the allergy regulatory gene interferon gamma varies by age, sex, and tissue type in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma is associated with allergic sensitization in about half of all cases, and asthma phenotypes can vary by age and sex. DNA methylation in the promoter of the allergy regulatory gene interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been linked to the maintenance of allergic immune function in human cell and mouse models. We hypothesized that IFNγ promoter methylation at two well-studied, key cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) sites (-186 and -54), may differ by age, sex, and airway versus systemic tissue in a cohort of 74 allergic asthmatics. Results After sampling buccal cells, a surrogate for airway epithelial cells, and CD4+ lymphocytes, we found that CD4+ lymphocyte methylation was significantly higher in children compared to adults at both CpG sites (P <0.01). Buccal cell methylation was significantly higher in children at CpG -186 (P = 0.03) but not CpG -54 (P = 0.66). Methylation was higher in males compared to females at both CpG sites in CD4+ lymphocytes (-186: P <0.01, -54: P = 0.02) but not buccal cells (-186: P = 0.14, -54: P = 0.60). In addition, methylation was lower in CD4+ lymphocytes compared to buccal cells (P <0.01) and neighboring CpG sites were strongly correlated in CD4+ lymphocytes (r = 0.84, P <0.01) and weakly correlated in buccal cells (r = 0.24, P = 0.04). At CpG -186, there was significant correlation between CD4+ lymphocytes and buccal cells (r = 0.24, P = 0.04) but not at CpG -54 (r = -0.03, P = 0.78). Conclusions These findings highlight significant age, sex, and tissue-related differences in IFNγ promoter methylation that further our understanding of methylation in the allergic asthma pathway and in the application of biomarkers in clinical research. PMID:24891923

  17. CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibitory action by interferon-gamma on CRF-stimulated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Tateno, Kozue; Hasegawa, Rumi; Takigami, Shu; Ohsako, Shunji; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    Secretion of hormones by the anterior pituitary gland can be stimulated or inhibited by paracrine factors that are produced during inflammatory reactions. The inflammation cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is known to inhibit corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-stimulated adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) release but its signaling mechanism is not yet known. Using rat anterior pituitary, we previously demonstrated that the CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10), known as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible protein 10 kDa, is expressed in dendritic cell-like S100β protein-positive (DC-like S100β-positive) cells and that its receptor CXCR3 is expressed in ACTH-producing cells. DC-like S100β-positive cells are a subpopulation of folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary. In the present study, we examine whether CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling between DC-like S100β-positive cells and ACTH-producing cells mediates inhibition of CRF-activated ACTH-release by IFN-γ, using a CXCR3 antagonist in the primary pituitary cell culture. We found that IFN-γ up-regulated Cxcl10 expression via JAK/STAT signaling and proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) expression, while we reconfirmed that IFN-γ inhibits CRF-stimulated ACTH-release. Next, we used a CXCR3 agonist in primary culture to analyze whether CXCL10 induces Pomc-expression and ACTH-release using a CXCR3 agonist in the primary culture. The CXCR3 agonist significantly stimulated Pomc-expression and inhibited CRF-induced ACTH-release, while ACTH-release in the absence of CRF did not change. Thus, the present study leads us to an assumption that CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibition of the CRF-stimulated ACTH-release by IFN-γ. Our findings bring us to an assumption that CXCL10 from DC-like S100β-positive cells acts as a local modulator of ACTH-release during inflammation.

  18. Development of simian immunodeficiency virus isolation, titration, and neutralization assays which use whole blood from rhesus monkeys and an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Lohman, B L; Higgins, J; Marthas, M L; Marx, P A; Pedersen, N C

    1991-10-01

    Assays that use rhesus macaque whole blood and an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) p27 core protein were developed for the isolation of SIV from the blood of infected animals, the titration of infectivity of SIV inocula, and the quantitation of virus neutralizing antibodies in serum. These assays required small amounts of whole blood, were adaptable to a microtiter format, and used substrates mainly of rhesus macaque origin.

  19. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test. PMID:27185543

  20. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

  1. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in blood culture by a single PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan-King, M; Baldeh, I; Adegbola, R; Omosigho, C; Usen, S O; Oparaugo, A; Greenwood, B M

    1996-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay was developed to screen blood cultures from children in The Gambia with suspected pneumonia for the simultaneous detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates. Analysis of 295 blood cultures showed that PCR detected the organisms in all samples positive by culture in two samples infected with H. influenzae type b and four samples infected with S. pneumoniae that were culture negative, indicating that this method is sensitive for detecting these organisms in blood cultures. PMID:8818907

  2. Endotoxin triggers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-dependent cytotoxicity from interferon-. gamma. (IFN-. gamma. ) primed and unprimed human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbluth, R.S.; Edgington, T.S.

    1986-03-05

    Under endotoxin-free conditions, the authors have found that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) lack spontaneous monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against actinomycin D-treated WEHI 164 target cells in a 6 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. However, small amounts of endotoxin (e.g., LPS) rapidly induce monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. IFN-..gamma.. alone is incapable of inducing monocyte cytotoxicity. Instead, pretreatment of PBM with IFN-..gamma.. for 36 hr or more primes them for triggering by amounts of endotoxin that are almost 100-fold less than that required for unprimed cells. These conditions are analogous to the two step activation sequence described for mice where IFN-..gamma.. primes and LPS triggers macrophage cytotoxic capacity. Additionally, the authors have observed that neutralizing anti-TNF monoclonal antibody abolishes the cytotoxicity measured here; and rTNF is directly cytotoxic to the target cells used in this assay. Thus, TNF is both necessary and sufficient for the monocyte mediated cytotoxicity. Since IFN-..gamma.. is thought to be produced during a variety of immunological reactions, these findings may help to explain the augmented capacity of immunologically stimulated animals for LPS-triggered TNF production and their enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of endotoxin.

  3. Clinical improvement in feline herpesvirus 1 infected cats by oral low dose of interleukin-12 plus interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, Filomena; Cantiello, Antonietta; Granato, Giovanna Elvira; Navas, Luigi; Diffidenti, Carmine; De Martino, Luisa; Maharajan, Veeramani; Olivieri, Fabio; Pagnini, Ugo; Iovane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) is a widespread cat pathogen inducing rhinitis, conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. To alleviate acute FHV-1-induced disease, antiviral agents are used often with antibiotics. But sometimes, these treatments, as well as conventional doses of cytokines have moderate efficacy and/or collateral effects. Herein we have investigated the effects of low dose interleukin (IL)-12 plus interferon (IFN)-gamma, prepared by Sequential Kinetic Activated (SKA), on the treatment of FHV-1 infection. Twenty-five, unvaccinated FHV-1-positive cats were recruited into a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Fifteen cats were treated for 6 months with oral low doses of SKA IL-12 plus IFN-gamma and 10 cats were treated with placebo. At 1, 6 and 12 months (follow-up) after the beginning of treatment, clinical assessment, PCR assay and blood count were carried out. At follow-up, in treated group, we observed significant (p<0.05) improvements in clinical signs and PCR became negative in 12/15 cats (80%). In placebo, 10/10 cats were PCR-positive, with improvements (30%) or worsening (70%) in clinical signs. Blood values were normal in both groups. Our results show that the low dose therapy, based on activated solutions of IL-12 plus IFN-gamma, represents a novel approach to treat FHV-1 infection in cats. PMID:27638118

  4. Assaying Blood Cell Populations of the Drosophila melanogaster Larva

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Sophia; Alexander, Brandy; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hematopoiesis is regulated by inductive microenvironments (niches). Likewise, in the invertebrate model organism Drosophila melanogaster, inductive microenvironments known as larval Hematopoietic Pockets (HPs) have been identified as anatomical sites for the development and regulation of blood cells (hemocytes), in particular of the self-renewing macrophage lineage. HPs are segmentally repeated pockets between the epidermis and muscle layers of the larva, which also comprise sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In the larva, resident (sessile) hemocytes are exposed to anti-apoptotic, adhesive and proliferative cues from these sensory neurons and potentially other components of the HPs, such as the lining muscle and epithelial layers. During normal development, gradual release of resident hemocytes from the HPs fuels the population of circulating hemocytes, which culminates in the release of most of the resident hemocytes at the beginning of metamorphosis. Immune assaults, physical injury or mechanical disturbance trigger the premature release of resident hemocytes into circulation. The switch of larval hemocytes between resident locations and circulation raises the need for a common standard/procedure to selectively isolate and quantify these two populations of blood cells from single Drosophila larvae. Accordingly, this protocol describes an automated method to release and quantify the resident and circulating hemocytes from single larvae. The method facilitates ex vivo approaches, and may be adapted to serve a variety of developmental stages of Drosophila and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26650404

  5. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  6. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kremastinou, J.; Polymerou, V.; Lavranos, D.; Aranda Arrufat, A.; Harwood, J.; Martínez Lorenzo, M. J.; Ng, K. P.; Queiros, L.; Vereb, I.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum. The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  7. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results.

  8. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    PubMed

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  9. The production of interferon-gamma in response to a major peanut allergy, Ara h II correlates with serum levels of IgE anti-Ara h II.

    PubMed

    Dorion, B J; Burks, A W; Harbeck, R; Williams, L W; Trumble, A; Helm, R M; Leung, D Y

    1994-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to examine the potential role of T cells in the pathogenesis of peanut allergy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with peanut allergy, patients with asthma, and nonatopic normal control subjects were assessed for proliferation after stimulation with a 17 kd major peanut allergen (Ara h II), ovalbumin, casein, soy, and Candida albicans. We found that Ara h II and C. albicans induced significantly higher levels of proliferation than ovalbumin, casein, and soy. Because interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) play critical roles in IgE regulation, we assessed the production of these cytokines after stimulation with C. albicans and Ara h II. C. albicans stimulated similar levels of IFN-gamma in all three study groups. In contrast, after stimulation with Ara h II, culture supernatants from PBMCs of subjects with peanut allergy contained significantly lower levels of IFN-gamma than did the PBMCs of the two control groups (p = 0.02). More important, there was a significant (p = 0.05) inverse correlation between the serum IgE anti-Ara h II levels and IFN-gamma production by PBMCs from the respective peanut-allergic patients. IL-4 protein was not detected in culture supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Ara h II. However, amplification of cytokine gene transcripts by polymerase chain reaction did demonstrate IL-4 expression in Ara h II-stimulated PBMCs from both patients with peanut allergy and control subjects. These data suggest that the level of IFN-gamma production in response to Ara h II may be an important factor in determining the development of peanut-specific IgE responses.

  10. Modulation of in vitro monocyte cytokine responses to Leishmania donovani. Interferon-gamma prevents parasite-induced inhibition of interleukin 1 production and primes monocytes to respond to Leishmania by producing both tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, N E; Ng, W; Wilson, C B; McMaster, W R; Burchett, S K

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines produced by mononuclear cells are important regulatory and effector molecules and evidence has been presented to support a role at least for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in host defense against Leishmania. In the present study, we examined the production of TNF-alpha and interleukin 1 (IL-1) by resting and IFN-gamma-primed peripheral blood monocytes infected in vitro with Leishmania donovani. Monocytes produced neither IL-1 nor TNF-alpha during challenge with Leishmania. Cells preinfected with Leishmania synthesized normal amounts of TNF-alpha, but had diminished production of IL-1 in response to stimulation with either S. aureus or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The induction by S. aureus or LPS of IL-1 beta mRNA accumulation in infected cells was normal despite diminished intracellular or supernatant IL-1 protein and bioactivity. Thus, inhibition of IL-1 production by Leishmania most probably reflected diminished translation of IL-1 beta mRNA. Pretreatment of cells with IFN-gamma abrogated infection-induced inhibition of IL-1 production and primed cells for the production of both IL-1 and TNF-alpha upon subsequent exposure to Leishmania. These results indicate that L. donovani has evolved the capacity to infect mononuclear phagocytes, without stimulating the production of two potentially host-protective monokines. The ability of IFN-gamma to prime monocytes to produce TNF-alpha and IL-1 in response to infection with Leishmania and to prevent inhibition of IL-1 production may have implications for immunotherapy with this lymphokine. Images PMID:2112157

  11. Specificity of the Tuberculin Skin Test and the T-SPOT."TB" Assay among Students in a Low-Tuberculosis Incidence Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Elizabeth A.; Harland, Dawn; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Burrer, Sherry; Adams, Lisa V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Interferon-[gamma] release assays (IGRAs) are an important tool for detecting latent "Mycobacterium tuberculosis" infection (LTBI). Insufficient data exist about IGRA specificity in college health centers, most of which screen students for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST). Participants: Students at a low-TB incidence college…

  12. Serum amyloid A-derived peptides, present in human rheumatic synovial fluids, induce the secretion of interferon-gamma by human CD(4)(+) T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yavin, E J; Preciado-Patt, L; Rosen, O; Yaron, M; Suessmuth, R D; Levartowsky, D; Jung, G; Lider, O; Fridkin, M

    2000-04-28

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute-phase protein whose biochemical functions remain largely obscure. Human rheumatic synovial fluids were screened by high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for SAA-derived peptides, specifically the sequence AGLPEKY (SAA(98-104)) which was previously shown to modulate various leukocyte functions. Two such fluids were found to contain a truncated version of SAA(98-104). Synthetic SAA(98-104) and several of its analogs were shown capable of binding isolated human CD(4)(+) T-lymphocytes and stimulating them to produce interferon-gamma. Given the high acute-phase serum level of SAA and its massive proteolysis by inflammatory related enzymes, SAA-derived peptides may be involved in host defense mechanisms. PMID:10788622

  13. Fabrication of fiber-optic localized surface plasmon resonance sensor and its application to detect antibody-antigen reaction of interferon-gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Erdene, Norov; Lee, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Dae-Hong; Park, Jae-Hyoung

    2011-12-01

    A fiber-optic localized surface plasmon (FO LSPR) sensor was fabricated by gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) immobilized on the end-face of an optical fiber. When Au NPs were formed on the end-face of an optical fiber by chemical reaction, Au NPs aggregation occurred and the Au NPs were immobilized in various forms such as monomers, dimers, trimers, etc. The component ratio of the Au NPs on the end-face of the fabricated FO LSPR sensor was slightly changed whenever the sensors were fabricated in the same condition. Including this phenomenon, the FO LSPR sensor was fabricated with high sensitivity by controlling the density of Au NPs. Also, the fabricated sensors were measured for the resonance intensity for the different optical systems and analyzed for the effect on sensitivity. Finally, for application as a biosensor, the sensor was used for detecting the antibody-antigen reaction of interferon-gamma.

  14. Effects of selected food factors with chemopreventive properties on combined lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-induced IkappaB degradation in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Koshimizu, Koichi; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2003-05-30

    Degradation of IkappaB (IkappaB) is a key step for nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-induced transcription of certain proinflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. We selected seven chemopreventive agents and examined their effects on combined lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-induced IkappaB degradation in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. IkappaB degradation was notably suppressed by 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), zerumbone (ZER), and benzylisothiocyanate (BITC), however, not by auraptene (AUR), while the suppressive potencies of nobiletin (NOB), genistein (GEN), and resveratrol (RES) were low, but significant. These results suggest that ACA, ZER, and BITC suppress iNOS/COX-2 gene expression mainly by attenuating IkappaB degradation, while other chemopreventive agents use alternative pathway(s) to suppress the expression of proinflammatory genes.

  15. Microfluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    PubMed Central

    Brengues, Muriel; Gu, Jian; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into microfluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a microfluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry. PMID:25877531

  16. Sensitive Detection Assays for Influenza RNA Do Not Reveal Viremia in US Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Stramer, Susan L.; Collins, Cynthia; Nugent, Thomas; Wang, Xue; Fuschino, Meghan; Heitman, John W.; Law, Jacqueline; Krysztof, David E.; Kiely, Nancy; Todd, Deborah; Vermeulen, Nicolaas M. J.; Harrington, Karen; Kamel, Hany; Kelvin, David J.; Busch, Michael P.; St. George, Kirsten; Hewlett, Indira K.; Linnen, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    (See the article by Delwart et al, on pages 875–85, and see the editorial commentary by Katz, on pages 867–9.) Background. There have been anecdotal reports of influenza viremia since the 1960s. We present an assessment of the prevalence of seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza viremia (via RNA testing) in blood donor populations using multiple sensitive detection assays. Methods. Several influenza RNA amplification assays, including transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) and 2 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, were evaluated and used to test donor samples. Retrospective samples from 478 subjects drawn at sites with high influenza activity were tested. Prospective samples were collected from 1004 blood donors who called their donation center within 3 days of donation complaining of influenza-like illness (ILI). The plasma collected on the day of donation for these subjects was tested. Results. Of the repository samples, 2 of 478 plasma samples were initially reactive but not repeat reactive by influenza TMA. Of blood donors reporting ILI symptoms postdonation, 1 of 1004 samples was TMA initially reactive but not repeat reactive; all samples were nonreactive by RT-PCR testing. Conclusions. Targeting blood donor populations most likely to have influenza infection, we failed to detect influenza RNA in 1482 donor samples, with most tested by 3 different RNA assays. Seasonal influenza does not appear to pose a significant contamination threat to the blood supply. PMID:22293429

  17. Radiometric-microbiologic assay of niacin using Kloeckera brevis: analysis of human blood and food

    SciTech Connect

    Guilarte, T.R.; Pravlik, K.

    1983-12-01

    Kloeckera brevis, a yeast, was used as the test organism for the development of a radiometric-microbiologic (RMA) assay for niacin. The assay was determined to be sensitive to the 2 ng niacin per vial level and specific for the biologically active forms of this vitamin. The method was shown to be simple, accurate, and precise in the analysis of niacin in human blood and food. The application of the radiometric technique eliminates some of the problems encountered with conventional turbidimetric-microbiologic assay.

  18. Blood bactericidal assay (Pasteurella haemolytica) comparison of morbidity in marketed feeder calves.

    PubMed

    Purdy, C W; Richards, A B; Foster, G S

    1989-02-01

    An in vitro bactericidal assay that used bovine heparinized blood was investigated for its usefulness in detecting differences in the bactericidal immunity of calves against Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 1 (Ph1). Greater than 90% of killing occurred within 30 minutes. The substitution of fetal calf serum for autologous calf plasma caused loss of bactericidal activity of the blood. Decomplemented calf serum also was low in bactericidal activity. The blood bactericidal assay appears to be opsonin antibody-dependent and complement-dependent. The coefficient of variation (CV) that can be expected with this assay was established by use of a group of 8 calves; within-day CV maximum was 0.9, and between-day CV maximum was 2.1. The blood bactericidal assay was used to evaluate 30 calves under typical market stress from 4 farms in eastern Tennessee. All calves had decreased bactericidal activity, as they moved into a feedyard in Texas. The bactericidal activity was reduced among sick calves, based on the severity of clinical signs. Morbidity was highest during the first 14 days in the feedlot. During this period, healthy calves had a decreased bactericidal index (BI) of 4 points, and calves with clinical signs of bovine respiratory tract disease for 3 days had a decreased BI of 8 points. The average reduction in the BI of calves with clinical signs of bovine respiratory tract disease for 6 or more days was 14 points. PMID:2719384

  19. Important Considerations for Methemoglobin Measurement in Fish Blood: Assay Choice and Storage Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, Mel Anton; Rodnick, K. J.; J. A. Lacey

    2002-05-01

    Spectrophotometric assays of methaemoglobin (metHb) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, tilapias Tilapia niloticus and Tilapia zillii and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, under baseline conditions, were low (<4%) for each species, and yet higher than human values (<1%). MetHb results for a given fish species varied significantly between assays and two assays were deemed unacceptable for particular animals. For rainbow trout, white sturgeon, and the two species of tilapia, the Dubowski method gave uncharacteristically high estimates of metHb. MetHb could not measured in tilapia blood using the Evelyn & Malloy method due to spectral interference. Only the Horecker & Brackett assay worked well for all species. Storage conditions were extremely important in the quantification of metHb in rainbow trout blood. For consistent values, samples can be stored up to 4 h on ice (0 degrees C) or at least 20 days under liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C). Auto-oxidation, however, elevates rainbow trout metHb at -20 and -80 degrees C. It should not be assumed that the blood of fishes and humans perform similarly during assays of metHb.

  20. Cryopreservation of human blood for alkaline and Fpg-modified comet assay.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2016-01-01

    The Comet assay is a reproducible and sensitive assay for the detection of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells and tissues. Incorporation of lesion specific, oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes (for example, Fpg, OGG1 and EndoIII) in the standard alkaline Comet assay procedure allows for the detection and measurement of oxidative DNA damage. The Comet assay using white blood cells (WBC) has proven useful in monitoring DNA damage from environmental agents in humans. However, it is often impractical to performance Comet assay immediately after blood sampling. Thus, storage of blood sample is required. In this study, we developed and tested a simple storage method for very small amount of whole blood for standard and Fpg-modified modified Comet assay. Whole blood was stored in RPMI 1640 media containing 10% FBS, 10% DMSO and 1 mM deferoxamine at a sample to media ratio of 1:50. Samples were stored at -20 °C and -80 °C for 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. Isolated lymphocytes from the same subjects were also stored under the same conditions for comparison. Direct DNA strand breakage and oxidative DNA damage in WBC and lymphocytes were analyzed using standard and Fpg-modified alkaline Comet assay and compared with freshly analyzed samples. No significant changes in either direct DNA strand breakage or oxidative DNA damage was seen in WBC and lymphocytes stored at -20 °C for 1 and 7 days compared to fresh samples. However, significant increases in both direct and oxidative DNA damage were seen in samples stored at -20 °C for 14 and 28 days. No changes in direct and oxidative DNA damage were observed in WBC and lymphocytes stored at -80 °C for up to 28 days. These results identified the proper storage conditions for storing whole blood or isolated lymphocytes to evaluate direct and oxidative DNA damage using standard and Fpg-modified alkaline Comet assay.

  1. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    SciTech Connect

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. )

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  2. Guidelines for the development and validation of new potency assays for the evaluation of umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Spellman, Stephen; Hurley, Carolyn K; Brady, Colleen; Phillips-Johnson, Lisa; Chow, Robert; Laughlin, Mary; McMannis, John; Reems, Jo-Anna; Regan, Donna; Rubinstein, Pablo; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2011-08-01

    The following commentary was developed by the National Marrow Donor Program Cord Blood Advisory Group and is intended to provide an overview of umbilical cord blood (UCB) processing, summarize the current state of potency assays used to characterize UCB, and define limitations of the assays and future needs of the cord blood banking and transplant community. The UCB banking industry is eager to participate in the development of standardized assays to uniformly characterize cellular therapy products that are manufactured in a variety of ways. This paper describes the desired qualities of these assays and how the industry proposes to co-operate with developers to bring relevant assays to market. To that end, the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Cord Blood Bank Network is available to serve as a resource for UCB testing material, research and development consulting, and product/assay testing in an accredited UCB manufacturing environment. PMID:21449685

  3. Evidence for predictive validity of blood assays to evaluate individual radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, Erhard . E-mail: severie@uni-muenster.de; Greve, Burkhard; Pascher, Elke; Wedemeyer, Niels; Hacker-Klom, Ursula; Silling, Gerda; Kienast, Joachim; Willich, Normann; Goehde, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: An escalation in standard irradiation dose ensuring improved local tumor control is estimated, but this strategy would require the exclusion of the most sensitive individuals from treatment. Therefore, fast and reliable assays for prediction of the individual radiosensitivity are urgently required. Methods and Materials: Seven parameters in lymphocytes of 40 patients with leukemia were analyzed before, during, and after total body irradiation (TBI) and in vitro X-ray irradiation. These were: cell proliferation, nuclear damage, activation of cytokines, and numbers of total leukocytes of CD34+ hematopoietic blood stem cells and of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Additionally, antioxidative capacity of blood plasma, uric acid, and hemoglobin levels were measured. Blood samples of 67 healthy donors were used as controls. Results: In vivo and in vitro irradiations showed comparable results. A dose-response relationship was found for most parameters. Three parameters were associated with severe acute oral mucositis (Grade 3 or 4 vs. Grade 0 to 2): leukocytes fewer than 6200/{mu}L after 4 Gy TBI, a rate of >19% lymphocytes with reduced DNA and protein content ('necroses') after 4 Gy in vitro irradiation, and a small antioxidative capacity in blood plasma (<0.68 mMol) after 8 Gy TBI. Conclusion: Three simple blood assays were associated with oral mucositis that are posed here hypothetically as an early symptom of enhanced radiosensitivity in leukemic patients: leukocyte count, damaged lymphocyte score, and the antioxidative capacity after exposure.

  4. [Optimization of a spectrophotometry assay of total and oxidized blood glutathione: comparison with a fluorimetric method].

    PubMed

    Coutelle, C; Iron, A; Higueret, D; Cassaigne, A

    1992-01-01

    We developed a method for the enzymatic assay of glutathione which is easy to practice, rapid, specific, based on the reaction of the thiol group of glutathione with dithiobis-nitrobenzoic acid after the action of glutathione reductase in the presence of NADPH. This spectrophotometric technique allowed, on the one hand, the determination of total glutathione and on the other hand, that of oxidized glutathione (disulfide), after the blockage of reduced glutathione by 2-vinyl-pyridine. The improvements of the assay of blood glutathione concerned the sample preparation, the reaction sensitivity, thanks to a better definition of the optimal pH and a reduction ot the blockage time by 2-vinyl-pyridine in well defined operating conditions. We compared the performances of our technique with a fluorimetric method. We used our method for the determination of total and oxidized blood glutathione in a control population.

  5. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  6. A common blood gene assay predates clinical and histological rejection in kidney and heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Sarwal, Minnie; Sigdel, Tara

    2013-01-01

    We assayed our recently defined blood gene panel, diagnostic for kidney and cardiac acute rejection (AR), for its ability to predict biopsy-confirmed renal and cardiac AR prior to clinical or histological AR detection. We utilized a subset of 63 patients from our recent studies with biopsy-confirmed AR (n=40 kidney AR, n=23 cardiacAR) who had paired blood samples collected within 6 months before and after AR. Blood samples were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) for 10 genes, modeled across differing panels of 5 genes for kidney and heart AR to classify each sample with a quantitative prediction score for rejection. The performance accuracy of the 5-gene panels for AR were compared to the only commercially available QPCR blood assay (AlloMap). A blood gene-based molecular call for AR was made -3 months prior to the histological AR diagnosis in both kidney (92% predicted probability) and cardiac (80% predicted probability) transplant patients and outperformed the AlloMapTM blood test for accuracy and sensitivity [area under the curve (AUC)=0.917 for the kidney 5 genes and 0.915 for the cardiac 5 genes versus an AUC=0.72 for AlloMap]. Serial, posttransplant, targeted profiling of blood samples for a set of 10 genes provides a means to identify kidney and heart transplant recipients at high risk for graft dysfunction and, in the absence of immunosuppression customization, fated to advance to histological rejection and increased graft and patient morbidity.

  7. Dried blood spots PCR assays to screen congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Zhu, Jianxing

    2015-04-14

    The performance of dried blood spots (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection varies between different studies. To determine whether the DBS PCR assay has sufficient accuracy to be used as a screening test for cCMV infection, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies (n = 26007 neonates) that evaluated the performance of DBS PCR tests in screening for cCMV infection and that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.844 (95% CI = 0.812-0.872) and 0.999 (95% CI = 0.998-0.999), respectively, and the diagnostic odds ratio was 1362.10 (95%CI = 566.91-3272.60). As sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust. In conclusion, the performance of DBS PCR assays for testing cCMV was more suitable for retrospective diagnosis than screening.

  8. Rapid liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay for oxymetazoline in whole rat blood.

    PubMed

    Hayes, F J; Baker, T R; Dobson, R L; Tsueda, M S

    1995-02-10

    A rapid HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometric assay for the quantitation of oxymetazoline in whole rat blood has been developed. Sample preparation was a single liquid-liquid extraction after addition of a deuterated internal standard (IS) and pH adjustment. An aliquot of reconstituted extract was injected onto a narrow-bore octadecyl reversed-phase column at a flow-rate of 400 microliters/min. Using a 20:1 post-column split, 5% of the eluent was introduced into the mass spectrometer interface. Elution of the analyte and IS occurred in less than 2 min. This rapid separation was made possible because of the sample cleanup and the selectivity of the mass spectrometric detection. The [M+H]+ ions for oxymetazoline (m/z 261) and [2H9]oxymetazoline (m/z 270) were detected using selected ion monitoring. The linear range of the assay was 0.67-167 ng/g of blood and the limit of quantitation with a 0.30-g sample was 1.0 ng/g. The assay permitted the analysis of nine samples per hour with the requisite sensitivity and selectivity and was used to determine the blood pharmacokinetics of oxymetazoline in rats dosed via intravenous and intranasal routes.

  9. Rapid Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Blood Cultures Using a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Immunofluorescent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Rapid antimicrobial therapy is necessary to improve patient outcome, which is aided by direct detection of B. pseudomallei in clinical samples. A drawback for all antigen assays is that the number of B. pseudomallei in blood usually falls below the achievable level of detection. We performed a prospective cohort study of 461 patients with 541 blood cultures to evaluate the utility of a pre-incubation step prior to detection of B. pseudomallei using a monoclonal antibody-based immunofluorescent assay (Mab-IFA). The Mab-IFA was positive in 74 of 76 patients with melioidosis (sensitivity = 97.4%), and negative in 385 patients who did not have blood cultures containing B. pseudomallei (specificity = 100%). The Mab-IFA could be a valuable supplementary tool for rapid detection. We recommend the use of the Mab-IFA to test blood cultures that flag positive in regions where melioidosis is endemic. PMID:24019434

  10. Combination of cytochrome b heteroduplex-assay and sequencing for identification of triatomine blood meals.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Rosio; Depickère, Stéphanie; Bosseno, Marie-France; Patzi, Edda Siñani; Waleckx, Etienne; Salas, Renata; Aliaga, Claudia; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    The identification of blood meals in vectors contributes greatly to the understanding of interactions between vectors, microorganisms and hosts. The aim of the current work was to complement the validation of cytochrome b (Cytb) heteroduplex assay (HDA) previously described, and to add the sequencing of the Cytb gene of some samples for the identification of blood meals in triatomines. Experimental feedings of reared triatomines helped to clarify the sensitivity of the HDA. Moreover, the sequencing coupled with the HDA, allowed the assessment of the technique's taxonomic level of discrimination. The primers used to produce DNA fragments of Cytb genes for HDA had a very high sensitivity for vertebrate DNAs, rather similar for mammals, birds and reptiles. However, the formation of heteroduplex depended on blood meal's quality rather than its quantity; a correlation was observed between blood meals' color and the positivity of HDA. HDA electrophoresis profiles were reproducible, and allowed the discrimination of blood origins at the species level. However, in some cases, intraspecific variability of Cytb gene generated different HDA profiles. The HDA based on comparison of electrophoresis profiles is a very useful tool for screening large samples to determine blood origins; the subsequent sequencing of PCR products of Cytb corresponding to different HDA profiles allowed the identification of species whatever the biotope in which the vectors were captured. PMID:21963963

  11. Sustained inflammation and differential expression of interferons type I and III in PVM-infected interferon-gamma (IFNγ) gene-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Glineur, Stephanie F; Bowen, Aaron B; Percopo, Caroline M; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-11-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has complex immunomodulatory and antiviral properties. While IFNγ is detected in the airways in response to infection with the pneumovirus pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; Family Paramyxoviridae), its role in promoting disease has not been fully explored. Here, we evaluate PVM infection in IFNγ(-/-) mice. Although the IFNγ gene-deletion has no impact on weight loss, survival or virus kinetics, expression of IFNβ, IFNλ2/3 and IFN-stimulated 2-5' oligoadenylate synthetases was significantly diminished compared to wild-type counterparts. Furthermore, PVM infection in IFNγ(-/-) mice promoted prominent inflammation, including eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration into the airways and lung parenchyma, observed several days after peak virus titer. Potential mechanisms include over-production of chemoattractant and eosinophil-active cytokines (CXCL1, CCL11, CCL3 and IL5) in PVM-infected IFNγ(-/-) mice; likewise, IFNγ actively antagonized IL5-dependent eosinophil survival ex vivo. Our results may have clinical implications for pneumovirus infection in individuals with IFNγ signaling defects.

  12. Lateralised behaviour and immune response in dogs: relations between paw preference and interferon-gamma, interleukin-10 and IgG antibodies production.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, A; Siniscalchi, M; Frate, A; Iacoviello, R; Buonavoglia, C; Vallortigara, G

    2006-01-30

    The production of specific antibodies (IgG), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was evaluated in dogs in relation to behavioural lateralisation as assessed by paw preference. Left-handed, right-handed and ambidextrous dogs of mixed breed were selected on the basis of their performance in a task consisting of the removal of a piece of adhesive paper from the snout. All dogs were immunised with rabies vaccine. IgG anti-rabies antibody response was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test. Serum IFN-gamma and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA in animals showing significant individual left-, right- or no-paw preferences in the behavioural test. The results showed that the direction of behavioural lateralisation influenced the immune response in dogs. The titers of anti-rabies antibodies were lower in left-pawed dogs than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs. Similarly, the IFN-gamma serum levels were lower in left-pawed dogs than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs. IL-10, on the contrary, seemed to be an immune parameter, which was not affected by lateralisation. These findings suggest that immunomodulation can be correlated with brain laterality in canine species by the regulation of the production of antibodies and some cytokines like IFN-gamma, which are molecules involved in the immune-neurohumoral crosstalk.

  13. Prenatal Dexamethasone and Postnatal High-Fat Diet Decrease Interferon Gamma Production through an Age-Dependent Histone Modification in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Tain, You-Lin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hung, Pi-Lien; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Overexposure to prenatal glucocorticoid (GC) disturbs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolism and susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. A high-fat (HF) diet is a major environmental factor that can cause metabolic syndrome. We aimed to investigate whether prenatal GC plus a postnatal HF diet could alter immune programming in rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone or saline at 14-21 days of gestation. Male offspring were then divided into four groups: vehicle, prenatal dexamethasone exposure, postnatal HF diet (VHF), and prenatal dexamethasone exposure plus a postnatal HF diet (DHF). The rats were sacrificed and adaptive immune function was evaluated. Compared to the vehicle, the DHF group had lower interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production by splenocytes at postnatal day 120. Decreases in H3K9 acetylation and H3K36me3 levels at the IFN-γ promoter correlated with decreased IFN-γ production. The impaired IFN-γ production and aberrant site-specific histone modification at the IFN-γ promoter by prenatal dexamethasone treatment plus a postnatal HF diet resulted in resilience at postnatal day 180. Prenatal dexamethasone and a postnatal HF diet decreased IFN-γ production through a site-specific and an age-dependent histone modification. These findings suggest a mechanism by which prenatal exposure to GC and a postnatal environment exert effects on fetal immunity programming. PMID:27669212

  14. Tryptophan recycling is responsible for the interferon-gamma resistance of Chlamydia psittaci GPIC in indoleamine dioxygenase-expressing host cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, Heidi; Roshick, Christine; McClarty, Grant

    2004-05-01

    Comparative genomics indicates that vast differences in Chlamydia sp. host range and disease characteristics can be traced back to subtle variations in gene content within a region of the chromosome termed the plasticity zone. Genes required for tryptophan biosynthesis are located in the plasticity zone; however, the complement of genes encoded varies depending on the chlamydial species examined. Of the sequenced chlamydia genomes, Chlamydia psittaci GPIC contains the most complete tryptophan biosynthesis operon, encoding trpRDCFBA. Immediately downstream of the trp operon are genes encoding kynureninase and ribose phosphate pyrophosphokinase. Here, we show that, in GPIC, these genes are transcribed as a single transcript, the expression of which is regulated by tryptophan. Complementation analyses, using various mutant Escherichia coli isolates, indicate that the tryptophan biosynthesis, kynureninase and ribose phosphate pyrophosphokinase gene products are functional. Furthermore, growth of C. psittaci GPIC in HeLa cells, cultured in tryptophan-free medium, could be rescued by the addition of anthranilate, kynurenine or indole. In total, our results indicate that this complement of genes enables GPIC to recycle tryptophan and thus accounts for the interferon-gamma resistant phenotype displayed in indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-expressing host cells.

  15. Induction of superoxide in glioma cell line U87 stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma: ESR using a new flow-type quartz cell.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Moritake, T; Tsuboi, K; Ikota, N; Ozawa, T

    2000-04-14

    The production of superoxide and nitric oxide induced in U87 glioma treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy using a newly designed flow-type quartz cuvette without detaching cells from the culture plate. ESR spectra of 2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxy-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPOL) with U87 cells on a quartz culture plate were measured at 15 min intervals. The signal intensity of TEMPOL decreased in the presence of U87 cells at the pseudo-first order rate. The signal decay was accelerated in the U87 cells treated with LPS/IFN-gamma for 24 h, and was suppressed in the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase. By the spin-trapping method, nitric oxide from U87 cells pretreated with LPS/IFN-gamma for 24 h was measured by the ESR, but only a weak signal of nitric oxide adducts was detected. Further, the nitrite and nitrate levels in the medium did not increase for 24 h. By the ESR measurement of cells on culture plates without detachment stress, it was found that the production of superoxide was induced by LPS/IFN-gamma, but that of nitric oxide was not, in U87 glioma cells.

  16. Effect of treatment with interferon-gamma and concanavalin A on the course of infection of mice with Salmonella typhimurium strain LT-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Cheryl L.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment of mice with 34 units/day, for five days, of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on the course of infection with LD50 of Salmonella typhimurium strain LT-2 was assessed, using two IFN preparations: (1) a hybridoma supernatant fluid containing concanavalin-A-induced IFN-gamma activity and (2) pure murine IFN-gamma produced by recombinant DNA technology. The hybridoma supernatant-treated Salmonella-infected mice were found to die faster than mice treated only with Salmonella. Pure murine IFN-gamma was found to protect infected mice significantly, with 95 percent of mice surviving LD50 infection. In contrast, the Salmonella-infected mice treated with hybridoma supernatant were found to die faster than the Salmonella-infected untreated controls. Mice treated with concanavalin A alone prior to infection with S. typhimurium died more quickly than the untreated infected controls, suggesting that contamination with concanavalin A had a detrimental effect on mice survival.

  17. Interferon-gamma-responsive neuronal sites in the normal rat brain: receptor protein distribution and cell activation revealed by Fos induction.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B; Kong, G; Peng, Z; Bentivoglio, M; Kristensson, K

    2000-05-01

    Constitutive expression of the interferon-gamma receptor protein (IFN-gammaR), and the distribution of cells in which Fos, a marker of cell activation, is induced by intracerebroventricular administration of IFN-gamma, were studied in the rat brain by immunohistochemistry. IFN-gammaR immunopositivity was found in neuronal elements, which exhibited a selective distribution being concentrated in the piriform and entorhinal cortex, midline thalamus and medial hypothalamic structures, brainstem nociceptive relays (including the periaqueductal gray, the parabrachial nuclei and the caudal part of the spinal trigeminal nuclei), and circumventricular organs such as the median eminence and area postrema. IFN-gamma-induced Fos expression mostly corresponded to neuronal sites of receptor distribution. Because of its topographical distribution, it is suggested that activation of the IFN-gammaR in neurons may play a role to limit spread of infections in the brain and, in concert with other proinflammatory cytokines, to modulate adaptive responses to an antigen challenge mediated by the central nervous system. PMID:10779704

  18. Tryptophan recycling is responsible for the interferon-gamma resistance of Chlamydia psittaci GPIC in indoleamine dioxygenase-expressing host cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, Heidi; Roshick, Christine; McClarty, Grant

    2004-05-01

    Comparative genomics indicates that vast differences in Chlamydia sp. host range and disease characteristics can be traced back to subtle variations in gene content within a region of the chromosome termed the plasticity zone. Genes required for tryptophan biosynthesis are located in the plasticity zone; however, the complement of genes encoded varies depending on the chlamydial species examined. Of the sequenced chlamydia genomes, Chlamydia psittaci GPIC contains the most complete tryptophan biosynthesis operon, encoding trpRDCFBA. Immediately downstream of the trp operon are genes encoding kynureninase and ribose phosphate pyrophosphokinase. Here, we show that, in GPIC, these genes are transcribed as a single transcript, the expression of which is regulated by tryptophan. Complementation analyses, using various mutant Escherichia coli isolates, indicate that the tryptophan biosynthesis, kynureninase and ribose phosphate pyrophosphokinase gene products are functional. Furthermore, growth of C. psittaci GPIC in HeLa cells, cultured in tryptophan-free medium, could be rescued by the addition of anthranilate, kynurenine or indole. In total, our results indicate that this complement of genes enables GPIC to recycle tryptophan and thus accounts for the interferon-gamma resistant phenotype displayed in indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-expressing host cells. PMID:15101993

  19. Interferon gamma-induced protein 10 is associated with insulin resistance and incident diabetes in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chu; Wu, Chia-Lin; Su, Wei-Wen; Shih, Kai-Lun; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chou, Chen-Te; Chen, Ting-Yu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Wu, Hung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10), a proinflammatory chemokine, plays a crucial role in inflammatory diseases. This cross-sectional pilot study investigated whether circulating IP-10 is associated with the progression of liver disease, and prediabetes in patients with NAFLD. A total of 90 patients with NAFLD alone (n = 48) or NAFLD with incident diabetes (n = 42) and 43 controls participated in this study. Fasting plasma was used to assess metabolic parameters, inflammatory factors, endotoxin levels, and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. Insulin resistance was estimated using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). IP-10 levels were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD alone (median (interquartile range): 369.44 (309.30-418.97) pg/mL) and in those with incident diabetes (418.99 (330.73-526.04) pg/mL) than in controls (293.37 (214.10-331.57) pg/mL) (P < 0.001). IP-10 levels were positively correlated with levels of alanine aminotransferase, hs-CRP, MDA, MCP-1, and TNF-α as well as HOMA-IR values. Ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed IP-10 was an independent risk factor associated with progressive liver injury, insulin resistance and incident diabetes. Circulating IP-10 may be a non-invasive biomarker for disease progression and subsequent diabetes development of NAFLD. PMID:25961500

  20. Interferon-gamma inhibits the neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells by inhibiting the expression of Neurogenin2 via the JAK/STAT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jyhyun; Lee, Junsub; Kim, Sunyoung

    2015-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is one of the critical cytokines released by host immune cells upon infection. Despite the important role(s) of IFN-γ in host immune responses, there has been no in vivo study regarding the effects of IFN-γ on brain development, and the results from many in vitro studies are controversial. In this study, the effects of IFN-γ on embryonic neurogenesis were investigated. Treatment of E14.5 mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with IFN-γ resulted in a decrease in the percentage of TuJ1-positive immature neurons but an increase in the percentage of Nestin-positive NPCs. Similar results were obtained in vivo. Treatment of NPCs with a JAK inhibitor or the knockdown of STAT1 expression abrogated the IFN-γ-mediated inhibition of neurogenesis. Interestingly, the expression of one of proneural genes, Neurogenin2 (Neurog2) was dramatically inhibited upon IFN-γ treatment, and cells overexpressing Neurog2 did not respond to IFN-γ. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IFN-γ inhibits neuronal differentiation of NPCs by negatively regulating the expression of Neurog2 via the JAK/STAT1 pathway. Our findings may provide an insight into the role of IFN-γ in the development of embryonic brain.

  1. Macrophage-Lineage Cells Negatively Regulate the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Pool in Response to Interferon Gamma at Steady State and During Infection.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Amanda; Zhang, Yubin; Thai, Vinh; Jones, Maura; Jordan, Michael B; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) resident macrophages (Mϕs) regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization; however, their impact on HSC function has not been investigated. We demonstrate that depletion of BM resident Mϕs increases HSC proliferation as well as the pool of quiescent HSCs. At the same time, during bacterial infection where BM resident Mϕs are selectively increased we observe a decrease in HSC numbers. Moreover, strategies that deplete or reduce Mϕs during infection prevent HSC loss and rescue HSC function. We previously found that the transient loss of HSCs during infection is interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-dependent. We now demonstrate that IFNγ signaling specifically in Mϕs is critical for both the diminished HSC pool and maintenance of BM resident Mϕs during infection. In addition to the IFNγ-dependent loss of BM HSC and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during infection, IFNγ reduced circulating HSPC numbers. Importantly, under infection conditions AMD3100 or G-CSF-induced stem cell mobilization was impaired. Taken together, our data show that IFNγ acts on Mϕs, which are a negative regulator of the HSC pool, to drive the loss in BM and peripheral HSCs during infection. Our findings demonstrate that modulating BM resident Mϕ numbers can impact HSC function in vivo, which may be therapeutically useful for hematologic conditions and refinement of HSC transplantation protocols.

  2. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 Are Associated with Adult-Onset Immunodeficiency with Acquired Anti-Interferon-Gamma Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pithukpakorn, Manop; Roothumnong, Ekkapong; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Luangwedchakarn, Voravich; Umrod, Pinklow; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Foongladda, Suporn; Suputtamongkol, Yupin

    2015-01-01

    Recently a newly identified clinical syndrome of disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial diseases (with or without other opportunistic infections in adult patients who were previously healthy, has been recognized in association with an acquired autoantibody to interferon-gamma. This syndrome is emerging as an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among people of Asian descent. Trigger for the production of this autoantibody remains unknown, but genetic factors are strongly suspected to be involved. We compared HLA genotyping between 32 patients with this clinical syndrome, and 38 controls. We found that this clinical syndrome was associated with very limited allele polymorphism, with HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 alleles, especially HLA-DRB1*15:01, DRB1*16:02, DQB1*05:01 and DQB1*05:02. Odds ratio of DRB1*15:01, DRB1*16:02, DQB1*05:01 and DQB1*05:02 were 7.03 (95% CI, 2.18–22.69, P<0.0001, 9.06 (95% CI, 2.79–29.46, P<0.0001), 6.68 (95% CI, 2.29–19.52, P = 0.0004), and 6.64 (95% CI, 2.30–19.20, P = 0.0004), respectively. Further investigation is warranted to provide better understanding on pathogenesis of this association. PMID:26011559

  3. Inhibition by 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate of lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-induced nitric oxide production through suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in RAW264 cells.

    PubMed

    Ohata, T; Fukuda, K; Murakami, A; Ohigashi, H; Sugimura, T; Wakabayashi, K

    1998-06-01

    Although nitric oxide (NO) is an important biological mediator, excessive production in inflammation is thought to be a causative factor of cellular injury and cancer in the long term. In the present study the effects of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), which has anticarcinogenic properties, on NO production in murine macrophage cell line RAW264 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or interferon-gamma were examined. ACA suppressed NO production dose dependently with an IC50 of 160 ng/ml (680 nM). The decrease in NO production was shown to parallel reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. The influence of ACA on transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB, AP-1 and Stat1, which are involved in expression of the iNOS gene was assessed. ACA was found to suppress degradation of IkappaB, an NF-kappaB inhibitory factor, and consequently inhibit NF-kappaB activation. Activation of AP-1 and Stat1 was also blocked by ACA treatment. Thus we demonstrate that ACA exerts potent inhibitory effects on NO production, apparently mediated by modulation of activation of several transcription factors. This could contribute to the anticarcinogenic properties of ACA.

  4. Prenatal Dexamethasone and Postnatal High-Fat Diet Decrease Interferon Gamma Production through an Age-Dependent Histone Modification in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Tain, You-Lin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hung, Pi-Lien; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Overexposure to prenatal glucocorticoid (GC) disturbs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolism and susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. A high-fat (HF) diet is a major environmental factor that can cause metabolic syndrome. We aimed to investigate whether prenatal GC plus a postnatal HF diet could alter immune programming in rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone or saline at 14–21 days of gestation. Male offspring were then divided into four groups: vehicle, prenatal dexamethasone exposure, postnatal HF diet (VHF), and prenatal dexamethasone exposure plus a postnatal HF diet (DHF). The rats were sacrificed and adaptive immune function was evaluated. Compared to the vehicle, the DHF group had lower interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production by splenocytes at postnatal day 120. Decreases in H3K9 acetylation and H3K36me3 levels at the IFN-γ promoter correlated with decreased IFN-γ production. The impaired IFN-γ production and aberrant site-specific histone modification at the IFN-γ promoter by prenatal dexamethasone treatment plus a postnatal HF diet resulted in resilience at postnatal day 180. Prenatal dexamethasone and a postnatal HF diet decreased IFN-γ production through a site-specific and an age-dependent histone modification. These findings suggest a mechanism by which prenatal exposure to GC and a postnatal environment exert effects on fetal immunity programming. PMID:27669212

  5. Rapid diagnosis of human brucellosis by peripheral-blood PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Queipo-Ortuño, M I; Morata, P; Ocón, P; Manchado, P; Colmenero, J D

    1997-01-01

    A single-step PCR assay with genus-specific primers for the amplification of a 223-bp region of the sequence encoding a 31-kDa immunogenetic Brucella abortus protein (BCSP31) was used for the rapid diagnosis of human brucellosis. We examined peripheral blood from 47 patients, with a total of 50 cases of brucellosis, and a group of 60 control subjects, composed of patients with febrile syndromes of several etiologies other than brucellosis, asymptomatic subjects seropositive for Brucella antibodies, and healthy subjects. Diagnosis of brucellosis was established in 35 cases (70%) by isolation of Brucella in blood culture and in the other 15 cases (30%) by clinical and serological means. The sensitivity of our PCR assay was 100%, since it correctly identified all 50 cases of brucellosis, regardless of the duration of the disease, the positivity of the blood culture, or the presence of focal forms. The specificity of the test was 98.3%, and the only false-positive result was for a patient who had had brucellosis 2 months before and possibly had a self-limited relapse. In those patients who relapsed, the results of our PCR assay were positive for both the initial infection and the relapse, becoming negative once the relapse treatment was completed and remaining negative in the follow-up tests at 2, 4, and 6 months. In conclusion, these results suggest that the PCR assay is rapid and easy to perform and highly sensitive and specific, and it may therefore be considered a useful tool for diagnosis of human brucellosis. PMID:9350761

  6. Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Fire Assay Workers and Their Children in Alaska, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kimberly A; Kirk, Cassandra; Fearey, Donna; Castrodale, Louisa J; Verbrugge, David; McLaughlin, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In October 2010, an employee at Facility A in Alaska that performs fire assay analysis, an industrial technique that uses lead-containing flux to obtain metals from pulverized rocks, was reported to the Alaska Section of Epidemiology (SOE) with an elevated blood lead level (BLL) ≥10 micrograms per deciliter (μg/dL). The SOE initiated an investigation; investigators interviewed employees, offered blood lead screening to employees and their families, and observed a visit to the industrial facility by the Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Section (AKOSH). Among the 15 employees with known work responsibilities, 12 had an elevated BLL at least once from October 2010 through February 2011. Of these 12 employees, 10 reported working in the fire assay room. Four children of employees had BLLs ≥5 μg/dL. Employees working in Facility A's fire assay room were likely exposed to lead at work and could have brought lead home. AKOSH inspectors reported that they could not share their consultative report with SOE investigators because of the confidentiality requirements of a federal regulation, which hampered Alaska SOE investigators from fully characterizing the lead exposure standards. PMID:26327721

  7. Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Fire Assay Workers and Their Children in Alaska, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kimberly A; Kirk, Cassandra; Fearey, Donna; Castrodale, Louisa J; Verbrugge, David; McLaughlin, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In October 2010, an employee at Facility A in Alaska that performs fire assay analysis, an industrial technique that uses lead-containing flux to obtain metals from pulverized rocks, was reported to the Alaska Section of Epidemiology (SOE) with an elevated blood lead level (BLL) ≥10 micrograms per deciliter (μg/dL). The SOE initiated an investigation; investigators interviewed employees, offered blood lead screening to employees and their families, and observed a visit to the industrial facility by the Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Section (AKOSH). Among the 15 employees with known work responsibilities, 12 had an elevated BLL at least once from October 2010 through February 2011. Of these 12 employees, 10 reported working in the fire assay room. Four children of employees had BLLs ≥5 μg/dL. Employees working in Facility A's fire assay room were likely exposed to lead at work and could have brought lead home. AKOSH inspectors reported that they could not share their consultative report with SOE investigators because of the confidentiality requirements of a federal regulation, which hampered Alaska SOE investigators from fully characterizing the lead exposure standards.

  8. Microcirculation-on-a-Chip: A Microfluidic Platform for Assaying Blood- and Lymphatic-Vessel Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Miwa; Sasaki, Naoki; Ato, Manabu; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sato, Kiichi; Sato, Kae

    2015-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic model of microcirculation containing both blood and lymphatic vessels for examining vascular permeability. The designed microfluidic device harbors upper and lower channels that are partly aligned and are separated by a porous membrane, and on this membrane, blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were cocultured back-to-back. At cell-cell junctions of both BECs and LECs, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin were detected. The permeability coefficient measured here was lower than the value reported for isolated mammalian venules. Moreover, our results showed that the flow culture established in the device promoted the formation of endothelial cell-cell junctions, and that treatment with histamine, an inflammation-promoting substance, induced changes in the localization of tight and adherens junction-associated proteins and an increase in vascular permeability in the microdevice. These findings indicated that both BECs and LECs appeared to retain their functions in the microfluidic coculture platform. Using this microcirculation device, the vascular damage induced by habu snake venom was successfully assayed, and the assay time was reduced from 24 h to 30 min. This is the first report of a microcirculation model in which BECs and LECs were cocultured. Because the micromodel includes lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels, the model can be used to evaluate both vascular permeability and lymphatic return rate. PMID:26332321

  9. DNA strand breaks (comet assay) in blood lymphocytes from wild bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard F; Bulski, Karrie; Adams, Jeffrey D; Peden-Adams, Margie; Bossart, Gregory D; King, Lydia; Fair, Patricia A

    2013-12-15

    The comet assay was carried out on blood lymphocytes from a large number of wild dolphins (71 from Indian River Lagoon, FL, USA; 51 from Charleston Harbor, SC, USA) and provides a baseline study of DNA strand breaks in wild dolphin populations. There were no significant differences in the comet assay (% DNA in tail) results between the different age and sex categories. Significant difference in DNA strand breaks were found between Charleston Harbor dolphins (median--17.4% DNA in tail) and Indian River Lagoon dolphins (median--14.0% DNA in tail). A strong correlation found between T-cell proliferation and DNA strand breaks in dolphin lymphocytes suggests that dolphins with a high numbers of DNA strand breaks have a decreased ability to respond to infection. Higher concentrations of genotoxic agents in Charleston Harbor compared with Indian River lagoon may have been one of the causes of higher DNA strand breaks in these dolphins.

  10. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay.

  11. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay. PMID:22933153

  12. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  13. Identification and evaluation of new Mycobacterium bovis antigens in the in vitro interferon gamma release assay for bovine tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Eirin, María E; Macias, Analia; Magnano, Gabriel; Morsella, Claudia; Mendez, Laura; Blanco, Federico C; Bianco, María V; Severina, Walter; Alito, Alicia; Pando, Maria de Los Angeles; Singh, Mahavir; Spallek, Ralph; Paolicchi, Fernando A; Bigi, Fabiana; Cataldi, Angel A

    2015-12-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a common zoonotic disease, caused by Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), responsible for significant economic losses worldwide. Its diagnosis is based on the detection of cell mediated immunity under the exposure to protein purified derivative tuberculin (PPD), a complex and poorly characterized reagent. The cross-reactivity to non-tuberculous mycobacterium species (false-positive results) has been crucial to develop a more proper antigen. In the present study, we selected six M. bovis Open Reading Frames (Mb1992, Mb2031c, Mb2319, Mb2843c, Mb2845c and Mb3212c) by in-silico analysis and evaluated them in experimental and natural infection; none of these antigens had been previously assessed as diagnostic antigens for bTB. The reactivity performance was tested in animals with both positive and negative Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) results as well as in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subesp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The six recombinant antigens individually induced an IFN-γ response, with overall responder frequency ranging from 18.3 to 31%. Mb2845c was the most valuable antigen with the potential to discriminate TST-positive cattle from either TST-negative or MAP infected animals. Mb2845c showed similar performance to that observed with ESAT-6 and PPD-B among TST and MTC specific-PCR positive animals, although this result needs to be proven in further studies with a higher sample size. Our data confirm the feacibility to implement bioinformatic screening tools and suggest Mb2845c as a potential diagnostic antigen to be tested in protein cocktails to evaluate their contribution to bTB diagnosis.

  14. Interferon-gamma release assay sensitivity in children younger than 5 years is insufficient to replace the use of tuberculin skin test in western countries.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Elena; Bonsignori, Francesca; Mazzantini, Rachele; Sollai, Sara; Venturini, Elisabetta; Mangone, Giusi; Cortimiglia, Martina; Olivito, Biagio; Azzari, Chiara; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculin skin test, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB were performed in 338 children at risk for tuberculosis (TB), including 70 active TB cases. In children <5 years of age, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube sensitivity was 73.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 57.5-89.1]; and T-SPOT.TB sensitivity was 59.3% (95% CI: 40.1-77.8); both were inferior to tuberculin skin test sensitivity (90.0%; 95% CI: 79.3-100). In children ≥ 5 years QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube sensitivity was 92.5% (95% CI: 84.4-100); T-SPOT.TB sensitivity was 73.0% (95% CI: 58.6-87.3) ; and tuberculin skin test sensitivity was 97.5% (95% CI: 92.6-100).Test specificities were similar in all age groups.

  15. Natural inhibitors of indoleamine 3,5-dioxygenase induced by interferon-gamma in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Corteling, R; Stevanato, L; Sinden, J

    2012-12-01

    Indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) is a heme- containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine and the downstream quinolinic acid. Though IDO is physiologically important in maintaining tissue integrity, aberrant IDO expression represses T cell function and promotes regulatory T cells (Treg) in cancer. It additionally exacerbates Alzheimer, depression, Huntington and Parkinson diseases via quinolinic acid. Inhibition of IDO has thus been recently proposed as a strategy for treating cancer and neuronal disorders. In the present study, we have developed a cell-based assay to evaluate the suppressive effect of anti-inflammatory phytochemicals on the enzyme. When stimulated by INF-γ, profound high expressions of IDO-1 mRNA as well as the protein were detected in human neural stem cells (hNSC) and verified by real-time retro-transcribed PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The protein activity was measured by kynurenine concentration and the assay was validated by dose-responsive inhibition of IDO-1 antagonists including 1-methyltryptaphan, indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid. Among the tested compounds, apigenin, baicalein, chrysin, and wogonin exhibit a potent repressive activity with IC(50s) comparable to that of indomethacin. The inhibition was further found to be independent of gene expression and protein translation because of the unaltered levels of mRNA and protein expression. Although curcumin displayed a potent inhibitory activity to the enzyme, it appeared to be cytotoxic to hNSCs. Morphological examination of hNSC revealed that baicalein and wogonin at the inhibitory concentrations induced neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, our data shows that certain phytochemicals with 2-phenyl-1-benzopyran-4-one backbone (flavones) attenuate significantly the IDO-1 protein activity without harming hNSCs. The inhibitory activity might have partially contributed to the anti-cancer and neuro-protective property of the

  16. Comparative evaluation of genotoxicity by micronucleus assay in the buccal mucosa over comet assay in peripheral blood in oral precancer and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Katarkar, Atul; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Khan, Masood H; Ray, Jay G; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2014-09-01

    Early detection and quantification of DNA damage in oral premalignancy or malignancy may help in management of the disease and improve survival rates. The comet assay has been successfully utilised to detect DNA damage in oral premalignant or malignancy. However, due to the invasive nature of collecting blood, it may be painful for many unwilling patients. This study compares the micronucleus (MN) assay in oral buccal mucosa cells with the comet assay in peripheral blood cells in a subset of oral habit-induced precancer and cancer patients. For this, MN assay of exfoliated epithelial cells was compared with comet assay of peripheral blood leucocytes among 260 participants, including those with oral lichen planus (OLP; n = 52), leukoplakia (LPK; n = 51), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF; n = 51), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC; n = 54) and normal volunteers (n = 52). Among the precancer groups, LPK patients showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage as reflected by both comet tail length (P < 0.0001) and micronuclei (MNi) frequency (P = 0.0009). The DNA damage pattern in precancer and cancer patients was OLP < OSF < LPK < OSCC, and with respective oral habits, it was multiple habits > cigarette + khaini > cigarette smokers > areca + khaini > areca. There was no significant difference in the comet length and MNi frequency between males and females who had oral chewing habits. An overall significant correlation was observed between MNi frequency and comet tail length with r = 0.844 and P < 0.0001. Thus, the extent of DNA damage evaluation by the comet assay in peripheral blood cells is perfectly reflected by the MN assay on oral exfoliated epithelial cells, and MNi frequency can be used with the same effectiveness and greater efficiency in early detection of oral premalignant conditions.

  17. Executive summary of the guidelines for the use of interferon-γ release assays in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-05-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guideline for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations) methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at the risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health.

  18. Executive summary of the guidelines for the use of interferon-γ release assays in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-05-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guideline for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations) methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at the risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health. PMID:26926262

  19. Effects of interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide on macrophage iron metabolism are mediated by nitric oxide-induced degradation of iron regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Ponka, P

    2000-03-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and IRP-2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements, which are located in the 3'-untranslated region and the 5'-untranslated region of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to iron-responsive elements and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(*), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP-1 RNA binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels. Recently we found that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA binding of IRP-2 followed by IRP-2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels (Kim, S., and Ponka, P. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 33035-33042). In this study, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP-1 binding activity, whereas RNA binding of IRP-2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Moreover, the decrease of IRP-2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, LPS/IFN-gamma-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells showed increased rates of ferritin synthesis. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP-2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  20. Swine leukocyte antigen-DQ expression and its regulation by interferon-gamma at the maternal-fetal interface in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mingoo; Seo, Heewon; Choi, Yohan; Shim, Jangsoo; Bazer, Fuller W; Ka, Hakhyun

    2012-02-01

    Successful pregnancy requires an appropriate intrauterine immune response to the conceptus, which is a semiallograft within the uterus. We reported that swine leukocyte antigen-DQA (SLA-DQA), a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene, is expressed in the uterine endometrium at the time of conceptus implantation in pigs. Because MHC molecules play critical roles in the immune system, SLA-DQ was hypothesized to be involved in immune regulation during pregnancy. Therefore, we examined expression of SLA-DQ in uterine endometrial tissues obtained during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. SLA-DQA and SLA-DQB mRNAs were detected as 1.3-kb and 1.2-kb bands, respectively. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that SLA-DQA and SLA-DQB mRNA expression was affected by day and pregnancy status, with the highest expression on Day 15 of pregnancy. SLA-DQ was localized primarily to subepithelial stromal cells and endothelial cells of the uterus. Using endometrial explant cultures from Day 12 of the estrous cycle, we determined that expression of SLA-DQA and SLA-DQB mRNAs increased in response to interferon-gamma (IFNG), which is produced by pig conceptus trophectoderm between Days 14 and 18 of pregnancy. The abundance of SLA-DQ protein was less in endometria from gilts with conceptuses resulting from somatic cell nuclear transfer compared with endometria from gilts with conceptuses resulting from natural mating. These results support our hypothesis that SLA-DQ is expressed in response to IFNG from the conceptus, and likely regulates immune response at the maternal-fetal interface to support the maintenance of pregnancy in pigs.

  1. A highly sensitive label-free electrochemical aptasensor for interferon-gamma detection based on graphene controlled assembly and nuclease cleavage-assisted target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Genping; Wang, Yonghong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Liu, Jinquan; Du, Yudan

    2013-06-15

    We report here a highly sensitive and label-free electrochemical aptasensing technology for detection of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) based on graphene controlled assembly and enzyme cleavage-assisted target recycling amplification strategy. In this work, in the absence of IFN-γ, the graphene could not be assembled onto the 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) modified gold electrode because the IFN-γ binding aptamer was strongly adsorbed on the graphene due to the strong π-π interaction. Thus the electronic transmission was blocked (eT OFF). However, the presence of target IFN-γ and DNase I led to desorption of aptamer from the graphene surface and further cleavage of the aptamer, thereby releasing the IFN-γ. The released IFN-γ could then re-attack other aptamers on the graphene, resulting in the successive release of the aptamers from the graphene. At the same time, the "naked" graphene could be assembled onto the MHA modified gold electrode with hydrophobic interaction and π-conjunction, mediating the electron transfer between the electrode and the electroactive indicator. Then, measurable electrochemical signals were generated (eT ON), which was related to the concentration of the IFN-γ. By taking advantages of graphene and enzyme cleavage-assisted target recycling amplification, the developed label-free electrochemical aptasensing technology showed a linear response to concentration of IFN-γ range from 0.1 to 0.7 pM. The detection limit of IFN-γ was determined to be 0.065 pM. Moreover, this aptasensor shows good selectivity toward the target in the presence of other relevant proteins. Our strategy thus opens new opportunities for label-free and amplified detection of other kinds of proteins.

  2. Regression of intracerebral rat glioma isografts by therapeutic subcutaneous immunization with interferon-gamma, interleukin-7, or B7-1-transfected tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Visse, E; Siesjö, P; Widegren, B; Sjögren, H O

    1999-01-01

    Progress in the definition of the roles of various costimulators and cytokines in determining the type and height of immune responses has made it important to explore genetically altered tumor cells expressing such molecules for therapeutic immunizations. We have studied the effect of therapeutic subcutaneous (s.c.) immunizations on the growth of preexisting intracerebral brain tumor isografts in the rat. Transfectant glioma cell clones expressing either rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), rat interleukin-7 (IL-7), or rat B7-1 were selected. After irradiation (80 Gy) the clones were used for immunization (administered in up to four s.c. doses in a hind leg over 14-day intervals starting 1 day after the intracranial isografting of the parental tumor). Significant growth inhibition of the intracerebral parental tumors was induced by transfectants expressing IFN-gamma and IL-7, respectively. The strongest effect was observed with IFN-gamma-expressing cells, resulting in cures in 37% of the males and in 100% of the females. Immunization with IL-7 had a similar, strong initial effect, with significantly prolonged survival in the majority of the rats but a lower final cure rate (survival for >150 days). The B7-1-expressing tumor clones induced cures in seven of eight female rats; however, no cures were seen in the male rats. It was also shown that the B7-1-expressing cells were themselves strongly immunogenic in female rats, requiring high cell numbers to result in a progressively growing tumor upon s.c. isografting; this was not the case in male rats. As a whole, the results imply that despite the unfavorable location of intracerebral tumors, therapeutic s.c. immunizations with certain types of genetically altered tumor cells can induce complete regressions with permanent survival and without gross neurological or other apparent signs of brain damage. The present results demonstrate complete regressions when immunizations are initiated shortly after intracranial

  3. Interferon-gamma regulates nucleoside transport systems in macrophages through signal transduction and activator of transduction factor 1 (STAT1)-dependent and -independent signalling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio; García-Manteiga, José; Serra, Maria; Guillén-Gómez, Elena; Casado, F Javier; MacLeod, Carol; Modolell, Manuel; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Celada, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The expressions of CNT and ENT (concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters) in macrophages are differentially regulated by IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). This cytokine controls gene expression through STAT1-dependent and/or -independent pathways (where STAT1 stands for signal transduction and activator of transcription 1). In the present study, the role of STAT1 in the response of nucleoside transporters to IFN-gamma was studied using macrophages from STAT1 knockout mice. IFN-gamma triggered an inhibition of ENT1-related nucleoside transport activity through STAT1-dependent mechanisms. Such inhibition of macrophage growth and ENT1 activity by IFN-gamma is required for DNA synthesis. Interestingly, IFN-gamma led to an induction of the CNT1- and CNT2-related nucleoside transport activities independent of STAT1, thus ensuring the supply of extracellular nucleosides for the STAT1-independent RNA synthesis. IFN-gamma up-regulated CNT2 mRNA and CNT1 protein levels and down-regulated ENT1 mRNA in both wild-type and STAT1 knockout macrophages. This is consistent with a STAT1-independent, long-term-mediated, probably transcription-dependent, regulation of nucleoside transporter genes. Moreover, STAT1-dependent post-transcriptional mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity. Although nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of ENT1 activity in B-cells at a post-transcriptional level, our results show that STAT1-dependent induction of nitric oxide by IFN-gamma is not implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity in macrophages. Our results indicate that both STAT1-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of nucleoside transporters by IFN-gamma in macrophages. PMID:12868960

  4. Mechanisms of the Eimeria tenella growth inhibitory activity induced by concanavalin A and reticuloendotheliosis virus supernatants with interferon gamma activity in chicken macrophages and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Dimier-Poisson, I H; Soundouss, Z; Naciri, M; Bout, D T; Quéré, P

    1999-01-01

    Pretreatment of chicken bone marrow macrophages and embryo fibroblasts with supernatants containing chicken interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) for 24 hr prior to inoculation inhibited intracellular Eimeria tenella replication, measured by [3H] uracil incorporation. The supernatants (Sns) were obtained from culture of lymphoblastoid cells transformed by a reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) and chicken splenocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A). The mechanisms of the E. tenella growth inhibitory activity induced by Sn REV and Sn Con A in chicken macrophages and fibroblasts were studied. Addition of oxygen scavengers (superoxide dismutase, D-mannitol, DABCO, benzoic acid, L-histidine hydrochloride) was able to overcome the inhibition of E. tenella replication after pretreatment with Sn REV or Sn Con A in macrophage cultures but not in fibroblast cultures. Nitric oxide (NO) synthesis was induced in macrophage culture treated with Sn REV or Sn Con A but not in fibroblast culture. Addition of NG monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor together with the supernatants was also able to overcome inhibition of E. tenella replication in macrophage culture. On the other hand, addition of L-tryptophan to Sn REV- or Sn Con A-treated fibroblasts was able to reverse the inhibitory effect on E. tenella replication. In conclusion, production of inorganic NO or toxic oxygen intermediates may be involved in the E. tenella growth inhibitory activity of chicken macrophages pretreated with supernatants containing an IFN-gamma activity, and cellular tryptophan depletion may be involved for chicken fibroblasts, thus matching the mechanisms of the IFN-gamma-induced growth inhibitory activity for protozoans in mammals.

  5. Interferon-gamma differentially regulates CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) expression on human Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, H; Katayama, I; Ohki, O; Arimura, M; Takayama, K; Matsunaga, T; Satoh, T; Umeda, T; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Nishioka, K

    1997-06-01

    CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2/B70) have recently been identified in cultured human Langerhans cells (LCs), although their role and regulatory properties remain unclear. We present our comparison of the expression of the molecules, mRNAs and the function between CD80 and CD86 in human LCs treated by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). We examined the regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 expression in human LCs pretreated with IFN-gamma. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the mean fluorescence intensity of CD86 but not CD80 was enhanced. However, the percentage modulation of both CD80 and CD86 positive cells were significantly up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner, after 48-h culturing with IFN-gamma. The regulatory properties of CD80 and CD86 mRNA expressions in human LC were studied using polymerase chain reaction methods. We found that both CD80 and CD86 mRNA of enriched LCs following IFN-gamma pretreatment for 12 h were higher than those without pretreatment. We have demonstrated that the primary allogeneic mixed epidermal cell-lymphocyte reaction induced by human LCs treated by IFN-gamma increased in a dose-dependent manner. There was a 61.5% inhibition by anti-CD86 monoclonal antibody and a 32.5% inhibition by anti-CD80 monoclonal antibody. These data indicate that the CD80 and CD86 expression of human LCs may be differently regulated by IFN-gamma.

  6. A nonimmunogenic sarcoma transduced with the cDNA for interferon gamma elicits CD8+ T cells against the wild-type tumor: correlation with antigen presentation capability

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To be recognized by CD8+ T lymphocytes, target cells must process and present peptide antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The nonimmunogenic, low class I- expressing, methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced murine sarcoma cell line, MCA 101, is a poor presenter of endogenously generated viral antigens to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and cannot be used to generate tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Since interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has been shown to upregulate three sets of molecules important for antigen processing and presentation, we retrovirally transduced wild-type MCA 101 (101.WT) tumor with the mIFN-gamma cDNA to create the 101.NAT cell line. Unlike 101.WT, some clones of retrovirally transduced 101.NAT tumor expressed high levels of class I, and could be used to generate CD8+ TIL. More importantly, these TIL were therapeutic in vivo against established pulmonary metastases from the wild-type tumor. Although not uniformly cytotoxic amongst several separate cultures, these TIL did specifically release cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) in response to 101.WT targets. 101.WT's antigen presentation deficit was also reversed by gene modification with mIFN-gamma cDNA. 101.NAT had a greatly improved capacity to present viral antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These findings show that a nonimmunogenic tumor, incapable of generating a CD8+ T cell immune response, could be gene-modified to generate a therapeutically useful immune response against the wild-type tumor. This strategy may be useful in developing treatments for tumor histologies not thought to be susceptible to T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:1588273

  7. Production of aggregation prone human interferon gamma and its mutant in highly soluble and biologically active form by SUMO fusion technology.

    PubMed

    Tileva, M; Krachmarova, E; Ivanov, I; Maskos, K; Nacheva, G

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a preferable choice for production of recombinant proteins. A disadvantage of this system is the target protein aggregation in "inclusion bodies" (IBs) that further requires solubilisation and refolding, which is crucial for the properties and the yield of the final product. In order to prevent aggregation, SUMO fusion tag technology has been successfully applied for expression of eukaryotic proteins, including human interferon gamma (hIFNγ) that was reported, however, with no satisfactory biological activity. We modified this methodology for expression and purification of both the wild type hIFNγ and an extremely prone to aggregation mutant hIFNγ-K88Q, whose recovery from IBs showed to be ineffective upon numerous conditions. By expression of the N-terminal His-SUMO fusion proteins in the E. coli strain BL21(DE3)pG-KJE8, co-expressing two chaperone systems, at 24 °C a significant increase in solubility of both target proteins (1.5-fold for hIFNγ and 8-fold for K88Q) was achieved. Two-step chromatography (affinity and ion-exchange) with on-dialysis His-SUMO-tag cleavage was applied for protein purification that yielded 6.0-7.0mg/g wet biomass for both proteins with >95% purity and native N-termini. The optimised protocol led to increased yields from 5.5 times for hIFNγ up to 100 times for K88Q in comparison to their isolation from IBs. Purified hIFNγ showed preserved thermal stability and antiproliferative activity corresponding to that of the native reference sample (3 × 10(7)IU/mg). The developed methodology represents an optimised procedure that can be successfully applied for large scale expression and purification of aggregation-prone proteins in soluble native form.

  8. Inhibition of sup 125 I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo (125I)iodotyrosines and (125I)iodothyronines, and secreted (125I)T4 and (125I)T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and (125I)iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism.

  9. Evaluation of in vivo targeting of andenocarcinomas with In-111-DTPA-B72.3-antibody under treatment with interferon gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Becherer, A.; Raderer, M.; Scheithauer, W.

    1994-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) In-111-DTPA-B72.3 directed against the tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 has successfully been used for tumor diagnosis and staging, however, for evaluation of liver metastases the sensitivity is poor. Interferon gamma (IFNg) has been reported to increase TAG-72 expression on ascites tumor cells in patients with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. This study was undertaken to show a possible influence of IFNg on the diagnostic abilities of imunnoscintigraphy with In-111-DTPA-B72.3. We compared the in vivo targeting in 12 patients (9 males, 3 females, 59{plus_minus}16 years) under IFNg treatment (250 g daily s.c.) with a control group of 17 patients (10 males, 7 females, 66{plus_minus}10 years). In 5 patients (3 males, 2 females, 65{plus_minus}13 years) repeated scanning was performed before and during IFNg treatment. The patients suffered from advanced colorectal, pancreatic or gastric adenocarcinomas and underwent surgery and chemotherapy prior to scintigraphic investigations. In patients without IFNg, primary resp. residual tumors were imaged in 1 of 5 and liver metastases in 9 of 14 patients. In the IFNg-treated patients primary resp. residual tumors were visualized in 1 of 3 and Ever metastases in 8 of 9 patients (89%, vs 64% control group). Contrast of imaging for liver metastases was improved in 2 of 5 patients under treatment with IFNg while no difference in the visualization of primary resp. residual tumors could be realized under IFNg treatment. We conclude that in vivo targeting of TAG-72 with In-111-DTPA-B72.3 mAb may be increased in tumor patients under therapy with IFNg.

  10. Physiological and receptor-selective retinoids modulate interferon gamma signaling by increasing the expression, nuclear localization, and functional activity of interferon regulatory factor-1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin M; Ross, A Catharine

    2005-10-28

    Synergistic actions between all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and interferon gamma (IFNgamma) on modulation of cellular functions have been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism of atRA-mediated regulation of IFNgamma signaling is poorly understood. In this study, we have used the human lung epithelial cell line A549 to examine the effect of atRA on IFNgamma-induced expression of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), an important transcription factor involved in cell growth and apoptosis, differentiation, and antiviral and antibacterial immune responses. At least 4 h of pretreatment with atRA followed by suboptimal concentrations of IFNgamma induced a faster, higher, and more stable expression of IRF-1 than IFNgamma alone. Actinomycin D completely blocked the induction of IRF-1 by the combination, suggesting regulation at the transcriptional level. Further, we found that activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 was induced more dramatically by atRA and IFNgamma than by IFNgamma alone. Expression of IFNgamma receptor-1 on the cell surface was also increased upon atRA pretreatment. Experiments using receptor-selective retinoids revealed that ligands for retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RARalpha), including atRA, 9-cis-retinoic acid, and Am580, sequentially increased the levels of IFNgamma receptor-1, activated signal transducer and activator of transcription-1, and IRF-1 and that an RARalpha antagonist was able to inhibit the effects of atRA and Am580. In addition, atRA pretreatment affected the transcriptional functions of IFNgamma-induced IRF-1, increasing its nuclear localization and DNA binding activity as well as the transcript levels of IRF-1 target genes. These results suggest that atRA, an RARalpha ligand, regulates IFNgamma-induced IRF-1 by affecting multiple components of the IFNgamma signaling pathway, from the plasma membrane to the nuclear transcription factors.

  11. Sphingosine kinase inhibitor suppresses IL-18-induced interferon-gamma production through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation in human NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Seok Bean; Jung, Minkyung; Park, Yoorim; Bang, Jung-Wook; Kim, Tae Sung; Park, Hyunjeong; Kim, Cherl-hyun; Yang, Yool-hee; Bang, Sa Ik; Cho, Daeho

    2008-09-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the innate immune response. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a well-known interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma} inducing factor, which stimulates immune response in NK and T cells. Sphingosine kinase (SPHK) catalyzes the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which acts as a second messenger to function as an anti-apoptotic factor and proliferation stimulator of immune cells. In this study, to elucidate whether SPHK is involved in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, we measured IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production after pre-treatment with SPHK inhibitor (SKI) in NK-92MI cells. We found that IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} expression was blocked by SKI pre-treatment in both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the increased IFN-{gamma} production by stimulation with IL-18 is mediated through both SPHK and p38 MAPK. To determine the upstream signals of SKI and p38 MAPK in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK was measured after SKI pre-treatment. As a result, inhibition of SPHK by SKI blocked phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, showing that SPHK activation by IL-18 is an upstream signal of p38 MAPK activation. Inhibition of SPHK by SKI also inhibited IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production in human primary NK cells. In conclusion, SPHK activation is an essential factor for IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production via p38 MAPK.

  12. Heterozygous deletion of ATG5 in Apc(Min/+) mice promotes intestinal adenoma growth and enhances the antitumor efficacy of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Lu, Yuyin; Zhang, Qianyun; Qu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5) was lost in 23% of the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and the role of loss of ATG5 in the pathogenesis of CRC remains unclear. Knockdown of ATG5 in cancer cells enhances the antitumor efficacy of lots of chemotherapeutic agents. However, there is still no animal model to validate these in vitro observations in vivo. In this study, we found that heterozygous deletion of ATG5 in Apc(Min/+) mice increased the number and size of adenomas as compared with those in Apc(Min/+)ATG5(+/+) mice. To investigate whether ATG5 deficiency could sensitize tumors to chemotherapies, we compared the antitumor effects of Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) between Apc(Min/+)ATG5(+/+) and Apc(Min/+)ATG5(+/-) mice, as IFN-γ is a potential tumor suppressor for CRC and has been used clinically as an efficient adjuvant to chemotherapy of cancer. We revealed that heterozygous deletion of ATG5 significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy of IFN-γ. Early treatment of Apc(Min/+)ATG5(+/-) mice with IFN-γ decreased tumor incidence rate to 16.7% and reduced the number of adenomas by 95.5% and late treatment led to regression of tumor. Moreover, IFN-γ treatment did not cause any evident toxic reaction. Mechanistic analysis revealed that heterozygous deletion of ATG5 activated EGFR/ERK1/2 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in adenomas of Apc(Min/+) mice and enhanced the effects of IFN-γ-dependent inhibition of these 2 pathways. Our results demonstrate that ATG5 plays important roles in intestinal tumor growth and combination of IFN-γ and ATG5 deficiency or ATG5-targeted inhibition is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:25695667

  13. Interferon-gamma increases cellular calcium ion concentration and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation in human renal carcinoma cells: relation to ICAM-1 antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, A. B.; Bouchelouche, P. N.; Lillevang, S. T.; Andersen, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on cellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins 1,4,5-P3) formation in the human renal carcinoma cell line CaKi-1. We also examined the possible role of a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism during IFN-gamma-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) antigen expression. IFN-gamma caused a rapid concentration-dependent rise in [Ca2+]i, which was partly inhibited by diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, TMB-8, an inhibitor of intracellular calcium redistribution, and in calcium-free medium. IFN-gamma caused a fourfold increase in Ins 1,4,5-P3 formation. The induction of ICAM-1 antigen expression was synergistically enhanced by 4-bromocalcium ionophore A23187. Finally, the calcium antagonists diltiazem. TMB-8 and EGTA, as well as two potent inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent kinases, calmidazolium (R24571) and W7, had no or only a minor inhibitory effect on IFN-gamma induction. Our data suggest that IFN-gamma increases [Ca2+]i in CaKi-1 cells by stimulating influx of Ca2+ and release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, probably via Ins 1,4,5-P3 formation. IFN-gamma signal transduction in our model may not be limited to an increase in [Ca2+]i and Ins 1,4,5-P3, since IFN-gamma-induced ICAM-1 antigen expression was abrogated to a minor degree by calcium antagonists and not coupled to Ins 1,4,5-P3 formation. PMID:7905278

  14. Measurement of glycated haemoglobin in whole blood by a novel fluorescence quenching assay.

    PubMed

    Blincko, S; Anzetse, J; Edwards, R

    2000-07-01

    We describe a method for the specific measurement of glycated Hb (GHb) by fluorescence quenching. Whole blood is added to lysing solution, then the lysate is mixed with eosin-boronic acid solution and reacted for at least 5 min at room temperature. The quenching of the fluorescence of the eosin-boronic acid solution is proportional to the concentration of GHb present. Total Hb concentration was measured by absorbance and the GHb expressed as a percentage of the total Hb. Comparison with a commercial high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system for HbA1c showed: %GHb=1.30 (SD 0.04) %HbA1c + 1.36 (SD 0.30), S(y/x) 0.803, n=95, r=0.965 (SD=standard deviation). Intra-assay coefficients of variation were <2.5% (for GHb concentrations in the range 6-20%) and inter-assay coefficients of variation were <4.1% (10 assays on six samples with GHb concentrations in the range 6-20%). Linearity of response was demonstrated by dilution. The effect of adding exogenous glucose, bilirubin and triglycerides was tested on samples with low, medium and high GHb concentrations. No significant interference was found. Variation of haematocrit over the range 0.4-0.6 also had no significant effect on percentage GHb. Preliminary results with samples containing variant Hb (HbAS and HbAC) indicated good agreement with HPLC for these samples also. PMID:10902866

  15. First application of comet assay in blood cells of Mediterranean loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Caliani, Ilaria; Campani, Tommaso; Giannetti, Matteo; Marsili, Letizia; Casini, Silvia; Fossi, Maria Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the comet assay in erythrocytes of Caretta caretta, a species never investigated for genotoxicity. We studied 31 loggerhead sea turtles from three Italian marine rescue centres. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all the animals and the comet assay applied. All comet cells were analysed using two methods: visual scoring and computer image analysis. The % DNA in tail mean value ± SD and Damage Index were 21.56 ± 15.41 and 134.83 ± 94.12, respectively. A strong and statistically significant statistically correlation between the two analytical methods was observed (r = 0.95; p < 0.05). These results demonstrate that the comet assay is a useful method to detect the possible effects of genotoxic agents in loggerhead sea turtle and to increase the knowledge about the ecotoxicological health status of this threatened species.

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Methods Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. Results An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1–6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. Conclusions The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-Cells That Express Interferon-Gamma Contribute to HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Rachel D.; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. Methods To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Results Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNFα, IL-2, IFNγ and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFNγ. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFNγ expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFNγ and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/μl and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFNγ expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Conclusions Presence of IFNγ expressing CD8+ T

  18. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L

    2014-12-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm(2))/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s(-1)), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s(-1) revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s(-1) or 1000 s(-1), and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s(-1) (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s(-1)) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions.

  19. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm2)/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s−1), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s−1) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s−1 revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s−1 or 1000 s−1, and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s−1 (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s−1) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions. PMID:25303860

  20. Contact activation of blood coagulation on a defined kaolin/collagen surface in a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Diamond, Scott L

    2014-12-01

    Generation of active Factor XII (FXIIa) triggers blood clotting on artificial surfaces and may also enhance intravascular thrombosis. We developed a patterned kaolin (0 to 0.3 pg/μm(2))/type 1 collagen fibril surface for controlled microfluidic clotting assays. Perfusion of whole blood (treated only with a low level of 4 μg/mL of the XIIa inhibitor, corn trypsin inhibitor) drove platelet deposition followed by fibrin formation. At venous wall shear rate (100 s(-1)), kaolin accelerated onset of fibrin formation by ~100 sec when compared to collagen alone (250 sec vs. 350 sec), with little effect on platelet deposition. Even with kaolin present, arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) delayed and suppressed fibrin formation compared to venous wall shear rate. A comparison of surfaces for extrinsic activation (tissue factor TF/collagen) versus contact activation (kaolin/collagen) that each generated equal platelet deposition at 100 s(-1) revealed: (1) TF surfaces promoted much faster fibrin onset (at 100 sec) and more endpoint fibrin at 600 sec at either 100 s(-1) or 1000 s(-1), and (2) kaolin and TF surfaces had a similar sensitivity for reduced fibrin deposition at 1000 s(-1) (compared to fibrin formed at 100 s(-1)) despite differing coagulation triggers. Anti-platelet drugs inhibiting P2Y1, P2Y12, cyclooxygenase-1 or activating IP-receptor or guanylate cyclase reduced platelet and fibrin deposition on kaolin/collagen. Since FXIIa or FXIa inhibition may offer safe antithrombotic therapy, especially for biomaterial thrombosis, these defined collagen/kaolin surfaces may prove useful in drug screening tests or in clinical diagnostic assays of blood under flow conditions. PMID:25303860

  1. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  2. Interferon gamma blocks the growth of Toxoplasma gondii in human fibroblasts by inducing the host cells to degrade tryptophan.

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, E R

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of human fibroblasts with human recombinant gamma interferon blocked the growth of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. Growth of the parasite was measured by a plaque assay 7 days after infection or by the incorporation of [3H]uracil 1 or 2 days after infection. The antitoxoplasma activity induced in the host cells by gamma interferon was strongly dependent upon the tryptophan concentration of the medium. Progressively higher minimal inhibitory concentrations of gamma interferon were observed as the tryptophan concentration in the culture medium was increased. Treatment with gamma interferon did not make the cells impermeable to tryptophan. The kinetics of [3H]tryptophan uptake into the acid-soluble pools of control and gamma interferon-treated cultures were identical during the first 48 sec. Thereafter uptake of [3H]tryptophan into the acid-soluble pool of control fibroblasts reached the expected plateau after 96 sec. In contrast, uptake of [3H]tryptophan continued for at least 12 min in the gamma interferon-treated cultures. At that time, the acid-soluble pool of the gamma interferon-treated cultures contained 8 times the radioactivity of the control cultures. This continued accumulation was the result of rapid intracellular degradation of [3H]tryptophan into kynurenine and N-formylkynurenine that leaked slowly from the cells. These two metabolites were also recovered from the medium of cultures treated for 1 or 2 days with gamma interferon. Human recombinant alpha and beta interferons, which have no antitoxoplasma activity, did not induce any detectable degradation of tryptophan. Several hypotheses are presented to explain how the intracellular degradation of tryptophan induced by gamma interferon could restrict the growth of an obligate intracellular parasite. Images PMID:6422465

  3. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K; Pass, Kenneth A

    2012-09-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay. PMID:27625817

  4. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K.; Pass, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay.

  5. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  6. Rapid Detection of Candida albicans by Polymerase Spiral Reaction Assay in Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoqun; Dong, Derong; Bian, Lihong; Zou, Dayang; He, Xiaoming; Ao, Da; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Liu, Ningwei; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen which causes mucosal infections and invasive fungal diseases. Early detection of this pathogen is needed to guide preventative and therapeutic treatment. The aim of this study was to establish a polymerase spiral reaction (PSR) assay that rapidly and accurately detects C. albicans and to assess the clinical applicability of PSR-based diagnostic testing. Internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), a region between 5.8S and 28S fungal ribosomal DNA, was used as the target sequence. Four primers were designed for amplification of ITS2 with the PSR method, which was evaluated using real time turbidity monitoring and visual detection using a pH indicator. Fourteen non-C. albicans yeast strains were negative for detection, which indicated the specificity of PSR assay was 100%. A 10-fold serial dilution of C. albicans genomic DNA was subjected to PSR and conventional polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare their sensitivities. The detection limit of PSR was 6.9 pg/μl within 1 h, 10-fold higher than that of PCR (69.0 pg/μl). Blood samples (n = 122) were collected from intensive care unit and hematological patients with proven or suspected C. albicans infection at two hospitals in Beijing, China. Both PSR assay and the culture method were used to analyze the samples. Of the 122 clinical samples, 34 were identified as positive by PSR. The result was consistent with those obtained by the culture method. In conclusion, a novel and effective C. albicans detection assay was developed that has a great potential for clinical screening and point-of-care testing. PMID:27379048

  7. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by human T lymphocytes upon Legionella pneumophila stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kitsukawa, K; Nakamoto, A; Koito, H; Matsuda, Y; Saito, A; Yamamoto, H

    1995-01-01

    In vitro immune responses to Legionella pneumophila were investigated. When human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy volunteers were stimulated with formalin-killed L. pneumophila for 7 days in vitro, strong proliferative responses were observed. The responding cells were shown to be a CD4 T cell subset. It was also found that the CD4 T cells secreted significant amounts of IFN-gamma into the PBL culture supernatant. The production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by PBL was measured semiquantitatively by reverse transcriptase-assisted polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. Formalin-killed or live L. pneumophila-stimulated PBL expressed the mRNA for IFN-gamma but not the mRNA for IL-4. The results suggest that the whole bacterium, as opposed to the supernatant, predominantly stimulates Th1 type helper T cells. The cloned T cells specific for L. pneumophila expressed the mRNA for IFN-gamma but not for IL-4. In contrast to formalin-killed or live L. pneumophila stimulation, when PBL were stimulated with the bacterial culture supernatant, the proliferating T cells produced the mRNA for IL-4 as well as for IFN-gamma. A significant correlation between the proliferative response to formalin-killed L. pneumophila and IFN-gamma release in culture was observed (r = 0.6932, P < 0.001) in PBL from 30 healthy volunteers. From these in vitro studies, it is suggested that the whole L. pneumophila bacterium and their soluble antigens stimulate T cells in a manner which results in a different pattern of cytokine production. PMID:7813113

  8. Specific in vitro interferon-gamma and IL-2 production as biomarkers during treatment of chronic Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, Teske; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C.; Ammerdorffer, Anne; Pronk, Marjolijn J. H.; Soethoudt, Yvonne E. P.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; van Deuren, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic treatment of chronic Q fever is cumbersome and of long duration. To monitor treatment, there is a need for alternative biomarkers. Coxiella burnetii-specific interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 production reflect the type of effector and memory T-cell response. In chronic Q fever, C. burnetii-specific IFN-γ production is higher and IL-2 production is lower than in individuals with past Q fever. Here we explore whether C. burnetii-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 production correlate to treatment response. Methods: We studied the longitudinal C. burnetii-specific IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio in fifteen proven chronic Q fever patients. All patients were followed for at least 18 months during antibiotic treatment. Treatment was considered successful when clinical recovery was observed, a positive PCR for C. burnetii DNA in blood became persistently negative, anti-phase I IgG showed a fourfold decrease or more, and imaging techniques showed disappearance of infectious foci. Results: Overall, the IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio declined when patients experienced a successful treatment outcome. When treatment failed, IFN-γ/IL-2 ratios did not significantly decrease. The median (±IQR) slope of the longitudinal IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio with successful treatment was -2.10 (-7.02 to -0.06), and -0.15 (-1.13 to 0.25) with unsuccessful treatment (P = 0.19). Q fever endocarditis patients had higher IFN-γ/IL-2 ratios than patients with endovascular infections. Conclusion: We propose that the IFN-γ/IL-2 ratio can be used as an additional biomarker for monitoring chronic Q fever treatment, with declining ratios being indicative of successful treatment. PMID:25729380

  9. Enzymatic diagnosis of Fabry disease using a fluorometric assay on dried blood spots: An alternative methodology.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Eric; Prognon, Patrice; Germain, Dominique P

    2015-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM#301500) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional deficiency of α-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. A method to screen for FD in large populations has been developed using a fluorometric assay of α-galactosidase A activity in dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. However, results can be influenced by quenching of fluorescence by haemoglobin which, together with small sample size, may result in a low light emission signal. An alternative, simple and sensitive fluorometric assay was developed for the determination of α-galactosidase A activity in DBS. The assay uses 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-galactose as an artificial substrate. To minimize the risk of false-positives, zinc sulfate was used for protein precipitation to stop the enzymatic reaction and eliminate interfering species (hemoglobin). Samples from 209 individuals (60 hemizygotes, 68 heterozygotes, and 81 controls) were tested to establish reference values for the assay. The mean α-galactosidase A activity of the 81 controls was 9.1 ± 3.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (mean ± SD). All 60 hemizygotes affected with FD had AGAL activities below 1.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (0.2 ± 0.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). For the 68 heterozygous females, AGAL activity ranged from 0 to 12.6 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (3.5 ± 2.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Two-thirds of the female patients could be identified using the enzymatic assay and a cut-off level of 40% of the median control value (<3.4 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Our fluorometric assay using zinc sulfate protein precipitation was shown to have similar sensitivity and robustness while reducing the risk of false positive results due to quenching of 4-MU fluorescence by haemoglobin. PMID:26520229

  10. Enzymatic detection and quantification assay of isatin, a putative stress biomarker in blood.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Theis; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Simensen, Stine Marie; Jensen, Jan K; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Riss, Patrick J; Etzerodt, Michael; Morth, J Preben

    2015-08-19

    Isatin is an endogenous inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B and is found in human blood and tissue. Increased levels of isatin have been linked to stress and anxiety in rodents and humans; however, the metabolism of isatin in humans is largely unknown. We have developed a fluorescence-based enzymatic assay that can quantify isatin in blood samples. A phase extraction of isatin followed by a second phase extraction combined with an enzymatic reaction performed by an isatin hydrolase is used to extract and quantify isatin in whole blood samples. This results in a purity of more than 95% estimated from RP-HPLC. The hydrophobic molecule isatin is in equilibrium between an organic and aqueous phase; however, conversion by isatin hydrolase to the hydrophilic product isatinate traps it in the aqueous phase, making this step highly specific for isatin. The described protocol also offers a novel method for fast and efficient removal of isatin from any type of sample. The isolated isatinate is converted chemically to anthranilate that allows fluorescent detection and quantification. Pig plasma isatin levels are quantified to a mean of 458 nM ± 91 nM. Biophysical characterization of the isatin hydrolase shows enzymatic functionality between pH 6 and 9 and at temperatures up to 50 °C. Isatin hydrolase is highly selective for manganese ions with a dissociation constant determined to be 9.5 μM. We deliver proof-of-concept for the enzymatic quantification of isatin in blood and provide a straightforward method for further investigation of isatin as a biomarker in human health.

  11. Microfluidic assay for precise measurements of mouse, rat, and human neutrophil chemotaxis in whole-blood droplets.

    PubMed

    Jones, Caroline N; Hoang, Anh N; Martel, Joseph M; Dimisko, Laurie; Mikkola, Amy; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Kuriyama, Naohide; Yamada, Marina; Hamza, Bashar; Kaneki, Masao; Warren, H Shaw; Brown, Diane E; Irimia, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Animal models of human disease differ in innate immune responses to stress, pathogens, or injury. Precise neutrophil phenotype measurements could facilitate interspecies comparisons. However, such phenotype comparisons could not be performed accurately with the use of current assays, as they require the separation of neutrophils from blood using species-specific protocols, and they introduce distinct artifacts. Here, we report a microfluidic technology that enables robust characterization of neutrophil migratory phenotypes in a manner independent of the donor species and performed directly in a droplet of whole blood. The assay relies on the particular ability of neutrophils to deform actively during chemotaxis through microscale channels that block the advance of other blood cells. Neutrophil migration is measured directly in blood, in the presence of other blood cells and serum factors. Our measurements reveal important differences among migration counts, velocity, and directionality among neutrophils from 2 common mouse strains, rats, and humans. PMID:26819316

  12. Evaluation of the Xpert™ MRSA/SA Blood Culture assay for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus including strains with reduced vancomycin susceptibility from blood culture specimens.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Peter G; Grabsch, Elizabeth A; Farrell, Jenny; Xie, Shirley; Montgomery, Janet; Mayall, Barrie; Howden, Benjamin P

    2011-07-01

    The Xpert MRSA/SA Blood Culture (BC) assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) was prospectively compared to culture and found to have excellent specificity for both Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in BC specimens with a sensitivity of 75% (3/4) and 100% (17/17), respectively. Among 28 heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA)/VISA spiked BCs, the assay correctly identified 84.6% VISA and 80% hVISA isolates as MRSA.

  13. Development of a Fibrinogen-Specific Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Microarray Assay for Distinguishing Between Blood Plasma and Serum Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Zhang, Qibin; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a fibrinogen-specific sandwich ELISA microarray assay for use in qualitatively distinguishing between blood plasma and serum samples. Three capture antibodies, 49D2, HPA001900, and F8512, were evaluated in conjunction with 1D6 as detection antibody, and the data show that 49D2 and, to a lesser extent, F8512 successfully identify previously unknown plasma and serum samples based upon a ~28-fold difference in signal intensity between the sample types. This assay has utility in rapidly identifying previously archived clinical samples with incomplete annotation in a high throughput manner prior to proteomics analyses.

  14. Release of interleukin-12 in experimental Escherichia coli septic shock in baboons: relation to plasma levels of interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P M; van der Pouw Kraan, T C; de Jong, I W; van Mierlo, G; Wijdenes, J; Chang, A A; Aarden, L A; Taylor, F B; Hack, C E

    1996-06-15

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is thought to be a key factor for the induction of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), a cytokine essential for the lethal effects of endotoxin. We report here on the release of the nonfunctional subunit of IL-12, p40, as well as biologically active heterodimeric IL-12, p70, after administration of a lethal (n = 5) or sublethal (n = 8) dose of live Escherichia coli to baboons. Remarkably, on lethal challenge, peak levels of p40 were observed at 3 hours that were about twofold lower than those elicited after sublethal challenge (2,813 +/- 515 pg/mL v 4,972 +/- 732 pg/mL, P < .05). This disparity was also observed, although to a lesser extent, for IL-12 p70 antigen, of which maximum levels of 91 +/- 47 pg/mL and 151 +/- 41 pg/mL were measured 6 hours after a lethal or sublethal dose of E coli, respectively. Circulating p70 antigen correlated with IL-12 biologic activity (r = 0.869; P < .001). When comparing lethal to sublethal conditions, lower peak levels of IL-12 on lethal E coli sharply contrasted with higher levels of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 observed in these animals. Lower IL-12 concentrations in the lethal group may have resulted in part from the enhanced production of IL-10, a known inhibitor of IL-12 synthesis in vitro, as peak levels of this cytokine 3 hours postchallenge inversely correlated with peak levels of IL-12, in particular p40 (r = -0.802; P < .01). Contrary to what might be expected if IFN-gamma were solely induced by IL-12, lethally challenged baboons generated threefold more IFN-gamma at 6 hours than those receiving a sublethal dose (P < .05). Moreover, higher levels of IFN-gamma were associated with lower p40/p70 ratios, suggesting that, in agreement with observations in vitro, IFN-gamma may have preferentially upregulated the release of p70 over p40. These data show that IL-12 is released in experimental septic shock in nonhuman primates and suggest that

  15. Interferon-Gamma and Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 Mediate the Aggregation of Resident Adherent Peritoneal Exudate Cells: Implications for the Host Response to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Bhagawat S.; Yadav, Shikha; Victor, Emmanuel S.; Majumdar, Shamik; Deobagkar-Lele, Mukta; Wadhwa, Nitin; Podder, Santosh; Das, Mrinmoy; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (Ifnγ), a key macrophage activating cytokine, plays pleiotropic roles in host immunity. In this study, the ability of Ifnγ to induce the aggregation of resident mouse adherent peritoneal exudate cells (APECs), consisting primarily of macrophages, was investigated. Cell-cell interactions involve adhesion molecules and, upon addition of Ifnγ, CD11b re-localizes preferentially to the sites of interaction on APECs. A functional role of CD11b in enhancing aggregation is demonstrated using Reopro, a blocking reagent, and siRNA to Cd11b. Studies with NG-methyl-L-arginine (LNMA), an inhibitor of Nitric oxide synthase (Nos), NO donors, e.g., S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) or Diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA/NO), and Nos2-/- mice identified Nitric oxide (NO) induced by Ifnγ as a key regulator of aggregation of APECs. Further studies with Nos2-/- APECs revealed that some Ifnγ responses are independent of NO: induction of MHC class II and CD80. On the other hand, Nos2 derived NO is important for other functions: motility, phagocytosis, morphology and aggregation. Studies with cytoskeleton depolymerizing agents revealed that Ifnγ and NO mediate the cortical stabilization of Actin and Tubulin which contribute to aggregation of APECs. The biological relevance of aggregation of APECs was delineated using infection experiments with Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). APECs from orally infected, but not uninfected, mice produce high amounts of NO and aggregate upon ex vivo culture in a Nos2-dependent manner. Importantly, aggregated APECs induced by Ifnγ contain fewer intracellular S. Typhimurium compared to their single counterparts post infection. Further experiments with LNMA or Reopro revealed that both NO and CD11b are important for aggregation; in addition, NO is bactericidal. Overall, this study elucidates novel roles for Ifnγ and Nos2 in regulating Actin, Tubulin, CD11b, motility and morphology during the aggregation

  16. CD8+ T-cells expressing interferon gamma or perforin play antagonistic roles in heart injury in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8(+) T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8(+) T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8(+) T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8(+) T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8(+) T-cells segregated into IFNγ(+) perforin (Pfn)(neg) or IFNγ(neg)Pfn(+) cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8(+)Pfn(+) cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8(-/-) recipients showed that the CD8(+) cells from infected ifnγ(-/-)pfn(+/+) donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8(+) cells from ifnγ(+/+)pfn(-/-) donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8(-/-) mice with CD8(+) cells from naïve ifnγ(+/+)pfn(-/-) donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ(+) cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8(+) cells from naïve ifnγ(-/-)pfn(+/+) donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn(+) cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8(+)Pfn(+) and CD8(+)IFNγ(+) cells during CCC. CD8(+)IFNγ(+) cells may exert a beneficial role

  17. CD8+ T-Cells Expressing Interferon Gamma or Perforin Play Antagonistic Roles in Heart Injury in Experimental Trypanosoma Cruzi-Elicited Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ+ perforin (Pfn)neg or IFNγnegPfn+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8+Pfn+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8−/− recipients showed that the CD8+ cells from infected ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8+ cells from ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8−/− mice with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8+Pfn+ and CD8+IFNγ+ cells during CCC. CD8+IFNγ+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8+Pfn+ may play a detrimental role

  18. The C-terminus of interferon gamma receptor beta chain (IFNγR2) has antiapoptotic activity as a Bax inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Jose A.; Sun, Weiyon; Gama, Vivian; Hajkova, Dagmar; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Wu, Zhengrong; Miyagi, Masaru; Pink, John J.; Jackson, Mark W.; Danielpour, David; Matsuyama, Shigemi

    2010-01-01

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates intrinsic cell-death signaling. Using a yeast-based functional screening approach, we identified interferon gamma receptor beta chain (IFNγR2) as a new Bax suppressor. IFNγR2 is a component of the IFNγ receptor complex along with the IFNγR alpha chain (IFNγR1). Upon IFNγ binding, a conformational change in the receptor complex occurs that activates the Jak2/STAT1 signaling cascade. We found that the C-terminal region (amino acids 296–337) of IFNγR2 (IFNγR2296-337) contains a novel Bax inhibitory domain. This portion does not contain the Jak2-binding domain; therefore, the antiapoptotic function of IFNγR2 is independent of JAK/STAT signaling. IFNγR2296-337 rescued human cells from apoptosis induced by overexpression of Bax but not Bak. Overexpression of IFNγR2 (wild type and IFNγR2296-337) rescued cells from etopo-side and staurosporine, which are known to induce Bax-mediated cell death. Interestingly, IFNγR2 inhibited apoptosis induced by the BH3-only protein Bim-EL, suggesting that IFNγR2 inhibits Bax activation through a BH3-only protein. Bax and IFNγR2 were co-immunoprecipitated from cell lysates prepared from HEK293 and DAMI cells. Furthermore, direct binding of purified recombinant proteins of Bax and IFNγR2 was also confirmed. Addition of recombinant Bcl-2 protein to cell lysates significantly reduced the interaction of IFNγR2 and Bax, suggesting that Bcl-2 and IFNγR2 bind a similar domain of Bax. We found that the C-terminal fragment (cytoplasmic domain) of IFNγR2 is expressed in human cancer cell lines of megakaryocytic cancer (DAMI), breast cancer (MDA-MD-468), and prostate cancer (PC3 cells). The presence of the C-terminal fragment of IFNγR2 may confer on cancer cells resistance to apoptotic stresses. Our discovery of the anti-Bax activity of the cytoplasmic domain of IFNγR2 may shed new light on the mechanism of how cell death is controlled by IFNγ and Bax. PMID:19657228

  19. The C-terminus of interferon gamma receptor beta chain (IFNgammaR2) has antiapoptotic activity as a Bax inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Jose A; Sun, Weiyon; Gama, Vivian; Hajkova, Dagmar; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Wu, Zhengrong; Miyagi, Masaru; Pink, John J; Jackson, Mark W; Danielpour, David; Matsuyama, Shigemi

    2009-09-01

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates intrinsic cell-death signaling. Using a yeast-based functional screening approach, we identified interferon gamma receptor beta chain (IFNgammaR2) as a new Bax suppressor. IFNgammaR2 is a component of the IFNgamma receptor complex along with the IFNgammaR alpha chain (IFNgammaR1). Upon IFNgamma binding, a conformational change in the receptor complex occurs that activates the Jak2/STAT1 signaling cascade. We found that the C-terminal region (amino acids 296-337) of IFNgammaR2 (IFNgammaR2(296-337)) contains a novel Bax inhibitory domain. This portion does not contain the Jak2-binding domain; therefore, the antiapoptotic function of IFNgammaR2 is independent of JAK/STAT signaling. IFNgammaR2(296-337) rescued human cells from apoptosis induced by overexpression of Bax but not Bak. Overexpression of IFNgammaR2 (wild type and IFNgammaR2(296-337)) rescued cells from etoposide and staurosporine, which are known to induce Bax-mediated cell death. Interestingly, IFNgammaR2 inhibited apoptosis induced by the BH3-only protein Bim-EL, suggesting that IFNgammaR2 inhibits Bax activation through a BH3-only protein. Bax and IFNgammaR2 were co-immunoprecipitated from cell lysates prepared from HEK293 and DAMI cells. Furthermore, direct binding of purified recombinant proteins of Bax and IFNgammaR2 was also confirmed. Addition of recombinant Bcl-2 protein to cell lysates significantly reduced the interaction of IFNgammaR2 and Bax, suggesting that Bcl-2 and IFNgammaR2 bind a similar domain of Bax. We found that the C-terminal fragment (cytoplasmic domain) of IFNgammaR2 is expressed in human cancer cell lines of megakaryocytic cancer (DAMI), breast cancer (MDA-MD-468), and prostate cancer (PC3 cells). The presence of the C-terminal fragment of IFNgammaR2 may confer on cancer cells resistance to apoptotic stresses. Our discovery of the anti-Bax activity of the cytoplasmic domain of IFNgammaR2 may shed new light on the mechanism of how cell

  20. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E.; Camargo, Fabio V.; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z.; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J.; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  1. Differential effects of the absence of interferon-gamma and IL-4 in acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, W J; Welniak, L A; Taub, D D; Wiltrout, R H; Taylor, P A; Vallera, D A; Kopf, M; Young, H; Longo, D L; Blazar, B R

    1998-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in which immunocompetent donor cells attack the host, remains a major cause of morbidity after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). To understand the role of cytokines in the pathobiology of GVHD, we used cytokine knockout (KO) mice as a source of donor T cells. Two different MHC-disparate strain combinations were examined: BALB/c (H2(d)) donors into lethally irradiated C57BL/6 (H2(b)) recipients or C57BL/6 (H2(b)) donors into B10.BR (H2(k)) recipients. Donor cells were from mice in which either the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or the IL-4 gene was selectively disrupted to understand the role of these cytokines in acute GVHD. In both strain combinations the same pattern was noted with regard to GVHD onset and morbidity. All mice exhibited the classic signs of acute GVHD: weight loss with skin, gut, and liver pathology resulting in morbidity and mortality. Surprisingly, donor cells obtained from mice lacking IFN-gamma gave rise to accelerated morbidity from GVHD when compared with cells from wild-type control donors. Similar results were obtained using normal donors when neutralizing antibodies to IFN-gamma were administered immediately after the BMT. These results suggest that IFN-gamma plays a role in protection from acute GVHD. In marked contrast, cells obtained from IL-4 KO mice resulted in protection from GVHD compared with control donors. Splenocytes from IFN KO mice stimulated with a mitogen proliferated to a significantly greater extent and produced more IL-2 compared with splenocytes obtained from IL-4 KO or control mice. Additionally, there was increased IL-2 production in the spleens of mice undergoing GVHD using IFN-gamma KO donors. These results therefore indicate, with regard to the TH1/ TH2 cytokine paradigm, the absence of a TH1-type cytokine can be deleterious in acute GVHD, whereas absence of a TH2 cytokine can be protective. PMID:9802888

  2. Contact sensitization to oxazolone: involvement of both interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in oxazolone-specific Ig and T-cell responses.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, J A; Troutt, A B; Kelso, A

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis and role of several lymphokines were examined during contact sensitization to oxazolone (OX). Application of OX to the skin of mice increased the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to challenge, serum titres of OX-specific IgG1 and IgG2a, and draining lymph node cell (LNC) numbers. At day 3, LN contained detectable interleukin-4 (IL-4), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) but not IL-2 or IL-3 mRNAs; IL-3 and higher levels of IL-4, IFN-gamma and GM-CSF mRNAs were measured after 24 hr culture with anti-CD3 antibody in OX-primed but not unprimed LNC. As a result of sensitization, LNC secreted IL-3 constitutively and produced elevated levels of IL-2, IL-3, IL-4 and IFN-gamma in response to anti-CD3 antibody; a similar but weaker lymphokine response was recalled by OX-protein conjugate. CD4+ cells were the major source of the anti-CD3-induced lymphokines except IFN-gamma, which was derived mainly from CD8+ cells. Since both IL-4 and IFN-gamma were synthesized by OX-primed LNC in vivo and in vitro, their role was investigated by administering anti-lymphokine antibodies at the time of sensitization. Anti-IL-4 treatment reduced OX-specific serum IgG1 titres without affecting IgG2a titres, whereas anti-IFN-gamma treatment reduced IgG2a but not IgG1 titres. Although neither antibody altered DTH responsiveness, anti-IFN-gamma treatment markedly increased IL-4 production by CD4+ LNC and reduced IFN-gamma production in vitro, particularly by CD4+ cells. We conclude that endogenous IL-4 and IFN-gamma reciprocally influence the isotype of the Ig response to OX and that IFN-gamma also affects the relative levels of IL-4 and IFN-gamma synthesis by CD4+ LNC. Images Figure 3 PMID:8473011

  3. Role of interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 single nucleotide polymorphism in natural clearance and treatment response of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Azam, Sikandar; Manzoor, Sobia; Imran, Muhammad; Ashraf, Javed; Ashraf, Sarah; Resham, Saleha; Ghani, Eijaz

    2015-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis and treatment outcomes are multifactorial phenomena involving both viral and host factors. This study was designed to determine the role of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1(TRAIL-R1) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) genetic mutations in susceptibility and response to interferon-based therapy of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The detection of TRAIL-R1 rs4242392 and IFN-γ rs2069707 single nucleotide polymorphisms was completed in 118 chronic HCV patients and 96 healthy controls by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphisms polymerase chain reaction. Patients were further categorized into sustained virological responder (SVR) and nonresponder (NR) groups on the basis of their response to interferon-based therapy for HCV infection. Real-time PCR was used for HCV quantification. HCV genotyping was performed by Ohno's method. The results demonstrated that the distribution of the TRAIL-R1 rs4242392TT genotype was significantly higher in the SVR group (78%) compared to the NR group (36%). It showed that chronic HCV patients possessing the TRAIL-R1 rs4242392TT genotype are better responders to interferon-based therapy (p<0.05). The prevalence of the TRAIL-R1 rs4242392TT genotype in healthy controls and chronic HCV patients was 56% and 65% respectively. It indicated that there is the TRAIL-R1 rs4242392 genetic variation plays no role in the spontaneous clearance of HCV infection (p>0.05). The distribution of IFN-γ rs2069707 was the opposite to TRAIL-R1 rs4242392 prevalence, that is, there was high distribution of the IFN-γ rs2069707GG genotype in patients and healthy controls (p<0.05), while the prevalence of IFN-γ rs2069707GG in SVR and NR groups was comparable (p>0.05). In conclusion, genetic variation of TRAIL-R1 rs4242392 is linked with response to interferon-based therapy for HCV infection, and genetic variation IFN-γ rs2069707 is associated with

  4. Investigation of Toll-Like Receptor-2 (2258G/A) and Interferon Gamma (+874T/A) Gene Polymorphisms among Infertile Women with Female Genital Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhanothu, Venkanna; Lakshmi, Vemu; Theophilus, Jane P.; Rozati, Roya; Badhini, Prabhakar; Vijayalaxmi, Boda

    2015-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) coordinate with a diverse array of cellular programs through the transcriptional regulation of immunologically relevant genes and play an important role in immune system, reproductive physiology and basic pathology. Alterations in the functions of TLR2 2258G (guanine)/ A, IFN-γ (+874T/A) and signalling molecules that result from polymorphisms are often associated with susceptibility or resistance, which may, in turn, establish the innate host response to various infectious diseases. Presently, we proposed to investigate the risk of common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of TLR2 and IFN-γ genes, for their effect on infertility in women with female genital tuberculosis (FGTB) and healthy women as controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Genotyping of TLR2 and IFN-γ gene polymorphisms was performed by amplification refractory mutation system multi-gene/multi-primer polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in 175 FGTB patients and 100 healthy control women (HCW). The TLR2 polymorphism [adenine (A) allele] was observed in 57.7 and 58.0% of FGTB patients and HCW, respectively. The IFN-γ (+874T/A) polymorphism (A allele) was significant in 74.3 and 71.0% of FGTB patients and HCW, respectively, while the odds ratios for the AA and TA genotypes for predisposition of FGTB were found to be 0.304 and 1.650 in HCW, respectively. The SNP of TLR2 was not associated with FGTB but the SNP of IFN-γ was found to be associated with mycobacteria infections and to induce infertility. Conclusions/Significance At present, we hypothesize that infertile women with FGTB and HCW without tuberculosis (TB) have identical frequency of TLR variants, which may be adequate in the production of IFN-γ in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Thus, the study appears to be the first of its kind reporting a mutation in the IFN-γ gene [+874 T (thymine) to A] responsible for

  5. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E; Camargo, Fabio V; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  6. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Bovigam Interferon-Gamma Elisa for Bovine Tuberculosis Using Alternative Antigens or Tuberculins for Blood Stimulation in Field Trials and Experimental Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) is a major infectious disease found worldwide in domestic animals, particularly cattle, as well as in certain wildlife populations and is a re-emerging disease in many countries that have been officially bTB-free for decades. The era...

  8. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... system disease). It is also used to slow down worsening of their condition in people with severe, ... them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose ...

  9. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Rühle, Paul F.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB) that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384), pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553), and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955) and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome. PMID:27529227

  10. In vitro assays and clinical trials in red blood cell aging: Lost in translation.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The age of erythrocyte concentrates (EC) in transfusion medicine and the adverse outcomes when transfusing long-term-stored EC are highly controversial issues. Whereas the definition of a short-term-stored EC or a long-term-stored EC is unclear in clinical trials, data based on in vitro storage assays can help defining a limit in addition of the expiration date. The present review merges together these data in order to highlight an EC age cut-off and points out potential misleading consideration. The analysis of in vitro data highlights the presence of reversible and irreversible storage lesions and demonstrates that red blood cells (RBC) exhibit two limits during storage: one around 2 weeks and another one around 4 weeks of storage. Of particular importance, the first lesions to appear, i.e. the reversible ones, are per se reversible once transfused, whereas the irreversible lesions are not. In clinical trials, the EC age cut-off for short-term storage is in general fewer than 14 days (11 ± 4 days) and more disperse for long-term-stored EC (17 ± 13 days), regardless the clinical outcomes. Taking together, EC age cut-off in clinical trials does not totally fall into line of in vitro aging data, whereas it is the key criteria in clinical studies. Long-term-stored EC considered in clinical trials are not probably old enough to answer the question: "Does transfusion of long-term-stored EC (older than 4 weeks) result in worse clinical outcomes?" Depending on ethical concerns and clinical practices, older EC than currently assayed in clinical trials should have to be considered. These two worlds trying to understand the aging of erythrocytes and the impact on patients do not seem to speak the same language.

  11. Evaluation of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay Using Plasma and Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Malaya K; Varghese, Vici; White, Elizabeth; Winslow, Meg; Katzenstein, David A; Shafer, Robert W; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 RNA quantitation in plasma, or virus load testing, is the primary method by which the response to antiretroviral therapy is monitored. Here we describe evaluation of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima) performed on the automated Panther system. The clinical performance of Aptima was compared to that of the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test v2.0 (CAP/CTM) using 162 EDTA plasma samples collected from patients undergoing HIV-1 monitoring. Overall agreement was 84.0% (136/162), with a kappa statistic of 0.723 (standard error, 0.047; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.630 to 0.815), indicating substantial agreement. Using the 86 clinical samples quantifiable by both methods, Passing-Bablok regression revealed a regression line of Y = (1.069 × X) - 0.346 (95% CI of the slope [1.003 to 1.139] and intercept [-0.666 to -0.074]), and Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a mean difference (Aptima-CAP/CTM) of -0.075 log10 copies/ml (95% limits of agreement of -0.624 to 0.475), consistent with negative bias. Comparison of Aptima results for paired dried blood spot (DBS) and plasma specimens archived from participants in the Peninsula AIDS Research Cohort Study (PARC) demonstrated an overall agreement of 94.7% (90/95) when 1,000 copies/ml was used as the threshold. In conclusion, the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay provides a suitable alternative for HIV-1 monitoring in plasma and DBS. PMID:27535684

  12. A nested PCR assay exhibits enhanced sensitivity for detection of Theileria parva infections in bovine blood samples from carrier animals.

    PubMed

    Odongo, David O; Sunter, Jack D; Kiara, Henry K; Skilton, Robert A; Bishop, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Theileria parva causes East Coast fever, an economically important disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assay for the detection of T. parva DNA in cattle blood spotted onto filter paper using primers derived from the T. parva-specific 104-kDa antigen (p104) gene. The sensitivity of this assay was compared to a previously described p104-based PCR and also the reverse line blot (RLB) technique, using serial dilutions of blood from a calf with known T. parva piroplasm parasitaemia. The relative sensitivities of the three assays were 0.4, 1.4 and 4 parasites/microl corresponding to blood parasitaemias of 9.2 x 10(-6)%, 2.8 x 10(-5)% and 8.3 x 10(-5)%, respectively. The three assays were applied to samples from two calves infected with the T. parva Muguga stock. Parasite DNA was consistently detectable by the two p104 PCR assays until 48 and 82 days post-infection, respectively, and thereafter sporadically. RLB detected parasite DNA in the two infected calves until days 43 and 45. Field samples from 151 Kenyan cattle exhibited 37.7% positivity for T. parva by regular p104 PCR and 42.3% positivity using p104 nPCR. Among 169 cattle blood samples from Southern Sudan, 36% were positive for T. parva using nPCR. The nPCR assay represents a highly sensitive tool for detection and monitoring of asymptomatic carrier state infections of T. parva in the blood of cattle. PMID:19902251

  13. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2015-10-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 10(2) to 4.30 × 10(3) IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(-) or IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(+)), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection.

  14. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Knabbe, C.; Dreier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 102 to 4.30 × 103 IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA+/IgM+/IgG− or IgA+/IgM+/IgG+), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection. PMID:26202109

  15. Detection of prostate cancer with a blood-based assay for early prostate cancer antigen.

    PubMed

    Paul, Barbara; Dhir, Rajiv; Landsittel, Douglas; Hitchens, Moira R; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2005-05-15

    Prostate-specific antigen lacks specificity for prostate cancer, so the identification and characterization of a unique blood-based marker for the disease would provide for a more accurate diagnosis, reducing both unnecessary biopsies and patient uncertainty. We previously identified a novel biomarker for prostate cancer, early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA). EPCA antibodies positively stained the negative biopsies of men who, as much as 5 years later, were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether EPCA antibodies could be used in a clinically applicable plasma-based immunoassay to specifically detect prostate cancer. Using an EPCA-based ELISA, the protein was measured in the plasma of 46 individuals, including prostate cancer patients, healthy individuals, other cancer patients, spinal cord injury victims, and patients with prostatitis. With a predetermined cutoff value of 1.7 absorbance at 450 nm, only the prostate cancer population, as a whole, expressed plasma-EPCA levels above the cutoff. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in EPCA levels between the prostate cancer population and each of the other groups, specifically the healthy donors (P < 0.0001), bladder cancer patients (P = 0.03), and spinal cord injury patients (P = 0.001). Sensitivity of the EPCA assay for prostate cancer patients was 92% whereas the overall specificity was 94%. Specificity for the healthy donors was 100%. Although larger trials are required, this initial study shows the potential of EPCA to serve as a highly specific blood-based marker for prostate cancer. EPCA, when coupled with prostate-specific antigen, may help reduce the number of both unnecessary biopsies and undetected prostate tumors.

  16. The impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples measured by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The comet assay is frequently used in human biomonitoring for the detection of exposure to genotoxic agents. Peripheral blood samples are most frequently used and tested either as whole blood or after isolation of lymphocytes (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMC). To investigate a potential impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples, we exposed blood ex vivo to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action. The comet assay was performed either directly with whole blood at the end of the exposure period or with lymphocytes isolated directly after exposure. In addition to the recommended standard protocol for lymphocyte isolation, a shortened protocol was established to optimise the isolation procedure. The results indicate that the effects of induced DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites induced by ionising radiation and alkylants, respectively, are significantly reduced in isolated lymphocytes. In contrast, oxidative DNA base damage (induced by potassium bromate) and stable bulky adducts (induced by benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide; BPDE) seem to be less affected. Our findings suggest that in vivo-induced DNA damage might also be reduced in isolated lymphocytes in comparison with the whole blood depending of the types of DNA damage induced. Because only small genotoxic effects can generally be expected in human biomonitoring studies with the comet assay after occupational and environmental exposure to genotoxic agents, any loss might be relevant and should be avoided. The possibility of such effects and their potential impact on variability of comet assay results in human biomonitoring should be considered when performing or evaluating such kind of studies.

  17. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Benarroz, M O; Fonseca, A S; Rocha, G S; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M O; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2008-02-01

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99m(99mTc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1 hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  18. Optimization of a Whole-Blood Gamma Interferon Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis-Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigens of Mycobacterium bovis elicit a cell-mediated immune response upon intradermalinjection in cattle. In vitro, such antigens stimulate the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma by bovine T-cells in whole blood culture (IFN-gamma assay). We have analyzed various parameters of the in vitro IFN-g...

  19. Significance of Lipid Composition in a Blood Brain Barrier-Mimetic PAMPA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Scott D.; Regina, Karen J.; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier limit drug access into the brain, due to tight junctions, membrane drug transporters, and unique lipid composition. Passive permeability, thought to mediate drug access, is typically tested using porcine whole brain lipid. However human endothelial cell lipid composition differs. This investigation evaluated the influence of lipid composition on passive permeability across artificial membranes. Permeability of CNS-active drugs across an immobilized lipid membrane was determined using three lipid models: crude extract from whole pig brain, human brain microvessel lipid, and microvessel lipid plus cholesterol. Lipids were immobilized on polyvinylidene difluoride, forming donor and receiver chambers, in which drug concentration were measured after 2 hr. The log of effective permeability was then calculated using the measured concentrations. Permeability of small, neutral compounds was unaffected by lipid composition. Several structurally diverse drugs were highly permeable in porcine whole brain lipid but 1–2 orders of magnitude less permeable across human brain endothelial cell lipid. Inclusion of cholesterol had the greatest influence on bulky amphipathic compounds such as glucuronide conjugates. Lipid composition markedly influences passive permeability. This was most apparent for charged or bulky compounds. These results demonstrate the importance of using species-specific lipid models in passive permeability assays. PMID:23945876

  20. Immunomodulatory Factors Galectin-9 and Interferon-Gamma Synergize to Induce Expression of Rate-Limiting Enzymes of the Kynurenine Pathway in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Alexandra K.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Rytych, Jennifer L.; Yu, Kevin C.; Janda, Tiffany M.; Steelman, Andrew J.; McCusker, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with symptomology of several psychiatric disorders, notably major depressive disorder. Symptomology has been linked to inflammation/cytokine-dependent induction of the Kynurenine Pathway. Galectins, like pro-inflammatory cytokines, play a role in neuroinflammation and the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders but without a clearly defined mechanism of action. Their involvement in the Kynurenine Pathway has not been investigated. Thus, we searched for a link between galectins and the Kynurenine Pathway using in vivo and ex vivo models. Mice were administered LPS and pI:C to determine if galectins (Gal’s) were upregulated in the brain following in vivo inflammatory challenges. We then used organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) to determine if Gal’s, alone or with inflammatory mediators [interferon-gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (pI:C), and dexamethasone (Dex; synthetic glucocorticoid)], would increase expression of indoleamine/tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenases (DO’s: Ido1, Ido2, and Tdo2; Kynurenine Pathway rate-limiting enzymes). In vivo, hippocampal expression of cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα, and IFNγ), Gal-3, and Gal-9 along with Ido1 and Ido2 were increased by LPS and pI:C (bacterial and viral mimetics). Of the cytokines induced in vivo, only IFNγ increased expression of two Ido1 transcripts (Ido1-FL and Ido1-v1) by OHSCs. Although ineffective alone, Gal-9 accentuated IFNγ-induced expression of only Ido1-FL. Similarly, IFNγ induced expression of several Ido2 transcripts (Ido2-v1, Ido2-v3, Ido2-v4, Ido2-v5, and Ido2-v6). Gal-9 accentuated IFNγ-induced expression of only Ido2-v1. Surprisingly, Gal-9 alone, slightly but significantly, induced expression of Tdo2 (Tdo2-v1 and Tdo2-v2, but not Tdo2-FL). These effects were specific to Gal-9 as Gal-1 and Gal-3 did not alter DO expression. These results

  1. A comparative study of tissue factor and kaolin on blood coagulation assays using rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Grodecki, Richard; Rizoli, Sandro; Shek, Pang N

    2016-01-01

    Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and thromboelastography (TEG) have been increasingly used to diagnose acute coagulopathy and guide blood transfusion. The tests are routinely performed using different triggering activators such as tissue factor and kaolin, which activate different pathways yielding different results. To optimize the global blood coagulation assays using ROTEM and TEG, we conducted a comparative study on the activation methods employing tissue factor and kaolin at different concentrations as well as standard reagents as recommended by the manufacturer of each device. Key parameter values were obtained at various assay conditions to evaluate and compare coagulation and fibrinolysis profiles of citrated whole blood collected from healthy volunteers. It was found that tissue factor reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R, and increased ROTEM clot formation time and TEG K in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, tissue factor affected ROTEM alpha angle, and maximum clot firmness, especially in the absence of kaolin activation, whereas both ROTEM and TEG clot lysis (LI30, CL30, and LY30) remained unaffected. Moreover, kaolin reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R and K, but to a lesser extent than tissue factor, in-tem and ex-tem. Correlations in all corresponding parameters between ROTEM and TEG were observed, when the same activators were used in the assays compared with lesser correlations between standard kaolin TEG and ROTEM (INTEM/EXTEM). The two types of viscoelastic point-of-care devices provide different results, depending on the triggering reagent used to perform the assay. Optimal assay condition was obtained to reduce assay time and improve assay accuracy.

  2. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 103 CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  3. Development of a rapid recombinase polymerase amplification assay for detection of Brucella in blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Yang, Mingjuan; Zhang, Guoxia; Liu, Shiwei; Wang, Xinhui; Ke, Yuehua; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Huang, Liuyu; Liu, Chao; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay, Bruce-RPA, was developed for detection of Brucella. The assay could detect as few as 3 copies of Brucella per reaction within 20 min. Bruce-RPA represents a candidate point-of-care diagnosis assay for human brucellosis.

  4. Development of a rapid recombinase polymerase amplification assay for detection of Brucella in blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Yang, Mingjuan; Zhang, Guoxia; Liu, Shiwei; Wang, Xinhui; Ke, Yuehua; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Huang, Liuyu; Liu, Chao; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay, Bruce-RPA, was developed for detection of Brucella. The assay could detect as few as 3 copies of Brucella per reaction within 20 min. Bruce-RPA represents a candidate point-of-care diagnosis assay for human brucellosis. PMID:26911890

  5. Derivation of human T lymphocytes from cord blood and peripheral blood with antiviral and antileukemic specificity from a single culture as protection against infection and relapse after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Savoldo, Barbara; Hanley, Patrick J; Leen, Ann M; Demmler-Harrison, Gail J; Cooper, Laurence J N; Liu, Hao; Gee, Adrian P; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K; Bollard, Catherine M; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2010-04-01

    Viral infections and leukemic relapse account for the majority of treatment failures in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) or cord blood (CB) transplants. Adoptive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) provides protection against common viruses causing serious infections after HSC transplantation without concomitant graft-versus-host disease. We have now generated CTL lines from peripheral blood (PB) or CB units that recognize multiple common viruses and provide antileukemic activity by transgenic expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD19 expressed on B-ALL. PB-derived CAR(+) CTLs produced interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in response to cytomegalovirus-pp65, adenovirus-hexon, and Epstein-Barr virus pepmixes (from 205 +/- 104 to 1034 +/- 304 spot-forming cells [SFCs]/10(5) T cells) and lysed primary B-ALL blasts in (51)Cr-release assays (mean, 66% +/- 5% specific lysis; effector-target [E/T] ratio, 40:1) and the CD19(+) Raji cell line (mean, 78% +/- 17%) in contrast to nontransduced controls (8% +/- 8% and 3% +/- 2%). CB-derived CAR(+) CTLs showed similar antiviral and antitumor function and both PB and CB CAR(+) CTLs completely eliminated B-ALL blasts over 5 days of coculture. This approach may prove beneficial for patients with high-risk B-ALL who have recently received an HSC or CB transplant and are at risk of infection and relapse.

  6. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard E.; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C.; Zhang, Sean X.; Avornu, Gideon D.; Rounds, Megan A.; Carolan, Heather E.; Toleno, Donna M.; Moore, David; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Richmond, Gregory S.; Gutierrez, Jose R.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J.; Blyn, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes) or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample), amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis), and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours. Disclaimer: The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States. PMID:27384540

  7. Structural analysis of the human interferon gamma receptor: a small segment of the intracellular domain is specifically required for class I major histocompatibility complex antigen induction and antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J R; Jung, V; Schwartz, B; Wang, P; Pestka, S

    1992-01-01

    Mutations of the human interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor intracellular domain have permitted us to define a restricted region of that domain as necessary for both induction of class I major histocompatibility complex antigen by IFN-gamma and protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. This region consists of five amino acids (YDKPH), all of which are conserved in the human and murine receptors. Tyr-457 and His-461 are essential for activity. Approximately 80% of the amino acids of the intracellular domain of the receptor is not required for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen induction or for antiviral protection against encephalomyocarditis virus. The observation that there was no protection by IFN-gamma against vesiculostomatitis virus indicates that other factors, in addition to chromosome 21 accessory factor(s), are required to generate the full complement of transduction signals from the human IFN-gamma receptor. Images PMID:1454813

  8. Modulation of MUC1 and blood group antigen expression in gastric adenocarcinoma cells by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Georg P M; Schirmacher, Peter; Manzke, Oliver; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Dienes, Hans P; Baldus, Stephan E

    2003-08-01

    Immunohistological studies demonstrated that MUC1 expression in gastric cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. As a mediator of cell-cell interactions, MUC1 may also be involved in metastasis. However, these aspects are of relevance since cytokine levels are locally increased as a consequence of peritumorous inflammatory response and coexisting chronic gastritis. Therefore we analyzed the potential influence of several cytokines on the expression of tumor-associated MUC1 and Lewis blood group antigens in gastric carcinoma cells. Gastric cancer cell lines AGS and KATOIII were incubated with the cytokines interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and hepatocyte growth factor over a period of 72 h. Expressions of mucin antigens and cytokine secretion were measured by immunocytochemistry and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) demonstrated that MUC1 and sialyl Lewis A reactivities of AGS cells were increased significantly following TNF-alpha stimulation but not by other cytokines. Expression of mucin-associated antigens by cell line KATOIII was not affected by any of the employed cytokines. These data provide evidence that TNF-alpha can raise the expression of important mucin peptide as well as mucin-associated carbohydrate antigens and thereby potentially influence the progression of gastric carcinomas. PMID:12906871

  9. Trypanosome-induced Interferon-γ production in whole blood stimulation assays is associated with latent Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections.

    PubMed

    Ilboudo, Hamidou; Jamonneau, Vincent; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Amoussa, Roukiyath; Holzmuller, Philippe; Garcia, André; Bucheton, Bruno; Courtin, David

    2016-06-01

    Control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is highly dependent on the ability to detect and treat infected individuals. However, a number of individuals exposed to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense are able to control infection to undetectable levels in blood. They are long-term potential reservoirs and thus a threat for control strategies. Cytokine responses in whole blood stimulation assays were quantified in individuals with contrasting HAT status. Trypanosome-induced IFN-γ production was only observed in "trypanotolerant" subjects suspected of harboring latent infections. This result contributes new insights into the immune responses associated with infection control and opens novel diagnosis perspectives regarding HAT elimination. PMID:26993030

  10. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  11. Specificity of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays designed for the detection of circulating cancer cells is influenced by cytokines in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, R.; Krüger, W.; Hosch, S.; Holweg, M.; Kröger, N.; Gutensohn, K.; Wagener, C.; Neumaier, M.; Zander, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Several reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays have been described for the detection of circulating tumour cells in blood and bone marrow. Target mRNA sequences for this purpose are the cytokeratins (CK) 19 and 20, the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and the prostate-specific antigen messages. In this study, we investigated biological factors influencing the specificity of the CK19 and CEA RT-PCR assays. Bone marrow, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized blood stem cells and peripheral blood samples obtained from healthy volunteers (n = 15; CEA n = 7), from patients with epithelial (n = 29) and haematological (n = 23) cancer and from patients with chronic inflammatory diseases (n = 16) were examined. Neither CEA nor cytokeratin 19 messages could be amplified from bone marrow samples from healthy subjects and from patients with haematological malignancies. In contrast, specimens from patients with inflammatory diseases scored positive up to 60%. To investigate the influence of inflammation on target mRNA expression, haemopoietic cells were cultured with and without cytokine stimulation in vitro. CK19 messages could be easily detected in cultured marrow cells without further stimulation, CEA messages only after gamma-interferon (gamma-INF) stimulation. In contrast, G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells were positive for CK19 messages only after stem cell factor (SCF) or interleukin stimulation. We conclude that transcription of so-called tissue-specific genes is inductible in haemopoietic tissues under certain conditions. These factors have to be considered in future applications of RT-PCR for the detection of minimal residual disease. PMID:9820179

  12. Development of a FACS-based assay for evaluating antiviral potency of compound in dengue infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Chen, Yen-Liang; Herve, Maxime; Gu, Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Blasco, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arthropod-transmitted viral disease affecting humans. It is a blood-borne disease characterized by persistent fever and joint pain. In the blood, primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), in particular monocytes, are the main target of the dengue virus (DENV). These cells are poorly permissive for in vitro dengue virus infection and their infectivity varies from donor to donor. To overcome this barrier, an anti-dengue antibody was used to improve the infectivity of DENV-2 clinical isolates to PBMCs, the monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 and the granulocyte cell line, KU812. A higher throughput 96-well-format assay based on a fluorescent-activated cell sorter could potentially be developed to evaluate the antiviral potency of compounds in DENV-infected PBMCs in vitro. The results correlate well with data obtained by a standard plaque assay. Altogether, an assay has been developed that enables evaluation of the antiviral activity of test compounds in a physiologically-relevant cell system (PBMCs). These screening processes are urgently needed for dengue drug discovery.

  13. Evaluation of IFN-γ polymorphism+874 T/A in patients with recurrent tonsillitis by PCR real time mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA real time PCR).

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Gambarino, Stefano; Loiacono, Elisa; Vergano, Luca; Galliano, Ilaria; Montanari, Paola; Astegiano, Sara; Tavormina, Paolo; Tovo, Pier-Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an important cytokine that plays a crucial role in the balance between normal and pathological immune response. Defect of IFN-γ can give a predisposition to infectious disease, autoimmune pathologies and tumours. Different polymorphisms in this gene have been described, in particular the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)+874∗T/A that may affect IFN-γ gene expression. Several techniques can be used for the detection of SNPs. In this work two PCR Real Time assays were developed, an Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and a Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay (MAMA). Twenty-seven samples from patients (tonsillectomy) and 85 from donor's blood bank were considered. As a result, 78/85 controls (91.7%) and 25/27 patients (92.6%) were heterozygosis, considering the ARMS-PCR; 55/85 (64.7%) and 14/27 (51.9%) were heterozygosis using MAMA-PCR assay. Fourteen of 85 (16.5%) and 8/27 (29.6%) were homozygosis A, 16/85 (18.8%) and 5/27 (18.5%) presented homozygosis T, taking into account the MAMA-PCR. There are statistically difference between the two assay with p<0.0001 at Chi-square test. Our preliminary data suggest that tonsillectomy patients had a statistical trend to possess the low IFN-γ polymorphism when compared with control subject (p=0.3) but is not statistically significant. In conclusion the Real time MAMA-PCR assay has several advantages over other SNP identification techniques such as rapidity, reliability, easily to perform in one working day and applicable in clinical molecular diagnostic laboratories, although sequencing remains the gold standard.

  14. Diagnostic assays for identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance determinants directly from positive blood culture broth.

    PubMed

    Pence, Morgan A; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2013-09-01

    The detection of blood stream infections is one of the most important functions of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Sepsis is a clinical emergency, and mortality increases if commencement of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is delayed. Automated blood culture systems are the most sensitive approach for detection of the causative agent of sepsis. Several laboratory methods have been developed to expedite identification of organisms directly from positive blood culture broth. The principle and analytical performance characteristics of these methods are described in this review.

  15. Profile of interferon-gamma response to latency-associated and novel in vivo expressed antigens in a cohort of subjects recently exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Leonardo Silva de; da Silva, Nidai de Bárbara Moreira; da Silva, Renan Jeremias; Leung, Janaina Aparecida Medeiros; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho Queiroz; Saad, Maria Helena Féres

    2015-12-01

    Recently some latency-associated antigens (LAA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were described, as Rv2029c, Rv2031c, Rv2034, Rv2628 and Rv3353c. Of which, the Rv2034 and Rv3353c also demonstrated in vivo expression. Therefore evaluating the immune response to these antigens may help to understand their role in latent TB infection. In a 1-year longitudinal study, IFN-γ response by in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulation with LAA was investigated in subjects recently exposed to TB, classified by IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) using RD1 antigens (ESAT-6:CFP-10) and tuberculin skin test (TST) response. Except for Rv3353c, all the LAA triggered higher mean IFN-γ response in IGRA-RD1(+) groups (p < 0.05). Combining the IFN-γ-responders to Rv2029c, Rv2031c plus Rv2034 detected 90.3% (28/31) of IGRA-RD1(+) and 66.7% (24/36) of TST(+) contacts, while 95% (19/20) and 11% (2/17) were identified by classifying them according to a TST and IGRA-RD1 double-positive or double-negative response, respectively. In the follow-up, the TST convertors (negative to positive) also demonstrated an IFN-γ conversion to Rv2029c and Rv2031c, whereas the unique TB incident case was exclusively detected via IGRA-Rv2029c and TST before developing TB. A reversion rate to LAA (60%-100%) after prophylactic treatment was observed at TST(+)/IGRA-RD1(+) group. Further studies into the performance of these antigens are thus warranted.

  16. Measurement of free magnesium and free zinc in blood plasma by enzymic assay

    SciTech Connect

    Magneson, G.R.; Puvathingal, J.M.; Ray, W.J. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    While the measurement of free Mg in biological fluids is accessible by different means, a methodology for measuring physiological levels of free Zn has not been previously reported. The authors have developed an accurate in vitro assay system for free Mg and free Zn in biological fluids which employs an exogenous enzyme, muscle phosphoglucomutase (PGM), as a metal ion indicator. PGM is maximally activated by Mg and is inhibited competitively by Zn. Free Mg values were determined from plasma supplemented with the dephospho form of PGM by using a burst of product assay. Enzymic activity is a function of the fractional saturation of PGM with Mg. Interference from Zn binding was eliminated by adding lyophilized histidine to plasma. The assay for free Zn involved the equilibration of the phospho form of PGM with sample for which free Mg was known and subsequent assessment of the degree of Zn inhibition by initial velocity assay. Free Zn values were calculated from the molar ratio of Zn and Mg forms of PGM, the free Mg concentration, and enzyme-metal stability constants. In equine plasma, the concentration of free Mg is close to 0.5 mM and free Zn is about 2 x 20/sup -10/ M. A titration of plasma with Zn indicates that nearly all of the exchangeable Zn is bound to albumin and the concentration of free Zn is essentially unbuffered. This enzymic assay system may be a useful tool for the evaluation of marginal Zn deficiency.

  17. Comparison of two molecular assays for detection of cytomegalovirus DNA in whole blood and plasma samples from transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cristina; Sidoti, Francesca; Mantovani, Samantha; Gregori, Gabriella; Proietti, Alex; Ghisetti, Valeria; Cavallo, Rossana

    2016-09-01

    In immunosuppressed patients, pre-emptive therapy and a strict follow-up of CMV infection are the standard of care for the prevention of CMV disease. Several real-time PCR assays for CMV DNA quantification on whole blood (WB) and plasma (PL) are commercially available. This study compared and correlated CMV viral loads obtained by the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan (CAP/CTM) platform on plasma specimens with those obtained on corresponding whole blood specimens by the real-time PCR assay (ELITe MGB-CMV) in 185 sequential samples from 41 immunosuppressed patients. Correlation between the two assays was good. Kinetics of CMV DNA within the same patient was similar, but PL viral load was constantly 1 log lower than WB. In patients under antiviral therapy, low level of CMV DNA persisted in WB, while it was absent in PL. The good correlation between CMV DNA detected on both PL and WB supports the reliability of the two matrices for viral monitoring and the therapeutic management of CMV infection. Nevertheless, due to significant quantification differences between PL and WB CMV DNA, the same biological specimen should be used for a sequential and reliable follow-up of patients at high risk of CMV infection. PMID:27602416

  18. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  19. Development of an assay to simultaneously measure orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Held, Patrice K.; Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.; Baker, Mei W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Orotic aciduria in the presence of hyperammonemia is a key indicator for a defect in the urea cycle, specifically ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency. Current newborn screening (NBS) protocols can detect several defects of the urea cycle, but screening for OTC deficiency remains a challenge due to the lack of a suitable assay. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay to measure orotic acid in dried blood spot (DBS) specimens as an indicator for urea cycle dysfunction, which can be readily incorporated into routine NBS. Methods Orotic acid was extracted from DBS punches and analyzed using flow-injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA–MS/MS) with negative-mode ionization, requiring <2 min/sample run time. This method was then multiplexed into a conventional newborn screening assay for analysis of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and orotic acid. Results We describe 2 assays which can quantify orotic acid in DBS: a stand-alone method and a combined method for analysis of orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines. Both methods demonstrated orotic acid recovery of 75–85% at multiple levels of enrichment. Precision was also comparable to traditional FIA–MS/MS methods. Analysis of residual presumptively normal NBS specimens demonstrated a 5:1 signal to noise ratio and the average concentration of orotic acid was approximately 1.2 μmol/l. The concentration of amino acids and acylcarnitines as measured by the combined method showed no significant differences when compared to the conventional newborn screening assay. In addition, retrospective analysis of confirmed patients and presumptively normal newborn screening specimens suggests potential for the methods to identify patients with OTC deficiency, as well as other urea cycle defects. Conclusion The assays described here quantify orotic acid in DBS using a simple extraction and FIA–MS/MS analysis procedures that can be implemented into current NBS protocols. PMID

  20. A monobromobimane-based assay to measure the pharmacokinetic profile of reactive sulphide species in blood

    PubMed Central

    Wintner, Edward A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Langston, William; Bengtsson, Asa; Leviten, Dina; Hill, Paul; Insko, Michael A; Dumpit, Ronald; VandenEkart, Emily; Toombs, Christopher F; Szabo, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a labile, endogenous metabolite of cysteine, with multiple biological roles. The development of sulphide-based therapies for human diseases will benefit from a reliable method of quantifying H2S in blood and tissues. Experimental approach: Concentrations of reactive sulphide in saline and freshly drawn whole blood were quantified by reaction with the thio-specific derivatization agent monobromobimane, followed by reversed-phase fluorescence HPLC and/or mass spectrometry. In pharmacokinetic studies, male rats were exposed either to intravenous infusions of sodium sulphide or to H2S gas inhalation, and levels of available blood sulphide were measured. Levels of dissolved H2S/HS- were concomitantly measured using an amperometric sensor. Key results: Monobromobimane was found to rapidly and quantitatively derivatize sulphide in saline or whole blood to yield the stable small molecule sulphide dibimane. Extraction and quantification of this bis-bimane derivative were validated via reversed-phase HPLC separation coupled to fluorescence detection, and also by mass spectrometry. Baseline levels of sulphide in blood were in the range of 0.4–0.9 µM. Intravenous administration of sodium sulphide solution (2–20 mg·kg−1·h−1) or inhalation of H2S gas (50–400 ppm) elevated reactive sulphide in blood in a dose-dependent manner. Each 1 mg·kg−1·h−1 of sodium sulphide infusion into rats was found to be pharmacokinetically equivalent to approximately 30 ppm of H2S gas inhalation. Conclusions and implications: The monobromobimane derivatization method is a sensitive and reliable means to measure reactive sulphide species in whole blood. Using this method, we have established a bioequivalence between infused sodium sulphide and inhaled H2S gas. PMID:20590590

  1. Genomic Assays for Identification of Chikungunya Virus in Blood Donors, Puerto Rico, 2014.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Charles Y; Bres, Vanessa; Yu, Guixia; Krysztof, David; Naccache, Samia N; Lee, Deanna; Pfeil, Jacob; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Stramer, Susan L

    2015-08-01

    A newly developed transcription-mediated amplification assay was used to detect chikungunya virus infection in 3 of 557 asymptomatic donors (0.54%) from Puerto Rico during the 2014-2015 Caribbean epidemic. Viral detection was confirmed by using PCR, microarray, and next-generation sequencing. Molecular clock analysis dated the emergence of the Puerto Rico strains to early 2013.

  2. Development of screening assays for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in human blood: preliminary studies with charged Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Love, Sara A; Thompson, John W; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-09-01

    As nanoparticles have found increased use in both consumer and medical applications, corresponding increases in possible exposure to humans necessitate studies examining the impacts of these nanomaterials in biological systems. This article examines the effects of approximately 30-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles, with positively and negatively charged surface coatings in human blood. Here, we study the exposure effects, with up to 72 h of exposure to 5, 15, 25 and 50 µg/ml nanoparticles on hemolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and platelet aggregation in subsets of cells from human blood. Assessing viability with hemolysis, results show significant changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. Rates of ROS generation were investigated using the dichlorofluorscein diacetate-based assay as ROS generation is a commonly suspected mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity; herein, ROS was not a significant factor. Optical monitoring of platelet aggregation revealed that none of the examined nanoparticles induced aggregation upon short-term exposure.

  3. A rapid detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a nitrate reductase assay on blood agar.

    PubMed

    Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Cayci, Yeliz Tanriverdi; Deveci, Aydin; Akgunes, Alper; Uzun, Meltem; Durupinar, Belma

    2011-05-01

    The susceptibility of 49 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates to isoniazid (INH) and rifampisin (RIF) (28 multi-drug resistant-tuberculosis samples) was determined by a nitrate reductase assay (NRA) on blood agar. Agreement between the NRA and other testing methods was found to be 93.8% for both INH and RIF. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for INH were 92.8%, 94.2%, 86.6% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for RIF were 90.4%, 96.4%, 95% and 93.1%. In conclusion, we show here that blood agar can be used effectively for the NRA test.

  4. C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10 (IP-10), and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Are Associated with Risk of Tuberculosis after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Tenforde, Mark W.; Gupte, Nikhil; Dowdy, David W.; Asmuth, David M.; Balagopal, Ashwin; Pollard, Richard B.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Lama, Javier R.; Pillay, Sandy; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Pawar, Jyoti; Santos, Breno; Riviere, Cynthia; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Hakim, James G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Bollinger, Robert; Semba, Richard D.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association between pre-antiretroviral (ART) inflammation and immune activation and risk for incident tuberculosis (TB) after ART initiation among adults is uncertain. Design Nested case-control study (n = 332) within ACTG PEARLS trial of three ART regimens among 1571 HIV-infected, treatment-naïve adults in 9 countries. We compared cases (participants with incident TB diagnosed by 96 weeks) to a random sample of controls (participants who did not develop TB, stratified by country and treatment arm). Methods We measured pre-ART C-reactive protein (CRP), EndoCab IgM, ferritin, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14 (sCD14), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD4/DR+/38+ and CD8/DR+/38+ T cells. Markers were defined according to established cutoff definitions when available, 75th percentile of measured values when not, and detectable versus undetectable for LPS. Using logistic regression, we measured associations between biomarkers and incident TB, adjusting for age, sex, study site, treatment arm, baseline CD4 and log10 viral load. We assessed the discriminatory value of biomarkers using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Seventy-seven persons (4.9%) developed incident TB during follow-up. Elevated baseline CRP (aOR 3.25, 95% CI: 1.55–6.81) and IP-10 (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.05–3.39), detectable plasma LPS (aOR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.13–5.06), and the established TB risk factors anemia and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with incident TB. In ROC analysis, CRP, albumin, and LPS improved discrimination only modestly for TB risk when added to baseline routine patient characteristics including CD4 count, body mass index, and prior TB. Conclusion Incident TB occurs commonly after ART initiation. Although associated with higher post-ART TB risk, baseline CRP, IP-10, and LPS add limited value to routine patient characteristics

  5. Low-volume, high-sensitivity assay for cadmium in blood and urine using conventional atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Cerny, E. A.; Bhattacharyya, M. H.; Biosciences Division

    2003-03-15

    An assay for cadmium in whole blood and urine using deuterium background-correction electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (D2-ETAAS) was developed. Cadmium (in a 1- to 2-ml sample) was bound to 15 mg anion-exchange resin, interfering ions were removed in a 2-ml Bio-Spin column, and cadmium was extracted into 100 {mu}l 1 M nitric acid for analysis. Cadmium in the sample extract was concentrated 7-fold for blood and 10-fold for urine over the starting material. These steps produced cadmium atomic absorption traces with high signal to background ratios and allowed analysis against aqueous standards. At {approx}0.1 ng Cd/ml, mean intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 11-12%. Cadmium recovery for 0.1 to 0.6 ng added cadmium was 107{+-}4% for blood and 94{+-}4% for urine (mean{+-}SE, n=3). The mean detection limit (mean + 3x SD of blank) was 0.008 ng/ml for blood and 0.003 ng/ml for urine. Samples from 'unexposed' animals including humans ranged from 0.051{+-}0.000 to 0.229{+-}0.035 ng/ml. Values were approximately 10-fold lower than those obtained by the method of Stoeppler and Brandt using Zeeman background-correction ETAAS. This new high-sensitivity, low-volume assay will be useful for epidemiological studies, even those involving children, and will provide a means to help determine the contribution of cadmium to disease incidence in the general population.

  6. Assay of lysergic acid diethylamide and its passage from blood into the perfused cerebral ventricles.

    PubMed

    DRASKOCI, M

    1960-03-01

    On the isolated rat uterus, lysergic acid diethylamide had an oxytocic action in a concentration of 2x10(-8); in smaller concentrations (10(-9) to 10(-10)), which had no stimulating effect of their own, it potentiated acetylcholine-induced contractions. This potentiating effect was made the basis for assaying minute amounts of lysergic acid diethylamide. The method was used to assay this substance in plasma of cats during its intravenous infusion at a rate of 10 mug./min./kg. During these infusions 0.4 to 2 ng./min. of lysergic acid diethylamide passed into the cerebral ventricles perfused with a salt solution of a composition resembling that of cerebrospinal fluid.

  7. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens in positive blood culture bottles by use of a broad-based PCR assay coupled with high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Won, Helen; Rothman, Richard; Ramachandran, Padmini; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Carroll, Karen C; Aird, Deborah; Gaydos, Charlotte; Yang, Samuel

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated a broad-based PCR assay coupled with high-resolution melt analysis for rapid bacterial identification in patients with bacterial sepsis. With a reference library of 60 clinically relevant bacterial species, 52 positive blood culture samples were tested. Our assay identified 46/52 samples at the species level, with 100% concordance to culture findings.

  8. Performance of the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Assay for Direct Detection of Gram-Positive Organisms and Resistance Markers in a Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mestas, Javier; Polanco, Claudia M.; Felsenstein, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture (BC-GP) assay were evaluated in pediatric patients. Concordance of the BC-GP assay was 95.8%, with significant decreases in turnaround time for identification and resistance detection. BC-GP is highly accurate and can be integrated into the routine workflow of the microbiology laboratory. PMID:24131696

  9. Japanese Reference Panel of Blood Specimens for Evaluation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA and Core Antigen Quantitative Assays

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Asako; Sugiyama, Nao; Watashi, Koichi; Masaki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Aizaki, Hideki; Mizuochi, Toshiaki; Wakita, Takaji

    2012-01-01

    An accurate and reliable quantitative assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is essential for measuring viral propagation and the efficacy of antiviral therapy. There is a growing need for domestic reference panels for evaluation of clinical assay kits because the performance of these kits may vary with region-specific genotypes or polymorphisms. In this study, we established a reference panel by selecting 80 donated blood specimens in Japan that tested positive for HCV. Using this panel, we quantified HCV viral loads using two HCV RNA kits and five core antigen (Ag) kits currently available in Japan. The data from the two HCV RNA assay kits showed excellent correlation. All RNA titers were distributed evenly across a range from 3 to 7 log IU/ml. Although the data from the five core Ag kits also correlated with RNA titers, the sensitivities of individual kits were not sufficient to quantify viral load in all samples. As calculated by the correlation with RNA titers, the theoretical lower limits of detection by these core Ag assays were higher than those for the detection of RNA. Moreover, in several samples in our panel, core Ag levels were underestimated compared to RNA titers. Sequence analysis in the HCV core region suggested that polymorphisms at amino acids 47 to 49 of the core Ag were responsible for this underestimation. The panel established in this study will be useful for estimating the quality of currently available and upcoming HCV assay kits; such quality control is essential for clinical usage of these kits. PMID:22495557

  10. The Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay may be unsuitable for detecting endotoxin in blood of healthy female subjects.

    PubMed

    Gnauck, Anne; Lentle, Roger G; Kruger, Marlena C

    2015-01-01

    We examined the factors that may influence the outcome of the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay, when it is used for quantifying Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin, also referred to as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in samples of human blood. We found that the method recommended by the manufacturers, based on the reaction time, was inaccurate with any type of serum samples due to the slowing of the initial phase of reaction, likely by serum proteins. We describe an alternative method that is more accurate for use with heated serum samples. Further, we found that components of fresh serum irreversibly sequester endotoxin but that this action may be largely prevented by dilution and heating, but only if this occurs prior to the addition of endotoxin. The tests also indicated that a number of types of proprietary plastic vacutainers appeared to contain significant amounts of endotoxin. However, even when appropriate blood collection containers and calculation methods were used, the levels of endotoxin in serum samples detected by LAL assay were unlikely to reflect the total quantities of endotoxin in that sample and more likely to reflect the capacity of a given serum sample to sequester endotoxin.

  11. [Assay for level of Marburg virus in blood and isolates from experimentally infected animals].

    PubMed

    Chupurnova, T S; Pisanko, V A; Bakulina, L F; Zhukov, V A; Chepurnov, A A

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of concentrations of Marburg virus in guinea pig saliva, urine, and feces showed that as early as by the end of incubation period the virus concentrations in the feces and saliva were 2.3-3.3 lg LD50. In the blood the content of the virus was high and increased by the end of the disease, while the concentrations in the urine, saliva, and feces were virtually the same throughout the disease. PMID:10765545

  12. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (p<0.001) decrease in the percentage of CD3(+) T lymphocytes within the PBMCs was found. More specifically, this reduction was due to a significant (p<0.01) decrease in the percentage of γδ(+) T lymphocytes. Thus measuring immune responses on purified PBMCs might not give a physiologically relevant output. Additionally, it was tested if the choice of incubation plate would interfere with the level of secreted IFN-γ in whole blood cultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (p<0.05) higher background level in a flat-bottom plate from Corning® (cat# 3595) (plate d) compared to two different flat-bottom plates from Corning

  13. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (p<0.001) decrease in the percentage of CD3(+) T lymphocytes within the PBMCs was found. More specifically, this reduction was due to a significant (p<0.01) decrease in the percentage of γδ(+) T lymphocytes. Thus measuring immune responses on purified PBMCs might not give a physiologically relevant output. Additionally, it was tested if the choice of incubation plate would interfere with the level of secreted IFN-γ in whole blood cultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (p<0.05) higher background level in a flat-bottom plate from Corning® (cat# 3595) (plate d) compared to two different flat-bottom plates from Corning

  14. Immune cell dysfunctions in breast cancer patients detected through whole blood multi-parametric flow cytometry assay

    PubMed Central

    Verronèse, E.; Delgado, A.; Valladeau-Guilemond, J.; Garin, G.; Guillemaut, S.; Tredan, O.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Bachelot, T.; N'Kodia, A.; Bardin-Dit-Courageot, C.; Rigal, C.; Pérol, D.; Caux, C.; Ménétrier-Caux, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monitoring functional competence of immune cell populations in clinical routine represents a major challenge. We developed a whole-blood assay to monitor functional competence of peripheral innate immune cells including NK cells, dendritic and monocyte cell subsets through their ability to produce specific cytokines after short-term stimulation, detected through intra-cytoplasmic staining and multi-parametric flow-cytometry. A PMA/ionomycin T cell activation assay complemented this analysis. Comparing cohorts of healthy women and breast cancer (BC) patients at different stages, we identified significant functional alteration of circulating immune cells during BC progression prior to initiation of treatment. Of upmost importance, as early as the localized primary tumor (PT) stage, we observed functional alterations in several innate immune populations and T cells i.e. (i) reduced TNFα production by BDCA-1+ DC and non-classical monocytes in response to Type-I IFN, (ii) a strong drop in IFNγ production by NK cells in response to either Type-I IFN or TLR7/8 ligand, and (iii) a coordinated impairment of cytokine (IL-2, IFNγ, IL-21) production by T cell subpopulations. Overall, these alterations are further accentuated according to the stage of the disease in first-line metastatic patients. Finally, whereas we did not detect functional modification of DC subsets in response to TLR7/8 ligand, we highlighted increased IL-12p40 production by monocytes specifically at first relapse (FR). Our results reinforce the importance of monitoring both innate and adaptive immunity to better evaluate dysfunctions in cancer patients and suggest that our whole-blood assay will be useful to monitor response to treatment, particularly for immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:27141361

  15. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  16. Large-Scale Prospective T Cell Function Assays in Shipped, Unfrozen Blood Samples: Experiences from the Multicenter TRIGR Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Roy K.; Becker, Dorothy J.; Girgis, Rose; Palmer, Jerry P.; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Broad consensus assigns T lymphocytes fundamental roles in inflammatory, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. However, clinical investigations have lacked fully characterized and validated procedures, equivalent to those of widely practiced biochemical tests with established clinical roles, for measuring core T cell functions. The Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) type 1 diabetes prevention trial used consecutive measurements of T cell proliferative responses in prospectively collected fresh heparinized blood samples shipped by courier within North America. In this article, we report on the quality control implications of this simple and pragmatic shipping practice and the interpretation of positive- and negative-control analytes in our assay. We used polyclonal and postvaccination responses in 4,919 samples to analyze the development of T cell immunocompetence. We have found that the vast majority of the samples were viable up to 3 days from the blood draw, yet meaningful responses were found in a proportion of those with longer travel times. Furthermore, the shipping time of uncooled samples significantly decreased both the viabilities of the samples and the unstimulated cell counts in the viable samples. Also, subject age was significantly associated with the number of unstimulated cells and T cell proliferation to positive activators. Finally, we observed a pattern of statistically significant increases in T cell responses to tetanus toxin around the timing of infant vaccinations. This assay platform and shipping protocol satisfy the criteria for robust and reproducible long-term measurements of human T cell function, comparable to those of established blood biochemical tests. We present a stable technology for prospective disease-relevant T cell analysis in immunological diseases, vaccination medicine, and measurement of herd immunity. PMID:24334687

  17. Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) associated with corrosion products in metal-on-metal and dual modular neck total hip replacements is associated with upregulation of interferon gamma-mediated chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolatat, Kritti; Perino, Giorgio; Wilner, Gabrielle; Kaplowitz, Elianna; Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Boettner, Friedrich; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Jerabek, Seth A; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward

    2015-10-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) associated with tribocorrosion following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become a significant clinical concern in recent years. In particular, implants featuring metal-on-metal bearing surfaces and modular femoral stems have been reported to result in elevated rates of ALTR. These tribocorrosion-related tissue reactions are characterized by marked necrosis and lymphocytic infiltration, which contrasts sharply with the macrophagic and foreign body giant cell inflammation associated with polyethylene wear particle induced peri-implant osteolysis. In this study, we characterize tribocorrosion-associated ALTR at a molecular level. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant tissue around failing implants identifies upregulation of numerous inflammatory mediators in ALTR, including several interferon gamma inducible factors, most notably the chemokines MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10. This expression profile is distinct from that associated with polyethylene wear induced osteolysis, which is characterized by induction of markers of alternative macrophage activation, such as chitotriosidase (CHIT-1). Importantly, MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10 are also elevated at the protein level in the synovial fluid and, albeit more moderately, the serum, of ALTR patients, raising the possibility that these factors may serve as circulating biomarkers for the early detection of ALTR in at-risk patients. PMID:25940887

  18. Simplified Assay for Epigenetic Age Estimation in Whole Blood of Adults

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Bralo, Laura; Lopez-Golan, Yolanda; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Biological age is not always concordant with chronological age and the departures are of interest for understanding how diseases and environmental insults affect tissue function, organismal health, and life expectancy. The best-known biological age biomarker is telomere length, but there are more accurate biomarkers as the recently developed based in epigenetic, transcriptomic, or biochemical changes. The most accurate are the epigenetic biomarkers based on specific changes in DNA methylation referred as DNA methylation age measures (DmAM). Here, we have developed and validated a new DmAM that addresses some limitations of the previously available. The new DmAM includes the study in whole blood (WB) of 8 CpG sites selected as the most informative on a training set of 390 healthy subjects. The 8 CpG DmAM showed better accuracy than other DmAM based in few CpG in an independent validation set of 335 subjects. Results were not significantly influenced by sex, smoking, or variation in blood cell subpopulations. In addition, the new 8 CpG DmAM was amenable to study in a single multiplex reaction done with methylation-sensitive single-nucleotide primer extension (MS-SNuPE), a methodology based on commercially available reagents and run in capillary electrophoresis sequencers. In this way, the high cost of DNA methylation microarrays or of a pyrosequencer, which are needed for alternative DmAM, was avoided. Performance of the DmAM with MS-SNuPE was assessed in a set of 557 donors, showing high call rate (>97%), low CV (<3.3%) and high accuracy (Mean Absolute Deviation = 6.07 years). Therefore, the 8 CpG DmAM is a feasible and accurate tool for assessing the epigenetic component of biological age in blood of adults. PMID:27471517

  19. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  20. Ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay for determination of kukoamine B in human blood and urine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Li, Lili; Wang, Zhenlei; Jiang, Ji; Dong, Kai; Chen, Shuai; Hu, Pei

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we report a sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method which is capable of quantifying kukoamine B (KB) levels in human blood and urine. Following solid phase extraction and direct dilution process, the analyte and its internal standard (D5-KB) run on an Acquity UPLC(®) HSS T3 column (2.1×50mm i.d., 1.8μm) by using a gradient elution method (run time was 1.5min). The mass spectrometric analysis was performed by using an API-5500 mass spectrometer coupled with an electro-spray ionization source. The MRM transitions of m/z 531.3(+)→222.1(+) and 536.3(+)→222.1(+) were used to quantify KB and D5-KB respectively. This assay method has been fully validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, lower limit of quantification, precision, accuracy, stability, recovery and matrix effect. The concentration range of this method is 10.0-2000.0ngmL(-1) in blood and 0.5-500.0ngmL(-1) in urine. Linearity (R(2)) of calibration curves were 0.9964±0.0022 and 0.9935±0.0053 for blood and urine, respectively (regression equation: y=ax+b). The precision (RSD%) of quality control samples is less than 10.3% for blood and less than 10.5% for urine. The accuracy (RE%) is within -4.0-11.3% and -11.7-12.5% for blood and urine respectively. KB was stable after 4h in ice-water bath, 1 freeze/thaw cycles and 180days at -80°C for blood samples; and was stable after 3h at room temperature, 3 freeze/thaw cycles and 180days at -80°C for urine samples. Recoveries of KB were 4.7±0.9% in blood and 96.5±1.3% in urine, respectively. Additionally, the applicability of this method has been proved by analyzing clinical samples from pharmacokinetic study of KB in human. PMID:27447928

  1. Spectrophotometric assay for calcineurin activity in leukocytes isolated from human blood.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Kathryn J; van Rossum, Huub H; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Smit, Nico P M; de Fijter, Johan W; van Pelt, Johannes

    2006-11-01

    The calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, still constitute the cornerstone of immunosuppressive regimen after organ transplantation. An efficient and feasible way to measure calcineurin activity and inhibition by these drugs may improve therapeutic monitoring of these drugs in transplant recipients. Calcineurin activity was measured in leukocyte lysates isolated from human blood using spectrophotometric phosphate quantification. The dephosphorylation of a 19-amino acid peptide substrate of calcineurin was determined using the Malachite green phosphate reagent in the presence of okadaic acid and with and without the calcium chelator EGTA. Sample storage and lysis buffer components were among the variables optimized, and the inhibitory effect of calcineurin inhibitors was investigated. Observed loss of calcineurin activity during sample storage was eliminated by adding ascorbic acid to lysis buffer. The final inter- and intraassay variation coefficients were 10 and 4.5%, respectively, and the detection limit was 15 pmol min(-1)x10(6) WBC(-1), where WBC is white blood cells (leukocytes). In vitro IC50 values were 212 and 34 microg/L for cyclosporine and tacrolimus, respectively. In vivo calcineurin inhibition was observed when calcineurin activity was measured in transplant recipients on maintenance therapy with cyclosporine and tacrolimus.

  2. Dried blood spot assay for the quantification of phenytoin using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Villanelli, Fabio; Giocaliere, Elisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Rosati, Anna; Forni, Giulia; Funghini, Silvia; Shokry, Engy; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2015-02-01

    Phenytoin (PHT) is one of the most commonly used anticonvulsant drugs for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorders. The large amount of plasma required by conventional methods for drug quantification makes mass spectrometry combined with dried blood spot (DBS) sampling crucial for pediatric patients where therapeutic drug monitoring or pharmacokinetic studies may be difficult to realize. DBS represents a new convenient sampling support requiring minimally invasive blood drawing and providing long-term stability of samples and less expensive shipment and storage. The aim of this study was to develop a LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of PHT on DBS. This analytical method was validated and gave good linearity (r(2)=0.999) in the range of 0-100mg/l. LOQ and LOD were 1.0mg/l and 0.3mg/l, respectively. The drug extraction from paper was performed in a few minutes using a mixture composed of organic solvent for 80%. The recovery ranged from 85 to 90%; PHT in DBS showed to be stable at different storage temperatures for one month. A good correlation was also obtained between PHT plasma and DBS concentrations. This method is both precise and accurate and appears to be particularly suitable to monitor treatment with a simple and convenient sample collection procedure.

  3. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Balinda, Sheila N.; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A.; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low–cost, qualitative viral–failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross–sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV–1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). Results 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%–87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%–96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%–92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second–line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV–1 treatment in RLS. PMID:26824465

  5. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Elnager, Abuzar; Hassan, Rosline; Idris, Zamzuri; Mustafa, Zulkifli; Wan-Arfah, Nadiah; Sulaiman, S. A.; Gan, Siew Hua; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah

    2015-01-01

    Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB) clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM). After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD) levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG) parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL) levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams) were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM). The 50% effective dose (ED50) of CAPE (based on DD) was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted. PMID:25664321

  6. Effects of unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and heparinoid on thromboelastographic assay of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Zmuda, K; Neofotistos, D; Ts'ao, C H

    2000-05-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) has been used increasingly as an intraoperative hemostasis monitoring device. Low-molecular-weight heparins are given increasingly to reduce the development of antibodies against the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex, and heparinoids are given to patients who have developed the antibody. We studied the effect of unfractionated heparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin (enoxaparin sodium [Lovenox]), and a heparinoid (danaparoid sodium [Orgaran]) on blood clotting assayed with TEG (TEG clotting) in vitro and the efficacy of protamine sulfate and heparinase for reversing the effect. Heparin, enoxaparin, and danaparoid all caused a dose-dependent inhibition of TEG clotting of normal blood. Concentrations of enoxaparin and danaparoid that totally inhibited TEG clotting only minimally prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time. While inhibition of TEG clotting by heparin and enoxaparin was reversed by protamine sulfate and heparinase, inhibition by danaparoid was reversed only by heparinase. Abnormal TEG clotting was observed in patients receiving enoxaparin whose plasma level of the drug was more than 0.1 antiXa U/mL. However, the degree of TEG abnormality did not always coincide with plasma levels of the drug.

  7. Human Erythrocyte PIG-A Assay: An Easily Monitored Index of Gene Mutation Requiring Low Volume Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Stephen D.; Avlasevich, Svetlana L.; Bemis, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Yuhchyau; MacGregor, James T.

    2015-01-01

    This laboratory has previously described a method for scoring the incidence of rodent blood Pig-a mutant phenotype erythrocytes using immunomag-netic separation in conjunction with flow cytometric analysis (In Vivo MutaFlow®). The current work extends this approach to human blood. The frequencies of CD59- and CD55-negative reticulo-cytes (RETCD59−/CD55−) and erythrocytes (RBCCD59−/CD55−) seve as phenotypic reporters of PIG-A gene mutation. Immunomagnetic separation was found to provide an effective means of increasing the number of reticulocytes and erythro-cytes evaluated. Technical replicates were utilized to provide a sufficient number of cells for precise scoring while at the same time controlling for procedural accuracy by allowing comparison of replicate values. Cold whole blood samples could be held for at least one week without affecting reticulo-cyte, RETCD59−/CD55− or RBCCD59−/CD55− frequencies. Specimens from a total of 52 nonsmoking, self-reported healthy adult subjects were evaluated. The mean frequency of RETCD59−/CD55− and RBCCD592−/CD55− were 6.0 × 10−6 and 2.9 × 10−6, respectively. The difference is consistent with a modest selective pressure against mutant phenotype erythrocytes in the circulation, and suggests advantages of studying both populations of erythrocytes. Whereas intra-subject variability was low, inter-subject variability was relatively high, with RETCD59−/CD55− frequencies differing by more than 30-fold. There was an apparent correlation between age and mutant cell frequencies. Taken together, the results indicate that the frequency of human PIG-A mutant phenotype cells can be efficiently and reliably estimated using a labeling and analysis protocol that is well established for rodent-based studies. The applicability of the assay across species, its simplicity and statistical power, and the relatively non-invasive nature of the assay should benefit myriad research areas involving DNA damage

  8. Analysis of Performance of a PCR-Based Assay To Detect DNA of Aspergillus fumigatus in Whole Blood and Serum: a Comparative Study with Clinical Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Gago, Sara; Buitrago, María J.; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a real-time PCR-based assay was retrospectively analyzed (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group criteria) in the samples of patients with invasive aspergillosis. A total of 711 serial samples (356 whole-blood and 355 serum samples) from 38 adult patients were analyzed. The Aspergillus fumigatus PCR assay results were positive for 89 of 356 (25%) whole-blood samples and 90 of 355 (25.35%) serum samples. Positive PCR results were seen in 29 of 31 (93.5%) patients for which serum was analyzed and in 31 of 33 (93.9%) cases with whole-blood specimens. Both blood and serum samples were available in 26 cases, and significant differences were not observed in this subgroup of cases. The average number of threshold cycles (CT) for positive blood samples was 37.6, and the average CT for serum was 37.4. The DNA concentration ranged between 2 and 50 fg per μl of sample, with average DNA concentrations of 10.2 and 11.7 fg in positive blood and serum samples, respectively (P > 0.01). The performance of this PCR-based quantitative assay was similar for both serum and blood samples. We recommend serum samples as the most convenient hematological sample to use for Aspergillus DNA quantification when serial determinations are done. PMID:21849696

  9. Microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency type-1 viruses in human blood samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chu Chieh . E-mail: chuchieh.hsia@fda.hhs.gov; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Yang, Amy X.; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Hewlett, Indira; Duncan, Robert; Puri, Raj K.; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2007-05-18

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) are transfusion-transmitted human pathogens that have a major impact on blood safety and public health worldwide. We developed a microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of these three viruses. The microarray consists of 16 oligonucleotide probes, immobilized on a silylated glass slide. Amplicons from multiplex PCR were labeled with Cy-5 and hybridized to the microarray. The assay detected 1 International Unit (IU), 10 IU, 20 IU of HBV, HCV, and HIV-1, respectively, in a single multiplex reaction. The assay also detected and discriminated the presence of two or three of these viruses in a single sample. Our data represent a proof-of-concept for the possible use of highly sensitive multiplex microarray assay to screen and confirm the presence of these viruses in blood donors and patients.

  10. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-05-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the multiplex nucleic acid assay for identification of microorganisms and resistance markers from positive blood cultures. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  11. Laboratory Evaluation of the Liat HIV Quant (IQuum) Whole-Blood and Plasma HIV-1 Viral Load Assays for Point-of-Care Testing in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gous, Natasha; Carmona, Sergio; Stevens, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) HIV viral load (VL) testing offers the potential to reduce turnaround times for antiretroviral therapy monitoring, offer near-patient acute HIV diagnosis in adults, extend existing centralized VL services, screen women in labor, and prompt pediatrics to early treatment. The Liat HIV Quant plasma and whole-blood assays, prerelease version, were evaluated in South Africa. The precision, accuracy, linearity, and agreement of the Liat HIV Quant whole-blood and plasma assays were compared to those of reference technologies (Roche CAP CTMv2.0 and Abbott RealTime HIV-1) on an HIV verification plasma panel (n = 42) and HIV clinical specimens (n = 163). HIV Quant plasma assay showed good performance, with a 2.7% similarity coefficient of variation (CV) compared to the Abbott assay and a 1.8% similarity CV compared to the Roche test on the verification panel, and 100% specificity. HIV Quant plasma had substantial agreement (pc [concordance correlation] = 0.96) with Roche on clinical specimens and increased variability (pc = 0.73) in the range of <3.0 log copies/ml range with the HIV Quant whole-blood assay. HIV Quant plasma assay had good linearity (2.0 to 5.0 log copies/ml; R2 = 0.99). Clinical sensitivity at a viral load of 1,000 copies/ml of the HIV Quant plasma and whole-blood assays compared to that of the Roche assay (n = 94) was 100% (confidence interval [CI], 95.3% to 100%). The specificity of HIV Quant plasma was 88.2% (CI, 63.6% to 98.5%), and that for whole blood was 41.2% (CI, 18.4% to 67.1%). No virological failure (downward misclassification) was missed. Liat HIV Quant plasma assay can be interchanged with existing VL technology in South Africa. Liat HIV Quant whole-blood assay would be advantageous for POC early infant diagnosis at birth and adult adherence monitoring and needs to be evaluated further in this clinical context. LIAT cartridges currently require cold storage, but the technology is user-friendly and robust. Clinical cost and

  12. The preparation of interferon gamma-producing T-cell hybridomas from jacalin-stimulated T lymphocytes and the SH9 T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Crane, I; Leung, H; Barwick, S; Parti, S; Meager, A

    1984-12-01

    Jacalin, a lectin(s) extracted from the seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (Jackfruit), was shown to induce the production of gamma interferon (IFN gamma) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and human T-lymphocyte cultures. The amount of IFN gamma produced was enhanced in the presence of mezerein, a phorbol ester derivative. Fusion of jacalin stimulated T lymphocytes with the SH9 T-cell line resulted in the formation of T-cell hybridomas which spontaneously secreted IFN gamma. The spontaneous production of IFN gamma by T-cell hybridomas was not influenced by the presence of jacalin, although significant enhancement of production was observed when the cells were cultured in the presence of mezerein.

  13. The Use of Interferon Gamma Inducible Protein 10 as a Potential Biomarker in the Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Biraro, Irene Andia; Kimuda, Simon; Egesa, Moses; Cose, Stephen; Webb, Emily L.; Joloba, Moses; Smith, Steven G.; Elliott, Alison M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Katamba, Achilles

    2016-01-01

    Background In the absence of a gold standard for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI), the current tests available for the diagnosis of LTBI are limited by their inability to differentiate between LTBI and active TB disease. We investigated IP-10 as a potential biomarker for LTBI among household contacts exposed to sputum positive active TB cases. Methods Active TB cases and contacts were recruited into a cohort with six months’ follow-up. Contacts were tested for LTBI using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFN) assay and the tuberculin skin test (TST). Baseline supernatants from the QFN assay of 237 contacts and 102 active TB cases were analysed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) specific and mitogen specific IP-10 responses. Results Contacts with LTBI (QFN+TST+) had the highest MTB specific IP-10 responses at baseline, compared to uninfected contacts (QFN-TST-) p<0.0001; and active cases, p = 0.01. Using a cut-off of 8,239 pg/ml, MTB specific IP-10 was able to diagnose LTBI with a sensitivity of 87.1% (95% CI, 76.2–94.3) and specificity of 90.9% (95% CI, 81.3–96.6). MTB specific to mitogen specific IP-10 ratio was higher in HIV negative active TB cases, compared to HIV negative latently infected contacts, p = 0.0004. Concentrations of MTB specific IP-10 were higher in contacts with TST conversion (negative at baseline, positive at 6-months) than in those that were persistently TST negative, p = 0.001. Conclusion IP-10 performed well in differentiating contacts with either latent or active TB from those who were uninfected but was not able to differentiate LTBI from active disease except when MTB specific to mitogen specific ratios were used in HIV negative adults. In addition, IP-10 had the potential to diagnose ‘recent TB infection’ in persons classified as having LTBI using the TST. Such individuals with strong IP-10 responses would likely benefit from chemoprophylaxis. PMID:26771653

  14. Stewardship approach for optimizing antimicrobial therapy through use of a rapid microarray assay on blood cultures positive for Enterococcus species.

    PubMed

    Sango, Aaron; McCarter, Yvette S; Johnson, Donald; Ferreira, Jason; Guzman, Nilmarie; Jankowski, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Enterococci are a major cause of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients and have limited antimicrobial treatment options due to their many resistance mechanisms. Molecular technologies have significantly shortened the time to enterococcal isolate identification compared with conventional methods. We evaluated the impact of rapid organism identification and resistance detection with the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture microarray assay on clinical and economic outcomes for patients with enterococcal bacteremia. A single-center preintervention/postintervention quasiexperimental study compared inpatients with enterococcal bacteremia from 1 February 2012 to 9 September 2012 (preintervention period) and 10 September 2012 to 28 February 2013 (postintervention period). An infectious disease and/or critical care pharmacist was contacted with the microarray assay results, and effective antibiotics were recommended. The clinical and economic outcomes for 74 patients were assessed. The mean time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 23.4 h longer in the preintervention group than in the postintervention group (P = 0.0054). A nonsignificant decrease in the mean time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy was seen for patients infected with vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus isolates (P = 0.1145). For patients with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia, the mean time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 31.1 h longer in the preintervention group than in the postintervention group (P < 0.0001). In the postintervention group, the hospital length of stay was significantly 21.7 days shorter (P = 0.0484) and mean hospital costs were $60,729 lower (P = 0.02) than in the preintervention group. The rates of attributed deaths in the two groups were not statistically different. Microarray technology, supported by pharmacy and microbiology departments, can decrease the time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy, the hospital length of stay, and health care costs.

  15. Detection of Lewis, P1, and some MNS blood group system antibodies by a solid phase assay.

    PubMed

    Rolih, S; Thomas, R; Sinor, L

    1995-01-01

    Some solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assays are designed to detect IgG antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens. These assays use anti-IgG-coated red cells as the indicator. It is reported that most antibodies to Lea, Leb, P1, M, and N fail to react by solid phase (SP), presumably because they are IgM antibodies. Those detected are assumed to be IgG. In one year, during routine testing using SPRCA to screen patients for intended RBC transfusion, 28 of 59 such examples were found to react: anti-Lea(9), -Leb(1), -M(14), -N(1), and -P1(3). A study was undertaken to determine if reactivity was due to crosslinking by IgM antibodies of antigen-positive indicator RBCs to antigen-positive reagent RBC monolayers, or due to detection of IgG antibodies. Antibodies were tested according to standard SP protocols, except where IgG-neutralized indicator RBCs were substituted for anti-IgG-active indicator cells. The 59 samples were retested with antigen-positive and antigen-negative indicator RBCs. Only 5 of 59 reacted optimally when antigen-positive indicator cells were used: anti-Lea(2), -Leb(1), -M(1), and -N(1). The reactions of all antibodies were abolished when the anti-IgG component of the indicator was neutralized by soluble IgG. These findings show that detection of most Lewis, P1, M, and N antibodies by SPRCA is dependent on the presence of an IgG antibody in the serum.

  16. Interferon-gamma Inhibits Melanogenesis and Induces Apoptosis in Melanocytes: A Pivotal Role of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wei, Yi; Sun, Yue; Shi, Weimin; Yang, Ji; Zhu, Lubing; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Increased expression of the cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ plays a pivotal role in vitiligo-induced depigmentation. However, the major source of IFN-γ in vitiligo patients and the mechanisms underlying melanocyte destruction are unknown. In this study, a large number of skin infiltrating IFN-γ+ cells and CD8+ T cells were detected in progressive vitiligo. Among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of vitiligo patients, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that express IFN-γ exhibited significant expansion, which suggests that activated CTLs are the main source of increased IFN-γ in progressive vitiligo. An in vitro analysis demonstrated that IFN-γ inhibits melanogenesis in primary cultured human melanocytes by altering melanogenic enzyme mRNA expression and, more importantly, that IFN-γ directly induces melanocyte apoptosis. Our data indicate that vitiligo pathophysiology may be linked to globally activated CD8+ CTL subpopulations, which produce increased IFN-γ and induce melanocyte dysfunction and apoptosis.

  17. Development and validation of a dried blood spot-LC-APCI-MS assay for estimation of canrenone in paediatric samples.

    PubMed

    Suyagh, Maysa Faisal; Kole, Prashant Laxman; Millership, Jeff; Collier, Paul; Halliday, Henry; McElnay, James C

    2010-03-15

    A selective and sensitive liquid chromatography (LC)-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-mass spectroscopic (MS) assay of canrenone has been developed and validated employing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) as the sample collection medium. DBS samples were prepared by applying 30 microl of spiked whole blood onto Guthrie cards. A 6mm disc was punched from the each DBS and extracted with 2 ml of methanolic solution of 17alpha-methyltestosterone (Internal Standard). The methanolic extract was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in acetonitrile:water (1:9, v/v). The reconstituted solution was further subjected to solid phase extraction using HLB cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved using Waters Sunfire C18 reversed-phase column using isocratic elution, followed by a high organic wash to clear late eluting/highly retained components. The mobile phase consisted of methanol:water (60:40, v/v) pumped at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min. LC-APCI-MS detection was performed in the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode using target ions at m/z 341.1 and 303.3 for canrenone and internal standard respectively. The selectivity of the method was established by analysing DBS samples from 6 different sources (individuals). The calibration curve for canrenone was found to be linear over 25-1000 ng/ml (r>0.994). Accuracy (% RE) and precision (% CV) values for within and between day were <20% at the lower limit of quantification (LLQC) and <15% at all other concentrations tested. The LLOQ of the method was validated at 25 ng/ml. Clinical validation of the method was achieved by employing the validated method for analysis of 160 DBS samples from 37 neonatal and paediatric patients. PMID:20153705

  18. Infants with late breast milk acquisition of HIV-1 generate interferon-gamma responses more rapidly than infants with early peripartum acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lohman-Payne, B; Slyker, J A; Richardson, B A; Farquhar, C; Majiwa, M; Maleche-Obimbo, E; Mbori-Ngacha, D; Overbaugh, J; Rowland-Jones, S; John-Stewart, G

    2009-06-01

    Infants infected with HIV-1 after the first month of life have a lower viral set-point and slower disease progression than infants infected before 1 month. We investigated the kinetics of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma in infants infected before 1 month of life compared with those infected between months 1 and 12 (late infection). HIV-1 infection was assessed at birth and at months 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 and timing of infection was determined by HIV-1 gag DNA from dried blood spots and verified by plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. HIV-1 peptide-specific IFN-gamma responses were measured by enzyme-linked immunospot at months 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12. Timing of development of IFN-gamma responses was compared using the log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Infants infected late developed HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T cell responses 2.8 months sooner than infants infected peripartum: 2.3 versus 5.1 months after HIV-1 infection (n = 52, P = 0.04). Late-infected infants had more focused epitope recognition than early-infected infants (median 1 versus 2 peptides, P = 0.03); however, there were no differences in the strength of IFN-gamma responses. In infants infected with HIV-1 after the first month of life, emergence of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) IFN-gamma responses is coincident with the decline in viral load, nearly identical to what is observed in adults and more rapid than in early-infected infants.

  19. Children with chronic suppurative lung disease have a reduced capacity to synthesize interferon-gamma in vitro in response to non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Pizzutto, Susan J; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Upham, John W; Hales, Belinda J; Thomas, Wayne R; Chang, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) is characterized by the presence of a chronic wet or productive cough and recurrent lower respiratory infections. The aim of this study was to identify features of innate, cell-mediated and humoral immunity that may increase susceptibility to respiratory infections in children with CSLD. Because non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is commonly isolated from the airways in CSLD, we examined immune responses to this organism in 80 age-stratified children with CSLD and compared their responses with 51 healthy control children. Cytokines involved in the generation and control of inflammation (IFN-γ, IL-13, IL-5, IL-10 at 72 hours and TNFα, IL-6, IL-10 at 24 hours) were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells challenged in vitro with live NTHi. We also measured circulating IgG subclass antibodies (IgG1 and IgG4) to two H. influenzae outer membrane proteins, P4 and P6. The most notable finding was that PBMC from children with CSLD produced significantly less IFN-γ in response to NTHi than healthy control children whereas mitogen-induced IFN-γ production was similar in both groups. Overall there were minor differences in innate and humoral immune responses between CSLD and control children. This study demonstrates that children with chronic suppurative lung disease have an altered systemic cell-mediated immune response to NTHi in vitro. This deficient IFN-γ response may contribute to increased susceptibility to NTHi infections and the pathogenesis of CSLD in children.

  20. High Sensitivity RT-qPCR Assay of Nonlabeled siRNA in Small Blood Volume for Pharmacokinetic Studies: Application to Survivin siRNA.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Bertrand Z; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, Guillaume M; Au, Jessie L-S

    2015-11-01

    RNAi therapeutics provide an opportunity to correct faulty genes, and several RNAi have entered clinical evaluation. The existing quantification methods typically use radioactivity- or fluorescence-labeled RNAi, require large blood volumes, and/or have a limited dynamic detection range. We established a quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay to measure RNAi; the model analyte was survivin siRNA (siSurvivin). A second siRNA was used as the internal standard. The three major steps were (a) extraction of the two siRNAs from blood or water, (b) synthesis of their cDNA by poly-A extension, and (c) qPCR of cDNA. Standard curves were established. Utility of the assay was demonstrated in a pharmacokinetic study where all 12 samples for the blood concentration-time profile were obtained from a single mouse given an intravenous dose of 1 nmole siSurvivin (prepared as lipoplex with pegylated cationic liposomes). The RT-qPCR assay was sensitive (lower detection limit of 100 fM) and had a 5 × 107-fold dynamic range and low sample volume requirement (10 μL). The 16-point standard curves constructed using whole blood samples were linear (R (2) > 0.98). The intraday and interday variations for the slopes were ≤6%, although the variations for accuracy and precision at individual concentrations were substantially higher (58-145%). Standard curves prepared with water in place of blood showed similar results (<6% difference), indicating water may be used when blood is not available. The current RT-qPCR assay enabled the measurement of nonlabeled siRNA in small volume of blood samples. PMID:26286676

  1. The effectiveness of asthma therapy alternatives and evaluating the effectivity of asthma therapy by interleukin-13 and interferon gamma levels in children.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Ozkan; Arli, Ozgun; Uzuner, Nevin; Islekel, Huray; Babayigit, Arzu; Olmez, Duygu; Kose, Suna; Tezcan, Dilek

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the superiority of combination therapy over steroid therapy alone by using clinical and laboratory data including interleukin (IL)-13 and interferon (IFN) gamma, which participate in the characteristic inflammation and have not been studied to evaluate the efficiency of asthma treatment sufficiently. Moderate persistent asthma patients, aged 7-17 years were included in the study. Patients were randomized to three groups. Group 1 used inhaled budesonide, group 2 used inhaled budesonide plus inhaled formoterol fumarate, and group 3 used inhaled budesonide and oral montelukast sodium therapy. At the beginning and at the end of the 2nd month a detailed physical examination and clinical evaluation; total IgE levels and total eosinophil count in peripheral venous blood, serum IL-13, and IFN-gamma levels; pulmonary function tests; and an assessment questionnaire (Pediatric Asthma Quality-of-Life Questionnaire with Standardized Activities [PAQLQ{S}] were performed. Sixty-seven patients completed the study. Serum IL-13 levels and PAQLQ(S) scores before the therapy and serum IL-13 levels after the therapy were significantly different between the groups and other parameters did not show any significant differences. Serum IgE level was decreased after the therapy in group I and increased in groups 2 and 3, but the difference was insignificant. In all groups total eosinophil levels were decreased insignificantly. After the therapy, IL-13 levels were decreased in groups 1 and 2 and increased in group 3, but the difference was not statistically significant. When compared with the levels before the therapy IFN-gamma levels were decreased after the therapy but the difference was not statistically significant. When the improvement rates for IgE, total eosinophil, IL-13, and IFN-gamma levels and each parameter of respiratory function tests were compared, there were no significant differences between the therapy groups. In all groups PAQLQ(S) scores were

  2. Transcriptional profiling of TLR-4/7/8-stimulated guinea pig splenocytes and whole blood by bDNA assay

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Lance K.; Mompoint, Farah; Guderian, Jeffrey A.; Picone, Alex; Orme, Ian M.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.; Baldwin, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are currently being examined as adjuvants for vaccines, with several lead candidates now in licensed products or in late-stage clinical development. Guinea pigs are widely used for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines; however, evaluation of TLR agonists in this model is hindered by the limited availability of immunological tools and reagents. In this study, we validated the use of a branched-chain DNA (bDNA) assay known as the QuantiGene Plex 2.0 Reagent System for measuring innate cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels following TLR stimulation of guinea pig cells. Gene expression for T-helper-1 (Th1) polarizing cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12) and chemokines (CXCL1, CCL2) was upregulated following ex vivo stimulation of guinea pig splenocytes and whole blood with TLR-4 or TLR-7/8 agonists. These data confirm the utility of the QuantiGene system both as an alternative to RT-PCR for measuring transcript levels and as a high-throughput screening tool for dissecting the immunological response to TLR stimulation in guinea pigs. Overall, the QuantiGene platform is reliable, reproducible, and sensitive. These agonists have the potential to be used as adjuvant components in vaccines against various pathogens. PMID:21839740

  3. Rapid Immuno-Chromatographic Assay for the Detection of Antibodies to HIV Compare with Elisa among Voluntary and Replacement Blood Donor of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, P; Rudra, S; Hossain, M A; Begum, S A; Mirza, T T; Rudra, M

    2015-04-01

    Suitable algorithms based on a combination of two or more simple rapid HIV assays have been shown to have a diagnostic accuracy comparable to double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or double ELISA with Western Blot strategies. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of five simple rapid HIV assays using whole blood samples from voluntary and replacement blood donors & HIV-infected patients (positive samples from BSMMU, Dhaka). Five rapid HIV assays: Determine™ HIV-1/2 (Inverness Medical), SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc.), First Response HIV Card 1-2.0 (PMC Medical India Pvt Ltd.), HIV1/2 Stat-Pak Dipstick (Chembio Diagnostic System, Inc) and Uni-Gold™ HIV-1/2 (Biotech) were evaluated between 1st February to 30th June, 2013 using 400 whole blood samples from voluntary and replacement blood donors. All samples that were reactive on all or any of the five rapid assays and 10% of non-reactive samples were tested on a confirmatory Inno-Lia HIV I/II immunoblot assay (Immunogenetics). Only 01 sample including ten positive samples from BSMMU were confirmed HIV-1 antibody positive, while 399 were HIV negative. The sensitivity at initial testing of Determine, SD Bioline and Uni-Gold™ was 100% (95% CI; 99.1-100) while First Response and Stat-Pak had sensitivity of 99.5% (95% CI; 98.2-99.9) and 97.7% (95% CI; 95.7-98.9) respectively, which increased to 100% (95% CI; 99.1-100) on repeat testing. The initial specificity of the Uni-Gold™ assay was 100% (95% CI; 99.6-100) while specificities were 99.6% (95% CI; 99-99.9), 99.4% (95% CI; 98.8-99.7), 99.6% (95% CI; 99-99.9) and 99.8% (95% CI; 99.3-99.9) for Determine, SD Bioline, First Response and Stat-Pak assays, respectively. There was no any sample which was concordantly false positive in Uni-Gold™, Determine and SD Bioline assays. An alternative confirmatory HIV testing strategy based on initial testing on either SD Bioline or Determine assays followed by testing of reactive

  4. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Reedijk, Mariska L.; Scheuer, Rachel D.; Dekker, Lennard J. M.; Burger, David M.; Hartwig, Nico G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Luider, Theo M.; Gruters, Rob A.

    2010-01-01

    Kaletra® (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations in whole blood and in plasma from HIV-1-infected children. Whole blood was blotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) collecting cards, and plasma was collected simultaneously. DBS collecting cards were extracted by an acetonitrile/water mixture while plasma samples were deproteinized with acetone. Drug concentrations were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-QqQ-MS/MS). The application of DBS made it possible to measure lopinavir and ritonavir in whole blood in therapeutically relevant concentrations. The MALDI-QqQ-MS/MS plasma assay was successfully cross-validated with a commonly used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)–ultraviolet (UV) assay for the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of HIV-1-infected patients, and it showed comparable performance characteristics. Observed DBS concentrations showed as well, a good correlation between plasma concentrations obtained by MALDI-QqQ-MS/MS and those obtained by the HPLC-UV assay. Application of DBS for TDM proved to be a good alternative to the normally used plasma screening. Moreover, collection of DBS requires small amounts of whole blood which can be easily performed especially in (very) young children where collection of large whole blood amounts is often not possible. DBS is perfectly suited for TDM of HIV-1-infected children; but nevertheless, DBS can also easily be applied for TDM of patients in areas with limited or no laboratory facilities. PMID:20632164

  5. Evaluation of a Microarray-Based Assay for Rapid Identification of Gram-Positive Organisms and Resistance Markers in Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, Robert J.; Agotesku, Adam; Fey, Margaret; Hensley, Rhonda; Meier, Frederick A.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid identification of pathogens directly from positive blood cultures can play a major role in reducing patient mortality rates. We evaluated the performance of the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP) assay (Nanosphere Inc., Northbrook, IL) for detection of commonly isolated Gram-positive organisms as well as associated resistance markers from positive blood cultures. Positive blood cultures (VersaTREK; Trek Diagnostic Systems, Independence, OH) from 203 patients with Gram-positive organism infections were analyzed using the BC-GP assay within 12 h for the detection of 12 different organisms, including staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci, as well as for the presence of 3 resistance markers (mecA, vanA, and vanB). Results were compared to those of routine laboratory methods for identification and susceptibility testing. For identification of organisms and detection of resistance markers in 178 monomicrobial positive blood cultures, the BC-GP assay showed 94% and 97% concordance, respectively, with routine methods. After 25 polymicrobial cultures were included, the results showed 92% and 96% agreement for identification and resistance markers, respectively, for a total of 203 positive cultures. In 6/25 polymicrobial cultures, at least 1 isolate was not detected. Concordance levels for detection of major pathogens such Staphylococcus aureus (n = 45) and enterococci (n = 19) were 98% and 95%, respectively. Agreement levels for detection of resistance markers such as mecA and vanA/B were 92% and 100%, respectively. The BC-GP assay is capable of providing rapid identification of Gram-positive cocci as well as detection of resistance markers directly from positive blood cultures at least 24 to 48 h earlier than conventional methods. PMID:23363838

  6. Cordyceps sinensis: Genotoxic Potential in Human Peripheral Blood Cells and Antigenotoxic Properties Against Hydrogen Peroxide by Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Jovana D; Zivkovic, Lada P; Cabarkapa, Andrea M; Bajic, Vladan P; Djelic, Ninoslav J; Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana M

    2016-06-01

    Context • Cordyceps sinensis (C sinensis) is a well-known, traditional, Chinese medicinal mushroom, valued for its beneficial properties for human health. C sinensis has been reported to have immunomodulatory, anticancer, antiaging, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Despite potential medicinal benefits, no previously published reports are available about the genotoxicity or antigenotoxicity of C sinensis, as detected by comet assay. Objective • The objective of the study was to evaluate both the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of an extract of C sinensis (CS extract) in human peripheral blood cells. Design • The research team designed a pilot study. Setting •The study was conducted at the Center for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, in Belgrade, Serbia. Participants • Participants were 6 healthy individuals (2 males and 4 females), between the ages of 20 and 45 y, recruited on a voluntary basis, who provided heparinized, peripheral blood samples. Intervention • Four concentrations of the CS extract-125 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, 500 μg/mL, and 1000 μg/mL-were used in the treatment of tested blood cells from the blood samples. Three independent procedures were performed: (1) a genotoxicity assessment, (2) an antigenotoxicity assessment for pretreatment of human cells with the CS extract prior to their exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as a preventive agent); and (3) posttreatment of human cells with the CS extract after their exposure to H2O2 (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as an interventional agent). Outcome Measures • Cells were graded by eye inspection into 5 classes, depending on the extent of DNA damage, representing: (1) class A-undamaged cells with no tail (<5% damaged DNA); (2) class B-low-level damage (5%-20%); (3) class C-medium-level damage (20%-40%); (4) class D-high-level damage (40%-95%), and (5) class E-total destruction (>95%).Results

  7. The role of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in combination with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1 in the induction of immunosuppressive macrophages because of Mycobacterium avium complex infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, H; Maw, W W; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1996-01-01

    The role of some cytokines including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the generation of immunosuppressive macrophages (M phi s) in host spleen cells of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-infected mice was studied. M phi populations with potent suppressor activity against concanavalin A (Con A)-induced mitogenesis of splenocytes (SPCs) were elicited not only in euthymic but also in athymic nude mice during MAC infection. The suppressor M phi s are, therefore, inducible not only through a T-cell-dependent mechanism but also through T-cell-independent mechanism. However, MAC-induced M phi s of athymic mice displayed about four times lower suppressor activity than those of euthymic mice, indicating that mature T cells are important for M phi activation to the highly immunosuppressive state. Anti-TNF, anti-IFN-gamma, and anti-TGF-beta antibodies (Abs) but not anti-IL-6 Ab inhibited in vivo generation of MAC-induced immunosuppressive M phi s, and the neutralizing efficacy was in the order of anti-IFN-gamma Ab > anti-TNF Ab > anti-TGF-beta Ab. The effects of TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-6, and IFN-gamma alone or combinations of them upon the acquisition of the suppressor activity by cultured splenic M phi s were studied. When normal splenic M phi s were treated with each cytokine for 3 days, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-1 alpha alone caused a slight elevation of their suppressive activity. Treatment of the normal M phi s with the combination of either TNF-alpha+IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma yielded a marked increase in the suppressor activity, followed by IL-1 alpha+IFN-gamma. These findings indicate the important roles of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-1 alpha in the generation of MAC-induced suppressor M phi s. PMID:8707352

  8. Estimation of DNA integrity in blood cells of eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) inhabiting an aluminium-polluted water environment: an alkaline comet assay study.

    PubMed

    Ternjej, Ivancica; Mihaljević, Zlatko; Stanković, Igor; Kerovec, Mladen; Sipos, Laszlo; Zeljezić, Davor; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2010-08-01

    To estimate the impacts of an Al-contaminated aquatic environment on DNA integrity in the blood cells of eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki Girard 1859 inhabiting Lake Njivice (Island of Krk, Croatia), an evaluation using the alkaline comet assay was carried out. Genome integrity was studied in parallel with the same fish species inhabiting the nearby, unpolluted Lake Ponikve. The amount of DNA damage in cells was estimated from three different parameters: comet tail length as the extent of genetic material migration, tail intensity (% DNA in the comet tail) and tail moment. The results indicate the loss of genome integrity in blood cells of mosquitofish inhabiting Lake Njivice and the genotoxicity of this aquatic environment. Using the same assay, acute genotoxicity of contaminated water and sediment was evaluated and confirmed on fish, mouse and human blood cells treated ex vivo. Results of the present study indicate that the alkaline comet assay applied to fish blood cells is a valuable tool for determining the potential genotoxicity of water pollutants and confirm its usefulness in the evaluation of DNA damage in fish living in Al-polluted waters.

  9. A novel RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay for the detection of HIV-1 nucleic acids in dried blood spots and plasma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shihai; Erickson, Brian; Mak, Wai Bing; Salituro, John; Abravaya, Klara

    2011-12-01

    Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative is an in vitro real-time PCR assay for detecting HIV-1 nucleic acids in human plasma and dried blood spots (DBS). The assay was designed to be used in diagnosis of HIV-1 infections in pediatric and adult patients, with an emphasis on the applicability in resource-limited settings. Use of DBS facilitates specimen collection from remote areas and transportation to testing laboratories. Small sample input requirement facilitates testing of specimens with limited collection volume. The Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay is capable of detecting HIV-1 group M subtypes A-H, group O and group N samples. HIV-1 virus concentrations detected with 95% probability were 80 copies/mL of plasma using the plasma protocol, and 2469 copies/mL of whole blood using the DBS protocol. The assay detected HIV-1 infection in 13 seroconversion panels an average 10.5 days earlier than an HIV-1 antibody test and 4.9 days earlier than a p24 antigen test. For specimens collected from 6 weeks to 18 months old infants born to HIV-1 positive mothers, assay results using both the DBS and plasma protocols agreed well with the Roche Amplicor HIV-1 DNA Test version 1.5 (95.5% agreement for DBS and 97.8% agreement for plasma).

  10. A fluorescence assay for measuring acetylcholinesterase activity in rat blood and a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y).

    PubMed

    Santillo, Michael F; Liu, Yitong

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme responsible for metabolism of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and inhibition of AChE can have therapeutic applications (e.g., drugs for Alzheimer's disease) or neurotoxic consequences (e.g., pesticides). A common absorbance-based AChE activity assay that uses 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) can have limited sensitivity and be prone to interference. Therefore, an alternative assay was developed, in which AChE activity was determined by measuring fluorescence of resorufin produced from coupled enzyme reactions involving acetylcholine and Amplex Red (10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine). The Amplex Red assay was used for two separate applications. First, AChE activity was measured in rat whole blood, which is a biomarker for exposure to AChE inhibitor pesticides. Activity was quantified from a 10(5)-fold dilution of whole blood, and there was a linear correlation between Amplex Red and DTNB assays. For the second application, Amplex Red assay was used to measure AChE inhibition potency in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), which is important for assessing pharmacological and toxicological potential of AChE inhibitors including drugs, phytochemicals, and pesticides. Five known reversible inhibitors were evaluated (IC50, 7-225 nM), along with irreversible inhibitors chlorpyrifos-oxon (ki=1.01 nM(-1)h(-1)) and paraoxon (ki=0.16 nM(-1)h(-1)). Lastly, in addition to inhibition, AChE reactivation was measured in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM). The Amplex Red assay is a sensitive, specific, and reliable fluorescence method for measuring AChE activity in both rat whole blood and cultured SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:26165232

  11. Effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens D.C. (devil's claw) on COX-1, COX-2 activity and nitric oxide production on whole-blood assay.

    PubMed

    Anauate, Maria Cecilia; Torres, Luce Maria; de Mello, Suzana Beatriz Veríssimo

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of isolated fractions of Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw) on cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) activities and NO production using a whole blood assay. The activity of COX-1 was quantified as platelet thromboxane B(2) production in blood clotting and COX-2 as prostaglandin E(2) production in LPS-stimulated whole blood. Total NO(2) (-)/NO(3) (-) concentration was determined by Griess reaction in LPS stimulated blood. Assays were performed by incubation of isolated fractions obtained by flash chromatography monitored with HPLC, TLC and identified by (1)HNMR, containing different amounts of harpagoside with blood from healthy donors. Indomethacin and etoricoxib were the positive controls of COX-1 and COX-2 Inhibition. Data shows that fraction containing the highest concentration of harpagoside inhibited indistinctively COX-1 and COX-2 (37.2 and 29.5% respectively) activity and greatly inhibited NO production (66%). In contrast the fraction including iridoid pool increased COX-2 and did not alter NO and COX-1 activities. The fraction containing cinnamic acid was able to reduce only NO production (67%). Our results demonstrated that the harpagoside fraction is the main responsible for the effect of devils claw on these enzyme activities. However, other components from devil's claw crude extract could antagonize or increase the synthesis of inflammatory mediators. PMID:20812280

  12. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD*

    PubMed Central

    Zillmer, Laura Russo; Russo, Rodrigo; Manzano, Beatriz Martins; Ivanaga, Ivan; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Santos, Gildo; Rodriguez, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc; Jardim, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm) was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL), with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency. PMID:24310627

  13. A locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based real-time PCR assay for the rapid detection of multiple bacterial antibiotic resistance genes directly from positive blood culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1-10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates.

  14. Field evaluation of three blood-based assays for elk (Cervus canadensis) naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Shury, Todd K; Bergeson, Doug; Surujballi, Om; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena

    2014-08-01

    Diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis in wild populations is very challenging due to complications imposed by the use of traditional skin tests, poor sensitivity of gold standard tests which rely on culture of M. bovis from tissues and wide variations in severity of disease. Various combinations of a lymphocyte stimulation test (LST), fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and the Cervid TB Stat-Pak were evaluated using two different validation approaches: a latent class analysis and classical statistical approach using culture as a gold standard. A validation subsample consisting of animals culled for population control and mortalities from capture provided an unbiased estimate of test performance for comparison. The sensitivity of the LST (0.83, 95% CI: [0.70-0.97] as a single test was similar to existing tuberculin skin tests, but the sensitivity of the FPA (0.40, 95% CI: [0.22-0.58]) and Cervid TB Stat-Pak (0.62, 95% CI: [0.41-0.83]) were lower in this population. Test performance of the LST and Cervid TB Stat-Pak in parallel was similar to the use of all three tests in parallel and inclusion of the FPA did not greatly enhance test performance. Prevalence of M. bovis in elk varied substantially between the high risk area of southern Manitoba (9.1%, 95% CI: [6.09-12.1%]) and lower risk areas outside this zone (0.76%, 95% CI: [0-2.26%]). Bayesian latent class analysis indicated lack of covariance between the two antibody tests (FPA and Cervid TB Stat-Pak) while the classical two-stage analysis indicated there was conditional dependence between the tests. All three tests when used in parallel resulted in 100% NPV using all three validation methods, indicating few elk were misclassified as false negative by post mortem culture. Similar to previous studies, this study found that combinations of blood tests that utilize cell mediated responses along with humoral antibody responses maximize the sensitivity of tests for diagnosis of M. bovis in wild cervid populations. PMID

  15. Comparison of DNA damage by the comet assay in fresh versus cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained following dietary intervention.

    PubMed

    Del Bo', Cristian; Fracassetti, Daniela; Lanti, Claudia; Porrini, Marisa; Riso, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous and oxidatively induced DNA damage, as evaluated by the comet assay, are widely used as biomarkers of oxidative stress in numerous dietary intervention studies. This analysis can be performed on fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or on cryopreserved cells. However, information pertaining to the effects of cryopreservation on DNA damage is often missing, and this may be crucial in studies in which samples are analysed before and after intervention. The purpose of this study was to compare DNA damage in fresh versus cryopreserved PBMCs obtained from subjects following a 6-week intervention with wild blueberry drink or placebo drink. Fresh and 12-month-stored PBMCs were analysed for formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites and H2O2-induced DNA damage. The levels of FPG-sensitive sites were significantly higher in the cryopreserved compared with the fresh cells (P < 0.001), while H2O2-induced DNA damage was significantly lower after storage (P < 0.001). Both the fresh and cryopreserved samples showed reductions in FPG-sensitive sites following the wild blueberry treatment (fresh PBMCs: from 12.50 ± 5.61% to 9.62 ± 3.52%, P = 0.039; cryopreserved PBMCs: from 22.7 ± 6.1% to 19.1 ± 7.0%, P = 0.012). In contrast, the decrease in H2O2-induced DNA damage observed in the cryopreserved cells masked the protective effect of the wild blueberry drink documented in the fresh samples (fresh PBMCs: from 44.73 ± 7.46% to 36.34 ± 9.27%, P < 0.001; cryopreserved PBMCs: from 25.8 ± 4.6% to 23.9 ± 4.6%, P = 0.414). In conclusion, our results suggest that FPG-sensitive sites, and more importantly, H2O2-induced DNA damage could be significantly modified following the long-term storage of samples obtained from individuals participating in a dietary intervention study. Because storage may affect the assessment of the protective role of diet against DNA damage as a marker of oxidative stress, further research is needed.

  16. Leucocytes isolated from simply frozen whole blood can be used in human biomonitoring for DNA damage measurement with the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Akor-Dewu, Maryam B; El Yamani, Naouale; Bilyk, Olena; Holtung, Linda; Tjelle, Torunn E; Blomhoff, Rune; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    Preservation of human blood cells for DNA damage analysis with the comet assay conventionally involves the isolation of mononuclear cells by centrifugation, suspension in freezing medium and slow freezing to -80 °C-a laborious process. A recent publication (Al-Salmani et al. Free Rad Biol Med 2011; 51: 719-725) describes a simple method in which small volumes of whole blood are frozen to -20 or -80 °C; on subsequent thawing, the comet assay is performed, with no indication of elevated DNA strand breakage resulting from the rapid freezing. However, leucocytes in whole blood (whether fresh or frozen) are abnormally resistant to damage by H2 O2 , and so a common test of antioxidant status (resistance to strand breakage by H2 O2 ) cannot be used. We have refined this method by separating the leucocytes from the thawed blood; we find that, after three washes, the cells respond normally to H2 O2 . In addition, we have measured specific endogenous base damage (oxidized purines) in the isolated leucocytes, using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. In a study of blood samples from 10 subjects, H2 O2 sensitivity and endogenous damage-both reflecting the antioxidant status of the cells-correlated significantly. This modified approach to sample collection and storage is particularly applicable when the available volume of blood is limited and has great potential in biomonitoring and ecogenotoxicology studies where samples are obtained in the field or at sites remote from the testing laboratory.

  17. Development of a Rapid Streptavidin Capture-Based Assay for the Tyrosine Phosphorylated CSF-1R in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Dell, Elayne; Siegel, Derick; Brittingham, Gregory; Seetharam, Shobha

    2013-01-01

    A novel assay was developed to measure ratio of p-FMS (phospho FMS) to FMS using the Meso Scale Discovery® (MSD) technology and compared to the routinely used, IP-Western based approach. The existing IP-Western assay used lysed PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) that were immunoprecipitated (IP) overnight, and assayed qualitatively by Western analysis. This procedure takes three days for completion. The novel IP-MSD method described in this paper employed immunoprecipitation of the samples for one hour, followed by assessment of the samples by a ruthenium labeled secondary antibody on a 96-well Streptavidin-coated MSD plate. This IP-MSD method was semi-quantitative, could be run in less than a day, required one-eighth the volume of sample, and compared well to the IP-Western method. In order to measure p-FMS/FMS, samples from healthy volunteers (HV) were first stimulated with CSF-1(Macrophage colony-stimulating factor) to initiate the changes in the phosphotyrosyl signaling complexes in FMS. The objective of the present work was to develop a high throughput assay that measured p-FMS/FMS semi-quantitatively, with minimal sample requirement, and most importantly compared well to the current IP-Western assay. PMID:24339731

  18. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  19. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Melina; Milenkov, Milen; Albrich, Werner C; van der Linden, Mark P G; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P; Endtz, Hubert P; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  20. Genotoxicity of doxorubicin in F344 rats by combining the comet assay, flow-cytometric peripheral blood micronucleus test, and pathway-focused gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Bishop, Michelle E; Pearce, Mason G; Kulkarni, Rohan; Lyn-Cook, Lascelles E; Ding, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an antineoplastic drug effective against many human malignancies. DOX's clinical efficacy is greatly limited because of severe cardiotoxicity. To evaluate if DOX is genotoxic in the heart, ~7-week-old, male F344 rats were administered intravenously 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg bw DOX at 0, 24, 48, and 69 hr and the Comet assays in heart, liver, kidney, and testis and micronucleus (MN) assay in the peripheral blood (PB) erythrocytes using flow cytometry were conducted. Rats were euthanized at 72 hr and PB was removed for the MN assay and single cells were isolated from multiple tissues for the Comet assays. None of the doses of DOX induced a significant DNA damage in any of the tissues examined by the alkaline Comet assay. Contrastingly, the glycosylase enzymes-modified Comet assay showed a significant dose dependent increase in the oxidative DNA damage in the cardiac tissue (P ≤ 0.05). In the liver, only the top dose induced significant increase in the oxidative DNA damage (P ≤ 0.05). The histopathology showed no severe cardiotoxicity but non-neoplastic lesions were present in both untreated and treated samples. A severe toxicity likely occurred in the bone marrow because no viable reticulocytes could be screened for the MN assay. Gene expression profiling of the heart tissues showed a significant alteration in the expression of 11 DNA damage and repair genes. These results suggest that DOX is genotoxic in the heart and the DNA damage may be induced primarily via the production of reactive oxygen species.

  1. Multiplex Assay of Second-Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs in Dried Blood Spots Using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Jun, Sun-Hee; Han, Minje; Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Jong Sun; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Kyoung Un

    2016-01-01

    As dried blood spots (DBSs) have various advantages over conventional venous blood sampling, some assays for detection of one or two anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs in DBSs have been developed. However, there are no assays currently available for the simultaneous measurement of three or more anti-TB drugs in DBSs. In this study, we developed and evaluated a multiplex method for detecting nine anti-TB drugs including streptomycin, kanamycin, clarithromycin, cycloserine, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, para-aminosalicylic acid, prothionamide, and linezolid in DBSs by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Seventy-nine patient samples of DBS were analyzed on the UPLC-MS/MS system. All drug concentrations were determined within 4 min, and assay performance was evaluated. All drugs were clearly separated without ion suppression. Within-run and between-run precisions were 1.7-13.0% and 5.7-17.0%, respectively, at concentrations representing low and high levels for the nine drugs. Lower limits of detection and quantification were 0.06-0.6 and 0.5-5.0 µg/mL, respectively. Linearity was acceptable at five level concentrations for each drug. Correlations between drug concentrations in plasma and DBSs by using Passing-Bablock regression and Pearson's rho (ρ, 0.798-0.989) were acceptable. In conclusion, we developed a multiplex assay to measure nine second-line anti-TB drugs in DBSs successfully. This assay provided convenient and rapid drug quantification and could have applications in drug monitoring during treatment. PMID:27374716

  2. Assay of Blood and Synovial Fluid of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis for Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin D: Absence of Bacteria But Presence of Its Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Kashefi, Reyhane; Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Esmaieli, Davoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease. The staphylococcal superantigens are considered as the causative agent of RA disease. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin D in synovial fluid and blood of patients with RA. Patients and Methods: A total of 120 blood and SF samples of patients with RA were studied. Bacterial culture, primer pairs design, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods have been used to assess of the staphylococcal enterotoxin D. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. Results: During this study and after sequential subcultures, only 5 bacterial strains were isolated. The results of PCR showed the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin D gene in almost 50% of SF and also in 48.4% of blood samples of patients with RA. Similarly, the ELISA method detected staphylococcal enterotoxin D in 36.16% of SF and in 33.33% of blood of patients with RA. Conclusions: The result of this study showed that a high percentage of patients with RA have shown staphylococcal enterotoxin D (superantigen D) or entD gene in SF and in blood. However, the origin of this superantigen was not clarified and no Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin D producer was isolated. This finding indicates other role of this superantigen besides its intoxication. Therefore, staphylococcal enterotoxin D as a biomarker may provide a good model for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with RA. PMID:26870313

  3. Highly sensitive and selective immuno-capture/electrochemical assay of acetylcholinesterase activity in red blood cells: a biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold (MWCNTs-Au) nanocomposites modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is used for the immobilization of AChE specific antibody. Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentrations of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to OP concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposure to OPs.

  4. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  5. Probit analysis of comparative assays on toxicities of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured human umbilical cord blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Rajashree

    2015-01-01

    This work describes that cytotoxicity of lead chloride and lead acetate to in vitro cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood, using four monitoring methods namely, trypan blue staining, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl] 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake assays; lead genotoxicity to lymphocytes was monitored by comet assay. The MIC value in each method was invariably 300 mg/L for PbCl2. Lethal concentration25 (LC25) values were almost in an agreeable range: 691.83 to 831.76 mg/L; LC50 values in each method were almost in the range: 1174.9 to 1348.9 mg/L; LC100 values were in the range: 3000 to 3300 mg/L, for lead chloride. Similarly, The MIC value in each method were invariably 150 mg/L; LC25 values were almost in the range: 295.12 to 371.53 mg/L; LC50 values were in the range: 501.18 to 588.84 mg/L; LC100 value was 1500 mg/L in all assays, for lead acetate. The comet assay also indicated that the LC100 values were 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate. Thus, both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were recorded at 3300 mg/L lead chloride and 1500 mg/L lead acetate with lymphocytes. PMID:27486358

  6. Antibiotic treatment algorithm development based on a microarray nucleic acid assay for rapid bacterial identification and resistance determination from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Jürgen; Karrasch, Matthias; Edel, Birgit; Stoll, Sylvia; Bohnert, Jürgen; Löffler, Bettina; Saupe, Angela; Pfister, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Rapid diagnosis of bloodstream infections remains a challenge for the early targeting of an antibiotic therapy in sepsis patients. In recent studies, the reliability of the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-positive and Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GP and BC-GN) assays for the rapid identification of bacteria and resistance genes directly from positive BCs has been demonstrated. In this work, we have developed a model to define treatment recommendations by combining Verigene test results with knowledge on local antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens. The data of 275 positive BCs were analyzed. Two hundred sixty-three isolates (95.6%) were included in the Verigene assay panels, and 257 isolates (93.5%) were correctly identified. The agreement of the detection of resistance genes with subsequent phenotypic susceptibility testing was 100%. The hospital antibiogram was used to develop a treatment algorithm on the basis of Verigene results that may contribute to a faster patient management. PMID:26712265

  7. Assessing the genotoxicity of imidacloprid and RH-5849 in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro with comet assay and cytogenetic tests.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaolong; Kong, Zhiming; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Pingan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2005-06-01

    A combined approach employing comet assay and micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) tests was utilized to assess the genotoxicity of two pesticides, imidacloprid [1-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitro-imidazolidin-2-ylideneamine] and RH-5849 [2'-benzoyl-1'-tert-butylbenzoylhydrazine], on human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. No significant difference in the frequencies of MN and SCE from the negative groups (P>0.05) was observed at low dose levels (i.e., 0.05 mg/L for imidacloprid and 5mg/L for RH-5849). As the concentrations of imidacloprid and RH-5849 were increased to 0.1 and 25 mg/L, respectively, significant effects to the frequencies of MN and SCE (P<0.05) were achieved relative to those of the negative controls. MN and SCE frequencies increased similarly in a dose-related manner with both pesticides. With the comet assay, however, the distribution of DNA damage grades in all the pesticide-treated groups was significantly different from those in the control (P<0.01). DNA damage scores increased with the exposure levels of both pesticides, and linear dose-effect relationships were observed for both imidacloprid (r2=0.98) and RH-5849 (r2=0.92). The cytogenetic techniques and comet assay revealed potential adverse effects of both imidacloprid and RH-5849 in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Combination of the comet assay and cytogenetic tests appears commendable to assess the potential risks of human exposure to the pesticides.

  8. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Assay for Biofilm-Active Antibiotics Commonly Used for Treatment of Prosthetic Implant Infections.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Ben; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Salman, Sam; Clark, Ben; Dyer, John; Batty, Kevin T; Davis, Timothy M E; Manning, Laurens

    2016-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. We sought to develop, validate, and apply a DBS assay for rifampin (RIF), fusidic acid (FUS), and ciprofloxacin (CIP). These antibiotics are considered active against organisms in biofilms and are therefore commonly used for the treatment of infections associated with prosthetic implants. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy DBS assay was developed and validated, including red cell partitioning and thermal stability for each drug and the rifampin metabolite desacetyl rifampin (Des-RIF). Plasma and DBS concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and the concentration-time profiles were incorporated into population PK models. The limits of quantification for RIF, Des-RIF, CIP, and FUS in DBS were 15 μg/liter, 14 μg/liter, 25 μg/liter, and 153 μg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations for each antibiotic (r > 0.95; P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable. These drugs were stable in DBSs for at least 10 days at room temperature and 1 month at 4°C. The present DBS antibiotic assays are robust and can be used as surrogates for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including therapeutic drug monitoring or studies of implant infections.

  9. Effect of buckminsterfullerenes on cells of the innate and adaptive immune system: an in vitro study with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunz, Hanno; Plankenhorn, Sandra; Klein, Reinhild

    2012-01-01

    C60 nanoparticles, the so-called buckminsterfullerenes, have attracted great attention for medical applications as carriers, enzyme inhibitors or radical scavengers. However, publications evaluating their immunological mechanisms are still rather limited. Therefore, we aimed to analyze systematically the in vitro influence of polyhydroxy-C60 (poly-C60) and N-ethyl-polyamino-C60 (nepo-C60) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals, angling their effect on proliferation, expression of surface markers, and cytokine production. We isolated PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and incubated them in a first step only with poly-C60 or nepo-C60, and in a second step together with recall antigens (purified protein derivative, tetanus toxoid, bacillus Calmette-Guérin). Proliferation was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation, activation of PBMC-subpopulations by flow cytometry by measurement of the activation marker CD69, and secretion of T helper cell type 1 (TH1)- (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor beta [TNF-β]), TH2- (interleukin-5 [IL-5], −13, −10) and macrophage/monocyte-related cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α) into the supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both fullerenes did not influence T cell reactivity, with no enhanced expression of CD69 and production of T cell cytokines observed, the CD4/CD8 ratio remaining unaffected. In contrast, they significantly enhanced the release of IL-6 and CD69-expression by CD56 positive natural killer cells. PBMC, which had been cultured together with the three recall antigens were not affected by both fullerenes at all. These data indicate that fullerenes do not interact with T cell reactivity but may activate cells of the innate immune system. Furthermore, they seem to act only on ‘naïve’ cells, which have not been prestimulated with recall antigens, there are however, large inter individual differences. PMID:22942641

  10. Evaluation of Th9 lymphocytes in peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients and correlation with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: results from an in vitro pivotal study.

    PubMed

    Talotta, R; Berzi, A; Atzeni, F; Dell'Acqua, D; Sarzi Puttini, P; Trabattoni, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of T helper 9 (Th9) lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to identify a possible association between the percentage of Th9 and the discontinuation of a biological treatment with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (infliximab). We collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 55 consecutive RA outpatients and 10 healthy controls. Among RA patients, 15 were not receiving any immunosuppressive drug, 20 were successfully treated with infliximab and 20 discontinued infliximab because of adverse events or inefficacy and were treated with other biological agents. PBMCs were cultured with/without infliximab 50 mg/L for 18 h, and the percentage of Th9 cells was assessed by means of flow cytometry. Th9 lymphocytes were identified as interferon gamma, interleukin (IL)4-, IL17-, IL9-secreting cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4)+ T cells. Cytometric analysis revealed no significant decrease in the percentage of Th9 cells after infliximab exposure in any of the groups, although it was lower in healthy controls than RA patients either before and after the infliximab stimulation assay. Th9 cells are IL-9-secreting T helper lymphocytes whose role in RA is still poorly known. IL-9 levels are increased in RA patients, in whom this cytokine plays a crucial role. Th9 cells are the major producers of IL-9, and their prevalence is higher in RA patients than in healthy subjects; however our experiment in vitro does not demonstrate an association between Th9 lymphocytes and the response to infliximab. Further studies are required to evaluate the real involvement of Th9 population in the immunogenicity of anti-TNF agents. PMID:27608796

  11. The importance of platelets in the expression of monocyte tissue factor antigen measured by a new whole blood flow cytometric assay.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Alexander, M; May, K; Francis, D A; Warnes, G; Biggerstaff, J; Francis, J L

    1996-01-01

    Previous methods for the determination of monocyte tissue factor (TF) have been technically complex, difficult to standardize, prone to spuriously elevated results and difficult to implement in a clinical laboratory environment. We report the development of a two-color whole blood cytometric technique that overcomes many of these disadvantages. The assay uses small volumes of citrated blood (1.0 ml), can be performed in under one hour (if endotoxin stimulation is not performed), is reproducible (CV = 5%) and uses methodology commonly available in clinical laboratories. Baseline (mean +/- SD) expression of monocyte TF in normal subjects was very low (1.1 +/- 0.95%, Mean Fluorescence [Mean FL] 0.20 +/- 0.01) making relatively small increases easy to detect. Monocyte TF expression following endotoxin (LPS) stimulation for 1 h was 34.6 +/- 11.2% (Mean FL 0.32 +/- 0.04). LPS-stimulated activity varied between subjects (21-68%) but was remarkably consistent for individual subjects (CV = 5.4%). Stimulated monocyte TF expression was directly proportional to the platelet count and was reduced by platelet protective anticoagulants and by ingestion of aspirin. Non LPS-stimulated monocyte TF was markedly increased, in a dose-dependent manner, by adding collagen to whole blood. This was apparently associated with platelet-monocyte binding and could be abolished by anti-P-Selectin. We conclude that the whole blood flow cytometric assay of monocyte TF may be a valuable tool for clinical use and a useful model system for evaluating the humoral and cellular factors governing monocyte TF expression in a natural environment.

  12. Evaluation of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for detecting microbial DNA in blood culture bottles using PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seoyong; Park, Soon Deok; Yu, Kwangmin; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2016-09-01

    DNA extraction efficiency affects the success of PCR-based method applications. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for extracting DNA by using paper chromatography is technically easy to use and requires just two reagents and only 10min to complete. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit could be offered as a rapid, accurate, and convenient method for extracting bacterial and fungal DNA from blood culture bottles. We compared the efficiencies of the commercial kit (Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit) and an in-house conventional boiling method with Chelex-100 resin for DNA extraction from blood culture bottles. The efficiency of the two DNA extraction methods was assessed by PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (PCR-REBA, REBA Sepsis-ID) for detecting Gram positive (GP) bacteria, Gram negative (GN) bacteria, and Candida species with 196 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottles. The detection limits of the two DNA extraction methods were 10(3)CFU/mL for GP bacteria, 10(3)CFU/mL for GN bacteria, and 10(4)CFU/mL for Candida. The sensitivity and specificity of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit by REBA Sepsis-ID were 95.4% (187/196) and 100% (200/200), respectively. The overall agreement of the two DNA extraction methods was 98.9% (392/396). Three of four samples showing discrepant results between the two extraction methods were more accurately matched up with the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit based on conventional culture methods. The results indicated that the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit extracted bacterial and fungal DNA in blood culture bottles and allowed extracted DNA to be used in molecular assay. PMID:27263831

  13. The importance of platelets in the expression of monocyte tissue factor antigen measured by a new whole blood flow cytometric assay.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Alexander, M; May, K; Francis, D A; Warnes, G; Biggerstaff, J; Francis, J L

    1996-01-01

    Previous methods for the determination of monocyte tissue factor (TF) have been technically complex, difficult to standardize, prone to spuriously elevated results and difficult to implement in a clinical laboratory environment. We report the development of a two-color whole blood cytometric technique that overcomes many of these disadvantages. The assay uses small volumes of citrated blood (1.0 ml), can be performed in under one hour (if endotoxin stimulation is not performed), is reproducible (CV = 5%) and uses methodology commonly available in clinical laboratories. Baseline (mean +/- SD) expression of monocyte TF in normal subjects was very low (1.1 +/- 0.95%, Mean Fluorescence [Mean FL] 0.20 +/- 0.01) making relatively small increases easy to detect. Monocyte TF expression following endotoxin (LPS) stimulation for 1 h was 34.6 +/- 11.2% (Mean FL 0.32 +/- 0.04). LPS-stimulated activity varied between subjects (21-68%) but was remarkably consistent for individual subjects (CV = 5.4%). Stimulated monocyte TF expression was directly proportional to the platelet count and was reduced by platelet protective anticoagulants and by ingestion of aspirin. Non LPS-stimulated monocyte TF was markedly increased, in a dose-dependent manner, by adding collagen to whole blood. This was apparently associated with platelet-monocyte binding and could be abolished by anti-P-Selectin. We conclude that the whole blood flow cytometric assay of monocyte TF may be a valuable tool for clinical use and a useful model system for evaluating the humoral and cellular factors governing monocyte TF expression in a natural environment. PMID:8713785

  14. Biomonitoring of lead-contaminated Missouri streams with an assay for erythrocyte δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in fish blood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C. J.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Hunn, J.B.; Nash, T.; Tieger, M. N.; Steadman, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    The activity of the enzyme δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) in erythrocytes has long been used as a biomarker of lead exposure in humans and waterfowl and, more recently, in fishes. The assay was tested for ALA-D activity in fishes from streams affected by lead in combination with other metals from lead-zinc mining and related activities. Fishes (mostly catostomids) were collected from sites affected by historic and current mining activities, and from sites considered to be unaffected by mining (reference sites). A group of potentially toxic elements was measured in blood and carcass samples of individual fish, as were ALA-D activity, total protein (TP), and hemoglobin (Hb) in blood. Concentrations of mining-related metals (lead, zinc, and cadmium) were significantly greater (P<0.05) in fish blood and carcass at sites affected by historic mining activities than at reference and active mining sites. When analyzed by multiple regression, ALA-D activity, Hb, and TP accounted for 66% of blood-lead and 69% of carcass-lead variability. Differences among species were small. ALA-D activity as a biomarker adequately distinguished sites affected by bioavailable environmental lead. Zinc was the only other metal that affected ALA-D activity; it appeared to ameliorate the inactivation of ALA-D by lead.

  15. Evaluation of dried blood spots collected on filter paper for serodiagnosis of human hydatidosis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Sehgal, Rakesh; Goyal, Kapil; Tripathi, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Serological diagnosis of hydatidosis is usually performed by detecting the circulating antibodies in serum by ELISA. The present study was carried out to standardize and evaluate procedure of the ELISA using elute from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper and blood stored at different temperatures and at different durations for its further application under field conditions. Materials and Methods: Dried blood spots were collected from fifty study subjects and fifty control subjects and evaluated for the detection of IgG antibodies against hydatid. Samples were stored at room temperature and 4°C and tested by ELISA at 0, 15 and 30 days. Results: The present study shows that elute of DBS on filter paper can be stored at room temperature for a maximum of 30 days without a decrease in antibody titer as compared to serum samples tested by ELISA. Conclusions: The collection of blood sample on filter paper may serve useful purpose in resource limited countries for carrying out sero-epidemiological surveys at a cost effective level. PMID:23767019

  16. Multiplex time-reducing quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for determination of telomere length in blood and tissue DNA.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jingjing; Kang, Jing X; Tan, Rui; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Yu

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we describe a multiplex time-reducing quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for determination of telomere length. This multiplex qPCR assay enables two pairs of primers to simultaneously amplify telomere and single copy gene (albumin) templates, thus reducing analysis time and labor compared with the previously established singleplex assay. The chemical composition of the master mix and primers for the telomere and albumin were systematically optimized. The thermal cycling program was designed to ensure complete separation of the melting processes of the telomere and albumin. Semi-log standard curves of DNA concentration versus cycle threshold (C (t)) were established, with a linear relationship over an 81-fold DNA concentration range. The well-performed intra-assay (RSD range 2.4-4.7%) and inter-assay (RSD range: 3.1-5.0%) reproducibility were demonstrated to ensure measurement stability. Using wild-type, Lewis lung carcinoma and H22 liver carcinoma C57BL/6 mouse models, significantly different telomere lengths among different DNA samples were not observed in wild-type mice. However, the relative telomere lengths of the tumor DNA in the two strains of tumor-bearing mice were significantly shorter than the lengths in the surrounding non-tumor DNA of tumor-bearing mice and the tissue DNA of wild-type mice. These results suggest that the shortening of telomere lengths may be regarded as an important indicator for cancer control and prevention. Quantification of telomere lengths was further confirmed by the traditional Southern blotting method. This method could be successfully used to reduce the time needed for rapid, precise measurement of telomere lengths in biological samples.

  17. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  18. Ferric reducing antioxidant power and square wave voltammetry for assay of low molecular weight antioxidants in blood plasma: performance and comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Bandouchova, Hana; Sobotka, Jakub; Sedlackova, Jana; Soukupova, Ivana; Pikula, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to employ two methods-square wave voltammetry (SWV) performed on screen printed sensors and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)-as suitable tools for the assay of low-molecular-weight antioxidants (LMWAs). LMWAs were assayed by both methods and the resulting data were statistically compared. Plasma samples from five Cinereous vultures accidentally intoxicated with lead were used to represent real biological matrices with different levels of LMWAs. Blood was collected from the birds prior to and one month after treatment with Ca-EDTA. SWV resulted in two peaks. The first peak, with the potential value of 466 ± 15 mV, was recognized as ascorbic and uric acids, while the second one (743 ± 30 mV) represented glutathione, tocopherol, ascorbic acid and in a minor effect by uric acid, too. Contribution of individual antioxidants was recognized by separate assays of LMWA standards. Correlation between peaks 1 and 2 as well as the sum of the two peaks and FRAP was analysed. While peak 1 and the sum of peaks were in close correlation to FRAP results (correlation coefficient of 0.97), the relation between peak 2 and FRAP may be expressed using a correlation coefficient of 0.64. The determination of thiols by the Ellman assay confirmed the accuracy of SWV. Levels of glutathione and other similar structures were stable in the chosen model and it may be concluded that SWV is appropriate for assay of LMWAs in plasma samples. The methods employed in the study were advantageous in minimal sample volume consumption and fast acquisition of results.

  19. Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power and Square Wave Voltammetry for Assay of Low Molecular Weight Antioxidants in Blood Plasma: Performance and Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Bandouchova, Hana; Sobotka, Jakub; Sedlackova, Jana; Soukupova, Ivana; Pikula, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to employ two methods—square wave voltammetry (SWV) performed on screen printed sensors and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)—as suitable tools for the assay of low-molecular-weight antioxidants (LMWAs). LMWAs were assayed by both methods and the resulting data were statistically compared. Plasma samples from five Cinereous vultures accidentally intoxicated with lead were used to represent real biological matrices with different levels of LMWAs. Blood was collected from the birds prior to and one month after treatment with Ca-EDTA. SWV resulted in two peaks. The first peak, with the potential value of 466 ± 15 mV, was recognized as ascorbic and uric acids, while the second one (743 ± 30 mV) represented glutathione, tocopherol, ascorbic acid and in a minor effect by uric acid, too. Contribution of individual antioxidants was recognized by separate assays of LMWA standards. Correlation between peaks 1 and 2 as well as the sum of the two peaks and FRAP was analysed. While peak 1 and the sum of peaks were in close correlation to FRAP results (correlation coefficient of 0.97), the relation between peak 2 and FRAP may be expressed using a correlation coefficient of 0.64. The determination of thiols by the Ellman assay confirmed the accuracy of SWV. Levels of glutathione and other similar structures were stable in the chosen model and it may be concluded that SWV is appropriate for assay of LMWAs in plasma samples. The methods employed in the study were advantageous in minimal sample volume consumption and fast acquisition of results. PMID:22291555

  20. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C.; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T.; Tran, Nam K.; Polage, Christopher R.; Thomson, Kenneth S.; Hanson, Nancy D.; Winegar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  1. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  2. Identification of Gram-Negative Bacteria and Genetic Resistance Determinants from Positive Blood Culture Broths by Use of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Multiplex Microarray-Based Molecular Assay.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Nathan A; Lopansri, Bert K; Dhiman, Neelam; Cavagnolo, Robert; Carroll, Karen C; Granato, Paul; Thomson, Richard; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Berger, Heather; Samuel, Linoj; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Hansen, Glen T; Tran, Nam K; Polage, Christopher R; Thomson, Kenneth S; Hanson, Nancy D; Winegar, Richard; Buchan, Blake W

    2015-08-01

    Bloodstream infection is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections can be positively affected by the early implementation of effective antibiotic therapy based on the identification of the infecting organism and genetic markers associated with antibiotic resistance. In this study, we evaluated the microarray-based Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay in the identification of 8 genus or species targets and 6 genetic resistance determinants in positive blood culture broths. A total of 1,847 blood cultures containing Gram-negative organisms were tested using the BC-GN assay. This comprised 729 prospective fresh, 781 prospective or retrospective frozen, and 337 simulated cultures representing 7 types of aerobic culture media. The results were compared to those with standard bacterial culture and biochemical identification with nucleic acid sequence confirmation of the resistance determinants. Among monomicrobial cultures, the positive percent agreement (PPA) of the BC-GN assay with the reference method was as follows; Escherichia coli, 100%; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 92.9%; Klebsiella oxytoca, 95.5%; Enterobacter spp., 99.3%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 98.9%; Proteus spp., 100%; Acinetobacter spp., 98.4%; and Citrobacter spp., 100%. All organism identification targets demonstrated >99.5% negative percent agreement (NPA) with the reference method. Of note, 25/26 cultures containing K. pneumoniae that were reported as not detected by the BC-GN assay were subsequently identified as Klebsiella variicola. The PPA for identification of resistance determinants was as follows; blaCTX-M, 98.9%; blaKPC, 100%; blaNDM, 96.2%; blaOXA, 94.3%; blaVIM, 100%; and blaIMP, 100%. All resistance determinant targets demonstrated >99.9% NPA. Among polymicrobial specimens, the BC-GN assay correctly identified at least one organism in 95.4% of the broths and correctly identified all organisms present in 54.5% of the broths

  3. Absorption of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene and dieldrin in largemouth bass from a 60-D slow-release pellet and detection using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method for blood plasma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Jennifer K.; Sepulveda, Maria S.; Borgert, Christopher J.; Gross, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the uptake of two organochlorine pesticides from slow-release pellets by largemouth bass and the utility of a blood plasma enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for exposure verification. We measured blood and tissue levels by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by a novel ELISA method, and present a critical comparison of the results.

  4. Analytical Performance of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Using TaqMan Probes for Quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi Satellite DNA in Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Teresa; Cayo, Nelly M.; Parrado, Rudy; Bello, Zoraida Diaz; Velazquez, Elsa; Muñoz-Calderon, Arturo; Juiz, Natalia A.; Basile, Joaquín; Garcia, Lineth; Riarte, Adelina; Nasser, Julio R.; Ocampo, Susana B.; Yadon, Zaida E.; Torrico, Faustino; de Noya, Belkisyole Alarcón; Ribeiro, Isabela; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The analytical validation of sensitive, accurate and standardized Real-Time PCR methods for Trypanosoma cruzi quantification is crucial to provide a reliable laboratory tool for diagnosis of recent infections as well as for monitoring treatment efficacy. Methods/Principal Findings We have standardized and validated a multiplex Real-Time quantitative PCR assay (qPCR) based on TaqMan technology, aiming to quantify T. cruzi satellite DNA as well as an internal amplification control (IAC) in a single-tube reaction. IAC amplification allows rule out false negative PCR results due to inhibitory substances or loss of DNA during sample processing. The assay has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.70 parasite equivalents/mL and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1.53 parasite equivalents/mL starting from non-boiled Guanidine EDTA blood spiked with T. cruzi CL-Brener stock. The method was evaluated with blood samples collected from Chagas disease patients experiencing different clinical stages and epidemiological scenarios: 1- Sixteen Venezuelan patients from an outbreak of oral transmission, 2- Sixty three Bolivian patients suffering chronic Chagas disease, 3- Thirty four Argentinean cases with chronic Chagas disease, 4- Twenty seven newborns to seropositive mothers, 5- A seronegative receptor who got infected after transplantation with a cadaveric kidney explanted from an infected subject. Conclusions/Significance The performing parameters of this assay encourage its application to early assessment of T. cruzi infection in cases in which serological methods are not informative, such as recent infections by oral contamination or congenital transmission or after transplantation with organs from seropositive donors, as well as for monitoring Chagas disease patients under etiological treatment. PMID:23350002

  5. Antibody levels correlate with detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by sensitive PCR assays in seropositive blood donors and possible resolution of infection over time

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, E.C.; Lee, T.H.; Montalvo, L.; Nguyen, M.L.; Leiby, D.A.; Carrick, D.M.; Otani, M.M.; Vinelli, E.; Wright, D.; Stramer, S.L.; Busch, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical significance of anti-T. cruzi low-level reactive samples is incompletely understood. PCR-positive rates and antibody levels among seropositive blood donors in three countries are described. Methods Follow-up whole blood and plasma samples were collected from T. cruzi-seropositive donors from 2008-2010 in the US (n=195) and Honduras (n=58). Also 143 samples from Brazil in 1996-2002, originally positive by three serological assays, were available and paired with contemporary follow-up samples from these donors. All samples were retested with the FDA-approved Ortho ELISA. PCR assays were performed on coded sample panels by two laboratories (BSRI and ARC) that amplified kinetoplast minicircle DNA sequences of T. cruzi. Results PCR testing at BSRI yielded slightly higher overall sensitivity and specificity (33% and 98%) compared with the ARC lab (28% and 94%). Among seropositive donors, PCR-positive rates varied by country (p<0.0001) for the BSRI laboratory: Brazil (57%), Honduras (32%) and the US (14%). ELISA signal/cutoff (S/CO) ratios were significantly higher for PCR-positive compared to PCR-negative donors (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Additionally, PCR-negative Brazilian donors exhibited greater frequencies of antibody decline over time versus PCR-positive donors (p=0.003). Conclusion For all three countries, persistent DNA positivity correlated with higher ELISA S/CO values, suggesting that high-level seroreactivity reflects chronic parasitemia. The higher rate of PCR positivity for Brazilian donors was likely attributable to required reactivity on three assays available a decade ago. Significant S/CO declines in 10% of the PCR-negative Brazilian donors may indicate seroreversion following