Science.gov

Sample records for blood leukocyte subsets

  1. Comparison of Human Neonatal and Adult Blood Leukocyte Subset Composition Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Savit B; Rathore, Deepak K; Nair, Deepa; Chaudhary, Anita; Raza, Saimah; Kanodia, Parna; Sopory, Shailaja; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddharth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C; Chellani, Harish K; Arya, Sugandha; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Wadhwa, Nitya; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    2016-01-01

    The human peripheral leukocyte subset composition depends on genotype variation and pre-natal and post-natal environmental influence diversity. We quantified this composition in adults and neonates, and compared the median values and dispersal ranges of various subsets in them. We confirmed higher frequencies of monocytes and regulatory T cells (Tregs), similar frequencies of neutrophils, and lower frequencies of CD8 T cells, NKT cells, B1 B cells and gamma-delta T cells in neonatal umbilical cord blood. Unlike previous reports, we found higher frequencies of eosinophils and B cells, higher CD4:CD8 ratios, lower frequencies of T cells and iNKT cells, and similar frequencies of CD4 T cells and NK cells in neonates. We characterized monocyte subsets and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in far greater detail than previously reported, using recently described surface markers and gating strategies and observed that neonates had lower frequencies of patrolling monocytes and lower myeloid dendritic cell (mDC):plasmacytoid DC (pDC) ratios. Our data contribute to South Asian reference values for these parameters. We found that dispersal ranges differ between different leukocyte subsets, suggesting differential determination of variation. Further, some subsets were more dispersed in adults than in neonates suggesting influences of postnatal sources of variation, while some show the opposite pattern suggesting influences of developmental process variation. Together, these data and analyses provide interesting biological possibilities for future exploration. PMID:27610624

  2. Comparison of Human Neonatal and Adult Blood Leukocyte Subset Composition Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Deepak K.; Nair, Deepa; Chaudhary, Anita; Raza, Saimah; Kanodia, Parna; Sopory, Shailaja; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddharth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C.; Chellani, Harish K.; Arya, Sugandha; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Wadhwa, Nitya; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    2016-01-01

    The human peripheral leukocyte subset composition depends on genotype variation and pre-natal and post-natal environmental influence diversity. We quantified this composition in adults and neonates, and compared the median values and dispersal ranges of various subsets in them. We confirmed higher frequencies of monocytes and regulatory T cells (Tregs), similar frequencies of neutrophils, and lower frequencies of CD8 T cells, NKT cells, B1 B cells and gamma-delta T cells in neonatal umbilical cord blood. Unlike previous reports, we found higher frequencies of eosinophils and B cells, higher CD4:CD8 ratios, lower frequencies of T cells and iNKT cells, and similar frequencies of CD4 T cells and NK cells in neonates. We characterized monocyte subsets and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in far greater detail than previously reported, using recently described surface markers and gating strategies and observed that neonates had lower frequencies of patrolling monocytes and lower myeloid dendritic cell (mDC):plasmacytoid DC (pDC) ratios. Our data contribute to South Asian reference values for these parameters. We found that dispersal ranges differ between different leukocyte subsets, suggesting differential determination of variation. Further, some subsets were more dispersed in adults than in neonates suggesting influences of postnatal sources of variation, while some show the opposite pattern suggesting influences of developmental process variation. Together, these data and analyses provide interesting biological possibilities for future exploration. PMID:27610624

  3. Quantitative reconstruction of leukocyte subsets using DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lineage-specific DNA methylation patterns distinguish normal human leukocyte subsets and can be used to detect and quantify these subsets in peripheral blood. We have developed an approach that uses DNA methylation to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte subsets, enabling investigation of immune modulations in virtually any blood sample including archived samples previously precluded from such analysis. Here we assess the performance characteristics and validity of this approach. Results Using Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 and VeraCode GoldenGate Methylation Assay microarrays, we measure DNA methylation in leukocyte subsets purified from human whole blood and identify cell lineage-specific DNA methylation signatures that distinguish human T cells, B cells, NK cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and neutrophils. We employ a bioinformatics-based approach to quantify these cell types in complex mixtures, including whole blood, using DNA methylation at as few as 20 CpG loci. A reconstruction experiment confirms that the approach could accurately measure the composition of mixtures of human blood leukocyte subsets. Applying the DNA methylation-based approach to quantify the cellular components of human whole blood, we verify its accuracy by direct comparison to gold standard immune quantification methods that utilize physical, optical and proteomic characteristics of the cells. We also demonstrate that the approach is not affected by storage of blood samples, even under conditions prohibiting the use of gold standard methods. Conclusions Cell mixture distributions within peripheral blood can be assessed accurately and reliably using DNA methylation. Thus, precise immune cell differential estimates can be reconstructed using only DNA rather than whole cells. PMID:24598480

  4. CCR2 inhibition sequesters multiple subsets of leukocytes in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Naoki; Xu, Baohui; Dalman, Jackson; Deng, Hongping; Aoyama, Kohji; Dalman, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR2 mediates monocyte mobilization from the bone marrow (BM) and subsequent migration into target tissues. The degree to which CCR2 is differentially expressed in leukocyte subsets, and the contribution of CCR2 to these leukocyte mobilization from the BM are poorly understood. Using red fluorescence protein CCR2 reporter mice, we found heterogeneity in CCR2 expression among leukocyte subsets in varying tissues. CCR2 was highly expressed by inflammatory monocytes, dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and NK cells in all tissues. Unexpectedly, more than 60% of neutrophils expressed CCR2, albeit at low levels. CCR2 expression in T cells, B cells and NK T cells was greatest in the BM compared to other tissues. Genetic CCR2 deficiency markedly sequestered all leukocyte subsets in the BM, with reciprocal reduction noted in the peripheral blood and spleen. CCR2 inhibition via treatment with CCR2 signaling inhibitor propagermanium produced similar effects. Propagermanium also mitigated lipopolysaccharide-induced BM leukocyte egress. Consistent with its functional significance, CCR2 antibody staining revealed surface CCR2 expression within a subset of BM neutrophils. These results demonstrate the central role CCR2 plays in mediating leukocyte mobilization from the BM, and suggest a role for CCR2 inhibition in managing monocytes/macrophages-mediated chronic inflammatory conditions.

  5. Leukocyte Subset Changes in Response to a 164-km Road Cycle Ride in a Hot Environment

    PubMed Central

    LUK, HUI-YING; MCKENZIE, AMY L.; DUPLANTY, ANTHONY A.; BUDNAR, RONALD G.; LEVITT, DANIELLE; FERNANDEZ, ALEX; LEE, ELAINE C.; ARMSTRONG, LAWRENCE E.; VINGREN, JAKOB L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this observational study was to determine the circulating leukocyte subset response to completing the 2013 Hotter’N Hell Hundred recreational 164-km road cycle event in a hot and humid environmental condition. Twenty-eight men and four women were included in this study. Whole blood samples were obtained 1–2 hours before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) the event. Electronic sizing/sorting and cytometry were used to determine complete blood counts (CBC) including neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte subsets. The concentration of circulating total leukocytes (103·μL−1) increased 134% from PRE to POST with the greatest increase in neutrophils (319%, p<0.0001). Circulating monocytes (including macrophages) increased 24% (p=0.004) and circulating lymphocytes including B and T cells increased 53% (p<0.0001). No association was observed between rolling time or relative intensity and leukocyte subset. Completing the Hotter n′ Hell Hundred (HHH), a 100 mile recreational cycling race in extreme (hot and humid) environmental conditions, induces a substantial increase in total leukocytes in circulation. The contribution of increases in specific immune cell subsets is not equal, with neutrophils increasing to greater than 4-fold starting values from PRE to POST race. It is likely that exercise in stressful environmental conditions affects the complement of circulating immune cells, although activational state and characterization of specific leukocyte subsets remains unclear. The observed increase in circulating cell sub-populations suggests that the circulating immune surveillance system may be acutely affected by exercise in hot and humid conditions. PMID:27293505

  6. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael; Alcaide, Pilar; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; van Buul, Jaap D

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers.

  7. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Schnoor, Michael; Alcaide, Pilar; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers. PMID:26568666

  8. Leukocyte subsets and neutrophil function after short-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Sams, C. F.; Mehta, S. K.; Kaur, I.; Jones, M. L.; Feeback, D. L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte subpopulations and function after spaceflight have been observed but the mechanisms underlying these changes are not well defined. This study investigated the effects of short-term spaceflight (8-15 days) on circulating leukocyte subsets, stress hormones, immunoglobulin levels, and neutrophil function. At landing, a 1.5-fold increase in neutrophils was observed compared with preflight values; lymphocytes were slightly decreased, whereas the results were variable for monocytes. No significant changes were observed in plasma levels of immunoglobulins, cortisol, or adrenocorticotropic hormone. In contrast, urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol were significantly elevated at landing. Band neutrophils were observed in 9 of 16 astronauts. Neutrophil chemotactic assays showed a 10-fold decrease in the optimal dose response after landing. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was increased both before and after spaceflight. At landing, the expression of MAC-1 was significantly decreased while L-selectin was significantly increased. These functional alterations may be of clinical significance on long-duration space missions.

  9. Blood leukocyte and spleen lymphocyte immune response of spleen lymphocytes and whole blood leukocytes of hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.A.; Sothmann, M.; Wehrenberg, W.B. )

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic physical activity on the immune response of spleen lymphocytes and whole blood leukocytes of hamsters. Animals were kept sedentary or allowed to exercise spontaneously on running wheels for eight weeks. Physically active animals averaged 12 kilometers per day. The immune response of spleen lymphocytes whole blood leukocytes was evaluated by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation in response to Concanavalin A or lipopolysaccharide. There was no treatment effect between physically active and sedentary hamster in response of spleen lymphocytes. The immune response of whole blood leukocytes to these mitogens was significantly greater in physically active vs. sedentary hamsters. These results demonstrate that chronic physical activity has the capacity to modulate immunoresponses.

  10. Leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets after a short pharmacological stress by intravenous epinephrine and hydrocortisone in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Brohee, D; Vanhaeverbeek, M; Kennes, B; Neve, P

    1990-08-01

    Nine healthy volunteers received epinephrine and hydrocortisone intravenously in order to assess the typical acute response to a brief stress, of leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets, acute phase reactants and lymphocyte reactivity to T and B mitogens. At 10 min., all leukocyte subsets were increased, especially mononuclear cells. At 1 hour, moderate lymphopenia and monocytopenia occurred. At 6 hours, neutrophilia and eosinopenia were observed. During the lymphocytic early wave, all the lymphocyte subset counts increased, particularly T-suppressive/cytotoxic and natural killer cells. As a consequence, the percentage of T cells decreased and the CD4/CD8 ratio fell. No changes in acute phase reactants occurred over the 24 hours of the study. All leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets were normalized and mitogen reactivity was unchanged 24 hours after the stress. These typical shifts in leukocyte subsets could probe the adrenocortical and medullary response to an environmental stressor.

  11. The removal of leukocytes and platelets from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E; West, C; Blume, K G

    1976-08-01

    Various methods for the removal of leukocytes from whole blood have been compared and a new technique has been devised. This procedure consists of passing whole blood through a bed composed of microcrystalline cellulose and alpha-cellulose. The method is rapid, reliable, removes over 99.75 per cent of the leukocytes from blood, and does not seem selectively to retain reticulocytes or to release a significant proportion of leukocyte enzymes. Most of the platelets are also removed from anticoagulated blood, and platelet-free red cells can be obtained by passing defibrinated blood over the microcrystalline cellulose-alpha-cellulose bed.

  12. The filterability of leukocytes in undiluted blood.

    PubMed

    Cook, A M; Evans, S A; Jones, J G

    1998-01-01

    A filtrometer is described for measuring the flow of fluids through microfilters. The flow of Newtonian fluids through the filters can be predicted from the diameter, length and number of pores. There are no physical artefacts such as turbulent flow or a significant lag period before steady-state flow is achieved. The instrument has been used as a viscometer and has been used to record and analyse the flow of undiluted blood through 5 microns polycarbonate filters. The calculated viscosity of Newtonian fluids agrees well with those measured by a more conventional viscometer (Ostwald). Flow profiles of blood have been analysed to give both the numbers and the flow properties of a small population of slow leukocytes which equate numerically with the monocytes. They are subdivided into three distinct sub-populations, according to their rheological properties, and these are termed SL1, SL2 and PB. The concentration of these cells, in blood, are 0.12 +/- 0.02 x 10(6) ml-1, 0.11 +/- 0.02 x 10(6) ml-1, 0.09 +/- 0.02 x 10(6) ml-1 in young females aged about 25 years. The transit time of these cells, through 5 microns pores, is 34.8 +/- 1.4 s, 147.5 +/- 2.5 s and > 300 s, respectively. Analysis of blood from older men (53-79 years) gives essentially the same results although the concentration of SL1 is slightly higher at 0.19 +/- 0.09 x 10(6) ml-1. PMID:10193484

  13. Immuno-fluorescence staining patterns of leukocyte subsets in the skin of taurine and indicine cattle.

    PubMed

    Constantinoiu, C C; Jonsson, N N; Jorgensen, W K; Jackson, L A; Piper, E K; Lew-Tabor, A E

    2013-12-01

    The immuno-staining patterns of skin leukocytes were investigated in three breeds of cattle: Holstein-Friesian, Brahman and Santa Gertrudis of similar age before and after tick infestation. The antibodies specific for CD45 and CD45RO reacted with cells in the skin of all Holstein-Friesian cattle but did not react with cells in the skin of any Brahman cattle. The same antibodies reacted with cells from the skin of four (CD45) and seven (CD45RO) of twelve Santa Gertrudis cattle. The antibodies specific for T cells and γδ subset of T cells recognized cells from all three breeds of cattle. The antibody specific for MHC class II molecules labelled cells of mostly irregular shape, presumably dermal dendritic cells and/or macrophages and Langerhans cells. The antibody specific for granulocytes (mAb CH138) reacted with cells only in sections cut from skin with lesions. The antibody specific for CD25(+) cells labelled regularly shaped cells that showed a wide range of intensities of staining. PMID:24011596

  14. Peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Covas, M I; Esquerda, A; García-Rico, A; Mahy, N

    1992-01-01

    Interest in T-lymphocyte subsets has arisen because of their involvement in the autoimmune process. Contradictory results have been published in the literature about the number of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune diseases. In order to investigate the number and distribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease, the levels of total T-lymphocytes (CD3), T-helper (CD4) and T-suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) lymphocytes were determined in 44 patients with Graves' disease (1), multinodular goiter (2) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3). All patients had high levels of antithyroglobulin and thyroid antiperoxidase (antimicrosomal) antibodies. The T subset levels were related to the functional thyroid status, measured as serum free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH). Our data show the existence of a strong influence of functional status on CD3, CD4 and CD8 levels, as reflected in the significant correlations obtained with FT4 (negative) and TSH (positive). A significant decrease in all populations was observed in Graves' disease hyperthyroid patients. A decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio in Hashimoto's thyroiditis hypothyroid patients was observed, in contrast to an increase in the ratio in autoimmune hyperthyroid patients. This points to the CD4/CD8 ratio as a differential characteristic between the two autoimmune (hypothyroid and hyperthyroid) entities, independent of free thyroxine levels. No significant correlation was found between antithyroid antibody levels and peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets or serum levels of FT4 and TSH.

  15. Leukocyte transport by red blood cells in a microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    A simulation model is used to study the transport of relatively large, spherical, and stiff white blood cells (leukocytes) by the relatively smaller and highly flexible red cell as they flow in the microcirculation. Their interaction dynamics are thought to be an important component of the inflammation response, in which leukocytes bind to the walls of blood vessels. The red cells are modeled in the simulations as highly deformable three-dimensional shells encasing a Newtonian fluid, and the viscous-flow equation is solved via a boundary integral formulation in which the cell shapes discretized by global spectral basis functions. For slow flow rates, it is found that the leukocyte is predominantly adjacent the vessel walls, whereas for faster flow rates this configuration appears to become unstable and the leukocyte traverses the whole vessel in a seemingly random fashion. For the straight round tubes simulated thus far, the stable leukocyte stand-off distance is always beyond the range of the binding molecules that capture it, which suggests that vessel inhomogeneities or interactions with other white cells are needed to create contact and thereby binding with the vessel walls.

  16. Parallel Affinity-Based Isolation of Leukocyte Subsets Using Microfluidics: Application for Stroke Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the design and performance of a polymer microfluidic device that can affinity select multiple types of biological cells simultaneously with sufficient recovery and purity to allow for the expression profiling of mRNA isolated from these cells. The microfluidic device consisted of four independent selection beds with curvilinear channels that were 25 μm wide and 80 μm deep and were modified with antibodies targeting antigens specifically expressed by two different cell types. Bifurcated and Z-configured device geometries were evaluated for cell selection. As an example of the performance of these devices, CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils were selected from whole blood as these cells are known to express genes found in stroke-related expression profiles that can be used for the diagnosis of this disease. CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils were simultaneously isolated with purities >90% using affinity-based capture in cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) devices with a processing time of ∼3 min. In addition, sufficient quantities of the cells could be recovered from a 50 μL whole blood input to allow for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) following cell lysis. The expression of genes from isolated T-cells and neutrophils, such as S100A9, TCRB, and FPR1, was evaluated using RT-PCR. The modification and isolation procedures demonstrated here can also be used to analyze other cell types as well where multiple subsets must be interrogated. PMID:24650222

  17. Adjusting MtDNA Quantification in Whole Blood for Peripheral Blood Platelet and Leukocyte Counts

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lazaro, Monica; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) in the blood (mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio) appear associated with several systemic diseases, including primary mitochondrial disorders, carcinogenesis, and hematologic diseases. Measuring mtDNAcn in DNA extracted from whole blood (WB) instead of from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or buffy coat may yield different results due to mitochondrial DNA present in platelets. The aim of this work is to quantify the contribution of platelets to mtDNAcn in whole blood [mtDNAcn(WB)] and to propose a correction formula to estimate leukocytes' mtDNAcn [mtDNAcn(L)] from mtDNAcn(WB). Blood samples from 10 healthy adults were combined with platelet-enriched plasma and saline solution to produce artificial blood preparations. Aliquots of each sample were combined with five different platelet concentrations. In 46 of these blood preparations, mtDNAcn was measured by qPCR. MtDNAcn(WB) increased 1.07 (95%CI 0.86, 1.29; p<0.001) per 1000 platelets present in the preparation. We proved that leukocyte count should also be taken into account as mtDNAcn(WB) was inversely associated with leukocyte count; it increased 1.10 (95%CI 0.95, 1.25, p<0.001) per unit increase of the ratio between platelet and leukocyte counts. If hematological measurements are available, subtracting 1.10 the platelets/leukocyte ratio from mtDNAcn(WB) may serve as an estimation for mtDNAcn(L). Both platelet and leukocyte counts in the sample are important sources of variation if comparing mtDNAcn among groups of patients when mtDNAcn is measured in DNA extracted from whole blood. Not taking the platelet/leukocyte ratio into account in whole blood measurements, may lead to overestimation and misclassification if interpreted as leukocytes' mtDNAcn. PMID:27736919

  18. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  19. Association of leukocyte telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes with endometrial cancer risk in Caucasian Americans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhui; Zhang, Liren; Zhao, Lina; Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres are the protective structure at the ends of each chromosome and play an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. Interindividual variation of telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with the risks of developing many human diseases including several cancers. The association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and endometrial cancer risk is still inconsistent. Using a case-control study of endometrial cancer patients (n = 139) and control subjects (n = 139) in a Caucasian population, we assessed the association of relative LTL with the risk of endometrial cancer. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using multivariate logistic regression. We also determined the joint effects of LTL with established risk factors of endometrial cancer. The normalized LTL was significantly longer in endometrial cancer cases (median, 0.93; range, 0.19-1.62) than in controls (median, 0.70; range, 0.03-2.14) (P < 0.001). When individuals were dichotomized into long and short groups based on the median LTL value in the controls, individuals with long LTL had a significantly increased risk of endometrial cancer (adjusted OR, 3.84; 95%CI, 2.16-6.85; P < 0.001) compared to those with short LTL. When individuals were categorized into three groups or four groups according to tertile or quartile LTL value in the controls, there was a significant dose-response association between LTL and the risk of endometrial cancer (P < 0.001). Joint effects between LTL and smoking status, body mass index and a history of hypertension or diabetes in elevating endometrial cancer risk were observed. Long telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with a significantly increased risk of endometrial cancer.

  20. Effects of spray-dried porcine plasma and plant extracts on intestinal morphology and on leukocyte cell subsets of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Nofrarías, M; Manzanilla, E G; Pujols, J; Gibert, X; Majó, N; Segalés, J; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of a 6% spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) and a plant extracts mixture (XT; 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin) on the productive performance, intestinal morphology, and leukocyte cell subsets of early-weaned pigs compared with a control group. Morphometry of the jejunum, ileum, and colon, and immune cell analysis of blood, ileocolic lymph node (LN), and ileal Peyer's patches were done in 24 weaned pigs (20 +/- 2 d) at 19 or 21 d postweaning. Although SDPP and XT treatments did not increase ADG or ADFI, SDPP improved the G:F ratio (P = 0.024) compared with the control group. Dietary SDPP reduced the percentages of blood monocytes (P = 0.006) and macrophages in ileal Peyer's patches and LN (P = 0.04), of B lymphocytes (P = 0.04) and gammadelta+ T cells in LN (P = 0.009), and of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P = 0.026) as well as the density of lamina propria cells in the colon (P < 0.01). Dietary XT reduced intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers in jejunum (P = 0.034) and the percentages of blood cytotoxic cells (P = 0.07) and B lymphocytes in LN (P = 0.03); however, XT increased blood monocytes (P = 0.038) and the density of lamina propria lymphocytes in the colon (P = 0.003). These results indicate that dietary SDPP and plant extracts can affect intestinal morphology and immune cell subsets of gut tissues and blood in weaned pigs. Furthermore, the effects of SDPP suggest lower activation of the immune system of the piglets. PMID:16971575

  1. CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 redistributes leukocytes from primary immune organs to secondary immune organs, lung, and blood in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Li, Zhanzhuo; Gao, Ji-Liang; Wan, Wuzhou; Ganesan, Sundar; McDermott, David H; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-06-01

    AMD3100 (plerixafor), is a specific CXCR4 antagonist approved by the FDA for mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow to blood for transplantation in cancer. AMD3100 also mobilizes most mature leukocyte subsets to blood; however, their source and trafficking potential have not been fully delineated. Here, we show that a single injection of AMD3100 10 mg/kg into C57Bl/6 mice rapidly mobilizes (peak ∼ 2.5 h) the same leukocyte subsets to blood as in humans. Using this model, we found that AMD3100 mobilization of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes to blood is not reduced by splenectomy or by blockade of lymphocyte egress from lymph node with FTY720, but is coupled to (i) reduced content of each of these cell types in the bone marrow; (ii) reduced T-cell numbers in thymuses; (iii) increased lymphocytes in lymph nodes; and (iv) increased neutrophil and monocyte content in the lung. Direct intrathymic labeling showed that AMD3100 selectively mobilizes naïve thymic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to blood. Finally, AMD3100-induced neutrophil mobilization to blood did not reduce neutrophil trafficking to thioglycollate-inflamed peritoneum. Thus, AMD3100 redistributes lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils from primary immune organs to secondary immune organs, peripheral tissues, and blood, without compromising neutrophil trafficking to inflamed sites.

  2. Leukocyte subsets and cortisol serum levels in patients with migraine without aura and chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Biffi, M; Leoni, F; Bussone, G

    1994-04-01

    Leukocyte subsets, serum cortisol and immunoglobulin production were investigated in a group of 12 migraine without aura patients, 12 chronic tension-type headache patients and compared with findings in 12 healthy controls. Chronic tension-type headache patients had statistically significant increased levels of B-lymphocytes (CD19+ cells) (p < 0.05), while migraine sufferers had a similarly significant decrease in CD8+ T-lymphocytes (p < 0.05). Migraine patients also had an increased percentage of B-lymphocytes although this failed to reach statistical significance. Immunoglobulin production and cortisol serum levels did not differ in the two headache groups. We conclude that the observed abnormalities in tension-type headache and migraine are unlikely to be a consequence of pain or of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction.

  3. Peripheral blood leukocyte count as an index of defense status in the leukopenic host

    SciTech Connect

    Cawley, S.; Findon, G.; Miller, T.E.

    1988-07-01

    These experimental studies have investigated the reliability of the peripheral blood leukocyte count to predict whether the leukopenic host can contain or eliminate infection. Additionally, we have investigated the possibility that determination of leukocyte recruitment, supplementary to peripheral blood leukocyte counts, might allow individuals with neutropenia at risk from serious infection to be distinguished with greater certainty. Varying doses of radiation, cyclophosphamide, and methylprednisolone were used to induce distinct levels of leukopenia in rats. Leukocyte recruitment was measured by quantifying the response of neutropenic animals to evocative, subcutaneous stimuli, and the results of this assay were then compared with circulating leukocyte counts in the same individuals. Six models of experimentally induced infection were used to compare circulating and recruitable leukocytes as indicators of the susceptibility of the leukopenic host to infection. Response curves relating leukocyte numbers to host resistance were similar when circulating or recruitable leukocytes were used as an index of defense capability. These findings support the use of peripheral blood leukocyte numbers as an index of resistance to infection in individuals with leukopenia and suggest that functional analyses such as leukocyte recruitment are unlikely to provide additional information.

  4. The Activation Pattern of Blood Leukocytes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Is Correlated to Survival

    PubMed Central

    Millrud, Camilla Rydberg; Månsson Kvarnhammar, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is known to cause substantial immunosuppression. The present study was designed to characterize blood leukocyte activation in HNSCC and to investigate if the individual activation pattern could be related to tumor progress and survival. The leukocyte activation profile of HNSCC patients and healthy controls was assessed with flow cytometry. HNSCC patients displayed increased numbers of monocytes, neutrophils and total leukocytes as well as an enhanced neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. In addition, patients had a higher percentage of CD69+, CD71+ and CD98+ T cell subsets and NK cells, and a reduced expression of L-selectin in CD14highCD16+ monocytes and neutrophils, when compared to controls. These changes could be correlated to both tumor burden and spread to lymph nodes. Among the cancer patients an increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, a low neutrophil and CD14high CD16+ monocyte activation state and an elevated CD4/CD8 ratio were related to poor survival. In contrast, a high percentage of CD98+ Th cells appeared to be associated with a better outcome. Taken together, the present data indicate that HNSCC causes activation of blood leukocytes and that the individual activation pattern can be linked to prognosis. PMID:23251433

  5. The Effect of Hemiscorpius lepturus (Scorpionida: Hemiscorpiidae) Venom on Leukocytes and the Leukocyte Subgroups in Peripheral Blood of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ghafourian, Mehri; Ganjalikhanhakemi, Neda; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Dehghani, Rouhullah; Kooti, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Hemiscorpius lepturus venom on leukocytes and the leukocyte subgroups in peripheral blood of rat. Methods: In this experimental study, sixty N-Mari rats were divided into three groups of 20 rats. Then the rats in each group were divided into four subgroups based on the blood sampling time that was 2, 6, 24 and 48 hours after the venom injection, respectively. The control group did not receive anything, however, the first and the second experimental groups received 0.1 and 0.01mg/kg of venom, subcutaneously. In accordance with a designated four sampling times, the blood sampling was carried out in three groups. After RBC lysis, the leukocytes and leukocyte sub-populations were determined and counted using appropriate hematological standard methods. Results: The leukocyte and the neutrophil count at two (P<0.05), six (P<0.01) and 24 (P<0.05) hours after the venom injection showed a significant decline compared with the control group, this decrease was significant at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg until 48 hours after the venom injection (P<0.05). The lymphocyte count showed a significant decline throughout the all hours of the experiment, compared with the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Leukocytes are probably affected by the cytotoxicity effect of the H. lepturus venom in a dose-dependent manner. This could be a wakeup call for the medical staff to perform quick and accurate treatment in the least time possible. PMID:27308274

  6. Methods for axolotl blood collection, intravenous injection, and efficient leukocyte isolation from peripheral blood and the regenerating limb.

    PubMed

    Debuque, Ryan J; Godwin, James W

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate immune system comprises both adaptive and innate immune cells with distinct functions during the resolution of inflammation and wound healing after tissue injury. Recent evidence implicates a requirement for innate immune cells from the myeloid lineage during the early stages of limb regeneration in the Mexican axolotl. Understanding the functions of innate and adaptive immune cells in the axolotl has been hampered by a lack of approaches to isolate and analyze these cells. Here we describe a protocol to isolate myeloid cells from the regenerating axolotl limb that incorporates intravenous delivery of physiological labels. In addition we provide a protocol to enrich for leukocytes in the peripheral blood. These protocols produce single-cell suspensions that can be analyzed using flow cytometry or sorted into specific subsets using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS). FACS is a routine approach to sort cells based on their physical characteristics as well as their cell surface antigen repertoire. Isolated cell populations can then be analyzed in a wide range of downstream assays to facilitate a greater understanding of leukocyte biology in the axolotl.

  7. Methods for axolotl blood collection, intravenous injection, and efficient leukocyte isolation from peripheral blood and the regenerating limb.

    PubMed

    Debuque, Ryan J; Godwin, James W

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate immune system comprises both adaptive and innate immune cells with distinct functions during the resolution of inflammation and wound healing after tissue injury. Recent evidence implicates a requirement for innate immune cells from the myeloid lineage during the early stages of limb regeneration in the Mexican axolotl. Understanding the functions of innate and adaptive immune cells in the axolotl has been hampered by a lack of approaches to isolate and analyze these cells. Here we describe a protocol to isolate myeloid cells from the regenerating axolotl limb that incorporates intravenous delivery of physiological labels. In addition we provide a protocol to enrich for leukocytes in the peripheral blood. These protocols produce single-cell suspensions that can be analyzed using flow cytometry or sorted into specific subsets using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS). FACS is a routine approach to sort cells based on their physical characteristics as well as their cell surface antigen repertoire. Isolated cell populations can then be analyzed in a wide range of downstream assays to facilitate a greater understanding of leukocyte biology in the axolotl. PMID:25740489

  8. A Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptor Subset Is a Marker of Antiviral Cytotoxic Cells in Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin B; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Stuge, Tor B; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Bengten, Eva; Wilson, Melanie

    2016-03-15

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, leukocyte immune type receptors (LITRs) represent a multigene family that encodes Ig superfamily proteins that mediate activating or inhibitory signaling. In this study, we demonstrate the use of mAb CC41 to monitor viral cytotoxic responses in catfish and determine that CC41 binds to a subset of LITRs on the surface of catfish clonal CTLs. Homozygous gynogenetic catfish were immunized with channel catfish virus (CCV)-infected MHC-matched clonal T cells (G14D-CCV), and PBL were collected at various times after immunization for flow cytometric analyses. The percentage of CC41(+) cells was significantly increased 5 d after primary immunization with G14D-CCV and at 3 d after a booster immunization as compared with control fish only injected with G14D. Moreover, CC41(+) cells magnetically isolated from the PBL specifically killed CCV-infected targets as measured by (51)Cr release assays and expressed messages for CD3γδ, perforin, and at least one of the CD4-like receptors as analyzed by RNA flow cytometry. When MLC effector cells derived from a G14D-CCV-immunized fish were preincubated with CC41 mAb, killing of G14D-CCV targets was reduced by ∼40%, suggesting that at least some LITRs have a role in target cell recognition and/or cytotoxicity. The availability of a LITR-specific mAb has allowed, to our knowledge for the first time, functional characterization of LITRs in an autologous system. In addition, the identification of an LITR subset as a cytotoxic cell marker will allow for more effective monitoring of catfish immune responses to pathogens. PMID:26856701

  9. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  10. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P; Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N; Matyunin, S N; Nazarov, M M; Cherkasova, O P

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  11. Phenotypic, ultra-structural and functional characterization of bovine peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multifunctional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets...

  12. Microfluidic isolation of leukocytes from whole blood for phenotype and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sethu, Palaniappan; Moldawer, Lyle L; Mindrinos, Michael N; Scumpia, Philip O; Tannahill, Cynthia L; Wilhelmy, Julie; Efron, Philip A; Brownstein, Bernard H; Tompkins, Ronald G; Toner, Mehmet

    2006-08-01

    Technologies that enable the isolation of cell subtypes from small samples of complex populations will greatly facilitate the implementation of proteomics and genomics to human diseases. Transcriptome analysis of blood requires the depletion of contaminating erythrocytes. We report an automated microfluidic device to rapidly deplete erythrocytes from whole blood via deionized water lysis and to collect enriched leukocytes for phenotype and genomic analyses. Starting with blood from healthy subjects, we demonstrate the utility of this microfluidic cassette and lysis protocol to prepare unstimulated leukocytes, and leukocytes stimulated ex vivo with Staphylococcal enterotoxin B, which mimics some of the cellular effects seen in patients with severe bacterial infections. Microarrays are used to assess the global gene expression response to enterotoxin B. The results demonstrate that this system can isolate unactivated leukocytes from small blood samples without any significant loss, which permits more information to be obtained from subsequent analysis, and will be readily applicable to clinical settings.

  13. Dynamic properties of blood flow and leukocyte mobilization in infected flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, L.J.; Price, D.C.; Mathes, S.J.; Hohn, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Two aspects of the inflammatory response to infection--blood flow alteration and leukocyte mobilization--are investigated in the canine model. The elevation of paired musculocutaneous (MC) and random pattern (RP) flaps allowed comparison of healing flaps with significant differences in blood flow (lower in random pattern flaps) and resistance to infection (greater in musculocutaneous flaps). Blood flow changes as determined by radioactive xenon washout were compared in normal skin and distal flap skin both after elevation and following bacterial inoculation. Simultaneous use of In-111 labeled leukocytes allowed determination of leukocyte mobilization and subsequent localization in response to flap infection. Blood flow significantly improved in the musculocutaneous flap in response to infection. Although total leukocyte mobilization in the random pattern flap was greater, the leukocytes in the musculocutaneous flap were localized around the site of bacterial inoculation within the dermis. Differences in the dynamic blood flow and leukocyte mobilization may, in part, explain the greater reliability of musculocutaneous flaps when transposed in the presence of infection.

  14. Red Blood Cells Initiate Leukocyte Rolling in Postcapillary Expansions: A Lattice Boltzmann Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenghai; Migliorini, Cristiano; Munn, Lance L.

    2003-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling on the vascular endothelium requires initial contact between leukocytes circulating in the blood and the vessel wall. Although specific adhesion mechanisms are involved in leukocyte-endothelium interactions, adhesion patterns in vivo suggest other rheological mechanisms also play a role. Previous studies have proposed that the abundance of leukocyte rolling in postcapillary venules is due to interactions between red blood cells (RBCs) and leukocytes as they enter postcapillary expansions, but the details of the fluid dynamics have not been elucidated. We have analyzed the interactions of red and white blood cells as they flow from a capillary into a postcapillary venule using a lattice Boltzmann approach. This technique provides the complete solution of the flow field and quantification of the particle-particle forces in a relevant geometry. Our results show that capillary-postcapillary venule diameter ratio, RBC configuration, and RBC shape are critical determinants of the initiation of cell rolling in postcapillary venules. The model predicts that an optimal configuration of the trailing red blood cells is required to drive the white blood cell to the wall. PMID:12829477

  15. Report: Nuclei segmentation of leukocytes in blood smear digital images.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Naveed; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    The Leukocytes are differentiated from each other on the basis of their nuclei, demanded in many Medical studies, especially in all types of Leukemia by the Hematologists to note the disorder caused by specific type of Leukocyte. Leukemia is a life threatening disease. The work for diagnosing is manually carried out by the Hematologists involving much labor, time and human errors. The problems mentioned are easily addressed through computer vision techniques, but still accuracy and efficiency are demanded in terms of the basic and challenging step segmentation of Leukocyte's nuclei. The underlying study proposed better method in terms of accuracy and efficiency by designing a dynamic convolution filter for boosting low intensity values in the separated green channel of an RGB image and suppressing the high values in the same channel. The high values in the green channel become 255 (background) while the nuclei always have low values in the green channel and thus clearly appear as foreground. The proposed technique is tested on 365 images achieving an overall accuracy of 95.89%, while improving the efficiency by 10%. The proposed technique achieved its targets in a realistic way by improving the accuracy as well as the efficiency and both are highly required in the area.

  16. Peripheral blood leukocytes of cows with subclinical endometritis show an altered cellular composition and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Düvel, Anna; Maaß, Janine; Heppelmann, Maike; Hussen, Jamal; Koy, Mirja; Piechotta, Marion; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G E; Sheldon, Iain Martin; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Zieger, Peter; Schuberth, Hans Joachim

    2014-04-15

    Subclinical endometritis (SCE) is an important postpartum disease in dairy cows, but conventional cytobrush diagnosis often gives imprecise results. The aim of this study was to analyze disease-associated changes in peripheral blood as potential diagnostic parameters. Cellular subpopulations of blood leukocytes from cows with or without SCE (45-55 days postpartum) were flow-cytometrically quantified. Gene expression of whole blood leukocytes was assessed by PAXgene analysis. Subclinical endometritis cows showed significantly higher number of blood mononuclear cells and neutrophils. Among mononuclear cells, numbers of B-cells, NK-cells, and CD172a-positive monocytes were significantly elevated. Compared with non-SCE cows, blood leukocytes of SCE cows significantly expressed higher copy numbers of CXCL8, TNF, and IL12. To test whether circulating plasma factors are responsible for these changes, leukocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, and monocyte subpopulations (classical, intermediate, nonclassical) of healthy cows were stimulated with plasma of SCE and non-SCE cows. Although gene expression of whole leukocytes and polymorphonuclear cells remained unaltered, plasma from SCE animals significantly elevated expressed messenger RNA copy numbers of CXCL8, CXCL1, and IL1B in intermediate monocytes. In conclusion, elevated number of selected mononuclear subpopulations in peripheral blood and enhanced expression of distinct genes encoding for inflammatory mediators in blood leukocytes reflect the subclinical uterine inflammatory process in cows. Whether the observed changes in the periphery of SCE cows are the consequence of the uterine inflammatory process, or whether they affect the pathogenesis of the disease is currently unknown. PMID:24560452

  17. Expression of beta 2 integrins on blood leukocytes of cows with or without bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cox, E; Mast, J; MacHugh, N; Schwenger, B; Goddeeris, B M

    1997-09-19

    Peripheral blood leukocytes of 11 normal cows, 7 cows heterozygous and 2 heifers homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) were analysed by flow cytometry for the intensity of their beta 2 integrin expression (LFA-1(CD11a/CD18), CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18)). BLAD-homozygotes revealed no or a very weak expression of the beta 2 integrins and had a 10-fold and 4- to 5-fold increase in absolute number of neutrophils and monocytes, respectively, whereas the absolute number of lymphocytes remained normal. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the beta 2 integrins (CD18) in heterozygous animals was 56 to 90% of this in the normal cows (MFI between 14 and 512). The difference in the expression level was most pronounced for LFA-1 on the small cluster of lymphocytes with the highest MFI for LFA-1. Repeated analysis and phorbol myristate acetate stimulation revealed that the LFA-1 expression on this high-expressing cell population of the peripheral blood allowed a ready identification of BLAD-heterozygotes by flow cytometry. PMID:9436269

  18. A leukocyte immune-type receptor (LITR) subset is a marker of antiviral cytotoxic cells in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, leukocyte immune type-receptors (LITRs) represent a multigene family that encodes immunoglobulin superfamily proteins that mediate activating or inhibitory signaling. Here we demonstrate the utility of mAb CC41 to monitor viral cytotoxic responses in catfish an...

  19. Selection of the best features for leukocytes classification in blood smear microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafzadeh, Omid; Rabbani, Hossein; Talebi, Ardeshir; Banaem, Hossein Usefi

    2014-03-01

    Automatic differential counting of leukocytes provides invaluable information to pathologist for diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The main objective of this paper is to detect leukocytes from a blood smear microscopic image and classify them into their types: Neutrophil, Eosinophil, Basophil, Lymphocyte and Monocyte using features that pathologists consider to differentiate leukocytes. Features contain color, geometric and texture features. Colors of nucleus and cytoplasm vary among the leukocytes. Lymphocytes have single, large, round or oval and Monocytes have singular convoluted shape nucleus. Nucleus of Eosinophils is divided into 2 segments and nucleus of Neutrophils into 2 to 5 segments. Lymphocytes often have no granules, Monocytes have tiny granules, Neutrophils have fine granules and Eosinophils have large granules in cytoplasm. Six color features is extracted from both nucleus and cytoplasm, 6 geometric features only from nucleus and 6 statistical features and 7 moment invariants features only from cytoplasm of leukocytes. These features are fed to support vector machine (SVM) classifiers with one to one architecture. The results obtained by applying the proposed method on blood smear microscopic image of 10 patients including 149 white blood cells (WBCs) indicate that correct rate for all classifiers are above 93% which is in a higher level in comparison with previous literatures.

  20. Long Telomeres in Blood Leukocytes Are Associated with a High Risk of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Huusko, Tuija J.; Santaniemi, Merja; Kakko, Sakari; Taskinen, Panu; Ukkola, Olavi; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Savolainen, Markku J.; Salonurmi, Tuire

    2012-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm is a connective tissue disorder. Even though multiple novel gene mutations have been identified, risk profiling and diagnosis before rupture still represent a challenge. There are studies demonstrating shorter telomere lengths in the blood leukocytes of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients. The aim of this study was to measure whether relative telomere lengths are changed in the blood leukocytes of ascending aortic aneurysm patients. We also studied the expression of telomerase in aortic tissue samples of ascending aortic aneurysms. Relative lengths of leukocyte telomeres were determined from blood samples of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms and compared with healthy controls. Telomerase expression, both at the level of mRNA and protein, was quantified from the aortic tissue samples. Mean relative telomere length was significantly longer in ascending aortic aneurysm blood samples compared with controls (T/S ratio 0.87 vs. 0.61, p<0.001). Expressions of telomerase mRNA and protein were elevated in the aortic aneurysm samples (p<0.05 and p<0.01). Our study reveals a significant difference in the mean length of blood leukocyte telomeres in ascending aortic aneurysm and controls. Furthermore, expression of telomerase, the main compensating factor for telomere loss, is elevated at both the mRNA and protein level in the samples of aneurysmal aorta. Further studies will be needed to confirm if this change in telomere length can serve as a tool for assessing the risk of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:23209831

  1. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  2. A New Machine Classification Method Applied to Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses pattern classification of images by computer and describes the Two Domain Method in which expert knowledge is acquired using multidimensional scaling of judgments of dissimilarities and linear mapping. An application of the Two Domain Method that tested its power to discriminate two patterns of human blood leukocyte distribution is…

  3. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  4. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) , CD141(+) and CD16(+) myeloid DCs and CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141(+) DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  5. Reduction of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells from donor blood by leukocyte filtration.

    PubMed

    Rawal, B D; Busch, M P; Endow, R; Garcia-de-Lomas, J; Perkins, H A; Schwadron, R; Vyas, G N

    1989-06-01

    Several filters for leukocyte removal were evaluated in terms of their ability to reduce the cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load in units of blood either inoculated in vitro with lymphocytes from a chronically infected cell line or collected directly from seropositive donors. Filtration of the experimentally inoculated units of blood resulted in a 5.9 log 10 mean reduction (95% confidence interval:7.4-4.5) of tissue culture infectious units (TCIU) as assayed by end-point titration using the coculture assay. Filtration of the units of blood from anti-HIV positive donors lowered the infectivity by over 2 logs, as detected by the coculture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. However, residual cell-associated virus was detected in the majority of experiments. Clinical studies are warranted to determine if leukocyte filtration of blood will reduce the risk of transfusion transmitted viral infections.

  6. Expression of peptide YY by human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Holler, Julia Pia Natascha; Schmitz, Jessica; Roehrig, Rainer; Wilker, Sigrid; Hecker, Andreas; Padberg, Winfried; Grau, Veronika

    2014-08-01

    Peptide YY is produced by L cells in the mucosa of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum and may have systemic and paracrine functions. We hypothesized that peptide YY is expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peptide YY mRNA and peptide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and differentiated THP-1 cells after lipopolysaccharide treatment as an in vitro model of inflammation. Blood was drawn by venipuncture from 18- to 63-year-old healthy male blood donors (n=63); peptide YY mRNA expression levels were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all healthy male subjects. In 3 subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured for 3 and 24h and peptide YY was detected in the cell culture supernatant. In human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate to induce differentiation to macrophages, treatment with lipopolysaccharide caused down-regulation of peptide YY mRNA levels. In summary, freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans expressed peptide YY. In vitro data suggested that peptide YY expression is down-regulated by differentiation of monocytes to macrophages and proinflammatory stimuli.

  7. Expression profile of novel cell surface molecules on different subsets of human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Daniela; Andrés, Martín Pérez; van den Bossche, Wouter BL; Flores-Montero, Juan; de Bruin, Sandra; Teodosio, Cristina; van Dongen, Jacques JM; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults. These experiments were performed in the context of the Tenth International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA10). Plasmacytoid DC was the only cell population that expressed CD85g and CD195, whereas they lacked all of the other molecules investigated. In contrast, myeloid DC mostly expressed inhibitory C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and other inhibitory-associated molecules, whereas monocytes expressed both inhibitory and activating CLRs, together with other phagocytosis-associated receptors. Within monocytes, progressively lower levels of expression were generally observed from classical monocytes (cMo) to SLAN− and SLAN+ non-classical monocytes (ncMo) for most of the molecules expressed, except for the CD368 endocytic receptor. This molecule was found to be positive only in cMo, and the CD369 and CD371 modulating/signalling receptors. In addition, the CD101 inhibitory molecule was found to be expressed at higher levels in SLAN+ vs SLAN− ncMo. In summary, the pattern of expression of the different signalling molecules and receptors analysed in this work varies among the distinct subsets of PB APCs, with similar profiles for molecules within each functional group. These findings suggest unique pattern-recognition and signalling capabilities for distinct subpopulations of APCs, and therefore, diverse functional roles. PMID:27766148

  8. An epigenomic signature of postprandial hyperglycemia in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Cho, Yoon-Kyung; Hong, Eun-Jung; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2016-03-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia is known to be one of the earliest signs of abnormal glucose homeostasis associated with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to assess clinical significance of a 1-h postprandial glucose level for the development of diabetes, and identify epigenetic biomarkers of postprandial hyperglycemia. We analyzed clinical data from the oral glucose tolerance tests for healthy subjects (n=4502). The ratio (Glu60/Glu0) of 1-h glucose levels to fasting glucose levels was significantly associated with an insulin sensitive index (QUICKI, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) (β=0.055, P=1.25E-04) as well as a risk of future pre-diabetic and diabetic conversion. Next, DNA methylation profile analyses of 24 matched pairs of the high and low Glu60/Glu0 ratio subjects showed that specific DNA methylation levels in the promoter region of an olfactory receptor gene (olfactory receptor gene family10 member A4, OR10A4) were associated with the Glu60/Glu0 ratios (β=0.337, P=0.03). Moreover, acute oral glucose challenges decreased the DNA methylation levels of OR10A4 but not the global DNA methylation in peripheral leukocytes of healthy subjects (n=7), indicating that OR10A4 is a specific epigenomic target of postprandial hyperglycemia. This work suggests possible relevance of olfactory receptor genes to an earlier molecular biomarker of peripheral hyperglycemia and diabetic conversion. PMID:26632885

  9. Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor 1-Expressing Human Natural Killer Cell Subsets Differentially Recognize Isolates of Human Cytomegalovirus through the Viral Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Homolog UL18

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin C.; Banat, Jareer J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immune responses of natural killer (NK) cell are controlled by the balance between activating and inhibitory receptors, but the expression of these receptors varies between cells within an individual. Although NK cells are a component of the innate immune system, particular NK cell subsets expressing Ly49H are positively selected and increase in frequency in response to cytomegalovirus infection in mice. Recent evidence suggests that in humans certain NK subsets also have an increased frequency in the blood of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected individuals. However, whether these subsets differ in their capacity of direct control of HCMV-infected cells remains unclear. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro assay to assess whether human NK cell subsets have differential abilities to inhibit HCMV growth and dissemination. NK cells expressing or lacking NKG2C did not display any differences in controlling viral dissemination. However, when in vitro-expanded NK cells were used, cells expressing or lacking the inhibitory receptor leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR1) were differentially able to control dissemination. Surprisingly, the ability of LIR1+ NK cells to control virus spread differed between HCMV viral strains, and this phenomenon was dependent on amino acid sequences within the viral ligand UL18. Together, the results here outline an in vitro technique to compare the long-term immune responses of different human NK cell subsets and suggest, for the first time, that phenotypically defined human NK cell subsets may differentially recognize HCMV infections. IMPORTANCE HCMV infection is ubiquitous in most populations; it is not cleared by the host after primary infection but persists for life. The innate and adaptive immune systems control the spread of virus, for which natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role. NK cells can respond to HCMV infection by rapid, short-term, nonspecific innate responses, but evidence from murine

  10. Cellular softening mediates leukocyte demargination and trafficking, thereby increasing clinical blood counts.

    PubMed

    Fay, Meredith E; Myers, David R; Kumar, Amit; Turbyfield, Cory T; Byler, Rebecca; Crawford, Kaci; Mannino, Robert G; Laohapant, Alvin; Tyburski, Erika A; Sakurai, Yumiko; Rosenbluth, Michael J; Switz, Neil A; Sulchek, Todd A; Graham, Michael D; Lam, Wilbur A

    2016-02-23

    Leukocytes normally marginate toward the vascular wall in large vessels and within the microvasculature. Reversal of this process, leukocyte demargination, leads to substantial increases in the clinical white blood cell and granulocyte count and is a well-documented effect of glucocorticoid and catecholamine hormones, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that alterations in granulocyte mechanical properties are the driving force behind glucocorticoid- and catecholamine-induced demargination. First, we found that the proportions of granulocytes from healthy human subjects that traversed and demarginated from microfluidic models of capillary beds and veins, respectively, increased after the subjects ingested glucocorticoids. Also, we show that glucocorticoid and catecholamine exposure reorganizes cellular cortical actin, significantly reducing granulocyte stiffness, as measured with atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, using simple kinetic theory computational modeling, we found that this reduction in stiffness alone is sufficient to cause granulocyte demargination. Taken together, our findings reveal a biomechanical answer to an old hematologic question regarding how glucocorticoids and catecholamines cause leukocyte demargination. In addition, in a broader sense, we have discovered a temporally and energetically efficient mechanism in which the innate immune system can simply alter leukocyte stiffness to fine tune margination/demargination and therefore leukocyte trafficking in general. These observations have broad clinically relevant implications for the inflammatory process overall as well as hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and homing. PMID:26858400

  11. The effect of acupuncture on leukocyte levels in peripheral blood is modified by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Vilchis, José Federico; Barrera-Escorcia, Eduardo; Fregoso-Padilla, Martha

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that acupuncture can modify circulating levels of subpopulations of leukocytes. There have been few investigations on the effect of acupuncture on prostaglandins metabolism. Aspirin is capable of inhibiting the metabolism of prostaglandins and to produce several pharmacological effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether prior administration of aspirin could modify the action of acupuncture on levels of circulating leukocytes. Fourteen healthy males (age: 19-23 years) were recruited from a university student population. This study was a placebo-controlled, prospective, cross-over design. Subjects were randomly assigned into A or B groups. Group A received aspirin 500 mg and group B placebo, after 1 week of a washout period, group A received placebo and group B aspirin. Subjects were given acupuncture with manual needling in GV14 (Dazhui) acupoint 2 hr after receiving medication. The needle was stimulated for 10 sec and was kept in place for 5 min. Leukocytes and their subpopulations were quantified in blood samples taken immediately before and 2 hr after acupuncture treatment. In each subject pre-acupuncture values were compared to those post-acupuncture. The results showed that acupuncture significantly increased overall leukocytes (p=0.006) and neutrophils (p<0.001). Aspirin partially inhibited these effects. The data suggest that the effect of acupuncture on leukocytes may be related to levels of prostaglandins.

  12. Cellular softening mediates leukocyte demargination and trafficking, thereby increasing clinical blood counts

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Meredith E.; Myers, David R.; Kumar, Amit; Turbyfield, Cory T.; Byler, Rebecca; Crawford, Kaci; Mannino, Robert G.; Laohapant, Alvin; Tyburski, Erika A.; Sakurai, Yumiko; Rosenbluth, Michael J.; Switz, Neil A.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes normally marginate toward the vascular wall in large vessels and within the microvasculature. Reversal of this process, leukocyte demargination, leads to substantial increases in the clinical white blood cell and granulocyte count and is a well-documented effect of glucocorticoid and catecholamine hormones, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that alterations in granulocyte mechanical properties are the driving force behind glucocorticoid- and catecholamine-induced demargination. First, we found that the proportions of granulocytes from healthy human subjects that traversed and demarginated from microfluidic models of capillary beds and veins, respectively, increased after the subjects ingested glucocorticoids. Also, we show that glucocorticoid and catecholamine exposure reorganizes cellular cortical actin, significantly reducing granulocyte stiffness, as measured with atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, using simple kinetic theory computational modeling, we found that this reduction in stiffness alone is sufficient to cause granulocyte demargination. Taken together, our findings reveal a biomechanical answer to an old hematologic question regarding how glucocorticoids and catecholamines cause leukocyte demargination. In addition, in a broader sense, we have discovered a temporally and energetically efficient mechanism in which the innate immune system can simply alter leukocyte stiffness to fine tune margination/demargination and therefore leukocyte trafficking in general. These observations have broad clinically relevant implications for the inflammatory process overall as well as hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and homing. PMID:26858400

  13. Inhalation of Ultrafine Particles Alters Blood Leukocyte Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Mark W.; Stewart, Judith C.; Oberdörster, Günter; Morrow, Paul E.; Chalupa, David; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.; Frasier, Lauren M.; Speers, Donna M.; Cox, Christopher; Huang, Li-Shan; Utell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs; aerodynamic diameter < 100 nm) may contribute to the respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with particulate air pollution. We tested the hypothesis that inhalation of carbon UFPs has vascular effects in healthy and asthmatic subjects, detectable as alterations in blood leukocyte expression of adhesion molecules. Healthy subjects inhaled filtered air and freshly generated elemental carbon particles (count median diameter ~ 25 nm, geometric standard deviation ~ 1.6), for 2 hr, in three separate protocols: 10 μg/m3 at rest, 10 and 25 μg/m3 with exercise, and 50 μg/m3 with exercise. In a fourth protocol, subjects with asthma inhaled air and 10 μg/m3 UFPs with exercise. Peripheral venous blood was obtained before and at intervals after exposure, and leukocyte expression of surface markers was quantitated using multiparameter flow cytometry. In healthy subjects, particle exposure with exercise reduced expression of adhesion molecules CD54 and CD18 on monocytes and CD18 and CD49d on granulocytes. There were also concentration-related reductions in blood monocytes, basophils, and eosinophils and increased lymphocyte expression of the activation marker CD25. In subjects with asthma, exposure with exercise to 10 μg/m3 UFPs reduced expression of CD11b on monocytes and eosinophils and CD54 on granulocytes. Particle exposure also reduced the percentage of CD4+ T cells, basophils, and eosinophils. Inhalation of elemental carbon UFPs alters peripheral blood leukocyte distribution and expression of adhesion molecules, in a pattern consistent with increased retention of leukocytes in the pulmonary vascular bed. PMID:16393658

  14. Shorter telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with childhood autism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongchang; Tang, Jinsong; Li, Hong; Chen, Shan; He, Ying; Liao, Yanhui; Wei, Zhen; Wan, Guobin; Xiang, Xi; Xia, Kun; Chen, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are protective chromosomal structures that play a key role in preserving genomic stability. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the abnormal telomere length in leukocytes is associated with some mental disorders and age-related diseases. However, the association between leukocyte telomere length and autism has not been investigated. Here we investigated the possible association between relative telomere length (RTL) in peripheral blood leukocytes and childhood autism by using an established real-time polymerase chain reaction method. We observed significantly shorter RTL in patients with childhood autism than in controls (p = 0.006). Individuals with shorter RTL had a significantly increased presence of childhood autism compared with those who had long RTL. In patients, we found that family training interventions have a significant effect on telomere length (P = 0.012), but no correlations between RTL and clinical features (paternal age, maternal age, age of onset, illness of duration, CARS score and ABC score) were observed in this study. These results provided the first evidence that shorter leukocytes telomere length is significantly associated with childhood autism. The molecular mechanism underlying telomere length may be implicated in the development of autism. PMID:25399515

  15. Leukocyte-subset counts in idiopathic parkinsonism provide clues to a pathogenic pathway involving small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Following Helicobacter pylori eradication in idiopathic parkinsonism (IP), hypokinesia improved but flexor-rigidity increased. Small intestinal bacterial-overgrowth (SIBO) is a candidate driver of the rigidity: hydrogen-breath-test-positivity is common in IP and case histories suggest that Helicobacter keeps SIBO at bay. Methods In a surveillance study, we explore relationships of IP-facets to peripheral immune/inflammatory-activation, in light of presence/absence of Helicobacter infection (urea-breath- and/or stool-antigen-test: positivity confirmed by gastric-biopsy) and hydrogen-breath-test status for SIBO (positivity: >20 ppm increment, 2 consecutive 15-min readings, within 2h of 25G lactulose). We question whether any relationships found between facets and blood leukocyte subset counts stand in patients free from anti-parkinsonian drugs, and are robust enough to defy fluctuations in performance consequent on short t½ therapy. Results Of 51 IP-probands, 36 had current or past Helicobacter infection on entry, 25 having undergone successful eradication (median 3.4 years before). Thirty-four were hydrogen-breath-test-positive initially, 42 at sometime (343 tests) during surveillance (2.8 years). Hydrogen-breath-test-positivity was associated inversely with Helicobacter-positivity (OR 0.20 (95% CI 0.04, 0.99), p<0.05). In 38 patients (untreated (17) or on stable long-t½ IP-medication), the higher the natural-killer count, the shorter stride, slower gait and greater flexor-rigidity (by mean 49 (14, 85) mm, 54 (3, 104) mm.s-1, 89 (2, 177) Nm.10-3, per 100 cells.μl-1 increment, p=0.007, 0.04 & 0.04 respectively, adjusted for patient characteristics). T-helper count was inversely associated with flexor-rigidity before (p=0.01) and after adjustment for natural-killer count (-36(-63, -10) Nm.10-3 per 100 cells.μl-1, p=0.007). Neutrophil count was inversely associated with tremor (visual analogue scale, p=0.01). Effect-sizes were independent of IP

  16. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  17. HIV migration between blood plasma and cellular subsets before and after HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun Yong; Chaillon, Antoine; Oh, Jin Ok; Ahn, Jin Young; Ann, Hae Won; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ku, Nam Su; Smith, Davey M; Kim, June Myung

    2016-04-01

    The cellular source of HIV RNA circulating in blood plasma remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether sequence analysis of HIV RNA populations circulating before combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and HIV DNA populations in cellular subsets (CS) after cART could identify the cellular sources of circulating HIV RNA. Blood was collected from five subjects at cART initiation and again 6 months later. Naïve CD4+ T cells, resting central memory and effector memory CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+ T cells, monocytes, and natural killer cells were sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. HIV-1 env C2V3 sequences from HIV RNA in blood plasma and HIV DNA in CSs were generated using single genome sequencing. Sequences were evaluated for viral compartmentalization (Fst test) and migration events (MEs; Slatkin Maddison and cladistic measures) between blood plasma and each CS. Viral compartmentalization was observed in 88% of all cellular subset comparisons (range: 77-100% for each subject). Most observed MEs were directed from blood plasma to CSs (52 MEs, 85.2%). In particular, there was only viral movement from plasma to NK cells (15 MEs), monocytes (seven MEs), and naïve cells (five ME). We observed a total of nine MEs from activated CD4 cells (2/9 MEs), central memory T cells (3/9 MEs), and effector memory T cells (4/9 MEs) to blood plasma. Our results revealed that the HIV RNA population in blood plasma plays an important role in seeding various cellular reservoirs and that the cellular source of the HIV RNA population is activated central memory and effector memory T cells. PMID:26348372

  18. HIV migration between blood plasma and cellular subsets before and after HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun Yong; Chaillon, Antoine; Oh, Jin Ok; Ahn, Jin Young; Ann, Hae Won; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ku, Nam Su; Smith, Davey M; Kim, June Myung

    2016-04-01

    The cellular source of HIV RNA circulating in blood plasma remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether sequence analysis of HIV RNA populations circulating before combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and HIV DNA populations in cellular subsets (CS) after cART could identify the cellular sources of circulating HIV RNA. Blood was collected from five subjects at cART initiation and again 6 months later. Naïve CD4+ T cells, resting central memory and effector memory CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+ T cells, monocytes, and natural killer cells were sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. HIV-1 env C2V3 sequences from HIV RNA in blood plasma and HIV DNA in CSs were generated using single genome sequencing. Sequences were evaluated for viral compartmentalization (Fst test) and migration events (MEs; Slatkin Maddison and cladistic measures) between blood plasma and each CS. Viral compartmentalization was observed in 88% of all cellular subset comparisons (range: 77-100% for each subject). Most observed MEs were directed from blood plasma to CSs (52 MEs, 85.2%). In particular, there was only viral movement from plasma to NK cells (15 MEs), monocytes (seven MEs), and naïve cells (five ME). We observed a total of nine MEs from activated CD4 cells (2/9 MEs), central memory T cells (3/9 MEs), and effector memory T cells (4/9 MEs) to blood plasma. Our results revealed that the HIV RNA population in blood plasma plays an important role in seeding various cellular reservoirs and that the cellular source of the HIV RNA population is activated central memory and effector memory T cells.

  19. Expression of NRF2 and NRF2-modulated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes of bladder cancer males.

    PubMed

    Reszka, E; Jablonowski, Z; Wieczorek, E; Gromadzinska, J; Jablonska, E; Sosnowski, M; Wasowicz, W

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) is an oxidant-responsive transcription factor involved in induction of antioxidant genes. We assessed NRF2 and selected NRF2-modulated gene expression: glutathione S-transferase A1 and P1 (GSTA1 and GSTP1), mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in blood leukocytes of 51 bladder cancer patients and 90 control males. A significant up-regulation of SOD2 expression (P=0.002) was observed in leukocytes of patients. NRF2 expression was positively correlated with GSTP1 and with SOD2 mRNA level, both in patients and controls. These data suggest disturbances in SOD2 transcription in circulating blood leukocytes of males with bladder cancer. Moreover, concomitant constitutive expression of NRF2 and its target genes may suggest important role of NRF2 transcription factor in positive regulation of antioxidant genes, resulted in enhanced cytoprotection in human peripheral blood leukocytes. PMID:23259779

  20. Serum biochemical changes and chemiluminescent responses of whole blood in Holstein cattle with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Tanaka, S; Oba, M; Minami, S; Noda, H

    1994-08-01

    Serum biochemical profile and whole blood chemiluminescent (CL) responses in 8 Holstein cattle affected with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) were evaluated. Concentrations of sodium, chloride and calcium in serum from cattle affected with LAD were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased as compared with controls. The characteristic changes in serum proteins were hypoalbuminemia and hyperglobulinemia, and the concentrations of albumin and gammaglobulin in serum from normal cattle and cattle affected with LAD were significantly (p < 0.01) different. Significantly (p < 0.01) diminished CL indices and prolonged peak time of CL responses in whole blood were detected in cattle affected with LAD. These findings indicate that the CL response associated with iC3b receptor mediated phagocytic activity is impaired in cattle affected with LAD. The whole blood CL assay appeared to be practical and useful for routine evaluation of blood samples from cattle affected with LAD. PMID:7999886

  1. Characterization of a human blood monocyte subset with low peroxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Y; Miller, P J; Thurman, G B; Neubauer, R H; Oliver, C; Favilla, T; Beman, J A; Oldham, R K; Stevenson, H C

    1983-01-01

    Two human monocyte subsets from the peripheral blood of healthy donors have been isolated in greater than 90% purity by countercurrent centrifugal elutration and human serum albumin gradients and their functional capabilities have been assessed. We have demonstrated that one subset ("regular" monocytes, RM) showed intense cytoplasmic peroxidase staining and contained substantial peroxidase activity. In contrast, another subset ("intermediate" monocytes, IM) stained poorly for peroxidase and had low peroxidase activity. By electron microscopic analysis combined with peroxidase localization, it was found that IM had fewer peroxidase-positive granules per cell than did RM. IM coelutriated with some lymphocytes and by cell sizing analysis were shown to be slightly smaller than RM. Functional and cytochemical analysis of these subsets indicated that IM had less activity than RM in assays such as accessory cell function for mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and that fewer IM expressed OKM1 antigen and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) receptors on their membranes than did RM. The subset of IM not bearing either the PWM receptor or the OKM1 antigen had very low peroxidase activity. IM also were found to have a greater sensitivity to polyriboinosinic and polyribocytidilic acid (100 micrograms/ml)-induced secretion of interferon. There was no significant difference in the phagocytic capability, the percentage of Fc receptor-positive cells, 5'-nucleotidase activity, DR antigen expression, or the responsiveness to migration inhibitory factor of IM as compared with RM. Furthermore, it was found that the ratio of IM to RM increased after prolonged cytapheresis, which suggests that IM are more mobilizable than RM from the extravascular reservoirs of human monocytes. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:6193141

  2. Monoclonal antibodies (MT1, MT2, MB1, MB2, MB3) reactive with leukocyte subsets in paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed Central

    Poppema, S.; Hollema, H.; Visser, L.; Vos, H.

    1987-01-01

    The absence of reactivity on routinely prepared tissue sections has hampered the use of monoclonal antileukocyte antibodies in diagnostic histopathology. Here we describe five new antibodies reactive with leukocyte subsets in formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Antibody MT1 is reactive with mature and immature T cells and not with mature B cells. MT2 is reactive with mature T cells and B cells, but not with immature T cells, activated T cells, and germinal center B cells. Antibody MB1 is reactive with all B cells, with about 50% of mature T cells, and not with immature T cells. MB2 is reactive with all B cells and not with T cells. However, MB2 also stains endothelial cells and several types of epithelial cells. MB3 is reactive with B cells and histiocytes, but not with T cells. The antibodies were tested on a series of lymphomas that were also immunophenotyped with a panel of well-established reagents on frozen tissue sections. The results indicate that the MB and MT antibodies are useful tools in the study of reactive and neoplastic disorders of the lymphoid system. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3296769

  3. Differential processing of amyloid precursor protein in brain and in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, Elaine; Bentley, Karen; Stubbs, Victoria; Sabbagh, Marwan; Coleman, Paul D

    2013-06-01

    Because amyloid precursor protein (APP) fragments exist in many tissues throughout the body, including the fluid compartments of blood, they have been the focus of numerous investigations into their potential as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease. Using immunohistochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy, Western blot, and quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis we examined whether APP processing in leukocytes is analogous to APP processing in the brain. We show APP immunoreactivity at light and electron microscopic levels in the cytoplasm and nucleus of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) yet our Western blot analysis data demonstrated that brain and PBL contain different APP fragments and differentially expressed APP processing enzymes. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase domain 10 (ADAM10), nicastrin, and beta-secretase 2 (BACE2) were present in brain but were undetected in PBL. Presenilin 1 and beta-secretase 1 (BACE1) were detected in both tissues but showed different patterns in Western blots. Quantitative PCR results identified Neprilysin as the only processing enzyme we interrogated in which Western and quantitative PCR data coincided. Although our data on differential processing of APP in brain and PBL point to exercising caution when generalizing between blood and brain with regard to mechanisms, they have no implications regarding utility as biomarkers. PMID:23298733

  4. Age-related methylation profiles of equine blood leukocytes in the RNASEL locus.

    PubMed

    Ząbek, T; Semik, E; Szmatoła, T; Oklejewicz, B; Fornal, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M

    2016-08-01

    Methylation profiles across three CpG islands of the RNASEL gene were determined in blood leukocyte samples of Anglo-Arabian and Hucul horses. Bisulfite sequencing revealed hypomethylated state of the RNASEL promoter coinciding with methylated CpG island placed inside the gene. Several CpG sites were identified for which the methylation state was influenced by DNA polymorphism. Two of them showed monoallelic methylation. One of the CpG sites revealed functional polymorphism. A number of partially methylated CpG sites have been observed in the promoter area of RNASEL, which were used for the comparison of breed- and age-related effects. Clone bisulfite sequencing of blood leukocyte samples collected at different ages from particular individuals of AA and HC breeds and, also, BSPCR sequencing of 50 samples of juvenile and old AA and HC horses revealed increased methylation in particular CpG sites during aging. The age-related heterogeneity of white blood cells was hypothesized as being one of the potential causes of observed variability of methylation profiles in the RNASEL promoter. PMID:26553552

  5. [Reference intervals for peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in healthy adults in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cóndor, José M; Álvarez, Marco; Cano, Luis; Matos, Edgar; Leiva, Christian; Paredes, José A

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (PBL) in healthy adults in Lima (Peru), a cross-sectional study was conducted among blood donors taken in between 2011 and 2012. Based on the criteria obtained from the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI C28-A3), 318 samples were processed, 61.9% (197/318) coming from male donors. For PBL count, a flow cytometer with a simple platform was used. The RIs are established for each PBL in adults based on sex with their respective reference limits and 90% confidence intervals. Differences were found in CD3+ percentage counts (p=0.001) and in CD3-CD56+ absolute (p=0.003) and percentage counts (p?0.001). The RIs found are different to those described in studies conducted in other countries due to the characteristics of the population and the study model.

  6. [Reference intervals for peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in healthy adults in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cóndor, José M; Álvarez, Marco; Cano, Luis; Matos, Edgar; Leiva, Christian; Paredes, José A

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (PBL) in healthy adults in Lima (Peru), a cross-sectional study was conducted among blood donors taken in between 2011 and 2012. Based on the criteria obtained from the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI C28-A3), 318 samples were processed, 61.9% (197/318) coming from male donors. For PBL count, a flow cytometer with a simple platform was used. The RIs are established for each PBL in adults based on sex with their respective reference limits and 90% confidence intervals. Differences were found in CD3+ percentage counts (p=0.001) and in CD3-CD56+ absolute (p=0.003) and percentage counts (p?0.001). The RIs found are different to those described in studies conducted in other countries due to the characteristics of the population and the study model. PMID:23949508

  7. RAG1 and RAG2 expression by B cell subsets from human tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Girschick, H J; Grammer, A C; Nanki, T; Mayo, M; Lipsky, P E

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that B cells acquire the capacity for secondary V(D)J recombination during germinal center (GC) reactions. The nature of these B cells remains controversial. Subsets of tonsil and blood B cells and also individual B cells were examined for the expression of recombination-activating gene (RAG) mRNA. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that RAG1 mRNA was present in all tonsil B cell subsets, with the largest amount found in naive B cells. RAG2 mRNA was only found in tonsil naive B cells, centrocytes, and to a lesser extent in centroblasts. Neither RAG1 nor RAG2 mRNA was routinely found in normal peripheral blood B cells. In individual tonsil B cells, RAG1 and RAG2 mRNAs were found in 18% of naive B cells, 22% of GC founder cells, 0% of centroblasts, 13% of centrocytes, and 9% of memory B cells. Individual naive tonsil B cells containing both RAG1 and RAG2 mRNA were activated (CD69(+)). In normal peripheral blood approximately 5% of B cells expressed both RAG1 and RAG2. These cells were uniformly postswitch memory B cells as documented by the coexpression of IgG mRNA. These results indicate that coordinate RAG expression is not found in normal peripheral naive B cells but is up-regulated in naive B cells which are activated in the tonsil. With the exception of centroblasts, RAG1 and RAG2 expression can be found in all components of the GC, including postswitch memory B cells, some of which may circulate in the blood of normal subjects.

  8. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Subset Counts in Pre-menopausal Women with Iron-Deficiency Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reza Keramati, Mohammad; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Khajedaluea, Mohammad; Tavasolian, Houman; Borzouei, Anahita

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major worldwide public health problem. Children and women of reproductive age are especially vulnerable to IDA, and it has been reported that these patients are more prone to infection. This study was done to evaluate alteration of lymphocyte subgroups in IDA. Methods: In this prospective study, we investigated lymphocyte subsets in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia; 50 normal subjects and 50 IDA (hypochromic microcytic) cases were enrolled. Experimental and control anticoagulated blood samples were evaluated using flow cytometry to determine the absolute and relative numbers of various lymphocyte subgroups. Finally, the results of the patient and control groups were compared. Results: Mean (SD) absolute counts of lymphocytes, CD3+ cells, CD3+/CD4+ subsets (T helper) and CD3+/CD8+ subsets (T cytotoxic) in the patient group were 2.08 (0.65) x 109/L, 1.53 (0.53) x 109/L, 0.87 (0.28) x 109/L, and 0.51 (0.24) x 109/L, respectively. The results showed significant differences between case and control groups in mean absolute counts of lymphocytes (P = 0.014), T lymphocytes (P = 0.009), helper T cells (P = 0.004), and cytotoxic T cells (P = 0.043). Conclusion: This study showed that absolute counts of peripheral blood T lymphocytes as a marker of cell-mediated immunity may be decreased in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia, and that these patients may be more prone to infection. PMID:22135572

  9. Nipah Virus Infects Specific Subsets of Porcine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stachowiak, Beata; Weingartl, Hana M.

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic paramyxovirus, is highly contagious in swine, and can cause fatal infections in humans following transmission from the swine host. The main viral targets in both species are the respiratory and central nervous systems, with viremia implicated as a mode of dissemination of NiV throughout the host. The presented work focused on the role of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the viremic spread of the virus in the swine host. B lymphocytes, CD4−CD8−, as well as CD4+CD8− T lymphocytes were not permissive to NiV, and expansion of the CD4+CD8− cells early post infection was consistent with functional humoral response to NiV infection observed in swine. In contrast, significant drop in the CD4+CD8− T cell frequency was observed in piglets which succumbed to the experimental infection, supporting the hypothesis that antibody development is the critical component of the protective immune response. Productive viral replication was detected in monocytes, CD6+CD8+ T lymphocytes and NK cells by recovery of infectious virus in the cell supernatants. Virus replication was supported by detection of the structural N and the non-structural C proteins or by detection of genomic RNA increase in the infected cells. Infection of T cells carrying CD6 marker, a strong ligand for the activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule ALCAM (CD166) highly expressed on the microvascular endothelial cell of the blood-air and the blood-brain barrier may explain NiV preferential tropism for small blood vessels of the lung and brain. PMID:22303463

  10. A correlation study of telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes and kidney function with age.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Guang; Wang, Yong; Hou, Kai; Jia, Lin-Pei; Ma, Jie; Zhao, De-Long; Zhu, Shu-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Juan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Wang, Yan-Ping; Sun, Xue-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2015-06-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the association between telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes and kidney function in various age groups of a healthy population. A total of 139 healthy individuals were divided into five groups according to their age: 35‑44, 45‑54, 55‑64, 65‑74 and >75 years old. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained and the telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length was assayed using a digoxigenin‑labeled hybridization probe in Southern blot assays. Laboratory assays of kidney function were also performed. A correlation was observed between TRF length and age (r=‑0.314, P<0.001), with the telomere length of the individuals >75 years group being significantly shorter than the telomere length of the 35‑44, 45‑54 and 55‑64 years age groups (P<0.05). By contrast, the TRF length for males versus females did not differ for any of the age groups, while a correlation was observed between TRF length and serum levels of cystatin C (r=‑0.195, P<0.05). There was also a correlation between TRF length and glomerular filtration rate (r=‑0.184, P<0.05). The current study demonstrated that in this cohort, leukocyte telomere length reduced with age and was correlated with serum levels of cystatin C and glomerular filtration rate. Therefore, TRF length is associated with kidney function and may serve as a marker of aging.

  11. Biochemical and Cellular Changes in Leukocyte-Depleted Red Blood Cells Stored for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Diana; Rocha, Susana; Abreu, Estela; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate biochemical and cellular changes associated with the storage of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells (RBCs). Methods We investigated 10 leukocyte-depleted RBC units, randomly chosen from volunteer donors. Every week an aliquot was collected for laboratorial evaluation, which included complete cell blood count, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, extracellular sodium, potassium and pH, membrane-bound hemoglobin (MBH), band 3 profile, and quantification of RBC membrane proteins composition. Results We observed an increase in mean cell volume (from 91.86 ± 4.65 fl to 98.10 ± 5.80 fl, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05), red cell distribution width, percentage of macrocytic RBCs, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and a decreased percentage of microcytic RBCs, mean cell volume concentration and G6PD activity. The extracellular concentration of sodium decreased, and that of potassium increased significantly over time. RBC membrane composition revealed an increase in spectrin/ankyrin ratio after 21 days (from 4.84 ± 0.99 to 5.27 ± 0.94, day 0 vs. day 21; p < 0.05). At day 35, a decrease in ankyrin (from 6.44 ± 1.70% to 5.49 ± 1.96%, day 0 vs. day 35; p < 0.05), in protein 4.1/band 3, protein 4.2/band 3, and ankyrin/band 3 ratios and in band 5 was observed. Conclusions Our data show that leukocyte-depleted RBCs present changes in the RBC morphology, membrane protein composition, enzymatic activity, and extracellular electrolyte concentration and pH. PMID:25960715

  12. Age gene expression and coexpression progressive signatures in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Irizar, Haritz; Goñi, Joaquín; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Olascoaga, Javier; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Otaegui, David

    2015-12-01

    Both cellular senescence and organismic aging are known to be dynamic processes that start early in life and progress constantly during the whole life of the individual. In this work, with the objective of identifying signatures of age-related progressive change at the transcriptomic level, we have performed a whole-genome gene expression analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes in a group of healthy individuals with ages ranging from 14 to 93 years. A set of genes with progressively changing gene expression (either increase or decrease with age) has been identified and contextualized in a coexpression network. A modularity analysis has been performed on this network and biological-term and pathway enrichment analyses have been used for biological interpretation of each module. In summary, the results of the present work reveal the existence of a transcriptomic component that shows progressive expression changes associated to age in peripheral blood leukocytes, highlighting both the dynamic nature of the process and the need to complement young vs. elder studies with longitudinal studies that include middle aged individuals. From the transcriptional point of view, immunosenescence seems to be occurring from a relatively early age, at least from the late 20s/early 30s, and the 49-56 year old age-range appears to be critical. In general, the genes that, according to our results, show progressive expression changes with aging are involved in pathogenic/cellular processes that have classically been linked to aging in humans: cancer, immune processes and cellular growth vs. maintenance.

  13. Counting leukocytes from whole blood using a lab-on-a-chip Coulter counter.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhe; Cho, Sung Hwan; Zhang, Arthur; Dai, Jie; Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip Coulter counter was demonstrated to count micro particles and leukocytes from whole blood. Instead of electroplated or deposited metal electrodes, off-the-shelf gold pins were used as electrodes to simplify fabrication process, reduce cost, enhance device durability, and above all, achieve superior uniformity in E-field distribution for improved signal quality. A custom-designed, low-cost demodulation circuit was developed to detect the AC impedance signals of the particles and cells passing the detection area defined by the microfluidic channels. A mixture of polystyrene beads with three different sizes was used to characterize the device. The results showed high throughput at 2000 particles/s and clear separation among different sizes of beads with coefficients of variation (CV) of 13.53%, 10.35% and 5.67% for 7.66 µm, 10.5 µm and 14.7 µmbeads, respectively. To demonstrate the potential for a point-of-care or self-administered device for cancer patients going through chemotherapy, we have used the lab-on-a-chip device to count leukocytes from whole blood, generating encouraging preliminary results comparable to the results from a commercial flow cytometer.

  14. Spectrophotometric assay for calcineurin activity in leukocytes isolated from human blood.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Kathryn J; van Rossum, Huub H; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Smit, Nico P M; de Fijter, Johan W; van Pelt, Johannes

    2006-11-01

    The calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, still constitute the cornerstone of immunosuppressive regimen after organ transplantation. An efficient and feasible way to measure calcineurin activity and inhibition by these drugs may improve therapeutic monitoring of these drugs in transplant recipients. Calcineurin activity was measured in leukocyte lysates isolated from human blood using spectrophotometric phosphate quantification. The dephosphorylation of a 19-amino acid peptide substrate of calcineurin was determined using the Malachite green phosphate reagent in the presence of okadaic acid and with and without the calcium chelator EGTA. Sample storage and lysis buffer components were among the variables optimized, and the inhibitory effect of calcineurin inhibitors was investigated. Observed loss of calcineurin activity during sample storage was eliminated by adding ascorbic acid to lysis buffer. The final inter- and intraassay variation coefficients were 10 and 4.5%, respectively, and the detection limit was 15 pmol min(-1)x10(6) WBC(-1), where WBC is white blood cells (leukocytes). In vitro IC50 values were 212 and 34 microg/L for cyclosporine and tacrolimus, respectively. In vivo calcineurin inhibition was observed when calcineurin activity was measured in transplant recipients on maintenance therapy with cyclosporine and tacrolimus.

  15. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  16. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  17. [Effect of processed blood volume, leukocyte count and concentration of CD34-positive cells in peripheral blood on efficiency of stem cell apheresis].

    PubMed

    Matic, G B; Ullrich, H; Barlage, S; Rothe, G; Schmitz, G

    1997-01-01

    Despite many published studies no parameter could be identified yet to acceptably and individually predict collection results in stem cell apheresis. We analyzed leukocyte counts and processed blood volume, absolute and relative CD34+ cell counts, and overall collection efficiency in 120 patients with hematological and solid malignancies (354 leukaphereses using the Cobe Spectra cell separator, a median of 3 per patient, span 1-9). Stem cells were mobilized into peripheral blood by conventional chemotherapy followed by daily doses of G-CSF. CD34+ progenitor cell counts were monitored through multiparametric flow cytometry. Blood and collection flows varied in the range of 45-90 ml/min and 0.7-1.5 ml/min, respectively. CD34+ progenitor cells were enriched 38-fold in the apheresis product as compared to peripheral blood at a processed blood volume lower than one total blood volume. Efficiency continuously declined, on to a 25-fold concentration at a processed blood volume above the 3-fold total blood volume. Total collection efficiency, calculated from the absolute content of CD34+ progenitor cells in peripheral blood and apheresis concentrate (a parameter for progenitor cell mobilization during the apheresis), reached a plateau at a processed blood volume above the 3-fold total blood volume. However, variation among individual patients was high. The concentration rate of CD34+ cells at a leukocyte count below 5,000/microliter averaged 50 and declined continuously to 8 at leukocyte counts between 45,000 and 50,000/microliter. To summarize, in 70% of patients with leukocyte counts below 5,000/microliter and CD34+ progenitor cell counts above 10,000/ml, more than 1.5 x 10(6) progenitors per kg body weight could be collected in a single leukapheresis. According to the presented data, the variation in overall collection efficiency is mainly due to: 1) varying mobilization of progenitors during the apheresis procedures itself and 2) dependence on peripheral leukocyte

  18. Development of a continuous cell line, PBLE, from an American eel peripheral blood leukocyte preparation.

    PubMed

    Dewitte-Orr, S J; Lepic, K; Bryson, S P; Walsh, S K; Lee, L E J; Bols, N C

    2006-01-01

    A continuous cell line, PBLE, was developed from the adherent cells in a culture of peripheral blood leukocytes from the American eel, Anguilla rostrata. The cells were grown in Leibovitz's L-15 basal medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Under normal culture conditions at 18 degrees C, the morphology of PBLE was fibroblast-like. The cultures have been subcultured over 80 times and have been cryopreserved successfully. These cells have a diploid karyotype of 38 chromosomes, survived temperatures from 5 to 36 degrees C, and proliferated at temperatures from 5 degrees C to at least 30 degrees C. PBLE underwent apoptosis in response to gliotoxin, but did not show a respiratory burst. Results suggest that PBLE may have arisen from a circulating mesenchymal stem cell. PBLE was susceptible to Chum salmon reovirus (CSV) and supported CSV replication. Therefore this cell line should be useful in studying eel specific virus-host interactions.

  19. Age gene expression and coexpression progressive signatures in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Irizar, Haritz; Goñi, Joaquín; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Olascoaga, Javier; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Otaegui, David

    2015-12-01

    Both cellular senescence and organismic aging are known to be dynamic processes that start early in life and progress constantly during the whole life of the individual. In this work, with the objective of identifying signatures of age-related progressive change at the transcriptomic level, we have performed a whole-genome gene expression analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes in a group of healthy individuals with ages ranging from 14 to 93 years. A set of genes with progressively changing gene expression (either increase or decrease with age) has been identified and contextualized in a coexpression network. A modularity analysis has been performed on this network and biological-term and pathway enrichment analyses have been used for biological interpretation of each module. In summary, the results of the present work reveal the existence of a transcriptomic component that shows progressive expression changes associated to age in peripheral blood leukocytes, highlighting both the dynamic nature of the process and the need to complement young vs. elder studies with longitudinal studies that include middle aged individuals. From the transcriptional point of view, immunosenescence seems to be occurring from a relatively early age, at least from the late 20s/early 30s, and the 49-56 year old age-range appears to be critical. In general, the genes that, according to our results, show progressive expression changes with aging are involved in pathogenic/cellular processes that have classically been linked to aging in humans: cancer, immune processes and cellular growth vs. maintenance. PMID:26362218

  20. RNA-seq Transcriptional Profiling of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes from Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Kirsten E.; Nalpas, Nicolas C.; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; Browne, John A.; Magee, David A.; Killick, Kate E.; Park, Stephen D. E.; Hokamp, Karsten; Meade, Kieran G.; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Gormley, Eamonn; Gordon, Stephen V.; MacHugh, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, is a major endemic disease affecting cattle populations worldwide, despite the implementation of stringent surveillance and control programs in many countries. The development of high-throughput functional genomics technologies, including gene expression microarrays and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), has enabled detailed analysis of the host transcriptome to M. bovis infection, particularly at the macrophage and peripheral blood level. In the present study, we have analyzed the peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) transcriptome of eight natural M. bovis-infected and eight age- and sex-matched non-infected control Holstein-Friesian animals using RNA-seq. In addition, we compared gene expression profiles generated using RNA-seq with those previously generated using the high-density Affymetrix® GeneChip® Bovine Genome Array platform from the same PBL-extracted RNA. A total of 3,250 differentially expressed (DE) annotated genes were detected in the M. bovis-infected samples relative to the controls (adjusted P-value ≤0.05), with the number of genes displaying decreased relative expression (1,671) exceeding those with increased relative expression (1,579). Ingenuity® Systems Pathway Analysis (IPA) of all DE genes revealed enrichment for genes with immune function. Notably, transcriptional suppression was observed among several of the top-ranking canonical pathways including Leukocyte Extravasation Signaling. Comparative platform analysis demonstrated that RNA-seq detected a larger number of annotated DE genes (3,250) relative to the microarray (1,398), of which 917 genes were common to both technologies and displayed the same direction of expression. Finally, we show that RNA-seq had an increased dynamic range compared to the microarray for estimating differential gene expression. PMID:25206354

  1. Mitochondrial DNA 4977-base pair common deletion in blood leukocytes and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Wan, Jie; Huff, Chad; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Zhao, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The 4977-base pair common deletion DmtDNA4977 is the most frequently observed mitochondrial DNA mutation in human tissues. Because mitochondrial DNA mutations are mainly caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and given that oxidative stress plays an important role in melanoma carcinogenesis, the investigation of DmtDNA4977 may be particularly relevant to the development of melanoma. In this study, we compared DmtDNA4977 levels in blood leukocytes from 206 melanoma patients and 219 healthy controls. Overall, melanoma cases had significantly higher levels of DmtDNA4977 than healthy controls (median: 0.60 vs 0.20, P = 0.008). The difference was evident among individuals who were older than 47 yrs, women, and had pigmentation risk factors (e.g., blond or red hair, blue eye, fair skin, light, or none tanning ability after prolonged sun exposure, and freckling in the sun as a child). The difference was also evident among those who had at least one lifetime sunburn with blistering and had no reported use of a sunlamp. Interestingly, among controls, DmtDNA4977 levels differed by phenotypic index and reported use of a sunlamp. In the risk assessment, increased levels of DmtDNA4977 were associated with a 1.23-fold increased risk of melanoma (odds ratio (OR): 1.23, 95% confidence interval (90% CI): 1.01, 1.50). A significant dose-response relationship was observed in quartile analysis (P = 0.001). In summary, our study suggests that high levels of DmtDNA4977 in blood leukocytes are associated with increased risk of melanoma and that association is affected by both pigmentation and personal history of sun exposure. PMID:26988264

  2. Effects of spaceflight on rat peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichiki, A. T.; Gibson, L. A.; Jago, T. L.; Strickland, K. M.; Johnson, D. L.; Lange, R. D.; Allebban, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The white blood cell (WBC) elements and the bone marrow myeloid progenitor cell populations were analyzed to ascertain adaptation to micro-gravity and subsequent readaptation to 1 G in rats flown on the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission. Bone marrow cells were harvested from one group of rats killed inflight (FD13) and blood was drawn from three other groups at various times. The WBC level was normal on FD14 with the exception of neutrophilia. On FD13, numbers of colony-forming units-granulocyte (CFU-G), CFU-GM, and CFU-M from flight animals were decreased compared with ground controls when incubated with recombinant rat interleukin-3 (rrIL-3) alone or in combination with recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo). On recovery (R + 0), flight rats had decreased numbers of total leukocytes and absolute numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes with elevated neutrophils compared with control rats. They had lower numbers of CD4, CD8, CD2, CD3, and B cells in the peripheral blood but no differences in spleen lymphocytes.

  3. Methylation of a panel of genes in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiang; Huang, Rong; Sun, Hongru; Liu, Yupeng; Bi, Haoran; Li, Jing; Yu, Hongyuan; Sun, Jiamei; Lin, Shangqun; Cui, Binbin; Zhao, Yashuang

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the DNA methylation status of the CpG islands of multiple genes in blood leukocytes in CRC susceptibility and prognosis, as well as possible interactions with dietary factors on CRC risk are unclear. We carried out a case-control study including 421 CRC patients and 506 controls to examine the associations between six genes (AOX-1, RARB2, RERG, ADAMTS9, IRF4, and FOXE-1), multiple CpG site methylation (MCSM) and susceptibility to CRC. High-level MCSM (MCSM-H) was defined as methylation of greater than or equal to 2 of 5 candidate genes (except for RARB2); low-level MCSM (MCSM-L) was when 1 candidate gene was methylated; non-MCSM was when none of the candidate genes were methylated. Blood cell-derived DNA methylation status was detected using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. The hypermethylation status of each individual gene was statistically significantly associated with CRC. MCSM status was also associated with CRC (OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.15–2.05, P = 0.004). We observed interactions between a high level of dietary intake of cereals, pungent food, and stewed fish with brown sauce, age (older than 60 yrs), smoking and hypermethylation on risk of CRC. MCSM in peripheral blood DNA may be an important biomarker for susceptibility to CRC. PMID:27453436

  4. Relationship between zinc malnutrition and alterations in murine peripheral blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    King, L.E.; Morford, L.A.; Fraker, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies using a murine model have shown that the immune system responds rapidly and adversely to zinc deficiency. The extent of alteration of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and immunoglobulin levels were investigated in four zinc dietary groups: zinc adequate (ZA); restricted fed zinc adequate (RZA); marginal zinc deficient (MZD, 72-76% of ZA mouse weight); and severely zinc deficient. The peripheral white blood cell count was 3.66 {plus minus} 1.08 {times} 10{sup 6} cells/ml for ZA mice decreasing by 21%, 28% and 54% for RZA, MZD and SZD mice respectively. An equally dramatic change in the flow cytometric light scatter profile was found. ZA mice had 66% lymphocytes and 21% polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) in their peripheral blood while MZD and SZD mice contained 43% and 30% lymphocytes and 40% and 60% PMNs respectively. Analysis of the phenotypic distribution of specific classes of lymphocytes revealed ZA blood contained 25% B-cells and 40% T-cells (CD5{sup +}). B-cells decreased 40-50% for RZA and MZD mice and 60-70% for SZD mice. The decline in CD5{sup +} T-cells was more modest at 30% and 45% for MZD and SZD mice. A nearly 40% decline in both T{sub h} and T{sub c/s} cells was noted for both MZD and SZD mice. Radioimmunoassay of serum for changes in IgM and IgG content revealed no change among dietary groups while serum zinc decreased 10% for RZA mice and 50% for both MZD and SZD mice. The authors conclude that peripheral blood differential counts in concert with total B and T-cell phenotype may serve as indicators of zinc status while serum zinc and Ig will not.

  5. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caldefie-Chézet, F; Fusillier, C; Jarde, T; Laroye, H; Damez, M; Vasson, M-P; Guillot, J

    2006-05-01

    The fungicidal and bactericidal actions of the essential oil (EO) of Melaleuca alternifolia seem well established, but their anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects remain unclear. This study investigated in vitro the possible role of whole Melaleuca alternifolia EO as a modulator of the inflammatory/non-specific immune response by exploring the chemotaxis and kinetic radical oxygen species (ROS) production of leukocytes and cytokine secretion in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in humans. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia EO on the chemotaxis under agarose of isolated neutrophils (PMNs) was evaluated. The kinetics of ROS production by stimulated total circulating leukocytes was followed over 2 h by recording the fluorescence intensity of oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123. The effects of this EO on pro-(interleukin IL-2) and anti-(IL-4 and IL10) inflammatory cytokine secretions were determined by ELISA following incubation of PBMCs with the EO for 24 h. Melaleuca alternifolia EO was inefficient on the chemotaxis of PMNs. It exerted an antioxidant effect, reducing ROS production throughout the kinetic study. Melaleuca alternifolia EO inhibited PBMC proliferation, as revealed by a reduction in IL-2 secretion by stimulated lymphocytes. This EO at 0.1% directly increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 compared with IL-4 secretion without EO (18.5 +/- 10.0 vs 3.3 +/- 1, p < 0.05), and also increased IL-10 secretion at 0.01% (94.9 +/- 38.7 vs 44.1 +/- 18, ns). Melaleuca alternifolia EO may not only act as an anti-inflammatory mediator through its antioxidant activity but may also efficiently protect the organism by reducing the proliferation of inflammatory cells without affecting their capacity to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16619364

  6. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  7. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  8. Estimating skin blood saturation by selecting a subset of hyperspectral imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewerlöf, Maria; Salerud, E. Göran; Strömberg, Tomas; Larsson, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    Skin blood haemoglobin saturation (?b) can be estimated with hyperspectral imaging using the wavelength (λ) range of 450-700 nm where haemoglobin absorption displays distinct spectral characteristics. Depending on the image size and photon transport algorithm, computations may be demanding. Therefore, this work aims to evaluate subsets with a reduced number of wavelengths for ?b estimation. White Monte Carlo simulations are performed using a two-layered tissue model with discrete values for epidermal thickness (?epi) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ's ), mimicking an imaging setup. A detected intensity look-up table is calculated for a range of model parameter values relevant to human skin, adding absorption effects in the post-processing. Skin model parameters, including absorbers, are; μ's (λ), ?epi, haemoglobin saturation (?b), tissue fraction blood (?b) and tissue fraction melanin (?mel). The skin model paired with the look-up table allow spectra to be calculated swiftly. Three inverse models with varying number of free parameters are evaluated: A(?b, ?b), B(?b, ?b, ?mel) and C(all parameters free). Fourteen wavelength candidates are selected by analysing the maximal spectral sensitivity to ?b and minimizing the sensitivity to ?b. All possible combinations of these candidates with three, four and 14 wavelengths, as well as the full spectral range, are evaluated for estimating ?b for 1000 randomly generated evaluation spectra. The results show that the simplified models A and B estimated ?b accurately using four wavelengths (mean error 2.2% for model B). If the number of wavelengths increased, the model complexity needed to be increased to avoid poor estimations.

  9. Effects of formaldehyde on lymphocyte subsets and cytokines in the peripheral blood of exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaowei; Jia, Qiang; Zhang, Zhihu; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Xianan; Niu, Yong; Meng, Tao; Feng, Bin; Duan, Huawei; Ye, Meng; Dai, Yufei; Jia, Zhongwei; Zheng, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a well-known irritant, and it is suggested to increase the risk of immune diseases and cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the distribution of major lymphocyte subsets and cytokine expression profiles in the peripheral blood of FA-exposed workers. A total of 118 FA-exposed workers and 79 controls were enrolled in the study. High performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, and cytometric bead array were used to analyze FA in air sample and formic acid in urine, blood lymphocyte subpopulations, and serum cytokines, respectively. The FA-exposed workers were divided into low and high exposure groups according to their exposure levels. The results showed that both the low and high FA-exposed groups had a significant increase of formic acid in urine when compared to the controls. Both the low and high exposure groups had a significant increase in the percentage of B cells (CD19+) compared to the control group (p<0.01). A significant increase in the percentage of the natural killer (NK) cells (CD56+) was observed in the low exposure group compared to the control (p = 0.013). Moreover, the FA-exposed workers in both exposure groups showed a significant higher level of IL-10 but lower level of IL-8 than the control (p<0.01). Subjects in the high exposure group had a higher level of IL-4 but a lower level of IFN-γ than the control (p<0.05). Finally, there is a significant correlation between the levels of IL-10, IL-4, and IL-8 and formic acid (p<0.05). The findings from the present study may explain, at least in part, the association between FA exposure and immune diseases and cancer.

  10. Comparison of the peripheral blood leukocyte population between Japanese Black and Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Ono, Maiko; Saruyama, Yumi; Mukai, Machiko; Kohiruimaki, Masayuki; Kawamura, Seiichi

    2011-02-01

    Japanese black (JB) calves have greater susceptibility to infectious diseases compared to Holstein (Hol) calves. In order to clarify the differences in cellular immune status between JB and Hol calves, the leukocyte population and lymphocyte proliferative ability were analyzed. In total 200 healthy calves, 1 day to 14 weeks of age, were examined: 105 JB and 95 Hol calves. Lower numbers in peripheral blood and percentage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of CD3(+)TcR1-N12(+) T cells and major histocompatibility complex class-II(+)CD14(-) B cells were observed in the JB compared to the Hol. The percentage of TcR1-N12(+)CD25(+) T cell in the JB was significantly lower than that of the Hol at 4-6, and 8-10 weeks. Interleukin (IL)-2 sensitivity in the JB was lower than that in the Hol, and significant differences were observed in age groups of 6-8 weeks and 10-14 weeks. These findings indicated that the lower numbers of γδ T cells and B cells in the JB compared to the Hol might be associated with the specificity of the immune systems in JB calves.

  11. Effect of supplemental vitamin E on the peripheral blood leukocyte population in Japanese Black calves.

    PubMed

    Otomaru, Konosuke; Saito, Shun; Endo, Karura; Kohiruimaki, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the effect of supplemental vitamin E on the peripheral blood leukocyte population in Japanese Black calves. Twenty-six calves kept at the same farm were studied. They were divided into two groups; thirteen calves received 300 IU/day of vitamin E orally from 1 to 3 months of age (VE group), and the other thirteen calves did not receive the vitamin E supplement (control group). The VE group showed a higher serum vitamin E concentration at 2 and 3 months of age compared with the control group (P<0.01). The numbers of CD3(+) cells and CD4(+) cells were higher in the VE group than in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant at 3 months of age (P<0.05). The numbers of CD21(+) cells were higher in the VE group than in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant at 2 months of age (P<0.05). The numbers of CD335(+) cells tended to be higher in the VE group than in the control group. The numbers of CD8(+) cells and CD14(+) cells tended to be higher in the VE group than in the control group at 3 and 4 months of age. This study demonstrated that the supplementation of suckling Japanese Black calves with vitamin E might affect the numbers of some immune cell types in the peripheral blood.

  12. Metabolic parameters and blood leukocyte profiles in cows from herds with high or low mastitis incidence.

    PubMed

    Holtenius, K; Persson Waller, K; Essén-Gustavsson, B; Holtenius, P; Hallén Sandgren, C

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether there were differences in metabolic parameters and blood leukocyte profiles between cows in herds with high or low yearly mastitis incidence. In this study, 271 cows from 20 high yielding dairy herds were examined. According to the selection criteria, all herds had low somatic cell counts. Ten of the selected herds represented low mastitis treatment incidence (LMI) and ten herds had high mastitis treatment incidence (HMI). The farms were visited once and blood samples were taken from each cow that was in the interval from three weeks before to 15 weeks after parturition. The eosinophil count was significantly lower among cows from the HMI herds in the period from four weeks to 15 weeks after parturition. The plasma concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, insulin and urea did not differ between groups, but the concentration of nonesterified fatty acids was significantly higher among HMI cows during the period three weeks after parturition. The concentration of the amino acid tryptophan in plasma was significantly lower among the HMI cows prior to parturition. Glutamine was significantly lower in cows from HMI herds during the first three weeks after parturition. Arginine was consistently lower in HMI cows, although the decrease was only significant during the period from four to fifteen weeks after parturition. The results suggest that there were differences in the metabolism and immune status between herds with high or low yearly mastitis treatment incidence indicating an increased metabolic stress in HMI cows.

  13. Prevalence of cytomegalovirus in Thai blood donors by monoclonal staining of blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Amarapal, P; Tantivanich, S; Balachandra, K

    2001-03-01

    Four hundred and forty-one blood and serum samples were collected during August to October 1998 from the blood donors at the blood bank of Rajvithi Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Their ages were varied between 18-55 years. All specimens were tested by immunostaining and ELISA methods. Forty-seven specimens (10.66%) gave positive results by immunostaining. Among these, 20 cases were seropositive and 27 cases were seronegative. The age group between 41-50 years had a high percentage of CMV infection as judged by the immunostaining method, more than the other age groups. By ELISA, 231 cases (52.38%) had positive IgG antibody to CMV, 42 cases (9.52%) were IgM antibody positive and 39 cases (8.84%) were positive for both IgG and IgM antibodies. The age groups between 36-40 years had a higher percentage of IgM antibody positives than the other age groups. Since the immunostaining method can detect early CMV infection, screening for the presence of antibodies alone is not enough to rule out CMV infection. Immunostaining along with ELISA detection of antibodies was useful for determining a decrease in CMV infection.

  14. Accurate segmentation of leukocyte in blood cell images using Atanassov's intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2014-06-01

    In this paper automatic leukocyte segmentation in pathological blood cell images is proposed using intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory. This is done to count different types of leukocytes for disease detection. Also, the segmentation should be accurate so that the shape of the leukocytes is preserved. So, intuitionistic fuzzy set and interval Type II fuzzy set that consider either more number of uncertainties or a different type of uncertainty as compared to fuzzy set theory are used in this work. As the images are considered fuzzy due to imprecise gray levels, advanced fuzzy set theories may be expected to give better result. A modified Cauchy distribution is used to find the membership function. In intuitionistic fuzzy method, non-membership values are obtained using Yager's intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Optimal threshold is obtained by minimizing intuitionistic fuzzy divergence. In interval type II fuzzy set, a new membership function is generated that takes into account the two levels in Type II fuzzy set using probabilistic T co norm. Optimal threshold is selected by minimizing a proposed Type II fuzzy divergence. Though fuzzy techniques were applied earlier but these methods failed to threshold multiple leukocytes in images. Experimental results show that both interval Type II fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy methods perform better than the existing non-fuzzy/fuzzy methods but interval Type II fuzzy thresholding method performs little bit better than intuitionistic fuzzy method. Segmented leukocytes in the proposed interval Type II fuzzy method are observed to be distinct and clear.

  15. Adenovirus-specific T-cell Subsets in Human Peripheral Blood and After IFN-γ Immunomagnetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chongsheng; Wang, Yingying; Cai, Huili; Laroye, Caroline; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Clement, Laurence; Stoltz, Jean-François; Decot, Véronique; Reppel, Loïc; Bensoussan, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive antiviral cellular immunotherapy by infusion of virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is becoming an alternative treatment for viral infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The T memory stem cell (TSCM) subset was recently described as exhibiting self-renewal and multipotency properties which are required for sustained efficacy in vivo. We wondered if such a crucial subset for immunotherapy was present in VSTs. We identified, by flow cytometry, TSCM in adenovirus (ADV)-specific interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection, and analyzed the distribution of the main T-cell subsets in VSTs: naive T cells (TN), TSCM, T central memory cells (TCM), T effector memory cell (TEM), and effector T cells (TEFF). In this study all of the different T-cell subsets were observed in the blood sample from healthy donor ADV-VSTs, both before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection. As the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system sorts mainly the most differentiated T-cell subsets, we observed that TEM was always the major T-cell subset of ADV-specific T cells after immunomagnetic isolation and especially after expansion in vitro. Comparing T-cell subpopulation profiles before and after in vitro expansion, we observed that in vitro cell culture with interleukin-2 resulted in a significant expansion of TN-like, TCM, TEM, and TEFF subsets in CD4IFN-γ T cells and of TCM and TEM subsets only in CD8IFN-γ T cells. We demonstrated the presence of all T-cell subsets in IFN-γ VSTs including the TSCM subpopulation, although this was weakly selected by the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system. PMID:26641259

  16. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Nina S; Lapteva, Nellya Sh; Rubanovich, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24-77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19-77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2-51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62-11.76, p=3.9×10(-7)). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10(-5)). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10(-7)). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with the development

  17. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Nina S; Lapteva, Nellya Sh; Rubanovich, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24-77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19-77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2-51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62-11.76, p=3.9×10(-7)). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10(-5)). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10(-7)). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with the development

  18. Quantitative T cell subsets profile in peripheral blood from patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: tilting the balance towards proinflammatory and pro-apoptotic subsets

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Ortega, F; Gómez-Martin, D; Santana-De Anda, K; Romo-Tena, J; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Alcocer-Varela, J

    2015-01-01

    The role of T cells in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) is not yet clear. Some alterations in certain subsets have been reported in inflamed muscle cells. However, a broad quantitative assessment of peripheral T cell subsets has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to address the quantitative profile of potential pathogenic T cell subsets, namely follicular helper T cells (Tfh), T helper type 17 (Th17), CD28null and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in peripheral blood from IIM patients. Thirty IIM patients and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy donors were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated. T cell subsets were evaluated by flow cytometry, as follows: Tfh (CD4+CXCR5+) and its subsets Tfh1 (CXCR3+CCR6−), Tfh2 (CXCR3−CCR6−), Tfh17 (CXCR3−CCR6+), Th17 (CD4+IL17A+), CD28null (CD4+CD28−CD244+) and Tregs (CD4+CD25highforkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+); CD8+CD25highFoxP3+). Percentage, absolute numbers and mean fluorescence intensity were analysed. We found increased numbers of total Tfh cells (28 ± 8·16 versus 6·64 ± 1·29, P = 0·031) in IIM patients when compared to healthy controls. Moreover, this increment was dependent upon Tfh2 and Tfh17 (Tfh2:9·49 ± 2·19 versus 1·66 ± 0·46, P = 0·005; Tfh17 9·48 ± 2·83 versus 1·18 ± 0·21, P = 0·014). Also, IIM patients showed higher numbers of Th17 cells (30·25 ± 6·49 versus 13·46 ± 2·95, P = 0·031) as well as decreased number of Tregs (5·98 ± 1·61 versus 30·82 ± 8·38, P = 0·009). We also found an expansion of CD28null cells (162·88 ± 32·29 versus 64 ± 17·35, P = 0·015). Our data suggest that IIM patients are characterized by an expansion of peripheral proinflammatory T cells, such as Tfh and Th17, as well as pro-apoptotic CD28 null cells and a deficiency of suppressor populations of Tregs (CD4+ and CD8+). PMID:25348796

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood brain/nerve barrier dysfunction and leukocyte infiltration: closely related or discordant?

    PubMed

    Weise, Gesa; Stoll, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood nerve barrier (BNB) preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf) allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and perfluorocarbons enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage) infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Blood Brain/Nerve Barrier Dysfunction and Leukocyte Infiltration: Closely Related or Discordant?

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Gesa; Stoll, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood nerve barrier (BNB) preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf) allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and perfluorocarbons enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage) infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients. PMID:23267343

  1. Extracellular Histones Induce Chemokine Production in Whole Blood Ex Vivo and Leukocyte Recruitment In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Johannes; Papareddy, Praveen; Dahlgren, Madelene W.; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Smeds, Emanuel; Linder, Adam; Mörgelin, Matthias; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Egesten, Arne; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system relies to a great deal on the interaction of pattern recognition receptors with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. Extracellular histones belong to the latter group and their release has been described to contribute to the induction of systemic inflammatory reactions. However, little is known about their functions in the early immune response to an invading pathogen. Here we show that extracellular histones specifically target monocytes in human blood and this evokes the mobilization of the chemotactic chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 from these cells. The chemokine induction involves the toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex on monocytes, and is under the control of interferon-γ. Consequently, subcutaneous challenge with extracellular histones results in elevated levels of CXCL10 in a murine air pouch model and an influx of leukocytes to the site of injection in a TLR4 dependent manner. When analyzing tissue biopsies from patients with necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, extracellular histone H4 and CXCL10 are immunostained in necrotic, but not healthy tissue. Collectively, these results show for the first time that extracellular histones have an important function as chemoattractants as their local release triggers the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. PMID:26646682

  2. Cell-type specific gene expression profiles of leukocytes in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Chana; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A; Brown, Patrick O

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood is a complex tissue comprising numerous cell types with distinct functions and corresponding gene expression profiles. We attempted to define the cell type specific gene expression patterns for the major constituent cells of blood, including B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, lymphocytes and granulocytes. We did this by comparing the global gene expression profiles of purified B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, granulocytes, and lymphocytes using cDNA microarrays. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that similar cell populations from different donors share common gene expression profiles. Supervised analyses identified gene expression signatures for B-cells (427 genes), T-cells (222 genes), CD8+ T-cells (23 genes), granulocytes (411 genes), and lymphocytes (67 genes). No statistically significant gene expression signature was identified for CD4+ cells. Genes encoding cell surface proteins were disproportionately represented among the genes that distinguished among the lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocytes were distinguishable from granulocytes based on their higher levels of expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, while granulocytes exhibited characteristic expression of various cell surface and inflammatory proteins. Conclusion The genes comprising the cell-type specific signatures encompassed many of the genes already known to be involved in cell-type specific processes, and provided clues that may prove useful in discovering the functions of many still unannotated genes. The most prominent feature of the cell type signature genes was the enrichment of genes encoding cell surface proteins, perhaps reflecting the importance of specialized systems for sensing the environment to the physiology of resting leukocytes. PMID:16704732

  3. Flow cytometry as a tool in the evaluation of blood leukocyte function in Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758) (Testudines, Cheloniidae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Sá-Rocha, V M; Kinoshita, D; Genoy-Puerto, A; Zwarg, T; Werneck, M R; Sá-Rocha, L C; Matushima, E R

    2009-08-01

    Chelonia mydas is a sea turtle that feeds and nests on the Brazilian coast and a disease called fibropapillomatosis is a threat to this species. Because of this, it is extremely necessary to determine a methodology that would enable the analysis of blood leukocyte function in these sea turtles. In order to achieve this aim, blood samples were collected from C. mydas with or without fibropapillomas captured on the São Paulo north coast. Blood samples were placed in tubes containing sodium heparin and were transported under refrigeration to the laboratory in sterile RPMI 1640 cell culture medium. Leukocytes were separated by density gradient using Ficoll-PaqueTM Plus, Amershan Biociences. The following stimuli were applied in the assessment of leukocyte function: Phorbol Miristate-Acetate (PMA) for oxidative burst activity evaluation and Zymosan A (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Bio Particles, Alexa Fluor 594 conjugate for phagocytosis evaluation. Three cell populations were identified: heterophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. Monocytes were the cells responsible for phagocytosis and oxidative burst.

  4. Influence of fingolimod on basic lymphocyte subsets frequencies in the peripheral blood of multiple sclerosis patients – preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Julia; Czerwiec, Michał; Siwicka-Gieroba, Dorota; Walankiewicz, Monika; Grafka, Agnieszka; Zgurski, Michał; Surdacka, Agata; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina; Roliński, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background Fingolimod is a drug administered orally to adult patients treated for relapsing remitting course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mode of action of fingolimod is based on intense S1P1 receptor stimulation and “arresting” lymphocytes in lymphatic organs. Objective of the research was to assess changes in the frequencies of basic lymphocyte subsets in patients treated for multiple sclerosis with the use of fingolimod. Material and methods Study group comprised of 25 previously untreated adult patients with MS. Venous blood samples were collected from each patient before and one month, three months and six months after treatment initiation. Peripheral blood lymphocyte immunophenotype was assessed with a set of monoclonal antibodies bounded to appropriate fluorochromes and flow cytometer FACSC alibur. Statistical analysis of the results was conducted using Statistica 9.0 software. Results Before fingolimod administration median of lymphocyte subsets percentage in each patient was in reference range. After 1 month of treatment we noticed significant changes in frequencies of following lymphocyte subsets: NK cells – 51.22% (p = 0.016), T CD4+ cells – 11.58% (p = 0.01), T CD4+:T CD8+ cells ratio – 0.61 (p = 0.005). After 3 and 6 months of treatment there was further increase of deviation from normal state. Conclusions The use of fingolimod is associated with profound changes in lymphocyte subsets distribution, which might bear a risk of the development of cellular immune deficiency symptoms. PMID:26648781

  5. Imbalance between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Liu, Hong-Ju; Xin, Jian-Bao; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Meng, Zhao-Ji; Sun, Sheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background. CD8+ T lymphocytes are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, systematic analyses of CD8+ T cell (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc) subsets in COPD patients have yet to be well conducted. Methods. The whole Tc subsets, including Tc1/2/10/17, CD8+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8+α7+ T cells, were quantified by flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 24 stable COPD subjects (SCOPD), 14 patients during acute exacerbations (AECOPD), and 14 healthy nonsmokers (HN). Results. Acute exacerbations of COPD were accompanied by elevated levels of circulating CD8+ T cells. Tc1 cells were increased in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients, whereas the percentage of Tc2 cells was decreased in SCOPD patients but remained normal in AECOPD patients. Tc17 cells were increased only in AECOPD patients, and the percentage of Tc10 cells was reduced in both SCOPD and AECOPD patients. The imbalances of pro/anti-inflammatory Tc subsets observed in COPD may be caused by the lack of Tc10 cells and the impaired anti-inflammatory capacity of CD8+ Tregs. Conclusions. The imbalances between subsets of CD8+ peripheral blood T cells contribute to the immune response dysfunction in COPD pathogenesis. PMID:27547589

  6. Age-Related Changes following In Vitro Stimulation with Rhodococcus equi of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes from Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Kachroo, Priyanka; Ivanov, Ivan; Seabury, Ashley G.; Liu, Mei; Chowdhary, Bhanu P.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium primarily known as an equine pathogen that infects young foals causing a pyogranulomatuous pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms mediating the immune response of foals to R. equi are not fully elucidated. Hence, global genomic high-throughput tools like gene expression microarrays might identify age-related gene expression signatures and molecular pathways that contribute to the immune mechanisms underlying the inherent susceptibility of foals to disease caused by R. equi. The objectives of this study were 2-fold: 1) to compare the expression profiles at specific ages of blood leukocytes from foals stimulated with virulent R. equi with those of unstimulated leukocytes; and, 2) to characterize the age-related changes in the gene expression profile associated with blood leukocytes in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi. Peripheral blood leukocytes were obtained from 6 foals within 24 hours (h) of birth (day 1) and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after birth. The samples were split, such that half were stimulated with live virulent R. equi, and the other half served as unstimulated control. RNA was extracted and the generated cDNA was labeled with fluorescent dyes for microarray hybridizations using an equine microarray. Our findings suggest that there is age-related differential expression of genes involved in host immune response and immunity. We found induction of genes critical for host immunity against pathogens (MHC class II) only at the later time-points (compared to birth). While it appears that foals up to 8-weeks of age are able to initiate a protective inflammatory response against the bacteria, relatively decreased expression of various other immune-related genes points toward inherent diminished immune responses closer to birth. These genes and pathways may contribute to disease susceptibility in foals if infected early in life, and might thus be targeted for developing preventative or therapeutic strategies. PMID

  7. LRP5 and plasma cholesterol levels modulate the canonical Wnt pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Pages, Maria; Carolina Romero, July; Badimon, Lina

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is triggered after invasion or injury to restore homeostasis. Although the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is one of the first molecular responses to cellular damage, its role in inflammation is still unclear. It was our hypothesis that the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway are modulators of inflammatory mechanisms. Wild-type (WT) and LRP5(-/-) mice were fed a hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet to trigger dislipidemia and chronic inflammation. Diets were supplemented with plant sterol esters (PSEs) to induce LDL cholesterol lowering and the reduction of inflammation. HC WT mice showed increased serum cholesterol levels that correlated with increased Lrp5 and Wnt/β-catenin gene expression while in the HC LRP5(-/-) mice Wnt/β-catenin pathway was shut down. Functionally, HC induced pro-inflammatory gene expression in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting an inhibitory role of the Wnt pathway in inflammation. Dietary PSE administration downregulated serum cholesterol levels in WT and LRP5(-/-) mice. Furthermore, in WT mice PSE increased anti-inflammatory genes expression and inhibited Wnt/β-catenin activation. Hepatic gene expression of Vldlr, Lrp2 and Lrp6 was increased after HC feeding in WT mice but not in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting a role for these receptors in the clearance of plasmatic lipoproteins. Finally, an antiatherogenic role for LRP5 was demonstrated as HC LRP5(-/-) mice developed larger aortic atherosclerotic lesions than WT mice. Our results show an anti-inflammatory, pro-survival role for LRP5 and the Wnt signaling pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

  8. A Comparative Study of the T Cell Stimulatory and Polarizing Capacity of Human Primary Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Simone P.; Bakdash, Ghaith; Weiden, Jorieke; Sköld, Annette E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players of immune responses; they become activated upon infection or inflammation and migrate to lymph nodes, where they can initiate an antigen-specific immune response by activating naive T cells. Two major types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in peripheral blood, namely, myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Myeloid DCs (mDCs) can be subdivided based on the expression of either CD1c or CD141. These human DC subsets differ in surface marker expression, Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and transcriptional profile, suggesting functional differences between them. Here, we directly compared the capacity of human blood mDCs and pDCs to activate and polarize CD4+ T cells. CD141+ mDCs show an overall more mature phenotype over CD1c+ mDC and pDCs; they produce less IL-10 and more IL-12 than CD1c+ mDCs. Despite these differences, all subsets can induce the production of IFN-γ in naive CD4+ T cells. CD1c+ and CD141+ mDCs especially induce a strong T helper 1 profile. Importantly, naive CD4+ T cells are not polarized towards regulatory T cells by any subset. These findings further establish all three human blood DCs—despite their differences—as promising candidates for immunostimulatory effectors in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057096

  9. Leukocyte, red blood cell and morphological adaptation to moderate physical training in rats undernourished in the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marcelo Tavares; Perez, Manuella Cavalcanti; Ribas, Valdenilson Ribeiro; Martins, Gilberto de Freire; de Castro, Célia Maria Machado Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the impact of moderate physical exercise on the total and differential leukocyte counts and red blood cell count of 36 sixty-day-old adult male Wistar rats subjected to early malnourishment. Methods The rats were divided in nourished (N - casein 17%) and malnourished groups (M - casein 8%) and thesegroups were then subdivided in trained (T) untrained (U) creating four groups NT, NU, MT and MU. The NT and MTgroups were submitted to moderate physical exercise using a treadmill (60 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks). Onthe 1st day, before the training started T0 and 24 hours after the last training day of the week (T1 until T8), a 1 mLaliquot of blood was collected from the animals' tails for analysis. The total leukocyte count was evaluated in a cellcounter with an electronic microscope. The cyanmethemoglobin technique was used to measure the hemoglobin level. The hematocrit values were determined as a percentage using the micro-hematocrit technique with a microcapillaryreader and a cell counter was used to determine the red blood cell count. The t-test was used for statistical analysis and a p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Data are expressed as means ± standard deviation. Results There was a significant difference in the total leukocyte count between the NT (9.1 ± 0.1) and MT groups (8.0 ± 0.1) from T1 and in neutrophils between the NT (22.1 ± 0.6) and MT groups (24.6 ± 1.8) from T7 (p < 0.05). There was no statistical significance in the hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell count from T1. Conclusions According to the results of this study, moderate physical exercise seems to have induced physiologic adaptation in adult rats from T1. PMID:23049442

  10. Defining Mononuclear Phagocyte Subset Homology Across Several Distant Warm-Blooded Vertebrates Through Comparative Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickaël; Moroldo, Marco; Foucras, Gilles; Salmon, Henri; Marty, Hélène; Quéré, Pascale; Bertho, Nicolas; Boudinot, Pierre; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenetically and functionally distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic, and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections. We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover, we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey. PMID:26150816

  11. [The study of aberrant methylation in blood leukocytes of liquidators of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Kuz'mina, N S; Miazin, A E; Lapteva, N Sh; Rubanovich, A V

    2014-01-01

    The study of aberrant methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of genes (P16/CDKN2A, P14/ARF, RASSF1A, GSTP1) in blood leukocytes of liquidators of the Chernobyl accident (n = 83, 38-76 years of age) and control subjects of two groups (n = 48, age ≤ 35 and n = 65, age > 35) was carried out using methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease analysis followed by PCR. The total number of AciI sites in the analyzed fragments ranged from 2 to 7 for different genes. Only 1 subject (2.1%) from the control group (healthy young individuals, age ≤ 35) has methylation of the studied CpG--dinucleotides of RASSF1A gene. Promoter methylation of at least one of the genes analyzed was observed in 28.92% liquidators and significantly exceeded (p = 0.016) such rate in a one-age (> 35 years of age) control group (12.31%). A significantly elevated frequency (p = 0.023) of individuals with abnormal methylation of GSTP1 gene in the group of liquidators as compared to the control group was revealed. The occurrence of promoter methylation of RASSF1A gene significantly correlated with aging both in the control group (r = 0.214; p = 0.023) and in the liquidators of the Chernobyl accident (r = 0.230; p = 0.036). No similar trend was found for other genes. Multiple regression analysis showed that the growth in the number of methylated loci of a set of genes p16, p14 and GSTP1 is exclusively due to the fact of exposure (OR = 7.32, 95% CI = 2.49-25.83, p-value = 2.7 x 10(-5)). The results obtained demonstrate for the first time the reality of the radiation-induced aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoters of genes involved in the basic protective, functions of cells in the human body in remote periods after radiation exposure.

  12. Flow cytometric characterizations of leukocyte subpopulations in the peripheral blood of northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Lin-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Pang, Wei; Lyu, Long-Bao; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2014-11-18

    Pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemistrina group) have been extensively used as non-human primate animal models for various human diseases in recent years, notably for AIDS research due to their sensitivity to HIV-1. Northern pig-tailed macaques (M. leonina) are distributed in China and other surrounding Southeast Asia countries. Although northern pig-tailed macaques have been bred on a large scale as experimental animals since 2012, the reference value of normal levels of leukocytes is not available. To obtain such information, 62 blood samples from male and female healthy northern pig-tailed macaques at different ages were collected. The normal range of major leukocyte subpopulations, such as T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, and the expression levels of activation or differentiation related molecules (CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5, CD21, IgD, CD80 and CD86) on lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. The counts of B cells decreased with age, but those of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells and the frequency of CD38(+)HLA-DR(+)CD4(+) T cells were positively correlated with age. The counts of leukocyte subpopulations were higher in males than those in females except for CD4(+) T cells. Males also showed higher expression levels of IgD and CD21 within B cells. This study provides basic data about the leukocyte subpopulations of northern pig-tailed macaques and compares this species with commonly used Chinese rhesus macaques (M. mulatta), which is meaningful for the biomedical application of northern pig-tailed macaques.

  13. Functional capacities of T lymphocyte subsets from synovial fluid and blood in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J

    1986-01-01

    A reverse haemolytic plaque forming cell (PFC) assay was employed to analyse the impact of T suppressor/cytotoxic and T helper cells on B cell function in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In all cases T8-enriched cells from synovial fluid and blood suppressed the pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced IgM, IgG, and IgA secretion by autologous lymphocytes to the same degree. The suppression was partly abolished by irradiation of T8-enriched cells. T4-enriched cells from blood increased the PWM induced Ig secretion by autologous blood B cells. In six of 10 patients responses 1.2 to four times higher were obtained with T4-enriched cells from synovial fluid, but in four of 10 patients synovial fluid T4-enriched cells did not increase the PWM responses of blood B cells. T4- and T8-enriched T cells from synovial fluid comprised more Ia+ cells than did T cells from blood (36% v 3% and 43% v 6%). Ia+ T helper and suppressor/cytotoxic cells may modulate in vivo activation of synovial B cells in RA. PMID:2943237

  14. Amifostine (WR2721) Confers DNA Protection to In Vivo Cisplatin-Treated Murine Peripheral Blood Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prieto González, E. A.; Fuchs, A. G.; Sánchez, González S.

    2009-01-01

    Amifostine [S-2-3-aminopropil amino ethyl phosphorotioic acid], a modulator agent for antineoplastic drugs involved in free radicals generation has given controversial results in cisplatin treated leukocytes in vitro. We have evaluated the amifostine protection over leukocytes in vivo, using comet assay. Groups of five OF1 male mice were given one of three doses of amifostine (56, 105 and 200 mg/Kg) after a cisplatin single injection (10 mg/Kg). Serum malonyldialdehide levels, catalase and superoxide dismutase activity were also evaluated. Amifostine showed significant DNA protection (p< 0.01) at the two lower doses evaluated. Malonyldildehide decreased in all amifostine treatments with respect to cisplatin while antioxidant enzyme activities remained unchanged. However, DNA migration increased with the highest amifostine dose; in fact highest dose of amifostine did no protect damage caused by cisplatin this result have implications on amifostine treatment schedules in clinical practice. PMID:19809542

  15. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  16. Effect of vanadium on the subset and proliferation of peripheral blood T cells, and serum interleukin-2 content in broilers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Cui, Heng-Min; Peng, Xi; Zuo, Zhicai; Liu, Xiaodong; Wu, Bangyuan

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this 42-day study was to investigate the effects of dietary excess vanadium on immune function by determining changes of the subsets and proliferation function of peripheral blood T cells. Four hundred twenty 1-day-old avian broilers were divided into six groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same diet amended to contain 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 ppm vanadium supplied as ammonium metavanadate. In comparison with those of the control group, the percentages of CD (3) (+) , CD (3) (+) CD (4) (+) , and CD (3) (+) CD (8) (+) were decreased in 45 and 60 ppm groups from 14 to 42 days of age, and the percentages of CD (3) (+) and CD (3) (+) CD (4) (+) were increased in 5 ppm group at 42 days of age. The CD (4) (+) /CD (8) (+) ratio was increased in 45 and 60 ppm groups at 28 days of age. Meanwhile, the proliferation function of peripheral blood T cell were decreased in 30, 45, and 60 ppm groups from 14 to 42 days of age. Also, the serum interleukin-2 contents were decreased in 45 and 60 ppm groups from 14 to 42 days of age and increased in 5 ppm group at 28 days of age. Histopathologically, hypocellularity appeared in the thymus in 45 and 60 ppm groups. It was concluded that dietary vanadium in excess of 30 ppm reduced the percentages of peripheral blood T-cell subsets and the proliferation function and serum interleukin-2 contents. The cellular immune function was finally impaired in broilers.

  17. Comparison of Sample Fixation and the use of LDS-751 or anti-CD45 for Leukocyte Identification in Mouse Whole Blood for Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Melissa L.; Davidson, Lisa; McDonagh, Paul F.; Ritter, Leslie S.

    2007-01-01

    Flow cytometry methods used to measure leukocyte function often entail sample preparation procedures that cause artifactual cell activation. To avoid leukocyte activation by isolation techniques, some preparation methods use fluorescent markers to discriminate leukocytes from erythrocytes in whole blood. One of these markers, laser dye styryl–751(LDS-751), has been used to distinguish leukocytes by staining nucleic acid, but has been found to stain other blood cells and dead cells indiscriminately. Thus, LDS-751 may not be an appropriate reagent for leukocyte identification in whole blood. Fixing samples with formaldehydes increases cell permeability and causes surface protein cross-linking that may alter staining of both intra- and extracellular markers. The degree of this sample alteration by formaldehyde fixation, however, remains in question. In addition, little is known about flow cytometry and sample preparation methods in mouse whole blood. The purpose of this study was to determine if labeling leukocytes with a monoclonal antibody specific to leukocyte common antigen (CD45) was superior to labeling with LDS-751 and to determine the effect of sample fixation on a mouse whole blood preparation for flow cytometry. Samples were incubated with CD16/CD32 Fc receptor blocker, and either 10 μg/ml LDS-751 or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The samples were then fixed with paraformaldehyde or diluted with PBS followed by incubation with 5ug/ml PerCP-conjugated anti-CD45, 5ug/ml FITC-conjugated anti-CD11b, or 80 μM dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We found that samples labeled with LDS-751 demonstrated decreased fluorescence intensity for granulocyte CD11b expression and ROS production compared to samples labeled with anti-CD45. In addition, sample fixation decreased mean fluorescence intensity in samples labeled with either LDS-751 or anti-CD45. We conclude that labeling leukocytes with monoclonal antibody CD45 in a mouse whole blood preparation is preferable, as

  18. Effect of Very Low Dose Fast Neutrons on the DNA of Rats' Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Sherif S; Saeed, Abdu; Shaheen, Salem A; El Assouli, Sufian M; El Assouli, M-Zaki; Raouf, Gehan A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of very low dose fast neutrons on the chromatin and DNA of rats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and leukocytes has been studied in the present work using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Fourteen female Wistar rats were used; seven were irradiated with neutrons of 0.9 cGy (Am-Be, 0.02 cGy h(-1)), and seven others were used as control. Second derivative and curve fitting were used to analyze the FTIR spectra. In addition, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify the group spectra. Meanwhile, the tail moment and percentage of DNA in the tail were used as indicators to sense the breaking and the level of damage in DNA. The analysis of FTIR spectra of the PBMC of the irradiated group revealed a marked increase in the area of phosphodiesters of nucleic acids and the area ratios of RNA/DNA and phosphodiesters/carbohydrates. A sharp significant increase and decrease in the areas of RNA and DNA ribose were recorded, respectively. In the irradiated group, leukocytes with different tail lengths were observed. The distributions of tail moments and the percentage of DNA in the tail of irradiated groups were heterogeneous. The mean value of the percentages of DNA in the tail at 0.5 h post-irradiation represented low-level damage in the DNA. Therefore, one can conclude that very low dose fast neutrons might cause changes in the DNA of PBMC at the submolecular level. It could cause low-level damage, double-strand break, and chromatin fragmentation of DNA of leukocytes.

  19. 76 FR 5386 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Pre-Storage Leukocyte Reduction of Whole Blood and Blood Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... same title dated January 2001 (January 31, 2001, 66 FR 8410). The draft guidance, when finalized, will... of Whole Blood and Blood Components Intended for Transfusion; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Blood and Blood Components Intended for Transfusion'' dated January 2011. The draft guidance...

  20. Antibody and blood leukocyte response in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) tick-infested dogs and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Matias P J; Aoki, Vanessa L; Sanches, Françoise P S; Aquino, Lúcia P T C T; Garcia, Marcos V; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H

    2003-07-10

    The dog is considered to be the natural host of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and is unable to develop appreciable resistance even after repeated feedings. The guinea pig develops strong resistance after one infestation with adult ticks. Antibody (IgG) titres against tick salivary gland antigens (SGAs) and blood leukocyte numbers in dogs and guinea pigs undergoing experimental R. sanguineus tick infestations were measured to detect a possible correlation with susceptibility or resistance of hosts. Since infested dogs develop an immediate hypersensitivity reaction to R. sanguineus antigens, total and anti-R. sanguineus SGA IgE levels were also measured in this host species. IgG and IgE antibody levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along three consecutive infestations of both hosts. Most dogs and guinea pigs displayed low IgG levels against R. sanguineus SGAs, though marked differences in individual response were observed. Although dog's total serum IgE levels increased significantly after infestations, no change in the amount of anti-salivary gland IgE was detected. Total and differential blood cell counts were determined in dogs and guinea pigs during primary and secondary infestation. In dogs, a tertiary infestation and a subsequent higher infestation level were also evaluated. Infested dogs did not display any alteration in blood leukocyte counts throughout the experiment. Guinea pigs, on the other hand, developed a significant basophilia during primary infestation which increased further during secondary infestation. These data reveal similarities and differences in the reactions of resistant and non-resistant hosts to ticks. They contribute for the understanding of such host-parasite relationships and will hopefully aid in the development of immune control of ticks. PMID:12860067

  1. Influence of the olfactory bulbs on blood leukocytes and behavioral responses to infection in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J; Galang, Jerome; Kay, Leslie M; Pyter, Leah M

    2009-05-01

    Surgical removal of the olfactory bulb alters several aspects of immunological activity. This study investigated the role of the olfactory bulbs in the control of behavioral responses to simulated infection, and the environmental modulation of sickness behaviors by changes in day length. Adult male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were subjected to bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBx) or a sham surgical procedure, and were then exposed to long(15 h light/day; LD) or short (9 h light/day; SD) photoperiods for 8–12 weeks, after which circulating leukocytes and behavioral responses (anorexia, anhedonia, cachexia) to simulated gram-negative bacterial infections (i.p. lipopolysaccharide [LPS] treatment;0.625 mg/kg) were quantified. OBx treatment altered the effects of photoperiod on immune function in a trait-specific manner. LPS-induced anorexia was exacerbated in SD-OBx hamsters; LPS-induced anhedonia was exacerbated in LD-OBx hamsters; and photoperiodic differences in circulating leukocytes and LPS-induced cachexia were eliminated by OBx. Plasma cortisol concentrations did not differ between LD and SD hamsters, irrespective of olfactory bulb integrity. The data indicate that photoperiod affects immune function via OB-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and that changes in cortisol production are not required for photoperiodic changes in sickness behaviors to manifest.

  2. Model studies of leukocyte-endothelium-blood interactions. II. Hemodynamic impact of leukocytes adherent to the wall of post-capillary vessels.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G B; Cokelet, G R

    1997-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and large scale model experiments were used to analyze the hemodynamic impact of leukocytes adherent to the wall of post-capillary venules. Using a large scale model and, with the aid of a finite element package, solving the Navier Stokes equations for low Reynolds number flow in a cylinder past an adherent sphere, we have developed a dimensionless correlation which permits the estimation of the pressure drop across an adherent leukocyte in an in vivo vessel. This relationship is: f.Re = exp[2.877+4.630 (d/D)4] where f is the Fanning friction factor, Re is the Reynolds number and d/D is the leukocyte to vessel diameter ratio. The friction factor is proportional to the pressure drop across the leukocyte, and does not significantly increase until d/D is greater than 0.5, and then increases rapidly with increasing d/D. Computations indicate that the length of the disturbed flow region generated by an adherent leukocyte increases with decreasing vessel size. The average wall stress in the disturbed flow region remains constant, and equal to the wall stress in the undisturbed region for d/D less than approximately 0.5. For d/D greater than 0.5, the average wall stress in the disturbed flow region increases rapidly with increasing d/D. There is an even larger increase, up to five times greater than the average disturbed stress, in the peak wall stress in the disturbed flow region. This indicates that significant wall stress gradients can be generated by an adherent leukocyte in post-capillary size vessels.

  3. Synergistic effects of high blood cholesterol and hypertension on leukocyte and platelet recruitment in the cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Almeida-Paula, Lidiana D; Granger, Daniel N

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension or hypercholesterolemia can induce a proinflammatory and prothrombogenic phenotype in the microcirculation of the brain; however, less is known about how the combination of these risk factors affects the vasculature. We recently reported that a moderate (60%) increase in plasma cholesterol blunts the recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the cerebral microvessels elicited by hypertension. In this study, we examined whether larger increments in blood cholesterol (4-fold) exerts a similar modulating influence on the vasculature in the presence of hypertension. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice with deoxycorticosterone acetate salt-induced hypertension were placed on a high-cholesterol diet and exhibited exaggerated leukocyte and platelet adhesion responses in cerebral microvessels. Intermittent feeding (every fourth day) with high-cholesterol diet yielded similar phenotypic changes in the vasculature. Once the mice were placed on high-cholesterol diet, 4 days on normal diet (ND) were needed to revert to a normal vascular phenotype. Angiotensin II type 1 receptors and reactive oxygen species seem to contribute to the vascular responses induced by hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Our findings indicate that the combination of hypertension and large increases in plasma cholesterol concentration results in a severe, but reversible, inflammatory and thrombogenic phenotype in the cerebral microvasculature.

  4. Quantitative analysis of the suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sedeño-Monge, Virginia; Arcega-Revilla, Raúl; Rojas-Morales, Emmanuel; Santos-López, Gerardo; Perez-García, Juan Carlos; Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Solis-Morales, Casandra Lucrecia; Aguilar-Rosas, Salvador; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a triad of inflammation, demyelination and gliosis. Because the suppressors of cytokine signaling (Socs) regulate the immune response, we quantified SOCS1 and SOCS3 transcription in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with MS. SOCS1 transcription decreased significantly in MS patients compared with neurologically healthy persons (0.08±0.02 vs. 1.02±0.23; p=0.0001); while SOCS3 transcription increased in MS patients compared with controls (2.76±0.66 vs. 1.03±0.27; p=0.0008). Our results showed an imbalance of SOCS1 and SOCS3 transcription in MS patients, and a moderated negative correlation between them (Spearman's r=-0.57; p=0.0003).

  5. Oxidant injury of caucasian glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase—deficient red blood cells by phagocytosing leukocytes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Baehner, Robert L.; Nathan, David G.; Castle, William B.

    1971-01-01

    Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency of red blood cells (RBC) may develop sudden hemolytic anemia during infection. Since phagocytizing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are known to generate hydrogen peroxide, we explored the influence of this oxidant product of PMN on juxtaposed G6PD-deficient and normal RBC. The oxidant stress induced by phagocytosis depleted G6PD-deficient RBC of reduced glutathione (GSH) and this was associated with rapid removal of these cells from the circulation by the liver and spleen. No such effect was observed on normal RBC. Phagocytizing chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) PMN which lack hydrogen peroxide generation, failed to diminish GSH level in G6PD-deficient RBC. Thus, PMN can pose as a source of oxidant damage to G6PD-deficient RBC due to hydrogen peroxide generated during phagocytosis. PMID:5129301

  6. The effects of oil exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes and splenic melano-macrophage centers of Gulf of Mexico fishes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad Omar; Hohn, Claudia; Allen, Peter J; Ford, Lorelei; Dail, Mary Beth; Pruett, Stephen; Petrie-Hanson, Lora

    2014-02-15

    In August and November 2010 we collected and examined peripheral blood and tissues from three species of Gulf of Mexico fish. Findings were compared to non-exposed control fish. The leukocyte counts of exposed alligator gar were not significantly different from controls, while exposed Gulf killifish and sea trout had significantly decreased lymphocyte counts. Liver ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) values from sea trout were significantly greater than control sea trout EROD values, suggesting poly aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. Splenic melano-macrophage centers (MMCs) from exposed sea trout and Gulf killifish showed a significant increase in number compared to non-exposed fish. Sea trout splenic MMCs were also significantly greater in size. These findings suggest that Gulf fish sampled were exposed to crude oil from the Macondo well and were in a lymphopenic or immuno-compromised state. PMID:24405733

  7. The effects of oil exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes and splenic melano-macrophage centers of Gulf of Mexico fishes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad Omar; Hohn, Claudia; Allen, Peter J; Ford, Lorelei; Dail, Mary Beth; Pruett, Stephen; Petrie-Hanson, Lora

    2014-02-15

    In August and November 2010 we collected and examined peripheral blood and tissues from three species of Gulf of Mexico fish. Findings were compared to non-exposed control fish. The leukocyte counts of exposed alligator gar were not significantly different from controls, while exposed Gulf killifish and sea trout had significantly decreased lymphocyte counts. Liver ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) values from sea trout were significantly greater than control sea trout EROD values, suggesting poly aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. Splenic melano-macrophage centers (MMCs) from exposed sea trout and Gulf killifish showed a significant increase in number compared to non-exposed fish. Sea trout splenic MMCs were also significantly greater in size. These findings suggest that Gulf fish sampled were exposed to crude oil from the Macondo well and were in a lymphopenic or immuno-compromised state.

  8. Phenotypic and functional cellular differences between human CD3- decidual and peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Deniz, G; Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Johnson, P M

    1994-05-01

    CD3- leukocyte clones derived from human decidualized endometrial tissue of first trimester pregnancy have been compared with CD3- PBL clones. Most CD3- decidual granulated leukocyte (DGL) clones were CD16- CD56+, whereas most CD3- PBL clones were CD16+ CD56+. CD3- DGL and PBL clones, whether CD16+ or not, showed MHC-nonrestricted NK cell activity. However, CD3- CD16- DGL clones had low cytotoxic activity against the NK-resistant cell line BSM, whereas CD3- CD16+ DGL and CD3- PBL clones were strongly cytotoxic. Cytolytic activity has also been investigated in respect of target cell HLA-G expression, because this nonpolymorphic class I MHC molecule is expressed selectively by invasive fetal cytotrophoblast. Class I HLA Ag loss cell mutants were killed efficiently by CD3- DGL clones. Expression of transfected HLA-B8 increased their sensitivity to lysis by most CD3- DGL clones, whereas expression of transfected HLA-G commonly led to decreased target cell killing. In addition, the effects of uncloned CD3- DGL on the one-way MLR have been examined. These cells were very poor responders and, unless cultured to induce expression of class II MHC molecules, were also very poor stimulators. When fresh CD3- DGLs were added as third-party cells, either autologous or allogeneic to responder cells, [3H]TdR incorporation was decreased in the MLR. Thus, CD3- DGL clones express MHC-nonrestricted cytolytic activity, notably against HLA-negative cells, but expression of HLA-G offers protection to target cells. In addition, CD3- DGL may function to suppress allogeneic responses.

  9. Expression of Adiponectin Receptors on Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of Hypertensive Children Is Associated with the Severity of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gackowska, Lidia; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Trojanek, Joanna; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Kubiszewska, Izabela; Niemirska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Aldona; Michalkiewicz, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out whether peripheral blood leukocyte adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1, AdipoR2) protein expression patterns (flow cytometry) differ between the primary hypertension children (n = 57) and healthy controls (n = 19) and if their expression levels are related to selected clinical parameters. The group of 26 patients [AdipoR(-)] showed lower and the group of 31 patients [AdipoR(+)] showed higher AdipoRs protein expression than the control and each other (P < 0.01 for neutrophils, P < 0.05 for monocytes). The AdipoR(+) leukocytes expressed higher AdipoR1 mRNA levels (RT-PCR) than AdipoR(-) ones and controls (P = 0.022 and P = 0.007, resp.). Despite greater BMI, the AdipoR(-) patients had unchanged serum adiponectin levels. In contrast, AdipoR(+) patients had lower serum adiponectin concentrations than the AdipoR(-) ones and controls (P < 0.001). The AdipoR(+) patients had higher blood pressure (P = 0.042) and greater carotid intima-media thickness (P = 0.017) than the AdipoR(-) ones. The stage of hypertension was associated with increased neutrophil but not monocyte AdipoR1 density (AdipoR1 MFI) (P < 0.05). Severe ambulatory hypertension was presented more often in AdipoR(+) patients than in AdipoR(-) ones (51.6% versus 26.9%, resp.; P < 0.01). In conclusion, neutrophil AdipoRs upregulation was associated with early stages of vascular injury, hypertension severity, and low serum levels of adiponectin.

  10. Effects of doxycycline on haematology, blood chemistry and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets of healthy dogs and dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, A; García-Sancho, M; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Tesouro, M Á; Sainz, Á

    2015-06-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by Ehrlichia canis, is a vector-borne disease with a worldwide distribution. It has been proposed that the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of disease caused by Ehrlichia spp. can be attributed to the immune response rather than to any direct rickettsial effect. Moreover, doxycycline, the antimicrobial of choice for the treatment of CME, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties associated with blood leukocyte proliferation function, cytokine synthesis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In order to assess the potential effects of doxycycline, dependent and independent of its antimicrobial activity, the present study compared changes in haematology, blood chemistry and circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in 12 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CME after doxycycline therapy. Some changes were recorded only in the CME affected dogs, probably due to the antimicrobial effect of doxycycline. However, increases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelet count and α2-globulins, and decreased plasma creatinine were observed in both healthy and CME affected dogs. The absolute count of B lymphocytes (CD21(+)) increased initially, but then decreased until the end of the study period in both groups. A potential effect of doxycycline unrelated to its antimicrobial activity against E. canis is suggested, taking into account the results observed both in healthy dogs and in dogs with CME. PMID:25957920

  11. Modulatory influence of rarely repeated of immobilization episodes on the interleukin-1β-dependent reaction of blood leukocytes and hepatoprotective effect of restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Tseilikman, O B; Tseilikman, V E; Linin, A V; Gubkin, D A; Rudina, E A; Trubetskoy, S A; Ivanov, P V; Pozdnyakov, E A

    2011-02-01

    Repeated episodes of 1-h restraint stress were accompanied by a decrease in the sensitivity of blood leukocytes and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases of the liver to recombinant IL-1β. These changes are associated with the anti-inflammatory hepatoprotective effect of chronic stress.

  12. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic.

  13. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro and in vivo geared towards targeted molecular therapies for peripheral neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Kelsey M; Palladino, Steven P; Dong, Chaoling; Helton, Eric S; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuroinflammation is characterized by hematogenous mononuclear leukocyte infiltration into peripheral nerves. Despite significant clinical knowledge, advancements in molecular biology and progress in developing specific drugs for inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis, there are currently no specific therapies that modulate pathogenic peripheral nerve inflammation. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the blood-nerve barrier using a reliable human in vitro model and potential intravital microscopy techniques in representative animal models guided by human observational data should facilitate the targeted modulation of the complex inflammatory cascade needed to develop safe and efficacious therapeutics for immune-mediated neuropathies and chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26732309

  14. Autochthonous Bacterial Isolates Successfully Stimulate In vitro Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of the European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    PubMed Central

    Mladineo, Ivona; Bušelić, Ivana; Hrabar, Jerko; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Jozić, Slaven; Trumbić, Željka

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available probiotics are routinely administered as feed supplements in aquaculture important species. Among them, the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is the most widely reared fish in the Mediterranean, whose rearing systems are highly variable between countries, affecting at some level the sustainability of production. After random isolation of autochthonous gut bacteria of the sea bass, their identification and pathogenicity testing, we have selected three potentially probiotic isolates; Pseudoalteromonas sp., Alteromonas sp., and Enterovibrio coralii. Selected isolates were tested and their immunostimulative efficiency was compared with a commercially available Lactobacillus casei isolate, inferring inflammatory, apoptotic and anti-pathogen response of sea bass’ peripheral blood leukocytes. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, and expression of lysozyme, Mx protein, caspase 3, TNF-α, IL-10 genes was measured 1, 3, 5, and 12 h post-stimulation by four bacterial isolates to evaluate early kinetics of the responses. Best immunostimulative properties were observed in Pseudoalteromonas-stimulated leukocytes, followed by Alteromonas sp. and L. casei, while Enterovibrio coralii failed to induce significant stimulation. Based on such in vitro assay intestinal autochthonous bacterial isolates showed to have better immunostimulative effect in sea bass compared to aquaculture-widely used L. casei, and further steps need to engage tank and field feeding trials to evaluate long-term prophylactic suitability of the chosen isolates. A panel of biomarkers that represent pro-/anti-inflammatory, pro-/anti-apoptotic, and anti-bacteria/viral responses of the fish should be taken into consideration when evaluating the usefulness of the potential probiotic in aquaculture. PMID:27551281

  15. Autochthonous Bacterial Isolates Successfully Stimulate In vitro Peripheral Blood Leukocytes of the European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Mladineo, Ivona; Bušelić, Ivana; Hrabar, Jerko; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Jozić, Slaven; Trumbić, Željka

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available probiotics are routinely administered as feed supplements in aquaculture important species. Among them, the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is the most widely reared fish in the Mediterranean, whose rearing systems are highly variable between countries, affecting at some level the sustainability of production. After random isolation of autochthonous gut bacteria of the sea bass, their identification and pathogenicity testing, we have selected three potentially probiotic isolates; Pseudoalteromonas sp., Alteromonas sp., and Enterovibrio coralii. Selected isolates were tested and their immunostimulative efficiency was compared with a commercially available Lactobacillus casei isolate, inferring inflammatory, apoptotic and anti-pathogen response of sea bass' peripheral blood leukocytes. Phagocytic activity, respiratory burst, and expression of lysozyme, Mx protein, caspase 3, TNF-α, IL-10 genes was measured 1, 3, 5, and 12 h post-stimulation by four bacterial isolates to evaluate early kinetics of the responses. Best immunostimulative properties were observed in Pseudoalteromonas-stimulated leukocytes, followed by Alteromonas sp. and L. casei, while Enterovibrio coralii failed to induce significant stimulation. Based on such in vitro assay intestinal autochthonous bacterial isolates showed to have better immunostimulative effect in sea bass compared to aquaculture-widely used L. casei, and further steps need to engage tank and field feeding trials to evaluate long-term prophylactic suitability of the chosen isolates. A panel of biomarkers that represent pro-/anti-inflammatory, pro-/anti-apoptotic, and anti-bacteria/viral responses of the fish should be taken into consideration when evaluating the usefulness of the potential probiotic in aquaculture. PMID:27551281

  16. Phenotyping of leukocytes and granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity in the peripheral blood and uterus of cows with endometritis.

    PubMed

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Lisiecka, U; Kurek, L; Marczuk, J

    2014-08-01

    This study was a comparative evaluation of selected immunological parameters in peripheral blood and uterine wash samples from cows with a normal postpartum period compared with cows with endometritis. We aimed to determine the usefulness of these parameters in monitoring the puerperium. In total, 40 cows were included in the study: 20 had endometritis (experimental group), and 20 did not have uterine inflammation (control group). Animals were chosen on the basis of cytological and bacteriological test results. The tests were conducted 5, 22, and 40 days postpartum. In both groups, flow cytometric analysis of the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD21, CD25, and CD14 in the peripheral blood and uterine washings was performed. Granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity was determined using a commercial Phagotest kit that was adapted for flow cytometry. The percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes in both the peripheral blood and the uterine washings was significantly lower for cows in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in the percentage of CD4+, CD25+, CD14+, and CD4 + CD25(high) leukocyte subpopulations was also observed in the peripheral blood of cows with endometritis. A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in CD21+ lymphocytes and an increase in CD8+ lymphocytes was detected in uterine washings. The results of this work indicate that cell immunity dysfunction may be the main factor causing advanced inflammation of the uterus in endometritis. Knowledge of the immunological mechanisms observed in cows with endometritis might aid in choosing the correct immunomodulating agent-based adjuvant therapy. PMID:24857644

  17. Cytogenetic observations in human peripheral blood leukocytes following in vitro exposure to THz radiation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeni, O; Gallerano, G P; Perrotta, A; Romanò, M; Sannino, A; Sarti, M; D'Arienzo, M; Doria, A; Giovenale, E; Lai, A; Messina, G; Scarfì, M R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging technologies are considering the possible use of Terahertz radiation in different fields ranging from telecommunications to biology and biomedicine. The study of the potential effects of Terahertz radiation on biological systems is therefore an important issue in order to safely develop a variety of applications. This paper describes a pilot study devoted to determine if Terahertz radiation could induce genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood leukocytes. For this purpose, human whole blood samples from healthy donors were exposed for 20 min to Terahertz radiation. Since, to our knowledge, this is the first study devoted to the evaluation of possible genotoxic effects of such radiation, different electromagnetic conditions were considered. In particular, the frequencies of 120 and 130 GHz were chosen: the first one was tested at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 mW g-1, while the second one was tested at SAR levels of 0.24, 1.4, and 2 mW g-1. Chromosomal damage was evaluated by means of the cytokinesis block micronucleus technique, which also gives information on cell cycle kinetics. Moreover, human whole blood samples exposed to 130 GHz at SAR levels of 1.4 and 2 mW g-1 were also tested for primary DNA damage by applying the alkaline comet assay immediately after exposure. The results obtained indicate that THz exposure, in the explored electromagnetic conditions, is not able to induce either genotoxicity or alteration of cell cycle kinetics in human blood cells from healthy subjects. PMID:17351499

  18. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Cao, Ye; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO3H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group (⊕N((CH3)2)(CH2)3SO3⊖) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO3H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO3H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  19. Influence of energy level and nicotinic acid supplementation on apoptosis of blood leukocytes of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bühler, S; Frahm, J; Tienken, R; Kersten, S; Meyer, U; Huber, K; Dänicke, S

    2016-10-15

    The periparturient period of dairy cows is accompanied by an immunosuppression that leaves the animal more susceptible to infections and metabolic disorders. Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) which peak shortly after parturition due to lipolysis are known to impair immune cell functions. Niacin with its well-known anti-lipolytic effect may have the ability to ameliorate this situation. Additionally, niacin shows also anti-inflammatory effects that may be beneficial to the immune status of the cow. To address this 29 multiparous and 18 primiparous German Holstein cows were subjected to four different feeding groups. They were fed either a ration with a high concentrate proportion of 60% (HC), or a low concentrate proportion of 30% (LC). After parturition both concentrate levels were reduced to 30% and increased again to 50% either within 16days (LC-group) or within 24days (HC-group). Half of the animals received either 24g per day of nicotinic acid from 42days prepartum until 24days postpartum (LC-NA, HC-NA) or no supplement (LC-CON, HC-CON). Apoptosis in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was examined with an Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) based fluorescence flow cytometry assay and distinguished into early apoptotic (Annexin V positive and PI negative) and late apoptotic (Annexin V and PI positive) cells. Additionally, the pro-apoptotic gene BAX, the effector caspase CASP3, and the anti-apoptotic genes BCL2 and BCL-xL, as well as the NFκB subunit RELA were quantified by real-time PCR in blood leukocytes. All variables showed time dependencies that were mainly related to parturition (p<0.01). Early apoptotic PBMC were significantly affected by concentrate level showing higher numbers of apoptotic cells in the HC groups (p=0.029). PBMC were characterized by a more pronounced apoptosis than PMN and seemed to be more susceptible to the changes that occur around parturition. The genes

  20. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of cytokine-induced phosphorylation pathways [CIPP] in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Montag, David T; Lotze, Michael T

    2006-11-01

    Current strategies designed to assess cells in the peripheral blood are limited to evaluation of phenotype or delayed measurement [>6 h] of function, usually quantifying cytokine production, cytolytic activity, or response to antigens. We reasoned that measurable abnormalities in signaling pathways could reflect pathological environs that cells experience in the setting of inflammatory states/cancer and could be represented in the peripheral blood. Two major pathways regulating the immune response are the JAK/STAT and MAPK/ERK pathways. These pathways are initiated by ligand-receptor binding and are rapidly propagated by subsequent protein phosphorylation cascades. We evaluated the brief application of cytokines in vitro to interrogate the early phosphorylation events of these signaling pathways in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Individual cytokine doses and time intervals of treatment were assessed to identify conditions useful in a clinical laboratory and as an initial goal to induce maximal phosphorylation. Surprisingly, all of the STAT proteins assessed and ERK1/2 are maximally phosphorylated within 15 min in human PBMC simply following addition of cytokines without preactivation of the cells. At 2 h, cells typically return to their basal phosphorylation states. For most of the cytokines tested, increased phosphorylation directly correlated with increased concentrations of the individual cytokines. These strategies will enable robust development of simple blood analyses to identify normal levels as well as impairments in STAT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways associated with various human disease states including acute and chronic inflammatory conditions throughout clinical immunology.

  1. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody.

  2. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  3. Circulating immune complexes of calves with bronchopneumonia modulate the function of peripheral blood leukocytes: In vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Buač, Marijana; Mojsilović, Slavko; Mišić, Dušan; Vuković, Dejan; Savić, Olivera; Valčić, Olivera; Marković, Dragana; Gvozdić, Dragan; Ilić, Vesna; Fratrić, Natalija

    2016-06-01

    In this work we studied if circulating immune complexes (CIC) of calves with bronchopneumonia have the capacity to modulate function of peripheral blood leukocytes of healthy cattle. CIC of three month old calves (6 healthy and 6 diseased) were isolated by PEG precipitation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and granulocytes from healthy calves and cows were the CIC responder cells in in vitro tests. The most remarkable increase of adhesiveness to polystyrene and ROS synthesis (assessed by NBT test) was detected in cows' granulocytes stimulated with CIC of diseased calves. Results of MTT test showed that CIC of both healthy and diseased calves reduced granulocytes' viability. The strongest effect of inhibition of cows' granulocytes resulted from CIC of diseased calves. CIC only moderately reduced spontaneous viability of calves' MNCs. Again, the strongest effect of CIC isolated from diseased calves was observed. In contrast to the low impact of CIC on non-stimulated cells, their inhibitory effect on viability of mitogen stimulated MNCs was very strong. With CFSE assay we showed that both types of CIC stimulated spontaneous, but inhibited mitogen induced proliferation of calves' MNCs. Propidium iodide staining reviled that CIC increased apoptosis/necrosis of both non-stimulated and mitogen stimulated MNCs. CIC of both healthy and diseased calves modulated the function of peripheral blood MNCs and granulocytes, but a stronger effect of CIC of diseased calves was shown. The age of the donors (calves or cows) of the responder cells, and the activation state of these cells, were also of influence. PMID:27234551

  4. Performance evaluation of a hematology blood counter with five-part leukocyte differential capability.

    PubMed

    Davis, B H; Bigelow, N C

    1999-01-01

    The summarized data and other studies to date indicate that performance of the Pentra 60 is comparable to other hematology analyzers for all CBC and 5-Diff parameters. Comparative studies indicate good correlation for all the reportable CBC parameters, lymphocyte counts, and neutrophil counts with 24 hr stability on blood samples. Good intermethod correlations on monocyte and eosinophil counts were observed. Only basophil counts showed poor intermethod correlations, but this is expected on a statistical basis, and the counts are similar to those reported for other hematology analyzer performance studies. The combination of the MDSS and stepper motor fluidic system allows for low-volume blood sampling, compact size, and low operational noise level. The Pentra 60 is well suited for physician's office laboratories, medical clinics, small- or medium-size hospitals with less than 100 CBCs per day, and larger hospitals or reference laboratories that need back-up for a high-end automated hematology analyzer.

  5. An extended convection diffusion model for red blood cell-enhanced transport of thrombocytes and leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, S. J.; Antaki, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    Transport phenomena of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs) are fundamental to the processes of vascular disease and thrombosis. Unfortunately, the dilute volume occupied by these cells is not amenable to fluid-continuum modeling, and yet the cell count is large enough that modeling each individual cell is impractical for most applications. The most feasible option is to treat them as dilute species governed by convection and diffusion; however, this is further complicated by the role of the red blood cell (RBC) phase on the transport of these cells. We therefore propose an extended convection-diffusion (ECD) model based on the diffusive balance of a fictitious field potential, Ψ, that accounts for the gradients of both the dilute phase and the local hematocrit. The ECD model was applied to the flow of blood in a tube and between parallel plates in which a profile for the RBC concentration field was imposed and the resulting platelet concentration field predicted. Compared to prevailing enhanced-diffusion models that dispersed the platelet concentration field, the ECD model was able to simulate a near-wall platelet excess, as observed experimentally. The extension of the ECD model depends only on the ability to prescribe the hematocrit distribution, and therefore may be applied to a wide variety of geometries to investigate platelet-mediated vascular disease and device-related thrombosis.

  6. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (<1 % of mononuclear cells) and have a less mature phenotype than their tissue counterparts (MacDonald et al., Blood. 100:4512-4520, 2002; Haniffa et al., Immunity 37:60-73, 2012). In contrast, the skin covering an average total surface area of 1.8 m(2) has approximately tenfold more DCs than the average 5 L of total blood volume (Wang et al., J Invest Dermatol 134:965-974, 2014). DCs migrate spontaneously from skin explants cultured ex vivo, which provide an easy method of cell isolation (Larsen et al., J Exp Med 172:1483-1493, 1990; Lenz et al., J Clin Invest 92:2587-2596, 1993; Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages. PMID:27142012

  7. Telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes and lung cancer risk: a large case-control study in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Espiridion, Beatriz; Chen, Meng; Chang, Joe Y; Lu, Charles; Chang, David W; Roth, Jack A; Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Telomere dysfunction is a crucial event in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with lung cancer risk, but the relationship has remained controversial. In this study, we investigated whether the association might be confounded by study of different histological subtypes of lung cancer. We measured relative telomere lengths in patients in a large case-control study of lung cancer and performed stratified analyses according to the two major histologic subtypes [adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)]. Notably, patients with adenocarcinoma had longer telomeres than controls, whereas patients with SCC had shorter telomeres compared with controls. Long telomeres were associated with increased risk of adenocarcinoma, with the highest risk associated with female sex, younger age (<60 years), and lighter smoking (<30 pack-years). In contrast, long telomeres were protective against SCC, particularly in male patients. Our results extend the concept that telomere length affects risk of lung cancer in a manner that differs with histologic subtype.

  8. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  9. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  10. Specific antibodies induced by inactivated parapoxvirus ovis potently enhance oxidative burst in canine blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Nicole; Raue, Rüdiger; Büttner, Mathias; Köhler, Gabriele; McInnes, Colin J; Alber, Gottfried

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that inactivated parapoxvirus ovis (iPPVO) effectively stimulates canine blood phagocytes. However, a potential link between innate and adaptive immunity induced by iPPVO remained open. The objective of this study was to define the effects of repeated iPPVO treatment of dogs to evaluate (i) iPPVO-specific antibody production, and (ii) modulation of iPPVO-induced oxidative burst by anti-iPPVO antibodies. Serum analysis of dogs treated repeatedly with iPPVO (Zylexis) showed transient production of non-neutralising iPPVO-specific IgG. There was a correlation between iPPVO-specific IgG levels and enhanced oxidative burst rates in vitro upon transfer of immune sera. Even four years after Zylexis treatment considerably stronger oxidative burst rates in response to iPPVO were observed in monocytes and PMN, whereas only moderate burst rates were detected in monocytes, but not in PMN, from dogs treated with a placebo. Depletion of serum IgG by protein A-sepharose or by parapoxvirus ovis coupled to sepharose abolished the increase of oxidative burst responses and resulted in burst rates similar to blood leukocytes from control dogs. However, uptake of viral particles was found to be independent of iPPVO-specific IgG and restricted to cells with dendritic and monocytic morphology. These data demonstrate that non-neutralising iPPVO-specific IgG is produced during treatment with Zylexis. Moreover, for the first time the interaction of iPPVO with antibodies is shown to enhance oxidative burst.

  11. Full blood count and haemozoin-containing leukocytes in children with malaria: diagnostic value and association with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Lell, Bertrand; Pötschke, Marc; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Kremsner, Peter G; Grobusch, Martin P

    2008-01-01

    Background Diligent and correct laboratory diagnosis and up-front identification of risk factors for progression to severe disease are the basis for optimal management of malaria. Methods Febrile children presenting to the Medical Research Unit at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital (HAS) in Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for malaria. Giemsa-stained thick films for qualitative and quantitative diagnosis and enumeration of malaria pigment, or haemozoin (Hz)-containing leukocytes (PCL) were performed, and full blood counts (FBC) were generated with a Cell Dyn 3000® instrument. Results Compared to standard light microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick films, diagnosis by platelet count only, by malaria pigment-containing monocytes (PCM) only, or by pigment-containing granulocytes (PCN) only yielded sensitivities/specificities of 92%/93%; 96%/96%; and 85%/96%, respectively. The platelet count was significantly lower in children with malaria compared to those without (p < 0.001), and values showed little overlap between groups. Compared to microscopy, scatter flow cytometry as applied in the Cell-Dyn 3000® instrument detected significantly more patients with PCL (p < 0.01). Both PCM and PCN numbers were higher in severe versus non-severe malaria yet reached statistical significance only for PCN (p < 0.0001; PCM: p = 0.14). Of note was the presence of another, so far ill-defined pigment-containing group of phagocytic cells, identified by laser-flow cytometry as lymphocyte-like gated events, and predominantly found in children with malaria-associated anaemia. Conclusion In the age group examined in the Lambaréné area, platelets are an excellent adjuvant tool to diagnose malaria. Pigment-containing leukocytes (PCL) are more readily detected by automated scatter flow cytometry than by microscopy. Automated Hz detection by an instrument as used here is a reliable diagnostic tool and correlates with disease severity. However, clinical usefulness as a prognostic tool is limited

  12. Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Production of BDNF following Mitogen Stimulation in Early Onset and Regressive Autism

    PubMed Central

    Enstrom, Amanda; Onore, Charity; Tarver, Angela; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hansen, Robin; Croen, Lisa; Van de Water, Judy; Ashwood, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical for neuronal differentiation and synaptic development. BDNF is also implicated in the development of psychological disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Previously, elevated BDNF levels were observed in neonatal blood samples from infants who were later diagnosed with autism when compared with children who developed normally, suggesting that BDNF may be involved in the development of autism. BDNF is produced by activated brain microglial cells, a cellular phenotype that shares several features with peripheral macrophages, suggesting an important role for the immune system in BDNF production. We hypothesized that under mitogenic stimulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from children with autism may have altered BDNF production compared with age-matched typically developing control subjects. In addition, we examined the differences between the production of BDNF in classic/early-onset autism and children who had a regressive form of autism. We show here that plasma levels of BDNF levels are increased in children with autism, especially in early onset autism subjects. Furthermore, under mitogenic stimulation with PHA and LPS, BDNF production is significantly increased in children with autism compared with typically developing subjects. However, stimulation with tetanus toxoid results in a decreased response in children with autism. This data suggest that immune cell-derived production of BDNF could be an important source for the increased BDNF that is detected in some subjects with autism. As a neurotrophic factor produced by immune cells, BDNF could help elucidate the role of the immune system in neurodevelopment and neuronal maintenance, which may be dysregulated in autism.

  13. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific? - A miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Dahmke, Indra N.; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  14. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific?--a miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Dahmke, Indra N; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-10-15

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  15. Differential innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes to Salmonella enterica serovars Dublin, Typhimurium, and Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Deng; Rostagno, Marcos H; Ebner, Paul D; Eicher, Susan D

    2015-05-15

    The majority of Salmonella serovars cause no clinical disease in cattle, while some are associated with severe disease. The objective of the current study was to determine the innate immune responses of bovine peripheral blood leukocytes exposed to Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (bovine-specific), Salmonella typhimurium (murine adapted, but zoonotic), and Salmonella enteritidis (poultry host-adapted) in 3-week-old calves. All Salmonella exposures increased cell surface CD14 and CD18 regardless of serovar. The greatest CD14 marker mean fluorescence was in monocytes and the greatest mean fluorescent of the marker mean was in neutrophils. Phagocytosis increased with all serovars, but was not different among them. Neutrophils had the greatest marker mean fluorescence for phagocytosis, with all serovars being equal. Oxidative burst increased in all serovars compared to control cells, but were not different among the serovars. Neutrophils and monocytes were similar in the oxidative burst, with limited oxidative burst detected in the primarily lymphocyte population. mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-12, increased above the control cells whereas none of these serovars affected mRNA expression of TLR4. TNF-α was greatest in S. enterica and S. typhimurium, compared to Salmonella dublin. In contrast, IL-8 was expressed more in S. dublin than S. typhiurium, with S. Enteriditus intermediary. These results show while cell surface markers, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst were largely unaffected by serovar, cytokine and chemokine expression differed among the Salmonella serovars. It appears that internal responses of the cells differ, rather than cell recognition, creating pathogenicity differences among of the serovars, even in the neonate with developing immunity.

  16. Immunomodulatory effects upon in vitro exposure of California sea lion and southern sea otter peripheral blood leukocytes to domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; Joshi, Dhanashree; Draghi, Andrew; Gulland, Frances M; Jessup, David; De Guise, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    During red tide bloom events, the marine diatom Pseudo-nitzschia produces the toxin domoic acid (DA), which has been associated with stranding and mortality events involving California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris). In addition to these well-documented DA-induced neurotoxic events, there is increasing concern that DA may exert chronic effects, such as immunomodulation, which may potentially increase an individual's susceptibility to a number of opportunistic infections following nonlethal exposure. We investigated the effects of DA on innate (phagocytosis and respiratory burst) and adaptive (mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation) immune functions with the use of peripheral blood leukocytes collected from healthy California sea lions and southern sea otters upon in vitro exposure to 0 (unexposed control), 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, and 100 microM DA. Domoic acid did not significantly modulate phagocytosis or respiratory burst in either species. For California sea lions, DA significantly increased ConA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation upon exposure to DA concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 10 microM, resulting in a nonlinear dose-response curve. There was no effect on lymphocyte proliferation at the highest concentration of DA tested. No effects on lymphocyte proliferation were observed in southern sea otters. Importantly, the in vitro DA concentrations affecting T-cell proliferation were within or below the range of DA in serum measured in free-ranging California sea lions following natural exposure, suggesting a risk for immunomodulation in free-ranging animals. Understanding the risk for immunomodulation upon DA exposure will contribute in the health assessment and management of California sea lions and southern sea otters, as well as guide veterinarians and wildlife rehabilitators in caring for and treating afflicted animals. PMID:20688647

  17. Foreskin T-cell subsets differ substantially from blood with respect to HIV co-receptor expression, inflammatory profile, and memory status.

    PubMed

    Prodger, J L; Gray, R; Kigozi, G; Nalugoda, F; Galiwango, R; Hirbod, T; Wawer, M; Hofer, S O P; Sewankambo, N; Serwadda, D; Kaul, R

    2012-03-01

    The foreskin is the main site of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition in uncircumcised men, but functional data regarding T-cell subsets present at this site are lacking. Foreskin tissue and blood were obtained from Ugandan men undergoing elective adult circumcision. Tissue was treated by mechanical and enzymatic digestion followed by T-cell subset identification and assessment of cytokine production using flow cytometry. Foreskin CD4(+) T cells were predominantly an effector memory phenotype, and compared with blood they displayed a higher frequency of CCR5 expression (42.0% vs. 9.9%) and interleukin-17 production. There was no difference in T-regulatory cell frequency, but interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α production were increased in foreskin CD8(+) T cells. These novel techniques demonstrate that the foreskin represents a proinflammatory milieu that is enriched for HIV-susceptible T-cell subsets. Further characterization of foreskin T-cell subsets may help to define the correlates of HIV susceptibility in the foreskin. PMID:22089029

  18. [Connection of endothelial dysfunction and level of blood leukocytes with clinical course of stable angina pectoris in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Lyzohub, V H; Savchenko, O V; Bondarchuk, O M; Dykukha, I S; Voloshyna, O O; Bohdan, T V; Koval'chuk, S M; Moshkovs'ka, Iu O

    2008-01-01

    The authors presents in the article information on influence of endothelial dysfunction and level of blood leukocytes with clinical course of stable angina pectoris in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). 104 male patients aged from 36 to 69 (on average 54.9+/-2.1 years) with IHD and stage I-III stable angina pectoris have been observed. The level of leukocytes, ECG daily monitoring, endotelial function with the help of Celermaera-Sorensena test and plasma concentration of endothelin I have been studied in patients. It was established that there is no significant different (P>0.05) in the level of leukocytes between health persons and patients with IHD independently of functional class of angina pectoris. Patients with IHD had higher level of endothelin I in their blood serum than those in a control group. Patients with IHD have a complicated endothelial-non-dependent vasodilation and an increased thickness of the complex intima-media, there is a negative correlation bond between these characteristics. Patients III functional class of angina pectoris has also reliably decreased endothelial-dependent vasodilation by 37%. Frequency of ventricular extrasystoles in patients with IHD and endothelial dysfunction increases by 12 times.

  19. The calorically restricted low-fat nutrient-dense diet in Biosphere 2 significantly lowers blood glucose, total leukocyte count, cholesterol, and blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Walford, R L; Harris, S B; Gunion, M W

    1992-01-01

    Biosphere 2 is a 3.15-acre space containing an ecosystem that is energetically open (sunlight, electric power, and heat) but materially closed, with air, water, and organic material being recycled. Since September 1991, eight subjects (four women and four men) have been sealed inside, living on food crops grown within. Their diet, low in calories (average, 1780 kcal/day; 1 kcal = 4.184 kJ), low in fat (10% of calories), and nutrient-dense, conforms to that which in numerous animal experiments has promoted health, retarded aging, and extended maximum life span. We report here medical data on the eight subjects, comparing preclosure data with data through 6 months of closure. Significant changes included: (i) weight, 74 to 62 kg (men) and 61 to 54 kg (women); (ii) mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure (eight subjects), 109/74 to 89/58 mmHg (1 mmHg = 133 Pa); (iii) total serum cholesterol, from 191 +/- 11 to 123 +/- 9 mg/dl (mean +/- SD; 36% mean reduction), and high density lipoprotein, from 62 +/- 8 to 38 +/- 5 (risk ratio unchanged); (iv) triglyceride, 139 to 96 mg/dl (men) and 78 to 114 mg/dl (women); (v) fasting glucose, 92 to 74 mg/dl; (vi) leukocyte count, 6.7 to 4.7 x 10(9) cells per liter. We conclude that drastic reductions in cholesterol and blood pressure may be instituted in normal individuals in Western countries by application of a carefully chosen diet and that a low-calorie nutrient-dense regime shows physiologic features in humans similar to those in other animal species. PMID:1454844

  20. Development of hedge operator based fuzzy divergence measure and its application in segmentation of chronic myelogenous leukocytes from microscopic image of peripheral blood smear.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Madhumala; Chakraborty, Chandan; Konar, Amit; Ray, Ajoy K

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces a hedge operator based fuzzy divergence measure and its application in segmentation of leukocytes in case of chronic myelogenous leukemia using light microscopic images of peripheral blood smears. The concept of modified discrimination measure is applied to develop the measure of divergence based on Shannon exponential entropy and Yager's measure of entropy. These two measures of divergence are compared with the existing literatures and validated by ground truth images. Finally, it is found that hedge operator based divergence measure using Yager's entropy achieves better segmentation accuracy i.e., 98.29% for normal and 98.15% for chronic myelogenous leukocytes. Furthermore, Jaccard index has been performed to compare the segmented image with ground truth ones where it is found that that the proposed scheme leads to higher Jaccard index (0.39 for normal, 0.24 for chronic myelogenous leukemia).

  1. Temperature-induced transcription of inflammatory mediators and the influence of Hsp70 following LPS stimulation of southern bluefin tuna peripheral blood leukocytes and kidney homogenates.

    PubMed

    Polinski, Mark; Bridle, Andrew; Nowak, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    Temperature is known to influence inflammatory signalling in mammals, but far less understood in fish. The aim of the present study was to explore the potential effects of temperature on innate immune signalling in head kidney and leukocyte populations of the economically important southern bluefin tuna through the identification and utilization of gene expression targets in vitro. Here, we identified the mRNA sequences of five potential inflammatory mediators - TNFα (1 and 2), IL-1β, IL-8, and Cox2 - and demonstrate induction of four - TNFα (2), IL-1β, IL-8, and Cox2 - following LPS stimulation of both peripheral blood leukocytes and head kidney homogenates in vitro by real-time quantitative PCR. Comparison of transcriptional expression in cultures held at 18 and 25 °C (both within the presumed natural temperature range of this heterothermic species) showed accelerated transcription of cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 following LPS stimulation at 25 °C in both tissue types. Peak induction reached comparable levels for each transcript at both temperatures during the 24 h test period with only limited (if any) protraction in expression resulting from cold temperature (18 °C) incubation. Partial mRNA sequences were also identified for both the constitutively expressed and heat inducible chaperone proteins Hsc70 and Hsp70, and 24 h incubation at 25 °C was sufficient to induce Hsp70 transcription in leukocyte but not in head kidney cell populations. Taken together these findings suggest that temperature exerts influence in the timing but not the degree of an innate inflammatory response in bluefin tuna and that different cell populations have differential responsiveness to heat shock in this heterothermic species. Further, LPS stimulation failed to induce Hsp70 at either incubation temperature in leukocytes; whereas 25 °C incubation caused Hsp70 up-regulation in leukocytes with or without the presence of LPS. This suggests that Hsp70 does not play a

  2. Analysis of the binding of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a and 1b E2 glycoproteins to peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eriko; Montoya, Maria; Schuettler, Christian G; Hickling, Timothy P; Tarr, Alexander W; Vitelli, Alessandra; Dubuisson, Jean; Patel, Arvind H; Ball, Jonathan K; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) binding to hepatocytes is thought to be mediated via interaction of the E2 glycoprotein with (co-)receptors including CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Here, the expression of CD81 and SR-BI was analysed on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets, and the binding of genotype 1 soluble truncated E2 (sE2) proteins to these cells was investigated. All PBMC subsets expressed CD81, although at varying levels. In contrast, SR-BI was only detected on monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs). The genotype 1a H77c sE2 protein showed higher PBMC binding than other genotype 1a/b sE2s. H77c sE2 binding to different PBMC subsets largely paralleled their level of CD81 expression, and could be inhibited by blocking E2-CD81 interaction. However, those PBMC subsets reported to be infected by HCV in vivo (monocytes, DCs and B cells) also exhibited residual, CD81-independent binding, indicating roles for SR-BI/other receptor(s) in mediating haematopoietic cell infection. PMID:16099909

  3. Cytoskeletal proteins from human skin fibroblasts, peripheral blood leukocytes, and a lymphoblastoid cell line compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Willard, K.E.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-04-01

    Differences in proteins between cells grown as suspension cultures and those grown as attached cultures were studied by comparing the proteins of detergent-resistant cytoskeletons prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes and a lymphoblastoid cell line (GM607) (both grown as suspension cultures) and those of human skin fibroblasts (grown as attached cultures) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The major cytoskeletal proteins of the leukocytes were also present in the protein pattern of GM607 cytoskeletons. In contrast, the fibroblast cytoskeletal protein pattern contained four groups of proteins that differed from the patterns of the leukocytes and GM607. In addition, surface labeling of GM607 and human fibroblasts with /sup 125/I demonstrated that substantial amounts of vimentin and actin are exposed at the surface of the attached fibroblasts, but there is little evidence of similar exposure at the surface of the suspension-grown GM607. These results demonstrate some differences in cytoskeletal protein composition between different types of cells could be related to their ability or lack of ability to grow as attached cells in tissue culture.

  4. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, David J; Kearney, Sinéad M; Kilcawley, Niamh A; Early, Philip L; Glynn, Macdara T; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic "Lab-on-a-Disc" cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are 'low-pass', i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both 'hydrostatically' and 'hydrodynamically' triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, 'dual siphon' configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction.

  5. Expression of tlr4, md2 and cd14 in equine blood leukocytes during endotoxin infusion and in intestinal tissues from healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Fossum, C; Hjertner, B; Olofsson, K M; Lindberg, R; Ahooghalandari, P; Camargo, M M; Bröjer, J; Edner, A; Nostell, K

    2012-12-15

    The expression of tlr4, md2 and cd14 was studied in equine blood leukocytes and in intestinal samples using real time PCR. The stability of three commonly used reference genes, glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxantine ribosyltransferase (HPRT) and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA), was evaluated using qbase(PLUS). The equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) examined were either stimulated in vitro with Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin or with the CpG oligodeoxynuclotide 2216 (CpG-ODN 2216) or obtained from horses before, during and after infusion of endotoxin. Intestinal tissue from healthy horses was sampled at ileum, right dorsal colon and rectum. Ranking of the three reference genes used for normalisation identified the combination HPRT/SDHA as most suitable both when determined ex vivo in leukocytes obtained from experimentally induced endotoxaemia and in eqPBMC activated in vitro while HPRT/GAPDH were most appropriate for the intestinal samples. The relative amounts of mRNA for TLR4 and MD-2 increased threefold during in vitro activation of the cells with CpG-ODN 2216 but was decreased in cultures stimulated with PMA/ionomycin. A transient elevation in the transcription of tlr4 and md2 was also evident for equine blood leukocytes following endotoxaemia. The levels of mRNA for CD14 on the other hand remained unaffected both during the induction of endotoxaemia and in the in vitro stimulated PBMCs. A low steady expression of TLR4, MD-2 and CD14 mRNA was demonstrated for the intestinal samples with no variation between the intestinal segments analysed. Thus, the foundation for real time PCR based levels of analysis of mRNA for all three components in the equine LPS receptor complex in different intestinal segments was set, making it possible to carry out future expression studies on clinical material.

  6. Suppression of fibrotic scar formation promotes axonal regeneration without disturbing blood-brain barrier repair and withdrawal of leukocytes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Nozomu; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Kawano, Hitoshi

    2010-09-15

    The fibrotic scar containing type IV collagen (Col IV) formed in a lesion site is considered as an obstacle to axonal regeneration, because intracerebral injection of 2,2'-dipyridyl (DPY), an inhibitor of Col IV triple-helix formation, suppresses fibrotic scar formation in the lesion site and promotes axonal regeneration. To determine the role of the fibrotic scar on the healing process of injured central nervous system (CNS), the restoration of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and withdrawal of inflammatory leukocytes were examined in mice subjected to unilateral transection of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and intracerebral DPY injection. At 5 days after injury, destruction of BBB represented by leakage of Evans blue (EB) and widespread infiltration of CD45-immunoreactive leukocytes was observed around the lesion site, whereas reactive astrocytes increased surrounding the BBB-destroyed area. By 2 weeks after injury, the region of EB leakage and the diffusion of leukocytes were restricted to the inside of the fibrotic scar, and reactive astrocytes gathered around the fibrotic scar. In the DPY-treated lesion site, formation of the fibrotic scar was suppressed (84% decrease in Col IV-deposited area), reactive astrocytes occupied the lesion center, and areas of both EB leakage and leukocyte infiltration decreased by 86%. DPY treatment increased the number of regenerated dopaminergic axons by 2.53-fold. These results indicate that suppression of fibrotic scar formation does not disturb the healing process in damaged CNS, and suggest that this strategy is a reliable tool to promote axonal regeneration after traumatic injury in the CNS.

  7. [The state of the mitochondrial energy-supplying system of blood leukocytes in the dynamics of Guerin's carcinoma growth under the low-level irradiation conditions].

    PubMed

    Marchenko, M M; Voloshchuk, O N

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activities of peripheral blood leukocytes of rats with the grafted Guerin's carcinoma were studied in the dynamics of oncogenesis under the conditions of the preliminary low-level irradiation. Tumor growth was accompanied by a decrease in NADH-dehydrogenase activity, an increase of succinate dehydrogenase activity. Cytochrome oxidase activity of leucocytes remained at the control level up to the terminal stages of tumor growth. Preliminary low-level irradiation of the tumor bearing animals caused a tendency to the decrease of enzymatic activities studied. This tendency was observed from the initial stages of oncogenesis. PMID:25552501

  8. Early Rise of Blood T Follicular Helper Cell Subsets and Baseline Immunity as Predictors of Persisting Late Functional Antibody Responses to Vaccination in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Borgogni, Erica; Zedda, Luisanna; Cantisani, Rocco; Chiappini, Nico; Schiavetti, Francesca; Rosa, Domenico; Castellino, Flora; Montomoli, Emanuele; Bodinham, Caroline L.; Lewis, David J.; Medini, Duccio; Bertholet, Sylvie; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper cells (TFH) have been identified as the T-cell subset specialized in providing help to B cells for optimal activation and production of high affinity antibody. We recently demonstrated that the expansion of peripheral blood influenza-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS1+ T helper (TH) cells, three weeks after vaccination, associated with and predicted the rise of protective neutralizing antibodies to avian H5N1. In this study, healthy adults were vaccinated with plain seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIIV), MF59®-adjuvanted TIIV (ATIIV), or saline placebo. Frequencies of circulating CD4+ TFH1 ICOS+ TFH cells and H1N1-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS+ CXCR5+ TFH and CXCR5- TH cell subsets were determined at various time points after vaccination and were then correlated with hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. All three CD4+ T cell subsets expanded in response to TIIV and ATIIV, and peaked 7 days after vaccination. To demonstrate that these TFH cell subsets correlated with functional antibody titers, we defined an alternative endpoint metric, decorrelated HI (DHI), which removed any correlation between day 28/day 168 and day 0 HI titers, to control for the effect of preexisting immunity to influenza vaccine strains. The numbers of total circulating CD4+ TFH1 ICOS+ cells and of H1N1-specific CD4+IL-21+ICOS+ CXCR5+, measured at day 7, were significantly associated with day 28, and day 28 and 168 DHI titers, respectively. Altogether, our results show that CD4+ TFH subsets may represent valuable biomarkers of vaccine-induced long-term functional immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01771367 PMID:27336786

  9. Early Rise of Blood T Follicular Helper Cell Subsets and Baseline Immunity as Predictors of Persisting Late Functional Antibody Responses to Vaccination in Humans.

    PubMed

    Spensieri, Fabiana; Siena, Emilio; Borgogni, Erica; Zedda, Luisanna; Cantisani, Rocco; Chiappini, Nico; Schiavetti, Francesca; Rosa, Domenico; Castellino, Flora; Montomoli, Emanuele; Bodinham, Caroline L; Lewis, David J; Medini, Duccio; Bertholet, Sylvie; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper cells (T(FH)) have been identified as the T-cell subset specialized in providing help to B cells for optimal activation and production of high affinity antibody. We recently demonstrated that the expansion of peripheral blood influenza-specific CD4(+)IL-21(+)ICOS1(+) T helper (T(H)) cells, three weeks after vaccination, associated with and predicted the rise of protective neutralizing antibodies to avian H5N1. In this study, healthy adults were vaccinated with plain seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIIV), MF59(®)-adjuvanted TIIV (ATIIV), or saline placebo. Frequencies of circulating CD4(+) T(FH)1 ICOS(+) T(FH) cells and H1N1-specific CD4(+-)IL-21(+)ICOS(+) CXCR5(+) T(FH) and CXCR5(-) T(H) cell subsets were determined at various time points after vaccination and were then correlated with hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. All three CD4(+) T cell subsets expanded in response to TIIV and ATIIV, and peaked 7 days after vaccination. To demonstrate that these T(FH) cell subsets correlated with functional antibody titers, we defined an alternative endpoint metric, decorrelated HI (DHI), which removed any correlation between day 28/day 168 and day 0 HI titers, to control for the effect of preexisting immunity to influenza vaccine strains. The numbers of total circulating CD4(+)T(FH)1 ICOS(+) cells and of H1N1-specific CD4(+)IL-21(+)ICOS(+) CXCR5(+), measured at day 7, were significantly associated with day 28, and day 28 and 168 DHI titers, respectively. Altogether, our results show that CD4(+) T(FH) subsets may represent valuable biomarkers of vaccine-induced long-term functional immunity. PMID:27336786

  10. [A new separation protocol (DRBCP-F) for automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator for collection of leukocyte depleted erythrocyte concentrates and plasma].

    PubMed

    Zeiler, T; Kretschmer, V

    1997-01-01

    Previously published studies on automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator proved fairly good quality of the collected red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP), with the disadvantage of a low hematocrit of the filtered RBC and a high platelet contamination of the FFP (RBCP-F protocol.) The DRBCP-F protocol was designed to eliminate the above-mentioned disadvantages and to provide 1 unit of leuko-depleted (filtered) RBC, 2 units of FFP, and additionally 1 platelet concentrate (PC) from the buffy coat. Twenty automated blood component collections (2 cycles, Latham bowl at 5,500 rpm, 230 ml isotonic saline for volume balance, PAGGS-M as additive solution) were performed. The RBC were filtered in a closed system after storage at 4 degrees C for 24 h. Blood cell counts and biochemical parameters of the RBC were determined initially and after 49 days. PC were separated from buffy coat after a soft spin. The volume of the RBC amounted to 293 +/- 12 ml (mean +/- SD) with a hematocrit of 0.61 +/- 0.05 l/l. Residual leukocytes after filtration were found to be 0.04 x 10(6) +/- 0.06 per unit. After storage, the following data were obtained: hemolysis 0.38%, ATP 2.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/g Hb, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) 1.4 +/- 0.3 mumol/g Hb, ph 6.3 +/- 0.1, potassium 6.4 mmol per unit, and LDH in the supernatant was 219 U/l. None of the RBC showed bacterial growth after 49 days. The volume of the collected FFP was 398 +/- 32 ml, with 3.4 +/- 3.5 x 10(3) residual platelets and 5 +/- 12 leukocytes per microliter. Platelet concentrates contained 90.2 +/- 32 x 10(9) platelets in 88 +/- 14 ml plasma. Automated blood donation with the DRBCP-F protocol provided RBC with very low residual leukocyte counts, adequate hematocrit and good metabolic status up to 49 days, and FFP with low platelet contamination. The platelet concentrates were even superior to those prepared from whole blood using the buffy coat method. The storable leuko-depleted RBC are

  11. Dynamic changes in the numbers of different subsets of peripheral blood NK cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus following classic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongshuang; Zhao, Ling; Jiang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yanfang; Feng, Li; Ye, Zhuang

    2014-11-01

    Imbalance of natural killer (NK) cells is associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, little is known about the dynamic changes on NK cells following therapy. This study aimed at examining the impact of classic therapies on the numbers of different subsets of NK cells in new-onset SLE patients. The numbers of different subsets of peripheral blood NK cells in 24 new-onset SLE patients before, 4 and 12 weeks post the classic therapies, and 7 healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. The potential correlation between the numbers of NK cells and the values of clinical measures was analyzed. In comparison with that before treatment, the numbers of NK, NKG2C+, and KIR2DL3+ NK cells were significantly increased while the numbers of NKp46+ and NKG2A + NK cells significantly decreased at 4 and/or 12 weeks post the treatment only in the drug well-responding patients, but not in those poor responders (P < 0.05 for all). The numbers of NKG2C + NK cells were correlated positively with the levels of serum C3 while the numbers of KIR2DL3+ NK cells were correlated negatively with the scores of SLEDAI in these patients at 4 weeks post the treatment. The classic therapies modulated the numbers of some subsets of NK cells in drug well-responding SLE patients. The changes in the numbers of some subsets of NK cells may serve as biomarkers for evaluating the therapeutic responses of SLE.

  12. Composition of innate lymphoid cell subsets in the human skin: enrichment of NCR(+) ILC3 in lesional skin and blood of psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Marcel B M; Munneke, J Marius; Bernink, Jochem H; Spuls, Phyllis I; Res, Pieter C M; Te Velde, Anje; Cheuk, Stanley; Brouwer, Marijke W D; Menting, Stef P; Eidsmo, Liv; Spits, Hergen; Hazenberg, Mette D; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly appreciated as important regulators of tissue homeostasis and inflammation. However, their role in human skin remains obscure. We found that healthy peripheral blood CD117(+) ILC3, lacking the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) NKp44 (NCR(-) ILC3), CD117(-)NCR(-)CRTH2(-)CD161(+) ILC1, and CRTH2(+) ILC2, express the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA). NCR(+) ILC3 were scarce in peripheral blood. Consistently, we identified in normal skin ILC2 and NCR(-) ILC3, a small proportion of CD161(+) ILC1, and hardly any NCR(+) ILC3, whereas NCR(+) ILC3 were present in cultured dermal explants. The skin ILC2 and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets produced IL-13 and IL-22, respectively, upon cytokine stimulation. Remarkably, dermal NCR(-) ILC3 converted to NCR(+) ILC3 upon culture in IL-1β plus IL-23, cytokines known to be involved in psoriatic inflammation. In line with this observation, significantly increased proportions of NCR(+) ILC3 were present in lesional skin and peripheral blood of psoriasis patients as compared with skin and blood of healthy individuals, respectively, whereas the proportions of ILC2 and CD161(+) ILC1 remained unchanged. NCR(+) ILC3 from skin and blood of psoriasis patients produced IL-22, which is regarded as a key driver of epidermal thickening, suggesting that NCR(+) ILC3 may participate in psoriasis pathology.

  13. The CD8+ granzyme B+ T-cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy individuals contains activated and apoptosis-prone cells.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Van Der Vliet, H J; Spaeny, L H; Wolbink, A M; Van Diepen, F N; Froelich, C J; Hack, C E; ten Berge, I J

    1998-03-01

    Granzyme B (GrB) has been implicated in induction of apoptosis in target cells. The presence of GrB in peripheral blood CD8+ T cells from healthy individuals was analysed in immunocytochemical and flow cytometric studies. Furthermore, CD8+ GrB- T cells and CD8+ GrB+ T cells were compared regarding phenotypical characteristics and susceptibility to both spontaneous and Fasmediated apoptosis. GrB was expressed by approximately one-fifth of CD8+ T cells. Compared with the CD8+ GrB- T-cell subset, the CD8+ GrB+ T-cell subset contained cells that were relatively more activated and more prone to spontaneous apoptosis. Culturing of cells with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-Fas monoclonal antibody had no additional effect on the number of CD8+ GrB+ T cells undergoing apoptosis. We suggest that the presence of CD8+ GrB+ T cells in peripheral blood from healthy individuals results from immune surveillance or contact with infectious agents, and that spontaneous apoptosis of these cells might serve as a mechanism for their eventual clearance.

  14. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  15. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Sinéad M.; Kilcawley, Niamh A.; Early, Philip L.; Glynn, Macdara T.; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic “Lab-on-a-Disc” cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are ‘low-pass’, i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both ‘hydrostatically’ and ‘hydrodynamically’ triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, ‘dual siphon’ configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. PMID:27167376

  16. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs) in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA) in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV) infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i) in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii) in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-) infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-), the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor exacerbated

  17. TGF-β affects development and differentiation of human natural killer cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Allan, David S.J.; Rybalov, Basya; Awong, Génève; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Kopcow, Hernan D.; Carlyle, James R.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human peripheral blood NK cells may be divided into two main subsets: CD56brightCD16− and CD56dimCD16+. Since TGF-β is known to influence the development of many leukocyte lineages, its effects on NK cell differentiation either from human CD34+Lin− hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells in vitro or from peripheral blood NK cells were investigated. TGF-β represses development of NK cells from CD34+ progenitors and inhibits differentiation of CD16+ NK cells. Moreover, TGF-β also results in conversion of a minor fraction of CD56brightCD16+ cells found in peripheral blood into CD56brightCD16− cells, highlighting a possible role of the former as a developmental intermediate and of TGF-β in influencing the genesis of NK subsets found in blood. PMID:20540115

  18. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  19. Leukocyte driven-decidual angiogenesis in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patricia DA; Zhang, Jianhong; Dunk, Caroline; Lye, Stephen J; Anne Croy, B

    2014-01-01

    Successful pregnancy and long-term, post-natal maternal and offspring cardiac, vascular and metabolic health require key maternal cardiovascular adaptations over gestation. Within the pregnant decidualizing uterus, coordinated vascular, immunological and stromal cell changes occur. Considerable attention has been given to the roles of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in initiating decidual spiral arterial remodeling, a process normally completed by mid-gestation in mice and in humans. However, leukocyte roles in much earlier, region specific, decidual vascular remodeling are now being defined. Interest in immune cell-promoted vascular remodeling is driven by vascular aberrations that are reported in human gestational complications such as infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortion, preeclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction. Appropriate maternal cardiovascular responses during pregnancy protect mothers and their children from later cardiovascular disease risk elevation. One of the earliest uterine responses to pregnancy in species with hemochorial placentation is stromal cell decidualization, which creates unique niches for angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment. In early decidua basalis, the aspect of the implantation site that will cradle the developing placenta and provide the major blood vessels to support mature placental functions, leukocytes are greatly enriched and display specialized properties. UNK cells, the most abundant leukocyte subset in early decidua basalis, have angiogenic abilities and are essential for normal early decidual angiogenesis. The regulation of uNK cells and their roles in determining maternal and progeny cardiovascular health over pregnancy and postpartum are discussed. PMID:25066422

  20. Leukocyte driven-decidual angiogenesis in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Patricia D A; Zhang, Jianhong; Dunk, Caroline; Lye, Stephen J; Croy, B Anne

    2014-11-01

    Successful pregnancy and long-term, post-natal maternal and offspring cardiac, vascular and metabolic health require key maternal cardiovascular adaptations over gestation. Within the pregnant decidualizing uterus, coordinated vascular, immunological and stromal cell changes occur. Considerable attention has been given to the roles of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in initiating decidual spiral arterial remodeling, a process normally completed by mid-gestation in mice and in humans. However, leukocyte roles in much earlier, region specific, decidual vascular remodeling are now being defined. Interest in immune cell-promoted vascular remodeling is driven by vascular aberrations that are reported in human gestational complications such as infertility, recurrent spontaneous abortion, preeclampsia (PE) and fetal growth restriction. Appropriate maternal cardiovascular responses during pregnancy protect mothers and their children from later cardiovascular disease risk elevation. One of the earliest uterine responses to pregnancy in species with hemochorial placentation is stromal cell decidualization, which creates unique niches for angiogenesis and leukocyte recruitment. In early decidua basalis, the aspect of the implantation site that will cradle the developing placenta and provide the major blood vessels to support mature placental functions, leukocytes are greatly enriched and display specialized properties. UNK cells, the most abundant leukocyte subset in early decidua basalis, have angiogenic abilities and are essential for normal early decidual angiogenesis. The regulation of uNK cells and their roles in determining maternal and progeny cardiovascular health over pregnancy and postpartum are discussed. PMID:25066422

  1. Alterations of GSH and MDA levels and their association with bee venom-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Gajski, Goran; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2012-07-01

    Bee venom (BV) has toxic effects in a variety of cell systems and oxidative stress has been proposed as a possible mechanism of its toxicity. This study investigated the in vitro effect of BV on glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and their association with BV-induced DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes (HPBLs). Blood samples were treated with BV at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 μg/ml over different lengths of time, and DNA damage in HPBLs was monitored with the alkaline and formamidopyrimidine glycoslyase (FPG)-modified comet assays, while GSH and MDA levels were determined in whole blood. Results showed a significant increase in overall DNA damage and FPG-sensitive sites in DNA of HPBLs exposed to BV compared with HPBLs from controls. An increase in DNA damage (assessed with both comet assays) was significantly associated with changes in MDA and GSH levels. When pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a source of cysteine for the synthesis of the endogenous antioxidant GSH, a significant reduction of the DNA damaging effects of BV in HPBLs was noted. This suggests that oxidative stress is at least partly responsible for the DNA damaging effects of BV.

  2. The leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Zinkl, J G

    1981-05-01

    Dogs and cats respond to many diseases by changes in leukocyte numbers. Infectious diseases often cause leukocytosis due to neutrophilia. Left shift may accompany the leukocytosis, indicating that the marrow is mounting a response to the disease. Left shift also indicates that the marrow has fallen somewhat behind the needs of the animal. Degenerative left shift is considered a poor sign. Lymphopenia and eosinopenia also are found in infectious diseases. Lymphocytosis may occur during the recovery or if the disease becomes chronic. The nature and duration of the infection determine the magnitude of the monocyte response. It is erroneous to consider a disease chronic based only upon monocytosis. Trauma, autoimmunity, or any disease with significant tissue destruction can evoke a monocyte response. Leukopenias are relatively common in cats and are found with moderate frequency in dogs. Drugs, viral diseases (such as FeLV, feline enteritis, parvovirus), ehrlichiosis, and hereditary conditions may cause panleukopenias or single leukopenias. Occasionally leukocyte examination provides evidence of a specific etiology (such as with ehrlichiosis). Sometimes changes occur which, although not specific for a disease, may provide a strong evidence of a particular disease (such as in salmon poisoning). Leukocyte evaluation should include not only total count and differential count (with calculation of absolute numbers of the different cells) but also morphologic examination of the cells by qualified people. In many practices the only qualified person is the veterinarian.

  3. Parnaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, prevents P-selectin-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Norma; Di Fabio, Giovannina; Barbanti, Miriam; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Cerletti, Chiara

    2007-06-01

    Parnaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), prevents platelet activation and interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) in a washed cell system. The in-vitro effect of parnaparin was studied here on platelet-PMN aggregates formed with more physiologic approaches in whole blood, in parallel with unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin, another LMWH. Citrated blood from healthy subjects was stimulated: i) from passage through the "Platelet Function Analyzer" (PFA-100), a device that exposes blood to standardized high shear flow through collagen/ADP cartridges; ii) by collagen and ADP (2 and 50 mug/ml, respectively) added in combination under stirring in an aggregometer cuvette; iii) with recombinant Tissue Factor, to generate thrombin concentrations able to activate platelets without inducing blood clotting, or iv) the Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide-6 (TRAP-6). Platelet P-selectin and platelet-PMN aggregates were measured by flow cytometry upon stimulation of blood. Fibrinogen binding to platelets and markers of PMN activation were also detected. Platelet P-selectin expression and platelet-PMN aggregate formation were induced in all four activation conditions tested. Parnaparin prevented in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-0.8 IUaXa/ml) the expression of P-selectin and the formation of mixed aggregates, while the two reference heparin preparations had a much weaker effect. Platelet fibrinogen binding and PMN activation markers (fibrinogen binding, CD11b and CD40) were also prevented by parnaparin. These data extend in more physiological systems of platelet activation, the anti-inflammatory profile of parnaparin, previously reported in washed cells. The greater effect of parnaparin, as compared to the reference heparins, could be due to chemico-physical differences possibly unrelated to their anticoagulant effect. PMID:17549299

  4. Immunological changes in canine peripheral blood leukocytes triggered by immunization with first or second generation vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; de Andrade, Renata Aline; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Magalhães, Camila Paula; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Campolina, Sabrina Sidney; Mello, Maria Norma; Vianna, Leonardo Rocha; Mayrink, Wilson; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Rocha, Luciana Morais; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-05-15

    In this study, we summarized the major phenotypic/functional aspects of circulating leukocytes following canine immunization with Leishvaccine and Leishmune®. Our findings showed that Leishvaccine triggered early changes in the innate immunity (neutrophils and eosinophils) with late alterations on monocytes. Conversely, Leishmune(®) induced early phenotypic changes in both, neutrophils and monocytes. Moreover, Leishvaccine triggered mixed activation-related phenotypic changes on T-cells (CD4+ and CD8+ and B-lymphocytes, whereas Leishmune(®) promoted a selective response, mainly associated with CD8+ T-cell activation. Mixed cytokine profile (IFN-γ/IL-4) was observed in Leishvaccine immunized dogs whereas a selective pro-inflammatory pattern (IFN-γ/NO) was induced by Leishmune® vaccination. The distinct immunological profile triggered by Leishvaccine and Leishmune® may be a direct consequence of the distinct biochemical composition of these immunobiological, i.e. complex versus purified Leishmania antigen along with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) versus saponin adjuvant. Both immunobiologicals are able to activate phagocytes and CD8+ T-cells and therefore could be considered as a putative vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL).

  5. Isolation, In-111 labeling, and abscess detection efficiency of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from blood and peritoneal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, K.M.; Elson, M.K.; Gerding, D.N.; Bamberger, D.M.; Forstrom, L.A.; Shafer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In-111 labeled blood and peritoneal exudate PMN were compared for labeling efficiency and ability to migrate to sites of experimental abscesses using both direct sampling and visual imaging techniques. Blood PMN were prepared by combining heparinized blood with 6% Hetastarch for 1 hour and layering the plasma over a double density Ficoll-Hy-paque gradient (S.G. 1.076 over 1.141). The PMN layer (90-99% PMN) at the interface yielded 10/sup 6/-10/sup 7/ PMN from 80-120 ml of blood. Peritoneal PMN were obtained by infusion of 0.1% glycogen, followed by infusion of saline after 4 or 18 hours. The exudate yielded 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ PMN (80-99% PMN). PMN suspensions were labeled for 30 minutes by addition of 100 ..mu..Ci of In-111-oxine, then washed twice. Percent cell-associated radioactivity of the labeled blood, 4 hour, and 18 hour peritoneal PMN was 89%, 88%, and 86%. The labeled PMN were injected intravenously into rabbits which had two of three abdominal capsules (table tennis balls drilled with 250 1.5 mm holes) inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus 4 hours earlier. Peak venous recovery of circulating labeled PMN, for blood, 4 hour and 18 hour peritoneal PMN was 60%, 43%, and 19%. Gamma camera images 24 hours after infusion into infected rabbits were superior with 4 hour peritoneal PMN. The peritoneal PMN harvested 4 hours after glycogen stimulation are simple to prepare, are obtainable in greater numbers than blood PMN, and result in better abscess visualization.

  6. Modification of radiation-induced DNA double strand break repair pathways by chemicals extracted from Podophyllum hexandrum: an in vitro study in human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nitya N; Shukla, Sandeep K; Yashavarddhan, M H; Devi, Memita; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Gupta, Manju L

    2014-06-01

    Radiation exposure is a serious threat to biomolecules, particularly DNA, proteins and lipids. Various exogenous substances have been reported to protect these biomolecules. In this study we explored the effect of pre-treatment with G-002M, a mixture of three active derivatives isolated from the rhizomes of Podophyllum hexandrum, on DNA damage response in irradiated human blood leukocytes. Blood was collected from healthy male volunteers, preincubated with G-002M and then irradiated with various doses of radiation. Samples were analyzed using flow cytometry to quantify DNA double strand break (DSB) biomarkers including γ-H2AX, P53BP1 and levels of ligase IV. Blood samples were irradiated in vitro and processed to determine time and dose-dependent kinetics. Semiquantitative RT-PCR was performed at various time points to measure gene expression of DNA-PKcs, Ku80, ATM, and 53BP1; each of these genes is involved in DNA repair signaling. Pre-treatment of blood with G-002M resulted in reduction of γ-H2AX and P53BP1 biomarkers levels and elevated ligase IV levels relative to non-G-002M-treated irradiated cells. These results confirm suppression in radiation-induced DNA DSBs. Samples pre-treated with G-002M and then irradiated also showed significant up-regulation of DNA-PKcs and Ku80 and downregulation of ATM and 53BP1 gene expressions, suggesting that G-002M plays a protective role against DNA damage. The protective effect of G-002M may be due to its ability to scavange radiation-induced free radicals or assist in DNA repair. Further studies are needed to decipher the role of G-002M on signaling molecules involved in radiation-induced DNA damage repair pathways.

  7. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    El-Aidy, Waleed K; Ebeid, Ahmad A; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M; Muhammad, Ibrahim E; Abbas, Ayman T; Kamal, M A; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2015-11-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells. PMID:26587007

  8. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    El-Aidy, Waleed K.; Ebeid, Ahmad A.; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M.; Muhammad, Ibrahim E.; Abbas, Ayman T.; Kamal, M.A.; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2014-01-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells. PMID:26587007

  9. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    El-Aidy, Waleed K; Ebeid, Ahmad A; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M; Muhammad, Ibrahim E; Abbas, Ayman T; Kamal, M A; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2015-11-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells.

  10. A Subset of Circulating Blood Mycobacteria-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Predict the Time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Sputum Culture Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P.; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+IL2+TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment. PMID:25048802

  11. A subset of circulating blood mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells can predict the time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis sputum culture conversion.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive M; Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+ Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+ HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+ HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+ IL2+ TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+ HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment.

  12. A subset of circulating blood mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells can predict the time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis sputum culture conversion.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive M; Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+ Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+ HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+ HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+ IL2+ TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+ HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment. PMID:25048802

  13. Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) seed extract increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and decreases proinflammatory signaling in peripheral blood human leukocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Fadia; Haines, David; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Dashti, Ali A; Al-Awadhi, Adel; Ibrahim, Basel; Al-Zayer, Bashayer; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2014-05-01

    Sour cherry seed extract (SCE) was evaluated for its capacity to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-treated human peripheral blood T cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and the chemokine interleukin-8. Both proteins are diagnostic biomarkers for inflammatory pathologies. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 11 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and 8 healthy control subjects were co-cultured for 24h in lipopolysaccharide and the extract, then evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell activation and by enzyme-linked immunoassay for lymphocyte-associated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. There was a dose-dependent decrease in expression of the immunophenotypes: CD3+TNF-α+, and CD3+IL8+ in cultures from RA patients to a greater extent than in cells from healthy participants. These results suggest that the extract may have a modulatory roll in RA and other inflammatory disorders via the induction of HO-1, thus abating oxidative stress and strengthening regulation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. PMID:24631368

  14. Modulatory effects of dietary beta-carotene on blood and mammary leukocyte function in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Michal, J J; Heirman, L R; Wong, T S; Chew, B P; Frigg, M; Volker, L

    1994-05-01

    Beginning 4 wk prior to predicted calving, 14 Holstein cows per treatment were fed diets 1) unsupplemented (control) or supplemented daily with 2) 300 mg of beta-carotene, 3) 600 mg of beta-carotene, or 4) 120,000 IU of vitamin A. Blood was collected around calving on wk -4, -2, -1, 0 (within 24 h postcalving), 1, 2, and 4 for isolation of lymphocytes and neutrophils and for the analysis of plasma vitamins. Lacteal secretions were collected on wk 0, 1, 2, and 4 for the isolation of phagocytes. Cows supplemented with 600 mg of beta-carotene had higher concentrations of plasma beta-carotene and retinol than did unsupplemented cows. Supplemental vitamin A increased plasma retinol on wk 4 and decreased plasma beta-carotene on wk -1 and 0. Treatment did not affect concentrations of plasma alpha-tocopherol. Blood lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen during the peripartum period was higher in cows supplemented with beta-carotene than in unsupplemented controls. Phagocytic activity of blood neutrophils was enhanced on wk 1 in cows fed 300 mg of beta-carotene. Intracellular killing by blood neutrophils was enhanced in cows supplemented with beta-carotene (wk 0) and vitamin A (wk 0 and 1). Iodine uptake and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by blood neutrophils was stimulated in cows supplemented with beta-carotene. Phagocytic activity, iodine uptake, and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by mammary phagocytes from all cows generally were lower postpartum than on the day of calving. The incidence of retained placenta and metritis was higher for unsupplemented cows than for cows supplemented with beta-carotene. Therefore, dietary beta-carotene can elevate peripartum concentrations of blood beta-carotene, enhance host defense mechanisms by potentiating lymphocyte and phagocyte function, and decrease the incidence of certain reproductive disorders.

  15. Blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier dysfunction for high molecular weight proteins in Alzheimer disease and major depression: indication for disease subsets.

    PubMed

    Hampel, H; Kötter, H U; Möller, H J

    1997-06-01

    There is a diversity of opinions concerning the function of the blood-brain barrier and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB) in Alzheimer disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders. In this paper we investigate and review the evidence for BCB dysfunction in Alzheimer disease and major depression. The hypothetical roles of immunologically mediated mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) are discussed. Special consideration is given to methodological factors influencing BCB function and analysis. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 29 patients with major depression (MD) and 51 patients with "probable Alzheimer disease" (AD) were investigated. The AD patients were subdivided in two groups of 21 early-onset (EO) and 30 late-onset (LO) cases and assayed for concentrations of albumin and IgG. The results were compared with those for 11 age-matched healthy controls. The severity of dementia was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). AD and MD patients showed significantly lower serum albumin [AD: p < 0.05 (LO: p < 0.038); MD p < 0.01] and IgG (AD: p < 0.01; MD: p < 0.013) concentrations compared with controls. MD (p < 0.001) and LO-AD (p < 0.07) patients displayed significantly lower absolute serum albumin levels than did EO-AD patients. The CSF/serum ratio for albumin and IgG was used to evaluate BCB function. There were no significant group differences; however, subsets of MD (29%) and AD (16%) patients showed a higher frequency of a pathological albumin ratio than did control subjects. Furthermore, a subset of 24% of MD and18% of AD patients and none of the controls showed an elevated IgG ratio. Different mechanisms of alteration of IgG distribution are presented. The degree of cognitive impairment in AD did not correlate positively with protein and ratio parameters. The BCB is critical to the maintenance of homeostasis within nervous system tissue. We suggest that the altered function can result from immune-mediated events such as

  16. Imbalance in recruitment of IgG (Gm) allotype-producing B-cell subsets from blood to brain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Salier, J P

    1984-10-15

    In Gm3/Gm3 homozygous multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in vitro production of the G1m(3) allotype of IgG1 induced by the T-independent polyclonal B-cell activator Salmonella paratyphi B (SPB) was lower than that of normal individuals of the same Gm phenotype. In contrast, lymphocytes from Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous MS patients responded to the same stimulus with a significantly increased G1m(3) allotype synthesis not observed in normal individuals of the same phenotype. The high level of intrathecal IgG1 production observed in MS patients might be achieved by a selection at the blood-brain barrier of some peripheral T-independent B-cell clones which in Gm3/Gm3 homozygous would bear the G1m(3) allotype, hence a peripheral depletion of this subset, whereas in Gm1/Gm3 heterozygous a preferential admission of the G1m(1)-producing B-cells would lead to a preferential synthesis of this allotype in the central nervous system and to a relative increase of G1m(3) production by the remaining peripheral B cells. PMID:6333282

  17. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs.

    PubMed

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J G; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent KM 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥2.5 μM, ≥2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake Vmax. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes).

  18. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  19. Towards hemerythrin-based blood substitutes: comparative performance to hemoglobin on human leukocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Mot, Augustin; Deac, Florina; Arkosi, Mariann; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2011-06-01

    Hemerythrin is a dioxygen-carrying protein whose oxidative/nitrosative stress-related reactivity is lower than that of hemoglobin, which may warrant investigation of hemerythrin as raw material for artificial oxygen carriers ('blood substitutes'). We report here the first biological tests for hemerythrin and its chemical derivatives, comparing their performance with that of a representative competitor, glutaraldehyde-polymerized bovine hemoglobin. Hemerythrin (native or derivatized) exhibits a proliferative effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures, as opposed to a slight inhibitory effect of hemoglobin. A similar positive effect is displayed on human lymphocytes by glutaraldehyde-polymerized hemerythrin, but not by native or polyethylene glycol-derivatized hemerythrin.

  20. Hypomethylation of the IL17RC Promoter in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes is Not A Hallmark of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Verity F; Franchina, Maria; Jaffe, Andrew E; Branham, Kari E; Othman, Mohammad; Heckenlively, John R; Swaroop, Anand; Campochiaro, Betsy; Vote, Brendan J; Craig, Jamie E; Saffery, Richard; Mackey, David A; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J; Hewitt, Alex W; Merbs, Shannath L

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Aberrant DNA methylation within the promoter of IL17RC in peripheral blood mononuclear cells has recently been reported in AMD. To validate this association, we examined DNA methylation of the IL17RC promoter in peripheral blood. First, we used Illumina Human Methylation450 Bead Arrays, a widely-accepted platform for measuring global DNA methylation. Second, methylation status at multiple sites within the IL17RC promoter was determined by bisulfite pyrosequencing in two cohorts. Third, a methylation-sensitive QPCR-based assay was performed on a subset of samples. In contrast to previous findings, we did not find evidence of differential methylation between AMD cases and age-matched controls. We conclude that hypomethylation within the IL17RC gene promoter in peripheral blood is not suitable for use as a clinical biomarker of AMD. This study highlights the need for considerable replication of epigenetic association studies prior to clinical application. PMID:24373284

  1. Cloning and expression of recombinant equine interleukin-3 and its effect on sulfidoleukotriene and cytokine production by equine peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Janda, Jozef; Lehmann, Melissa; Luttmann, Werner; Marti, Eliane

    2015-02-15

    Interleukin-3 is a growth and differentiation factor for various hematopoietic cells. IL-3 also enhances stimulus-dependent release of mediators and cytokine production by mature basophils. Function of IL-3 has not been studied in horses because of lack of horse-specific reagents. Our aim was to produce recombinant equine IL-3 and test its effect on sulfidoleukotriene and cytokine production by equine peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Equine IL-3 was cloned, expressed in E. coli and purified. PBL of 19 healthy and 20 insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH)-affected horses were stimulated with Culicoides nubeculosus extract with or without IL-3. Sulfidoleukotriene (sLT) production was measured in supernatants by ELISA and mRNA expression of IL-4, IL-13 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) assessed in cell lysate by quantitative real-time PCR. Recombinant equine IL-3 (req-IL-3) had a dose dependent effect on sLT production by stimulated equine PBL and significantly increased IL-4, IL-13 and TSLP expression compared to non-primed cells. IL-3 priming significantly increased Culicoides-induced sLT production in IBH-affected but not in non-affected horses and was particularly effective in young IBH-affected horses (≤ 3 years). A functionally active recombinant equine IL-3 has been produced which will be useful for future immunological studies in horses. It will also allow improving the sensitivity of cellular in vitro tests for allergy diagnosis in horses. PMID:25530476

  2. Pathogenic Triad in Bacterial Meningitis: Pathogen Invasion, NF-κB Activation, and Leukocyte Transmigration that Occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifu; Peng, Liang; Gai, Zhongtao; Zhang, Lehai; Jong, Ambrose; Cao, Hong; Huang, Sheng-He

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs): pathogen penetration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in coordination with type 1 interferon (IFN) signaling and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). This review outlines the progression of these early inter-correlated events contributing to the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and injury during the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. A better understanding of these issues is not only imperative to elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of bacterial meningitis, but may also provide the in-depth insight into the development of novel therapeutic interventions against this disease. PMID:26925035

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cell and Minocycline-Loaded Hydrogels Inhibit the Growth of Staphylococcus aureus that Evades Immunomodulation of Blood-Derived Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Alberto Daniel; Cantu, David Antonio; Vecchi, Joseph T; Rose, Warren E; Hematti, Peiman; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated favorable wound healing properties in addition to their differentiation capacity. MSCs encapsulated in biomaterials such as gelatin and polyethylene glycol (PEG) composite hydrogels have displayed an immunophenotype change that leads to the release of cytokines and growth factors to accelerate wound healing. However, therapeutic potential of implanted MSC-loaded hydrogels may be limited by non-specific protein adsorption that facilitates adhesion of bacterial pathogens such as planktonic Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to the surface with subsequent biofilm formation resistant to immune cell recognition and antibiotic activity. In this study, we demonstrate that blood-derived primary leukocytes and bone marrow-derived MSCs cannot inhibit colony-forming abilities of planktonic or biofilm-associated SA. However, we show that hydrogels loaded with MSCs and minocycline significantly inhibit colony-forming abilities of planktonic SA while maintaining MSC viability and multipotency. Our results suggest that minocycline and MSC-loaded hydrogels may decrease the bioburden of SA at implant sites in wounds, and may improve the wound healing capabilities of MSC-loaded hydrogels.

  4. Pathogenic Triad in Bacterial Meningitis: Pathogen Invasion, NF-κB Activation, and Leukocyte Transmigration that Occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shifu; Peng, Liang; Gai, Zhongtao; Zhang, Lehai; Jong, Ambrose; Cao, Hong; Huang, Sheng-He

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs): pathogen penetration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation in coordination with type 1 interferon (IFN) signaling and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). This review outlines the progression of these early inter-correlated events contributing to the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and injury during the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. A better understanding of these issues is not only imperative to elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of bacterial meningitis, but may also provide the in-depth insight into the development of novel therapeutic interventions against this disease.

  5. Differences in non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activities of human peripheral blood lymphocytes after transfusion with allogeneic leukocytes or platelets possessing class I and/or class II MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Pócsik, E; Mihalik, R; Réti, M; Gyódi, E; Pálóczi, K; Mayer, K; Kassai, M; Herold, M; Huber, C; Petrányi, G G

    1990-12-01

    MHC-unrestricted cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 4-6 healthy donors was investigated before and after transfusion with allogeneic leukocytes or platelets. Natural killer and lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (LDCC) of PBL was tested against K562 and Raji target cells in a 4-h and 16-h 51Cr-release assay, respectively. After allotransfusion with leukocytes, we found increased cytotoxic activity of each donor's PBL against all the three targets on day 3 or 7. The highest non-specific cytotoxic activity was detected against the relatively NK resistant Raji target cells. The increase of cytotoxic activity was lowest against the LDCC target (PHA-treated Raji) cells. On the contrary, no changes in cytotoxic activity against any targets were observed after allotransfusion with platelets (possessing class I HLA antigens but no HLA class II molecules). Our results suggest that HLA class II molecules, presumably by inducing immune responses, are essential for activation/generation of non-specific killing of tumor targets after leukocyte transfusion. Thrombocytes, known to be less immunogenic than leukocytes, are not effective in in vivo enhancing of non-specific cytotoxicity. Cellular activation of PBL following leukocyte allotransfusion was confirmed by detection of elevated serum neopterin and beta-2-microglobulin levels on day 3. This was not the case after platelet allotransfusion. In addition, the expression of ICAM-1 antigen (as a molecule involved directly in MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity) was also found to be increased in two donors' PBL on day 3 after leukocyte transfusion in contrast to transfusion with platelets.

  6. Perioperative transfusion of leukocyte depleted blood products in gastric cancer patients negatively influences oncologic outcome: A retrospective propensity score weighted analysis on 610 curatively resected gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reim, Daniel; Strobl, Andreas N; Buchner, Christian; Schirren, Rebekka; Mueller, Werner; Luppa, Peter; Ankerst, Donna Pauler; Friess, Helmut; Novotny, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The influence of perioperative transfusion (PT) on outcome following surgery for gastric cancer (GC) remains controversial, with randomized trials lacking and observational series confounded by patient risk factors. This analysis determines the association between reception of leukocyte-depleted blood products and post-operative survival for GC.Data from 610 patients who underwent curative surgery for GC in a German tertiary care clinic from 2001 to 2013 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied to determine the association of PT and clinical and patient risk factors for overall and relapse-free survival. Propensity score analysis was performed to adjust for observational biases in reception of PT.Higher Union International Contre le Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC/AJCC)-stages (P <0.001), postoperative complications and severity according to the Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification (P <0.001), PT (P = 0.02), higher age (P <0.001), and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P <0.001) were related to increased mortality rates. Higher UICC-stages (P <0.001), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P <0.001), and type of surgery (P = 0.02) were independently associated with increased relapse rates. Patients were more likely to receive PT with higher age (P = 0.05), surgical extension to adjacent organs/structures (P = 0.002), tumor location (P = 0.003), and female gender (P = 0.03). In the adjusted propensity score weighted analysis, PT remained associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio (HR): 1.31, 95% CI: 1.01-1.69, P = 0.04).Because of the association of PT with negative influence on patient survival following resection for GC, risks from application of blood products should be weighed against the potential benefits. PMID:27442682

  7. Determination of acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase enzyme activity in peripheral blood leukocytes of gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa).

    PubMed

    Altunay, H; Harem, I S; Harem, M K; Asti, R N; Kurtdede, N

    2008-12-01

    We examined gazelle peripheral blood leucocytes using the alpha-Naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) staining technique (pH 5.8). Our purpose was to determine the percentage of ANAE positive lymphocytes. The proportion of ANAE positive T-lymphocytes was 72%. T-lymphocytes showed an ANAE positive reaction, but eosinophilic granulocytes and monocytes also showed a positive reaction. By contrast, no reaction was detected in B-lymphocytes, neutrophil granulocytes or platelets. The reaction observed in T-lymphocytes was a red-brown coloration, usually 1-2 granules, but enough granules to fill the cytoplasm were detected rarely. As a result of ANAE enzyme staining, we concluded that the staining technique can be used as a cytochemical marker for gazelle T-lymphocytes. PMID:19085516

  8. Red blood cell transfusion is associated with increased hemolysis and an acute phase response in a subset of critically ill children.

    PubMed

    L'Acqua, Camilla; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Francis, Richard O; McMahon, Donald J; Nellis, Marianne; Sheth, Sujit; Kernie, Steven G; Brittenham, Gary M; Spitalnik, Steven L; Hod, Eldad A

    2015-10-01

    In healthy adults, transfusion of older stored red blood cells (RBCs) produces extravascular hemolysis and circulating non-transferrin-bound iron. In a prospective, observational study of critically ill children, we examined the effect of RBC storage duration on the extent of hemolysis by comparing laboratory measurements obtained before, and 4 hr after, RBC transfusion (N = 100) or saline/albumin infusion (N = 20). Transfusion of RBCs stored for longer than 4 weeks significantly increased plasma free hemoglobin (P < 0.05), indirect bilirubin (P < 0.05), serum iron (P < 0.001), and non-transferrin-bound iron (P < 0.01). However, days of storage duration poorly correlated (R(2) <0.10) with all measured indicators of hemolysis and inflammation. These results suggest that, in critically ill children, most effects of RBC storage duration on post-transfusion hemolysis are overwhelmed by recipient and/or donor factors. Nonetheless, we identified a subset of patients (N = 21) with evidence of considerable extravascular hemolysis (i.e., increased indirect bilirubin ≥0.4 mg/dL). In these patients, transfusion-associated hemolysis was accompanied by increases in circulating non-transferrin-bound iron and free hemoglobin and by an acute phase response, as assessed by an increase in median C-reactive protein levels of 21.2 mg/L (P < 0.05). In summary, RBC transfusions were associated with an acute phase response and both extravascular and intravascular hemolysis, which were independent of RBC storage duration. The 21% of transfusions that were associated with substantial hemolysis conferred an increased risk of inducing an acute phase response.

  9. CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood and skin lesions of psoriasis patients and their correlations with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J.; Ding, Y.; Yi, X.; Zheng, J.

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and increasing evidence indicates that B cells also play an important role. The mechanisms of action, however, remain unclear. We evaluated the ratios of CD19+ B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 157 patients with psoriasis (65 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, 32 patients with erythrodermic psoriasis, 30 patients with arthropathic psoriasis, and 30 patients with pustular psoriasis) and 35 healthy controls (HCs). Ratios of CD19+ B cells in skin lesions were compared with non-lesions in 7 erythrodermic psoriasis patients. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was used to measure disease severity. CD19+ B cell ratios in PBMCs from psoriasis vulgaris (at both the active and stationary stage) and arthropathic psoriasis patients were higher compared with HCs (P<0.01), but ratios were lower in erythrodermic and pustular psoriasis patients (P<0.01). CD19+ B cell ratios in erythrodermic psoriasis skin lesions were higher than in non-lesion areas (P<0.001). Different subsets of CD19+CD40+, CD19+CD44+, CD19+CD80+, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD11b+, and CD19+HLA-DR+ B cells in PBMCs were observed in different psoriasis clinical subtypes. PASI scores were positively correlated with CD19+ B cell ratios in psoriasis vulgaris and arthropathic psoriasis cases (r=0.871 and r=0.692, respectively, P<0.01), but were negatively correlated in pustular psoriasis (r=-0.569, P<0.01). The results indicated that similar to T cells, B cells activation may also play important roles in different pathological stages of psoriasis. PMID:27532281

  10. Leukocytes, cytokines, growth factors and hormones in human skeletal muscle and blood after uphill or downhill running.

    PubMed

    Malm, Christer; Sjödin, The Late Bertil; Sjöberg, Berit; Lenkei, Rodica; Renström, Per; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Ekblom, Björn

    2004-05-01

    Muscular adaptation to physical exercise has previously been described as a repair process following tissue damage. Recently, evidence has been published to question this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory processes in human skeletal muscle and epimysium after acute physical exercise with large eccentric components. Three groups of subjects (n= 19) performed 45 min treadmill running at either 4 deg (n= 5) or 8 deg (n= 9) downhill or 4 deg uphill (n= 5) and one group served as control (n= 9). One biopsy was taken from each subject 48 h post exercise. Blood samples were taken up to 7 days post exercise. Compared to the control group, none of the markers of inflammation in muscle and epimysium samples was different in any exercised group. Only subjects in the Downhill groups experienced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and increased serum creatine kinase activity (CK). The detected levels of immunohistochemical markers for T cells (CD3), granulocytes (CD11b), leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1beta (HIF-1beta) were greater in epimysium from exercised subjects with DOMS ratings >3 (0-10 scale) compared to exercised subjects without DOMS but not higher than controls. Eccentric physical exercise (downhill running) did not result in skeletal muscle inflammation 48 h post exercise, despite DOMS and increased CK. It is suggested that exercise can induce DOMS by activating inflammatory factors present in the epimysium before exercise. Repeated physical training may alter the content of inflammatory factors in the epimysium and thus reduce DOMS. PMID:14766942

  11. Disorders of sex development expose transcriptional autonomy of genetic sex and androgen-programmed hormonal sex in human blood leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Bebermeier, Jan-Hendrik; Werner, Ralf; Demeter, Janos; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Cario, Gunnar; Appari, Mahesh; Siebert, Reiner; Riepe, Felix; Brooks, James D; Hiort, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Background Gender appears to be determined by independent programs controlled by the sex-chromosomes and by androgen-dependent programming during embryonic development. To enable experimental dissection of these components in the human, we performed genome-wide profiling of the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with rare defined "disorders of sex development" (DSD, e.g., 46, XY-females due to defective androgen biosynthesis) compared to normal 46, XY-males and 46, XX-females. Results A discrete set of transcripts was directly correlated with XY or XX genotypes in all individuals independent of male or female phenotype of the external genitalia. However, a significantly larger gene set in the PBMC only reflected the degree of external genital masculinization independent of the sex chromosomes and independent of concurrent post-natal sex steroid hormone levels. Consequently, the architecture of the transcriptional PBMC-"sexes" was either male, female or even "intersex" with a discordant alignment of the DSD individuals' genetic and hormonal sex signatures. Conclusion A significant fraction of gene expression differences between males and females in the human appears to have its roots in early embryogenesis and is not only caused by sex chromosomes but also by long-term sex-specific hormonal programming due to presence or absence of androgen during the time of external genital masculinization. Genetic sex and the androgen milieu during embryonic development might therefore independently modulate functional traits, phenotype and diseases associated with male or female gender as well as with DSD conditions. PMID:19570224

  12. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes. PMID:27649020

  13. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes.

  14. Temporal Expression of Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Biomarkers in a Macaca fascicularis Infection Model of Tuberculosis; Comparison with Human Datasets and Analysis with Parametric/Non-parametric Tools for Improved Diagnostic Biomarker Identification

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Alice; Lewandowski, Kuiama S.; Williams, Ann; Dennis, Michael J.; Sharpe, Sally; Vipond, Richard; Silman, Nigel; Ball, Graham

    2016-01-01

    A temporal study of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary, pulmonary challenge model Macaca fascicularis has been conducted. PBL samples were taken prior to challenge and at one, two, four and six weeks post-challenge and labelled, purified RNAs hybridised to Operon Human Genome AROS V4.0 slides. Data analyses revealed a large number of differentially regulated gene entities, which exhibited temporal profiles of expression across the time course study. Further data refinements identified groups of key markers showing group-specific expression patterns, with a substantial reprogramming event evident at the four to six week interval. Selected statistically-significant gene entities from this study and other immune and apoptotic markers were validated using qPCR, which confirmed many of the results obtained using microarray hybridisation. These showed evidence of a step-change in gene expression from an ‘early’ FOS-associated response, to a ‘late’ predominantly type I interferon-driven response, with coincident reduction of expression of other markers. Loss of T-cell-associate marker expression was observed in responsive animals, with concordant elevation of markers which may be associated with a myeloid suppressor cell phenotype e.g. CD163. The animals in the study were of different lineages and these Chinese and Mauritian cynomolgous macaque lines showed clear evidence of differing susceptibilities to Tuberculosis challenge. We determined a number of key differences in response profiles between the groups, particularly in expression of T-cell and apoptotic makers, amongst others. These have provided interesting insights into innate susceptibility related to different host `phenotypes. Using a combination of parametric and non-parametric artificial neural network analyses we have identified key genes and regulatory pathways which may be important in early and adaptive responses to TB. Using comparisons

  15. Phenotyping of Leukocytes and Leukocyte-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pugholm, Lotte Hatting; Bæk, Rikke; Søndergaard, Evo Kristina Lindersson; Revenfeld, Anne Louise Schacht; Jørgensen, Malene Møller; Varming, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have a demonstrated involvement in modulating the immune system. It has been proposed that EVs could be used as biomarkers for detection of inflammatory and immunological disorders. Consequently, it is of great interest to investigate EVs in more detail with focus on immunological markers. In this study, five major leukocyte subpopulations and the corresponding leukocyte-derived EVs were phenotyped with focus on selected immunological lineage-specific markers and selected vesicle-related markers. The leukocyte-derived EVs displayed phenotypic differences in the 34 markers investigated. The majority of the lineage-specific markers used for identification of the parent cell types could not be detected on EVs released from monocultures of the associated cell types. In contrast, the vesicular presentation of CD9, CD63, and CD81 correlated to the cell surface expression of these markers, however, with few exceptions. Furthermore, the cellular expression of CD9, CD63, and CD81 varied between leukocytes present in whole blood and cultured leukocytes. In summary, these data demonstrate that the cellular and vesicular presentation of selected lineage-specific and vesicle-related markers may differ, supporting the accumulating observations that sorting of molecular cargo into EVs is tightly controlled.

  16. The role of G-CSF and IL-6 in the granulopoiesis-stimulating activity of murine blood serum induced by perorally administered ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, IMUNOR.

    PubMed

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2007-05-01

    IMUNOR, a low-molecular weight (< 12 kD) ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract, has been previously found to have significant stimulatory effects on murine hematopoiesis supressed by ionizing radiation or cytotoxic drugs. This communication shows data on the mechanisms of these effects. Using ELISA assay, significantly increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed. On the contrary, no detectable levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CFC) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) have been found in blood serum of IMUNOR-treated mice. Incubation of the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with antibodies against G-CSF caused abrogation of the ability of the sera to stimulate in vitro growth of colonies originating from granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC). In contrast, incubation of the serum with antibodies against IL-6 did not change its colony-stimulating activity. It may be inferred from these findings that G-CSF is probably the main cytokine responsible for the granulopoiesis-stimulating effects of IMUNOR. When the serum from IMUNOR-treated mice with G-CSF inactivated by anti-G-CSF antibodies (but with elevated IL-6) was added to cultures of bone marrow cells together with a suboptimum concentration of IL-3, a significant increase in the numbers of GM-CFC colonies was found. Moreover, conjoint inactivation of G-CSF and IL-6 significantly decreased the numbers of GM-CFC colonies in comparison with those observed when only G-CSF was inactivated. This observation strongly suggests that though IMUNOR-induced IL-6 is not able to induce the growth of GM-CFC colonies alone, it is able to potentiate the hematopoiesis-stimulating effect of IL-3. These findings represent a new knowledge concerning the hematopoiesis-stimulating action of IMUNOR, a promising immunomodulatory agent.

  17. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

  18. Effect of magnetic resonance imaging on lymphocyte subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, A.C.; Reichard, S.M.; Dickinson, M.M.; Allison, J.D.; Figueroa-Ortiz, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Research reports in both the lay press and the scientific literature raise the question as to the role of long term exposure to low level electromagnetic fields (EMF) in inducing cancers. Although sutdies have shown that EMF may have some effects on cells in tissue culture, it has been very difficult to determine if there is an effect in vivo. Since currents induced in the body by environmental EMF are lower than naturally existing currents, e.g., heart and brain, the authors have studied the effect of the high EMF generated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is also important for physicians to know if this procedure may have some effect on their patients since the use of this technique is growing rapidly. Blood samples were drawn by veinipuncture immediately prior to and just after patients were subjected to MRI scans of either their brain or lumbar regions. Samples were analyzed in the flow cytometer for various leukocyte subpopulations. Concentrations of monocytes, granulocytes, total T cells and helper T cells (p < 0.03) and the helper T cell/suppressor T cell ratio (a measure of immune system reactivity) increased (p < 0.05). There is a tendency toward an increase in the number of B cells following MRI (p < 0.13). Additional studies will correlate changes in leukocyte subset distribution with levels of various neurohormones that influence immune function.

  19. A Single 9-Colour Flow Cytometric Method to Characterise Major Leukocyte Populations in the Rat: Validation in a Model of LPS-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Sharrock, Anna; Birrell, Mark A; Rankin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a commonly used model for immunological investigation. Yet basic research and characterisation of leukocyte populations and sub-sets lags far behind murine research, with inconsistency on reported leukocyte markers and their overlap. These shortcomings limit the opportunity for more complex and advanced rat immunology research. In this study, we developed a robust 9-colour flow-cytometric protocol to elucidate the major blood and tissue rat leukocyte populations, and validated it in a model of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. Blood and tissues (lung, BALF, spleen, liver, bone marrow) from naïve Sprague-Dawley rats were collected and analysed by flow cytometry (FCM). Rats were exposed to aerosolised saline or LPS (1 mg/mL), at 3 and 24 hrs thereafter blood, lung and BALF were collected and analysed using FCM and ELISA. Neutrophils, two monocyte subsets, NK Cells, B Cells, CD4+, CD8+ T Cells and alveolar macrophages can be identified simultaneously across different tissues using a 9-colour panel. Neutrophils and monocytes can be distinguished based upon differential expression of CD43 and His48. Neutrophils and CD43Lo/His48Hi monocyte-macrophages are elevated in the lung at 3 and 24 hrs during LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. This validated method for leukocyte enumeration will offer a platform for greater consistency in future rat immunology and inflammation research.

  20. The association between CD2+ peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and the relapse of bladder cancer in prophylactically BCG-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; Carballido, J; Manzano, L; Moltó, L; Olivier, C; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the potential existence of differences in the distribution of T-lymphocyte subsets and in the proliferative response of these CD2+ cells to polyclonal mitogens in patients with transitional cell bladder carcinoma (SBTCC) treated with prophylactic intracavitary instillations of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) according to their clinical response to this treatment. Before BCG treatment, different subset distribution (CD8+ and CD3+ CD56+), activation antigen expression (CD3+ HLA– DR+) and proliferative response to mitogenic signals were found in CD2+ cells from SBTCC patients prophylactically treated with BCG who remained free of disease or those who had recurrence of tumour. Otherwise, the prophylactic intracavitary BCG instillations in SBTCC patients are associated with a transitory variation of T-lymphocyte subset distribution (CD4 and CD8) and activation antigens expression (CD25). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098752

  1. Erythrocyte and leukocyte: two partners in bacteria killing.

    PubMed

    Minasyan, Hayk A

    2014-01-01

    Leukocytes can't perform phagocytosis in blood stream. Blood velocity prevents phagocytosis because there is no time for leukocyte to recognize and catch bacteria. Bloodstream clearance from pathogens is performed by erythrocytes. During motion in bloodstream erythrocytes become charged by triboelectric effect. This charge attracts bacteria and fixes them on the surface of erythrocyte, then bacteria are engulfed and killed by hemoglobin oxygen. In bloodstream, leukocyte thin-wrinkled elastic membrane can't be charged by triboelectric effect and so leukocyte can't catch bacteria by means of electrostatic attraction force. Leukocytes engulf and kill bacteria out of blood circulatory system: in tissues, lymph nodes, slow velocity lymph, etc. Erythrocyte and leukocyte are bactericidal partners: the first kills bacteria in bloodstream, the second kills them locally, out of blood circulation.

  2. Expression Profile of Cytokines and Enzymes mRNA in Blood Leukocytes of Dogs with Leptospirosis and Its Associated Pulmonary Hemorrhage Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maissen-Villiger, Carla A.; Schweighauser, Ariane; van Dorland, H. Anette; Morel, Claudine; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Francey, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background Dogs with leptospirosis show similar organ manifestations and disease course as human patients, including acute kidney injury and pulmonary hemorrhage, making this naturally-occurring infection a good animal model for human leptospirosis. Expression patterns of cytokines and enzymes have been correlated with disease manifestations and clinical outcome in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to describe mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in canine leptospirosis and to compare it with other renal diseases to identify patterns characterizing the disease and especially its pulmonary form. Methodology and Principal Findings The mRNA abundance of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, TGF-β) and enzymes (5-LO, iNOS) was measured prospectively in blood leukocytes from 34 dogs with severe leptospirosis and acute kidney injury, including 22 dogs with leptospirosis-associated pulmonary hemorrhages. Dogs with leptospirosis were compared to 14 dogs with acute kidney injury of other origin than leptospirosis, 8 dogs with chronic kidney disease, and 10 healthy control dogs. Canine leptospirosis was characterized by high 5-LO and low TNF-α expression compared to other causes of acute kidney injury, although the decreased TNF-α expression was also seen in chronic kidney disease. Leptospirosis-associated pulmonary hemorrhage was not characterized by a specific pattern, with only mild changes noted, including increased IL-10 and decreased 5-LO expression on some days in affected dogs. Fatal outcome from pulmonary hemorrhages was associated with low TNF-α, high IL-1β, and high iNOS expression, a pattern possibly expressed also in dogs with other forms of acute kidney injury. Conclusion The patterns of cytokine and enzyme expression observed in the present study indicate a complex pro- and anti-inflammatory response to the infection with leptospires. The recognition of these signatures may be of diagnostic and prognostic relevance

  3. Substitution of Aspartate for glycine 1018 in the Type III procollagen (COL3AI) gene causes type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: The mutated allele is present in most blood leukocytes of the asymptomatic and mosaic mother

    SciTech Connect

    Kontusaari, S.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. ); Stolle, C. ); Pope, F.M.

    1992-09-01

    A proband with arterial ruptures and skin changes characteristic of the type IV variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was found to have a single-base mutation in the type III procollagen gene, which converted the codon for glycine at amino position 1018 to a codon for aspartate. (Amino acid positions are numbered by the standard convention in which the first glycine of the triple-helical domain of an [alpha] chain is number 1. The numbers of positions in the [alpha]1(III) chains can be converted to positions in the human pro[alpha](III) chain by adding 167.). Nucleotide sequencing of overlapping PCR products in which the two alleles were distinguished demonstrated that the mutation of glycine 1018 was the only mutation that changed the primary structure of type III procollagen. The glycine substitution markedly decreased the amount of type III procollagen secreted into the medium by cultured skin fibroblasts from the proband. It is surprising that the same mutation was found in about 94% of the peripheral blood leukocytes from the proband's asymptomatic 72-year-old mother. Other tissues from the mother contained the mutated allele; it was present in 0%-100% of different samples of hair cells and in about 40% of cells from the oral epithelium. Therefore, the mother was a mosaic for the mutation. Since the mutated allele was present in cells derived from all three germ layers, the results indicated that the mutation arose by the late blastocyst stage of development. The results also indicate that assays of blood leukocytes do not always reveal mosaicism or predict phenotypic involvement of tissues, such as blood vessels, that are derived from the same embryonic cells as are leukocytes. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The multiple faces of leukocyte interstitial migration

    PubMed Central

    Lämmermann, Tim; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of leukocyte dynamics within tissues is critical for successful innate and adaptive immune responses. Homeostatic trafficking and coordinated infiltration into and within sites of inflammation and infection rely on signaling in response to extracellular cues that in turn controls a variety of intracellular protein networks regulating leukocyte motility, migration, chemotaxis, positioning, and cell–cell interaction. In contrast to mesenchymal cells, leukocytes migrate in an amoeboid fashion by rapid cycles of actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and their migration in tissues is generally referred to as low adhesive and nonproteolytic. The interplay of actin network expansion, contraction, and adhesion shapes the exact mode of amoeboid migration, and in this review, we explore how leukocyte subsets potentially harness the same basic biomechanical mechanisms in a cell-type-specific manner. Most of our detailed understanding of these processes derives from in vitro migration studies in three-dimensional gels and confined spaces that mimic geometrical aspects of physiological tissues. We summarize these in vitro results and then critically compare them to data from intravital imaging of leukocyte interstitial migration in mouse tissues. We outline the technical challenges of obtaining conclusive mechanistic results from intravital studies, discuss leukocyte migration strategies in vivo, and present examples of mode switching during physiological interstitial migration. These findings are also placed in the context of leukocyte migration defects in primary immunodeficiencies. This overview of both in vitro and in vivo studies highlights recent progress in understanding the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that shape robust leukocyte migration responses in physiologically complex and heterogeneous environments. PMID:24573488

  5. The role of leukocytes in thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Swystun, Laura L; Liaw, Patricia C

    2016-08-11

    In recent years, the traditional view of the hemostatic system as being regulated by a coagulation factor cascade coupled with platelet activation has been increasingly challenged by new evidence that activation of the immune system strongly influences blood coagulation and pathological thrombus formation. Leukocytes can be induced to express tissue factor and release proinflammatory and procoagulant molecules such as granular enzymes, cytokines, and damage-associated molecular patterns. These mediators can influence all aspects of thrombus formation, including platelet activation and adhesion, and activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. Leukocyte-released procoagulant mediators increase systemic thrombogenicity, and leukocytes are actively recruited to the site of thrombus formation through interactions with platelets and endothelial cell adhesion molecules. Additionally, phagocytic leukocytes are involved in fibrinolysis and thrombus resolution, and can regulate clearance of platelets and coagulation factors. Dysregulated activation of leukocyte innate immune functions thus plays a role in pathological thrombus formation. Modulation of the interactions between leukocytes or leukocyte-derived procoagulant materials and the traditional hemostatic system is an attractive target for the development of novel antithrombotic strategies. PMID:27354721

  6. Alloreactive CD154-expressing T-cell subsets with differential sensitivity to the immunosuppressant, belatacept: potential targets of novel belatacept-based regimens

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ganguly, Bishu; Townsend, Robert; White, Jaimie; Levy, Samantha; Moritz, Michael; Mazariegos, George; Sun, Qing; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Belatacept blocks CD28-mediated T-cell costimulation and prevents renal transplant rejection. Understanding T-cell subset sensitivity to belatacept may identify cellular markers for immunosuppression failure to better guide treatment selection. Here, we evaluate the belatacept sensitivity of allo-antigen-specific CD154-expressing-T-cells, whose T-cytotoxic memory (TcM) subset predicts rejection with high sensitivity after non-renal transplantation. The belatacept concentration associated with half-maximal reduction (EC50) of CD154 expression was calculated for 36 T-cell subsets defined by combinations of T-helper (Th), Tc, T-memory and CD28 receptors, following allostimulation of peripheral blood leukocytes from 20 normal healthy subjects. Subsets were ranked by median EC50, and by whether subset EC50 was correlated with and therefore could be represented by the frequency of other subsets. No single subset frequency emerged as the significant correlate of EC50 for a given subset. Most (n = 25) T-cell subsets were sensitive to belatacept. Less sensitive subsets demonstrated a memory phenotype and absence of CD28 receptor. Potential drug-resistance markers for future validation include the low frequency highly differentiated, Th-memory-CD28-negative T-cells with the highest median EC50, and the least differentiated, high-frequency Tc subset, with the most CD28-negative T-cells, the third highest median EC50, and significant correlations with frequencies of the highest number of CD28-negative and memory subsets. PMID:26472085

  7. Probabilistic Subset Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Rajeev; Jedidi, Kamel

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce subset conjunction as a classification rule by which an acceptable alternative must satisfy some minimum number of criteria. The rule subsumes conjunctive and disjunctive decision strategies as special cases. Subset conjunction can be represented in a binary-response model, for example, in a logistic regression, using only…

  8. Analysis of leukocyte rolling in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Markus; Pickard, John; Unnikrishnan, Sunil; Acton, Scott T; Ley, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling is an important step for the successful recruitment of leukocytes from blood to tissues mediated by a specialized group of glycoproteins termed selectins. Because of the dynamic process of leukocyte rolling, binding of selectins to their respective counter-receptors (selectin ligands) needs to fulfill three major requirements: (1) rapid bond formation, (2) high tensile strength, and (3) fast dissociation rates. These criteria are perfectly met by selectins, which interact with specific carbohydrate determinants on selectin ligands. This chapter describes the theoretical background, technical requirements, and analytical tools needed to quantitatively assess leukocyte rolling in vivo and in vitro. For the in vivo setting, intravital microscopy allows the observation and recording of leukocyte rolling under different physiological and pathological conditions in almost every organ. Real-time and off-line analysis tools help to assess geometric, hemodynamic, and rolling parameters. Under in vitro conditions, flow chamber assays such as parallel plate flow chamber systems have been the mainstay to study interactions between leukocytes and adhesion molecules under flow. In this setting, adhesion molecules are immobilized on plastic, in a lipid monolayer, or presented on cultured endothelial cells on the chamber surface. Microflow chambers are available for studying leukocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood and without blood cell isolation. The microscopic observation of leukocyte rolling in different in vivo and in vitro settings has significantly contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the stepwise extravasation of leukocytes into inflamed tissues.

  9. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  10. Maternal BMI Associations with Maternal and Cord Blood Vitamin D Levels in a North American Subset of Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Josefson, Jami L.; Reisetter, Anna; Scholtens, Denise M.; Price, Heather E.; Metzger, Boyd E.; Langman, Craig B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity in pregnancy may be associated with reduced placental transfer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD). The objective of this study was to examine associations between maternal BMI and maternal and cord blood levels of 25-OHD in full term neonates born to a single racial cohort residing at similar latitude. Secondary objectives were to examine associations between maternal glucose tolerance with maternal levels of 25-OHD and the relationship between cord blood 25-OHD levels and neonatal size. Methods This study was conducted among participants of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) Study meeting the following criteria: residing at latitudes 41–43°, maternal white race, and gestational age 39–41 weeks. Healthy pregnant women underwent measures of height, weight, and a 75-g fasting oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at approximately 28 weeks gestation. Maternal and cord blood sera were analyzed for total 25-OHD by HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses included ANOVA and linear regression models. Results Maternal and cord blood (N = 360) mean levels (sd) of 25-OHD were 37.2 (11.2) and 23.4 (9.2) ng/ml, respectively, and these levels were significantly different among the 3 field centers (ANOVA p< 0.001). Maternal serum 25-OHD was lower by 0.40 ng/ml for BMI higher by 1 kg/m2 (p<0.001) in an adjusted model. Maternal fasting plasma glucose, insulin sensitivity, and presence of GDM were not associated with maternal serum 25-OHD level when adjusted for maternal BMI. Cord blood 25-OHD was lower by 0.26 ng/ml for maternal BMI higher by 1 kg/m2 (p<0.004). With adjustment for maternal age, field center, birth season and maternal serum 25-OHD, the association of cord blood 25-OHD with maternal BMI was attenuated. Neither birth weight nor neonatal adiposity was significantly associated with cord blood 25-OHD levels. Conclusion These results suggest that maternal levels of 25-OHD are associated with maternal BMI. The results also

  11. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  12. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Aspord, Caroline; Bruder Costa, Juliana; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  13. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  14. Analysis of blood leukocytes in a naturally occurring immunodeficiency of pigs shows the defect is localized to B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Ewen, C L; Cino-Ozuna, A G; He, H; Kerrigan, M A; Dekkers, J C M; Tuggle, C K; Rowland, R R R; Wyatt, C R

    2014-12-15

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is the result of a set of inherited genetic defects which render components of the immune response nonfunctional. In Arabian horses, Jack Russell terriers, and mice, the disorder is a consequence of the absence of T and B lymphocytes, while natural killer (NK) cell and other leukocyte populations remain intact. Preliminary analysis of a naturally acquired form of inherited SCID in a line of pigs showed several defects in the architecture and composition of secondary lymphoid organs. In this study, a quantitative assessment of lymphocyte populations in affected and normal littermates showed depleted T or B lymphocyte populations in affected pigs; however, NK cells and neutrophils were present in numbers comparable to unaffected littermates. The results indicate that the immune defect in pigs shares the same features as other SCID-affected species. PMID:25454085

  15. Measles virus-induced changes in leukocyte function antigen 1 expression and leukocyte aggregation: possible role in measles virus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Attibele, N; Wyde, P R; Trial, J; Smole, S C; Smith, C W; Rossen, R D

    1993-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection of U937 cell or peripheral blood leukocyte cultures was shown to induce changes in the expression of leukocyte function antigen 1 (LFA-1) and cause marked aggregation of these cells. Addition of selected monoclonal antibodies specific for LFA-1 epitopes that did not neutralize MV in standard neutralization assays were found to block both virus-induced leukocyte aggregation and virus dissemination. These data suggest that MV modulation of LFA-1 expression on leukocytes may be an important step in MV pathogenesis.

  16. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  17. Identification and characterization of human dendritic cell subsets in the steady state: a review of our current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are generally categorized as a group of rare antigen presenting cells that are to the crucial development of immune responses to pathogens and also of tolerance to self-antigens. Therefore, having the ability to identify DC in specific tissues and to test their functional abilities in the steady state are scientific gaps needing attention. Research on primary human DC is lacking due to their rarity and the difficulty of obtaining tissue samples. However, recent findings have shown that several different DC subsets exist, and that these subsets vary both by markers expressed and functions depending on their specific microenvironment. After discriminating from other cell types, DC can be split into myeloid and plasmacytoid fractions. While plasmacytoid DC express definite markers, CD123 and BDCA-2, myeloid DC encompass several different subsets with overlapping markers expressed. Such markers include the blood DC antigens BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, along with Langerin, CD1a and CD14. Marker specificity is further reduced when accounting for microenvironmental differences, as observed in the blood, primary lymphoid tissues, skin and lungs. The mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) has been used to measure the strength of antigen presentation by specific DC subsets. Surface markers and MLR require standardization to enable consistent identification of and comparisons between DC subsets. To alleviate these issues, researchers have begun comparing DC subsets at the transcriptional level. This has allowed degrees of relatedness to be determined between DC in different microenvironments, and should be a continued area of focus in years to come. PMID:26956785

  18. Adeno-associated virus 2-mediated high efficiency gene transfer into immature and mature subsets of hematopoietic progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) virions were constructed containing a gene for resistance to neomycin (neoR), under the control of either the herpesvirus thymidine kinase (TK) gene promoter (vTK- Neo), or the human parvovirus B19 p6 promoter (vB19-Neo), as well as those containing an upstream erythroid cell-specific enhancer (HS-2) from the locus control region of the human beta-globin gene cluster (vHS2-TK-Neo; vHS2-B19-Neo). These recombinant virions were used to infect either low density or highly enriched populations of CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood. In clonogenic assays initiated with cells infected with the different recombinant AAV-Neo virions, equivalent high frequency transduction of the neoR gene into slow-cycling multipotential, erythroid, and granulocyte/macrophage (GM) progenitor cells, including those with high proliferative potential, was obtained without prestimulation with growth factors, indicating that these immature and mature hematopoietic progenitor cells were susceptible to infection by the recombinant AAV virions. Successful transduction did not require and was not enhanced by prestimulation of these cell populations with cytokines. The functional activity of the transduced neo gene was evident by the development of resistance to the drug G418, a neomycin analogue. Individual high and low proliferative colony-forming unit (CFU)-GM, burst-forming unit-erythroid, and CFU- granulocyte erythroid macrophage megakaryocyte colonies from mock- infected, or the recombinant virus-infected cultures were subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis using a neo-specific synthetic oligonucleotide primer pair. A 276-bp DNA fragment that hybridized with a neo-specific DNA probe on Southern blots was only detected in those colonies cloned from the recombinant virus-infected cells, indicating stable integration of the transduced neo gene. These studies suggest that parvovirus-based vectors may prove to be a useful

  19. The effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocyte response experiment MA-032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    In a series of studies performed at intervals from 30 day before flight to 30 days after recovery, blood samples were obtained from the three astronauts of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project and from eight control subjects. To determine the effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocytes, tests were performed on blood samples obtained as quickly as possible after splashdown and on the day following recovery. The astronauts' inhalation of propellant gases and the inception of corticosteroid therapy 1 day after recovery provided an additional opportunity to investigate the possible effects of these factors on leukocyte function. Data were obtained during each time period on the total leukocyte count, differential count, leukocyte adhesion, leukocyte migration and chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and histochemical staining for leukocyte acid and alkaline phosphatase. These observations present a variety of in vitro correlates to white blood cell function within the body. Taken together, they serve as a reasonable approximation of the effects of space flight on leukocyte function.

  20. Leukocyte Recruitment and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Leukocytes are recruited into the cerebral microcirculation following an ischemic insult. The leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion manifested within a few hours after ischemia (followed by reperfusion, I/R) largely reflects an infiltration of neutrophils, while other leukocyte populations appear to dominate the adhesive interactions with the vessel wall at 24 h of reperfusion. The influx of rolling and adherent leukocytes is accompanied by the recruitment of adherent platelets, which likely enhances the cytotoxic potential of the leukocytes to which they are attached. The recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the postischemic brain is mediated by specific adhesion glycoproteins expressed by the activated blood cells and on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. This process is also modulated by different signaling pathways (e.g., CD40/CD40L, Notch) and cytokines (e.g., RANTES) that are activated/released following I/R. Some of the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity appear to exacerbate the leukocyte and platelet recruitment elicited by brain I/R. Although lymphocyte–endothelial cell and –platelet interactions in the postischemic cerebral microcirculation have not been evaluated to date, recent evidence in experimental animals implicate both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the cerebral microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and tissue injury associated with brain I/R. Evidence implicating regulatory T-cells as cerebroprotective modulators of the inflammatory and tissue injury responses to brain I/R support a continued focus on leukocytes as a target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic stroke. PMID:19579016

  1. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency: in vitro assessment of neutrophil function and leukocyte integrin expression.

    PubMed

    Olchowy, T W; Bochsler, P N; Neilsen, N R; Welborn, M G; Slauson, D O

    1994-04-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was identified in a two-month-old Holstein heifer calf using DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the affected calf and other clinical parameters. Neutrophil integrin expression (CD18, CD11a, CD11c), aggregation, and transendothelial migration were studied in vitro. Neutrophils were isolated from the affected calf and from normal, healthy, age-matched control Holstein calves. Neutrophils isolated from the affected BLAD calf had decreased expression of leukocyte integrins on their cell surface, decreased ability to aggregate in response to chemotactic stimuli, and decreased ability to migrate across bovine endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils from normal calves was reduced to levels comparable to the BLAD neutrophils by treatment with an anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb 60.3). Peripheral-blood lymphocytes from the BLAD calf also expressed negligible levels of leukocyte integrins, similar to their neutrophil counterparts. Our experimental findings in vitro correlate well with the clinical observations of decreased leukocyte trafficking and diminished host defense in leukocyte adhesion-deficient animals. The syndrome of BLAD may be a suitable model for one of the human leukocyte adhesion deficiency disorders. PMID:7911733

  2. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    article title:  MOPITT Search and Subset Tool View larger image A new and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 5 and 6 are now available for search and subsetting Subset output files for Version 6 data is now ...

  3. Lower bounds for identifying subset members with subset queries

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.

    1994-04-01

    An instance of a group testing problem is a set of objects {Omicron}and an unknown subset P of {Omicron}.The task is to determine P by using queries of the type ``does P intersect ``Q``, where Q is a subset of {Omicron}. This problem occurs in areas such as fault detection, multiaccess communications, optimal search, blood testing and chromosome mapping. Consider the two stage algorithm for solving a group testing problem where in the first stage, a predetermined set of queries, are asked in parallel, and in the second stage, P is determined by testing individual objects. Let n = {vert_bar}{Omicron}{vert_bar}. Suppose that P is generated by independently adding each {chi} {element_of}{Omicron} to P with probability p/n. Let q{sub 1} (q{sub 2}) be the number of queries asked in the first (second) stage of this algorithm. We show that if q{sub 1} = o(log(n) log(n)/log log(n)), then Exp(q{sub 2}) = n{sup l{minus}0(1)}, while there exist algorithms with q{sub 1} = O(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) and Exp(q{sub 2}) = o(l). The proof involves a relaxation technique which can be used with arbitrary distributions. The best previously known bound is q{sub 1} + Exp(q{sub 2}) = {Omega}(p log(n)). For general group testing algorithms, our results imply that if the average number of queries over the course of n{sup {gamma}} ({gamma} > 0) independent experiments is O n{sup l{minus}{element_of}}, then with high probability {Omega}(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) non-singleton subsets are queried. This settles a conjecture of Bill Bruno and David Torney and has important consequences for the use of group testing in screening DNA libraries and other applications where its is more cost effective to use non-adaptive algorithms and/or expensive to prepare a subset Q for its first test.

  4. Omics for prediction of environmental health effects: Blood leukocyte-based cross-omic profiling reliably predicts diseases associated with tobacco smoking

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Hebels, Dennie G.; Valavanis, Ioannis; Liampa, Irene; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Johansson, Anders; Palli, Domenico; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis; Jennen, Danyel G. J.; Krauskopf, Julian; Jetten, Marlon J.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Gottschalk, Ralph; van Leeuwen, Danitsja; Timmermans, Leen; de Kok, Theo M.C.M.; Botsivali, Maria; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Kelly, Rachel; Vermeulen, Roel; Portengen, Lutzen; Saberi-Hosnijeh, Fatemeh; Melin, Beatrice; Hallmans, Göran; Lenner, Per; Keun, Hector C.; Siskos, Alexandros; Athersuch, Toby J.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Myridakis, Antonis; Fazzo, Lucia; De Santis, Marco; Comba, Pietro; Kiviranta, Hannu; Rantakokko, Panu; Airaksinen, Riikka; Ruokojärvi, Päivi; Gilthorpe, Mark; Fleming, Sarah; Fleming, Thomas; Tu, Yu-Kang; Jonsson, Bo; Lundh, Thomas; Chen, Wei J.; Lee, Wen-Chung; Kate Hsiao, Chuhsing; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Hung, Hung; Liao, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The utility of blood-based omic profiles for linking environmental exposures to their potential health effects was evaluated in 649 individuals, drawn from the general population, in relation to tobacco smoking, an exposure with well-characterised health effects. Using disease connectivity analysis, we found that the combination of smoking-modified, genome-wide gene (including miRNA) expression and DNA methylation profiles predicts with remarkable reliability most diseases and conditions independently known to be causally associated with smoking (indicative estimates of sensitivity and positive predictive value 94% and 84%, respectively). Bioinformatics analysis reveals the importance of a small number of smoking-modified, master-regulatory genes and suggest a central role for altered ubiquitination. The smoking-induced gene expression profiles overlap significantly with profiles present in blood cells of patients with lung cancer or coronary heart disease, diseases strongly associated with tobacco smoking. These results provide proof-of-principle support to the suggestion that omic profiling in peripheral blood has the potential of identifying early, disease-related perturbations caused by toxic exposures and may be a useful tool in hazard and risk assessment. PMID:26837704

  5. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  6. The envelope gp120 gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 determines the rate of CD4-positive T-cell depletion in SCID mice engrafted with human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, R J; Levy, J A; Mosier, D E

    1996-01-01

    We have used envelope recombinant viruses generated between two molecular clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), T-cell-tropic HIV-1SF2 and macrophage-tropic HIV-1SF162, to assess pathogenic potential in the human peripheral blood leukocyte-reconstituted severe combined immune deficiency mouse model. Recombinant HIV-1SF2 viruses expressing the envelope gp120 gene of HIV-ISF162 caused as rapid a CD4+ T-cell depletion as did HIV-1SF162. The reciprocal HIV-1SF162 recombinant virus with the HIV-1SF2 envelope caused slower CD4+ T-cell loss. Although changing the V3 loop sequence of HIV-1SF162 to that of HIV-1SF2 did not change the rate of CD4+ T-cell depletion, replacing the V3 of HIV-1SF2 with the sequence of HIV-1SF162 resulted in virus that was poorly infectious in vivo but not in vitro. These studies suggest that the envelope gene determines properties important for pathogenesis in vivo as well as for cell tropism in vitro. HIV-1 infection in vivo may have more stringent requirements for envelope conformation. PMID:8648765

  7. Expression of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, TNF-β and GM-CSF in peripheral blood leukocytes of rabbits experimentally infected with rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak-Ryczek, Alicja; Tokarz-Deptuła, Beata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2016-04-15

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) is a highly morbid and mortal viral infection of European rabbits. This disease is one of the main causes of death in wild rabbits, and results in large economic losses in farms of rabbits worldwide. Although the first outbreak of this disease was noted in 1984, the pathogenesis of RHD and mechanisms of RHDV (rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus) pathogenecity have still not been fully elucidated. Recent studies indicate a role of the immune response, especially peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), in the pathogenesis of this disease. Thus, in the present study we investigated the expression of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, TNF-β and GM-CSF genes in PBL of RHDV-infected rabbits. We also compared the expression of genes encoding these cytokines in rabbits with different course of RHDV infection (in animals that died 36h postinfection or survived until 60th h after infection). The study revealed that three (IL-10, TNF-β and GM-CSF) out of five investigated genes encoding cytokines showed increased expression in PBL of RHDV-infected rabbits, and the level of expression depended on the course of RHD. The results indicate the potential role of these cytokines in RHDV infection and their influence on the survival time of infected rabbits.

  8. Effect of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Combined with Argon-Helium Cryosurgery System on the Changes of NK Cells and T Cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Manping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Bin, Huang

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive tumors in humans. T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells are the body's first line of defense to prevent tumor cell growth. Previous studies have demonstrated that transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with argon-helium cryosurgery system (AHCS) can effectively treat liver cancer. However, the mechanism of the treatment is unclear yet. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TACE combined with AHCS on the changes of T cell subsets and NK cells in peripheral blood of HCC. Our data show that alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in peripheral blood were significantly up-regulated in HCC patients before treatment when compared with healthy people and reduced after TACE combined with AHCS treatment (P < 0.01). In addition, we found that CD4+ cells and NK cells decreased (P < 0.05) and CD8+ cells increased (P < 0.05) in HCC patients when compared with healthy people. After treatment, the CD4+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and NK cells were dramatically increased in HCC patients (P < 0.05). In contrast, CD8+ cells were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). TACE combined with AHCS treatment significantly prolonged 1-year survival rate of HCC patients and did not show significant side effects. Taken together, our data indicate that TACE combined with AHCS treatment improves patients' immune system. It is a feasible and effective therapeutic method for HCC patients. PMID:27259326

  9. [In vitro transfer of immunity against PPD with dialyzable extract of leukocytes from human colostrum].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S; Alasio-Chávez, C; Dávila Velázquez, J R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the transference of PPD hypersensibility in an in vitro model, with dialysable colostral leukocyte extract (DCLE) of PPD+ and PPD-mothers, through measurements of leukocyte migration inhibition factor activity (LIF) from blood obtained of the umbilical cord of newborns from PPD+ mothers. The results show that DCLE PPD+ incubated with leukocytes of newborns from PPD- mothers had inhibition of leukocyte migration compared with migration of leukocytes incubated with DCLE PPD-. These results suggest that in this in vitro model, DCLE transfers hypersensibility to PPD. PMID:1492196

  10. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Fang-Yi; Wasser, Solomon P.; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB) and submerged culture mycelium (CM) of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX) extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg) for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day). Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:24872934

  11. The Subset Sum game☆

    PubMed Central

    Darmann, Andreas; Nicosia, Gaia; Pferschy, Ulrich; Schauer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address a game theoretic variant of the Subset Sum problem, in which two decision makers (agents/players) compete for the usage of a common resource represented by a knapsack capacity. Each agent owns a set of integer weighted items and wants to maximize the total weight of its own items included in the knapsack. The solution is built as follows: Each agent, in turn, selects one of its items (not previously selected) and includes it in the knapsack if there is enough capacity. The process ends when the remaining capacity is too small for including any item left. We look at the problem from a single agent point of view and show that finding an optimal sequence of items to select is an NP-hard problem. Therefore we propose two natural heuristic strategies and analyze their worst-case performance when (1) the opponent is able to play optimally and (2) the opponent adopts a greedy strategy. From a centralized perspective we observe that some known results on the approximation of the classical Subset Sum can be effectively adapted to the multi-agent version of the problem. PMID:25844012

  12. Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is concerned with the health risks to astronauts, particularly those risks related to radiation exposure. Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of (A) peripheral leukocyte distribution; (B) plasma cytokine levels; (C) cytokine production profiles following whole blood stimulation of either T cells or monocytes.

  13. The repopulation of lymph nodes of dogs after 1200 R whole-body x-irradiation and intravenous administration of mononuclear blood leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, B.; Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T. M.; Herbst, E.; Bruch, C.; Schnappauf, H. P.; Flad, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Fresh and cryopreserved autologous or allogeneic mononuclear blood cells (MBCs) intravenously injected in 1200 R total-body x-irradiated dogs repopulated lymph nodes within 10 days after tranfusion. Several parameters of the lymphopoietic regeneration were correlated with the number of cells transfused and with the number of colony-forming units contained in the cell suspension when they were cultured in agar (CFUc). Values within the normal or close to normal range were reached in the mesenteric nodes of most of the animals transfused with 10 X 10(9) MBC or more. These values were obtained when 5 X 10(5) CFUc or more were transfused. Axillary nodes showed lower values than mesenteric nodes. They were mostly under the normal range but well over those of the irradiated controls. Frozen and thawed MBCs seem to be as effective as fresh cells for lymphopoietic restoration. The mesenteric nodes of dogs transfused with allogeneic MBCs showed higher cellularity and larger cortical-paracortical areas than those of dogs tranfused with approximately the same number of autologous cells. The repopulation of lymph nodes parallels that of the marrow. Images Figure 3 Text-Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:941979

  14. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  15. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  16. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  17. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    article title:  CERES Search and Subset Tool View larger image The ASDC CERES Search and Subset Web Application provides a single, easy to use web interface ... of the archived granules or netCDF. Access at CERES Search and Subset Tool   The ASDC CERES Search and ...

  18. How leukocytes trigger opening and sealing of gaps in the endothelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debashree; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The entry of leukocytes into tissues requires well-coordinated interactions between the immune cells and endothelial cells which form the inner lining of blood vessels. The molecular basis for recognition, capture, and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial apical surface is well studied. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of events following the firm interaction of leukocytes with the inner surface of the blood vessel wall. We will discuss how leukocytes initiate the transmigration (diapedesis) process, trigger the opening of gaps in the endothelial barrier, and eventually move through this boundary. PMID:27703663

  19. How leukocytes trigger opening and sealing of gaps in the endothelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debashree; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The entry of leukocytes into tissues requires well-coordinated interactions between the immune cells and endothelial cells which form the inner lining of blood vessels. The molecular basis for recognition, capture, and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial apical surface is well studied. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of events following the firm interaction of leukocytes with the inner surface of the blood vessel wall. We will discuss how leukocytes initiate the transmigration (diapedesis) process, trigger the opening of gaps in the endothelial barrier, and eventually move through this boundary.

  20. Differential migration of passenger leukocytes and rapid deletion of naive alloreactive CD8 T cells after mouse liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tay, Szun S; Lu, Bo; Sierro, Fred; Benseler, Volker; McGuffog, Claire M; Bishop, G Alex; Cowan, Peter J; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Dwyer, Karen M; Bowen, David G; Bertolino, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Donor passenger leukocytes (PLs) from transplanted livers migrate to recipient lymphoid tissues, where they are thought to induce the deletion of donor-specific T cells and tolerance. Difficulties in tracking alloreactive T cells and PLs in rats and in performing this complex surgery in mice have limited progress in identifying the contribution of PL subsets and sites and the kinetics of T cell deletion. Here we developed a mouse liver transplant model in which PLs, recipient cells, and a reporter population of transgenic CD8 T cells specific for the graft could be easily distinguished and quantified in allografts and recipient organs by flow cytometry. All PL subsets circulated rapidly via the blood as soon as 1.5 hours after transplantation. By 24 hours, PLs were distributed differently in the lymph nodes and spleen, whereas donor natural killer and natural killer T cells remained in the liver and blood. Reporter T cells were activated in both liver and lymphoid tissues, but their numbers dramatically decreased within the first 48 hours. These results provide the first unequivocal demonstration of the differential recirculation of liver PL subsets after transplantation, and show that alloreactive CD8 T cells are deleted more rapidly than initially reported. This model will be useful for dissecting early events leading to the spontaneous acceptance of liver transplants.

  1. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Bifidobacterium BB12, and Lactobacillus casei DN001 modulate gene expression of subset specific transcription factors and cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of obese and overweight people.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Mitra; Shidfar, Farzad; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Mofid, Vahid; Hossein zadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad; Bidad, Katayoon; Najafi, Forouzan; Gheflati, Zahra; Chamari, Maryam; Salehi, Eisa

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are believed to have interaction with immune cells through sustained effects on gene expression of different cytokines and transcription factors. The present randomized doubled-blind controlled clinical trial was performed recruiting 75 individuals with BMI 25-35, who were randomly assigned to the following three groups: Group 1 (n = 25) who consumed regular yogurt as part of a low calorie diet [RLCD], group 2 (n = 25) who received probiotic yogurt with a LCD [PLCD] and group 3 (n = 25) who consumed probiotic yogurt without LCD [PWLCD] for 8 week. Participants in PLCD and PWLCD groups received 200 g/day yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Bifidobacterium Bb12, and lactobacillus casei DN001 10(8) cfu/gr. The expression of the FOXP3, T-bet, GATA3, TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β, and ROR-γt in PBMCs genes were assessed, before and after intervention. In three groups, ROR-γt expression was reduced (P = 0.007) and FOXP3 was increased (P < 0.001). The expression of TNFα, TGFβ, and GATA3 genes did not change among all groups after intervention. Interestingly, the expression of T-bet gene, which was significantly decreased in PLCD and PWLCD groups (P < 0.001), whereas gene expression of IFN-γ decreased in all three groups. Our results suggest that weight loss diet and probiotic yogurt had synergistic effects on T-cell subset specific gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells among overweight and obese individuals. PMID:24019207

  2. Chemokine receptor expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Talvani, Andre; Rocha, Manoel O C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2004-01-15

    We evaluated the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4) on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) and noninfected individuals. Only CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was different on the surface of the subsets (CD4, CD8, and CD14) evaluated. Patients with mild CCC had elevated leukocyte expression of CCR5, compared with noninfected individuals or those with severe disease. CXCR4 expression was lower on leukocytes from patients with severe CCC. The differential expression of both receptors on leukocytes of patients with CCC was consistent and clearly correlated with the degree of heart function such that the lower the heart function, the lower the expression of either CCR5 or CXCR4. These results highlight the possible participation of the chemokine system in early forms of chagasic cardiomyopathy and the relevance of heart failure-induced remodeling in modifying immune parameters in infected individuals.

  3. Leukocyte labeling with technetium-99m tin colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.H.; English, D.

    1987-09-01

    Triple density gradients of metrizamide in plasma (MP) were used to characterize label distribution in human leukocyte preparations incubated with /sup 99m/Tc tin colloids. Less than 50% of the cell-associated radioactivity was specifically bound to leukocytes when heparinized blood was rotated with stannous fluoride colloid ((Tc)SFC). Labeling efficiency in leukocyte rich plasma (LRP) averaged 44%, of which greater than 90% was specifically bound to leukocytes. MP-gradient analysis also revealed that leukocyte labeling did not occur with stannous chloride colloid, nor when citrate was present during rotation with (Tc)SFC. When citrate was added after labeling to solubilize unbound (Tc)SFC, radiocolloid was removed from the leukocytes, indicating that the mechanism of (Tc)SFC labeling is adherence rather than phagocytosis. Technetium-labeled neutrophils exhibited normal in vitro chemotaxis and no lung uptake in vivo. Technetium-labeled mononuclear leukocytes, on the other hand, exhibited prolonged lung transit in vivo. Neither (Tc)SFC cell preparation showed signs of in vivo reoxidation to pertechnetate.

  4. Targeting vascular and leukocyte communication in angiogenesis, inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kreuger, Johan; Phillipson, Mia

    2016-02-01

    Regulation of vascular permeability, recruitment of leukocytes from blood to tissue and angiogenesis are all processes that occur at the level of the microvasculature during both physiological and pathological conditions. The interplay between microvascular cells and leukocytes during inflammation, together with the emerging roles of leukocytes in the modulation of the angiogenic process, make leukocyte-vascular interactions prime targets for therapeutics to potentially treat a wide range of diseases, including pathological and dysfunctional vessel growth, chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In this Review, we discuss how the different cell types that are present in and around microvessels interact, cooperate and instruct each other, and in this context we highlight drug targets as well as emerging druggable processes that can be exploited to restore tissue homeostasis.

  5. Carp thrombocyte phagocytosis requires activation factors secreted from other leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Takahiro; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2015-10-01

    Thrombocytes are nucleated blood cells in non-mammalian vertebrates, which were recently focused on not only as hemostatic cells but also as immune cells with potent phagocytic activities. We have analyzed the phagocytic activation mechanisms in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) thrombocytes. MACS-sorted mAb(+) thrombocytes showed no phagocytic activity even in the presence of several stimulants. However, remixing these thrombocytes with other anti-thrombocyte mAb(-) leukocyte populations restored their phagocytic activities, indicating that carp thrombocyte phagocytosis requires an appropriate exogenous stimulation. Culture supernatant from anti-thrombocyte mAb(-) leukocytes harvested after PMA or LPS stimulation, but not culture supernatant from unstimulated leukocytes, could activate thrombocyte phagocytosis. This proposed mechanism of thrombocyte phagocytosis activation involving soluble factors produced by activated leukocytes suggests that thrombocyte activation is restricted to areas proximal to injured tissues, ensuring suppression of excessive thrombocyte activation and a balance between inflammation and tissue repair.

  6. Individual radiosensitivity and its daily variations. [leukocyte reaction to epinephrine load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. N.; Grigoryev, Y. G.; Podluzhnaya, G. N.; Pospishil, M.

    1974-01-01

    The effectiveness of determining individual radiosensitivity of rats by total gas exchange measurements, studies of Na/K content in urine, and the reaction of leukocytes to intra-abdominal administration of epinephrine, was studied. The most indicative results of predicting individual reaction to radiation were obtained by the leukocyte reaction to epinephrine load; however, changes in the leukocyte content of peripheral blood after epinephrine administration depended on the initial level during the day.

  7. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  8. CERES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-18

    CERES Search and Subset Application Thursday, February 18, 2016 ... Science Team is pleased to announce the release of the CERES Search and Subset Application. Features of the application provide a single, ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules for the following ...

  9. Leukocyte filtration in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, Mark; Roach, John D; Vertrees, Roger A; Girouard, Mark K; Lick, Scott D

    2002-05-01

    Controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung has been used in nine consecutive patients to decrease manifestations of lung reperfusion injury. An extracorporeal circuit containing a roller pump, heat exchanger and leukodepleting filter is primed with substrate-enhanced reperfusion solution mixed with approximately 2000 ml of the patient's blood. This solution is slowly recirculated to remove leukocytes prior to reperfusion. When the pulmonary anastomoses are completed, the pulmonary artery is cannulated through the untied anastomosis using a catheter containing a pressure lumen for measurement of infusion pressure. An atrial clamp is left in place on the patient's native atrial cuff to decrease the risk of systemic air embolism during the brief period of reperfusion from the extracorporeal reservoir. During reperfusion, the water bath to the heat exchanger is kept at 35 degrees C and the flow rate for reperfusion solution is between 150 and 200 m/min, keeping the pulmonary artery pressure <14 mmHg. Eight of nine patients were ventilated on 40% inspired oxygen within a few hours of operation and 7/9 were extubated on or before postoperative day 1. Six of nine patients are long-term survivors.

  10. Leukocyte filtration in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, Mark; Roach, John D; Vertrees, Roger A; Girouard, Mark K; Lick, Scott D

    2002-05-01

    Controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung has been used in nine consecutive patients to decrease manifestations of lung reperfusion injury. An extracorporeal circuit containing a roller pump, heat exchanger and leukodepleting filter is primed with substrate-enhanced reperfusion solution mixed with approximately 2000 ml of the patient's blood. This solution is slowly recirculated to remove leukocytes prior to reperfusion. When the pulmonary anastomoses are completed, the pulmonary artery is cannulated through the untied anastomosis using a catheter containing a pressure lumen for measurement of infusion pressure. An atrial clamp is left in place on the patient's native atrial cuff to decrease the risk of systemic air embolism during the brief period of reperfusion from the extracorporeal reservoir. During reperfusion, the water bath to the heat exchanger is kept at 35 degrees C and the flow rate for reperfusion solution is between 150 and 200 m/min, keeping the pulmonary artery pressure <14 mmHg. Eight of nine patients were ventilated on 40% inspired oxygen within a few hours of operation and 7/9 were extubated on or before postoperative day 1. Six of nine patients are long-term survivors. PMID:12009087

  11. Human leukocyte antigen supertype matching after myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation with 7/8 matched unrelated donor allografts: a report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research

    PubMed Central

    Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen R.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Pidala, Joseph; Nishihori, Taiga; Askar, Medhat; Olsson, Richard; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yong, Agnes; Gandhi, Manish; Dandoy, Christopher; Savani, Bipin; Hale, Gregory; Page, Kristin; Bitan, Menachem; Reshef, Ran; Drobyski, William; Marsh, Steven GE; Schultz, Kirk; Müller, Carlheinz R.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Verneris, Michael R.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles can be simplified by consolidating them into fewer supertypes based on functional or predicted structural similarities in epitope-binding grooves of HLA molecules. We studied the impact of matched and mismatched HLA-A (265 versus 429), -B (230 versus 92), -C (365 versus 349), and -DRB1 (153 versus 51) supertypes on clinical outcomes of 1934 patients with acute leukemias or myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative disorders. All patients were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research following single-allele mismatched unrelated donor myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation. Single mismatched alleles were categorized into six HLA-A (A01, A01A03, A01A24, A02, A03, A24), six HLA-B (B07, B08, B27, B44, B58, B62), two HLA-C (C1, C2), and five HLA-DRB1 (DR1, DR3, DR4, DR5, DR9) supertypes. Supertype B mismatch was associated with increased risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio =1.78, P=0.0025) compared to supertype B match. Supertype B07-B44 mismatch was associated with a higher incidence of both grade II–IV (hazard ratio=3.11, P=0.002) and III–IV (hazard ratio=3.15, P=0.01) acute graft-versus-host disease. No significant associations were detected between supertype-matched versus -mismatched groups at other HLA loci. These data suggest that avoiding HLA-B supertype mismatches can mitigate the risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease in 7/8-mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation when multiple HLA-B supertype-matched donors are available. Future studies are needed to define the mechanisms by which supertype mismatching affects outcomes after alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:27247320

  12. Lymphocytes subsets reference values in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tosato, F; Bucciol, G; Pantano, G; Putti, M C; Sanzari, M C; Basso, G; Plebani, M

    2015-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of blood lymphocyte subsets and activation markers is a basic tool in the diagnostic process of primary immunodeficiency diseases, its use becoming more and more widespread as the knowledge about these illnesses increases. However, the availability of reliable reference values, which need to be age-matched for the pediatric population, is a pre-requisite for the reliable interpretation of immunophenotyping data. Aim of this study is to analyze the lymphocyte subsets and activation markers distribution in children aged 0-18 years referring to the University Hospital of Padova and to create age-matched reference values expressed by percentiles, thus providing a valuable guideline for the interpretation of the immunophenotype. PMID:25132325

  13. Cells on the run: shear-regulated integrin activation in leukocyte rolling and arrest on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alon, Ronen; Ley, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The arrest of rolling leukocytes on various target vascular beds is mediated by specialized leukocyte integrins and their endothelial immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) ligands. These integrins are kept in largely inactive states and undergo in situ activation upon leukocyte-endothelial contact by both biochemical and mechanical signals from flow-derived shear forces. In vivo and in vitro studies suggest that leukocyte integrin activation involves conformational alterations through inside-out signaling followed by ligand-induced rearrangements accelerated by external forces. This activation process takes place within fractions of seconds by in situ signals transduced to the rolling leukocyte as it encounters specialized endothelial-displayed chemoattractants, collectively termed arrest chemokines. In neutrophils, selectin rolling engagements trigger intermediate affinity integrins to support reversible adhesions before chemokine-triggered arrest. Different leukocyte subsets appear to use different modalities of integrin activation during rolling and arrest at distinct endothelial sites.

  14. Leukocyte Activation in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Minervino, Daniele; Gumiero, Daniela; Nicolazzi, Maria Anna; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Fuorlo, Mariella; Guidone, Caterina; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Fattorossi, Andrea; Mingrone, Geltrude; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rising prevalence of obesity is a major global health problem. In severe obesity, bariatric surgery (BS) allows to obtain a significant weight loss and comorbidities improvement, among them one of the factors is the thrombotic risk. In this observational study, we measured indices of leukocyte activation in severely obese patients as markers of increased thrombotic risk in relation with serum markers of inflammation before and after BS. Frequency of polymorphonuclear neutrophil-platelet (PLT) and monocyte (MONO)-PLT aggregates as well as of tissue factor (TF) expressing MONOs was measured in the peripheral blood of 58 consecutive obese patients and 30 healthy controls. In 31 of the 58 obese patients, data obtained at the enrollment were compared with those obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months after BS. Compared with healthy controls, obese patients showed a higher frequency of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL)-PLT aggregates (7.47 ± 2.45 [6.82–8.11]% vs 5.85 ± 1.89 [5.14–6.55]%, P = 0.001), MONO-PLT aggregates (12.31 ± 7.33 [10.38–14.24]% vs 8.14 ± 2.22 [7.31–8.97]%, P < 0.001), and TF expressing MONOs (4.01 ± 2.11 [3.45–4.56]% vs 2.64 ± 1.65 [2.02–3.25]%, P = 0.002). PMNL-PLT and MONO-PLT aggregate frequency was positively correlated with TF expressing MONOs (R2 = 0.260, P = 0.049 and R2 = 0.318, P = 0.015, respectively). BS was performed in 31 patients and induced a significant reduction of the body mass index, and waist and hip circumferences. These effects were associated with a significant decrease of PMNL-PLT aggregates at 12 months (7.58 ± 2.27 [6.75–8.42]% vs 4.47 ± 1.11 [3.93–5.01]%, P < 0.001), and a reduction of TF expressing MONOs at 6 (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.60 ± 1.69 [0.30–2.90]%, P = 0.008) and 12 months (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.71 ± 0.54 [1.45–1.97]%, P = 0.001) after BS. These data suggest that leukocyte

  15. Fibrinogen modulates leukocyte recruitment in vivo during the acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Vitorino de Almeida, V; Silva-Herdade, A; Calado, A; Rosário, H S; Saldanha, C

    2015-01-01

    Besides playing an important role in blood hemostases, fibrinogen also regulates leukocyte function in inflammation. Our previous in vitro studies showed that the adhesive behaviour of the neutrophil is modulated by soluble fibrinogen when present at a physiological concentration. This led us to propose that this plasma glycoprotein might further influence leukocyte recruitment in vivo and thus contribute to the inflammatory response. To address this in vivo, leukocyte recruitment was here investigated under acute inflammatory conditions in the absence of soluble fibrinogen in the blood circulation. For such, intravital microscopy on mesentery post-capillary venules was performed on homozygous fibrinogen α chain-deficient mice ((α-/-) mice). Acute inflammatory states were induced by perfusing platelet activating factor (PAF) over the exposed tissue. As control animals, two groups of mice expressing soluble fibrinogen in circulation were used, namely, C57BL/6 wild type animals and heterozygous fibrinogen α chain-deficient mice ((α+/-) mice). Under acute inflammatory conditions, an abnormal pattern of recruitment was observed for leukocytes in homozygous (α-/-) mice in comparison to both control groups. In fact, the former exhibited a significantly decreased number of rolling leukocytes that nevertheless, migrated with increased rolling velocities when compared to leukocytes from control animals. Consistently, homozygous mice further displayed a diminished number of adherent leukocytes than the other groups. Altogether our observations led us to conclude that leukocyte recruitment in homozygous (α-/-) mice is compromised what strongly suggests a role for soluble fibrinogen in leukocyte recruitment in inflammation.

  16. Kinetics of reversible-sequestration of leukocytes by the isolated perfused rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Goliaei, B.

    1980-08-01

    The kinetics and morphology of sequestration and margination of rat leukocytes were studied using an isolated perfused and ventilated rat lung preparation. Whole rat blood, bone marrow suspension, or leukocyte suspensions, were used to perfuse the isolated rat lung. The lung was also perfused with latex particle suspensions and the passage of particles through the lung capillaries was studied. When a leukocyte suspension was perfused through the lung in the single-pass mode, the rate of sequestration decreased as more cells were perfused. In contrast, latex particles of a size comparable to that of leukocytes were totally stopped by the lung. When the leukocyte suspension was recirculated through the lung, cells were rapidly removed from circulation until a steady state was reached, after which no net removal of cells by the lung occurred. These results indicate that leukocytes are reversibly sequestered from circulation. The sequestered cells marginated and attached to the luminal surface of the endothelium of post-capillary venules and veins. A mathematical model was developed based on the assumption that the attachment and detachment of leukocytes to blood vessel walls follows first-order kinetics. The model correctly predicts the following characteristics of the system: (a) the kinetics of the sequestration of leukocytes by the lung; (b) the existence of a steady state when a suspension of leukocytes is recirculated through the lung; and (c) the independence of the fraction of cells remaining in circulation from the starting concentration for all values of starting concentration. (ERB)

  17. Different effects of anesthetics on spontaneous leukocyte rolling in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Janssen, G H; Tangelder, G J; oude Egbrink, M G; Reneman, R S

    1997-01-01

    In immunological reactions, leukocytes need to travel from the intravascular space through the vessel wall into the surrounding tissue. The first step in this process is leukocyte rolling, which has often been studied in anesthetized animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of pentobarbital, Hypnorm and both components of the latter, fentanyl and fluanisone, on this primary leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction. Using intravital brightfield video microscopy, observations were made in postcapillary venules in the intact skin of the nailfold of trained conscious Lewis rats. Subsequently, the animals were anesthetized and observations were made in vivo. Leukocyte rolling was significantly elevated after injection of Hypnorm or fentanyl, while pentobarbital and fluanisone had no effect. None of the anesthetics affected leukocyte rolling velocity. Blood flow was significantly increased only after injection of Hypnorm and fluanisone. No correlation existed between the relative changes in leukocyte rolling and concomitant changes in blood flow. The results show that the level of leukocyte rolling can be affected by anesthetics. These changes are probably not mediated by changes in local hemodynamics. Pentobarbital anesthesia does not influence leukocyte rolling. Therefore, pentobarbital is a suitable anesthetic for observation of leukocyte rolling in skin. Hypnorm significantly increases the level of rolling in skin venules. This effect seems to be caused mainly by fentanyl.

  18. Proteomics of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets Reveals Subset-Specific Surface Markers and Differential Inflammasome Function.

    PubMed

    Worah, Kuntal; Mathan, Till S M; Vu Manh, Thien Phong; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Schreibelt, Gerty; Tel, Jurjen; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Sköld, Annette E; van Spriel, Annemiek B; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Huynen, Martijn A; Wessels, Hans J; Gloerich, Jolein; Dalod, Marc; Lasonder, Edwin; Figdor, Carl G; Buschow, Sonja I

    2016-09-13

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in orchestrating adaptive immune responses. In human blood, three distinct subsets exist: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and BDCA3+ and CD1c+ myeloid DCs. In addition, a DC-like CD16+ monocyte has been reported. Although RNA-expression profiles have been previously compared, protein expression data may provide a different picture. Here, we exploited label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to compare and identify differences in primary human DC subset proteins. Moreover, we integrated these proteomic data with existing mRNA data to derive robust cell-specific expression signatures with more than 400 differentially expressed proteins between subsets, forming a solid basis for investigation of subset-specific functions. We illustrated this by extracting subset identification markers and by demonstrating that pDCs lack caspase-1 and only express low levels of other inflammasome-related proteins. In accordance, pDCs were incapable of interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in response to ATP. PMID:27626665

  19. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  20. Search for CEA-like molecules in polymorphonuclear leukocytes of non-human primates using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jantscheff, P; Indzhiia, L V; Micheel, B

    1986-01-01

    The monoclonal anti-CEA antibody ZIK-A42-A/C1 which reacts with NCA of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found to bind also to polymorphonuclear blood leukocytes of the following non-human primates tested: hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas), stump-tailed monkey (Macaca arctoides), pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemestrina), and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulata). No binding was observed to mononuclear blood leukocytes. It was concluded that non-human primates contain CEA-like substances in their polymorphonuclear leukocytes as humans do and that these substances carry some identical epitopes.

  1. Detection of deep venous thrombosis by indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte ((/sup 111/In)WBC) scintigraphy has been used successfully for detection of inflammation. Occasionally, noninflammatory collections of white blood cells such as hematomas or hemorrhage have been localized. We report a case in which unsuspected femoral deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed on an (/sup 111/In)WBC leukocyte scan performed for detection of osteomyelitis. Readers are advised to avoid interpreting all vascular (/sup 111/In)WBC localization as necessarily infectious. This may be of particular significance in patients with vascular grafts.

  2. Leukocyte chemoattractant activity of diacylglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Nishijima, J.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Phosphatidylinositol breakdown with the generation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DG) and inositol phosphates occurs in response to receptor mediated stimulation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In the authors attempt to demonstrate the direct role of 1,2-DG in cell migration, they have found 1,2 dioctanoyl glycerol (1,2-C8DG) to be a chemoattractant for 6C3HED, a mouse thymic lymphoma, and human peripheral blood PMN's. The chemoattractant activity for both cell types was observed at concentrations from 0.5 to 10mM in an under agarose assay. The maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on 6C3HED cells was similar to that of 1mM lysophosphatidylcholine and the maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on PMN's was similar to that of 10/sup -7/M f-met-leu-phe. Other 1,2-DG's with acyl chains ranging from 6 to 18 carbons in length and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol were also chemoattractants for 6C3HED, although their activities were less than 1,2-C8DG. In addition, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), another activator of protein kinase C, was a chemoattractant for 6C3HED and human PMN's. PMA was more potent than 1,2-C8DG for both 6C3HED and PMN's with chemoattractant activity in the range of 30nM to 1..mu..M. These studies support the direct role of 1,2-DG in the transduction of chemotactic stimuli in leukocytes and further suggest that the formation of diacylglycerol represents a common step in the migratory responses of lymphoid and myeloid cells.

  3. Hydrodynamic forces on a wall-bound leukocyte in small vessels due to red cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2010-11-01

    As part of the inflammation response, white blood cells (leukocytes) bind to the vessel wall before they transmigrate across the endothelium. The interactions between the wall-adhered leukocyte and flowing red blood cells (erythrocytes) play a critical role in this process. We provide a quantitative investigation of the forces exerted on a wall-bound leukocyte using a simulation tool that is based on a fast O(N N) boundary integral formulation. This permits simulations of red cells that are both realistically flexible and can approach to very close separation distances. The elastic membranes deform substantially but strongly resist surface dilatation. The no-slip condition is enforced both on the leukocyte and the round vessel walls. Vessel diameters from 10 to 20 microns are studied. At these scales the cellular-particulate nature of blood significantly affects the magnitude of the forces that the leukocyte experiences. For a tube hematocrit (cell volume fraction) of 25% and a spherical protrusion with a diameter 0.75 times that of the tube, the average forces are increased by about 40% and the local forces by more than 100% relative to those expected for a blood model homogenized by its effective viscosity. For a constant pressure gradient, the wall-bound leukocyte causes a blockage in the vessel. Different contact angles for the leukocyte as well as different mechanical properties for the erythrocytes are examined.

  4. Microscopic observation of leukocyte kinesis in the vascular bed during hemodialysis using the rabbit ear chamber technique.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Sugawara, M; Kitano, Y; Hoshino, T; Takahashi, M; Minagawa, Y; Naganuma, S; Sanaka, T; Mineshima, M; Era, K

    1989-04-01

    Leukocyte kinesis in the capillary vascular bed during hemodialysis (HD) was investigated to elucidate the mechanism of transient leukopenia. Leukocyte movement was observed microscopically during HD using the rabbit ear chamber (REC) technique, which permits visualization of the movement of blood corpuscles in capillaries. Blood was drawn from the femoral artery and returned into the auricular and/or carotid artery so that the blood passing through the hollow fiber artificial kidney (HFAK) flowed into capillaries in the REC. Leukocyte counts of blood samples taken from the afferent and efferent limbs of the HD circuit, the right jugular vein and the right atrium were determined consecutively during HD. The difference in the leukocyte count was observed between the afferent and efferent limbs for the first 15 minutes and thereafter between the efferent limb and the jugular vein. The "transpulmonary" difference in the leukocyte count was not noticed throughout HD. Between 15 and 90 minutes after the start of HD, scarcely any circulating leukocytes were found in capillaries in the REC and some leukocytes were attached to the endothelial surface. Thereafter circulating leukocytes were seen again and detachment of leukocytes from the endothelial surface was observed. No leukocyte aggregation or embolization of aggregating leukocytes was noticed. This evidence suggests that leukopenia may be attributed to the transient shift of leukocytes to the marginal pool of the vessel lumen and this process may not be specific for the pulmonary vasculature, but may occur in the first capillary bed into which the blood passing through the HFAK flows.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Heparan sulphate as a regulator of leukocyte recruitment in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Archana V; Katakam, Sampath K; Urbanowitz, Ann-Kathrin; Gotte, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A key event in inflammatory disease is the transendothelial recruitment of leukocytes from the circulation to the site of inflammation. Intense research in the past decades indicates that the polyanionic carbohydrate heparan sulphate (HS) modulates multiple steps in the leukocyte recruitment cascade. Leukocyte recruitment is initiated by endothelial cell activation and presentation of chemokines to rolling leukocytes, which, via integrin activation, results in adhesion and diapedesis through the vessel wall. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) immobilize the chemokines on the luminal endothelial cells, rendering them more robust against mechanical or hydrodynamic perturbations. During inflammation, endothelial HSPGs serve as ligands to L-selectin on leukocytes, transport chemokines in a basolateral to apical direction across the endothelium, and present chemokines at the luminal surface of the endothelium to circulating cells. HSPGs also promote chemokine oligomerization, which influences chemokine receptor signaling. Furthermore, proteoglycans of the syndecan family are involved in modulating integrin-mediated tight adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. Creation of a chemokine gradient by a localized chemokine release influences the speed of leukocyte recruitment from the blood to the tissue by attracting crawling neutrophils to optimal sites for transmigration. The directionality of intraluminal crawling is thought to be influenced by both mechanotactic and haptotactic signals, which are modulated by HS-dependent signaling processes. Finally, diapedesis is influenced by HS regarding transendothelial chemokine gradient formation and integrin- CAM interactions, and further enhanced by heparanase-mediated degradation of the endothelial basement membrane. Overall, the multifunctional role of HS in inflammation marks it as a potential target of glycan-centered therapeutic approaches.

  6. Lymphocytes subsets in children with febrile convulsions.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Karaman, Sait; Caksen, Hüseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun; Yilmaz, Cahide; Atas, Bülent

    2007-07-01

    In this study, lymphocytes subsets including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were analyzed in children with febrile convulsion (FC) to determine whether there was the association of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of FC. The study includes 48 children with FC, and 55 healthy age matched control subjects, followed in Yüzüncü Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics between October 2003 and June 2004. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were examined in the study and control groups. The analyses were performed in the Hematology Laboratory, Yüzüncü Yil University Faculty of Medicine, with flow cytometer device (Coulter Epics XL2, Flow Cytometer). A total of 48 children [17 girls (35.5%) and 31 boys (64.5%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 22.20 +/- 13.75 months) with FC and 55 healthy children [28 girls (51%) and 27 boys (49%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 28.87 +/- 17.04 months) were included in the study. When compared with the control group, the study found significantly decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values in the study group (p <.05). However, there was not significant difference in CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values between the control and study groups (p >.05). When comparing the children with and without positive family history for FC, the study did not find any difference for all CD values between the groups (p >.05). Similarly, there was not significant difference in CD values between the children with simple and complex FC (p >.05). The findings suggested that decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values might be responsible for the infections connected with FC or that they might be related to the pathogenesis of FC in some children.

  7. Decreases in percentages of naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells and increases in percentages of memory CD8 T-cell subsets in the peripheral blood lymphocyte populations of A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mika; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Nakachi, Kei; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2004-03-01

    Our previous studies have revealed a clear dose-dependent decrease in the percentage of naïve CD4 T cells that are phenotypically CD45RA+ in PBL among A-bomb survivors. However, whether there is a similar radiation effect on CD8 T cells has remained undetermined because of the unreliability of CD45 isoforms as markers of naïve and memory subsets among the CD8 T-cell population. In the present study, we used double labeling with CD45RO and CD62L for reliable identification of naïve and memory cell subsets in both CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations among 533 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. Statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in the percentages of CD45RO-/CD62L+ naïve cells were found in the CD8 T-cell population as well as in the CD4 T-cell population. Furthermore, the percentages of CD45RO+/CD62L+ and CD45RO+/CD62L- memory T cells were found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in the CD8 T-cell population but not in the CD4 T-cell population. These results suggest that the prior A-bomb exposure has induced long-lasting deficits in both naïve CD4 and CD8 T- cell populations along with increased proportions of these particular subsets of the memory CD8 T-cell population.

  8. Quantitation of acute experimental ocular inflammation with /sup 111/indium-leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, E.L. Jr.; Cole, P.W.; Cruse, V.K.; Pollycove, M.

    1988-03-01

    The cellular component of an acute ocular inflammation in rabbits was measured with autologous leukocytes exogenously labeled with /sup 111/Indium tropolonate. Inflammation was induced by intravitreal bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After 16 hr blood was removed, leukocytes separated, labeled with /sup 111/Indium tropolonate and reinjected. Three cell fractions were examined: a leukocyte rich fraction which had been prepared with Dextran; and polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocyte fractions which had been prepared using a discontinuous Percoll gradient. Two hours after labeled leukocytes were injected, measurements of /sup 111/Indium were made in blood, plasma, the whole eye and in ocular compartments. From these data the numbers of each leukocyte population present were estimated and compared directly to histopathologic changes. Both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes entered ocular tissues during the 2 hr period beginning 20 hr after LPS injection. Altered ocular vascular permeability was successfully measured with /sup 125/Iodine-albumin in some of these same rabbits. Both the number and type of inflammatory cell entering ocular tissues during a set period of time of the inflammatory response could thus be measured. This technique provides an opportunity to define the relationship of leukocyte infiltration and altered ocular vascular permeability in ocular tissues during the inflammatory response.

  9. Recent insights into endothelial control of leukocyte extravasation.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    In the process of leukocyte migration from the circulation across the vascular wall, the crosstalk with endothelial cells that line the blood vessels is essential. It is now firmly established that in endothelial cells important signaling events are initiated upon leukocyte adhesion that impinge on the regulation of cell-cell contact and control the efficiency of transendothelial migration. In addition, several external factors such as shear force and vascular stiffness were recently identified as important regulators of endothelial signaling and, consequently, leukocyte transmigration. Here, I review recent insights into endothelial signaling events that are linked to leukocyte migration across the vessel wall. In this field, protein phosphorylation and Rho-mediated cytoskeletal dynamics are still widely studied using increasingly sophisticated mouse models. In addition, activation of tyrosine phosphatases, changes in endothelial cell stiffness as well as different vascular beds have all been established as important factors in endothelial signaling and leukocyte transmigration. Finally, I address less-well-studied but interesting components in the endothelium that also control transendothelial migration, such as the ephrins and their Eph receptors, that provide novel insights in the complexity associated with this process.

  10. Imaging leukocytes in vivo with third harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Chien-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Shing; Wu, Pei-Chun; Hsieh, Tsung-Yuan; Liu, Han-Wen; Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Lin, Win-Li; Chia, Jean-San; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Without a labeling, we demonstrated that lipid granules in leukocytes have distinctive third harmonic generation (THG) contrast. Excited by a 1230nm femtosecond laser, THG signals were generated at a significantly higher level in neutrophils than other mononuclear cells, whereas signals in agranular lymphocytes were one order smaller. These characteristic THG features can also be observed in vivo to trace the newly recruited leukocytes following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Furthermore, using video-rate THG microscopy, we also captured images of blood cells in human capillaries. Quite different from red-blood-cells, every now and then, round and granule rich blood cells with strong THG contrast appeared in circulation. The corresponding volume densities in blood, evaluated from their frequencies of appearance and the velocity of circulation, fall within the physiological range of human white blood cell counts. These results suggested that labeling-free THG imaging may provide timely tracing of leukocyte movement and hematology inspection without disturbing the normal cellular or physiological status.

  11. Hydrodynamic forces on a wall-bound leukocyte due to interactions with flowing red cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2011-11-01

    As part of both healthy and pathologically physiological mechanisms sphere-like white blood cells (leukocytes) adhere to the walls of small blood vessels. We use quantitative numerical simulations to compare the forces from flowing red blood cells on a wall-adhered leukocyte to a homogenized model of blood at the same flow conditions. We model the highly flexible red blood cells using a fast O (N log N) boundary integral formulation. These elastic membranes deform substantially but strongly resist surface dilatation. They enclose a higher than plasma viscosity hemoglobin solution. The no-slip condition is enforced on the stationary leukocyte as well as the vessel walls. Vessel diameters of 10 to 20 microns are studied. Different hematocrits, leukocyte shapes, and flow conditions are examined. In vessels comparable to the size of the cells, we show that the particulate character of blood significantly affects the magnitude of the forces that the leukocyte experiences, transiently increasing it well above the homogenized-blood prediction: for example, for a tube hematocrit of 25 % and a spherical protrusion with a diameter 0.75 that of the tube, the average forces are increased by about 40 % and the local forces by more than 100 % relative to those expected for a blood model homogenized by its effective viscosity.

  12. Interaction of lactoferrin, monocytes, and T lymphocyte subsets in the regulation of steady-state granulopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bagby, G C; Rigas, V D; Bennett, R M; Vandenbark, A A; Garewal, H S

    1981-01-01

    Colony-stimulating activities (CSA) are potent granulopoietic stimulators in vitro. Using clonogenic assay techniques, we analyzed the degree to which mononuclear phagocytes and T lymphocytes cooperate in the positive (production/release of CSA) and feedback (inhibition of CSA production/release) regulation of granulopoiesis. We measured the effect of lactoferrin (a putative feedback regulator of CSA production) on CSA provision in three separate assay systems wherein granulocyte colony growth of marrow cells from 22 normal volunteers was stimulated by (a) endogenous CSA-producing cells in the marrow cells suspension, (b) autologous peripheral blood leukocytes in feeder layers, and (c) medium conditioned by peripheral blood leukocytes. The CSA-producing cell populations in each assay were varied by using cell separation techniques and exposure of isolated T lymphocytes to methylprednisolone or to monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens and complement. We noted that net CSA production increased more than twofold when a small number of unstimulated T lymphocytes were added to monocyte cultures. Lactoferrin's inhibitory effect was also T lymphocyte dependent. The T lymphocytes that interact with monocytes and lactoferrin to inhibit CSA production are similar to those that augment CSA production because their activities are neither genetically restricted not glucocorticoid sensitive, and both populations express HLA-DR (Ia-like) and T3 antigens but not T4 or T8 antigens. These findings are consistent with results of our studies on the mechanism of lactoferrin's inhibitory effect with indicate that mononuclear phagocytes produce both CSA and soluble factors that stimulate T lymphocytes to produce CSA, and that lactoferrin does not suppress monocyte CSA production, but does completely suppress production or release by monocytes of those factors that stimulate T lymphocytes to produce CSA. We conclude that mononuclear phagocytes and a subset of T lymphocytes exhibit

  13. Immune-stimulatory effects of a bacteria-based probiotic on peripheral leukocyte subpopulations and cytokine mRNA expression levels in scouring holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Qadis, Abdul Qadir; Goya, Satoru; Yatsu, Minoru; Kimura, Atsushi; Ichijo, Toshihiro; Sato, Shigeru

    2014-05-01

    Subpopulations of peripheral leukocytes and cytokine mRNA expression levels were evaluated in scouring and healthy Holstein calves (age 10 ± 5 days; n=42) treated with a probiotic consisting of Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium and Clostridium butyricum. The calves were assigned to the scouring or healthy group and then subdivided into pathogen-positive treated (n=8), pathogen-positive control (n=8), pathogen-negative treated (n=6), pathogen-negative control (n=6), healthy treated (n=6) and healthy control (n=8) groups. A single dose of the probiotic (3.0 g/100 kg body weight) was given to each calf in the treatment groups for 5 days. Blood samples were collected on the first day of scour occurrence (day 0) and on day 7. In the scouring calves, smaller peripheral leukocyte subpopulations and cytokine mRNA expression levels were noted on day 0. The numbers of CD3(+) T cells; CD4(+), CD8(+) and WC1(+) γδ T cell subsets; and CD14(+), CD21(+) and CD282(+) (TLR2) cells were significantly increased in the scouring and healthy treated calves on day 7. Furthermore, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma mRNA expression was elevated in the peripheral leukocytes of the scouring and healthy treated calves on day 7. The scouring calves given the probiotic recovered on day 7. A significantly smaller number of peripheral leukocytes and lower cytokine mRNA expression level might be induced by scouring in calves. Repeated probiotic administration might stimulate cellular immunity and encourage recovery from scouring in pre-weaning Holstein calves. PMID:24451928

  14. Microfluidic Leukocyte Isolation for Gene Expression Analysis in Critically Ill Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Russom, Aman; Sethu, Palaniappan; Irimia, Daniel; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Calvano, Steve E.; Garcia, Iris; Finnerty, Celeste; Tannahill, Cynthia; Abouhamze, Amer; Wilhelmy, Julie; López, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Herndon, David N.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Microarray technology is becoming a powerful tool for diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic applications. There is at present no consensus regarding the optimal technique to isolate nucleic acids from blood leukocyte populations for subsequent expression analyses. Current collection and processing techniques pose significant challenges in the clinical setting. Here, we report the clinical validation of a novel microfluidic leukocyte nucleic acid isolation technique for gene expression analysis from critically ill, hospitalized patients that can be readily used on small volumes of blood. METHODS We processed whole blood from hospitalized patients after burn injury and severe blunt trauma according to the microfluidic and standard macroscale leukocyte isolation protocol. Side-by-side comparison of RNA quantity, quality, and genome-wide expression patterns was used to clinically validate the microfluidic technique. RESULTS When the microfluidic protocol was used for processing, sufficient amounts of total RNA were obtained for genome-wide expression analysis from 0.5 mL whole blood. We found that the leukocyte expression patterns from samples processed using the 2 protocols were concordant, and there was less variability introduced as a result of harvesting method than there existed between individuals. CONCLUSIONS The novel microfluidic approach achieves leukocyte isolation in <25 min, and the quality of nucleic acids and genome expression analysis is equivalent to or surpasses that obtained from macroscale approaches. Microfluidics can significantly improve the isolation of blood leukocytes for genomic analyses in the clinical setting. PMID:18375483

  15. Arithmetic of five-part of leukocytes based on image process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yian; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo

    2007-12-01

    This paper apply computer image processing and pattern recognizition methods to solve the problem of auto classification and counting of leukocytes (white blood cell) in peripheral blood. In this paper a new leukocyte arithmetic of five-part based on image process and pattern recognizition is presented, which relized auto classify of leukocyte. The first aim is detect the leukocytes . A major requirement of the whole system is to classify these leukocytes to 5 classes. This arithmetic bases on notability mechanism of eyes, process image by sequence, divides up leukocytes and pick up characters. Using the prior kwonledge of cells and image shape information, this arithmetic divides up the probable shape of Leukocyte first by a new method based on Chamfer and then gets the detail characters. It can reduce the mistake judge rate and the calculation greatly. It also has the learning fuction. This paper also presented a new measurement of karyon's shape which can provide more accurate information. This algorithm has great application value in clinical blood test .

  16. Brain infiltration of leukocytes contributes to the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zattoni, Michela; Mura, Maria Luisa; Deprez, Francine; Schwendener, Reto A; Engelhardt, Britta; Frei, Karl; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2011-03-16

    Clinical and experimental evidence indicates that inflammatory processes contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, but underlying mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Using immunohistochemistry for CD45 (common leukocyte antigen) and CD3 (T-lymphocytes), we show here microglial activation and infiltration of leukocytes in sclerotic tissue from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), as well as in a model of TLE (intrahippocampal kainic acid injection), characterized by spontaneous, nonconvulsive focal seizures. Using specific markers of lymphocytes, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils in kainate-treated mice, we investigated with pharmacological and genetic approaches the contribution of innate and adaptive immunity to kainate-induced inflammation and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, we used EEG analysis in mutant mice lacking specific subsets of lymphocytes to explore the significance of inflammatory processes for epileptogenesis. Blood-brain barrier disruption and neurodegeneration in the kainate-lesioned hippocampus were accompanied by sustained ICAM-1 upregulation, microglial cell activation, and infiltration of CD3(+) T-cells. Moreover, macrophage infiltration was observed, selectively in the dentate gyrus where prominent granule cell dispersion was evident. Unexpectedly, depletion of peripheral macrophages by systemic clodronate liposome administration affected granule cell survival. Neurodegeneration was aggravated in kainate-lesioned mice lacking T- and B-cells (RAG1-knock-out), because of delayed invasion by Gr-1(+) neutrophils. Most strikingly, these mutant mice exhibited early onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures, suggesting a strong impact of immune-mediated responses on network excitability. Together, the concerted action of adaptive and innate immunity triggered locally by intrahippocampal kainate injection contributes seizure-suppressant and neuroprotective effects, shedding new light on neuroimmune interactions in temporal lobe

  17. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. Material/Methods Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. Results The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  18. Is Chronic Asthma Associated with Shorter Leukocyte Telomere Length at Midlife?

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Idan; Sears, Malcolm R.; Hancox, Robert J.; Lee Harrington, Hona; Houts, Renate; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is prospectively associated with age-related chronic diseases and mortality, suggesting the hypothesis that asthma may relate to a general, multisystem phenotype of accelerated aging. Objectives: To test whether chronic asthma is associated with a proposed biomarker of accelerated aging, leukocyte telomere length. Methods: Asthma was ascertained prospectively in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (n = 1,037) at nine in-person assessments spanning ages 9–38 years. Leukocyte telomere length was measured at ages 26 and 38 years. Asthma was classified as life-course-persistent, childhood-onset not meeting criteria for persistence, and adolescent/adult-onset. We tested associations between asthma and leukocyte telomere length using regression models. We tested for confounding of asthma-leukocyte telomere length associations using covariate adjustment. We tested serum C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts as potential mediators of asthma-leukocyte telomere length associations. Measurements and Main Results: Study members with life-course-persistent asthma had shorter leukocyte telomere length as compared with sex- and age-matched peers with no reported asthma. In contrast, leukocyte telomere length in study members with childhood-onset and adolescent/adult-onset asthma was not different from leukocyte telomere length in peers with no reported asthma. Adjustment for life histories of obesity and smoking did not change results. Study members with life-course-persistent asthma had elevated blood eosinophil counts. Blood eosinophil count mediated 29% of the life-course-persistent asthma-leukocyte telomere length association. Conclusions: Life-course-persistent asthma is related to a proposed biomarker of accelerated aging, possibly via systemic eosinophilic inflammation. Life histories of asthma can inform studies of aging. PMID:24956257

  19. A multiscale SPH particle model of the near-wall dynamics of leukocytes in flow.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Babak; Comerford, Andrew; Ellero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiscale Lagrangian particle solver based on SPH is developed with the intended application of leukocyte transport in large arteries. In such arteries, the transport of leukocytes and red blood cells can be divided into two distinct regions: the bulk flow and the near-wall region. In the bulk flow, the transport can be modeled on a continuum basis as the transport of passive scalar concentrations. Whereas in the near-wall region, specific particle tracking of the leukocytes is required and lubrication forces need to be separately taken into account. Because of large separation of spatio-temporal scales involved in the problem, simulations of red blood cells and leukocytes are handled separately. In order to take the exchange of leukocytes between the bulk fluid and the near-wall region into account, solutions are communicated through coupling of conserved quantities at the interface between these regions. Because the particle tracking is limited to those leukocytes lying in the near-wall region only, our approach brings considerable speedup to the simulation of leukocyte circulation in a test geometry of a backward-facing step, which encompasses many flow features observed in vivo.

  20. A high-throughput microfluidic approach for 1000-fold leukocyte reduction of platelet-rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Strachan, Briony C.; Gifford, Sean C.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte reduction of donated blood products substantially reduces the risk of a number of transfusion-related complications. Current ‘leukoreduction’ filters operate by trapping leukocytes within specialized filtration material, while allowing desired blood components to pass through. However, the continuous release of inflammatory cytokines from the retained leukocytes, as well as the potential for platelet activation and clogging, are significant drawbacks of conventional ‘dead end’ filtration. To address these limitations, here we demonstrate our newly-developed ‘controlled incremental filtration’ (CIF) approach to perform high-throughput microfluidic removal of leukocytes from platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in a continuous flow regime. Leukocytes are separated from platelets within the PRP by progressively syphoning clarified PRP away from the concentrated leukocyte flowstream. Filtrate PRP collected from an optimally-designed CIF device typically showed a ~1000-fold (i.e. 99.9%) reduction in leukocyte concentration, while recovering >80% of the original platelets, at volumetric throughputs of ~1 mL/min. These results suggest that the CIF approach will enable users in many fields to now apply the advantages of microfluidic devices to particle separation, even for applications requiring macroscale flowrates. PMID:27775049

  1. Leukocyte Infiltration Triggers Seizure Recurrence in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zanhua; Wang, Suping; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-06-01

    Epilepsy, which affects about 1 % of the population worldwide, leads to poor prognosis and increased morbidity. However, effective drugs providing satisfactory control on seizure relapse were rare, which encouraged more etiological studies. Whether inflammation is one of key events underlying seizure is in debate. In order to explore the role of inflammatory in the pathogenesis and development of epilepsy, we conducted intra-caudal vein injection of leukocytes to aggravated brain inflammatory process in kainic acid-induced seizure model in this study. The results showed that intravenous administration of activated leukocytes increased the frequency and reduced the latent phase of seizure recurrences in rat models of epileptic seizure, during which leukocyte inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury were also significantly aggravated, indicating that leukocyte infiltration might facilitate seizure recurrence through aggravating brain inflammation, brain-blood barrier damage, and neuron injury. PMID:27040283

  2. Carbohydrate ligands for endothelial - Leukocyte adhesion molecule 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemeyer, M.; Swiedler, S.J.; Ishihara, Masayuki; Moreland, M.; Schweingruber, H.; Hirtzer, P.; Brandley, B.K. )

    1991-02-15

    The acute inflammatory response requires that circulating leukocytes bind to and penetrate the vascular wall to access the site of injury. Several receptors have been implicated in this interaction, including a family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins. The authors report here the identification of an endogenous carbohydrate ligand for one of these receptors, endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1). Radiolabeled COS cells transfected with a plasmid containing the cDNA for ELAM-1 were used as probes to screen glycolipids extracted from human leukocytes. COS cells transfected with this plasmid adhered to a subset of sialylated glycolipids resolved on TLC plates or adsorbed on polyvinyl chloride microtiter wells. Adhesion to these glycolipids required calcium but was not inhibited by heparin, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or yeast phosphomannan. Monosaccharide composition, linkage analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of the glycolipids indicate that the ligands for ELAM-1 are terminally sialylated lactosylceramides with a variable number of N-acetyllactosamine repeats and at least one fucosylated N-acetylglucosamine residue.

  3. Personality and gene expression: Do individual differences exist in the leukocyte transcriptome?

    PubMed Central

    Vedhara, Kavita; Gill, Sana; Eldesouky, Lameese; Campbell, Bruce K.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The temporal and situational stability of personality has led generations of researchers to hypothesise that personality may have enduring effects on health, but the biological mechanisms of such relationships remain poorly understood. In the present study, we utilized a functional genomics approach to examine the relationship between the 5 major dimensions of personality and patterns of gene expression as predicted by ‘behavioural immune response’ theory. We specifically focussed on two sets of genes previously linked to stress, threat, and adverse socio-environmental conditions: pro-inflammatory genes and genes involved in Type I interferon and antibody responses. Methods An opportunity sample of 121 healthy individuals was recruited (86 females; mean age 24 years). Individuals completed a validated measure of personality; questions relating to current health behaviours; and provided a 5 ml sample of peripheral blood for gene expression analysis. Results Extraversion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes and Conscientiousness was associated with reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Both associations were independent of health behaviours, negative affect, and leukocyte subset distributions. Antiviral and antibody-related gene expression was not associated with any personality dimension. Conclusions The present data shed new light on the long-observed epidemiological associations between personality, physical health, and human longevity. Further research is required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations. PMID:25459894

  4. Noncytotoxic T cell clones obtained from a human mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chu, M H; Wee, S L; Bach, F H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a DQW-1 homozygous individual were cocultured with irradiated lymphoblastoid cell line from a DQW-1 homozygous unrelated donor bearing BW35-DW1 haplotype. From T cell cloning of primary and twice-stimulated mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC), 7 and 11 T cell clones were obtained respectively. None of the 18 clones showed specific cytotoxic activity against the alloantigen of the stimulator cell as well as natural killer (NK)-like activity against K562 cells. However, most T cell clones from both primary and re-stimulated MLC demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activity in lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (LDCC) assay. Screening assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) performed on growing microcultures obtained from restimulated MLC cloning confirmed the non-cytotoxic status of these T cell clones by showing that 41 out of 44 growing microcultures were not cytotoxic against the stimulator cell; the other 3 clones lyzed the target cell mildly. The cells from all 5 T cell clones detected for indirect fluorescence expressed CD3 and CD4 surface markers. Taken together, the results suggested that proliferation-regulating T cell subsets or factor(s) may be generated during the course of MLCs under the present responder-stimulator combination, and may suppress the development of alloreactive cytotoxic T cells and NK-like cells. PMID:2144231

  5. Oligonol supplementation affects leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Beom; Shin, Young Oh

    2014-06-24

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential promoter of immunity. This study investigates the effects of oligonol supplementation on leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in 19 healthy male volunteers. The participants took a daily dose of 200 mg oligonol or a placebo for 1 week. After a 2-week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. After each supplement, half-body immersion into hot water was made, and blood was collected. Then, complete and differential blood counts were performed. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and phenotype lymphocyte subsets. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in blood samples were analyzed. Lymphocyte subpopulation variables included counts of total T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Oligonol intake attenuated elevations in IL-1β (an 11.1-fold change vs. a 13.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 12.0-fold change vs. a 12.6-fold change 1h after heating) and IL-6 (an 8.6-fold change vs. a 9.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 9.1-fold change vs. a 10.5-fold change 1h after heating) immediately and 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. Oligonol supplementation led to significantly higher numbers of leukocytes (a 30.0% change vs. a 21.5% change immediately after heating; a 13.5% change vs. a 3.5% change 1h after heating) and lymphocytes (a 47.3% change vs. a 39.3% change immediately after heating; a 19.08% change vs. a 2.1% change 1h after heating) relative to those in the placebo group. Oligonol intake led to larger increases in T cells, B cells, and NK cells at rest (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively) and immediately after heating (p < 0.001) in comparison to those in the placebo group. In addition, levels of T cells (p < 0.001) and B cells (p < 0.001) were significantly higher 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the

  6. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  7. Assessing leukocyte-endothelial interactions under flow conditions in an ex vivo autoperfused microflow chamber assay.

    PubMed

    Mulki, Lama; Sweigard, J Harry; Connor, Kip M

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte-endothelial interactions are early and critical events in acute and chronic inflammation and can, when dysregulated, mediate tissue injury leading to permanent pathological damage. Existing conventional assays allow the analysis of leukocyte adhesion molecules only after the extraction of leukocytes from the blood. This requires the blood to undergo several steps before peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) can be ready for analysis, which in turn can stimulate PBLs influencing the research findings. The autoperfused micro flow chamber assay, however, allows scientists to study early leukocytes functional dysregulation using the systemic flow of a live mouse while having the freedom of manipulating a coated chamber. Through a disease model, the functional expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules can be assessed and quantified in a micro-glass chamber coated with immobilized endothelial adhesion molecules ex vivo. In this model, the blood flows between the right common carotid artery and left external jugular vein of a live mouse under anesthesia, allowing the interaction of native PBLs in the chamber. Real-time experimental analysis is achieved with the assistance of an intravital microscope as well as a Harvard Apparatus pressure device. The application of a flow regulator at the input point of the glass chamber allows comparable physiological flow conditions amongst the experiments. Leukocyte rolling velocity is the main outcome and is measured using the National Institutes of Health open-access software ImageJ. In summary, the autoperfused micro flow chamber assay provides an optimal physiological environment to study leukocytes endothelial interaction and allows researchers to draw accurate conclusions when studying inflammation.

  8. Hydralazine reduces leukocyte migration through different mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; de Oliveira, Maria A; dos Santos, Rosangela A; Soares, Antonio G; de Cássia Tostes, Rita; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B

    2008-07-28

    In addition to reducing blood pressure, hydralazine can reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines and reduce the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Differences in leukocyte behavior and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) compared to normotensive rats have been reported. However, whether hydralazine can reduce leukocyte migration in vivo in hypertension and in normotension remains unknown. To address this question, male SHR and Wistar rats were treated for 15 days with hydralazine at a dose of ~3.5 mg/kg or ~14 mg/kg in their drinking water. The numbers of rollers and adherent and migrated cells were determined by direct vital microscopy, and blood pressure was assessed by tail plethysmography. In addition, following treatment with the higher dose, immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), P-selectin, and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in endothelial cells, while flow cytometry was used to evaluate the expression of leukocyte CD18 and L-selectin. Hydralazine reduced leukocyte adherence and migration in SHR either at the higher, that reduced blood pressure levels, or lower dose, which did not reduce it. Reduced ICAM-1 expression might be involved in the reduced migration observed in SHR. In Wistar rats, only at the higher dose hydralazine reduced blood pressure levels and leukocyte migration. Reduced P-selectin expression might be involved. We therefore conclude that hydralazine reduces leukocyte migration by different mechanisms in SHR and Wistar rats, specifically by reducing ICAM-1 expression in the former and P-selectin expression in the latter.

  9. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  10. Multiparticle adhesive dynamics: Hydrodynamic recruitment of rolling leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    The slow rolling motion of leukocytes along the walls of blood vessels mediated by specific receptor-ligand adhesion is important in inflammation and occurs in postcapillary venules over a wide range of wall shear stresses and vessel diameters. The ability of hydrodynamic collisions between cells to induce capture of free-stream leukocytes to a selectin-bearing surface under shear flow was studied experimentally by using a cell-free assay. It was found that carbohydrate-coated spherical beads, representing model leukocytes, tend to attach to the adhesive wall 4–5 cell diameters up- or downstream of a slowly rolling or stationary adhesive bead. A key feature of such “hydrodynamic recruitment” is that only glancing, indirect collisions occurring close to the plane will result in downstream attachment. A direct numerical simulation of cell capture and rolling that includes multiparticle hydrodynamic interactions is shown to reproduce the observed behavior accurately. The theory predicts that hydrodynamic recruitment will occur in the absence of buoyancy effects and over a range of shear rates, suggesting that the mechanism may be important in vivo. This theory is supported by measurements of leukocyte capture in vivo using the hamster cheek pouch model. PMID:11752440

  11. Leukocyte numbers and function in subjects eating n-3 enriched foods: selective depression of natural killer cell levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukaro, Violet R; Costabile, Maurizio; Murphy, Karen J; Hii, Charles S; Howe, Peter R; Ferrante, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Introduction While consumption of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) has been recommended for those at risk of inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, the mechanism of their anti-inflammatory effect remains to be clearly defined, particularly in relation to the dose and type of n-3 LCPUFA. The objective of this study was to determine whether varying the levels of n-3 LCPUFA in erythrocyte membrane lipids, following dietary supplementation, is associated with altered numbers and function of circulating leukocytes conducive to protection against inflammation. Methods In a double-blind and placebo-controlled study, 44 healthy subjects aged 23 to 63 years consumed either standard or n-3 LCPUFA-enriched versions of typical processed foods, the latter allowing a target daily consumption of 1 gram n-3 LCPUFA. After six months, peripheral blood leukocyte and subpopulation proportions and numbers were assessed by flow cytometry. Leukocytes were also examined for lymphoproliferation and cytokine production, neutrophil chemotaxis, chemokinesis, bactericidal, adherence and iodination activity. Erythrocytes were analyzed for fatty-acid content. Results Erythrocyte n-3 LCPUFA levels were higher and absolute leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers were lower in subjects consuming n-3 enriched foods than in controls. There were no changes in the number of neutrophils, monocytes, T cells (CD3+), T-cell subsets (CD4+, CD8+) and B cells (CD19+). However, natural killer (NK) (CD3-CD16+CD56+) cell numbers were lower in n-3 supplemented subjects than in controls and were inversely related to the amount of eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid in erythrocytes. No significant correlations were found with respect to lymphocyte lymphoproliferation and production of IFN-γ and IL-2, but lymphotoxin production was higher with greater n-3 LCPUFA membrane content. Similarly, neutrophil chemotaxis, chemokinesis, bactericidal activity and adherence did not

  12. Influence of betulinic acid on lymphocyte subsets and humoral immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Jine, Y; Lis, M; Szczypka, M; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B

    2012-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene found in many plant species, among others, in the bark of white birch Betula alba. Betulinic acid was reported to display a wide range of biological effects, including antiviral, antiparasitic, antibacterial, anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. The effects of betulinic acid (50, 5, 0.5 mg/kg) administered orally five times at 24 hours intervals to non-immunized and red blood cells (SRBC)-immunized mice were determined. The present study examined the total number of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, and the percentage of subsets of T cells (CD4+CD8+, CD4CD8, CD4+, CD8+) in thymus,T (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, as well as white blood cell (WBC) and differential leukocyte counts in non-immunized mice, and humoral immune response in SRBC-immunized mice. SRBC was injected 24 hours after administration of the last dose of betulinic acid. It was found that betulinic acid administered orally five times at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg increased the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes, lymphocytes of mesenteric lymph node cells, and the weight ratio of the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes in non-immunized mice. Betulinic acid also changed the percentage of T cell subsets in the thymus and T and B lymphocytes in peripheral lymphatic organs. The effects of betulinic acid on T and B cell subpopulations depended on the dose applied. The strongest stimulating effect of betulinic acid was observed when the drug was administered at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg. Five exposures to betulinic acid (0.5 mg/kg) decreased the percentage of immature CD4+CD8+ thymic cells with corresponding increases in the percentage and absolute count of mature, single-positive CD4+ thymocytes and decreased the percentage and total count of CD3+ splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells with corresponding decreases in the percentage and absolute count of CD4+ and CD8+ cells

  13. Influence of rimonabant treatment on peripheral blood mononuclear cells; flow cytometry analysis and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Almestrand, Stefan; Wang, Xiao; Jeppsson-Ahlberg, Åsa; Nordgren, Marcus; Flygare, Jenny; Christensson, Birger; Rössner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonist rimonabant has been used as treatment for obesity. In addition, anti-proliferative effects on mitogen-activated leukocytes have been demonstrated in vitro. We have previously shown that rimonabant (SR141716A) induces cell death in ex vivo isolated malignant lymphomas with high expression of CB1 receptors. Since CB1 targeting may be part of a future lymphoma therapy, it was of interest to investigate possible effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients treated with rimonabant. We therefore evaluated leukocyte subsets by 6 color flow cytometry in eight patients before and at treatment with rimonabant for 4 weeks. Whole-transcript gene expression profiling in PBMC before and at 4 weeks of rimonabant treatment was done using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Our data show no significant changes of monocytes, B cells, total T cells or T cell subsets in PBMC during treatment with rimonabant. There was a small but significant increase in CD3–, CD16+ and/or CD56+ cells after rimonabant therapy. Gene expression analysis detected significant changes in expression of genes associated with innate immunity, cell death and metabolism. The present study shows that normal monocytes and leukocyte subsets in blood remain rather constant during rimonabant treatment. This is in contrast to the induction of cell death previously observed in CB1 expressing lymphoma cells in response to treatment with rimonabant in vitro. These differential effects observed on normal and malignant lymphoid cells warrant investigation of CB1 targeting as a potential lymphoma treatment. PMID:26157624

  14. The role of platelets in the recruitment of leukocytes during vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ed Rainger, G; Chimen, Myriam; Harrison, Matthew J; Yates, Clara M; Harrison, Paul; Watson, Stephen P; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Nash, Gerard B

    2015-01-01

    Besides their role in the formation of thrombus during haemostasis, it is becoming clear that platelets contribute to a number of other processes within the vasculature. Indeed, the integrated function of the thrombotic and inflammatory systems, which results in platelet-mediated recruitment of leukocytes, is now considered to be of great importance in the propagation, progression and pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease of the arteries. There are three scenarios by which platelets can interact with leukocytes: (1) during haemostasis, when platelets adhere to and are activated on sub-endothelial matrix proteins exposed by vascular damage and then recruit leukocytes to a growing thrombus. (2) Platelets adhere to and are activated on stimulated endothelial cells and then bridge blood borne leukocytes to the vessel wall and. (3) Adhesion between platelets and leukocytes occurs in the blood leading to formation of heterotypic aggregates prior to contact with endothelial cells. In the following review we will not discuss leukocyte recruitment during haemostasis, as this represents a physiological response to tissue trauma that can progress, at least in its early stages, in the absence of inflammation. Rather we will deal with scenarios 2 and 3, as these pathways of platelet-leukocyte interactions are important during inflammation and in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Indeed, these interactions mean that leukocytes possess means of adhesion to the vessel wall under conditions that may not normally be permissive of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion, meaning that the disease process may be able to bypass the regulatory pathways which would ordinarily moderate the inflammatory response.

  15. Leukocyte integrins: role in leukocyte recruitment and as therapeutic targets in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Mitroulis, Ioannis; Alexaki, Vasileia I; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Ziogas, Athanassios; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2015-03-01

    Infection or sterile inflammation triggers site-specific attraction of leukocytes. Leukocyte recruitment is a process comprising several steps orchestrated by adhesion molecules, chemokines, cytokines and endogenous regulatory molecules. Distinct adhesive interactions between endothelial cells and leukocytes and signaling mechanisms contribute to the temporal and spatial fine-tuning of the leukocyte adhesion cascade. Central players in the leukocyte adhesion cascade include the leukocyte adhesion receptors of the β2-integrin family, such as the αLβ2 and αMβ2 integrins, or of the β1-integrin family, such as the α4β1-integrin. Given the central involvement of leukocyte recruitment in different inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, the leukocyte adhesion cascade in general, and leukocyte integrins in particular, represent key therapeutic targets. In this context, the present review focuses on the role of leukocyte integrins in the leukocyte adhesion cascade. Experimental evidence that has implicated leukocyte integrins as targets in animal models of inflammatory disorders, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, psoriasis, inflammatory bone loss and inflammatory bowel disease as well as preclinical and clinical therapeutic applications of antibodies that target leukocyte integrins in various inflammatory disorders are presented. Finally, we review recent findings on endogenous inhibitors that modify leukocyte integrin function, which could emerge as promising therapeutic targets.

  16. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of conducting experiments with the formed elements of the blood under conditions of microgravity opens up important opportunities to improve the understanding of basic formed element physiology, as well as, contribution to improved preservation of the formed elements for use in transfusion. The physiological, biochemical, and physical changes of the membrane of the erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte was studied during storage under two specific conditions: standard blood bank conditions and microgravity, utilizing three FDA approved plastic bags. Storage lesions; red cell storage on Earth; platelet storage on Earth; and leukocyte storage Earth were examined. The interaction of biomaterials and blood cells was studied during storage.

  17. Influences of age and sex on leukocytes of healthy horses and their ex vivo cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, C L; Steinig, P; Schuberth, H-J; Koy, M; Wagner, B; Wittig, B; Juhls, C; Willenbrock, S; Murua Escobar, H; Jaehnig, P; Feige, K; Cavalleri, J-M V

    2015-05-15

    Leukocytes and their functional capacities are used extensively as biomarkers in immunological research. Commonly employed indicators concerning leukocytes are as follows: number, composition in blood, response to discrete stimuli, cytokine release, and morphometric characteristics. In order to employ leukocytes as biomarkers for disease and therapeutic monitoring, physiological variations and influencing factors on the parameters measured have to be considered. The aim of this report was to describe the ranges of selected leukocyte parameters in a sample of healthy horses and to analyse whether age, sex, breed, and sampling time point (time of day) influence peripheral blood leukocyte composition, cell morphology and release of cytokines ex vivo. Flow cytometric comparative characterisation of cell size and complexity in 24 healthy horses revealed significant variance. Similarly, basal release of selected cytokines by blood mononuclear cells also showed high variability [TNFα (65-16,624pg/ml), IFNγ (4-80U/ml), IL-4 (0-5069pg/ml), IL-10 (49-1862pg/ml), and IL-17 (4-1244U/ml)]. Each animal's age influenced leukocyte composition, cell morphology and cytokine release (TNFα, IL-4, IL-10) ex vivo. Geldings showed smaller monocytes and higher spontaneous production of IL-10 when compared to the mares included. The stimulation to spontaneous release ratios of TNFα, IL-4 and IL-17 differed in Warmblood and Thoroughbred types. Sampling time influenced leukocyte composition and cell morphology. In summary, many animal factors - age being the dominant one - should be considered for studies involving the analysis of equine leukocytes. In addition, high inter-individual variances argue for individual baseline measurements.

  18. Methamphetamine administration targets multiple immune subsets and induces phenotypic alterations suggestive of immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Harms, Robert; Morsey, Brenda; Boyer, Craig W; Fox, Howard S; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a widely abused stimulant and its users are at increased risk for multiple infectious diseases. To determine the impact of meth on the immune system, we utilized a murine model that simulates the process of meth consumption in a typical addict. Our phenotypic analysis of leukocytes from this dose escalation model revealed that meth affected key immune subsets. Meth administration led to a decrease in abundance of natural killer (NK) cells and the remaining NK cells possessed a phenotype suggesting reduced responsiveness. Dendritic cells (DCs) and Gr-1(high) monocytes/macrophages were also decreased in abundance while Gr-1(low) monocytes/macrophages appear to show signs of perturbation. CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets were affected by methamphetamine, both showing a reduction in antigen-experienced subsets. CD4 T cells also exhibited signs of activation, with increased expression of CD150 on CD226-expressing cells and an expansion of KLRG1(+), FoxP3(-) cells. These results exhibit that meth has the ability to disrupt immune homeostasis and impact key subsets of leukocytes which may leave users more vulnerable to pathogens.

  19. Visualization of a prosthetic vascular graft due to platelet contamination during /sup 111/Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Ramberg, K.

    1988-09-01

    A prosthetic axillo-femoral bypass graft was visualized during /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a patient referred for possible abdominal abscess. The presence of significant cardiac blood-pool activity raised the possibility that this uptake was due to deposition of contaminating labeled platelets rather than labeled leukocytes. An analysis of a small sample of the patient's blood confirmed that the circulating activity was due to labeled platelets. Increased activity along prosthetic vascular grafts in patients undergoing /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy may be due to adherent platelet, and not indicative of infection.

  20. Measurement of leukocyte rheology in vascular disease: clinical rationale and methodology. International Society of Clinical Hemorheology.

    PubMed

    Wautier, J L; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Nash, G B

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of leukocyte rheology in vascular disease is a recent development with a wide range of new opportunities. The International Society of Clinical Hemorheology has asked an expert panel to propose guidelines for the investigation of leukocyte rheology in clinical situations. This article first discusses the mechanical, adhesive and related functional properties of leukocytes (especially neutrophils) which influence their circulation, and establishes the rationale for clinically-related measurements of parameters which describe them. It is concluded that quantitation of leukocyte adhesion molecules, and of their endothelial receptors may assist understanding of leukocyte behaviour in vascular disease, along with measurements of flow resistance of leukocytes, free radical production, degranulation and gene expression. For instance, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) is abnormally present on endothelial cells in atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus and inflammatory conditions. Soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) or VCAM can be found elevated in the blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or infections disease. In the second part of the article, possible technical approaches are presented and possible avenues for leukocyte rheological investigations are discussed. PMID:10517484

  1. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors in human disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Brian A; Rott, Alena; Butcher, Eugene C

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of leukocyte attractant ligands and cognate heptahelical receptors specify the systemic recruitment of circulating cells by triggering integrin-dependent adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting extravasation, and directing specific intratissue localization via gradient-driven chemotaxis. Chemoattractant receptors also control leukocyte egress from lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues. In this article, we summarize the fundamental mechanics of leukocyte trafficking, from the evolution of multistep models of leukocyte recruitment and navigation to the regulation of chemoattractant availability and function by atypical heptahelical receptors. To provide a more complete picture of the migratory circuits involved in leukocyte trafficking, we integrate a number of nonchemokine chemoattractant receptors into our discussion. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors play key roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, allergy, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. We review recent advances in our understanding of chemoattractant receptors in disease pathogenesis, with a focus on genome-wide association studies in humans and the translational implications of mechanistic studies in animal disease models.

  2. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens.

    PubMed

    Iwanowicz, Luke R; Stafford, James L; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W; Blazer, Vicki S

    2014-09-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  3. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  4. Single and repeated moderate consumption of native or dealcoholized red wine show different effects on antioxidant parameters in blood and DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes in healthy volunteers: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN68505294

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Bianca M; Ellinger, Sabine; Kekic, Klaudia; Geus, Leonie; Fimmers, Rolf; Spengler, Ulrich; Müller, Wolfgang-Ulrich; Goerlich, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Background Red wine (RW) is rich in antioxidant polyphenols that might protect from oxidative stress related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Antioxidant effects after single ingestion of RW or dealcoholized RW (DRW) have been observed in several studies, but results after regular consumption are contradictory. Thus, we examined if single or repeated consumption of moderate amounts of RW or DRW exert antioxidant activity in vivo. Methods Total phenolic content and concentration of other antioxidants in plasma/serum, total antioxidant capacity (TEAC) in plasma as well as DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes were measured in healthy non-smokers A) before, 90 and 360 min after ingestion of one glass of RW, DRW or water; B) before and after consumption of one glass of RW or DRW daily for 6 weeks. DNA strand breaks (SB) were determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet Assay) in untreated cells and after induction of oxidative stress ex vivo with H2O2 (300 μM, 20 min). Results Both RW and DRW transiently increased total phenolic content in plasma after single consumption, but only RW lead to a sustained increase if consumed regularly. Plasma antioxidant capacity was not affected by single or regular consumption of RW or DRW. Effects of RW and DRW on DNA SB were conflicting. DNA strand breaks in untreated cells increased after a single dose of RW and DRW, whereas H2O2 induced SB were reduced after DRW. In contrast, regular RW consumption reduced SB in untreated cells but did not affect H2O2 induced SB. Conclusion The results suggest that consumption of both RW and DRW leads to an accumulation of phenolic compounds in plasma without increasing plasma antioxidant capacity. Red wine and DRW seem to affect the occurrence of DNA strand breaks, but this cannot be referred to antioxidant effects. PMID:16287499

  5. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test.

  6. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids.

  7. Effect of antenatal dexamethasone on neonatal leukocyte count.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Bauer, C R; Boehm, J; Korones, S B; Rigatto, H; Rao, A V

    1988-01-01

    The leukocyte count and differential white blood cell count during the first hour of life was determined in 164 neonates born of mothers receiving antenatal steroids and compared to 171 neonates of mothers randomly assigned to a placebo group. A leukemoid reaction (greater than 40,000 WBC/mm3) was seen only once each in the neonates born of placebo or steroid treated mothers. In addition, maternal steroid treatment had no general effect, except in a small subgroup of neonates born 3 to 7 days after the mother had been treated with 20 mg dexamethasone, where the total leukocyte and the absolute neutrophil counts were higher than the placebo group and other subgroups. PMID:3057139

  8. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  9. Enlarging Red Blood Cell Distribution Width During Hospitalization Identifies a Very High-Risk Subset of Acutely Decompensated Heart Failure Patients and Adds Valuable Prognostic Information on Top of Hemoconcentration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Arrigo, Mattia; Medeiros, Pedro Bettencourt; Ricardo, Miguel Bento; Almeida, Tiago; Rola, Alexandre; Tolpannen, Heli; Laribi, Said; Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Mueller, Christian; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Aragão, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) may serve as an integrative marker of pathological processes that portend worse prognosis in heart failure (HF). The prognostic value of RDW variation (ΔRDW) during hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) has yet to be studied. We retrospectively analyzed 2 independent cohorts: Centro Hospitalar do Porto (derivation cohort) and Lariboisière hospital (validation cohort). In the derivation cohort a total of 170 patients (age 76.2 ± 10.3 years) were included and in the validation cohort 332 patients were included (age 76.4 ± 12.2 years). In the derivation cohort the primary composite outcome of HF admission and/or cardiovascular death occurred in 78 (45.9%) patients during the 180-day follow-up period. Discharge RDW and ΔRDW were both increased when hemoglobin levels were lower; peripheral edema was also associated with increased discharge RDW (all P < 0.05). Discharge RDW value was significantly associated with adverse events: RDW > 15% at discharge was associated with a 2-fold increase in event rate, HR = 1.95 (1.05–3.62), P = 0.04, while a ΔRDW >0 also had a strong association with outcome, HR = 2.47 (1.35–4.51), P = 0.003. The addition of both discharge RDW > 15% and ΔRDW > 0 to hemoconcentration was associated with a significant improvement in the net reclassification index, NRI = 18.3 (4.3–43.7), P = 0.012. Overlapping results were found in the validation cohort. As validated in 2 independent AHF cohorts, an in-hospital RDW enlargement and an elevated RDW at discharge are associated with increased rates of mid-term events. RDW variables improve the risk stratification of these patients on top of well-established prognostic markers. PMID:27057905

  10. Photoperiod affects the expression of sex and species differences in leukocyte number and leukocyte trafficking in congeneric hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, S D; Dhabhar, F S; Viswanathan, K; Saul, A; Nelson, R J

    2003-11-01

    Sex differences in immune function are well documented. These sex differences may be modulated by social and environmental factors. Individuals of polygynous species generally exhibit more pronounced sex differences in immune parameters than individuals of monogamous species, often displaying an energetic trade-off between enhanced immunity and high mating success. During winter, animals contend with environmental conditions (e.g. low temperatures and decreased food availability) that evoke energetic-stress responses; many mammals restrict reproduction in response to photoperiod as part of an annual winter coping strategy. To test the hypothesis that extant sex and species differences in immune surveillance may be modulated by photoperiod, we examined leukocyte numbers in males and females of two closely related hamster species (Phodopus). As predicted, uniparental P. sungorus exhibited a robust sex difference, with total white blood cells, total lymphocytes, T cells, and B cells higher in females than males, during long days when reproduction occurs, but not during short days when reproduction usually stops. In contrast, biparental male and female P. campbelli exhibited comparable leukocyte numbers during both long and short days. To study sex differences in stress responses, we also examined immune cell trafficking in response to an acute (2 h) restraint stressor. During stressful challenges, it appears beneficial for immune cells to exit the blood and move to primary immune defense areas such as the skin, in preparation for potential injury or infection. Acute stress moved lymphocytes and monocytes out of the blood in all animals. Blood cortisol concentrations were increased in P. sungorus females compared to males at baseline (52%) and in response to restraint stress (38%), but only in long days. P. campbelli males and females exhibited comparable blood cortisol and stress responses during both long and short days. Our results suggest that interactions among

  11. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  12. The leukocyte response to fluid stress

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam, Fariborz; DeLano, Frank A.; Zweifach, Benjamin W.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    1997-01-01

    Leukocyte migration from a hemopoietic pool across marrow endothelium requires active pseudopod formation and adhesion. Leukocytes rarely show pseudopod formation while in circulation. At question then is the mechanism that serves to minimize leukocyte pseudopod formation in the circulation. We tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress acts to prevent pseudopod formation. When individual human leukocytes (neutrophils, monocytes) spreading on glass surfaces in vitro were subjected to fluid shear stress (≈1 dyn/cm2), an instantaneous retraction of pseudopods was observed. Removal of the fluid shear stress in turn led to the return of pseudopod projection and cell spreading. When steady shear stress was prolonged over several minutes, leukocyte swelling occurs together with an enhanced random motion of cytoplasmic granules and a reduction of cytoplasmic stiffness. The response to shear stress could be suppressed by K+ channel blockers and chelation of external Ca2+. In rat mesentery microvessels after occlusion, circulating leukocytes project pseudopods in free suspension or when attached to the endothelium, even though immediately after occlusion only few pseudopods were present. When flow was restored, pseudopods on adhering leukocytes were retracted and then the cells began to roll and detach from the endothelium. In conclusion, plasma shear stress in the circulation serves to reduce pseudopod projection and adhesion of circulating leukocytes and vice versa reduction of shear stress leads to pseudopod projection and spreading of leukocytes on the endothelium. PMID:9144238

  13. Effect of acetaminophen on the leukocyte-labeling efficiency of indium oxine In 111

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, S.C.; Schmelter, R.F.; Nelson, K.L.; Petersen, R.J.; Qualfe, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on the labeling efficiency of leukocytes with indium oxine In 111 was studied. A blood sample was obtained from eight healthy men before and after they received acetaminophen 650 mg every four hours for 24 hours. After dividing the plasma from each sample into three portions, leukocytes were separated and labeled with indium oxine In 111. In an in vitro study, 200 ml of blood was obtained from one of the men, and the plasma was separated into four portions. Acetaminophen in 95% ethanol was added to three of the plasma fractions to produce acetaminophen concentrations of 4, 20, and 100 micrograms/ml; ethanol was added to the fourth fraction as a control. Each plasma fraction was then subdivided into three aliquots, and leukocytes were labeled as in the in vivo study. Mean leukocyte labeling efficiencies in both studies were calculated from the ratios of leukocyte radioactivity to initial radioactivity in the samples, expressed as percentages. Leukocyte labeling efficiencies before acetaminophen administration ranged from 79 to 85%; after administration, labeling efficiencies ranged from 70 to 87%. No significant differences in mean labeling efficiency before and after acetaminophen administration were noted in any of the subjects. Leukocyte labeling efficiencies in all in vitro plasma fractions were reduced, ranging from 54 to 63%, but no significant differences in labeling efficiency between any of the plasma fractions were found. Using the labeling procedures in this study, exposure of leukocytes from healthy men to acetaminophen in vivo or in vitro does not affect labeling efficiency with indium oxine In 111.

  14. Relation between leukocyte count, adiposity, and cardiorespiratory fitness in pubertal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tenório, Thiago Ricardo dos Santos; Farah, Breno Quintella; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Botero, João Paulo; Brito, Daniel Calado; de Moura, Patrícia Muniz Mendes Freire; do Prado, Wagner Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the total and differential leukocyte count in obese and normal-weight adolescents, and to verify their possible relations with cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity indicators. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted with 139 adolescents (107 obese and 32 normal weight) aged between 13 and 18 years. Cardiorespiratory fitness was determined by direct gas analysis during an incremental treadmill test. Total leukocytes and subsets were estimated by flow cytometry. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The t-test for independent samples was used for comparison between groups. The relation between leukocytes, cardiorespiratory fitness and adiposity indicators was verified by Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression (adjusted for age and body mass index) tests. Results Obese adolescents had higher leukocyte (8.12±2.36u/L x 103; p=0.001), neutrophil (4.33±1.86u/L x 103; p=0.002), and monocyte (0.70±0.22u/L x 103; p=0.002) counts compared to the levels of normal weight subjects. After the necessary adjustments, cardiorespiratory fitness had a negative association with leukocytes, neutrophils, and monocytes in boys. Conclusion Obese adolescents had higher total and differential leucocyte count when compared to normal weight individuals. We also observed a weak positive association between adiposity and total leukocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil counts, and in boys, a negative association between cardiorespiratory fitness and total count of leukocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils. PMID:25628191

  15. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities.

  16. Glycobiology of leukocyte trafficking in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rachael D; Cooper, Dianne

    2014-12-01

    To fulfill their potential, leukocytes must be able to exit the vasculature and reach the site of inflammation within the tissue. This process of leukocyte extravasation is a tightly regulated sequence of events that is governed by a host of cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, chemokines and lipid mediators. Of major importance to this process and the function of many of the proteins and lipids involved is the posttranslational modification of these moieties by glycosylation. The glycosylation process is coordinated by multiple enzymes that add and remove saccharides to/from glycan structures on proteins and lipids, resulting in a unique molecular signature that affords specificity to the molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment. This review will discuss how glycosylation impacts the function of these key molecules involved in the recruitment of leukocytes during inflammation and the function of specific lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that have a role in leukocyte trafficking.

  17. Phenotypic and functional distinctions between the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets in man.

    PubMed

    Reinherz, E L; Strelkauskas, A J; O'Brien, C; Schlossman, S F

    1979-07-01

    Prior work has demonstrated the existence of distinct human peripheral blood T cell subsets by utilizing heterologous as well as autoimmune antisera. In the present study, the relationship between the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets was examined. T cells were purified with Sephadex G-200 anti-F(ab)2' affinity chromatography and E-rosetting technique, and subsequently fractionated into TH2+ and TH2- subsets by utilizing indirect immunofluorescence on FACS. Approximately 40 to 45% of the TH2- subset was shown to be JRA+, whereas less than 5% of the TH2+ subset was JRA+. In reciprocal studies, T cells were fractionated into JRA+ and JRA- subsets and reacted with heterologous antisera with anti-TH2+ specificity and indirect immunofluorescence. FACS analysis demonstrated that the JRA+ population contained no TH2+ T cells. In contrast, the JRA- population contained TH2+ T cells and accounted for the entire TH2+ subset found in the unfractionated T cell population. Functional studies showed that the TH2+ subset, and not the JRA+ subset, contain the effector population for cell-mediated lympholysis. It is concluded that the TH2+ and JRA+ T cell subsets define distinct and different T cell populations in man.

  18. Impaired leukocyte phagocytosis in patients undergoing hemihepatectomy for liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wiezer, M J; Meijer, C; Wallast-Groenewoud, H P; Tool, A T; Prins, H A; Houdijk, A P; Beelen, R H; Meijer, S; Hack, C E; van Leeuwen, P A

    1999-05-01

    Patients undergoing partial hepatectomy have an increased susceptibility to infection. To investigate whether this increased risk is related to impaired leukocyte function, we studied polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) phagocytosis in patients undergoing a hemihepatectomy because of liver metastasis (LM, n = 11) and in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery because of abdominal malignancy (AM, n = 8). Eight healthy volunteers (HVs) served as controls. Leukocyte suspensions were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Staphylococcus aureus, and phagocytosis was measured by flow cytometry. Preoperative PMN phagocytosis, in the presence of autologous plasma, was significantly less in patients with LM compared with patients with AM or HVs. This impaired phagocytosis was potentially restored in the presence of normal plasma. The decreased phagocytic capacity of PMNs from patients with LM was not related to levels of known plasma opsonins or phenotypic changes of PMNs. Rather, it was related to a deficiency of unidentified plasma factors. After surgery, the phagocytic capacity of PMNs of patients with AM decreased by approximately 30%, which correlated with decreasing levels of immunoglobulin G and C3. In conclusion, patients with LM had a decreased PMN phagocytic capacity before surgery. This impairment in phagocytosis disappeared 1 week after surgery. We propose that the presence of LM leads to a deficiency of factor(s) in the blood that impairs PMN phagocytic capacity.

  19. Cytochalasin B: Effect on Lysosomal Enzyme Release from Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zurier, Robert B.; Hoffstein, Sylvia; Weissmann, Gerald

    1973-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical consequences of treatment of human peripheral blood leukocytes with cytochalasin B were studied. Incubation of human polymorphs with cytochalasin B resulted in nuclear and cytoplasmic spreading, but not in spontaneous release of lysosomal enzymes. Cytochalasin B inhibited particle uptake. Consequently, phagocytic vacuoles were not observed; instead, granule contents were discharged directly into the surrounding medium when cytochalasin B-treated cells were challenged with zymosan particles. Cytochalasin B enhanced the release of lysosomal enzymes from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes whether these encountered zymosan particles or immune complexes on a nonphagocytosable Millipore filter. Cytochalasin B-treated leukocytes thus constitute a model system for quantitative study of lysosome fusion. Augmented enzyme release was blocked by prior treatment of cells with pharmacological doses of agents that influence the accumulation of cyclic nucleotides (cyclic nucleotides themselves, prostaglandin E1) or by compounds that interfere with microtubule function (e.g., colchicine, vinblastine). These observations suggest that one action of cytochalasin B on phagocytic cells is to remove the normal constraints to merger of granules, either with each other or with the plasma membrane, and that intact microtubule function is required for translocation of lysosomes. Images PMID:4351807

  20. Preparation and evaluation of a /sup 99m/Tc-SnF2 colloid kit for leukocyte labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, J.I.; Tatum, J.L.; Fratkin, M.J.; Apostolides, D.L.; Quint, R.I.

    1989-07-01

    Stannous fluoride colloid (SFC) kits for instant radiolabeling with 99mTc were prepared and evaluated for suitability as a leukocyte radiolabeling agent. Technetium-99m labeling for kits stored at -15/degree/C for up to 3 mo was greater than 95% as determined by instant thin layer chromatography while colloid particles of 1-3 microns were measured by electron microscope for these preparations. Canine leukocyte preparations labeled with (/sup 99m/Tc)SFC and characterized by triple density gradients of metrizamide in plasma demonstrated an 83% leukocyte association. Analysis of labeled cell preparation for up to 3 hr demonstrated label stability. Labeled leukocytes, when readministered in normal dogs, demonstrated bi-exponential blood clearance with uptake and subsequent clearance from lung. There was increasing uptake of labeled leukocytes by the liver until steady state was achieved. Furthermore, when whole blood samples were analyzed by the triple density gradient method, an increasing monocyte-to-granulocyte ratio was observed to occur with time. By 3 hr 95% of the whole blood activity was associated with the leukocyte fraction. Dogs in which a 24-hr sterile abscess was created demonstrated elevated blood-pool activity as compared to control with localization of the labeled cells at inflammatory sites within 3 hr following cell readministration.

  1. Preparation and evaluation of a 99mTc-SnF2 colloid kit for leukocyte labeling.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J I; Tatum, J L; Fratkin, M J; Apostolides, D L; Quint, R I

    1989-07-01

    Stannous fluoride colloid (SFC) kits for instant radiolabeling with 99mTc were prepared and evaluated for suitability as a leukocyte radiolabeling agent. Technetium-99m labeling for kits stored at -15 degrees C for up to 3 mo was greater than 95% as determined by instant thin layer chromatography while colloid particles of 1-3 microns were measured by electron microscope for these preparations. Canine leukocyte preparations labeled with [99mTc]SFC and characterized by triple density gradients of metrizamide in plasma demonstrated an 83% leukocyte association. Analysis of labeled cell preparation for up to 3 hr demonstrated label stability. Labeled leukocytes, when readministered in normal dogs, demonstrated bi-exponential blood clearance with uptake and subsequent clearance from lung. There was increasing uptake of labeled leukocytes by the liver until steady state was achieved. Furthermore, when whole blood samples were analyzed by the triple density gradient method, an increasing monocyte-to-granulocyte ratio was observed to occur with time. By 3 hr 95% of the whole blood activity was associated with the leukocyte fraction. Dogs in which a 24-hr sterile abscess was created demonstrated elevated blood-pool activity as compared to control with localization of the labeled cells at inflammatory sites within 3 hr following cell readministration.

  2. Cell-stiffness-induced mechanosignaling - a key driver of leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Antje; Hordijk, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    The breaching of cellular and structural barriers by migrating cells is a driving factor in development, inflammation and tumor cell metastasis. One of the most extensively studied examples is the extravasation of activated leukocytes across the vascular endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels. Each step of this leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) process is regulated by distinct endothelial adhesion receptors such as the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1). Adherent leukocytes exert force on these receptors, which sense mechanical cues and transform them into localized mechanosignaling in endothelial cells. In turn, the function of the mechanoreceptors is controlled by the stiffness of the endothelial cells and of the underlying substrate representing a positive-feedback loop. In this Commentary, we focus on the mechanotransduction in leukocytes and endothelial cells, which is induced in response to variations in substrate stiffness. Recent studies have described the first key proteins involved in these mechanosensitive events, allowing us to identify common regulatory mechanisms in both cell types. Finally, we discuss how endothelial cell stiffness controls the individual steps in the leukocyte TEM process. We identify endothelial cell stiffness as an important component, in addition to locally presented chemokines and adhesion receptors, which guides leukocytes to sites that permit TEM.

  3. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  4. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-08-05

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs.

  5. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  6. Measurement of oxyradicals from leukocytes lodged in a microchannel array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuji; Kikuchi, Hiroko E.

    2001-05-01

    The oxyradical production by leukocytes is crucial for killing invading bacteria, while it has been widely discussed as a tissue injuring factor. Despite such importance of the event, it is still unclear, probably because of lack of simple and reliable measurement methods, to what extent it varies among different subjects and either to what extent it is affected by environmental factors including diet. The present paper describes use of microfabricated channel arrays, that have been developed for use in studies of blood rheology, in the oxyradical measurement by chemiluminescence.

  7. Are soluble factors relevant for polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysregulation in septicemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, C; Graninger, W

    1995-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of twelve patients with gram-negative septicemia exhibited a decreased capacity to phagocytize Escherichia coli and generate reactive oxygen products which normalized within 7 days of treatment. Ex vivo exchange of plasma from age-, sex-, and blood-group-identical normal controls resulted in an increase of both phagocytic capacity and reactive oxygen intermediate generation in PMNs of septicemic patients and transiently reduced phagocytosis and reactive oxygen intermediate production in PMNs of normal controls. These results suggest that extrinsic factors are crucial for PMN function. PMID:7697538

  8. Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Minsuk; Kim, Dong-Joo; Lee, Mi-Ri; Wu, Yu; Han, Lin; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2014-05-01

    Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the entry of immune cells and mediators into the central nervous system (CNS), a small number of peripheral leukocytes can traverse the BBB and infiltrate into the CNS. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the major routes through which trafficking leukocytes migrate into the CNS. Therefore, the number of leukocytes and their phenotypic compositions in the CSF may represent important sources to investigate immune-to-brain interactions or diagnose and monitor neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the paucity of trafficking leucocytes in the CSF, a technology capable of efficient isolation, enumeration, and molecular typing of these cells in the clinical settings has not been achieved. In this study, we report on a biofunctionalized silicon nanowire array chip for highly efficient capture and multiplexed phenotyping of rare trafficking leukocytes in small quantities (50 microliters) of clinical CSF specimens collected from neurodegenerative disease patients. The antibody coated 3D nanostructured materials exhibited vastly improved rare cell capture efficiency due to high-affinity binding and enhanced cell-substrate interactions. Moreover, our platform creates multiple cell capture interfaces, each of which can selectively isolate specific leukocyte phenotypes. A comparison with the traditional immunophenotyping using flow cytometry demonstrated that our novel silicon nanowire-based rare cell analysis platform can perform rapid detection and simultaneous molecular characterization of heterogeneous immune cells. Multiplexed molecular typing of rare leukocytes in CSF samples collected from Alzheimer's disease patients revealed the elevation of white blood cell counts and significant alterations in the distribution of major leukocyte phenotypes. Our technology represents a practical tool for potentially diagnosing and monitoring the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by allowing an effective

  9. Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Minsuk; Kim, Dong-Joo; Lee, Mi-Ri; Wu, Yu; Han, Lin; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2014-05-01

    Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the entry of immune cells and mediators into the central nervous system (CNS), a small number of peripheral leukocytes can traverse the BBB and infiltrate into the CNS. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the major routes through which trafficking leukocytes migrate into the CNS. Therefore, the number of leukocytes and their phenotypic compositions in the CSF may represent important sources to investigate immune-to-brain interactions or diagnose and monitor neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the paucity of trafficking leucocytes in the CSF, a technology capable of efficient isolation, enumeration, and molecular typing of these cells in the clinical settings has not been achieved. In this study, we report on a biofunctionalized silicon nanowire array chip for highly efficient capture and multiplexed phenotyping of rare trafficking leukocytes in small quantities (50 microliters) of clinical CSF specimens collected from neurodegenerative disease patients. The antibody coated 3D nanostructured materials exhibited vastly improved rare cell capture efficiency due to high-affinity binding and enhanced cell-substrate interactions. Moreover, our platform creates multiple cell capture interfaces, each of which can selectively isolate specific leukocyte phenotypes. A comparison with the traditional immunophenotyping using flow cytometry demonstrated that our novel silicon nanowire-based rare cell analysis platform can perform rapid detection and simultaneous molecular characterization of heterogeneous immune cells. Multiplexed molecular typing of rare leukocytes in CSF samples collected from Alzheimer's disease patients revealed the elevation of white blood cell counts and significant alterations in the distribution of major leukocyte phenotypes. Our technology represents a practical tool for potentially diagnosing and monitoring the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by allowing an effective

  10. Kinetics of leukocyte sequestration in the lungs of acutely septic primates: A study using sup 111 In-labeled autologous leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hangen, D.H.; Segall, G.M.; Harney, E.W.; Stevens, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    To further clarify the role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of ARDS, we studied the localization and kinetics of leukocyte migration using 111In-labeled autologous white cell scans ({sup 111}In wbc scans) in four primates made acutely septic with infusions of Escherichia coli. Whole body images were obtained with a gamma camera and were acquired on computer every 15 min beginning immediately after the E. coli infusion. Simultaneous measurements of C5a and peripheral blood leukocyte count were also obtained. Within 5 min of initiating sepsis, three major events occurred: complement activation as measured by the production of C5a, a profound fall in peripheral leukocyte count, and a significant increase in the sequestration of leukocytes in the lungs. The pulmonary sequestration reached a peak at 15 min with a mean of 152% of baseline activity. This sequestration consisted of a population that was predominantly neutrophils. Damage to the pulmonary capillary endothelium was demonstrated by an increase in extravascular lung water. The results support a role for neutrophils and complement as mediators in the pathogenesis of ARDS.

  11. Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Minsuk; Kim, Dong-Joo; Lee, Mi-Ri; Wu, Yu; Han, Lin; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the entry of immune cells and mediators into the central nervous system (CNS), a small number of peripheral leukocytes can traverse BBB and infiltrate into the CNS. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the major routes through which trafficking leukocytes migrate into the CNS. Therefore, the number of leukocytes and their phenotypic compositions in CSF may represent important sources to investigate immune-to-brain interaction, or diagnose and monitor neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the paucity of trafficking leucocytes in CSF, a technology capable of efficient isolation, enumeration, and molecular typing of these cells in the clinical settings has not been achieved. In this study, we report on a biofunctionalized silicon nanowire array chip for highly efficient capture and multiplexed phenotyping of rare trafficking leukocytes in small quantities (50 microliters) of clinical CSF specimens collected from neurodegenerative disease patients. The antibody-coated 3D nanostructured materials exhibited vastly improved rare cell capture efficiency due to high-affinity binding and enhanced cell-substrate interactions. Moreover, our platform creates multiple cell capture interfaces, each of which can selectively isolate specific leukocyte phenotype. Comparison with the traditional immunophenotyping using flow cytometry demonstrated that our novel silicon nanowire-based rare cell analysis platform can perform rapid detection and simultaneous molecular characterization of heterogeneous immune cells. Multiplexed molecular typing of rare leukocytes in CSF samples collected from Alzheimer’s disease patients revealed the elevation of white blood cell counts and significant alterations in the distribution of major leukocyte phenotypes. Our technology represents a practical tool potentially for diagnosing and monitoring the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by allowing an effective hematological

  12. [Investigation on bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Zhu; Cui, Yu-Dong; Zhu, Zhan-Bo; Cao, Hong-Wei; Piao, Fan-Ze

    2006-10-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is autosomal recessive disease. The pathogeny of BLAD is genic mutation of CD18-integrins on the leukocyte. In order to know the carrier and occurrence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) among cows age from one to six years old in China, 1,000 cows were investigated by means of amplifying a CD18 gene fragment via reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by restriction digestion with Taq I. Results showed that 19 cows were BLAD carriers, indicating that the BLAD carrier rate was 1.9 percent. In addition, one cow was found to have BLAD. PMID:17035180

  13. Appearance of hyperostosis frontalis interna on indium-111 leukocyte scans: potential diagnostic pitfall

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, J.L.; Jackson, D.E. Jr.; Carretta, R.

    1986-04-01

    The appearance of hyperostosis frontalis interna on an (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scan is reported. Recognition of the potential for normal accumulation of 111In-labeled white blood cells within this common process involving the skull is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis.

  14. [Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD)--a hereditary disease in cattle].

    PubMed

    Heckert, H P; Wittstatt, U; Hofmann, W

    1997-07-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is an autosomal recessive and lethal disease of Holstein-Friesian cattle. It is characterized by leukocytosis with more than 30,000 cells/microliter blood and decreased resistance to infectious diseases. Details of the history and pathological findings in three patients, the situation in the herd and breeding aspects are described. PMID:9312893

  15. Blood leukocytes from benznidazole-treated indeterminate chagas disease patients display an overall type-1-modulated cytokine profile upon short-term in vitro stimulation with trypanosoma cruzi antigens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benznidazole (Bz)-chemotherapy is recommended to prevent Chagas disease progression, despite its limited efficacy during chronic disease. However, the host mechanisms underlying these benefits still remain to be elucidated. Methods In this study, we have used short-term whole blood cultures to describe the cytokine profile of Bz-treated Indeterminate Chagas disease patients-(INDt) as compared to untreated patients-(IND). Results Our findings showed that IND presented increased levels of IL-10+neutrophils, IL-12+ and IL-10+monocytes and IFN-γ+NK-cells. Moreover, IND showed slight increase of IL-4+CD4+T-cells and enhanced levels of IL-10+CD8+T-cells and B-cells. Additional analysis of cytokine Low and High producers also highlighted the presence of High cytokine producers within IND, including IL-10 from CD4+ T-cells and IFN-γ from CD8+ T-cells, as compared to NI. The Bz-treatment lead to an overall cytokine down-regulation in the innate and adaptive compartments, including low levels of IL-12+ and IL-10+neutrophils and monocytes, IFN-γ+NK-cells, IL-12+, TNF-α+, IFN-γ+ and IL-5+CD4+T-cells and IL-10+B-cells, along with basal levels of cytokine-expressing CD8+T-cells in INDt as compared to IND. The in vitro antigen stimulation shifted the cytokine profile toward a type 1-modulated profile, with increased levels of IL-12+ and IL-10+ monocytes, IFN-γ+ and IL-4+NK-cells along with TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+CD8+T-cells. Analysis of Low and High cytokine producers, upon in vitro antigen stimulation, further confirm these data. Conclusion Together, our findings showed that the Bz treatment of Indeterminate Chagas’ disease patients shifts the cytokine patterns of peripheral blood monocytes, NK-cells and CD8+ T-cells towards a long-lasting Type-1-modulated profile that could be important to the maintenance of a non-deleterious immunological microenvironment. PMID:22625224

  16. Comparison of In-111-MERC leukocytes with In-111-Oxine leukocytes for abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Intenzo, C.M.; Desai, A.G.; Thakur, M.L.; Park, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    This study was done to compare the clinical results of generally accepted Indium-111-oxine (oxine) labeled leukocytes with a relatively newer Indium-111-2-Mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (Merc) labeled leukocytes for the detection of occult abscesses. Of the 74 patients suspected of harboring an occult abscess, autologous leukocytes of 34 patients were labeled with oxine while in 40 patients Merc labeled leukocytes were used. Whole body imaging was performed at 24 hours. Interpretation of the scans was done without the knowledge of the leukocyte label (i.e. oxine vs Merc). The diagnosis was confirmed in each case by either subsequent clinical course, radiographic correlation (CT, US, etc.), surgery pathology, or autopsy. The results presented in this paper indicate that there is no significant difference between the Merc and oxine labeled leukocytes for abscess detection. The ease of labeling and potential availability of Merc as a kit is an advantage.

  17. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  18. Sour cherry seed kernel extract increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and decreases representation of CD3+ TNF-α+ and CD3+IL-8+ subpopulations in peripheral blood leukocyte cultures from type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Fadia F; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Haines, David D; Dashti, Ali; Dashti, Hussain; Al-Ozairi, Ebaa; Bak, Istvan; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-05-01

    The present study evaluates a hypothesis that sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) seed extracts (SCE) modulate CD3+ T lymphocyte activity in ways predictive of potential for uses of SCE in management of inflammatory diseases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 12 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients and eight healthy control subjects were cultured 24 h with 100 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to increase inflammatory signaling and co-incubated with 0.5-100 µg/ml SCE. Cultures were evaluated by two-color flow cytometry for percent representation of CD3+ IL8+ and CD3+TNF-α cells which express interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNF-α+) respectively, and by enzyme-linked immunoassay for lymphocyte-associated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, known to be induced by SCE). SCE dosage ranges of 0.5-100 µg/ml in cell cultures significantly suppressed LPS-increased CD3+TNF-α+ and CD3+IL8+ representation from all participants (p < 0.05), with greater pharmacological effect noted in suppression of CD3+TNF-α+ noted in cells from T2DM patients versus healthy control subjects. These effects correlated with increased HO-1 expression in SCE-treated PBMC from all subjects (p < 0.05). Since TNF-α and IL-8 are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for many inflammatory syndromes, the capacity of SCE to down-regulate representation of cells that express them suggests potential for therapeutic use of SCE in T2DM and other diseases. PMID:22848037

  19. Preparation of surface-modified poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwovens and their application as leukocyte removal filters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jin; Yeo, Gwu-Dong; Pai, Chaul-Min; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2009-08-01

    Blood transfusion-related adverse reactions have been reported to be caused by leukocytes in blood products. It is now generally accepted that it would be highly desirable to reduce leukocytes level as low as possible. In this study, melt-blown poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven (PBT-NW) was treated with a hydroxyapatite (HA) surface-modification method for removal of leukocytes from blood components. Acrylic acid was graft-polymerized onto the surface of the PBT-NW after oxygen plasma glow discharge treatment. The PBT-NW surface was covered with a thin layer of HA produced by immersing the polymer surface in an aqueous solution containing high concentrations of PO(4) (3-) and Ca(2+) after graft-polymerization of acrylic acid, which provided the nucleus for HA crystallization. The surface was characterized using water contact angles, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR), and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. When filtration was performed with a unit of red blood cell concentrates, HA-deposited PBT-NW (PBT-HA) removed 98.5% of the leukocytes and recovered 99.5% of the erythrocytes, suggesting that HA-deposited PBT-NW is a very promising blood filter for selective removal of leukocytes. PMID:19353568

  20. Preparation of surface-modified poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwovens and their application as leukocyte removal filters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jin; Yeo, Gwu-Dong; Pai, Chaul-Min; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2009-08-01

    Blood transfusion-related adverse reactions have been reported to be caused by leukocytes in blood products. It is now generally accepted that it would be highly desirable to reduce leukocytes level as low as possible. In this study, melt-blown poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven (PBT-NW) was treated with a hydroxyapatite (HA) surface-modification method for removal of leukocytes from blood components. Acrylic acid was graft-polymerized onto the surface of the PBT-NW after oxygen plasma glow discharge treatment. The PBT-NW surface was covered with a thin layer of HA produced by immersing the polymer surface in an aqueous solution containing high concentrations of PO(4) (3-) and Ca(2+) after graft-polymerization of acrylic acid, which provided the nucleus for HA crystallization. The surface was characterized using water contact angles, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR), and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. When filtration was performed with a unit of red blood cell concentrates, HA-deposited PBT-NW (PBT-HA) removed 98.5% of the leukocytes and recovered 99.5% of the erythrocytes, suggesting that HA-deposited PBT-NW is a very promising blood filter for selective removal of leukocytes.

  1. Mechanisms of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): anti-leukocyte antibodies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-05-01

    There is abundant evidence that leukocyte antibodies in blood donor products are somehow involved in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II, and neutrophil-specific antibodies in the plasma of both blood donors and recipients have been implicated in the pathogenesis of TRALI. The case for a relationship between leukocyte antibodies and TRALI is more compelling if concordance between the antigen specificity of the leukocyte antibodies in the donor plasma and the corresponding antigen on the cells of the affected recipient is demonstrated. Such antibody-antigen concordance can be investigated by typing the recipient for the cognate leukocyte antigens or by cross-matching the donor plasma against the recipient's leukocytes. Two proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms for TRALI have received the most attention: the antibody hypothesis and the two-event hypothesis. The final common pathway in all of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of TRALI is increased pulmonary capillary permeability, which results in movement of plasma into the alveolar space causing pulmonary edema. A typical TRALI serologic workup consists of tests for HLA class I and II and neutrophil-specific antibodies. The use of flow cytometry and HLA-coated microbeads is recommended for detection of HLA antibodies in plasma of implicated blood donors and a combination of the granulocyte agglutination test and granulocyte immunofluorescence test for detection of neutrophil-specific antibodies. Genotyping for class I and II HLA and for a limited number of neutrophil antigens may also be helpful in establishing antibody-antigen concordance. PMID:16617255

  2. Indium-111 autologous leukocyte imaging in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Spence, R.A.; Laird, J.D.; Ferguson, W.R.; Kennedy, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thirty-nine patients with acute pancreatitis have been assessed using a prognostic factor grading system, abdominal ultrasound, and autologous leukocyte imaging. Both prognostic factor grading and leukocyte imaging can accurately assess the severity of the disease early in its course. All patients with a negative indium-labeled leukocyte image recovered without sequelae, whereas five of the 12 patients with a positive image developed complications, including two deaths. Abdominal ultrasound is of no value in assessing severity, but is a useful method of detecting those patients with gallstone-associated disease. In patients with suspected abscess formation following acute pancreatitis, indium leukocyte imaging does not differentiate between fat necrosis and abscess formation. In this situation, computerized tomography should be carried out before laparotomy is undertaken.

  3. High leukocyte mtDNA content contributes to poor prognosis through ROS-mediated immunosuppression in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Xingchun; Chen, Yibing; Guo, Xu; Li, Jibin; Huang, Qichao; Yang, Yefa; Lyu, Zhuomin; Zhang, Hongxin; Xing, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiological evidences indicate a significant association between leukocyte mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and incidence risk of several malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether leukocyte mtDNA content affect prognosis of HCC patients and underlying mechanism has never been explored. In our study, leukocyte mtDNA content was measured in 618 HCC patients and its prognostic value was analyzed. Moreover, we detected the immunophenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma concentrations of several cytokines in 40 HCC patients and assessed the modulating effects of mtDNA content on immunosuppression in cell models. Our results showed that HCC patients with high leukocyte mtDNA content exhibited a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those with low leukocyte mtDNA content. Leukocyte mtDNA content and TNM stage exhibited a notable joint effect in prognosis prediction. Furthermore, we found that patients with high leukocyte mtDNA content exhibited a higher frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and lower frequency of NK cells in PBMCs and had higher TGF-β1 and lower TNF-α and IFN-γ plasma concentration when compared with those with low leukocyte mtDNA content, which suggests an immunosuppressive status. High leukocyte mtDNA content significantly enhanced the ROS-mediated secretion of TGF-β1, which accounted for higher Treg and lower NK frequency in PBMCs. In a conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that leukocyte mtDNA content is an independent prognostic marker complementing TNM stage and associated with an ROS-mediated immunosuppressive phenotype in HCC patients. PMID:26985767

  4. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  5. Intranuclear crystalloids associated with abnormal granules in eosinophilic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Parmley, R T; Crist, W M; Roper, M; Takagi, M; Austin, R L

    1981-12-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of eosinophilic leukocytes from a 2-yr-old asymptomatic girl with chronic benign neutropenia (CBN) revealed a variety of morphological abnormalities. All eosinophils obtained from blood and marrow specimens contained multipole microcrystalloids in most of the mature cytoplasmic granules. An increase in crystalloid-free, immature granules in late (bilobed nuclei) eosinophils suggested a delay in granule maturation. The eosinophil granules appeared to be of normal size and demonstrated normal acid phosphatase reactivity. Eosinophilic myelocytes contained abnormal cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and lacked abundant elongated RER cisternae seen in normal cells. A few eosinophilic myelocytes in specimens of bone marrow from the child contained large intranuclear crystalloids measuring up to 3 mu in length. The intranuclear crystalloid contained as cubic lattice of dense material with a periodicity similar to that described for cytoplasmic crystalloids. The ultrastructural morphology of marrow neutrophils was normal, as described in other cases of CBN. Ultrastructural examination of blood eosinophils from the father demonstrated microcrystalloids in cytoplasmic granules identical to those seen in the child. The father was asymptomatic and had normal leukocyte counts. Thus, anomalous crystalloid granule genesis occurred in the father and daughter and was not necessarily associated with neutropenia or clinical symptomatology. This anomaly is associated with the accumulation of intranuclear crystalloid material in eosinophilic myelocytes, which do not appear to be released from the marrow compartment. PMID:7306702

  6. Intranuclear crystalloids associated with abnormal granules in eosinophilic leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Parmley, R.T.; Crist, W.M.; Roper, M.; Takagi, M.; Austin, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of eosinophilic leukocytes from a 2-yr-old asymptomatic girl with chronic benign neutropenia (CBN) revealed a variety of morphological abnormalities. All eosinophils obtained from blood and marrow specimens contained multiple microcrystalloids in most of the mature cytoplasmic granules. An increase in crystalloid-free, immature granules in late (bilobed nuclei) eosinophils suggested a delay in granule maturation. The eosinophil granules appeared to be of normal size and demonstrated normal acid phosphatase reactivity. Eosinophilic myelocytes contained abnormal cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and lacked abundant elongated RER cisternae seen in normal cells. A few eosinophilic myelocytes in specimens of bone marrow from the child contained large intranuclear crystalloids measuring up to 3 mu in length. The intranuclear crystalloid contained as cubic lattice of dense material with a periodicity similar to that described for cytoplasmic crystalloids. The ultrastructural morphology of marrow neutrophils was normal, as described in other cases of CBN. Ultrastructural examination of blood eosinophils from the father demonstrated microcrystalloids in cytoplasmic granules identical to those seen in the child. The father was asymptomatic and had normal leukocyte counts. Thus, anomalous crystalloid granule genesis occurred in the father and daughter and was not necessarily associated with neutropenia or clinical symptomatology. This anomaly is associated with the accumulation of intranuclear crystalloid material in eosinophilic myelocytes, which do not appear to be released from the marrow compartment.

  7. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Boumsell, Laurence; Balderas, Robert; Bensussan, Armand; Gattei, Valter; Horejsi, Vaclav; Jin, Bo-Quan; Malavasi, Fabio; Mortari, Frank; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Stockinger, Hannes; van Zelm, Menno C; Zola, Heddy; Clark, Georgina

    2015-11-15

    CD (cluster of differentiation) Ags are cell surface molecules expressed on leukocytes and other cells relevant for the immune system. CD nomenclature has been universally adopted by the scientific community and is officially approved by the International Union of Immunological Societies and sanctioned by the World Health Organization. It provides a unified designation system for mAbs, as well as for the cell surface molecules that they recognize. This nomenclature was established by the Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops. In addition to defining the CD nomenclature, these workshops have been instrumental in identifying and determining the expression and function of cell surface molecules. Over the past 30 y, the data generated by the 10 Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops have led to the characterization and formal designation of more than 400 molecules. CD molecules are commonly used as cell markers, allowing the identification and isolation of leukocyte populations, subsets, and differentiation stages. mAbs against these molecules have proven to be essential for biomedical research and diagnosis, as well as in biotechnology. More recently, they have been recognized as invaluable tools for the treatment of several malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this article, we describe how the CD nomenclature was established, present the official updated list of CD molecules, and provide a rationale for their usefulness in the 21st century. PMID:26546687

  8. Mutations on the hinge region of leukocyte elastase inhibitor determine the loss of inhibitory function.

    PubMed

    Perani, P; Zeggai, S; Torriglia, A; Courtois, Y

    2000-08-11

    Leukocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI) is a cytosolic component of lung macrophages and blood leukocytes that inhibits neutrophil elastase. LEI is a member of the serpin superfamily, these proteins, mostly protease inhibitors, are thought to undergo a conformational change upon complex formation with proteinase that involves partial insertion of the hinge region of the reactive centre loop into a beta-sheet of the inhibitor. In this work three mutations were produced in the hinge region of elastase inhibitor that abolish the inhibition activity of LEI and transform the protein in a substrate of the elastase. This result demonstrates that the inhibitory mechanism of serpin is common to LEI.

  9. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  10. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, C O; Catai, A M; Moura-Tonello, S C G; Arruda, L C M; Lopes, S L B; Benze, B G; Del Vale, A M; Malmegrim, K C R; Leal, A M O

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  11. Evaluation of leptin receptor expression on buffalo leukocytes.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Giovanna; Grandoni, Francesco; Scatà, Maria Carmela; Catizone, Angela; Reale, Anna; Crisà, Alessandra; Moioli, Bianca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental evidences support a direct role for leptin in immunity. Besides controlling food intake and energy expenditure, leptin was reported to be involved in the regulation of the immune system in ruminants. The aim of this work was to highlight the expression of leptin receptor (LEPR) on Bubalus bubalis immune cells using a multi-approach assessment: flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and gene expression analysis. Flow cytometric analysis of LEPR expression showed that peripheral blood monocytes were the predominant cells expressing LEPR. This result was corroborated by confocal microscopy and RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, among lymphocytes, LEPR was mainly expressed by B lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Evidence of LEPR expression on buffalo blood leukocytes showed to be a good indicator of the responsivity of these cells to leptin, so confirming the involvement of leptin in buffalo immune response. PMID:27436440

  12. Leukocyte coping capacity: a novel technique for measuring the stress response in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    McLaren, G W; Macdonald, D W; Georgiou, C; Mathews, F; Newman, C; Mian, R

    2003-07-01

    Methods used to quantify the stress response in animals are vital tools in many areas of biology. Here we describe a new method of measuring the stress response, which provides rapid results and can be used in the field or laboratory. After a stressful event, we measure the capacity of circulating leukocytes to produce a respiratory burst in vitro in response to challenge by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). During the respiratory burst leukocytes produce oxygen free radicals, and the level of production can be measured directly as chemiluminescence. When in vitro PMA-stimulated whole blood chemiluminescence is measured directly after a stressful event, we define the response as the leukocyte coping capacity (LCC). In an experiment badgers (Meles meles), which were caught as part of an on-going population study, were either transported to a central site prior to blood sampling or blood was collected at their site of capture. Transported animals had a significantly lower LCC and showed changes in leukocyte composition that were indicative of stress. We conclude that the stress of transport reduced LCC in badgers and that LCC serves as a quantitative measure of stress. Potential applications of this method are discussed. PMID:12861342

  13. PTP1B deficiency exacerbates inflammation and accelerates leukocyte trafficking in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Pavlov, Vladimir I.; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; McCary, Christine A.; Klumpp, David J.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Cook-Mills, Joan M.

    2011-01-01

    It is reported that PTP1B limits cytokine signaling in vitro. However, PTP1B’s function during inflammation in vivo is not known. In this report, we determined whether PTP1B deficiency affects allergic inflammation in vivo. Briefly, lungs of OVA-challenged PTP1B−/− mice had elevated numbers of eosinophils and eosinophil progenitors at 6 hours after one OVA-challenge and at 24 hrs after a third OVA challenge as compared to OVA-challenged wild type mice. There was also an increase in numbers of CD11b+SiglecF+CD34+IL-5Rα+ eosinophil progenitors in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and spleens of OVA-challenged PTP1B−/− mice. Intravital microscopy revealed that, in OVA-challenged PTP1B−/− mice, blood leukocytes rapidly bound to endothelium (5–30 minutes), whereas, in wild type mice, blood leukocytes bound to endothelium at the expected 6–18 hrs. Consistent with early recruitment of leukocytes, lung eotaxin and Th2 cytokine levels were elevated early in the PTP1B−/− mice. Interestingly, spleen leukocytes from PTP1B−/− mice exhibited an increased chemotaxis, chemokinesis and transendothelial migration in vitro. In summary, PTP1B functions as a critical negative regulator to limit allergic responses. PMID:22156494

  14. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF, FGF-2) Potentiates Leukocyte Recruitment to Inflammation by Enhancing Endothelial Adhesion Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zittermann, Sandra I.; Issekutz, Andrew C.

    2006-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF-2) is a potent angiogenic factor and endothelial cell mitogen. Although bFGF levels are increased in chronically inflamed tissue, its role in inflammation is unclear. We investigated the effect of bFGF on acute dermal inflammation and the recruitment of monocytes, T cells, and neutrophils. Leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites was quantified with radiolabeled leukocytes. Intradermal injection of bFGF in rats did not induce leukocyte recruitment or inflammation. However, the recruitment of leukocytes to inflammation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, C5a, or a delayed hypersensitivity reaction was enhanced by bFGF by 55 to 132% (P < 0.05). Either acute or prolonged bFGF treatment of dermal sites had this effect. The potentiating effect of bFGF on leukocyte recruitment was also seen in joints. There was no associated modulation of vascular permeability, blood flow, or angiogenesis in the sites by bFGF. However, the expression of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) for leukocytes, P-selectin, E-selectin, and ICAM-1, was significantly up-regulated in the inflamed tissue by bFGF, as quantified by radiolabeled anti-CAM antibody binding in vivo. Thus, although not directly proinflammatory, bFGF synergistically potentiates inflammatory mediator-induced leukocyte recruitment, at least in part, by enhancing CAM up-regulation on endothelium. PMID:16507899

  15. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  16. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  18. Induction of autoantibody-producing cells after the coculture of haptenated and normal human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pisko, E J; Foster, S L; Turner, R A

    1981-10-01

    The coculture of normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) and autologous mononuclear leukocytes coupled to the trinitrophenyl (TNP) hapten (TNP-PBL) was found to induce a polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells. The polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells was demonstrated by detecting the induction of cells producing antibody to sheep red blood cells using a complement-dependent, direct, hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. A ratio of four normal to one haptenated mononuclear leukocyte was found to be optimal for inducing the polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cell in these cultures. The plaque-forming cells assay in these experiments utilized monolayers of indicator red cells. Further evidence for the polyclonal induction of antibody-producing cells by TNP-PBL was provided by demonstrating PFC on monolayers of not only sheep red blood cells, but also autologous human red cells, bromelain-treated autologous red cells, TNP-coupled human and sheep red cells, and human autologous red cells coupled to human heat-aggregated IgG with chromic chloride. Thus cells secreting antibody to TNP, human red cells, and human IgG were induced. Anti-IgG and anti-human red cell-producing cells were first detected on Day 2 of culture and were still present on Day 9. Mononuclear leukocytes altered by chemical haptenation polyclonally stimulate normal mononuclear leukocytes to become antibody-producing cells. This polyclonal stimulation of antibody-producing cells includes cells producing antibodies to human IgG and human autologous red blood cells suggesting that autoantibody-producing cells are induced.

  19. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  20. Exposure to Sodium Fluoride Produces Signs of Apoptosis in Rat Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Morales-González, José A.; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Esquivel-Chirino, César; González-Rubio, Manuel García-Luna y; Suástegui-Domínguez, Sigrit; Valadez-Vega, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride is naturally present in the earth’s crust and can be found in rocks, coal, and clay; thus, it can be found in small quantities in water, air, plants, and animals. Therefore, humans are exposed to fluoride through food, drinking water, and in the air they breathe. Flouride is essential to maintain bone strength and to protect against dental decay, but if it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles. Therefore, the present work was aimed at determining the effect of intake of sodium fluoride (NaF) as an apoptosis inducer in leukocytes of rats treated for eight weeks with 1 or 50 parts per million (ppm) NaF. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspade-3 were used as apoptotic and general metabolism indicators of leukocyte-like indicators of the (INT) oxidation system. Male rats were exposed to NaF (1 and 500 ppm) for eight weeks, and then sacrificed weekly to obtain blood samples. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspase-3 were determined in leukocytes by Western blot, and general metabolism of leukocytes was analyzed with a commercial kit. We found changes in the expression of the proteins described, especially when the animals received 50 ppm of NaF. These results indicate that NaF intoxication can be an apoptosis inducer in rat leukocytes treated with the compound for eight weeks. PMID:20957113

  1. Halloysite Nanotube Coatings Suppress Leukocyte Spreading.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew D; Marsh, Graham; Waugh, Richard E; Foster, David G; King, Michael R

    2015-12-22

    The nanoscale topography of adhesive surfaces is known to be an important factor governing cellular behavior. Previous work has shown that surface coatings composed of halloysite nanotubes enhance the adhesion, and therefore capture of, rare target cells such as circulating tumor cells. Here we demonstrate a unique feature of these coatings in their ability to reduce the adhesion of leukocytes and prevent leukocyte spreading. Surfaces were prepared with coatings of halloysite nanotubes and functionalized for leukocyte adhesion with E-selectin, and the dilution of nanotube concentration revealed a threshold concentration below which cell spreading became comparable to smooth surfaces. Evaluation of surface roughness characteristics determined that the average distance between discrete surface features correlated with adhesion metrics, with a separation distance of ∼2 μm identified as the critical threshold. Computational modeling of the interaction of leukocytes with halloysite nanotube-coated surfaces of varying concentrations demonstrates that the geometry of the cell surface and adhesive counter-surface produces a significantly diminished effective contact area compared to a leukocyte interacting with a smooth surface.

  2. Immune reconstitution in recipients of photodepleted HLA-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantations: T cell subset frequencies predict outcome.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah A; Melenhorst, Jan J; Grim, Andrew; Naguib, Nicholas; Weber, Gerrit; Fellowes, Vicki; Khuu, Hahn; Stroncek, David S; Leitman, Susan F; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, A John

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated an ex vivo photodepletion (PD) technique to selectively deplete graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) alloreacting T cells given to 24 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling stem cell transplantation (SCT) recipients. Donor lymphocytes were activated by 72-hour exposure to irradiated in vitro expanded recipient T lymphocytes and pulsed with a TH9402 photosensitizer. Alloactivated T cells preferentially retaining the photosensitizer were eliminated by light exposure. The PD product showed an inverted CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio with greatest depletion occurring in the CD4(+) naive and central memory populations. In contrast, the CD8(+) naive and effector cells were relatively conserved, reflecting the differential extrusion of TH9402 by T cell subsets. Cytomegalovirus reactive T cells were reduced in the PD product and in recipient blood 100 days after SCT when compared with contemporaneous HLA-identical sibling donor T cell-depleted SCT recipients. Although PD SCT recipients experienced similar absolute lymphocyte counts during the first 100 days after SCT, they achieved 100% donor T cell chimerism more rapidly and had higher CD8(+) naive T cell counts early after SCT. SCT recipients of PD products with the lowest CD4 central memory content had the highest risk of developing chronic GVHD (cGVHD) (P = .04) and a poorer survival (P = .03). Although the persistence of CD8(+) naive T cells may have contributed to important antileukemia responses resulting in a relatively low relapse rate, our findings emphasize the role of donor memory T cells and CD4 cells in establishing immune competence post-SCT. Although PD is associated with excellent outcomes in the haploidentical setting, the low frequency of alloactivations in HLA-matched pairs makes the PD approach used by our group for allodepletion in HLA-matched sibling transplantations an inefficient technique. PMID:21684345

  3. Combinatorial signals by inflammatory cytokines and chemokines mediate leukocyte interactions with extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Vaday, G G; Franitza, S; Schor, H; Hecht, I; Brill, A; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O

    2001-06-01

    On their extravasation from the vascular system into inflamed tissues, leukocytes must maneuver through a complex insoluble network of molecules termed the extracellular matrix (ECM). Leukocytes navigate toward their target sites by adhering to ECM glycoproteins and secreting degradative enzymes, while constantly orienting themselves in response to specific signals in their surroundings. Cytokines and chemokines are key biological mediators that provide such signals for cell navigation. Although the individual effects of various cytokines have been well characterized, it is becoming increasingly evident that the mixture of cytokines encountered in the ECM provides important combinatorial signals that influence cell behavior. Herein, we present an overview of previous and ongoing studies that have examined how leukocytes integrate signals from different combinations of cytokines that they encounter either simultaneously or sequentially within the ECM, to dynamically alter their navigational activities. For example, we describe our findings that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha acts as an adhesion-strengthening and stop signal for T cells migrating toward stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha, while transforming growth factor-beta down-regulates TNF-alpha-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion by monocytes. These findings indicate the importance of how one cytokine, such as TNF-alpha, can transmit diverse signals to different subsets of leukocytes, depending on its combination with other cytokines, its concentration, and its time and sequence of exposure. The combinatorial effects of multiple cytokines thus affect leukocytes in a step-by-step manner, whereby cells react to cytokine signals in their immediate vicinity by altering their adhesiveness, directional movement, and remodeling of the ECM. PMID:11404372

  4. Leukocytes Crossing the Endothelium: A Matter of Communication.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Ilse; Daniel, Anna E; Kroon, Jeffrey; van Buul, Jaap D

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes cross the endothelial vessel wall in a process called transendothelial migration (TEM). The purpose of leukocyte TEM is to clear the causing agents of inflammation in underlying tissues, for example, bacteria and viruses. During TEM, endothelial cells initiate signals that attract and guide leukocytes to sites of tissue damage. Leukocytes react by attaching to these sites and signal their readiness to move back to endothelial cells. Endothelial cells in turn respond by facilitating the passage of leukocytes while retaining overall integrity. In this review, we present recent findings in the field and we have endeavored to synthesize a coherent picture of the intricate interplay between endothelial cells and leukocytes during TEM.

  5. Cardiac and vascular imaging with labeled platelets and leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1984-07-01

    The contribution of platelets in atherosclerosis and thrombosis in animal models and in clinical studies has been quantified with 111In-platelet scintigraphy. New in vitro quantitative techniques have been developed using 111In-labeled platelets to determine the number of adherent platelets on deendothelialized surfaces of damaged vessel walls and synthetic vascular grafts. In vivo imaging techniques are semi-quantitative in nature; in these studies 111In radioactivity on thrombotic vessels or graft surfaces of iliac, femoral, or popliteal arteries is compared with contralateral vessels. Background 111In radioactivity in the circulating blood pool of venous and capillary networks and radioactivity in marrow decreases the sensitivity of these techniques. Subtraction of blood pool radioactivity with 99mTc-labeled autologous red cells and calculation of 111In radioactivity associated with platelet thrombus on vessel walls also have been performed for coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries. Although platelet concentrates are used frequently after open heart surgery (one to six per patient), consumption of platelets in the artificial lung or oxygenator, lysis of platelets during pumping, and suction of blood only recently have been quantified with the use of 111In-labeled platelets. These studies also demonstrated far less trauma to platelets with the use of a membrane rather than a bubble oxygenator. Further reduction in platelet consumption and trauma was observed with the use of prostacyclin, a short-acting drug with significant beneficial effect on platelet thrombus reduction and disaggregation of aggregated platelets. The role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in inflammation, infection and myocardial infarction, and in vivo evaluation with 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy in animals and humans has been described.

  6. Osteomyelitis: diagnosis with In-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.

    1989-04-01

    In a retrospective review, 485 patients with suspected osteomyelitis were studied. Of these, 453 patients were studied with both bone and indium-111 leukocyte scanning (173 sequentially and 280 simultaneously). The ability to determine that the infection was in bone rather than in adjacent soft tissue was greater with simultaneous bone scan and In-111 leukocyte studies than with sequential studies. The locations of suspected osteomyelitis were divided into central (containing active bone marrow), peripheral (hands and feet), and middle (between central and peripheral). Specificity remained high (about 90%) regardless of the location. Overall sensitivity was significantly lower in the central location than in the peripheral or middle location. Determination of whether the In-111 leukocyte activity was in bone or adjacent soft tissue was also more difficult when the infection was in the central location. For acute osteomyelitis, sensitivity was high regardless of the location. For chronic osteomyelitis, sensitivity was lower in the central location.

  7. Comparison of mesenchymal stem cells and leukocytes from Large White and Göttingen Minipigs: Clues for stem cell-based immunomodulatory therapies.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Verónica; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco-Miguel; Blázquez, Rebeca; Tarazona, Raquel; Casado, Javier G

    2016-10-15

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are one of the most promising cell types for human and veterinary use and their therapeutic effect is associated with their immunomodulatory properties. Farm animal models, such as pigs, have become a valuable tool to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adoptively transferred MSCs in the setting of veterinary medicine. In order to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of stem cell-based therapies in porcine breeds, a deep analysis and comparison of MSCs and leukocyte subsets are absolutely necessary. Here we provide a detailed analysis of bone-marrow derived MSCs and leukocyte subsets from Large White pigs and Göttingen Minipigs. Significant differences were observed between the two pig breeds in terms of T cell subsets that need to be considered for immune monitoring of stem cell-based therapies. PMID:27590427

  8. The Role of Physical Stabilization in Whole Blood Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Sandlin, Rebecca D.; Carey, Thomas R.; Miller, Kathleen L.; Shank, Aaron T.; Oklu, Rahmi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Irimia, Daniel; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The rapid degradation of blood ex vivo imposes logistical limitations on the utilization of blood-borne cells in medical diagnostics and scientific investigations. A fundamental but overlooked aspect in the storage of this fluid tissue is blood settling, which induces physical stress and compaction, aggregates blood cells, and causes collateral damage due to leukocyte activation. Here we show that the polymer Ficoll 70 kDa stabilized blood samples and prevented blood settling over the course of 72 hours, primarily by inhibiting depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation. Physical stabilization decreased echinocyte formation, improved leukocyte viability, and inhibited the release of neutrophil elastase—a marker of neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In addition, Ficoll-stabilized blood was compatible with common leukocyte enrichment techniques including red blood cell lysis and immunomagnetic purification. This study showed for the first time that blood settling can be prevented using polymers and has implications in diagnostics. PMID:26876805

  9. The Role of Physical Stabilization in Whole Blood Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Sandlin, Rebecca D.; Carey, Thomas R.; Miller, Kathleen L.; Shank, Aaron T.; Oklu, Rahmi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Irimia, Daniel; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    The rapid degradation of blood ex vivo imposes logistical limitations on the utilization of blood-borne cells in medical diagnostics and scientific investigations. A fundamental but overlooked aspect in the storage of this fluid tissue is blood settling, which induces physical stress and compaction, aggregates blood cells, and causes collateral damage due to leukocyte activation. Here we show that the polymer Ficoll 70 kDa stabilized blood samples and prevented blood settling over the course of 72 hours, primarily by inhibiting depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation. Physical stabilization decreased echinocyte formation, improved leukocyte viability, and inhibited the release of neutrophil elastase—a marker of neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In addition, Ficoll-stabilized blood was compatible with common leukocyte enrichment techniques including red blood cell lysis and immunomagnetic purification. This study showed for the first time that blood settling can be prevented using polymers and has implications in diagnostics.

  10. Intravascular leukocyte migration through platelet thrombi: directing leukocytes to sites of vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Mehran; Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat

    2015-06-01

    Leukocytes recruitment to thrombi supports an intimate cellular interaction leading to the enhancement of pro-coagulant functions and pro-inflammatory responses at site of vascular injury. Recent observations of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation and its mutual reactions with platelet thrombi adds more clinical interest to the growing body of knowledge in the field of platelet-leukocyte cross-talk. However, having considered thrombus as a barrier between leukocytes and injured endothelium, the full inflammatory roles of these cells during thrombosis is still ill defined. The most recent observation of neutrophils migration into the thrombi is a phenomenon that highlights the inflammatory functions of leukocytes at the site of injury. It has been hypothesised that leukocytes migration might be associated with the conveyance of highly reactive pro-inflammatory and/or pro-coagulant mediators to sites of vascular injury. In addition, the evidence of neutrophils migration into arterial thrombi following traumatic and ischaemia-reperfusion injury highlights the already described role of these cells in atherosclerosis. Regardless of the mechanisms behind leukocyte migration, whether these migrated cells benefit normal homeostasis by their involvement in wound healing and vascular rebuilding or they increase unwilling inflammatory responses, could be of interest for future researches that provide new insight into biological importance of leukocyte recruitment to thrombi.

  11. Rapid quantitative assessment of phagocytic activity of Indium-111 labeled leukocytes by chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Petry, N.; Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.

    1985-05-01

    Indium-111 labeled leukocyte imaging is gaining widespread acceptance. A rapid method for assaying changes in leukocyte viability and phagocytic function during the labeling process would facilitate the evaluation of new labeling techniques and testing of labeled cells before pt injection. The authors have conducted preliminary investigations of chemiluminescence in the clinical evaluation of leukocyte labeling. The chemiluminescence assay may be performed in 30 minutes with only 0.1 ml of whole blood. Zymossan is rapidly introduced to the blood or cell suspension resulting in the emission of light which is then counted by photometer. The amount of light given off by the reaction reflects both the phagocytic function of the cells and the ability of activated phagocytes to generate activated oxygen species. They have evaluated the chemiluminescent activity of normal human leukocyte suspensions both before and after labeling with Indium-111 oxine. The chemiluminescence assay provides a rapid means of evaluating granulocyte function. Correlations of this activity with image quality may provides clues for optimization of labeling techniques.

  12. Rac-null leukocytes are associated with increased inflammation-mediated alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Sima, Corneliu; Gastfreund, Shoshi; Sun, Chunxiang; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by altered host-biofilm interactions that result in irreversible inflammation-mediated alveolar bone loss. Genetic and epigenetic factors that predispose to ineffective control of biofilm composition and maintenance of tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. We elucidated how leukocytes affect the course of periodontitis in Rac-null mice. Mouse models of acute gingivitis and periodontitis were used to assess the early inflammatory response and patterns of chronicity leading to loss of alveolar bone due to inflammation in Rac-null mice. Leukocyte margination was differentially impaired in these mice during attachment in conditional Rac1-null (granulocyte/monocyte lineage) mice and during rolling and attachment in Rac2-null (all blood cells) mice. Inflammatory responses to subgingival ligatures, assessed by changes in peripheral blood differential leukocyte numbers, were altered in Rac-null compared with wild-type mice. In response to persistent subgingival ligature-mediated challenge, Rac-null mice had increased loss of alveolar bone with patterns of resorption characteristic of aggressive forms of periodontitis. These findings were partially explained by higher osteoclastic coverage of the bone-periodontal ligament interface in Rac-null compared with wild-type mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that leukocyte defects, such as decreased endothelial margination and tissue recruitment, are rate-limiting steps in the periodontal inflammatory process that lead to more aggressive forms of periodontitis.

  13. Modulatory Role of Surface Coating of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoworms in Complement Opsonization and Leukocyte Uptake.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Wang, Guankui; Chen, Fangfang; Banda, Nirmal K; Holers, V Michael; Wu, LinPing; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Simberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-24

    Notwithstanding rapid advances of nanotechnology in diagnostic imaging and drug delivery, the engineered nanocarriers still exhibit substantial lack of hemocompatibility. Thus, when injected systemically, nanoparticles are avidly recognized by blood leukocytes and platelets, but the mechanisms of immune recognition are not well understood and strategies to mitigate these phenomena remain underexplored. Using superparamagnetic dextran iron oxide (SPIO) nanoworms (NWs) we demonstrate an efficient and predominantly complement-dependent uptake by mouse lymphocytes, neutrophils and monocytes from normal and tumor bearing mice in vitro. Following intravenous injection into wild type mice, blood leukocytes as well as platelets became magnetically labeled, while the labeling was decreased by 95% in complement C3-deficient mice. Using blood cells from healthy and cancer patient donors, we demonstrated that neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes and eosinophils took up SPIO NWs, and the uptake was prevented by EDTA (a general complement inhibitor) and by antiproperdin antibody (an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of the complement system). Cross-linking and hydrogelation of SPIO NWs surface by epichlorohydrin decreased C3 opsonization in mouse serum, and consequently reduced the uptake by mouse leukocytes by more than 70% in vivo. Remarkably, the cross-linked particles did not show a decrease in C3 opsonization in human serum, but showed a significant decrease (over 60%) of the uptake by human leukocytes. The residual uptake of cross-linked nanoparticles was completely blocked by EDTA. These findings demonstrate species differences in complement-mediated nanoparticle recognition and uptake by leukocytes, and further show that human hemocompatibility could be improved by inhibitors of complement alternative pathway and by nanoparticle surface coating. These results provide important insights into the mechanisms of hemocompatibility of nanomedicines.

  14. Modulatory Role of Surface Coating of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoworms in Complement Opsonization and Leukocyte Uptake.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Wang, Guankui; Chen, Fangfang; Banda, Nirmal K; Holers, V Michael; Wu, LinPing; Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Simberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-24

    Notwithstanding rapid advances of nanotechnology in diagnostic imaging and drug delivery, the engineered nanocarriers still exhibit substantial lack of hemocompatibility. Thus, when injected systemically, nanoparticles are avidly recognized by blood leukocytes and platelets, but the mechanisms of immune recognition are not well understood and strategies to mitigate these phenomena remain underexplored. Using superparamagnetic dextran iron oxide (SPIO) nanoworms (NWs) we demonstrate an efficient and predominantly complement-dependent uptake by mouse lymphocytes, neutrophils and monocytes from normal and tumor bearing mice in vitro. Following intravenous injection into wild type mice, blood leukocytes as well as platelets became magnetically labeled, while the labeling was decreased by 95% in complement C3-deficient mice. Using blood cells from healthy and cancer patient donors, we demonstrated that neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes and eosinophils took up SPIO NWs, and the uptake was prevented by EDTA (a general complement inhibitor) and by antiproperdin antibody (an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of the complement system). Cross-linking and hydrogelation of SPIO NWs surface by epichlorohydrin decreased C3 opsonization in mouse serum, and consequently reduced the uptake by mouse leukocytes by more than 70% in vivo. Remarkably, the cross-linked particles did not show a decrease in C3 opsonization in human serum, but showed a significant decrease (over 60%) of the uptake by human leukocytes. The residual uptake of cross-linked nanoparticles was completely blocked by EDTA. These findings demonstrate species differences in complement-mediated nanoparticle recognition and uptake by leukocytes, and further show that human hemocompatibility could be improved by inhibitors of complement alternative pathway and by nanoparticle surface coating. These results provide important insights into the mechanisms of hemocompatibility of nanomedicines. PMID:26488074

  15. Subset specification of central serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Marten P; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2013-01-01

    The last decade the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system has received enormous attention due to its role in regulation of behavior, exemplified by the discovery that increased 5-HT tone in the central nervous system is able to alleviate affective disorders. Here, we review the developmental processes, with a special emphasis on subset specification, leading to the formation of the 5-HT system in the brain. Molecular classification of 5-HT neuronal groups leads to the definition of two independent rostral groups positioned in rhombomere 1 and 2/3 and a caudal group in rhombomere 5-8. In addition, more disperse refinement of these subsets is present as shown by the selective expression of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor, indicating functional diversity between 5-HT subsets. The functional significance of the molecular coding differences is not well known and the molecular basis of described specific connectivity patterns remain to be elucidated. Recent developments in genetic lineage tracing models will provide these data and form a major step-up toward the full understanding of the importance of developmental programming and function of 5-HT neuronal subsets.

  16. [Dynamic changes of circulating monocyte subsets in high-NaCl diet fed mice].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaotong; Luo, Yanwei; Ma, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Ji, Wenjie; Li, Yuming; Zhou, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Objective To observe the dynamic changes of the circulating monocyte subsets in C57BL/6 mice fed with high-NaCl diet. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups: 9, 40 and 80 g/L NaCl groups. Before the treatment and 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the treatment, the cardiac function was dynamically determined by echocardiography and the blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff plethysmography. Flow cytometry analysis of circulating monocyte subsets was performed. HE staining was used to observe cardiac pathological changes at the time of sacrifice. Results Systolic blood pressure significantly increased with the progression of the high-salt diet. Compared with 9 g/L NaCl group, the ejection fraction of the other two groups slightly increased at week 4, followed by a significant decreasing trend up to week 12, in addition, the percentage of Ly6C(high) monocyte subset showed a progressive increase during high-salt feeding and reached a plateau at week 4, and then abruptly went down up to week 12. On the contrary, Ly6C(low) monocyte subset had an opposite trend, whereas Ly6C(int) monocyte subset remained constant. HE staining showed that cardiomyocyte size, as determined by the myocyte cross-sectional area, became enlarged obviously in the latter two groups. Conclusion Circulating monocyte subsets dynamically changed in the mice fed with high-salt diet. PMID:27371845

  17. Evaluation of the Blood Film.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Terry W

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation of hemic cell morphology in stained blood film may be the most important part of the hematologic evaluation of exotic animals. The blood film provides important information regarding red blood cell abnormalities, such as changes in cell shape and color, presence of inclusions, and, in the case of lower vertebrates, changes in the position of the cell nucleus. Stained blood film also provides information about changes in leukocyte numbers and morphology, and shows important hemic features of mammalian platelets and the thrombocytes of lower vertebrates. The blood film is needed in the detection and identification of blood parasites.

  18. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesion deficiency type 1 leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that causes the immune system ...

  20. Halo sign on indium-111 leukocyte scan in gangrenous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, J.M.; Boykin, M.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Cawthon, M.A.; Landry, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with a long history of Crohn's disease was evaluated by In-111 labeled leukocyte scanning. A halo of leukocyte activity was seen around the gallbladder fossa. A gangrenous gallbladder was removed at surgery.

  1. Radiolabelled mixed leukocytes and pure granulocytes with stabilized 99Tcm-exametazime.

    PubMed

    Hung, J C; Chowdhury, S; Mahoney, D W; Mullan, B P

    1998-10-01

    Although the methylene blue stabilizer extends the shelf life of 99Tcm-exametazime to 4-6 h after reconstitution, the dark blue appearance of the mixture of stabilized 99Tcm-exametazime and blood components makes it impossible to separate out the leukocyte button. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using stabilized 99Tcm-exametazime to radiolabel mixed leukocytes separated by Volex sedimentation with hypotonic lysis (VL) and pure granulocytes isolated by a single-density Ficoll-Hypaque gradient with hypotonic lysis (FL). Isolated cells from 40-ml and 80-ml donor blood samples were mixed with 0.5 ml stabilized 99Tcm-exametazime (approximately 925 MBq 99Tcm and 62.5 micrograms exametazime) and incubated at room temperature for 15 min. After incubation, two dilution steps with 3 ml and 9 ml of 12.6% ACD/NS (anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A, USP, mixed with 0.9% NaCl, v/v) were conducted to dilute the dark blue mixture and to remove any unbound 99Tcm activity. With the addition of 9 ml of 12.6% ACD/NS solution to the 1-ml bottom portion from the first dilution, the supernatant of the centrifuged preparation was clear enough to be withdrawn. The overall labelling efficiency (LE) of labelled leukocytes and granulocytes was 87.1 +/- 4.9% and 87.7 +/- 6.2%, respectively (n = 12 each). Overall, radiolabelled cells (n = 12) from the 80-ml blood samples (LE = 90.3 +/- 2.8%) had an approximately 6% higher labelling efficiency than from the 40-ml blood samples (LE = 84.5 +/- 6.0%) and also had a slightly better in vitro stability compared to the 40-ml samples. The in vitro stability studies showed that only approximately 2% (n = 48) 99Tcm activity was eluted each hour from the radiolabelled leukocytes or granulocytes for the 40-ml or 80-ml blood samples during the 6-h evaluation period. Cell viability of all labelled leukocyte samples was confirmed by the trypan blue staining technique. In conclusion, mixed leukocytes separated by the VL method and

  2. Effects of red blood cell lysing solutions on the detection of peripheral basophils of healthy normals and SLE patients by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Ye, Ling; Deng, Zhenzhen; Li, Lu; Liu, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four widely used red blood cell lysing solutions on counting and measurement of activation marker of peripheral basophils in normals and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by flow cytometry. Our results showed that the light scatter properties including FS and SS value of leukocytes in whole blood were preserved when whole blood samples were lysed in RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution, while were affected when lysed in distilled water or ACK. By counting basophils, RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution were almost the same level, while were significantly lower when lysed in distilled water or ACK. The expressions of CD203c on peripheral basophils of SLE patients were significantly higher than those of normals. Comparing the data of CD203c expression obtained demonstrated that there were no significant differences among them, while FACS Lysing Solution treatment leads to a slightly lower staining intensity of CD203c. We provide a solid description that the widely used red blood cell lysing reagents may influence the light scatter properties of leukocytes, the accuracy of quantity of absolute number of the existence of basophil subsets and the quantity of staining intensity of cell-activated marker CD203c fluorescence when measured by flow cytometry. PMID:24593031

  3. Effects of red blood cell lysing solutions on the detection of peripheral basophils of healthy normals and SLE patients by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Ye, Ling; Deng, Zhenzhen; Li, Lu; Liu, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four widely used red blood cell lysing solutions on counting and measurement of activation marker of peripheral basophils in normals and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by flow cytometry. Our results showed that the light scatter properties including FS and SS value of leukocytes in whole blood were preserved when whole blood samples were lysed in RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution, while were affected when lysed in distilled water or ACK. By counting basophils, RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution were almost the same level, while were significantly lower when lysed in distilled water or ACK. The expressions of CD203c on peripheral basophils of SLE patients were significantly higher than those of normals. Comparing the data of CD203c expression obtained demonstrated that there were no significant differences among them, while FACS Lysing Solution treatment leads to a slightly lower staining intensity of CD203c. We provide a solid description that the widely used red blood cell lysing reagents may influence the light scatter properties of leukocytes, the accuracy of quantity of absolute number of the existence of basophil subsets and the quantity of staining intensity of cell-activated marker CD203c fluorescence when measured by flow cytometry.

  4. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction associated with feline leukaemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M G; Duska, G O; Stiff, M I; Lafrado, L J; Olsen, R G

    1986-10-01

    The chemiluminescent characteristics of enriched (greater than 95%) peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte populations (PMN) from normal and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats were investigated. FeLV-infected cats demonstrated a significantly lower (P less than 0.001) PMN chemiluminescent response when compared to the response of normal age-matched controls. Normal PMN treated with FeLV-infected cat serum exhibited a depressed response in comparison to control cells. A titration of serum from infected cats supplemented with normal serum revealed a titratable suppression of chemiluminescence with increasing concentration of serum from the infected cats. However, PMN from FeLV-infected cats treated with normal serum displayed a slight increase in chemiluminescence over the same cells in autologous serum. The addition of inactivated FeLV to normal PMN caused a titratable decrease in chemiluminescence.

  5. Flow cytofluorometric monitoring of leukocyte apoptosis in experimental cholera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsmanova, Ekaterina Y.; Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Livanova, Ludmila F.; Kobkova, Irina M.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.; Shchukovskaya, Tatyana N.; Smirnova, Nina I.; Kutyrev, Vladimir V.

    2003-10-01

    Flow cytofluorometric DNA analysis was applied to determine of the relative contents of proliferative (more then 2C DNA per cell) and apoptotic (less then 2C DNA per cell) leukocytes in blood of adult rabbits, challenged with 10,000 times the 50 % effective dose of Vibrio cholerae virulent strain by the RITARD technique. It has been shown that irreversible increase the percentage of cells carrying DNA in the degradation stage brings to disbalance between the genetically controlled cell proliferation and apoptosis that leads to animal death from the cholera infection. Such fatal changes were not observed in challenging of immunized animals that were not died. Thus received data show that the flow cytofluorometric measurements may be used for detection of transgressions in homeostasis during acute infection diseases, for outlet prognosis of the cholera infection.

  6. Characterization of Leukocyte-platelet Rich Fibrin, A Novel Biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Madurantakam, Parthasarathy; Yoganarasimha, Suyog; Hasan, Fadi K

    2015-09-29

    Autologous platelet concentrates represent promising innovative tools in the field of regenerative medicine and have been extensively used in oral surgery. Unlike platelet rich plasma (PRP) that is a gel or a suspension, Leukocyte-Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) is a solid 3D fibrin membrane generated chair-side from whole blood containing no anti-coagulant. The membrane has a dense three dimensional fibrin matrix with enriched platelets and abundant growth factors. L-PRF is a popular adjunct in surgeries because of its superior handling characteristics as well as its suturability to the wound bed. The goal of the study is to demonstrate generation as well as provide detailed characterization of relevant properties of L-PRF that underlie its clinical success.

  7. Macrophage and polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D J; Durst, G G; Majeski, J A

    1985-01-01

    Monocyte derived macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) isolated from the peripheral blood of thirteen patients with Alzheimer disease were studied for their cytotoxic effects on a sensitive allogenic tumor target. PMN cells from 11 of the 13 patients with Alzheimer disease were able to kill the tumor cells. In addition, the macrophages from 12 of the 13 Alzheimer disease patients were cytotoxic towards the tumor targets. Four of these patients possessed a plasma inhibitory factor which was capable of suppressing macrophage mediated cytotoxicity. When the lymphocytes from these patients were studied for their ability to be stimulated with the specific antigen, streptokinase, to produce macrophage activating factor (MAF), only 5 of the 13 patients studied possessed lymphocytes which were capable of producing MAF. Thus, the only immunological defect in Alzheimer disease patients which was observed in this study was in the ability of the lymphocytes to synthesize MAF. PMID:4084662

  8. Initial Afferent Lymphatic Vessels Controlling Outbound Leukocyte Traffic from Skin to Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Teijeira, Alvaro; Rouzaut, Ana; Melero, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Tissue drains fluid and macromolecules through lymphatic vessels (LVs), which are lined by a specialized endothelium that expresses peculiar differentiation proteins, not found in blood vessels (i.e., LYVE-1, Podoplanin, PROX-1, and VEGFR-3). Lymphatic capillaries are characteristically devoid of a continuous basal membrane and are anchored to the ECM by elastic fibers that act as pulling ropes which open the vessel to avoid edema if tissue volume increases, as it occurs upon inflammation. LVs are also crucial for the transit of T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells from tissue to draining lymph nodes (LN). Importantly, cell traffic control across lymphatic endothelium is differently regulated under resting and inflammatory conditions. Under steady-state non-inflammatory conditions, leukocytes enter into the lymphatic capillaries through basal membrane gaps (portals). This entrance is integrin-independent and seems to be mainly guided by CCL21 chemokine gradients acting on leukocytes expressing CCR7. In contrast, inflammatory processes in lymphatic capillaries involve a plethora of cytokines, chemokines, leukocyte integrins, and other adhesion molecules. Importantly, under inflammation a role for integrins and their ligands becomes apparent and, as a consequence, the number of leukocytes entering the lymphatic capillaries multiplies several-fold. Enhancing transmigration of dendritic cells en route to LN is conceivably useful for vaccination and cancer immunotherapy, whereas interference with such key mechanisms may ameliorate autoimmunity or excessive inflammation. Recent findings illustrate how, transient cell-to-cell interactions between lymphatic endothelial cells and leukocytes contribute to shape the subsequent behavior of leukocytes and condition the LV for subsequent trans-migratory events. PMID:24368908

  9. Cytokine-like effects of prolactin in human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dogusan, Z; Hooghe, R; Verdood, P; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    2001-11-01

    Some biochemical events following the binding of prolactin (PRL) to its receptor in normal human leukocytes were investigated. PRL enhanced JAK2 phosphorylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but not in granulocytes. PRL also induced phosphorylation of Stat-5 in PBMC and Stat-1 in granulocytes. Subsequent binding of Stat-5- and of Stat-1-like molecules to a GAS responsive element from the beta-casein promoter was detected by EMSA. p38 MAPK (but not p42/p44 MAPK) was activated by PRL in both leukocyte populations. PRL induced iNOS and CIS mRNA expression in granulocytes. Increased expression of IRF-1 and SOCS-2 was observed in granulocytes and of SOCS-3 and iNOS in PBMC. Similar effects were obtained with ovine and human PRL. Antiserum to PRL reduced iNOS and IRF-1 expression induced by PRL in granulocytes and reduced iNOS expression in PBMC. Also, pretreatment of granulocytes with a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB 203580) prevented in part PRL-induced iNOS and IRF-1 expression. In PBMC, the p38 inhibitor decreased PRL-induced iNOS gene expression. These results indicate that PRL-induced gene regulation in leukocytes requires the activation of at least two different pathways: the Stat and the MAP kinase pathways. Moreover, although PRL activates Stat in both leukocyte types, signal transduction is different in granulocytes and in PBMC. Most importantly, PRL modulates the expression of genes crucial to leukocyte function. The present findings reinforce the concept that PRL has "cytokine-like" activity in human leukocytes.

  10. Experimental bacterial pneumonia in rabbits: polymorphonuclear leukocyte margination and sequestration in rabbit lungs and quantitation and kinetics of /sup 51/Cr-labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes in E. coli-induced lung lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Movat, H.Z.

    1982-12-01

    A relationship between the circulating and marginal polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) pools was documented using /sup 51/Cr-labeled leukocytes as a marker. /sup 51/Cr-leukocytes marginating in the lungs were found to decrease following a first-order exponential decline, while /sup 51/Cr radioactivity accumulated in the liver and the spleen. Intravenously administered endotoxin caused a rapid selective disappearance of PMNs from the circulation. The percentage of infused /sup 51/Cr cells disappearing was equal to the percentage of disappearance of host cells. The PMNs were found to sequester in the lungs, with peak sequestration of labeled cells occurring 5 min after an endotoxin challenge. Over the next 25 min the /sup 51/Cr radioactivity in the lungs declined. Large numbers of PMNs, probably newly derived from the bone marrow, were observed histologically to be sequestered in the lung vasculature 90 min after an endotoxin dose, while the early sequestration of circulating leukocytes could not be assessed histologically. Pulmonary inflammatory lesions were induced selectively with Escherichia coli in the left lower lobes of rabbits, leaving the right lower lobes as intrinsic controls. PMN-accumulation into the lesions was quantitated using /sup 51/Cr-labeled blood leukocytes. With the aid of /sup 125/I-labeled E. coli, a logarithmic dose-response relationship was found between the number of E. coli and of PMNs. Over a 6-hr period circulating PMNs were found to accumulate in a lesion in the left lower lobe, whereas in the control right lower lobe, leukocyte radioactivity declined. These findings were confirmed with the aid of lavages of the right and left lungs. Two peaks of PMN-accumulation were found by studying leukocyte kinetics: a larger peak between 0 and 6 hr and a smaller peak 18-24 hr after instillation of the microorganisms. Histologic studies confirmed the accumulation of leukocytes, and by 3 weeks showed a complete resolution of the lesions.

  11. Boundary-precise segmentation of nucleus and plasma of leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerfaß, Thorsten; Rehn, Thomas; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    The exact segmentation of nucleus and plasma of a white blood cell (leukocyte) is the basis for the creation of an automatic, image based differential white blood cell count(WBC). In this contribution we present an approach for the according segmentation of leukocytes. For a valid classification of the different cell classes, a precise segmentation is essential. Especially concerning immature cells, which can be distinguished from their mature counterparts only by small differences in some features, a segmentation of nucleus and plasma has to be as precise as possible, to extract those differences. Also the problems with adjacent erythrocyte cells and the usage of a LED illumination are considered. The presented approach can be separated into several steps. After preprocessing by a Kuwahara-filter, the cell is localized by a simple thresholding operation, afterwards a fast-marching method for the localization of a rough cell boundary is defined. To retrieve the cell area a shortest-path-algorithm is applied next. The cell boundary found by the fast-marching approach is finally enhanced by a post-processing step. The concluding segmentation of the cell nucleus is done by a threshold operation. An evaluation of the presented method was done on a representative sample set of 80 images recorded with LED illumination and a 63-fold magnification dry objective. The automatically segmented cell images are compared to a manual segmentation of the same dataset using the Dice-coefficient as well as Hausdorff-distance. The results show that our approach is able to handle the different cell classes and that it improves the segmentation quality significantly.

  12. Endothelial gaps and adherent leukocytes in allergen-induced early- and late-phase plasma leakage in rat airways.

    PubMed

    Baluk, P; Bolton, P; Hirata, A; Thurston, G; McDonald, D M

    1998-06-01

    Exposure of sensitized individuals to antigen can induce allergic responses in the respiratory tract, manifested by early and late phases of vasodilatation, plasma leakage, leukocyte influx, and bronchoconstriction. Similar responses can occur in the skin, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. The early-phase response involves mast cell mediators and the late-phase response is leukocyte dependent, but the mechanism of leakage is not understood. We sought to identify the leaky blood vessels, to determine whether these vessels contained endothelial gaps, and to analyze the relationship of the gaps to adherent leukocytes, using biotinylated lectins or silver nitrate to stain the cells in situ and Monastral blue as a tracer to quantify plasma leakage. Most of the leakage occurred in postcapillary venules (< 40-microns diameter), whereas most of the leukocyte migration (predominantly neutrophils) occurred in collecting venules. Capillaries and arterioles did not leak. Endothelial gaps were found in the leaky venules, both by silver nitrate staining and by scanning electron microscopy, and 94% of the gaps were distinct from sites of leukocyte adhesion or migration. We conclude that endothelial gaps contribute to both early and late phases of plasma leakage induced by antigen, but most leakage occurs upstream to sites of leukocyte adhesion. PMID:9626051

  13. Leukocyte Homing, Fate, and Function Are Controlled by Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanxia; Brown, Chrysothemis; Ortiz, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2015-01-01

    Although vitamin A was recognized as an “anti-infective vitamin” over 90 years ago, the mechanism of how vitamin A regulates immunity is only beginning to be understood. Early studies which focused on the immune responses in vitamin A-deficient (VAD) animals clearly demonstrated compromised immunity and consequently increased susceptibility to infectious disease. The active form of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been shown to have a profound impact on the homing and differentiation of leukocytes. Both pharmacological and genetic approaches have been applied to the understanding of how RA regulates the development and differentiation of various immune cell subsets, and how RA influences the development of immunity versus tolerance. These studies clearly show that RA profoundly impacts on cell- and humoral-mediated immunity. In this review, the early findings on the complex relationship between VAD and immunity are discussed as well as vitamin A metabolism and signaling within hematopoietic cells. Particular attention is focused on how RA impacts on T-cell lineage commitment and plasticity in various diseases. PMID:25540140

  14. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Liao, Qiande; Hu, Yihe; Zhong, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  15. Lymphocyte Subsets in a Population of Nonfrail Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Sánchez-Flores, María; Maseda, Ana; Marcos-Pérez, Diego; Millán-Calenti, José C; Pásaro, Eduardo; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Laffon, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Age-related frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to stress due to decline in homeostatic reserve, which results in increased risk of adverse health outcomes including disability, hospitalization, and death. The relationship between frailty and immunological system alterations is well established. Thus, analysis of immunological changes, such as alterations in lymphocyte subsets, during senescence may provide useful markers for frailty and associated pathologies. Since reference ranges currently used for lymphocyte subsets do not specifically differentiate the elderly group, the aim of this study was to (1) establish reference ranges in nonfrail elderly individuals and (2) assess the evolution of these parameters with age. Further, the influence of other physiological and lifestyle factors was also evaluated. The study was performed on 144 elderly individuals (aged 65-95) from Galicia (in northwestern Spain). Percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3(+) T lymphocytes, CD4(+) T-helper lymphocytes, CD8(+) T-cytotoxic lymphocytes, CD19(+) B lymphocytes, and CD56(+)16(+) natural killer cells) were analyzed in peripheral blood by flow cytometry, and reference ranges were calculated. The individual status as nonfrail or prefrail did not markedly affect the immunological parameters, but an apparent influence of age was obtained for %CD3(+), %CD4(+), and %CD19(+) cells, all of which fell with increasing age. Women showed higher levels of %CD19(+) lymphocytes. No significant influence of smoking habits, physical activity, or drinking alcohol or caffeine beverages was observed. The results obtained may serve as a basis to establish comparisons between frail and nonfrail elderly individuals, in order to determine the usefulness of lymphocyte subsets as immunological biomarkers of frailty. PMID:26167746

  16. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate betweenmore » age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.« less

  17. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  18. Maternal influences on the transmission of leukocyte gene expression profiles in population samples from Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mason, Elizabeth; Tronc, Graham; Nones, Katia; Matigian, Nick; Kim, Jinhee; Aronow, Bruce J; Wolfinger, Russell D; Wells, Christine; Gibson, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Two gene expression profiling studies designed to identify maternal influences on development of the neonate immune system and to address the population structure of the leukocyte transcriptome were carried out in Brisbane, Australia. In the first study, a comparison of 19 leukocyte samples obtained from mothers in the last three weeks of pregnancy with 37 umbilical cord blood samples documented differential expression of 7,382 probes at a false discovery rate of 1%, representing approximately half of the expressed transcriptome. An even larger component of the variation involving 8,432 probes, notably enriched for Vitamin E and methotrexate-responsive genes, distinguished two sets of individuals, with perfect transmission of the two profile types between each of 16 mother-child pairs in the study. A minor profile of variation was found to distinguish the gene expression profiles of obese mothers and children of gestational diabetic mothers from those of children born to obese mothers. The second study was of adult leukocyte profiles from a cross-section of Red Cross blood donors sampled throughout Brisbane. The first two axes in this study are related to the third and fourth axes of variation in the first study and also reflect variation in the abundance of CD4 and CD8 transcripts. One of the profiles associated with the third axis is largely excluded from samples from the central portion of the city. Despite enrichment of insulin signaling and aspects of central metabolism among the differentially expressed genes, there was little correlation between leukocyte expression profiles and body mass index overall. Our data is consistent with the notion that maternal health and cytokine milieu directly impact gene expression in fetal tissues, but that there is likely to be a complex interplay between cultural, genetic, and other environmental factors in the programming of gene expression in leukocytes of newborn children.

  19. [Dynamic studies of the leukocyte phagocytic activity after exposure of rats to asbestos and basalt fibers].

    PubMed

    Hurbánková, M

    1993-05-01

    The paper presents the results of the dynamic one-year follow-up of the phagocytic activity of Wistar-rats peripheral blood leukocytes following intraperitoneal administration of asbestos and basalt fibres (Man-Made Mineral Fibres--MMMF). We investigated the phagocytic activity of leukocytes in peripheral blood following intraperitoneal administration of asbestos and basalt fibres to rats 2, 24, 48 h as well as 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks and 6 and 12 months after dosing. We investigated the time dependent of the changes of relative granulocytes count, percentage of phagocytizing cells from leukocytes, percentage of phagocytizing granulocytes and percentage of phagocytizing monocytes. The results of our experiment showed that asbestos and basalt fibres differed in their effects on the parameters studied. Granulocyte count as well as the phagocytic activity of leukocytes during the one-year dynamic follow-up in both dust--exposed groups of animals were found to change in two phases, characterised by the initial stimulation of the acute phase (I), followed by the suppression of the parameters in the chronic phase (II). Exposure to asbestos and basalt fibres led, in phase II, to impairment of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes. Asbestos fibres at the same time significantly decreased also the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Exposure to basalt fibres did not affect the phagocytic activity of monocytes in phase II. It follows from the results of the experiment, that the monocytic component of leukocytes probably plays an important role in the development of diseases caused by exposure to fibrous dusts and basalt fibres have smaller biological effects compared with asbestos fibres.

  20. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  1. Oxidative stress and reduced responsiveness of challenged circulating leukocytes following pulmonary instillation of metal-rich particulate matter in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is an exposure that consists of a mixture of metal-rich particulate matter with gases (ozone, carbon monoxide) and/or vapors (VOCs). Data suggests that welders are immune compromised. Given the inability of pulmonary leukocytes to properly respond to a secondary infection in animal models, the question arose whether the dysfunction persisted systemically. Our aim was to evaluate the circulating leukocyte population in terms of cellular activation, presence of oxidative stress, and functionality after a secondary challenge, following welding fume exposure. Rats were intratracheally instilled (ITI) with PBS or 2 mg of welding fume collected from a stainless steel weld. Rats were sacrificed 4 and 24 h post-exposure and whole blood was collected. Whole blood was used for cellular differential counts, RNA isolation with subsequent microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and secondary stimulation with LPS utilizing TruCulture technology. In addition, mononuclear cells were isolated 24 h post-exposure to measure oxidative stress by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Welding fume exposure had rapid effects on the circulating leukocyte population as identified by relative mRNA expression changes. Instillation of welding fume reduced inflammatory protein production of circulating leukocytes when challenged with the secondary stimulus LPS. The effects were not related to transcription, but were observed in conjunction with oxidative stress. These findings support previous studies of an inadequate pulmonary immune response following a metal-rich exposure and extend those findings showing leukocyte dysfunction occurs systemically. PMID:25123171

  2. Contributions of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets and leukocytes and microparticles to hypercoagulable state in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfa; Ma, Ruishuang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Muhua; Zhao, Liangliang; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Shi, Jialan; Zou, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Hypercoagulability in gastric cancer is a common complication and a major contributor to poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine procoagulant activity of blood cells and microparticles (MPs) in gastric cancer patients. Phosphatidylserine-positive blood cells and MPs, and their procoagulant properties in particular, were assessed in 48 gastric cancer patients and 35 healthy controls. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage III/IV gastric cancer were significantly higher than those in stage I/II patients or healthy controls. Moreover, procoagulant activity of platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in stage III/IV patients was significantly increased compared to the controls, as indicated by shorter clotting time, higher intrinsic and extrinsic factor tenase, and prothrombinase complex activity. Interestingly, lactadherin, which competes with factors V and VIII to bind phosphatidylserine, dramatically prolonged clotting time of the cells and MPs by inhibiting factor tenase and prothrombinase complex activity. Although anti-tissue factor antibody significantly attenuated extrinsic tenase complex activity of leukocytes and MPs, it only slightly prolonged clotting times. Meanwhile, treatment with radical resection reduced phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs, and prolonged the clotting times of the remaining cells and MPs. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs contribute to hypercoagulability and represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent coagulation in patients with stage III/IV gastric cancer.

  3. Altered biodistribution and incidental findings on gallium and labeled leukocyte/bone marrow scans.

    PubMed

    Love, Charito; Palestro, Christopher J

    2010-07-01

    infection. Labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis because 50% or more of cases present as nonspecific decreased activity. This test is not useful for diagnosing septic arthritis because labeled leukocytes accumulate in inflammatory, noninfectious arthritis. Nodal uptake in patients with lower extremity joint prostheses produces incongruent white blood cell/marrow images in the absence of infection. Careful attention to uptake patterns minimizes this problem. Radiation effects on bone marrow activity are dramatic. Acutely, there is intense, diffusely increased activity. As inflammation subsides, and marrow becomes fibrotic, the irradiated area appears as decreased activity.

  4. Ovine leukocyte profiles do not associate with variation in the prion gene, but are breed-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion genotype in sheep confer resistance to scrapie. In cattle, lymphocyte profile has been found to be associated with prion genotype. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if variations in the sheep prion gene were associated with leukocyte populations as measured by complete blood ce...

  5. Small and cheap: accurate differential blood count with minimal sample volume by laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, Anja; Lenz, Dominik; Smith, Paul J.; Pach, Susanne; Tarnok, Attila

    2005-04-01

    Aim: In patients, e.g. with congenital heart diseases, a differential blood count is needed for diagnosis. To this end by standard automatic analyzers 500 μl of blood is required from the patients. In case of newborns and infants this is a substantial volume, especially after operations associated with blood loss. Therefore, aim of this study was to develop a method to determine a differential blood picture with a substantially reduced specimen volume. Methods: To generate a differential blood picture 10 μl EDTA blood were mixed with 10 μl of a DRAQ5 solution (500μM, Biostatus) and 10 μl of an antibody mixture (CD45-FITC, CD14-PE, diluted with PBS). 20 μl of this cell suspension was filled into a Neubauer counting chamber. Due to the defined volume of the chamber it is possible to determine the cell count per volume. The trigger for leukocyte counting was set on DRAQ5 signal in order to be able to distinguish nucleated white blood cells from erythrocytes. Different leukocyte subsets could be distinguished due to the used fluorescence labeled antibodies. For erythrocyte counting cell suspension was diluted another 150 times. 20 μl of this dilution was analyzed in a microchamber by LSC with trigger set on forward scatter signal. Results: This method allows a substantial decrease of blood sample volume for generation of a differential blood picture (10 μl instead of 500μl). There was a high correlation between our method and the results of routine laboratory (r2=0.96, p<0.0001 n=40). For all parameters intra-assay variance was less than 7 %. Conclusions: In patients with low blood volume such as neonates and in critically ill infants every effort has to be taken to reduce the blood volume needed for diagnostics. With this method only 2% of standard sample volume is needed to generate a differential blood picture. Costs are below that of routine laboratory. We suggest this method to be established in paediatric cardiology for routine diagnostics and for

  6. [Circadian variation of lymphocyte subsets in health subjects].

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Bianco, G; Correra, M; Carella, A M; Balzanelli, M; Giuliani, A; Tarquini, R

    1998-11-01

    In our study cortisol and interleukin 2 (IL-2) levels were measured and lymphocyte sub-population analyses were performed on blood samples collected every four hours, for 24 hours from 10 healthy subjects aged 38-65 years. A clear circadian rhythm was validated for cortisol serum levels, for CD8, CD8 dim, CD16 and delta TcS1 with acrophase in the morning, and for CD2, CD4, CD/CD8 ratio, HLA-DR, CD20 and CD25 with acrophase at night. CD8 bright and TcR delta 1 presented higher levels in the morning without validation of the circadian rhythm. Changes of serum levels of IL-2 did not show circadian rhythmicity. The results show that specific lymphocyte subsets present different profiles of nyctohemeral changes and this may explain time related variations of immune responses.

  7. A simple skin blister technique for the study of in vivo transmigration of human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Lisa; Björkman, Lena; Christenson, Karin; Alsterholm, Mikael; Movitz, Charlotta; Thorén, Fredrik B; Karlsson, Anna; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2013-07-31

    The study of human leukocytes is almost exclusively conducted using cells isolated from peripheral blood. This is especially true for neutrophils, despite the fact that these cells are of main (pathological) importance in extravascular tissues upon e.g., infection and/or tissue damage. The journey from circulation to tissue is typically associated with a number of cellular changes, making the cells primed, or hyper-responsive, and in many aspects distinct from the cells present in circulation. Models to obtain in vivo transmigrated leukocytes from human tissue are available, but not widely used. We describe here an easy-to-use model for the study of local inflammation, stemming from limited tissue damage, which can be used to isolate viable and functional leukocytes. The model is based on the generation of aseptic skin blisters, formed by the application of negative pressure, and allows for investigations of the cellular infiltrate as well as of soluble mediators present in the exudate. We believe that this method, combined with modern analysis equipment suitable for small volumes and cell numbers, could be of great use for increasing our understanding of the nature and function of leukocytes that have left circulation and transmigrated to inflamed tissues.

  8. Therapeutic potential of inhibiting leukocyte rolling in ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kubes, P; Jutila, M; Payne, D

    1995-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling has been postulated to be mandatory for subsequent leukocyte adhesion and tissue injury observed during ischemia/reperfusion. The objective of this study was to systematically assess this hypothesis at the microvascular level by examining the effects of various concentrations of a selectin-binding carbohydrate (fucoidin) on the increased rolling and adhesion of leukocytes in postischemic venules. The contribution of L-selectin and/or P-selectin to leukocyte rolling were also assessed in this model. Using intravital microscopy we observed that 60 min of ischemia followed by reperfusion caused a profound increase in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. A high dose of fucoidin (25 mg/kg) reduced leukocyte rolling by > 90% and significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion, whereas a lower dose of fucoidin still reduced leukocyte rolling by 60% but had no effect on leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, despite the profound reduction in leukocyte rolling with fucoidin, the remaining rolling cells were able to firmly adhere via a CD18-dependent mechanism, particularly in those postcapillary venules with reduced (30-50%) shear rates. The increased rolling was also reduced 60% by either an anti-P-selectin antibody, an anti-L-selectin antibody, or a combination of the two antibodies, but this reduction in rolling cells did not translate into significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion. Our data suggest that L-selectin, P-selectin, and a fucoidin-sensitive pathway contribute to the significant increase in reperfusion-induced leukocyte rolling. However, targeting leukocyte rolling as a form of therapy requires very significant efficacy (> 90%) to achieve reasonable (approximately 50%) attenuation in leukocyte adhesion in postischemic venules. Images PMID:7539452

  9. The effects of cold exposure on leukocytes, hormones and cytokines during acute exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Dominique D; Gagnon, Sheila S; Rintamäki, Hannu; Törmäkangas, Timo; Puukka, Katri; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of exercise on total leukocyte count and subsets, as well as hormone and cytokine responses in a thermoneutral and cold environment, with and without an individualized pre-cooling protocol inducing low-intensity shivering. Nine healthy young men participated in six experimental trials wearing shorts and t-shirts. Participants exercised for 60 min on a treadmill at low (LOW: 50% of peak VO2) and moderate (MOD: 70% VO2peak) exercise intensities in a climatic chamber set at 22°C (NT), and in 0°C (COLD) with and without a pre-exercise low-intensity shivering protocol (SHIV). Core and skin temperature, heart rate and oxygen consumption were collected continuously. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of exercise to assess endocrine and immunological changes. Core temperature in NT was greater than COLD and SHIV by 0.4±0.2°C whereas skin temperature in NT was also greater than COLD and SHIV by 8.5±1.4°C and 9.3±2.5°C respectively in MOD. Total testosterone, adenocorticotropin and cortisol were greater in NT vs. COLD and SHIV in MOD. Norepinephrine was greater in NT vs. other conditions across intensities. Interleukin-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, Rantes, Eotaxin, IP-10, MIP-1β, MCP-1, VEGF, PDGF, and G-CSF were elevated in NT vs. COLD and/or SHIV. Furthermore, IFN-γ, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-10, VEGF, and PDGF demonstrate greater concentrations in SHIV vs. COLD, mainly in the MOD condition. This study demonstrated that exercising in the cold can diminish the exercise-induced systemic inflammatory response seen in a thermoneutral environment. Nonetheless, prolonged cooling inducing shivering thermogenesis prior to exercise, may induce an immuno-stimulatory response following moderate intensity exercise. Performing exercise in cold environments can be a useful strategy in partially inhibiting the acute systemic inflammatory response from exercise but oppositely, additional body cooling may reverse

  10. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning and fracture healing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, L.P.; Scott, A.C.; Bondurant, F.J.; Browner, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the specificity of indium-111 leukocyte scans for osteomyelitis when fractures are present. Midshaft tibial osteotomies were performed in 14 New Zealand white rabbits, seven of which were infected postoperatively with Staphylococcus aureus per Norden's protocol. All 14 rabbits were scanned following injection with 75 microCi of indium 111 at 72 h after osteotomy and at weekly intervals for 4 weeks. Before the rabbits were killed, the fracture sites were cultured to document the presence or absence of infection. The results of all infected osteotomy sites were positive, whereas no positive scans were found in the noninfected osteotomies. We concluded from this study that uncomplicated fracture healing does not result in a positive indium-111 leukocyte scan.

  11. Monocyte Subsets and Related Chemokines in Carotid Artery Stenosis and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Gerrit M; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Teebken, Omke E; Schuppner, Ramona; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Maye, Gerrit; Limbourg, Florian P; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis (CS) is an important cause of ischemic stroke. However, reliable markers for the purpose of identification of high-risk, so-called vulnerable carotid plaques, are still lacking. Monocyte subsets are crucial players in atherosclerosis and might also contribute to plaque rupture. In this study we, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential role of monocyte subsets and associated chemokines as clinical biomarkers for vulnerability of CS. Patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS (n = 21), patients with cardioembolic ischemic strokes (n = 11), and controls without any cardiovascular disorder (n = 11) were examined. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS). Monocyte subsets in peripheral blood were measured by quantitative flow cytometry. Plaque specimens were histologically analyzed. Furthermore, plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine were measured. Intermediate monocytes (Mon2) were significantly elevated in symptomatic and asymptomatic CS-patients compared to controls. Mon2 counts positively correlated with the ESRS. Moreover, stroke patients showed an elevation of Mon2 compared to controls, independent of the ESRS. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic than in those with asymptomatic CS. Several histological criteria significantly differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. However, there was no association of monocyte subsets or chemokines with histological features of plaque vulnerability. Due to the multifactorial influence on monocyte subsets, the usability as clinical markers for plaque vulnerability seems to be limited. However, monocyte subsets may be critically involved in the pathology of CS. PMID:27023515

  12. Modulation of chemokine gradients by apheresis redirects leukocyte trafficking to different compartments during sepsis, studies in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prior work suggests that leukocyte trafficking is determined by local chemokine gradients between the nidus of infection and the plasma. We recently demonstrated that therapeutic apheresis can alter immune mediator concentrations in the plasma, protect against organ injury, and improve survival. Here we aimed to determine whether the removal of chemokines from the plasma by apheresis in experimental peritonitis changes chemokine gradients and subsequently enhances leukocyte localization into the infected compartment, and away from healthy tissues. Methods In total, 76 male adult Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 400 g to 600 g were included in this study. Eighteen hours after inducing sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture, we randomized these rats to apheresis or sham treatment for 4 hours. Cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte counts from blood, peritoneal cavity, and lung were measured. In a separate experiment, we labeled neutrophils from septic donor animals and injected them into either apheresis or sham-treated animals. All numeric data with normal distributions were compared with one-way analysis of variance, and numeric data not normally distributed were compared with the Mann–Whitney U test. Results Apheresis significantly removed plasma cytokines and chemokines, increased peritoneal fluid-to-blood chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1, ligand 2, and C-C motif ligand 2) ratios, and decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid-to-blood chemokine ratios, resulting in enhanced leukocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity and improved bacterial clearance, but decreased recruitment into the lung. Apheresis also reduced myeloperoxidase activity and histologic injury in the lung, liver, and kidney. These Labeled donor neutrophils exhibited decreased localization in the lung when infused into apheresis-treated animals. Conclusions Our results support the concept of chemokine gradient control of leukocyte trafficking and demonstrate the efficacy of apheresis

  13. Caveolin-1 scaffolding domain promotes leukocyte adhesion by reduced basal endothelial nitric oxide-mediated ICAM-1 phosphorylation in rat mesenteric venules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sulei; Zhou, Xueping; Yuan, Dong; Xu, Yanchun; He, Pingnian

    2013-11-15

    Exogenously applied caveolin-1 scaffolding domain (CAV) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory mediator-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and NO-mediated increases in microvessel permeability. However, the effect of CAV on endothelial basal NO that prevents leukocyte adhesion remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the roles of exogenously applied CAV in endothelial basal NO production, leukocyte adhesion, and adhesion-induced changes in microvessel permeability. Experiments were conducted in individually perfused rat mesenteric venules. Microvessel permeability was determined by measuring hydraulic conductivity (Lp). NO was quantified with fluorescence imaging in DAF-2-loaded vessels. Perfusing venules with CAV inhibited basal NO production without affecting basal Lp. Resuming blood flow in CAV-perfused vessels significantly increased leukocyte adhesion. The firmly adherent leukocytes altered neither basal Lp nor adherens junction integrity. Increases in Lp occurred only upon formyl-Met-Leu-Phe application that induces release of reactive oxygen species from the adherent leukocytes. The application of NO synthase inhibitor showed similar results to CAV, and NO donor abolished CAV-mediated leukocyte adhesion. Immunofluorescence staining showed increases in binding of ICAM-1 to an adhesion-blocking antibody concurrent with a Src-dependent ICAM-1 phosphorylation following CAV perfusion. Pre-perfusing vessels with anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody or a Src kinase inhibitor attenuated CAV-induced leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that the application of CAV, in addition to preventing excessive NO-mediated permeability increases, also causes reduction of basal NO and promotes ICAM-1-mediated leukocyte adhesion through Src activation-mediated ICAM-1 phosphorylation. CAV-induced leukocyte adhesion was uncoupled from leukocyte oxidative burst and microvessel barrier function, unless in the presence of a secondary stimulation.

  14. Comparison of technetium-99m-HM-PAO leukocytes with indium-111-oxine leukocytes for localizing intraabdominal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Mountford, P.J.; Kettle, A.G.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Coakley, A.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Technetium-99m-HM-PAO (({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO) leukocyte and indium-111-oxine (111In-oxine) leukocyte scanning were carried out simultaneously in 41 patients at 4 hr and 24 hr after reinjection to determine whether the 4-hr {sup 99m}Tc scan could replace the 24-hr {sup 111}In scan for detecting intraabdominal sepsis. Abdominal infection was confirmed in 12 cases. The 4-hr {sup 99}Tc-leukocyte scan, the 4-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scan, and the 24-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scan yielded a sensitivity of 100%, 67%, and 100%, respectively, and a specificity of 62%, 90%, and 86%, respectively. The 24-hr {sup 99m}Tc-leukocyte scan also produced a sensitivity of 100%, but it was falsely positive in all 29 cases without infection due to physiologic bowel uptake. False-positive 4-hr {sup 99m}Tc-leukocyte scans were also produced by physiologic bowel uptake in seven cases all of whom had true-negative 4-hr and 24-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scans. Because of the high incidence of false-positive 4-hr ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO leukocyte scans, it was concluded that they could not replace 24-hr {sup 111}In-leukocyte scans for detecting intraabdominal sepsis, and that serial {sup 99m}Tc leukocyte scans starting earlier than 4 hr after reinjection must be evaluated.

  15. Automated leukocyte recognition using fuzzy divergence.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Madhumala; Das, Devkumar; Chakraborty, Chandan; Ray, Ajoy K

    2010-10-01

    This paper aims at introducing an automated approach to leukocyte recognition using fuzzy divergence and modified thresholding techniques. The recognition is done through the segmentation of nuclei where Gamma, Gaussian and Cauchy type of fuzzy membership functions are studied for the image pixels. It is in fact found that Cauchy leads better segmentation as compared to others. In addition, image thresholding is modified for better recognition. Results are studied and discussed.

  16. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD): a review.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime

    2004-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) in Holstein cattle is an autosomal recessive congenital disease characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, delayed wound healing and stunted growth, and is also associated with persistent marked neutrophilia. The molecular basis of BLAD is a single point mutation (adenine to guanine) at position 383 of the CD18 gene, which caused an aspartic acid to glycine substitution at amino acid 128 (D128G) in the adhesion molecule CD18. Neutrophils from BLAD cattle have impaired expression of the beta2 integrin (CD11a,b,c/CD18) of the leukocyte adhesion molecule. Abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence dependent functions of leukocytes have been fully characterized. Cattle affected with BLAD have severe ulcers on oral mucous membranes, severe periodontitis, loss of teeth, chronic pneumonia and recurrent or chronic diarrhea. Affected cattle die at an early age due to the infectious complications. Holstein bulls, including carrier sires that had a mutant BLAD gene in heterozygote were controlled from dairy cattle for a decade. The control of BLAD in Holstein cattle by publishing the genotypes and avoiding the mating between BLAD carriers was found to be successful. This paper provides an overview of the genetic disease BLAD with reference to the disease in Holstein cattle. PMID:15644595

  17. Burn and smoke injury activates poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase in circulating leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bartha, Eva; Asmussen, Sven; Olah, Gabor; Rehberg, Sebastian W.; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Traber, Daniel L.; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of various forms of critical illness. DNA strand breaks induced by oxidative and nitrative stress trigger the activation of PARP, and PARP, in turn, mediates cell death and promotes pro-inflammatory responses. Until recently, most studies focused on the role of PARP in solid organs such as heart, liver, kidney. Here we investigated the effect of burn and smoke inhalation on the levels of poly(ADP-ribosylated) proteins (PAR) in circulating sheep leukocytes ex vivo. Adult female merino sheep were subjected to burn injury (2×20% each flank, 3 degree) and smoke inhalation injury (insufflated with a total of 48 breaths of cotton smoke) under deep anesthesia. Arterial and venous blood were collected at baseline, immediately after the injury and 1-24 hours after the injury. Leukocytes were isolated with the Histopaque method. The levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins were determined by Western blotting. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the Oxyblot method. To examine whether PARP activation continues to increasing ex vivo in the leukocytes, blood samples were incubated at room temperature or at 37°C for 3h with or without the PARP inhibitor PJ34. To investigate whether the plasma of burn/smoke animals may trigger PARP activation, burn/smoke plasma was incubated with control leukocytes in vitro. The results show that burn and smoke injury induced a marked PARP activation in circulating leukocytes. The activity was the highest immediately after injury and at 1 hour, and decreased gradually over time. Incubation of whole blood at 37°C for 3 hours significantly increased PAR levels, indicative of the presence of an on-going cell activation process. In conclusion, PARP activity is elevated in leukocytes after burn and smoke inhalation injury and the response parallels the time-course of reactive oxygen species generation in these cells. PMID

  18. Greedy Hypervolume Subset Selection in Low Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Andreia P; Fonseca, Carlos M; Paquete, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Given a nondominated point set [Formula: see text] of size [Formula: see text] and a suitable reference point [Formula: see text], the Hypervolume Subset Selection Problem (HSSP) consists of finding a subset of size [Formula: see text] that maximizes the hypervolume indicator. It arises in connection with multiobjective selection and archiving strategies, as well as Pareto-front approximation postprocessing for visualization and/or interaction with a decision maker. Efficient algorithms to solve the HSSP are available only for the 2-dimensional case, achieving a time complexity of [Formula: see text]. In contrast, the best upper bound available for [Formula: see text] is [Formula: see text]. Since the hypervolume indicator is a monotone submodular function, the HSSP can be approximated to a factor of [Formula: see text] using a greedy strategy. In this article, greedy [Formula: see text]-time algorithms for the HSSP in 2 and 3 dimensions are proposed, matching the complexity of current exact algorithms for the 2-dimensional case, and considerably improving upon recent complexity results for this approximation problem.

  19. Complete subsets of a diffraction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervellino, Antonio; Ciccariello, Salvino

    2001-02-01

    A positive atomic density ρ(r) = ∑j=1Nnjδ(r-rj) in a D-dimensional space can be exactly reconstructed from an appropriate finite subset (complete set) of its Fourier series coefficients Uhh in ZD or even (limited to the support) rJj=1,....N) from a finite subset of moduli |Uh|. It is necessary first to determine a complete set of Fourier coefficients Uh (possibly inside the unavoidable high-resolution cut-off ||h|| < L) and then, by these coefficients to determine the unknown density. We report some procedures which are able to signle out complete sets. They are based on a property of Goedkoop's vector lattice |Ah h in ZD, defined so that

  20. Isolation and Properties of Phagocytic Vesicles from Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stossel, Thomas P.; Pollard, Thomas D.; Mason, Robert J.; Vaughan, Martha

    1971-01-01

    A method for the isolation of intact phagocytic vesicles from guinea pig peritoneal-exudate granulocytes and human peripheral-blood leukocytes is presented. After leukocytes ingested the particles of a stable emulsion of paraffin oil, the uningested emulsion was washed away and the cells were homogenized. The homogenate was placed in the middle of a three-step discontinuous sucrose gradient and centrifuged for 1 hr at 100,000 g. The phagocytic vesicles, containing the low density paraffin-oil particles, were simultaneously washed and collected by floatation, while the other organelles, chiefly granules, sedimented through the lower wash layer, and the particle-free supernatant remained in the middle of the gradient. Emulsion particles stained with Oil Red O were employed to assay the rate of phagocytosis and to mark the location of the particles in subcellular fractions. The dye was extracted from washed cells or cell fractions with dioxane and colorimetrically quantified. The purity of phagocytic vesicles obtained by this method was assessed by electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and assay of enzyme composition. Granule-associated enzymes, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and peroxidase were present in the phagocytic vesicles and originated from the granules. Cyanide-resistant NADH (reduced form of diphosphopyridine nucleotide) oxidase was also found. Enzymes associated with the vesicles exhibited latency to Triton X-100. Uptake of particles and the transfer of total protein and phospholipid into phagocytic vesicles occurred simultaneously Accumulation of acid and alkaline phosphatase in the vesicles continued until phagocytosis ceased. Peroxidase, NADH oxidase, and β-glucuronidase activities in the phagocytic vesicles, on the other hand, were maximal by 30 min and increased little thereafter even when phagocytosis was still going on. Images PMID:4106463

  1. Detection of CFTR protein in human leukocytes by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jan; Vezzalini, Marzia; Verzè, Genny; Caldrer, Sara; Bolognin, Silvia; Buffelli, Mario; Bellisola, Giuseppe; Tridello, Gloria; Assael, Baroukh Maurice; Melotti, Paola; Sorio, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Leukocytes have previously been shown to express detectable levels of the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This study aims to evaluate the application of flow cytometric (FC) analysis to detect CFTR expression, and changes thereof, in these cells. Aliquots (200 μL) of peripheral whole blood from 12 healthy control volunteers (CTRLs), 12 carriers of a CFTR mutation (CFC), and 40 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying various combinations of CFTR mutations were incubated with specific fluorescent probes recognizing CFTR protein expressed on the plasma membrane of leukocytes. FC was applied to analyze CFTR expression in monocytes, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. CFTR protein was detected in monocytes and lymphocytes, whereas inconclusive results were obtained from the analysis of PMN cells. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio value and %CFTR-positive cells above a selected threshold were the two parameters selected to quantify CFTR expression in cells. Lowest variability and the highest reproducibility were obtained when analyzing monocytes. ANOVA results indicated that both parameters were able to discriminate monocytes of healthy controls and CF individuals according to CFTR mutation classes with high accuracy. Significantly increased MFI ratio values were recorded in CFTR-defective cells that were also able to improve CFTR function after ex vivo treatment with PTC124 (Ataluren), an investigative drug designed to permit the ribosome to read through nonsense CFTR mutations. The method described is minimally invasive and may be used in the monitoring of responses to drugs whose efficacy can depend on increased CFTR protein expression levels. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Rühle, Paul F.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB) that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384), pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553), and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955) and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome. PMID:27529227

  3. Intravital Microscopy of Leukocyte-endothelial and Platelet-leukocyte Interactions in Mesenterial Veins in Mice.

    PubMed

    Herr, Nadine; Mauler, Maximilian; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a method that can be used to investigate different processes in different regions and vessels in living animals. In this protocol, we describe intravital microscopy of mesentery veins. This can be performed in a short period of time with reproducible results showing leukocyte-endothelial interactions in vivo. We describe an inflammatory setting after LPS challenge of the endothelium. But in this model one can apply many different types of inflammatory conditions, like bacterial, chemical or biological and investigate the administration of drugs and their direct effects on the living animal and its impact on leukocyte recruitment. This protocol has been applied successfully to a number of different treatments of mice and their effects on inflammatory response in vessels. Herein, we describe the visualization of leukocytes and platelets by fluorescently labeling these with rhodamine 6G. Additionally, any specific imaging can be performed using targeted fluorescently labeled molecules.

  4. Leukocyte emigration in normal calves and calves with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Masuyama, A; Masue, M; Yuki, M; Higuchi, H; Ohtsuka, H; Kurosawa, T; Sato, H; Noda, H

    1997-12-01

    The emigration of leukocytes from calves with beta 2 integrin deficiency (BLAD) into bronchoalveolar spaces and scraped tissues was compared to that of normal calves. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils were found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from BLAD-affected calves showing chronic pneumonia. The neutrophils were complement receptor type 3 (CR3)-negative when characterized by flow cytometric analysis using anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody. Chemiluminescent response mediated by CR3 in neutrophils isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from BLAD-calves showed similar findings obtained from CR3-deficient neutrophils. Neutrophils from normal calves migrated into scraped tissue which was prepared in an upper gluteal surface area, whereas few leukocytes from calves with BLAD migrated to the scraped tissue, evaluated by skin window (Rebuck) method. These findings confirmed the extravasation of CR3-deficient leukocytes into bronchoalveolar lumen in BLAD calves, and demonstrated in vivo characteristics of extravasating property of normal and CR3-deficient neutrophils into scraped tissues. PMID:9450245

  5. Effect of Sodium Polyanetholesulfonate on Antimicrobial Systems in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Belding, M. E.; Klebanoff, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sodium polyanetholesulfonate (SPS), an anticoagulant which inhibits the antimicrobial systems of blood, is used widely in blood culture media. The addition of SPS to experimental blood cultures inoculated with small numbers of a variety of organisms caused a striking increase in recovery of these organisms. Sodium fluoride also increased the incidence of positive blood cultures with some organisms. SPS completely inhibited serum antibacterial activity and serum-dependent phagocytosis (and killing) by isolated leukocytes at a concentration usually employed in blood culture media. SPS also stimulated both glucose C-1 oxidation in resting leukocytes and formate oxidation in both resting and phagocytosing leukocytes in serum-free systems. These in vitro studies support the concept that SPS is a useful additive to blood culture media and further elaborate on the mechanism of its inhibition of the microbicidal activity of blood. Images PMID:4640735

  6. Preventing the infiltration of leukocytes by monoclonal antibody blocks the development of progressive ischemia in rat burns.

    PubMed

    Choi, M; Rabb, H; Arnaout, M A; Ehrlich, H P

    1995-10-01

    Tissue loss as a consequence of thermal trauma occurs in two stages. There is immediate necrosis in tissues directly killed by the thermal energy, followed by a delayed secondary necrosis in neighboring tissues. The infiltration of neutrophils into traumatized tissues is a hallmark of the inflammatory response. Neutrophils have the machinery to kill invading microorganisms, but these same weapons have the capacity to destroy the host's viable tissues as well. Leukocyte infiltration requires their adherence to the vascular endothelial cell surface. Masking these adhesion sites on neutrophils will block the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) was developed to guinea pig leukocyte adhesion sites CD11b/ CD18, and this mAb cross-reacts with rat leukocytes, blocking their adherence. Rats received a "comb burn" composed of four rectangular full-thickness burns placed in a row and separated by three areas left unburned. The four individual burns convert into a single large wound because the blood flow to the interspaces was terminated, blood vessels were occluded, and leukocytes were present in the extravascular space. The systemic administration of the mAb (50 to 150 microliters) immediately following a comb burn promoted the survival of the interspace, demonstrated by the prevention of loss of blood flow by laser Doppler monitoring, maintained patent vessels by latex vascular casts, blocked extravascular migration of neutrophils histologically at 2 hours, and limited the tissue loss to the original four burns. PMID:7568496

  7. Metabolomics profiling reveals novel markers for leukocyte telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Zierer, Jonas; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Suhre, Karsten; Gieger, Christian; Codd, Veryan; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Bell, Jordana; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Schulz, Holger; Weidinger, Stephan; Mohney, Robert P.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Tim; Mangino, Massimo; Menni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is considered one of the most predictive markers of biological aging. The aim of this study was to identify novel pathways regulating LTL using a metabolomics approach. To this end, we tested associations between 280 blood metabolites and LTL in 3511 females from TwinsUK and replicated our results in the KORA cohort. We furthermore tested significant metabolites for associations with several aging-related phenotypes, gene expression markers and epigenetic markers to investigate potential underlying pathways. Five metabolites were associated with LTL: Two lysolipids, 1-stearoylglycerophosphoinositol (P=1.6×10−5) and 1-palmitoylglycerophosphoinositol (P=1.6×10−5), were found to be negatively associated with LTL and positively associated with phospholipase A2 expression levels suggesting an involvement of fatty acid metabolism and particularly membrane composition in biological aging. Moreover, two gamma-glutamyl amino acids, gamma-glutamyltyrosine (P=2.5×10−6) and gamma-glutamylphenylalanine (P=1.7×10−5), were negatively correlated with LTL. Both are products of the glutathione cycle and markers for increased oxidative stress. Metabolites were also correlated with functional measures of aging, i.e. higher blood pressure and HDL cholesterol levels and poorer lung, liver and kidney function. Our results suggest an involvement of altered fatty acid metabolism and increased oxidative stress in human biological aging, reflected by LTL and age-related phenotypes of vital organ systems. PMID:26797767

  8. Automatic leukocyte nucleus segmentation by intuitionistic fuzzy divergence based thresholding.

    PubMed

    Jati, Arindam; Singh, Garima; Mukherjee, Rashmi; Ghosh, Madhumala; Konar, Amit; Chakraborty, Chandan; Nagar, Atulya K

    2014-03-01

    The paper proposes a robust approach to automatic segmentation of leukocyte's nucleus from microscopic blood smear images under normal as well as noisy environment by employing a new exponential intuitionistic fuzzy divergence based thresholding technique. The algorithm minimizes the divergence between the actual image and the ideally thresholded image to search for the final threshold. A new divergence formula based on exponential intuitionistic fuzzy entropy has been proposed. Further, to increase its noise handling capacity, a neighborhood-based membership function for the image pixels has been designed. The proposed scheme has been applied on 110 normal and 54 leukemia (chronic myelogenous leukemia) affected blood samples. The nucleus segmentation results have been validated by three expert hematologists. The algorithm achieves an average segmentation accuracy of 98.52% in noise-free environment. It beats the competitor algorithms in terms of several other metrics. The proposed scheme with neighborhood based membership function outperforms the competitor algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy under noisy environment. It achieves 93.90% and 94.93% accuracies for Speckle and Gaussian noises, respectively. The average area under the ROC curves comes out to be 0.9514 in noisy conditions, which proves the robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  10. Complement and immunoglobulins stimulate superoxide production by human leukocytes independently of phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, I M; Roos, D; Kaplan, H B; Weissmann, G

    1975-01-01

    Human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, when exposed to appropriate stimuli, generate significant amounts of superoxide anion (O-.2), a highly reactive molecule which is possibly involved in bacterial killing. Since the subcellular localization and mechanism of activation of O-.2 generating systems are unknown, we have investigated superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction (attributable to O-.2) by, and lysosomal enzyme release from, normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cells rendered incapable of ingesting particles by treatment with cytochalasin B. Neither phagocytosis nor lysosomal degranulation were prerequisites for enhanced O-.2 generation. Cytochalasin B-treated cells exposed to (a) serum-treated zymosan, a C3b receptor stimulus; (b) heat aggregated human IgG, an Fc receptor stimulus; and (c) the complement component, C5a, generated enhanced amounts of O-.2 in a time and concentration-dependent fashion. These cells also responded by releasing lysosomal enzymes, but there was no correlation between the ability of any immune reactant to provoke enzyme release and its ability to stimulate O-.2 generation. The three stimuli also enhanced O-.2 generation by normal (untreated) polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but only serum-treated zymosan and aggregated IgG were capable of provoking lysosomal enzyme release from normal cells. Untreated zymosan and native IgG neither stimulated O-.2 production nor provoked lysomal enzyme release. Since enhanced O-.2 production was stimulated by immune reactants in the absence of phagocytosis, the O-.2 generating system is very likely associated with the external plasma membrane of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte. Leukocyte membrane receptors for complement and immunoglobulins may therefore not only serve in particle recognition but also may initiate biochemical events which accompany phagocytosis and killing. PMID:171281

  11. Evidence that the superoxide-generating system of human leukocytes is associated with the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, I M; Cerqueira, M; Lind, S; Kaplan, H B

    1977-01-01

    Superoxide anion (O-2-) generation by human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes is enhanced when these cells encounter appropriate soluble or particulate stimuli. O-2- generation requires intact, viable cells and proceeds independently of phagocytosis. To investigate the possibility that the O-2--generating system is associated with the outer surface of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte plasma membrane, we have examined the effects upon O-2- production of p-diazobenzenesulfonic acid, a reagent which can react predominantly with proteins of the external cell membrane. When normal human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were preincubated with cytochalasin B (to minimize endocytosis) and then exposed to the surface-active lectin, concanavalin A, the cells were stimulated to generate O-2- in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion and selectively to discharge the granule-associated enzyme, lysozyme, into the surrounding medium. These responses, as well as cellular binding of [H] concanavalin A, could be blocked by alpha-methyl-D-mannoside. Brief treatment (less than 5 min at 4 degrees C) of the cells with p-diazobenzenesulfonic acid (1.0-5.0 mM) significantly interfered with concanavalin A-mediated O-2- generation but had no influence upon lysozyme release or upon binding of [3H] concanavalin A. The diazonium salt did not alter cell viability or the specific activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (inhibitable under conditions which allowed entry of this reagent into the cytosol). p-Diazobenzenesulfonic acid, therefore, very likely exerted its effects at the cell surface of the intact polymorphonuclear leukocyte, selectively inhibiting O-2- production (either directly or indirectly) without influencing another response to lectin-cell contact: release of lysozyme. These results support the possibility that a polymorphonuclear leukocyte ectoenzyme is responsible for O-2- production. PMID:188867

  12. Bovine P-selectin mediates leukocyte adhesion and is highly polymorphic in dairy breeds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Cheng, Zhangrui; Werling, Dirk; Pollott, Geoffrey E; Salavati, Mazdak; Johnson, Kate F; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Wathes, D Claire; Zhang, Shujun

    2016-10-01

    Bovine P-selectin (SELP) mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocyte adhesion to endothelium, both essential for leukocyte recruitment to an infection site. We investigated SELP-mediated adhesion between bovine peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells pre-activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We examined gene polymorphism for bovine selectins SELP, l-selectin (SELL) and E-selectin (SELE) and compared their SNP frequency between five dairy breeds (Holstein, Friesian, Jersey, Ayrshire and Brown Swiss). LPS treatment caused a rapid (10min) and slower (4h) enhancement of PBL adhesion (P<0.01). Antibody blocking of SELP inhibited LPS induced cell adhesion. SELP was highly polymorphic, with 9 of the 13 SNPs in its exons, whereas only three synonymous SNPs in SELL and one in SELE. The resulting amino acid changes for the three missense SELP SNP were located in the lectin domain and in two consensus repeat (CR) regions, CR2 and CR5. The Val475Met variant locus in the CR4 and CR5 linking region was very close to a predicted N-acetyl-d-glucosamine glycosylation site, which is likely to influence SELP function. The AA genotype was under-represented, only being found in 1% of 373 heifers genotyped from the 5 breeds (P=0.056), suggesting that AA homozygous animals carrying the Val475Met substitution for SELP may have compromised development. Our study thus confirmed that SELP mediates the attachment of PBL to endothelium and provides novel evidence that its high polymorphism is likely to affect biological function. This may potentially influence leukocyte migration and fertility, both key to successful performance in dairy cows. PMID:27663375

  13. Impaired bone healing in multitrauma patients is associated with altered leukocyte kinetics after major trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Okan W; Kuijer, Anne; Koenderman, Leo; Stellato, Rebecca K; van Solinge, Wouter W; Leenen, Luke PH; Blokhuis, Taco J

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that the systemic inflammatory response to major injury impairs bone regeneration. It remains unclear whether the systemic immune response contributes to impairment of fracture healing in multitrauma patients. It is well known that systemic inflammatory changes after major trauma affect leukocyte kinetics. We therefore retrospectively compared the cellular composition of peripheral blood during the first 2 weeks after injury between multitrauma patients with normal (n=48) and impaired (n=32) fracture healing of the tibia. The peripheral blood-count curves of leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and thrombocytes differed significantly between patients with normal and impaired fracture healing during the first 2 weeks after trauma (P-values were 0.0122, 0.0083, 0.0204, and <0.0001, respectively). Mean myeloid cell counts were above reference values during the second week after injury. Our data indicate that leukocyte kinetics differ significantly between patients with normal and impaired fracture healing during the first 2 weeks after major injury. This finding suggests that the systemic immune response to major trauma can disturb tissue regeneration. PMID:27274302

  14. Increased expression of immune-related genes in leukocytes of patients with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Marzena; Zieleniak, Andrzej; Zurawska-Klis, Monika; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2016-03-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the immune system is linked to metabolism in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but factors participating in these processes still are awaiting identification. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, encoded by the NOS2 gene, and surfactant protein D, encoded by the SFTPD gene, have been implicated in diabetes. We investigated NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in leukocytes obtained from 125 pregnant women with (n = 87) or without (control group; n = 38) GDM, and, in turn, correlated their expression with clinical parameters of subjects. Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of pregnant women and NOS2 and SFTPD expression in these cells was determined by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Univariate correlation analyses were performed to assess an association between leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD expression and clinical characteristics of patients. qRT-PCR experiments disclosed significantly increased leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in hyperglycemic GDM patients (P < 0.05). In the entire study group, there were significant positive associations of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNAs with C-reactive protein. Additionally, transcript level of SFTPD also correlated positively with fasting glycemia and insulin resistance. This study demonstrates that an impaired glucose metabolism in GDM may be predominant predictor of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD overexpression in diabetic patients. Furthermore, alterations in the expression of these genes are associated with glucose metabolism dysfunction and/or inflammation during pregnancy. In addition, these findings support the utilization of leukocytes as good experimental model to study a relationship between immune-related genes and metabolic changes in women with GDM, as well as to assess the potential mechanisms underlying these alterations.

  15. Increased expression of immune-related genes in leukocytes of patients with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)

    PubMed Central

    Zieleniak, Andrzej; Zurawska-Klis, Monika; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the immune system is linked to metabolism in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but factors participating in these processes still are awaiting identification. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, encoded by the NOS2 gene, and surfactant protein D, encoded by the SFTPD gene, have been implicated in diabetes. We investigated NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in leukocytes obtained from 125 pregnant women with (n = 87) or without (control group; n = 38) GDM, and, in turn, correlated their expression with clinical parameters of subjects. Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of pregnant women and NOS2 and SFTPD expression in these cells was determined by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Univariate correlation analyses were performed to assess an association between leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD expression and clinical characteristics of patients. qRT-PCR experiments disclosed significantly increased leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in hyperglycemic GDM patients (P < 0.05). In the entire study group, there were significant positive associations of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNAs with C-reactive protein. Additionally, transcript level of SFTPD also correlated positively with fasting glycemia and insulin resistance. This study demonstrates that an impaired glucose metabolism in GDM may be predominant predictor of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD overexpression in diabetic patients. Furthermore, alterations in the expression of these genes are associated with glucose metabolism dysfunction and/or inflammation during pregnancy. In addition, these findings support the utilization of leukocytes as good experimental model to study a relationship between immune-related genes and metabolic changes in women with GDM, as well as to assess the potential mechanisms underlying these alterations. PMID:26568332

  16. Differential leukocyte counts in "dourado", Salminus maxillosus Valenciennes, 1840, from the Mogi-Guaçu River, Pirassununga, SP.