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Sample records for blood platelet function

  1. Effects of methaqualone on blood platelet function.

    PubMed

    Mills, D G

    1978-06-01

    To study the mechanism whereby toxic doses of methaqualone cause a bleeding tendency in humans, the effects of methaqualone, diphenhydramine, and the combination of methaqualone plus diphenhydramine on blood platelet function were investigated. Exposure of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma in vitro to final concentrations of methaqualone ranging from 1.1 to 4.5 X 10(-4)) M resulted in nearly complete inhibition of the secondary phase and significant inhibition of the primary phase of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)--induced aggregation. Both the slope and height of collagen-induced aggregation responses were reduced significantly in vitro by the drug. When methaqualone final concentrations of 1.1, 2.3, and 4.5 X 10(-4) M were studied in the presence of diphenhydramine (1.1, 2.3, and 4.5 X 10(-5) M, respectively), the degree of inhibition of ADP-induced aggregation was only slightly greater (not significant) than that observed with methaqualone. The platelets of rabbits injected intravenously with methaqualone, 10 mg/kg, demonstrated a significantly decreased ability to aggregate with ADP and collagen 30 and 60 min after administration of the drug. These results suggest that a drug-induced defect of blood platelet function may play a role in the bleeding associated with methaqualone toxicity.

  2. The effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on platelet function in whole blood and platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Anne-Grete; Hustad, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Nepstad, Ina; Hervig, Tor Audun

    2012-01-01

    Several studies report that patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression may have increased risk of bleeding, particularly from the gastrointestinal tract. This may be related to low intraplatelet serotonin concentrations. Several blood banks do not store platelets from donors using SSRIs for transfusion, although the possible effects of SSRIs on platelet storage are not documented. We conducted a case-control pilot study of apheresis platelet concentrates prepared from donors using SSRIs (n=8) and from donors without medication (n=10). The platelet concentrates were stored for 5 days. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA), thrombelastography (TEG), and flow cytometric analyses were preformed for in vitro measurements of platelet function. Platelet function and platelet serotonin content were investigated in whole blood and in platelet concentrates stored for up to 5 days. LTA, TEG, and flow cytometric analysis of glycoprotein expression did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups. All 18 platelet concentrates performed well according to the standards set for platelet quality in relation to transfusion. Blood donors using SSRIs had significantly lower platelet serotonin compared to blood donors without medication. The results from our pilot study indicate that platelets from donors using SSRIs may be suitable for transfusion after storage for 5 days, but further laboratory and clinical studies are necessary to confirm this.

  3. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable.

  4. Thrombocytopenia model with minimal manipulation of blood cells allowing whole blood assessment of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann Skipper, Mette; Rubak, Peter; Halfdan Larsen, Ole; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-06-01

    In vitro models of thrombocytopenia are useful research tools. Previously published models have shortcomings altering properties of platelets and other blood components. The aim of the present study was to develop a whole blood method to induce thrombocytopenia with minimal manipulation, and to describe platelet function in induced thrombocytopenia in individuals with healthy platelets. Hirudin anticoagulated blood was obtained from 20 healthy volunteers. One part of the blood was gently centrifuged at 130g for 15 minutes. The platelet-rich plasma was replaced with phosphate-buffered saline to establish thrombocytopenia. Various levels of thrombocytopenia were achieved by combining different volumes of baseline whole blood and thrombocytopenic blood. Platelet counts were measured by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) and routine haematological analyser (Sysmex XE-5000). Platelet function was analysed by impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer, Roche) and by flow cytometry (Navios, Beckman Coulter) using collagen, adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and ristocetin as agonists. Median baseline platelet count was 227×10(9)/l. The in vitro model yielded median platelet counts at 51×10(9)/l (range 26-93×10(9)/l). We observed minor, yet significant, changes in platelet size and maturity from baseline to modelled thrombocytopenia. In the thrombocytopenic samples, significant and positive linear associations were found between platelet count and platelet aggregation across all agonists (all p-values<0.001). Platelet function assessed by flow cytometry showed minimal alterations in the thrombocytopenic samples. A new whole blood-based model of thrombocytopenia was established and validated. This new model serves as a useful future tool, particularly to explore platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia.

  5. Is platelet function as measured by Thrombelastograph monitoring in whole blood affected by platelet inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lori A; Sistino, Joseph J; Uber, Walter E

    2005-03-01

    Platelet inhibitors, especially the glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists, have demonstrated their effectiveness in reducing the acute ischemic complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and in improving clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary crisis. Three common platelet inhibitors observed in emergent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for failed PCI are abciximab, eptifibatide, and tirofiban. An in vitro model was constructed in two parts to determine whether platelet aggregation inhibition induced by platelet inhibitors would be demonstrated by the Thrombelastograph (TEG) monitor when compared with baseline samples with no platelet inhibitor. In part A, 20 mL of fresh whole blood was divided into four groups: group I = baseline, group A = abcix-imab microg/mL, group E = eptifibatide ng/mL, and group T = tirofiban ng/mL. Platelet inhibitor concentrations in whole blood were derived starting with reported serum concentrations with escalation to achieve 80% platelet inhibition using the Medtronic hemoSTATUS and/or Lumi-aggregometer. A concentration range determined by our in vitro tests were chosen for each drug using concentrations achieving less than, equal to, or greater than 80% platelet inhibition. In part B, TEG analysis was then performed using baseline and concentrations for each drug derived in part A. Parameters measured were clot formation reaction time (R), coagulation time (K), maximum amplitude (MA) and alpha angle (A). Groups E1000 and E2000 extended R over control by 37% and 23%, respectively (p = 0.01 and 0.03). Groups E1000 and E2000 increased K times by 45% and 58% (p = .02 and .04). T160 samples prolonged K by 20% (p = 0.01). The angle or clot strength (A) was decreased in groups T160 and E1000 by 23% (+ 7.06 SD) and 18% (+ 11.23 SD), respectively (p = 0.001 and 0.01). The MA decrease was statistically significant in the T160, E1000 and E2000 by 9%, 6% and 13% respectively (p = 0.01). Samples treated with abciximab

  6. Effect of serotonin on platelet function in cocaine exposed blood

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Hadden, Coedy; Li, Yicong; Lowery, Curtis Lee; Singh, Preeti; Ucer, Serra S.; Mercado, Charles P.; Gu, Howard H.; Kilic, Fusun

    2014-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors counteract the pro-thrombotic effect of elevated plasma 5-HT by down-regulating the 5-HT uptake rates of platelets. Cocaine also down-regulates the platelet 5-HT uptake rates but in contrast, the platelets of cocaine-injected mice show a much higher aggregation rate than the platelets of control mice. To examine the involvement of plasma 5-HT in cocaine-mediated platelet aggregation, we studied the function of platelets isolated from wild-type and transgenic, peripheral 5-HT knock-out (TPH1-KO) mice, and cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter knock in (DAT-KI) mice. In cocaine-injected mice compared to the control mice, the plasma 5-HT level as well as the surface level of P-selectin was elevated; in vitro platelet aggregation in the presence of type I fibrillar collagen was enhanced. However, cocaine injection lowered the 5-HT uptake rates of platelets and increased the plasma 5-HT levels of the DAT-KI mice but did not change their platelets aggregation rates further which are already hyper-reactive. Furthermore, the in vitro studies supporting these in vivo findings suggest that cocaine mimics the effect of elevated plasma 5-HT level on platelets and in 5-HT receptor- and transporter-dependent pathways in a two-step process propagates platelet aggregation by an additive effect of 5-HT and nonserotonergic catecholamine. PMID:25091505

  7. Prostaglandin E2 levels and platelet function are different in cord blood compared to adults.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Axel; Haidl, Harald; Leschnik, Bettina; Leis, Hans-Joerg; Heinemann, Akos; Muntean, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal platelets support primary haemostasis and thrombin generation as well as adult platelets, despite observable hypoaggregability in vitro. High prostaglandin E2 levels at accouchement could account for inhibited platelet function via the EP4 receptor. We set out to determine prostaglandin E2 plasma levels in cord blood of healthy neonates and evaluate the impact of prostaglandin E2 on platelet function in adult and cord blood samples. Prostaglandin E2 plasma levels were measured in cord blood and venous adult blood using GC-MS. Impact of prostaglandin E2 on platelet aggregation was measured by spiking cord blood and adult samples. Contributions of EP3 and EP4 receptors were evaluated using respective antagonists. Intracellular cAMP concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA-kit. Prostaglandin E2 plasma levels were substantially higher in cord blood than in adult samples. Spiking with prostaglandin E2 resulted in a slight but consistent reduction of platelet aggregation in adult blood, but response to PGE2 was blunted in cord blood samples. Aggregation response of spiked adult samples was still higher than with non-spiked cord blood samples. Blockage of EP4 receptors resulted in improved platelet aggregation in adult platelets upon prostaglandin E2 spiking, while aggregation in cord blood samples remained unaltered. Intracellular cAMP concentrations after preincubation with prostaglandin E2 were only increased in adult samples. In conclusion, very high prostaglandin E2 concentrations in cord blood affect platelet function. This effect may partially explain neonatal platelet hypoaggregability. Peak levels of prostaglandin E2 can potentially protect against birth stress-induced platelet activation.

  8. Fusaric acid, a mycotoxin, and its influence on blood coagulation and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Girish, Kesturu S; Santhosh, Martin S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Nayaka, Siddaiah C; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2013-06-01

    The current study intended to explore the effect of fusaric acid on blood coagulation including plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation. Fusaric acid exhibited biphasic effects on citrated human plasma recalcification time. At concentrations below 50 ng, fusaric acid decreased the clotting time of plasma dose-dependently from 130 ± 3s control value to 32 ± 3s; however, above 50 ng, fusaric acid increased the clotting time from 32 ± 3s and reached a maximum of 152 s at 100 ng and remained unaltered thereafter for the increased dose of fusaric acid. Fusaric acid without damaging red blood cells and platelets, inhibited agonists such as collagen, ADP, thrombin, and epinephrine-induced aggregation of both platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelets preparations of human. Interestingly, fusaric acid showed biphasic effects only in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelets, and at lower concentration (below 900 ng) it activated platelet aggregation; however, in increased concentration (above 900 ng) it inhibited the platelet aggregation of washed platelets. In addition, fusaric acid also inhibited the agonist ADP-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelet suspension but did not show biphasic effect. Further, fusaric acid did not induce the platelets to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that clearly suggests that the induction of platelet function could be the result of the fusaric acid-mediated receptor interaction but not through the morphological shape change.

  9. Low-power laser irradiation of blood inhibits platelet function: role of cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Alexander G.; Brill, Gregory E.; Shenkman, Boris; Tamarin, Ilya; Dardik, Rima; Varon, David; Savion, Naphtali

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate effect of low power laser irradiation (LPLI) on platelet function in vitro. He-Ne laser (Optronix, USA; (lambda) - 632.8 nm, output power - 7 mW) was employed. Platelet adhesion and aggregation in whole blood (WB) under defined shear conditions were assayed by a Cone and Plate(let) Analyzer. Platelet activation was evaluated by flow cytometry. Level of platelet cGMP was estimated by immunoenzyme assay. Experiments performed showed that LPLI of WB resulted in decrease of platelet deposition on extracellular matrix at high shear rate (1300 s-1). Similar results were obtained using surfaces precoated with either collagen type I or von Willebrand factor. LPLI inhibited fibrinogen binding as well as P-selectin expression on the platelet membrane, induced by thrombin analogue. It was found out that primary acceptor of laser energy responsible for the effect on platelets was located in platelets themselves and not in blood plasma or in other blood cells. LPLI of gel- filtered platelets resulted in increase of intracellular level of cGMP both in the absence and in presence of izobutylmethylxantine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suggesting stimulation of synthesis rather than destruction of cGMP under the influence of LPLI. It is suggested that guanylate cyclase and/or NO-synthase might serve as primary acceptors of He-Ne laser light in platelets.

  10. Blood rheology and platelet function in untreated early-stage essential hypertensives complicated with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Hiroko; Tomoda, Fumihiro; Koike, Tsutomu; Kinuno, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Hiroko; Masutani, Toshitaka; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether hemorheology and platelet function are affected in essential hypertensives (EHTs) of the World Health Organization stage I when complicated with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In 156 untreated EHTs, blood viscosity and platelet surface markers were determined. Blood viscosity was significantly elevated in 54 subjects with Mets compared with 102 subjects without Mets. Hematocrit and plasma viscosity increased in the group with Mets, although red blood cell rigidity index "k" did not differ between groups. As a whole group, blood viscosity correlated positively with hematocrit and plasma viscosity. Additionally, plasma viscosity correlated positively with plasma leptin, triglyceride, homeostasis model assessment index, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen, but negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In contrast, no differences were seen in platelet surface markers between groups. In conclusion, EHTs of the early stage complicated with Mets are characterized by increased blood viscosity due to hemoconcentration and increased plasma viscosity. PMID:22570768

  11. Evaluation of a whole blood remote platelet function test for the diagnosis of mild bleeding disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dovlatova, Natalia; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Dawood, Ban; May, Jane; Heptinstall, Stan; Watson, Steve P.; Fox, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mild platelet function disorders (PFDs) are complex and difficult to diagnose. The current gold standard test, light transmission aggregometry (LTA), including lumi-aggregometry, is time- and labour-intensive and blood samples must be processed within a limited time after venepuncture. Furthermore, many subjects with suspected PFDs do not show a platelet abnormality on LTA. Objective To assess the diagnostic potential of an easy-to-use remote platelet function test (RPFT) as a diagnostic pre-test for suspected PFDs. Methods RPFT was compared to lumi-aggregometry in participants recruited to the Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study (GAPP, ISRCTN 77951167). For RPFT, whole blood was stimulated with platelet agonists, stabilized with PAMFix and returned to the central laboratory for analysis of P-selectin and CD63 by flow cytometry. Results In the 61 study participants (42 index cases and 19 relatives) there was a good agreement between lumi-aggregometry and RPFT with diagnosis being concordant in 84% of cases (kappa=0.668, p<0.0001). According to both tests, 29 participants were identified to have a deficiency in platelet function and 22 participants appeared normal. There were 4 participants where lumi-aggregometry revealed a defect but RPFT did not, and 6 participants where RPFT detected an abnormal platelet response that was not identified by lumi-aggregometry. Conclusion This study suggests that RPFT could be an easy-to-use pre-test to select, which participants with bleeding disorders would benefit from extensive platelet phenotyping. Further development and evaluation of the test are warranted in a wider population of patients with excessive bleeding and could provide informative screening tests for PFDs. PMID:24618131

  12. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  13. The Hydraulic Permeability of Blood Clots as a Function of Fibrin and Platelet Density

    PubMed Central

    Wufsus, A.R.; Macera, N.E.; Neeves, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow within blood clots is a biophysical mechanism that regulates clot growth and dissolution. Assuming that a clot can be modeled as a porous medium, the physical property that dictates interstitial fluid flow is the hydraulic permeability. The objective of this study was to bound the possible values of the hydraulic permeability in clots formed in vivo and present relationships that can be used to estimate clot permeability as a function of composition. A series of clots with known densities of fibrin and platelets, the two major components of a clot, were formed under static conditions. The permeability was calculated by measuring the interstitial fluid velocity through the clots at a constant pressure gradient. Fibrin gels formed with a fiber volume fraction of 0.02–0.54 had permeabilities of 1.2 × 10−1–1.5 × 10−4μm2. Platelet-rich clots with a platelet volume fraction of 0.01–0.61 and a fibrin volume fraction of 0.03 had permeabilities over a range of 1.1 × 10−2–1.5 × 10−5μm2. The permeability of fibrin gels and of clots with platelet volume fraction of <0.2 were modeled as an array of disordered cylinders with uniform diameters. Clots with a platelet volume fraction of >0.2 were modeled as a Brinkman medium of coarse solids (platelets) embedded in a mesh of fine fibers (fibrin). Our data suggest that the permeability of clots formed in vivo can vary by up to five orders of magnitude, with pore sizes that range from 4 to 350 nm. These findings have important implications for the transport of coagulation zymogens/enzymes in the interstitial spaces during clot formation, as well as the design of fibrinolytic drug delivery strategies. PMID:23601328

  14. An association of platelet indices with blood pressure in Beijing adults: Applying quadratic inference function for a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Tao, Lixin; Mahara, Gehendra; Yan, Yan; Cao, Kai; Liu, Xiangtong; Chen, Sipeng; Xu, Qin; Liu, Long; Wang, Chao; Huang, Fangfang; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Aoshuang; Ping, Zhao; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-09-01

    The quadratic inference function (QIF) method becomes more acceptable for correlated data because of its advantages over generalized estimating equations (GEE). This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between platelet indices and blood pressure using QIF method, which has not been studied extensively in real data settings.A population-based longitudinal study was conducted in Beijing from 2007 to 2012, and the median of follow-up was 6 years. A total of 6515 cases, who were aged between 20 and 65 years at baseline and underwent routine physical examinations every year from 3 Beijing hospitals were enrolled to explore the association between platelet indices and blood pressure by QIF method. The original continuous platelet indices were categorized into 4 levels (Q1-Q4) using the 3 quartiles of P25, P50, and P75 as a critical value. GEE was performed to make a comparison with QIF.After adjusting for age, usage of drugs, and other confounding factors, mean platelet volume was negatively associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (Equation is included in full-text article.)in males and positively linked with systolic blood pressure (SBP) (Equation is included in full-text article.). Platelet distribution width was negatively associated with SBP (Equation is included in full-text article.). Blood platelet count was associated with DBP (Equation is included in full-text article.)in males.Adults in Beijing with prolonged exposure to extreme value of platelet indices have elevated risk for future hypertension and evidence suggesting using some platelet indices for early diagnosis of high blood pressure was provided. PMID:27684843

  15. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  16. Platelet adhesiveness after blood donation.

    PubMed

    Pegrum, G D; Harrison, K M; Shaw, S

    1971-03-13

    Platelet adhesiveness to glass was measured in healthy blood donors at the time of and eight days after donating 500 ml of blood. By a whole blood method a highly significant increase was found whereas by a method using platelet-rich plasma with added adenosine diphosphate there was only a slightly significant increase. The discrepancy suggested that changes in the red cell population might influence the results. Packed red cells from 19 blood donors obtained at the time of donation and eight days later were mixed with fresh pooled platelets from the same independent persons on each occasion. The whole blood platelet adhesiveness on this mixture showed an increase in every case after blood donation. It is postulated that the increased adhesiveness is influenced by the presence of young red cells.

  17. [Adrenergic receptors of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    Blood platelets possess adrenergic receptors and are stimulated by adrenaline in the circulation. This review summarizes the state of knowledge of the pharmacology of adrenergic receptors and the biochemical mechanisms of platelet activation by adrenaline in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:2837727

  18. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  19. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  20. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic. PMID:26733371

  1. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-01-06

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic.

  2. Inhibition of platelet function with clopidogrel, as measured with a novel whole blood impedance aggregometer in horses.

    PubMed

    Roscher, Katja A; Failing, Klaus; Moritz, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to validate a loading and maintenance clopidogrel dosing scheme for the inhibition of platelet function, measured by whole blood impedance aggregometry in healthy adult horses. Ten Warmblood horses received oral clopidogrel once daily. Doses were based on 50 kg weight categories and resulted in one loading dose of 6-6.5 mg/kg bodyweight and maintenance doses of 1.2-1.4 mg/kg over the next 4 days. Platelet function was measured via whole blood multiple electrode impedance aggregometry prior to (T0) and at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, 144, 192 and 240 h following the loading dose. Aggregometries for collagen (COLtest), arachidonic acid (ASPItest), adenosine diphosphate (ADPtest) and ADP with prostaglandin E1 (ADPtestHS) were performed. Statistical analyses included one way repeated measures ANOVAs and subsequent Dunnett's tests. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen remained unchanged. There were significant inhibitions in the ASPItest (P <0.01 at 192 h, and P <0.05 at 240 h) and the ADPtest and ADPtestHS (P < 0.01, with the exception of 240 h). The loading dose of clopidogrel induced rapid inhibition of platelet function within hours, and the low dose was suitable for maintaining the inhibition over the 4 days of therapy. Recovery of platelet function was restored 6 days after the cessation of medication, determined with the ADPtest and ADPtestHS, but remained inhibited with the ASPItest. The prolonged effect of clopidogrel may indicate differences in the activation of platelets between horses and humans that were previously unknown.

  3. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  4. [Effects of intravenous nicardipine on blood pressure, hemorheology platelet function in arterial hypertension. Dose-effect relations].

    PubMed

    Zannad, F; Voisin, P; Sadoul, N; Marchal, C; Donetti, C; Stoltz, J F; Gilgenkrantz, J M

    1987-06-01

    In arterial hypertension, hyperviscosity with hemorheological disturbances and platelet dysfunction may play a role in the prognosis and complications of the disease. We studied the effects of Nicardipine (NIC) on these blood disturbances in a group of 21 untreated patients with essential hypertension, aged 25 to 70 years (SBP/DBP = 185 +/- 28/105 +/- 17 mmHg). During one hour before and 4 hours after the IV injection of single doses of 5, 7.5 or 10 mg NIC over 5 min, blood pressure was recorded automatically (Dinamap). Hemorheological variables and platelet function were studied before and 30 min, 3 h and 24 hours after the injection. NIC lowered blood pressure and increased heart rate significantly (At 5 min, SBP = -24 mmHg; DBP = -18 mmHg; HR = +22 b/min). These effects were dose-dependent with rapid onset and short duration (less than 2 hrs). NIC decreased plasma viscosity from 1.36 +/- 0.08 to 1.30 +/- 0.07 Cst; p less than 0.01, whole blood viscosity from 22.4 +/- 2.8 to 20.7 +/- 1.5 mPas; p less than 0.05 for gamma = 0.512 s-1, and erythrocyte filterability with the Ca++ ionophore A 23187 from 16.3 +/- 3.8 to 13.5 +/- 3.1; p less than 0.01. Platelet aggregation with ADP was unchanged, but aggregation with A 23187 decreased from 46.9 +/- 21.2 to 31.3 +/- 25.6; p less than 0.05, as well as plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (71.2 +/- 29.8 to 55.4 +/- 24.3 ng/ml; p less than 0.02) and platelet generated malonaldehyde (7.2 +/- 1.8 to 6.7 +/- 1.4 nM/10(9) platelets; NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Analysis of platelet function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jurk, K

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets act as central players of haemostasis only their cross-talk with other blood cells, plasma factors and the vascular compartment enables the formation of a stable thrombus. Multiple activation processes and complex signalling networks are responsible for appropriate platelet function. Thus, a variety of platelet function tests are available for platelet research and diagnosis of platelet dysfunction. However, universal platelet function tests that are sensitive to all platelet function defects do not exist and therefore diagnostic algorithms for suspected platelet function disorders are still recommended in clinical practice. Based on the current knowledge of human platelet activation this review evaluates point-of-care related screening tests in comparison with specific platelet function assays and focuses on their diagnostic utility in relation to severity of platelet dysfunction. Further, systems biology-based platelet function methods that integrate global and specific analysis of platelet vessel wall interaction (advanced flow chamber devices) and post-translational modifications (platelet proteomics) are presented and their diagnostic potential is addressed.

  6. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  7. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  8. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  9. Platelet function defects in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Jenkins, W J; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Platelet function in alcoholic patients was assessed on admission and during abstinence in hospital. On admission platelets from these patients were significantly less responsive (percentage aggregation and thromboxane A2 release) to conventional in vitro aggregating agents (adrenaline, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen) than platelets from healthy, moderate drinkers. Initially, platelet counts in platelet rich plasma tended to be low and the Simplate II bleeding times frequently prolonged. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release, however, were inhibited even in patients with normal platelet counts on admission. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release returned to normal or became hyper-responsive during two to three weeks of abstinence. Platelet counts rose during this period, the largest responses occurring in those patients with the lowest counts on admission. Bleeding times reverted to normal during abstinence and correlated significantly with changes in platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 release, and platelet count and with the estimated ethanol consumption during the week before admission. Chronic, heavy alcohol ingestion evidently exerts an inhibitory effect on platelet function even in the absence of alcohol in the blood, and this phenomenon is reversible on abstaining. The impaired platelet function, together with the reduced platelet count, may contribute to the bleeding diathesis associated with chronic alcoholism and to the increased incidence and recurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with excessive alcohol intake. PMID:3094624

  10. State of the Art in Platelet Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    E. Kehrel, Beate; F. Brodde, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Platelets perform many functions in hemostasis but also in other areas of physiology and pathology. Therefore, it is obvious that many different function tests have been developed, each one conceived and standardized for a special purpose. This review will summarize the different fields in which platelet function testing is currently in use; diagnostics of patients with bleeding disorders, monitoring patients’ response to anti-platelet therapy, monitoring in transfusion medicine (blood donors, platelet concentrates, and after transfusion), and monitoring in perioperative medicine to predict bleeding tendency. The second part of the review outlines different methods for platelet function testing, spanning bleeding time, and platelet counting as well as determining platelet adhesion, platelet secretion, platelet aggregation, platelet morphology, platelet signal transduction, platelet procoagulant activity, platelet apoptosis, platelet proteomics, and molecular biology. PMID:23653569

  11. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  12. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches.

  13. The role of peroxides as modulators of human blood platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, R.L.; Hess, M.L. )

    1990-02-26

    The ability to peroxidize lipid in the vicinity of arterial walls has been demonstrated through oxidation of the LDL-particle by monocytes/macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. The authors questioned what effect increased levels of peroxides might have on platelet function. Platelet aggregation, studied trubidometrically, was initiated by arachidonic acid (AA) alone or in the presence of a low concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (which by itself could not initiate aggregation). Aggregation was analyzed quantitatively by measuring the time it took to reach 1/2 the maximal extent of aggregation (T1/2Max). Using the minimal concentration of AA still able to initiate aggregation (0.2-0.45 mM) the T1/2Max was 112{+-}35 (n=10). With 50% of the respective AA conc. plus 17 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the T1/2Max was 52{+-}21. Under similar circumstances, the amount of AA able to initiate aggregation could be reduced by 80% with the addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. These effects could be duplicated by glucose oxidase, 0.015-0.15 IU, and could be eliminated by the addition of catalase (<25 U/ml) at any time prior to the start of aggregation. With non-aggregating concentrations of AA alone, synthesis of Thromboxane B{sub 2} was negligible; with aggregation by the same AA plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} it was 550{+-}79 pg/10{sup 3} platelets. Both aggregation and TxB{sub 2} synthesis were completely inhibited by aspirin or indomethacin, and by the antioxidants phenol and nor-dihydroguaretic acid, at concentrations known to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In platelets with a defect in the second wave of ADP induced aggregation, but having normal aggregation with added AA (indicating the cyclooxygenase-thromboxane axis was intact), sub-aggregating concentrations of AA, plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in brisk aggregation.

  14. [Covalent chloramine inhibitors of blood platelet functions: computational indices for their reactivity and antiplatelet activity].

    PubMed

    Roshchupkin, D I; Murina, M A; Sergienko, V I

    2011-01-01

    The quantum mechanics computation of the reactivities of chloramine derivatives of amino acids and taurine has been accomplished. A pair of computational indices that reflect a predisposition of alpha amino acid chloramines to chemical decay have been revealed. One of the indices was the dihedral angle for the chain of four atoms: carbons at beta- and alpha-positions, carbon of the carboxyl group, and carbonyl oxygen. The second index was the sum of partial charges for three or two carbon atoms in the chain. The amino acid chloramines with high values of the indices showed enhanced stability. Partial charges for active chlorine in known chloramines having different structures have been computed. The charges correlate with the rate constants of the reaction between chloramines and the thiol group of reduced glutathione. New derivatives of taurine chloramines have been constructed via the introduction of different substituents into the chloramine part. Among them, the amidoderivatives had the greatest charges of active chlorine (0.19-0.23). It was found in the study of the reactions of N-acetyl-N-chlorotaurine and N-propyonyl-N-chlorotaurine with amino acids and peptides possessing the thiol, thioester, or disulphide groups that the amidoderivatives manifested the thiol chemoselectivity. N-Acetyl-N-chlorotaurine and N-propionyl-N-chlorotaurine suppress the aggregation activity of blood platelets under their activation by the agonists ADP and collagen. It is not excluded that the amidoderivatives studied prevent platelet aggregation by a modification of the critical thiol group in the purine receptor P2Y12. PMID:22117450

  15. Image analysis of blood platelets adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krízová, P; Rysavá, J; Vanícková, M; Cieslar, P; Dyr, J E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of blood platelets is one of the major events in haemostatic and thrombotic processes. We studied adhesion of blood platelets on fibrinogen and fibrin dimer sorbed on solid support material (glass, polystyrene). Adhesion was carried on under static and dynamic conditions and measured as percentage of the surface covered with platelets. Within a range of platelet counts in normal and in thrombocytopenic blood we observed a very significant decrease in platelet adhesion on fibrin dimer with bounded active thrombin with decreasing platelet count. Our results show the imperative use of platelet poor blood preparations as control samples in experiments with thrombocytopenic blood. Experiments carried on adhesive surfaces sorbed on polystyrene showed lower relative inaccuracy than on glass. Markedly different behaviour of platelets adhered on the same adhesive surface, which differed only in support material (glass or polystyrene) suggest that adhesion and mainly spreading of platelets depends on physical quality of the surface. While on polystyrene there were no significant differences between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen, adhesion measured on glass support material markedly differed between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen. We compared two methods of thresholding in image analysis of adhered platelets. Results obtained by image analysis of spreaded platelets showed higher relative inaccuracy than results obtained by image analysis of platelets centres and aggregates.

  16. Laboratory testing for platelet function disorders.

    PubMed

    Israels, S J

    2015-05-01

    Platelet function testing is both complex and labor intensive. A stepwise approach to the evaluation of patients with suspected platelet disorders will optimize the use of laboratory resources, beginning with an appropriate clinical evaluation to determine whether the bleeding is consistent with a defect of primary hemostasis. Bleeding assessment tools, evaluation of platelet counts, and review of peripheral blood cell morphology can aid the initial assessment. For patients requiring further laboratory testing, platelet aggregometry, secretion assays, and von Willebrand factor assays are the most useful next steps and will direct further specialized testing including flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and molecular diagnostics. Guidelines and recommendations for standardizing platelet function testing, with a particular focus on light transmission aggregometry, are available and can provide a template for clinical laboratories in establishing procedures that will optimize diagnosis and assure quality results. This review outlines an approach to platelet function testing and reviews testing methods available to clinical laboratories.

  17. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Cao, Ye; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO3H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group (⊕N((CH3)2)(CH2)3SO3⊖) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO3H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO3H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  18. Cancer procoagulant and blood platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Olas, B; Wachowicz, B; Mielicki, W P

    2001-08-28

    The effects of cancer procoagulant (CP), cysteine protease (EC 3.4.22.26), on the pig blood platelet secretory process and platelet aggregation have been studied. The response of platelets to CP was compared with the response of these cells to thrombin. The obtained results show that blood platelets treated with CP (0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 microg/ml, 2-30 min, 37 degrees C) released adenine nucleotides (P < 0.05) and proteins (P < 0.05). The secretion of compounds from blood platelets after incubation with CP does not correlate with the release of platelet lactic dehydrogenase activity (marker of cell lysis) into the extracellular medium. In comparison with thrombin action, CP stimulates secretory process to a smaller extent than thrombin alone. In the presence of CP, the thrombin action is suppressed (P < 0.05). We noticed that CP does not induce platelet aggregation.

  19. Differences in the influence of the interaction between acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid on platelet function in whole blood and isolated platelets: influence of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    González-Correa, J A; Muñoz-Marín, J; López-Villodres, J A; Navas, M D; Guerrero, A; Torres, J A; De La Cruz, J P

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the interaction between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) on the inhibition by ASA of platelet aggregation in platelets isolated from whole blood, and to determine whether leukocytes influence this pharmacological interaction. This in vitro study was done in human blood from which we prepared samples of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), PRP plus mononuclear leukocytes, and PRP plus neutrophils. The variables recorded were maximum platelet aggregation intensity, thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production, and nitric oxide (NO) production (N=10 different samples in each type of experiment). Different concentrations of ASA and SA were incubated with all samples. In PRP, the concentration of ASA that inhibited maximum aggregation by 50% (IC50) (281+/-16microM) increased with increasing SA concentration to a maximum of more than 2mM when 500microM SA was used. In whole blood, the IC50 for ASA (24.9+/-1.2microM) decreased with decreasing SA concentrations to 7.9+/-0.8microM with 50microM SA and 15.6+/-0.9microM with 125microM SA, and increased to 46.2+/-2.6microM with 250microM SA and 96.3+/-7.2microM with 500microM SA. In experiments with PRP+neutrophils the IC50 of ASA increased in the presence of all concentrations of SA. The antagonistic interactions were also reflected in the changes in TxB2 production in all samples. In samples of neutrophils incubated with ASA, the curve for NO production was shifted to the right, a finding that paralleled the changes in platelet aggregation. In conclusion, the influence of the interaction between ASA and its metabolite SA on platelet aggregation difference depending on the type of sample, and was antagonistic in PRP but partially agonistic in whole blood. Nitric oxide synthesis showed an additive effect of the two compounds.

  20. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects.

  1. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  2. Microfluidics for simultaneous quantification of platelet adhesion and blood viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Park, Jun Hong; Kang, Yang Jun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Platelet functions, including adhesion, activation, and aggregation have an influence on thrombosis and the progression of atherosclerosis. In the present study, a new microfluidic-based method is proposed to estimate platelet adhesion and blood viscosity simultaneously. Blood sample flows into an H-shaped microfluidic device with a peristaltic pump. Since platelet aggregation may be initiated by the compression of rotors inside the peristaltic pump, platelet aggregates may adhere to the H-shaped channel. Through correlation mapping, which visualizes decorrelation of the streaming blood flow, the area of adhered platelets (APlatelet) can be estimated without labeling platelets. The platelet function is estimated by determining the representative index IA·T based on APlatelet and contact time. Blood viscosity is measured by monitoring the flow conditions in the one side channel of the H-shaped device. Based on the relation between interfacial width (W) and pressure ratio of sample flows to the reference, blood sample viscosity (μ) can be estimated by measuring W. Biophysical parameters (IA·T, μ) are compared for normal and diabetic rats using an ex vivo extracorporeal model. This microfluidic-based method can be used for evaluating variations in the platelet adhesion and blood viscosity of animal models with cardiovascular diseases under ex vivo conditions. PMID:27118101

  3. The effects of cytochalasin D and abciximab on hemostasis in canine whole blood assessed by thromboelastography and the PFA-100® platelet function analyzer system.

    PubMed

    Brainard, Benjamin M; Abed, Janan M; Koenig, Amie

    2011-07-01

    The selective inhibition of platelet function in whole blood coagulation testing may allow insights into the nature of hypercoagulability in dogs with critical illness. To determine the effects of cytochalasin D and abciximab on hemostatic parameters in canine citrated whole blood, an in-vitro study was designed using thromboelastography (TEG) and a platelet function analyzer (PFA-100®). 8 clinically healthy mixed breed dogs donated blood that was anticoagulated with 3.2% sodium citrate in a 9:1 blood-to-citrate ratio. Addition of cytochalasin D to citrated whole blood from 6 dogs at concentrations ranging from 0 µg/ml to 10 µg/ml caused a maximal reduction of TEG maximum amplitude (MA) at a concentration of 7.5 µg/ml (52.7 ± 4.3 to 14.3 ± 7.8 mm). Addition of abciximab to canine citrated whole blood at concentrations of either 20 µg/ml or 40 µg/ml did not affect the TEG tracing; however, addition of abciximab to citrated canine whole blood at concentrations of 10 µg/ml and 20 µg/ml significantly prolonged PFA-100 closure times (72.5 ± 15 to 149.2 ± 91 sec and 275.6 ± 54 sec, respectively, P < 0.04). Inhibition of canine platelet function by cytochalasin D is demonstrated by TEG, but abciximab did not change TEG tracings. Abciximab does, however, inhibit platelet aggregation under shear stress as measured by the PFA-100. Inhibition of canine platelet function with cytochalasin D may allow further TEG studies in dogs with clinical disease.

  4. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  5. Factor VIIa analog has marked effects on platelet function and clot kinetics in blood from patients with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Donald F; Martin, Erika J; Nolte, Melinda E; Kuhn, Janice G; Barrett, J Christian; Ezban, Mirella

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the hemostatic effects of NN1731 and rFVIIa, an ex-vivo study in hemophilia patients used the Hemodyne Hemostasis Analysis System (HAS) to measure platelet contractile force (PCF), clot elastic modulus (CEM), and force onset time (FOT), and the Haemoscope Thrombelastograph (TEG) to measure reaction time (R), kinetics time (K), and maximum amplitude (MA). Blood samples from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 Factor VIII-deficient patients of varying severity (mild, moderate, severe), were spiked with rFVIIa and NN1731 (both 0.64 and 1.28 microg/ml, respectively) and analyzed to characterize platelet function and clot kinetics. There was wide variability in the rFVIIa response. NN1731 had greater and more consistent effects on PCF, CEM, FOT, R, and K relative to rFVIIa, in all hemophilia groups. The lowest NN1731 concentration (0.64 microg/ml) shortened R and FOT, and increased CEM and PCF more than rFVIIa 1.28 microg/ml. NN1731 normalized clotting parameters equivalent to values obtained in healthy volunteers. FOT and R were highly correlated (r = 0.96). No correlation was observed between CEM and MA. NN1731 produced less variable, more pronounced and predictable ex-vivo hemostatic effects on PCF, CEM, FOT, R and K than rFVIIa in all hemophilia groups. HAS and TEG assays provided similar estimates of FOT and R, however CEM appeared to be more sensitive than MA to changes in clot firmness.

  6. Osmotic stability of blood platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Hypotonic solutions added to human platelet-containing plasma cause a transient decrease of absorbancy of light at 610 mμ which is followed by a gradual increase of absorbancy. 2. When platelets are stored for 7 hr at 4° C the absorbancy changes with variations of osmolarity and their aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) remain the same. However, the reversal of absorbancy declines during storage of platelet-containing plasma. 3. Platelets are not aggregated by stearate. Platelets appear to be only slightly affected by stearate concentration higher than 0·8 mM, but oleate has no effect. 4. Hypertonic solutions of NaCl and urea cause increase in absorbancy of platelet-containing human plasma. Hypertonic sucrose solutions produce no more change than isotonic solutions. Hypertonic NaCl produces permanent increases in absorbancy. In human platelet-containing plasma the increased absorbancy caused by hypertonic urea is transient and declines. 5. The osmotic platelet changes occur in isolated platelets as well as in platelet-containing plasma. 6. The absorbancy of frozen and thawed platelet-containing plasma is not significantly altered by hypotonic solutions but the absorbancy changes caused by hypertonic solutions are similar to that of unfrozen plasma. 7. The immediate absorbancy changes caused by hypo- and by hypertonic solutions are the same at 5° C and 30° C and are therefore probably of a physical nature. The reversal of absorbancy and aggregation of platelets by added adenosine diphosphate have Q10 > 1 and are therefore probably of a chemical-enzymic nature. 8. Divalent cations and contact activation are not required for the osmotic platelet changes and 10-3 M-Cu2+ and Zn2+ do not interfere. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, electron transfer, sodium, potassium activated adenosine triphosphatases and adenosine triphosphate do not inhibit reversal of absorbancy of platelets exposed to hypotonic solutions. Cyanide, 5 × 10-3 M, fluoride, 1

  7. Uptake of Latex Particles by Blood Platelets

    PubMed Central

    White, James G.

    1972-01-01

    The incorporation of large particulates by blood platelets is considered identical to the ingestion of bacteria by neutrophils, and is referred to as platelet phagocytosis. However, bacteria enter neutrophils in sealed vacuoles derived from the cell wall, and products deposited in the vacuoles during neutrophil degranulation are confined almost exclusively to the phagolysosomes. Products released from platelet storage organelles after uptake of foreign particles, on the other hand, are extruded to the cell exterior. The basis for this unusual difference in the phagocytic response of platelets and neutrophils has been sought in the present investigation. Combined electron microscopic and cytechemical study of platelet-latexspherule interaction revealed that platelets do not phagocytize in the usual sense. Most of the latex particles observed in platelets were lodged in channels of the open canalicular system. Channels which contained latex did not pinch off to form sealed phagocytic vacuoles, but remained open. An electron-dense tracer, lanthanum nitrate, was able to penetrate into the channels and outline the ingested latex particles. Therefore, platelets do not phagocytize latex, but sequester the spherules in preformed membranous invaginations. The persistence of open channel communication with the exterior after latex uptake may explain why platelets extrude secretory products, rather than confine them to phagolysosomes. ImagesFig 4Fig 1Fig 5Fig 2Fig 6Fig 3 PMID:5086899

  8. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  9. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  10. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  11. Platelet function in brown bear (Ursus arctos) compared to man

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on hemostasis and platelet function in brown bear (Ursus arctos) is of importance for understanding the physiological, protective changes during hibernation. Objective The study objective was to document platelet activity values in brown bears shortly after leaving the den and compare them to platelet function in healthy humans. Methods Blood was drawn from immobilized wild brown bears 7-10 days after leaving the den in mid April. Blood samples from healthy human adults before and after clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid administration served as control. We analyzed blood samples by standard blood testing and platelet aggregation was quantified after stimulation with various agonists using multiple electrode aggregometry within 3 hours of sampling. Results Blood samples were collected from 6 bears (3 females) between 1 and 16 years old and from 10 healthy humans. Results of adenosine diphosphate, aspirin, and thrombin receptor activating peptide tests in bears were all half or less of those in humans. Platelet and white blood cell counts did not differ between species but brown bears had more and smaller red blood cells compared with humans. Conclusion Using three different tests, we conclude that platelet function is lower in brown bears compared to humans. Our findings represent the first descriptive study on platelet function in brown bears and may contribute to explain how bears can endure denning without obvious thrombus building. However, the possibility that our findings reflect test-dependent and not true biological variations in platelet reactivity needs further studies. PMID:20525167

  12. Roll, adhere, spread and contract: structural mechanics of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Simona; Studt, Jan-Dirk; Medalia, Ohad; Tanuj Sapra, K

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are involved in life-sustaining processes such as hemostasis, wound healing, atherothrombosis and angiogenesis. Mechanical trauma to blood vessels causes platelet activation resulting in their adherence and clot formation at the damaged site, culminating in clot retraction and tissue repair. Two of the major players underlying this process are the cytoskeleton, i.e., actin and microtubules, and the membrane integrin receptors. Rare congenital bleeding disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia and Bernard-Soulier syndrome are associated with genetic alterations of platelet surface receptors, also affecting the platelet cytoskeletal structure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about platelet structure and adhesion, and delve into the mechanical aspects of platelet function. Platelets lack a nucleus, and can thus provide a minimal model of a biological cell. New biophysical tools may help to scrutinize platelets anew and to extend the existing knowledge on cell biology. PMID:25655000

  13. The role of adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase in the metabolism of acetyl coenzyme a and function of blood platelets in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Michno, Anna; Skibowska, Anna; Raszeja-Specht, Anna; Cwikowska, Justyna; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes is known to increase blood platelet activity. Activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase (ATPCL), acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) content, malonyl dialdehyde (MDA), synthesis, and platelet aggregation in resting conditions and after activation with thrombin were measured in diabetic subjects and in age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Activities of ATPCL and PDH, acetyl-CoA content, and thrombin-evoked MDA synthesis as well as platelet aggregation in diabetes were 31%, 51%, 62%, 35%, and 21%, respectively, higher than in healthy subjects. In addition, activation of diabetic platelets caused 2 times greater release of acetyl-CoA from their mitochondria than in controls. Both 1.0 mmol/L (-)hydroxycitrate and 0.1 mmol/L SB-204490 decreased acetyl-CoA content in platelet cytoplasm along with suppression of MDA synthesis and platelet aggregation. These inhibitory effects were about 2 times greater in diabetic than in control platelets. The data presented indicate that the ATPCL pathway is operative in human platelets and may be responsible for provision of about 50% of acetyl units from their mitochondrial to cytoplasmic compartment. Increased acetyl-CoA synthesis in diabetic platelets may be the cause of their excessive activity in the course of the disease. ATPCL may be a target for its specific inhibitors as factors decreasing platelet activity. PMID:14681844

  14. Effects of argon laser on in vitro aggregation of platelets in platelet rich plasma and whole blood

    SciTech Connect

    Doerger, P.T.; Glueck, H.I.; McGill, M.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of an Argon laser on platelet aggregation were studied, since platelets may be exposed to laser energy when used intravascularly. Various preparations of platelets in platelet rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood, with or without aspirin, were tested with the aggregating agents ADP, collagen, thrombin, and epinephrine. Simultaneous release of ATP was also measured in PRP. At relatively low levels of irradiation, platelet aggregation was potentiated. Enhancement was evidenced by an increase in percent aggregation, earlier onset of the reaction, and reduction in the amount of aggregating agent required. In PRP, the mechanism of laser potentiation appeared to be the release of endogenous ATP from platelets. At relatively high levels of irradiation, platelets were destroyed and aggregation abolished. In whole blood, the mechanism was somewhat more complicated since release of ATP occurred from RBCs as well as platelets. Spontaneous aggregation following laser treatment occurred in isolated instances in PRP and in every trial in whole blood preparations. Aspirin ingestion inhibited the laser's effects in PRP but not in whole blood. These results may have important clinical implications for laser angioplasty, and the potentiated aggregation response may prove useful in laboratory studies of platelet function.

  15. [The role of blood platelets in infections].

    PubMed

    Micota, Bartłomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Różalska, Barbara

    2015-05-17

    Platelets are primarily associated with their main function, hemostasis, although it is known that these cells also exhibit biological activity in cancer progression, inflammation and infectious processes. During infection platelets, due to the expression of specific receptors - Toll-like receptors (TLRs) - which recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens - pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) - are activated by the presence of microorganism components and/or substances released from damaged cells/tissue. Further antimicrobial activity of platelets is based on their capacity for phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the synthesis, storage and release of proteins/peptides with antimicrobial activity. Another mechanism of platelet action is their immunomodulatory activity. It is based mainly on the ability to secrete chemotactic factors allowing the accumulation of professional immunocompetent cells at the site of infection, thus enhancing the effective eradication of an infectious agent. In chronic infections, platelets, due to release of numerous growth factors and various cytokines, support mechanisms of acquired immunity. They accelerate the maturation of dendritic cells, stimulate B cells to be immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells and potentiate the activity of T cells. Unfortunately, in certain situations (the existence of specific risk factors) the interaction of microorganisms with activated platelets may also be the cause of pathology within the cardiovascular system.

  16. Multiple electrode aggregometry: a new device to measure platelet aggregation in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Orsolya; Calatzis, Andreas; Penz, Sandra; Losonczy, Hajna; Siess, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Several methods are used to analyse platelet function in whole blood. A new device to measure whole blood platelet aggregation has been developed, called multiple electrode platelet aggregometry (MEA). Our aim was to evaluate MEA in comparison with the single platelet counting (SPC) method for the measurement of platelet aggregation and platelet inhibition by aspirin or apyrase in diluted whole blood. Platelet aggregation induced by different concentrations of ADP, collagen and TRAP-6 and platelet inhibition by apyrase or aspirin were determined in citrateor hirudin-anticoagulated blood by MEA and SPC. MEA indicated that spontaneous platelet aggregation was lower, and stimulated platelet aggregation was higher in hirudin- than citrate-anticoagulated blood. In hirudin-anticoagulated, but not citrate-anticoagulated blood, spontaneous platelet aggregation measured by MEA was inhibited by apyrase. For MEA compared with SPC the dose response-curves of agonist-induced platelet aggregation in citrate- and hirudin-blood showed similar EC50 values for TRAP, and higher EC50 values for ADP (non-significant) and collagen (p < 0.05). MEA and the SPC method gave similar results concerning platelet-inhibition by apyrase and aspirin. MEA was more sensitive than SPC to the inhibitory effect of aspirin in collagen-induced aggregation. In conclusion, MEA is an easy, reproducible and sensitive method for measuring spontaneous and stimulated platelet aggregation, and evaluating antiplatelet drugs in diluted whole blood. The use of hirudin as an anticoagulant is preferable to the use of citrate. MEA is a promising technique for experimental and clinical applications. PMID:17139373

  17. Platelet function following trauma. A multiple electrode aggregometry study.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Cristina; Traintinger, Stefan; Ziegler, Bernhard; Hanke, Alexander; Rahe-Meyer, Niels; Voelckel, Wolfgang; Schöchl, Herbert

    2011-08-01

    Platelets play a central role in coagulation. Currently, information on platelet function following trauma is limited. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) at the AUVA Trauma Centre, Salzburg, after sustaining traumatic injury. Immediately after admission to the ER, blood was drawn for blood cell counts, standard coagulation tests, and platelet function testing. Platelet function was assessed by multiplate electrode aggregometry (MEA) using adenosine diphosphate (ADPtest), collagen (COLtest) and thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 (TRAPtest) as activators. The thromboelastometric platelet component, measuring the contribution of platelets to the elasticity of the whole-blood clot, was assessed using the ROTEM device. The study included 163 patients, 79.7% were male, and the median age was 43 years. The median injury severity score was 18. Twenty patients (12.3%) died. Median platelet count was significantly lower among non-survivors than survivors (181,000/μl vs. 212,000/μl; p=0.01). Although platelet function defects were relatively minor, significant differences between survivors and non-survivors were observed in the ADPtest (94 vs. 79 U; p=0.0019), TRAPtest (136 vs. 115 U; p<0.0001), and platelet component (134 vs.103 MCEEXTEM - MCEFIBTEM; p=0.0012). Aggregometry values below the normal range for ADPtest and TRAPtest were significantly more frequent in non-survivors than in survivors (p=0.0017 and p=0.0002, respectively). Minor decreases in platelet function upon admission to the ER were a sign of coagulopathy accompanying increased mortality in patients with trauma. Further studies are warranted to confirm these results and investigate the role of platelet function in trauma haemostatic management. PMID:21655681

  18. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  19. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) versus Autologous Whole Blood on Pain and Function Improvement in Tennis Elbow: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Sedighipour, Leyla; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Bayat, Masume; Rahimi, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS), modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P > 0.05). At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion. PMID:24579044

  20. Platelet concentrates, from whole blood or collected by apheresis?

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F

    2013-04-01

    Platelet concentrates can be isolated from donated whole blood with the platelet-rich plasma-method or the buffy coat-method. Alternatively, platelets can be obtained by apheresis, harvesting the platelets but returning all other cells to the donor. The quality and characteristics of platelets during storage are affected by a number of factors, such as anticoagulant, centrifugation and processing after collection, and pre- or post storage pooling, but when comparing literature on the various methods, most differences balance out. To have sufficient platelets to treat an adult patient, whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates need pooling of multiple donations, thereby increasing the risk of infectious agent transmission at least two-fold as compared with apheresis units. Allo immunization rates, acute reaction rates, and transfusion related acute lung injury rates are not different. Apheresis donation procedures have fewer adverse events. All these factors need to be considered and weighed when selecting a method of platelet collection for a blood center.

  1. Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion on polyaniline films.

    PubMed

    Humpolíček, Petr; Kuceková, Zdenka; Kašpárková, Věra; Pelková, Jana; Modic, Martina; Junkar, Ita; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Lehocký, Marián

    2015-09-01

    Polyaniline is a promising conducting polymer with still increasing application potential in biomedicine. Its surface modification can be an efficient way how to introduce desired functional groups and to control its properties while keeping the bulk characteristics of the material unchanged. The purpose of the study was to synthetize thin films of pristine conducting polyaniline hydrochloride, non-conducting polyaniline base and polyaniline modified with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPSA) and investigate chosen parameters of their hemocompatibility. The modification was performed either by introduction of PAMPSA during the synthesis or by reprotonation of polyaniline base. The polyaniline hydrochloride and polyaniline base had no impact on blood coagulation and platelet adhesion. By contrast, the polyaniline reprotonated with PAMPSA completely hindered coagulation thanks to its interaction with coagulation factors Xa, Va and IIa. The significantly lower platelets adhesion was also found on this surface. Moreover, this film maintains its conductivity at pH of 6, which is an improvement in comparison with standard polyaniline hydrochloride losing most of its conductivity at pH of 4. Polyaniline film with PAMPSA introduced during synthesis had an impact on platelet adhesion but not on coagulation. The combined conductivity, anticoagulation activity, low platelet adhesion and improved conductivity at pH closer to physiological, open up new possibilities for application of polyaniline reprotonated by PAMPSA in blood-contacting devices, such as catheters or blood vessel grafts.

  2. Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion on polyaniline films.

    PubMed

    Humpolíček, Petr; Kuceková, Zdenka; Kašpárková, Věra; Pelková, Jana; Modic, Martina; Junkar, Ita; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Lehocký, Marián

    2015-09-01

    Polyaniline is a promising conducting polymer with still increasing application potential in biomedicine. Its surface modification can be an efficient way how to introduce desired functional groups and to control its properties while keeping the bulk characteristics of the material unchanged. The purpose of the study was to synthetize thin films of pristine conducting polyaniline hydrochloride, non-conducting polyaniline base and polyaniline modified with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPSA) and investigate chosen parameters of their hemocompatibility. The modification was performed either by introduction of PAMPSA during the synthesis or by reprotonation of polyaniline base. The polyaniline hydrochloride and polyaniline base had no impact on blood coagulation and platelet adhesion. By contrast, the polyaniline reprotonated with PAMPSA completely hindered coagulation thanks to its interaction with coagulation factors Xa, Va and IIa. The significantly lower platelets adhesion was also found on this surface. Moreover, this film maintains its conductivity at pH of 6, which is an improvement in comparison with standard polyaniline hydrochloride losing most of its conductivity at pH of 4. Polyaniline film with PAMPSA introduced during synthesis had an impact on platelet adhesion but not on coagulation. The combined conductivity, anticoagulation activity, low platelet adhesion and improved conductivity at pH closer to physiological, open up new possibilities for application of polyaniline reprotonated by PAMPSA in blood-contacting devices, such as catheters or blood vessel grafts. PMID:26119372

  3. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  4. Inhibiting platelet-stimulated blood coagulation by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Barile, Christopher J; Herrmann, Paul C; Tyvoll, David A; Collman, James P; Decreau, Richard A; Bull, Brian S

    2012-02-14

    Platelets are important mediators of blood coagulation that lack nuclei, but contain mitochondria. Although the presence of mitochondria in platelets has long been recognized, platelet mitochondrial function remains largely unaddressed. On the basis of a small amount of literature that suggests platelet mitochondria are functional, we hypothesized that the inhibition of platelet mitochondria disrupts platelet function and platelet-activated blood coagulation. To test this hypothesis, members of the tetrazole, thiazole, and 1,2,3-triazole families of small molecule heterocycles were screened for the ability to inhibit isolated mitochondrial respiration and coagulation of whole blood. The families of heterocycles screened were chosen on the basis of the ability of the heterocycle family to inhibit a biomimetic model of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). The strength of mitochondrial inhibition correlates with each compound's ability to deter platelet stimulation and platelet-activated blood clotting. These results suggest that for this class of molecules, inhibition of blood coagulation may be occurring through a mechanism involving mitochondrial inhibition.

  5. Human platelets produced in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice upon transplantation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells are functionally active in an ex vivo flow model of thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Salles, Isabelle I; Thijs, Tim; Brunaud, Christine; De Meyer, Simon F; Thys, Johan; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Deckmyn, Hans

    2009-12-01

    Xenotransplantation systems have been used with increasing success to better understand human hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. In this study, we demonstrate that production of human platelets in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice after transplantation of unexpanded cord-blood CD34(+) cells was detected within 10 days after transplantation, with the number of circulating human platelets peaking at 2 weeks (up to 87 x 10(3)/microL). This rapid human platelet production was followed by a second wave of platelet formation 5 weeks after transplantation, with a population of 5% still detected after 8 weeks, attesting for long-term engraftment. Platelets issued from human hematopoietic stem cell progenitors are functional, as assessed by increased CD62P expression and PAC1 binding in response to collagen-related peptide and thrombin receptor-activating peptide activation and their ability to incorporate into thrombi formed on a collagen-coated surface in an ex vivo flow model of thrombosis. This interaction was abrogated by addition of inhibitory monoclonal antibodies against human glycoprotein Ibalpha (GPIbalpha) and GPIIb/IIIa. Thus, our mouse model with production of human platelets may be further explored to study the function of genetically modified platelets, but also to investigate the effect of stimulators or inhibitors of human thrombopoiesis in vivo.

  6. Scalable evaluation of platelet aggregation by the degree of blood migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Suk-Heung; Lim, Chae-Seung; Shin, Sehyun

    2013-12-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in vascular thrombosis. Antiplatelet drug therapy is commonly used for the prevention of abnormal platelet aggregation. So, measuring platelet aggregation function is critically important in clinical field. Here, we introduce a scalable evaluation method of platelet aggregation measured with the degree of blood migration through microchannel in a microfluidic chip. Unlike conventional methods that require expertise with system physics to operate devices, our approach is using microfluidics system, which requires only a syringe vacuum. The scalable migration factors, migration distance and touchdown time, are capable of distinguishing various antiplatelet drug effects under microfluidics and would be effective for the quick and easy evaluation of quantitative platelet aggregation.

  7. [Effect of soluble fibrin on the blood coagulation process and platelets aggregation].

    PubMed

    Zaichko, N V; Chernyshenko, T M; Platonova, T M; Volkov, H L

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of soluble fibrin (SF) in the blood plasma causes acceleration of the final stage of blood coagulation. It increases functional activity of a hemostasis system platelet link, that is the precondition of thrombotic complication. Accumulation of SF in the blood plasma is accompanied by proportional reduction of coagulation time in ancistron and thrombin time tests, and also the intensification of platelets aggregation process. A conclusion was drawn that for early diagnostics of the DIC-syndrom it is expedient to carry out complex estimation of the hemostasis system with obligatory definition of the blood SF content, performance of ancistron and thrombin time tests, and also study of platelets aggregation.

  8. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  9. Vasopressin elevation of Na+/H+ exchange is inhibited by genistein in human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Aharonovits, O; Zik, M; Livne, A A; Granot, Y

    1992-12-01

    The regulation of intracellular Na+ and pHi in human blood platelets is known to be controlled by the function of the Na+/H+ exchanger. The phosphorylation state of the Na+/H+ exchanger which determines the exchanger activity in human blood platelets is regulated by the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Observations in this study indicate that arginine vasopressin (AVP) that interacts with a V1 receptor, activates the Na+/H+ exchange in human blood platelets through a genistein-inhibited mechanism. The AVP-activated Na+/H+ exchange is probably not regulated by protein kinase C (PKC), since this activation is not inhibited by staurosporine. The multiple ways in which platelet Na+/H+ exchange can be modulated may indicate the critical role played by this exchanger in the homeostasis control of pHi in human blood platelets.

  10. High-throughput acoustic separation of platelets from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Wu, Mengxi; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Whitley, Pamela H; Wang, Lin; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-09-21

    Platelets contain growth factors which are important in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work, we present an acoustic separation device for high-throughput, non-invasive platelet isolation. In particular, we separated platelets from whole blood at a 10 mL min(-1) throughput, which is three orders of magnitude greater than that of existing acoustic-based platelet separation techniques. Without sample dilution, we observed more than 80% RBC/WBC removal and platelet recovery. High throughput, high separation efficiency, and biocompatibility make this device useful for many clinical applications. PMID:27477388

  11. High-throughput acoustic separation of platelets from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Wu, Mengxi; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Whitley, Pamela H; Wang, Lin; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-09-21

    Platelets contain growth factors which are important in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work, we present an acoustic separation device for high-throughput, non-invasive platelet isolation. In particular, we separated platelets from whole blood at a 10 mL min(-1) throughput, which is three orders of magnitude greater than that of existing acoustic-based platelet separation techniques. Without sample dilution, we observed more than 80% RBC/WBC removal and platelet recovery. High throughput, high separation efficiency, and biocompatibility make this device useful for many clinical applications.

  12. Platelet Function Testing-Guided Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spannagl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the Western world. Several factors have led to the increase in vascular disorders, including the aging population, unhealthy lifestyles, increasing rates of diabetes and raised lipids, and further risk factors resulting in inflammation and calcification of the vascular endothelium. Activated platelets in damaged blood vessels can trigger arterial thrombus formation, leading to vascular occlusion with subsequent organ hypoperfusion and clinical manifestation of myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral artery disease. Platelet inhibitors such as aspirin and clopidogrel (Plavix® and generics) are prescribed as primary or secondary prevention to attenuate chronic platelet activation. However, a significant proportion of patients do not respond adequately to uniform antiplatelet treatment. These ‘non-responders’ have an increased risk for stent thrombosis, stroke, and other ischemic complications. Platelet function (PF) tests can identify these patients thus enabling physicians to offer personalized and alternative treatment strategies. Recent alternatives to clopidogrel include prasugrel (Efient®) and ticagrelor (Brilique®) – that are both more potent than clopidogrel but also more expensive and associated with a higher risk of bleeding complications. Given these drawbacks, PF testing might help clinicians to prescribe optimal antiplatelet agent to maximize patient safety and efficacy while minimizing costs. While randomized studies using different test systems have left clinicians puzzled about the medical value of tailored antiplatelet therapy, accumulated evidence from recent studies on tailored antiplatelet therapies and the association with improved outcomes have now resulted in a consensus expert opinion for the specific adoption of PF diagnostics into clinical practice.

  13. Multiscale prediction of patient-specific platelet function under flow.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Matthew H; Colace, Thomas V; Chatterjee, Manash S; Jing, Huiyan; Zhou, Songtao; Jaeger, Daniel; Brass, Lawrence F; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2012-07-01

    During thrombotic or hemostatic episodes, platelets bind collagen and release ADP and thromboxane A(2), recruiting additional platelets to a growing deposit that distorts the flow field. Prediction of clotting function under hemodynamic conditions for a patient's platelet phenotype remains a challenge. A platelet signaling phenotype was obtained for 3 healthy donors using pairwise agonist scanning, in which calcium dye-loaded platelets were exposed to pairwise combinations of ADP, U46619, and convulxin to activate the P2Y(1)/P2Y(12), TP, and GPVI receptors, respectively, with and without the prostacyclin receptor agonist iloprost. A neural network model was trained on each donor's pairwise agonist scanning experiment and then embedded into a multiscale Monte Carlo simulation of donor-specific platelet deposition under flow. The simulations were compared directly with microfluidic experiments of whole blood flowing over collagen at 200 and 1000/s wall shear rate. The simulations predicted the ranked order of drug sensitivity for indomethacin, aspirin, MRS-2179 (a P2Y(1) inhibitor), and iloprost. Consistent with measurement and simulation, one donor displayed larger clots and another presented with indomethacin resistance (revealing a novel heterozygote TP-V241G mutation). In silico representations of a subject's platelet phenotype allowed prediction of blood function under flow, essential for identifying patient-specific risks, drug responses, and novel genotypes.

  14. Blood platelets contain tumor-derived RNA biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, R Jonas A; Balaj, Leonora; Hulleman, Esther; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Pegtel, D Michiel; Walraven, Maudy; Widmark, Anders; Gerritsen, Winald R; Verheul, Henk M; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Skog, Johan; Würdinger, Thomas

    2011-09-29

    Diagnostic platforms providing biomarkers that are highly predictive for diagnosing, monitoring, and stratifying cancer patients are key instruments in the development of personalized medicine. We demonstrate that tumor cells transfer (mutant) RNA into blood platelets in vitro and in vivo, and show that blood platelets isolated from glioma and prostate cancer patients contain the cancer-associated RNA biomarkers EGFRvIII and PCA3, respectively. In addition, gene-expression profiling revealed a distinct RNA signature in platelets from glioma patients compared with normal control subjects. Because platelets are easily accessible and isolated, they may form an attractive platform for the companion diagnostics of cancer.

  15. Blood platelets contain tumor-derived RNA biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, R Jonas A; Balaj, Leonora; Hulleman, Esther; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Pegtel, D Michiel; Walraven, Maudy; Widmark, Anders; Gerritsen, Winald R; Verheul, Henk M; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Skog, Johan; Würdinger, Thomas

    2011-09-29

    Diagnostic platforms providing biomarkers that are highly predictive for diagnosing, monitoring, and stratifying cancer patients are key instruments in the development of personalized medicine. We demonstrate that tumor cells transfer (mutant) RNA into blood platelets in vitro and in vivo, and show that blood platelets isolated from glioma and prostate cancer patients contain the cancer-associated RNA biomarkers EGFRvIII and PCA3, respectively. In addition, gene-expression profiling revealed a distinct RNA signature in platelets from glioma patients compared with normal control subjects. Because platelets are easily accessible and isolated, they may form an attractive platform for the companion diagnostics of cancer. PMID:21832279

  16. Point-of-care platelet function tests: detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Scharbert, Gisela; Gebhardt, Kristina; Sow, Zacharia; Duris, Monika; Deusch, Engelbert; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle

    2007-12-01

    Detection of platelet inhibition is of clinical relevance in the preinterventional risk-benefit assessment in chronic low-back-pain patients scheduled for invasive pain therapy. We evaluated the sensitivity of various point-of-care platelet function tests for the detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs. After Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, citrated whole blood from 40 patients with chronic unspecific low back pain was investigated before and 30 min after intravenous infusion of the study medication consisting of diclofenac 75 mg (plus orphenadrin 30 mg; Neodolpasse; Fresenius Kabi Austria GmbH, Austria), parecoxib 40 mg (Dynastat; Pharmacia Europe EEIG, UK), paracetamol 1 g (Perfalgan; Bieffe Medital S.P.A., Italy), or normal saline in a randomized, cross-over, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Platelet function was assessed using the PFA-100 platelet function analyzer and thromboelastometry, as well as impedance aggregometry (in the last 17 patients recruited after it became commercially available). Sensitivity for detecting diclofenac-induced platelet inhibition was 85% for the PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and 94% for arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. ADP-induced platelet function tests, as well as cytochalasin D-modified thromboelastometry were unreliable. All tests had a low incidence of false-positive test results after normal saline. Paracetamol and parecoxib had no significant platelet inhibiting effect. The PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry are recommended for the detection of cyclooxygenase-I-inhibiting effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac. Our findings confirm that a single rescue dose of paracetamol and parecoxib has no antiplatelet effect. PMID:17982319

  17. Megakaryocytes and platelets express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but nicotine does not affect megakaryopoiesis or platelet function.

    PubMed

    Schedel, Angelika; Kaiser, Kerstin; Uhlig, Stefanie; Lorenz, Florian; Sarin, Anip; Starigk, Julian; Hassmann, Dennis; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In our previous investigations we have shown that platelets and their precursors express nicotinic α7 acetylcholine receptors (nAChRα7) that are involved in platelet function and in vitro differentiation of the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. In this study, we were interested in the expression analysis of additional nAChR and the effects of nicotine in an ex vivo model using megakaryocytic cells differentiated from cord blood derived CD34(+) cells (CBMK) and an in vivo model using blood samples from smokers. CBMK were differentiated with thrombopoietin (TPO) for up to 17 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to investigate nAChR expression (nAChRα7, nAChRα4, nAChRβ2) and nicotine effects. In blood samples of 15 nonsmokers and 16 smokers platelet parameters (count, mean platelet volume--MPV and platelet distribution width--PDW) were determined as indicators for changes of in vivo megakaryopoiesis. Platelet function was determined by the use of whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The functional role of nAChR was evaluated using specific antagonists in aggregometry. CHRNA7, CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 gene transcripts and the corresponding proteins could be identified in CBMK during all stages of differentiation. Platelets contain nAChRα7 and nAChRβ2 but not nAChRα4. Nicotine had no effect on TPO-induced differentiation of CBMK. There was no significant difference in all platelet parameters of the smokers compared to the nonsmokers. In line with this, cholinergic gene transcripts as well as the encoded proteins were equally expressed in both the study groups. Despite our observation of nAChR expression in megakaryopoiesis and platelets, we were not able to detect effects of nicotine in our ex vivo and in vivo models. Thus, the functional role of the nAChR in these cells remains open.

  18. Three-dimensional multi-scale model of deformable platelets adhesion to vessel wall in blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Zhiliang; Kim, Oleg; Alber, Mark

    2014-01-01

    When a blood vessel ruptures or gets inflamed, the human body responds by rapidly forming a clot to restrict the loss of blood. Platelets aggregation at the injury site of the blood vessel occurring via platelet–platelet adhesion, tethering and rolling on the injured endothelium is a critical initial step in blood clot formation. A novel three-dimensional multi-scale model is introduced and used in this paper to simulate receptor-mediated adhesion of deformable platelets at the site of vascular injury under different shear rates of blood flow. The novelty of the model is based on a new approach of coupling submodels at three biological scales crucial for the early clot formation: novel hybrid cell membrane submodel to represent physiological elastic properties of a platelet, stochastic receptor–ligand binding submodel to describe cell adhesion kinetics and lattice Boltzmann submodel for simulating blood flow. The model implementation on the GPU cluster significantly improved simulation performance. Predictive model simulations revealed that platelet deformation, interactions between platelets in the vicinity of the vessel wall as well as the number of functional GPIbα platelet receptors played significant roles in platelet adhesion to the injury site. Variation of the number of functional GPIbα platelet receptors as well as changes of platelet stiffness can represent effects of specific drugs reducing or enhancing platelet activity. Therefore, predictive simulations can improve the search for new drug targets and help to make treatment of thrombosis patient-specific. PMID:24982253

  19. Effects of microgravity and hypergravity on platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kesheng; Wang, Yuedan; Yan, Rong; Shi, Quanwei; Wang, Zhicheng; Yuan, Yanhong; Cheng, Hong; Li, Suping; Fan, Yubo; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    2009-05-01

    Many serious thrombotic and haemorrhagic diseases or fatalities have been documented in human being exposed to microgravity or hypergravity environments, such as crewmen in space, roller coaster riders, and aircrew subjected to high-G training. Some possible related organs have been examined to explore the mechanisms underlying these gravity change-related diseases. However, the role of platelets which are the primary players in both thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. Here we show that platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or collagen and platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) were significantly decreased after platelets were exposed to simulated microgravity. Conversely, these platelet functions were increased after platelets were exposed to hypergravity. The tail bleeding time in vivo was significantly shortened in mice exposed to high-G force, whereas, was prolonged in hindlimb unloaded mice. Furthermore, three of 23 mice died after 15 minutes of -8 Gx stress. Platelet thrombi disseminated in the heart ventricle and blood vessels in the brain, lung, and heart from the dead mice. Finally, glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha surface expression and its association with the cytoskeleton were significantly decreased in platelets exposed to simulated microgravity, and obviously increased in hypergravity-exposed platelets. These data indicate that the platelet functions are inhibited in microgravity environments, and activated under high-G conditions, suggesting a novel mechanism for gravity change-related haemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases. This mechanism has important implications for preventing and treating gravity change-related diseases, and also suggests that special attentions should be paid to human actions under different gravity conditions. PMID:19404544

  20. [Adhesion of blood platelets to electric-featuring polymers].

    PubMed

    Shumakov, V I; Chepurov, A K; Kozlov, W K; Kazakova, T I

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of electric potential arising on the plastic surface upon the blood clotting process. The study was performed according to the Breddin method. The study concerned fluorosilicone rubber, fluoroplast, polyester, polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride with various surface potentials. The authors found that the negatively charged blood platelets adhere to negatively charged plastic surfaces only to a low extent and undergo no disintegration and agglomeration. To the surfaces of the same plastics being electrically neutral, only small aggregates of blood platelets adhere. On the other hand, on the positively charged surfaces the accumulation of blood platelets takes place with concurrent aggregation and disintegration, thus initiating the thrombus formation. The authors observed the intensity of these changes using blood platelet adhesion index and fluorescence microscope.

  1. Platelet function in the postprandial period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia have been related to cardiovascular events. Among different underlying mechanisms platelet activation seems to be responsible too. No comparable data between various tests in normo- vs. hyperlipidemics before and at different time intervals are available after a fat meal. We aimed to compare 9 of them within the same patients at several time points in postprandial hyperlipidemia. Results For some tests baseline values between the groups were significantly different (TXB2, platelet sensitivity, sedimentation and WU-test). However, hyperlipidemia revealed a variable influence on the tests examined. Some of the available tests apparently sensitive to show platelet activation reflect the increase in triglycerides (TG), such as the sedimentation index. ADP-induced platelet aggregatory activity in count adjusted washed isolated platelet samples during postprandial hyperlipidemia indicates mildly enhanced platelet activity, but does not seem to induce significant changes in aggregation. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 400 mg/dl fasting) changes in platelet function are more pronounced due to delayed decay and may last up to 16 hours paralleling TG reaching the prevalue. The overwhelming majority of platelet function tests do not significantly respond to postprandial hyperlipidemia. The correlation between the tests applied is poor. For standardization purpose, platelet aggregation tests, aimed to examine proaggregatory capacity in atherosclerosis, should only be performed at the same time of the day after a fasting period > 6 hours. The great variation in preanalytical work-up on comparison of various tests, large number of platelet tests available and their respective potential value are discussed. Conclusions At present, the suspicion that platelet function is significantly activated in the postprandial period cannot be supported by any of the tests used. The information provided is valuable to

  2. Mathematical model and numerical method for studying platelet adhesion and aggregation during blood clotting

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelson, A.L.

    1984-10-01

    The repair of small blood vessels and the pathological growth of internal blood clots involve the formation of platelet aggregates adhering to portions of the vessel wall. Our microscopic model represents blood by a suspension of discrete massless platelets in a viscous incompressible fluid. Platelets are initially noncohesive; however, if stimulated by an above-threshold concentration of the chemical ADP or by contact with the adhesive injured region of the vessel wall, they become cohesive and secrete more ADP into the fluid. Cohesion between platelets and adhesion of a platelet to the injured wall are modeled by creating elastic links. Repulsive forces prevent a platelet from coming too close to another platelet or to the wall. The forces affect the fluid motion in the neighborhood of an aggregate. The platelets and secreted ADP both move by fluid advection and diffusion. The equations of the model are studied numerically in two dimensions. The platelet forces are calculated implicitly by minimizing a nonlinear energy function. Our minimization scheme merges Gill and Murray's (Math. Programming 7 (1974), 311) modified Newton's method with elements of the Yale sparse matix package. The stream-function formulation of the Stokes' equations for the fluid motion under the influence of platelet forces is solved using Bjorstad's biharmonic solver (''Numerical Solution of the Biharmonic Equation,'' Ph.D. Thesis, Stanford University, 1980). The ADP transport equation is solved with an alternating-direction implicit scheme. A linked-list data structure is introduced to keep track of changing platelet states and changing configurations of interplatelet links.

  3. The removal of leukocytes and platelets from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Beutler, E; West, C; Blume, K G

    1976-08-01

    Various methods for the removal of leukocytes from whole blood have been compared and a new technique has been devised. This procedure consists of passing whole blood through a bed composed of microcrystalline cellulose and alpha-cellulose. The method is rapid, reliable, removes over 99.75 per cent of the leukocytes from blood, and does not seem selectively to retain reticulocytes or to release a significant proportion of leukocyte enzymes. Most of the platelets are also removed from anticoagulated blood, and platelet-free red cells can be obtained by passing defibrinated blood over the microcrystalline cellulose-alpha-cellulose bed.

  4. [Applications of platelets in studies on traditional Chinese medicines promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Qin; Chen, Cen; Xia, Zhi-Ning; Yang, Feng-Qing

    2014-08-01

    Thrombotic diseases in different forms become a great threat to human health. Such anti-platelet aggregation drugs as aspirin and clopidogrel are common drugs in clinic. However, along with the appearance of resistance and side effects of western anti-platelet aggregation drugs, anti-platelet aggregation traditional Chinese medicines promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis have gradually become an important study orientation. Platelet is one of major participant in thrombosis, and plays an important role as a bioactive material in studies on traditional Chinese medicines promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis, mainly involving two aspects--the evaluation for the anti-platelet aggregation activity of traditional Chinese medicines and the screening of their active components. This paper summarized the applications of platelets in studies on traditional Chinese medicines promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis, so as to provide basis for further studies.

  5. Topographic Cues Reveal Two Distinct Spreading Mechanisms in Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, Rabea; Köster, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Blood platelets are instrumental in blood clotting and are thus heavily involved in early wound closure. After adhering to a substrate they spread by forming protrusions like lamellipodia and filopodia. However, the interaction of these protrusions with the physical environment of platelets while spreading is not fully understood. Here we dynamically image platelets during this spreading process and compare their behavior on smooth and on structured substrates. In particular we analyze the temporal evolution of the spread area, the cell morphology and the dynamics of individual filopodia. Interestingly, the topographic cues enable us to distinguish two spreading mechanisms, one that is based on numerous persistent filopodia and one that rather involves lamellipodia. Filopodia-driven spreading coincides with a strong response of platelet morphology to the substrate topography during spreading, whereas lamellipodia-driven spreading does not. Thus, we quantify different degrees of filopodia formation in platelets and the influence of filopodia in spreading on structured substrates.

  6. Role of blood platelets in infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Matthias H F; Jelkmann, Wolfgang

    2002-09-01

    Blood platelets are here presented as active players in antimicrobial host defense and the induction of inflammation and tissue repair in addition to their participation in hemostasis. Megakaryopoiesis is inhibited after acute infection with viruses or bacteria. In contrast, chronic inflammation is often associated with reactive thrombocytosis. Platelets can bind and internalize pathogens and release microbicidal proteins that kill certain bacteria and fungi. By making cell-cell contacts with leukocytes and endothelial cells, platelets assist white blood cells in rolling, arrest and transmigration. On stimulation by bacteria or thrombin, platelets release the content of their alpha-granules, which include an arsenal of bioactive peptides, such as CC-chemokines and CXC-chemokines and growth factors for endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Thus, integral to innate immunity, the tiny little platelets may become bombshells when irritated by pathogens.

  7. Platelet function and hemolysis in centrifugal pumps: in vitro investigations.

    PubMed

    Steines, D; Westphal, D; Göbel, C; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1999-08-01

    The effects of centrifugal pumps on blood components other than erythrocytes, namely platelets and their interaction with the coagulation system, are not very well known. In a comparative study with three centrifugal pumps (BioMedicus BP-80, St. Jude Isoflow, and Sarns Delphin) and the Stockert roller pump hemolysis, platelet counts, thromboplastin and partial thromboplastin times, as well as resonance thrombography (RTG) parameters for the assessment of platelet and coagulation function were evaluated in vitro. Normalized indices of hemolysis (NIH) with ACD anticoagulation after 360 minutes were 0.008+/-0.004 (Isoflow), 0.018+/-0.017 (BP-80), 0.085+/-0.051 (Delphin), and 0.049+/-0.010 g/1001 (roller pump). Plasmatic coagulation was activated in all circuits. Platelet function was severely inhibited by the BP-80, indicated by increase in RTG platelet time to 358%+/-150% of initial values compared to 42%+/-29% (Isoflow), 40%+/-20% (Delphin), and 12%+/-10% (roller pump). Fibrin polymerization was affected similarly. The large surface area of the BP-80 leads to an extensive activation of platelets and plasminogen.

  8. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  9. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  10. Proteomics meets blood banking: identification of protein targets for the improvement of platelet quality.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Peter; Devine, Dana V

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has brought new perspectives to the fields of hematology and transfusion medicine in the last decade. The steady improvement of proteomic technology is propelling novel discoveries of molecular mechanisms by studying protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein interactions. This review article focuses on the application of proteomics to the identification of molecular mechanisms leading to the deterioration of blood platelets during storage - a critical aspect in the provision of platelet transfusion products. Several proteomic approaches have been employed to analyse changes in the platelet protein profile during storage and the obtained data now need to be translated into platelet biochemistry in order to connect the results to platelet function. Targeted biochemical applications then allow the identification of points for intervention in signal transduction pathways. Once validated and placed in a transfusion context, these data will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to platelet storage lesion. Future aspects of proteomics in blood banking will aim to make use of protein markers identified for platelet storage lesion development to monitor proteome changes when alterations such as the use of additive solutions or pathogen reduction strategies are put in place in order to improve platelet quality for patients.

  11. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE platelet function assay: performance and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wei C; Walker, C Ty; Obilby, David; Wash, Mark M; Carville, David G M; Guyer, Kirk E; Bates, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin) that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate). Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (%) of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91) and collagen (r=0.88). Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions. PMID:17890800

  12. Use of a solid phase red blood cell adherence method for pretransfusion platelet compatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Rachel, J M; Summers, T C; Sinor, L T; Plapp, F V

    1988-07-01

    A solid phase red blood cell adherence method has been used for platelet antibody detection and crossmatching for refractory platelet recipients. Patient sera were first screened for HLA or platelet-specific antibodies, then crossmatched with potential apheresis platelet donors. The overall correlation of platelet crossmatch results with transfusion outcome was 97% in patients with no evidence of nonimmune platelet destruction. The solid phase red blood cell adherence method provided a feasible and effective alternative to HLA matching as a means of donor selection for refractory platelet recipients. The speed and simplicity of this method may allow most hospital laboratories to perform platelet antibody screening before routine platelet transfusions.

  13. The effect of ex vivo anticoagulants on whole blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Madeleine L; Potura, Lukasz; Scharbert, Gisela; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A

    2009-02-01

    Pre- and intraoperative platelet function monitoring is increasingly recommended in order to detect risk factors for bleeding and to target coagulation management. The ideal anticoagulant for accurate platelet aggregometry remains controversial. The aim of this experimental trial was to compare platelet aggregability in whole blood stored in citrate, heparin and direct thrombin inhibitors. Whole blood was drawn from 11 healthy adult volunteers who had not taken any medication in the previous 14 days. Blood was stored in trisodium citrate, unfractionated heparin, melagatran, lepirudin and argatroban. Platelet aggregation was performed using the impedance aggregometer Multiplate (Dynabyte, Munich, Germany) with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP), collagen, arachidonic acid and ristocetin as agonists. Samples were analysed immediately after blood sampling (baseline), as well as 30 and 120 min afterwards. At baseline there were no significant differences in aggregability between samples containing direct thrombin inhibitors and heparin. In contrast, aggregation in response to all agonists except for ristocetin was significantly impaired in citrated blood. During storage the response to arachidonic acid and collagen was maintained by direct thrombin inhibitors and heparin, whereas ADP-, TRAP- and ristocetin-induced aggregation varied considerably over time in all ex vivo anticoagulants tested. Pre-analytical procedures should be standardized because storage duration and anticoagulants significantly affect platelet aggregability in whole blood. For point-of-care monitoring with immediate analysis after blood withdrawal all tested direct thrombin inhibitors as well as unfractionated heparin can be used as anticoagulants whereas citrate is not recommended. PMID:19172515

  14. Pharmacological actions of nobiletin in the modulation of platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Roweth, Harvey; Ali, Marfoua S; Unsworth, Amanda J; Stainer, Alexander R; Flora, Gagan D; Crescente, Marilena; Jones, Chris I; Moraes, Leonardo A; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The discovery that flavonoids are capable of inhibiting platelet function has led to their investigation as potential antithrombotic agents. However, despite the range of studies on the antiplatelet properties of flavonoids, little is known about the mechanisms by which flavonoids inhibit platelet function. In this study, we aimed to explore the pharmacological effects of a polymethoxy flavonoid, nobiletin, in the modulation of platelet function. Experimental Approach The ability of nobiletin to modulate platelet function was explored by using a range of in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Aggregation, dense granule secretion and spreading assays were performed using washed platelets. Fibrinogen binding, α-granule secretion and calcium mobilization assays were performed using platelet-rich plasma and whole blood was used in impedance aggregometry and thrombus formation experiments. The effect of nobiletin in vivo was assessed by measuring tail bleeding time using C57BL/6 mice. Key Results Nobiletin was shown to suppress a range of well-established activatory mechanisms, including platelet aggregation, granule secretion, integrin modulation, calcium mobilization and thrombus formation. Nobiletin extended bleeding time in mice and reduced the phosphorylation of PKB (Akt) and PLCγ2 within the collagen receptor (glycoprotein VI)-stimulated pathway, in addition to increasing the levels of cGMP and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, a protein whose activity is associated with inhibitory cyclic nucleotide signalling. Conclusions and Implications This study provides insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms through which nobiletin modulates haemostasis and thrombus formation. Therefore, nobiletin may represent a potential antithrombotic agent of dietary origins. PMID:25988959

  15. The impact of static work on fibrinolysis and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Vind, J; Gleerup, G; Nielsen, P T; Winther, K

    1993-12-01

    Brief stress such as dynamic work protects against thrombosis by enhancing blood fluidity. The effect of isometric work on blood fluidity, however, is not known. The aim of the present study therefore was to test the effect of isometric work on heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), platelet function and fibrinolytic activity. Twelve healthy male volunteers were tested before and after isometric work. Isometric work resulted in an increase in HR from 62.4 to 110.0 beats/min and in systolic BP from 118.3 to 134.5 mmHg (p < 0.01). No significant change occurred in platelet release estimated as plasma levels of B-TG and PF-4, or platelet aggregation induced by ADP. Fibrinolytic activity increased, as evidenced by a decrease in ECLT from 136.7 + 10.5 to 72.3 + 9.8 min) (p < 0.01) and an increase in t-PA of 400%. No significant change was observed in PAI. The present data suggest that isometric work increases fibrinolytic activity significantly, but leaves platelet function unchanged.

  16. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except

  17. Simulation of the Effect of Red Blood Cell Collisions on Platelet Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbon, Sean; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The adsorption of platelets to the endothelial wall is an important first step in the clotting process, which is critical to stopping blood loss after trauma. Initial platelet arrest is controlled by very short range interaction between two proteins, von Willibrand Factor and GPIb, so the rate of platelet adsorption is expected to be strongly dependent on the rate at which the platelets sample the wall. With Peclet numbers in the range (103 - 105) , simple diffusive arguments are not sufficient to explain the high rates of platelet adsorption. Using Stokes flow simulations, we show that the platelets' wall sampling rate is significantly increased by interactions with red blood cells. Our simulation models platelets as rigid bodies suspended in a Stokesian linear shear flow. We solve for the flow using standard boundary integral techniques with the appropriate single wall bounded Green's function. Receptor-ligand interactions are represented as Hookean springs with characteristic lifetimes, sizes, and stiffness coefficients. Drag forces are calculated with the reciprocal theorem, and RBC collisions are modelled as AR processes extracted from the large scale suspension simulations of Zhao et al.

  18. A novel role of h2-calponin in regulating whole blood thrombosis and platelet adhesion during physiologic flow.

    PubMed

    Hines, Patrick C; Gao, Xiufeng; White, Jennell C; D'Agostino, Ashley; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated protein reported in platelets, although the specific isoform expressed and functional role were not identified. The h2-calponin isoform is expressed in myeloid-derived peripheral blood monocytes, where it regulates adhesion. Our objective was to characterize the presence and function of the h2 isoform of calponin in platelets. H2-calponin was detected in human and mouse platelets via Western blotting. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated h2-calponin and actin colocalized in both human and wild-type mouse platelets at rest and following collagen activation. The kinetics of platelet adhesion and whole blood thrombosis during physiologic flow was evaluated in a microfluidic flow-based thrombosis assay. The time to initiation of rapid platelet/thrombus accumulation (lag time) was significantly longer in h2-calponin knockout versus wild-type mouse blood (130.02 ± 3.74 sec and 72.95 ± 16.23 sec, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the rate of platelet/thrombus accumulation during the rapid phase or the maximum platelet/thrombus accumulation. H2-calponin knockout mice also had prolonged bleeding time and blood loss. H2-calponin in platelets facilitates early interactions between platelets and collagen during physiologic flow, but does not significantly affect the rate or magnitude of platelet/thrombus accumulation. H2-calponin knockout mice take 2.3 times longer to achieve hemostasis compared to wild-type controls in a tail bleeding model. The ability to delay platelet accumulation without inhibiting downstream thrombotic potential would be of significant therapeutic value, thus h2-calponin may be a novel target for therapeutic platelet inhibition. PMID:25472609

  19. A novel role of h2‐calponin in regulating whole blood thrombosis and platelet adhesion during physiologic flow

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Patrick C.; Gao, Xiufeng; White, Jennell C.; D'Agostino, Ashley; Jin, Jian‐Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Calponin is an actin filament‐associated protein reported in platelets, although the specific isoform expressed and functional role were not identified. The h2‐calponin isoform is expressed in myeloid‐derived peripheral blood monocytes, where it regulates adhesion. Our objective was to characterize the presence and function of the h2 isoform of calponin in platelets. H2‐calponin was detected in human and mouse platelets via Western blotting. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated h2‐calponin and actin colocalized in both human and wild‐type mouse platelets at rest and following collagen activation. The kinetics of platelet adhesion and whole blood thrombosis during physiologic flow was evaluated in a microfluidic flow‐based thrombosis assay. The time to initiation of rapid platelet/thrombus accumulation (lag time) was significantly longer in h2‐calponin knockout versus wild‐type mouse blood (130.02 ± 3.74 sec and 72.95 ± 16.23 sec, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the rate of platelet/thrombus accumulation during the rapid phase or the maximum platelet/thrombus accumulation. H2‐calponin knockout mice also had prolonged bleeding time and blood loss. H2‐calponin in platelets facilitates early interactions between platelets and collagen during physiologic flow, but does not significantly affect the rate or magnitude of platelet/thrombus accumulation. H2‐calponin knockout mice take 2.3 times longer to achieve hemostasis compared to wild‐type controls in a tail bleeding model. The ability to delay platelet accumulation without inhibiting downstream thrombotic potential would be of significant therapeutic value, thus h2‐calponin may be a novel target for therapeutic platelet inhibition. PMID:25472609

  20. Sub-cellular modeling of platelet transport in blood flow through microchannels with constriction.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-05-11

    Platelet transport through arterial constrictions is one of the controlling processes influencing their adhesive functions and the formation of thrombi. We perform high-fidelity mesoscopic simulations of blood flow in microchannels with constriction, resembling arterial stenoses. The wall shear rates inside the constrictions reach levels as high as ≈8000 s(-1), similar to those encountered in moderate atherosclerotic plaques. Both red blood cells and platelets are resolved at sub-cellular resolution using the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. We perform a systematic study on the red blood cell and platelet transport by considering different levels of constriction, blood hematocrit and flow rates. We find that higher levels of constriction and wall shear rates lead to significantly enhanced margination of platelets, which may explain the experimental observations of enhanced post-stenosis platelet aggregation. We also observe similar margination effects for stiff particles of spherical shapes such as leukocytes. To our knowledge, such numerical simulations of dense blood through complex geometries have not been performed before, and our quantitative findings could shed new light on the associated physiological processes such as ATP release, plasma skimming, and thrombus formation. PMID:27087267

  1. Adjusting MtDNA Quantification in Whole Blood for Peripheral Blood Platelet and Leukocyte Counts

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lazaro, Monica; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) in the blood (mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio) appear associated with several systemic diseases, including primary mitochondrial disorders, carcinogenesis, and hematologic diseases. Measuring mtDNAcn in DNA extracted from whole blood (WB) instead of from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or buffy coat may yield different results due to mitochondrial DNA present in platelets. The aim of this work is to quantify the contribution of platelets to mtDNAcn in whole blood [mtDNAcn(WB)] and to propose a correction formula to estimate leukocytes' mtDNAcn [mtDNAcn(L)] from mtDNAcn(WB). Blood samples from 10 healthy adults were combined with platelet-enriched plasma and saline solution to produce artificial blood preparations. Aliquots of each sample were combined with five different platelet concentrations. In 46 of these blood preparations, mtDNAcn was measured by qPCR. MtDNAcn(WB) increased 1.07 (95%CI 0.86, 1.29; p<0.001) per 1000 platelets present in the preparation. We proved that leukocyte count should also be taken into account as mtDNAcn(WB) was inversely associated with leukocyte count; it increased 1.10 (95%CI 0.95, 1.25, p<0.001) per unit increase of the ratio between platelet and leukocyte counts. If hematological measurements are available, subtracting 1.10 the platelets/leukocyte ratio from mtDNAcn(WB) may serve as an estimation for mtDNAcn(L). Both platelet and leukocyte counts in the sample are important sources of variation if comparing mtDNAcn among groups of patients when mtDNAcn is measured in DNA extracted from whole blood. Not taking the platelet/leukocyte ratio into account in whole blood measurements, may lead to overestimation and misclassification if interpreted as leukocytes' mtDNAcn. PMID:27736919

  2. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J.; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:25530818

  3. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  4. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  5. Platelet function in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Rashid S; Cooper, Alan J; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2011-03-01

    Pronounced hemostatic changes occur during pregnancy, and the balance shifts markedly in favor of hypercoagulability. Although primarily a result of a marked rise in the levels of several procoagulants and a fall in some natural anticoagulants, platelet activation also contributes to this prothrombotic tendency. Several studies have confirmed the accentuation of platelet activation in pre-eclampsia (P-EC), which remains an important obstetric complication affecting ~2 to 4% of pregnancies. Although there is still a long way to go, significant inroads have been made in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Whereas the pathogenesis of P-EC is protean and involves a complex interplay of placental and maternal tissues, platelet activation is likely to contribute to several clinical features. Several techniques have been used to assess platelet activation in P-EC. Detection of aberrations of platelet function and activation appear to have predictive value for its diagnosis. The findings also lend support to the use of antiplatelet agents as prophylaxis in those women with a high risk of developing the condition.

  6. Development of a New Method for Platelet Function Test and Its Shearing Condition in Microfludic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Choi, Seawhan; Shin, Sehyun; Korea University Department of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2015-11-01

    Platelet is a crucial blood cell on hemostasis. As platelet exposed to high shear stress, it can be activated showing morphological and functional changes to stop bleeding. When platelet is abnormal, there is high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, quick and precise assay for platelet function is important in clinical treatment. In this study, we design a microfluidic system, which can test platelet function exposed with the stimulation of shear and agonists. The microfluidic system consists of three parts: 1) a shear mechanism with rotating stirrer; 2) multiple microchannels to flow samples and to stop; 3) camera-interfaced migration distance(MD) analyzing system. When sheared blood is driven by pressure through the microchannel, shear-activated platelets adhere to a collagen-coated surface, causing blood flow to significantly slow and eventually stop. As the micro-stirrer speed increases, MD decreases exponentially at first, but it increases beyond a critical rpm after all. These results are coincident with data measured by FACS flowcytometry. These results imply that the present system could quantitatively measure the degree of activation, aggregation and adhesion of platelets and that blood MD is potent index for measuring the shear-dependence of platelet function.

  7. Overcoming blood shortages: red blood cell and platelet substitutes and membrane modifications.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard J

    2004-03-01

    Blood shortages are increasingly common as the donor base declines and extensive restrictions on blood donation disqualify many donors. Red blood cell (RBC) and platelet substitutes have long been anticipated as alternatives to standard transfusions. However, difficulties in manufacturing, efficacy, and safety have slowed the development of these products. New understanding of the relationship between blood viscosity, oxygen transport, and vasoactivity have led to more effective RBC substitutes, several of which are in advanced clinical trials. In addition, creative approaches to RBC membrane modification, such as the enzymatic cleavage of ABH glycoproteins, may lead to a universal RBC. Advances in the understanding of platelet membrane behavior at low temperatures may lead to extended platelet storage at refrigerator temperatures. Standard transfusions of human RBCs and platelets will not be replaced soon. However, these new products will be a useful alternative for selected clinical applications and will lessen our dependence on our marginally adequate blood supply.

  8. Factor VIII is a positive regulator of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Obergfell, A; Sturm, A; Speer, C P; Walter, U; Grossmann, R

    2006-11-01

    FVIII is an important cofactor in the tenase coagulation factor complex, lack of FVIII causes severe bleeding, whereas high FVIII levels seem to be associated with venous and arterial thromboembolism. Resting platelets do not bind FVIII, but activated platelets bind unactivated FVIII if vWF is not present. We investigated a possible influence of platelet bound FVIII on platelet function itself as it is unclear if there is a direct effect of FVIII on platelet function. The influence of FVIII on platelet function was investigated by flow cytometric analysis of P-selectin expression (CD62P) and PAC-1 binding before and after submaximal stimulation with TRAP-6 (5 microM final concentration), by confocal microscopy and by platelet aggregometry. For flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, washed platelets were incubated with human recombinant FVIII for 5 min at 37 degrees C. Analysis of platelet surface area was measured by computerized image analysis. Treatment with FVIII only caused no changes in P-selectin expression or PAC-1 binding, respectively. Stimulation of platelets with TRAP-6 increased the expression of P-selectin (445%) and PAC-1 binding (934%) as expected. These effects were further increased when platelets were stimulated with TRAP-6 and FVIII (P-selectin 499%, difference not significant; PAC-1 1626%, P < 0.05. Values were expressed in%, related to unstimulated, buffer treated platelets). Platelet spreading on fibrinogen was significantly increased when platelets were treated with FVIII and TRAP-6 compared to TRAP-6 alone (368 vs. 307 average pixel/platelet, P<0.05). In addition platelet aggregation was enhanced when platelets were stimulated with FVIII and TRAP-6 compared to TRAP-6 alone. FVIII can act as a positive regulator of platelet function in TRAP-co-stimulated platelets. We hypothesize that FVIII induced increase in platelet activation might contribute to venous and even arterial thrombus formation in patients with high FVIII levels. PMID:17074720

  9. Global analysis of the rat and human platelet proteome - the molecular blueprint for illustrating multi-functional platelets and cross-species function evolution.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Leng, Taohua; Yun, Dong; Liu, Na; Yao, Jun; Dai, Ying; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Xian

    2010-07-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that blood platelets function in multiple biological processes including immune response, bone metastasis and liver regeneration in addition to their known roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Global elucidation of platelet proteome will provide the molecular base of these platelet functions. Here, we set up a high-throughput platform for maximum exploration of the rat/human platelet proteome using integrated proteomic technologies, and then applied to identify the largest number of the proteins expressed in both rat and human platelets. After stringent statistical filtration, a total of 837 unique proteins matched with at least two unique peptides were precisely identified, making it the first comprehensive protein database so far for rat platelets. Meanwhile, quantitative analyses of the thrombin-stimulated platelets offered great insights into the biological functions of platelet proteins and therefore confirmed our global profiling data. A comparative proteomic analysis between rat and human platelets was also conducted, which revealed not only a significant similarity, but also an across-species evolutionary link that the orthologous proteins representing "core proteome", and the "evolutionary proteome" is actually a relatively static proteome.

  10. Decreased fibrinolytic activity and increased platelet function in hypertension. Possible influence of calcium antagonism.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1991-02-01

    Twelve patients with mild hypertension were compared, after 14 days of placebo, with an age- and gender-matched group of 12 healthy volunteers for platelet aggregability and fibrinolytic activity. Following this, 10 of the 12 hypertensives were treated with the calcium antagonist isradipine for 12 months. Blood was drawn for determinations of platelet aggregation and fibrinolytic activity after two weeks and 12 months of treatment. Platelet aggregation tended to increase in the hypertensives compared with controls, indicated by a lowering of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) threshold value for irreversible aggregation. Tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) activity was significantly decreased in hypertensives compared to controls (P less than .05). During therapy, platelet aggregation decreased and t-PA activity increased (P less than .05). The present data suggest that fibrinolytic activity is decreased and platelet aggregation increased in mild hypertension. Besides the blood pressure-lowering effect, isradipine may protect against thromboembolic diseases by modifying platelet function and fibrinolytic activity.

  11. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function.

  12. Proteins, platelets, and blood coagulation at biomaterial interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James W; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors.

  13. Proteins, platelets, and blood coagulation at biomaterial interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James W; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  14. Proteins, Platelets, and Blood Coagulation at Biomaterial Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  15. Mach-Zehnder interferometer for separation of platelets from red blood cells using dielectrophoretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, M.; Narayan, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, separation of platelets from red blood cells using Mach-Zehnder interferometer is shown using Dielectrophoretics (DEP). The proposed model demonstrates continuous separation of platelets from red blood cells. Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has two arms, in which sensing arm will sense according to the applied voltage and separate the platelets from mixed blood cells. The platelets and the red blood cells will flow in two outlets of MZI. Microfluidic device is used to separate the RBC's and the platelets from the mixed blood cells.

  16. Platelet function alterations in dengue are associated with plasma leakage.

    PubMed

    Michels, M; Alisjahbana, B; De Groot, P G; Indrati, A R; Fijnheer, R; Puspita, M; Dewi, I M W; van de Wijer, L; de Boer, E M S; Roest, M; van der Ven, A J A M; de Mast, Q

    2014-08-01

    Severe dengue is characterised by thrombocytopenia, plasma leakage and bleeding. Platelets are important for preservation of endothelial integrity. We hypothesised that platelet activation with secondary platelet dysfunction contribute to plasma leakage. In adult Indonesian patients with acute dengue, we measured platelet activation status and the response to the platelet agonist TRAP using flow cytometer-based assays. Patients were monitored daily for plasma leakage by ultrasonography. Acute dengue was associated with platelet activation with an increased expression of the activated fibrinogen receptor (αIIbβ3), the lysosomal marker CD63 and the alpha-granule marker CD62P (P-selectin). Upon maximal platelet activation by TRAP, platelet function defects were observed with a significantly reduced maximal activated αIIbβ3 and CD63 expression and reduced platelet-monocyte and platelet-neutrophil complexes. Patients in the lowest tertile of activated αIIbβ3 and CD63 expression had an odds ratio for plasma leakage of 5.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-22.7) and 3.9 (95% CI 1.1-13.7), respectively, compared to the highest tertile. Platelet-derived serotonin has previously been related to plasma leakage and we found increased intra-platelet serotonin concentrations in our patients. In conclusion, platelet activation with platelet function alterations can be found in patients with acute dengue and this may contribute to dengue-associated plasma leakage.

  17. Imaging and Elastometry of Blood Clots Using Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography and Labeled Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Wu, Gongting; Spivak, Dmitry; Tsui, Frank; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Fischer, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods for imaging and assessment of vascular defects are needed for directing treatment of cardiovascular pathologies. In this paper, we employ magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MMOCT) as a platform both to detect and to measure the elasticity of blood clots. Detection is enabled through the use of rehydrated, lyophilized platelets loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO-RL platelets) that are functional infusion agents that adhere to sites of vascular endothelial damage. Evidence suggests that the sensitivity for detection is improved over threefold by magnetic interactions between SPIOs inside RL platelets. Using the same MMOCT system, we show how elastometry of simulated clots, using resonant acoustic spectroscopy, is correlated with the fibrin content of the clot. Both methods are based upon magnetic actuation and phase-sensitive optical monitoring of nanoscale displacements using MMOCT, underscoring its utility as a broad-based platform to detect and measure the molecular structure and composition of blood clots. PMID:23833549

  18. Imaging and Elastometry of Blood Clots Using Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography and Labeled Platelets.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Amy L; Wu, Gongting; Spivak, Dmitry; Tsui, Frank; Wolberg, Alisa S; Fischer, Thomas H

    2011-07-21

    Improved methods for imaging and assessment of vascular defects are needed for directing treatment of cardiovascular pathologies. In this paper, we employ magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MMOCT) as a platform both to detect and to measure the elasticity of blood clots. Detection is enabled through the use of rehydrated, lyophilized platelets loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO-RL platelets) that are functional infusion agents that adhere to sites of vascular endothelial damage. Evidence suggests that the sensitivity for detection is improved over threefold by magnetic interactions between SPIOs inside RL platelets. Using the same MMOCT system, we show how elastometry of simulated clots, using resonant acoustic spectroscopy, is correlated with the fibrin content of the clot. Both methods are based upon magnetic actuation and phase-sensitive optical monitoring of nanoscale displacements using MMOCT, underscoring its utility as a broad-based platform to detect and measure the molecular structure and composition of blood clots.

  19. Aprotinin reduces cardiopulmonary bypass-induced blood loss and inhibits fibrinolysis without influencing platelets.

    PubMed

    Orchard, M A; Goodchild, C S; Prentice, C R; Davies, J A; Benoit, S E; Creighton-Kemsford, L J; Gaffney, P J; Michelson, A D

    1993-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces a bleeding defect which leads to enhanced blood loss. A double-blind study was carried out comparing aprotinin with placebo in patients undergoing re-operation for heart valve replacement. The results confirm that aprotinin is effective at reducing such loss. In the placebo treated group, significant increases were observed, during CPB, in the plasma concentrations of fibrinolytic activity, tissue plasminogen activator antigen, D-dimer, and beta-thromboglobulin. Platelet counts fell within 5-10 min of the patients going onto CPB, but this could be accounted for by the dilutional effect of the extracorporeal circuit. Inhibition of responsiveness of platelets, as judged by aggregometry, was significant only at the end of bypass when collagen was the agonist and after protamine reversal when ristocetin was the agonist. CPB did not enhance the release, into the circulation, of glycocalicin (a proteolytic fragment of glycoprotein Ib). In the aprotinin-treated group, the formation of fibrin degradation products as measured by D-dimer was inhibited. However, aprotinin did not influence the change in platelet count, suppress beta-thromboglobulin release from platelets, prevent the inhibition of platelet function or influence the concentration of plasma glycocalicin during the study period. These observations confirm that CPB leads to a fibrinolytic state and less responsive platelets. This study also indicates that aprotinin-induced reduction in blood loss is associated with inhibition of plasmin-mediated fibrin digestion and that the mechanism by which aprotinin reduces blood loss is not via protection of platelets during CPB.

  20. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  1. Silica Nanoparticles Effects on Blood Coagulation Proteins and Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Gryshchuk, Volodymyr; Galagan, Natalya

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with the blood coagulation is important prior to their using as the drug carriers or therapeutic agents. The aim of present work was studying of the primary effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on haemostasis in vitro. We studied the effect of SiNPs on blood coagulation directly estimating the activation of prothrombin and factor X and to verify any possible effect of SiNPs on human platelets. It was shown that SiNPs shortened coagulation time in APTT and PT tests and increased the activation of factor X induced by RVV possibly due to the sorption of intrinsic pathway factors on their surface. SiNPs inhibited the aggregation of platelet rich plasma induced by ADP but in the same time partially activated platelets as it was shown using flow cytometry. The possibility of SiNPs usage in nanomedicine is strongly dependant on their final concentration in bloodstream and the size of the particles that are used. However SiNPs are extremely promising as the haemostatic agents for preventing the blood loss after damage. PMID:26881078

  2. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    For in vitro studies assessing the interaction of platelets with implant materials, common and standardized protocols for the preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) are lacking, which may lead to non-matching results due to the diversity of applied protocols. Particularly, the aging of platelets during prolonged preparation and storage times is discussed to lead to an underestimation of the material thrombogenicity. Here, we study the influence of whole blood- and PRP-storage times on changes in platelet morphology and function. Blood from apparently healthy subjects was collected according to a standardized protocol and examined immediately after blood collection, four hours and twenty four hours later. The capability of platelets to adhere and form stable aggregates (PFA100, closure time) was examined in sodium citrate anticoagulated whole blood (WB) using the agonists equine type I collagen and epinephrine bitartrate (collagen/epinephrine) as well as equine type I collagen and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (collagen/ADP). Circulating platelets were quantified at each time point. Morphology of platelets and platelet aggregates were visualized microscopically and measured using an electric field multi-channel counting system (CASY). The percentage of activated platelets was assessed by means of P-selectin (CD62P) expression of circulating platelets. Furthermore, platelet factor 4 (PF4) release was measured in platelet poor plasma (PPP) at each time point. Whole blood PFA100 closure times increased after stimulation with collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine. Twenty four hours after blood collection, both parameters were prolonged pathologically above the upper limit of the reference range. Numbers of circulating platelets, measured in PRP, decreased after four hours, but no longer after twenty four hours. Mean platelet volumes (MPV) and platelet large cell ratios (P-LCR, 12 fL - 40 fL) decreased over time. Immediately after blood collection, no debris or platelet

  3. Acetaminophen and meloxicam inhibit platelet aggregation and coagulation in blood samples from humans.

    PubMed

    Martini, Angela K; Rodriguez, Cassandra M; Cap, Andrew P; Martini, Wenjun Z; Dubick, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (Ace) and meloxicam (Mel) are the two types of analgesic and antipyretic medications. This study investigated the dose responses of acetaminophen and meloxicam on platelet aggregation and coagulation function in human blood samples. Blood samples were collected from six healthy humans and processed to make platelet-adjusted (100 × 10 cells/μl) blood samples. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Q-PAP, 100 mg/ml) was added at the doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 214 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Similarly, meloxicam (Metacam, 5 mg/ml) was added at doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 2.85 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Fifteen minutes after the addition of acetaminophen and/or meloxicam, platelet aggregation was stimulated with collagen (2 μg/ml) or arachidonic acid (0.5 mmol/l) and assessed using a Chrono-Log 700 aggregometer. Coagulation function was assessed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and using Rotem thrombelastogram. A robust inhibition by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam was observed in arachidonic acid-stimulated platelet aggregation starting at 1 × dose. Collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was inhibited by ACE starting at 1 × (78 ± 10% of control), and by meloxicam starting at 4 × (72 ± 5% of control, both P < 0.05). The inhibitions by acetaminophen and meloxicam combined were similar to those by acetaminophen or meloxicam. aPTT was prolonged by meloxicam starting at 4 ×. No changes were observed in PT or any of Rotem measurements by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam. Acetaminophen and meloxicam compromised platelet aggregation and aPTT. Further effort is warranted to characterize the effects of acetaminophen and meloxicam on bleeding in vivo.

  4. Fractionation of platelets according to size: functional and biochemical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, D.J.; Gear, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    The functional and biochemical heterogeneity of platelets has been studied using graded differential centrifugation to fractionate human platelets according to size while maintaining their morphological and functional integrity as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and content of beta-thromboglobulin. Aggregation kinetics were studied by both optical and quenched-flow methods involving single-particle counting. Large platelets were significantly more sensitive to ADP, but aggregated less rapidly than small platelets. Thrombin exerted a similar influence. Large platelets were also enriched in surface sialic acid and sulfhydryl groups and in internal glycogen, ATP, ADP, calcium, cyclic AMP, malonaldehyde, and succinate cytochrome c reductase when compared to small platelets, even when normalized per unit volume. ADP caused a more rapid breakdown of cyclic AMP in small platelets. Potential aging relationships were tested by isotope studies in rats. /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine was incorporated in vivo at a similar rate into all fractions. Large platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr disappeared from circulation linearly and had a longer mean lifespan than small platelets, which disappeared exponentially. This behavior supports independent aging of platelet populations of differing size. The data suggest a distinct heterogeneity in platelet function and fate, which could derive from protection of large platelets against excessive activation by Ca2+-regulated events.

  5. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  6. Cryopreservation of Autologous Blood (Red Blood Cells, Platelets and Plasma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebine, Kunio

    Prevention of post-transfusion hepatitis is still a problem in cardiovascular surgery. We initiated the cryopreservation of autologous blood for the transfusion in elective cardiovascular surgery since 1981. This study includes 152 surgical cases in which autologous frozen, allogeneic frozen, and/or allogeneic non-frozen blood were used. In the 152 surgical cases, there were 69 cases in which autologous blood only (Group I) was used; 12 cases with autologous and allogeneic frozen blood (Group II); 46 cases with autologous and allgeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group III); and 25 cases with allogeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group IV). No hepatitis developed in Groups I (0%) and II (0%), but there was positive hepatitis in Groups III (4.3%) and IV (8.0%) . In 357 cases of those who underwent surgery with allogeneic non-frozen whole blood during the same period, the incidence rate of hepatitis was 13.7% (49/357). Patients awaiting elective surgery can store their own blood in the frozen state. Patients who undergo surgery with the cryoautotransfusion will not produce any infections or immunologic reactions as opposed to those who undergo surgery with the allogeneic non-frozen blood.

  7. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of (14C)serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of (14C)serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of (14C)serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of (14C)serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP.

  8. Thrombin-Mediated Platelet Activation of Lysed Whole Blood and Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Comparison Between Platelet Activation Markers and Ultrastructural Alterations.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; van der Spuy, Wendy J; Kaberry, Lindsay L; Shayi, Millicent

    2016-06-01

    Platelet ultrastructural alterations representing spurious activation have been identified in pathological conditions. A limitation of platelet studies is that sample preparation may lead to artifactual activation processes which may confound results, impacting the use of scanning electron microscopy as a supplemental diagnostic tool. We used scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry to analyze platelet activation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) samples. PRP generated using a single high g force centrifugation, and WB samples treated with a red blood cell lysis buffer, were exposed to increasing concentrations of the agonist thrombin. Platelets in lysed WB samples responded to thrombin by elevating the activation marker CD62p definitively, with corresponding ultrastructural changes indicating activation. Conversely, CD62p expression in PRP preparations remained static. Ultrastructural analysis revealed fully activated platelets even under low concentration thrombin stimulation, with considerable fibrin deposition. It is proposed that the method for PRP production induced premature platelet activation, preventable by using an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and fibrin polymerization. Nevertheless, our results show a definitive correspondence between flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy in platelet activation studies, highlighting the potential of the latter technique as a supplemental diagnostic tool. PMID:27329313

  9. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults.

  10. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  11. A comparison of six major platelet functional tests to assess the impact of carbon nanomaterials on platelet function: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Laloy, Julie; Mullier, François; Alpan, Lutfiye; Mejia, Jorge; Lucas, Stéphane; Chatelain, Bernard; Toussaint, Olivier; Masereel, Bernard; Rolin, Stéphanie; Dogné, Jean-Michel

    2014-03-01

    The study of the haemocompatibility of nanomaterials that could be in contact with blood (e.g. nanoparticle (NP)-based drug-delivery system) is of major importance. The primary objective of this study was to compare the ability of six platelet functional tests to assess the impact of NPs on platelet function. The secondary objective was to determine an accurate and reliable screening test to measure the potential impact of NPs on primary haemostasis whatever their physicochemical properties. Four types of carbon NPs (carbon black, fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes) were investigated on six platelet function tests: light transmission aggregometry, whole-blood impedance aggregometry, platelet function analyser-100 (PFA-100®) and Cone-and-Plate(let) analyser (Impact-R®), transmission- and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). We considered that Impact-R® supported by FEG-SEM is the reference method to investigate the potential impact of NPs on platelet function.

  12. Association of MicroRNAs and YRNAs with Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Lukas H.; Barwari, Temo; Willeit, Peter; Pechlaner, Raimund; Sunderland, Nicholas P.; Willeit, Karin; Morton, Allison C.; Armstrong, Paul C.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lu, Ruifang; Yin, Xiaoke; Gracio, Filipe; Dudek, Katarzyna; Langley, Sarah R.; Zampetaki, Anna; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Ye, Shu; Warner, Timothy D.; Saxena, Alka; Kiechl, Stefan; Storey, Robert F.; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Platelets shed microRNAs (miRNAs). Plasma miRNAs change upon platelet inhibition. It is unclear if plasma miRNA levels correlate with platelet function. Objective To link small RNAs to platelet reactivity. Methods and Results Next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in plasma revealed two peaks at 22-23 and 32-33 nucleotides corresponding to miRNAs and YRNAs, respectively. Among YRNAs, predominantly fragments of RNY4 and RNY5 were detected. Plasma miRNAs and YRNAs were measured in 125 patients with a history of ACS who had undergone detailed assessment of platelet function 30 days after the acute event. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions, 92 miRNAs were assessed in ACS patients on different anti-platelet therapies. Key platelet-related miRNAs and YRNAs were correlated with platelet function tests. MiR-223 (rp=0.28, n=121, P=0.002), miR-126 (rp=0.22, n=121, P=0.016), other abundant platelet miRNAs and YRNAs showed significant positive correlations with the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay. YRNAs, miR-126 and miR-223 were also among the small RNAs showing the greatest dependency on platelets, and strongly correlated with plasma levels of P-selectin, platelet factor 4 and platelet basic protein in the population-based Bruneck study (n=669). A single nucleotide polymorphism that facilitates processing of pri-miR-126 to mature miR-126 accounted for a rise in circulating platelet activation markers. Inhibition of miR-126 in mice reduced platelet aggregation. MiR-126 directly and indirectly affects ADAM9 and P2Y12 receptor expression. Conclusions Levels of platelet-related plasma miRNAs and YRNAs correlate with platelet function tests in ACS patients and platelet activation markers in the general population. Alterations in miR-126 affect platelet reactivity. PMID:26646931

  13. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  14. Abnormal Whole Blood Thrombi in Humans with Inherited Platelet Receptor Defects

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Francis J.; Liang, Zhong; Davis, Patrick K.; Balsara, Rashna D.; Musunuru, Harsha; Donahue, Deborah L.; Smith, Denise L.; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    To delineate the critical features of platelets required for formation and stability of thrombi, thromboelastography and platelet aggregation measurements were employed on whole blood of normal patients and of those with Bernard-Soulier Syndrome (BSS) and Glanzmann’s Thrombasthenia (GT). We found that separation of platelet activation, as assessed by platelet aggregation, from that needed to form viscoelastic stable whole blood thrombi, occurred. In normal human blood, ristocetin and collagen aggregated platelets, but did not induce strong viscoelastic thrombi. However, ADP, arachidonic acid, thrombin, and protease-activated-receptor-1 and -4 agonists, stimulated both processes. During this study, we identified the genetic basis of a very rare double heterozygous GP1b deficiency in a BSS patient, along with a new homozygous GP1b inactivating mutation in another BSS patient. In BSS whole blood, ADP responsiveness, as measured by thrombus strength, was diminished, while ADP-induced platelet aggregation was normal. Further, the platelets of 3 additional GT patients showed very weak whole blood platelet aggregation toward the above agonists and provided whole blood thrombi of very low viscoelastic strength. These results indicate that measurements of platelet counts and platelet aggregability do not necessarily correlate with generation of stable thrombi, a potentially significant feature in patient clinical outcomes. PMID:23300803

  15. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  16. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  17. A Spatial-Temporal Model of Platelet Deposition and Blood Coagulation Under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiderman Gregg, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    In the event of a vascular injury, a blood clot will form to prevent bleeding. This response involves two intertwined processes: platelet aggregation and coagulation. Activated platelets are critical to coagulation in that they provide localized reactive surfaces on which many of the coagulation reactions occur. The final product from the coagulation cascade directly couples the coagulation system to platelet aggregation by acting as a strong activator of platelets and cleaving blood-borne fibrinogen into fibrin which then forms a mesh to help stabilize platelet aggregates. Together, the fibrin mesh and the platelet aggregates comprise a blood clot, which in some cases, can grow to occlusive diameters. Transport of coagulation proteins to and from the vicinity of the injury is controlled largely by the dynamics of the blood flow. It is crucial to learn how blood flow affects the growth of clots, and how the growing masses, in turn, feed back and affect the fluid motion. We have developed the first spatial-temporal model of platelet deposition and blood coagulation under flow that includes detailed decriptions of the coagulation biochemistry, chemical activation and deposition of blood platelets, as well as the two-way interaction between the fluid dynamics and the growing platelet mass.

  18. Imipramine binding in subpopulations of normal human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1984-02-01

    Imipramine binding was studied in platelet membranes isolated with different proportions of heavy (young) and light (old) platelets. The B/sub max/, a measure of the number of binding sites, was greater in the heavier platelets than in the light platelets. However, the dissociation constant K/sub d/ (a reflection of the affinity of imipramine binding) was greater in the lighter platelets compared to the heavy platelets. These results indicate that differences in K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ in particular membrane preparation, could be due to the differences in the relative proportion of heavy and light platelets.

  19. Blood sample stability at room temperature for counting red and white blood cells and platelets.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, S A; Posthuma, D; Boomsma, D; Kluft, C

    2002-08-01

    Blood handling required for different cellular variables is different. In a practical setting of blood sampling approximately 4 h separated from the first analysis, we compared the analysis of blood cell variables at this 4-h point with analysis of blood stored for approximately 48 h (over the weekend) at room temperature. Blood was collected from 304 apparently healthy individuals aged between 17 and 70 years, with a female/male ratio of 1.8, in K3EDTA. Measurement was performed with a Beckman Coulter Counter Maxm. In addition to the comparison of the data and their correlation on the two time points, we investigated agreement between the data using analysis according to Bland and Altman. Counts of white and red blood cells and platelets were found stable over time and agreement of data was excellent. Platelet mean volume increased as expected between the two time points from 8.8 to 10.3 fl. The white blood cell subpopulations, however, changed over time with a decrease in neutrophils and monocytes and increases in lymphocytes and eosinophils. Apparently, ageing of the sample resulted in the alteration of certain cell characteristics leading to a change in automated cell classification without changing the total number of cells. Among the preanalytical variables recorded, only the time of the year and gender were found to be minor determinants (r < .25) of some of the differences between approximately 4 and approximately 48 h analysis delay. It is concluded that after storage at room temperature over approximately 48 h counts of red, total white cells, platelets and analysis of platelet volume can be combined in one assay session.

  20. Detection of reticulated platelets in whole blood of rats using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pankraz, Alexander; Ledieu, David; Pralet, Dominique; Provencher-Bolliger, Anne

    2008-09-01

    As opposed to erythropoiesis, which is regularly assessed in the peripheral blood of animals by reticulocyte count, thrombopoiesis is rarely assessed in assays that detect immature platelets in the peripheral blood. An assessment of recent thrombopoiesis is feasible with the analysis of reticulated platelets in the peripheral blood via flow cytometry, but rarely performed. The aim of this study was to establish an assay for the detection of reticulated platelets in whole blood of rats via flow cytometry, using a two-color staining method with a platelet-specific antibody (CD61-PE) and thiazole orange to detect RNA-containing platelets. Platelets were detected in K3EDTA-anticoagulated, paraformaldehyde-fixed samples, using a CD61-PE antibody as well as a gate specific for the light scatter properties of platelets. The intra-assay coefficient of variation varied between 3.6% and 8.3% (n=6 animals). The stability of the assay was determined by storing blood prior to staining, storing stained samples for up to 2h at room temperature, and by diluting the blood prior to analysis with autologous plasma to create samples with artificial anemia and thrombocytopenia. Only samples stored at room temperature prior to analysis showed a significantly lower percentage of reticulated platelets. Percentage of reticulated platelets in the reference population (n=41 rats) was 10.0+/-1.3% reticulated platelets (mean+/-SD; min=6.2%; max=12.5%). These data show that the detection of reticulated platelets in whole blood of rats using a platelet-specific antibody is feasible. This test presents a minimal-invasive method to assess thrombopoiesis in rats that can be used for example in preclinical toxicological studies.

  1. High content evaluation of shear dependent platelet function in a microfluidic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Wufsus, Adam R; Barton, Steven T; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Johnson-Paben, Rebecca M; Neeves, Keith B

    2013-02-01

    The high blood volume requirements and low throughput of conventional flow assays for measuring platelet function are unsuitable for drug screening and clinical applications. In this study, we describe a microfluidic flow assay that uses 50 μL of whole blood to measure platelet function on ~300 micropatterned spots of collagen over a range of physiologic shear rates (50-920 s(-1)). Patterning of collagen thin films (CTF) was achieved using a novel hydrated microcontact stamping method. CTF spots of 20, 50, and 100 μm were defined on glass substrates and consisted of a dense mat of nanoscale collagen fibers (3.74 ± 0.75 nm). We found that a spot size of greater than 20 μm was necessary to support platelet adhesion under flow, suggesting a threshold injury size is necessary for stable platelet adhesion. Integrating 50 μm CTF microspots into a multishear microfluidic device yielded a high content assay from which we extracted platelet accumulation metrics (lag time, growth rate, total accumulation) on the spots using Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy. This method has potential broad application in identifying platelet function defects and screening, monitoring, and dosing antiplatelet agents. PMID:23001359

  2. High content evaluation of shear dependent platelet function in a microfluidic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Wufsus, Adam R; Barton, Steven T; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Johnson-Paben, Rebecca M; Neeves, Keith B

    2013-02-01

    The high blood volume requirements and low throughput of conventional flow assays for measuring platelet function are unsuitable for drug screening and clinical applications. In this study, we describe a microfluidic flow assay that uses 50 μL of whole blood to measure platelet function on ~300 micropatterned spots of collagen over a range of physiologic shear rates (50-920 s(-1)). Patterning of collagen thin films (CTF) was achieved using a novel hydrated microcontact stamping method. CTF spots of 20, 50, and 100 μm were defined on glass substrates and consisted of a dense mat of nanoscale collagen fibers (3.74 ± 0.75 nm). We found that a spot size of greater than 20 μm was necessary to support platelet adhesion under flow, suggesting a threshold injury size is necessary for stable platelet adhesion. Integrating 50 μm CTF microspots into a multishear microfluidic device yielded a high content assay from which we extracted platelet accumulation metrics (lag time, growth rate, total accumulation) on the spots using Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy. This method has potential broad application in identifying platelet function defects and screening, monitoring, and dosing antiplatelet agents.

  3. Evaluation of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus on biological properties of blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus in blood platelets stimulated by thrombin was studied. Thrombin as a strong physiological agonist induces the enzymatic peroxidation of endogenous arachidonic acid, the formation of different reactive oxygen species, including superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text](·)) and the platelet aggregation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the polyphenolic fraction from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus may change the biological properties of blood platelets activated by thrombin. We used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this fraction to change [Formula: see text](·) generation in platelets. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin (8-EPI) F(2). Moreover, we determined the effects of the fraction on blood platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. We observed that the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced [Formula: see text](·), 8-EPI and TBARS production in these cells. The ability of the fraction to decrease the [Formula: see text](·) generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. This study may suggest that the tested plant fraction might be a good candidate for protecting blood platelets against changes of their biological functions, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular disorders.

  4. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Ramasubramoni, Anjana; Pula, Giordano; Harper, Matthew T.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Coxon, Carmen H.

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12) to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase). In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb). This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents. PMID:27716777

  5. Proteasome proteolysis supports stimulated platelet function and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilaksh; Li, Wei; Willard, Belinda; Silverstein, Roy L.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Proteasome inhibitors are in use to treat hematologic cancers, but also reduce thrombosis. Whether the proteasome participates in platelet activation or function is opaque since little is known of the proteasome in these terminally differentiated cells. Approach and Results Platelets displayed all three primary proteasome protease activities, which MG132 and bortezomib (Velcade®) inhibited. Proteasome substrates are marked by ubiquitin, and platelets contained a functional ubiquitination system that modified the proteome by mono- and poly-ubiquitination. Systemic MG132 strongly suppressed formation of occlusive, platelet-rich thrombi in FeCl3-damaged carotid arteries. Transfusion of platelets treated ex vivo with MG132 and washed prior to transfusion into thrombocytopenic mice also reduced carotid artery thrombosis. Proteasome inhibition reduced platelet aggregation by low thrombin concentrations and ristocetin-stimulated agglutination through the GPIb-IX-V complex. This receptor was not appropriately internalized after proteasome inhibition in stimulated platelets, and spreading and clot retraction after MG132 exposure also were decreased. The effects of proteasome inhibitors were not confined to a single receptor as MG132 suppressed thrombin-, ADP-, and LPS-stimulated microparticle shedding. Proteasome inhibition increased ubiquitin decoration of cytoplasmic proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins Filamin A and Talin-1. Mass spectrometry revealed a single MG132-sensitive tryptic cleavage after R1745 in an extended Filamin A loop, which would separate its actin-binding domain from its carboxy terminal GPIbα binding domain. Conclusions Platelets contain a ubiquitin/proteasome system that marks cytoskeletal proteins for proteolytic modification to promote productive platelet-platelet and platelet-wall interactions. PMID:24177323

  6. Acidosis downregulates platelet haemostatic functions and promotes neutrophil proinflammatory responses mediated by platelets.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Carestia, Agostina; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Romaniuk, María Albertina; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Klement, Giannoula Lakka; Schattner, Mirta

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis is one of the hallmarks of tissue injury such as trauma, infection, inflammation, and tumour growth. Although platelets participate in the pathophysiology of all these processes, the impact of acidosis on platelet biology has not been studied outside of the quality control of laboratory aggregation assays or platelet transfusion optimization. Herein, we evaluate the effect of physiologically relevant changes in extracellular acidosis on the biological function of platelets, placing particular emphasis on haemostatic and secretory functions. Platelet haemostatic responses such as adhesion, spreading, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, ATP release, aggregation, thromboxane B2 generation, clot retraction and procoagulant activity including phosphatidilserine exposure and microparticle formation, showed a statistically significant inhibition of thrombin-induced changes at pH of 7.0 and 6.5 compared to the physiological pH (7.4). The release of alpha granule content was differentially regulated by acidosis. At low pH, thrombin or collagen-induced secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and endostatin were dramatically reduced. The release of von Willebrand factor and stromal derived factor-1α followed a similar, albeit less dramatic pattern. In contrast, the induction of CD40L was not changed by low pH, and P-selectin exposure was significantly increased. While the generation of mixed platelet-leukocyte aggregates and the increased chemotaxis of neutrophils mediated by platelets were further augmented under acidic conditions in a P-selectin dependent manner, the increased neutrophil survival was independent of P-selectin expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that extracellular acidosis downregulates most of the haemostatic platelet functions, and promotes those involved in amplifying the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory response.

  7. An ethanol extract of Ramulus mori improves blood circulation by inhibiting platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Park, Jieun; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Choe, Soo Young; Seo, Yoonhee; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can cause blood coagulation and thrombosis. In this study, the effect of an ethanol extract of Ramulus mori (ERM) on blood circulation was investigated. The antithrombotic activity of ERM on rat carotid arterial thrombosis was evaluated in vivo, and the effect of ERM on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation time was evaluated ex vivo. To evaluate the safety of ERM, its cytotoxicity to platelets and its effect on tail bleeding time were assessed; ERM was not toxic to rat platelets and did not prolong bleeding time. Moreover, administering ERM to rats had a significant preventive effect on carotid arterial thrombosis in vivo, and significantly inhibited adenosine diphosphate- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo, whereas it did not prolong coagulation periods, such as prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results suggest that ERM is effective in improving blood circulation via antiplatelet activity rather than anticoagulation activity.

  8. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  9. Interactions of human blood-platelets with vaccinia

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, C.E.B.

    1989-01-01

    These investigations were conducted to determine whether vaccinia (strain WR) adsorbs to the human platelet and alters specific platelet activities, namely, the uptake of {sup 14}C-serotonin, the release of {sup 14}C-serotonin and also the release of {sup 14}C-serotonin stimulated by thrombin. Vaccinia did not alter the platelet uptake of {sup 14}C-serotonin. To determine if vaccinia induces a release of {sup 14}C-serotonin from platelets, vaccinia was added to washed or unwashed {sup 14}C-serotonin labeled platelets, and the release of {sup 14}C-Serotonin into the supernatant was measured. Less than 8% of the {sup 14}C-Serotonin was released. The action of vaccinia to alter the platelet release of {sup 14}C-serotonin induced by thrombin was monitored by measuring the radioactivity released from thrombin stimulated {sup 14}C-serotonin labeled platelets incubated with or without vaccinia. Vaccinia inhibited the thrombin induced release of {sup 14}C-serotonin from platelets at a virus to platelet ratios of 5 through 80 plaque forming units (p.f.u.)/platelet. The inhibition was dose dependent. The binding of virus to platelets was determined by a plaque assay of a washed mixture of vaccinia virus and platelets. After inoculation of mixture onto a monolayer of BSC40 cells at a virus to platelet ratio of 0.1 p.f.u./platelet, 50 cell-bound-virus per 130,000-150,000 platelets were enumerated. Vaccinia was observed to inhibit the thrombin induced clot formation of plasma by a thrombin clotting time test. Scanning electron micrographs of the clot formed in the presence of vaccinia revealed a close packed fibrous structure lacking the cross-linked mesh-like pattern seen in a normal clot. Transmission electron micrographs showed an increase in the length and a close packing of the fibrin threads.

  10. Desmopressin in vitro effects on platelet function, monitored with Multiplate, ROTEM and Sonoclot.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kevin; Jensen, Hanna; Kander, Thomas; Schött, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Background and aims The vasopressin analogue desmopressin has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing bleeding time by increasing the circulating levels of coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor, but also by direct effects on platelets. Previous studies have demonstrated contrasting results regarding the effect of desmopressin on platelets in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-response effects of in vitro desmopressin in whole blood. Our hypothesis was that desmopressin could increase platelet function in anticoagulated whole blood being stored up to 4 hours. Methods Desmopressin was administered with up to four different concentrations to venous whole blood, sampled with standard vacutainer tubes from 10 healthy volunteers after consent. Platelet function was analyzed with three different point-of-care techniques: Multiplate platelet aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6, ristocetin and arachidonic acid agonists, tissue factor-activated thromboelastometry and Sonoclot glass bead viscoelastic coagulation tests at baseline and 4 hours later using different activator reagents. Results Thromboelastometry and Sonoclot did not show any significant change between baseline and 4 h later. A significant decrease in area under curve (AUC) could be seen with the Multiplate between baseline and after 4 h. Desmopressin did not improve any of these tests at baseline or during a 4 h storage and incubation period. Conclusion In vitro administered desmopressin could not increase normal platelet function or coagulation being measured with thromboelastometry and Sonoclot. Multiplate indicated decreased platelet aggregation over time, without any effect of in vitro added desmopressin. PMID:26923171

  11. Influence of different intravascular volume therapies on platelet function in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Boldt, J; Knothe, C; Zickmann, B; Andres, P; Dapper, F; Hempelmann, G

    1993-06-01

    The influence of four different kinds of intravascular volume replacement on platelet function was investigated in 60 patients undergoing elective aortocoronary bypass grafting using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In a randomized sequence, high-molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch solution (HMW-HES, mean molecular weight [Mw] 450,000 d), low-molecular weight HES (LMW-HES, Mw 200,000 d), 3.5% gelatin or 5% albumin were infused preoperatively to double reduced filling pressure (pulmonary capillary wedge pressure [PCWP] < 5 mm Hg). Fifteen untreated patients served as a control. Platelet function was assessed by aggregometry using turbidometric technique (inductors: ADP, epinephrine, collagen). Maximum aggregation, maximum gradient of aggregation, and platelet volume were measured before, during, and after CPB until the first postoperative day. HMW-HES 840 +/- 90 mL, LMW 850 +/- 100 mL, gelatin 950 +/- 110 mL, and albumin 810 +/- 100 mL were given preoperatively. Maximum platelet aggregation (ranging from -23% to -44% relative from baseline value) and maximum gradient of platelet aggregation (ranging from -26% to -45% relative from baseline values) were reduced only in the HMW-HES patients. After CPB, aggregometry also was impaired most markedly in these patients. The other volume groups showed less reduction in platelet aggregation and were similar to the untreated control. On the first postoperative day, aggregation variables had returned almost to baseline in all patients. Platelet volume was the same among the groups within the investigation period. Postbypass blood loss was highest in the HMW-HES group (890 +/- 180 mL). There was significant (P < 0.04) correlation in this group between blood loss and change in platelet aggregation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684579

  12. Anucleate platelets generate progeny

    PubMed Central

    Schwertz, Hansjörg; Köster, Sarah; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Michetti, Noemi; Kraemer, Bjoern F.; Weitz, David A.; Blaylock, Robert C.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Greinacher, Andreas; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are classified as terminally differentiated cells that are incapable of cellular division. However, we observe that anucleate human platelets, either maintained in suspension culture or captured in microdrops, give rise to new cell bodies packed with respiring mitochondria and α-granules. Platelet progeny formation also occurs in whole blood cultures. Newly formed platelets are structurally indistinguishable from normal platelets, are able to adhere and spread on extracellular matrix, and display normal signal-dependent expression of surface P-selectin and annexin V. Platelet progeny formation is accompanied by increases in biomass, cellular protein levels, and protein synthesis in expanding populations. Platelet numbers also increase during ex vivo storage. These observations indicate that platelets have a previously unrecognized capacity for producing functional progeny, which involves a form of cell division that does not require a nucleus. Because this new function of platelets occurs outside of the bone marrow milieu, it raises the possibility that thrombopoiesis continues in the bloodstream. PMID:20086251

  13. Human plasma epidermal growth factor/beta-urogastrone is associated with blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Y; Orth, D N

    1983-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) has previously been isolated from urine and probably is identical to human beta-urogastrone (hUG). Immunoreactive hEGF/UG has been found in the plasma of normal subjects. In this study, using immunoaffinity chromatography to extract hEGF/UG from plasma, we found that immunoreactive hEGF/UG in blood was associated with blood platelets. It was present in platelet-rich, but not platelet-poor plasma and serum, and was found predominantly in the platelet fraction of whole blood. Sephadex G-50 Fine gel-exclusion chromatography of an extract of outdated blood bank platelets revealed two hEGF/UG components, one of which eluted in the void volume, and the other of which coeluted with purified standard hEGF/UG. The former hEGF/UG component was a high-molecular weight form that was cleaved into hEGF/UG by incubation with either mouse EGF/UG-associated arginine esterase or trypsin. It appeared to be identical to the high-molecular weight hEGF/UG previously reported in human urine, except for its apparently equal activities in radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. The latter hEGF/UG component was immunologically, biologically, and physiochemically indistinguishable from highly purified hEGF/UG from human urine and was immunologically different from purified human platelet-derived growth factor. Platelet-associated hEGF/UG may account for the mitogenic activity of serum in cell lines in which platelet-derived growth factor is not active. Since hEGF/UG appears to be liberated from platelets during coagulation, platelet-associated EGF/UG may be involved in normal vascular and tissue repair and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. The discovery that the EGF/UG in plasma is associated with blood platelets raises important new possibilities for its role in human health and disease. PMID:6603475

  14. Parnaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, prevents P-selectin-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Norma; Di Fabio, Giovannina; Barbanti, Miriam; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Donati, Maria Benedetta; Cerletti, Chiara

    2007-06-01

    Parnaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), prevents platelet activation and interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) in a washed cell system. The in-vitro effect of parnaparin was studied here on platelet-PMN aggregates formed with more physiologic approaches in whole blood, in parallel with unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin, another LMWH. Citrated blood from healthy subjects was stimulated: i) from passage through the "Platelet Function Analyzer" (PFA-100), a device that exposes blood to standardized high shear flow through collagen/ADP cartridges; ii) by collagen and ADP (2 and 50 mug/ml, respectively) added in combination under stirring in an aggregometer cuvette; iii) with recombinant Tissue Factor, to generate thrombin concentrations able to activate platelets without inducing blood clotting, or iv) the Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide-6 (TRAP-6). Platelet P-selectin and platelet-PMN aggregates were measured by flow cytometry upon stimulation of blood. Fibrinogen binding to platelets and markers of PMN activation were also detected. Platelet P-selectin expression and platelet-PMN aggregate formation were induced in all four activation conditions tested. Parnaparin prevented in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-0.8 IUaXa/ml) the expression of P-selectin and the formation of mixed aggregates, while the two reference heparin preparations had a much weaker effect. Platelet fibrinogen binding and PMN activation markers (fibrinogen binding, CD11b and CD40) were also prevented by parnaparin. These data extend in more physiological systems of platelet activation, the anti-inflammatory profile of parnaparin, previously reported in washed cells. The greater effect of parnaparin, as compared to the reference heparins, could be due to chemico-physical differences possibly unrelated to their anticoagulant effect. PMID:17549299

  15. Platelet proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  16. Cytosolic free calcium in platelets: relationships to blood pressure and indices of systemic calcium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hvarfner, A; Larsson, R; Mörlin, C; Rastad, J; Wide, L; Akerström, G; Ljunghall, S

    1988-01-01

    Relationships between cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in platelets, indices of systemic calcium metabolism and blood pressure were examined in 86 subjects; 29 patients with untreated and 29 patients with treated essential hypertension, six patients with borderline hypertension and 22 healthy reference subjects. In order to analyse interactions between the variables, multivariate statistical analyses were employed. The patients with untreated hypertension had higher [Ca2+]i values in non-activated platelets (P = 0.04) and lower levels of plasma ionized calcium (P = 0.02) than the reference subjects. In multivariate models analysing platelet [Ca2+]i mean blood pressure (MBP), plasma ionized calcium, serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and body mass index (BMI), the relationship between platelet [Ca2+]i and blood pressure was attenuated (P = 0.13), whereas the inverse relationships between plasma ionized calcium and MBP (P = 0.01) and between platelet [Ca2+]i and serum PTH (P = 0.06) seen in univariate analyses persisted. According to the multivariate models the [Ca2+]i value explained only 5% of the MBP variability. Thus, the data from this investigation do not support a close relationship between basal platelet [Ca2+]i and blood pressure. The inverse relationship between plasma ionized calcium and blood pressure, independent of platelet [Ca2+]i and serum PTH, suggests a direct interaction between plasma ionized calcium and blood pressure regulation.

  17. Effects of high flavanol dark chocolate on cardiovascular function and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rull, Gurvinder; Mohd-Zain, Zetty N; Shiel, Julian; Lundberg, Martina H; Collier, David J; Johnston, Atholl; Warner, Timothy D; Corder, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Regular consumption of chocolate and cocoa products has been linked to reduced cardiovascular mortality. This study compared the effects of high flavanol dark chocolate (HFDC; 1064mg flavanols/day for 6weeks) and low flavanol dark chocolate (LFDC; 88mg flavanols/day for 6weeks) on blood pressure, heart rate, vascular function and platelet aggregation in men with pre-hypertension or mild hypertension. Vascular function was assessed by pulse wave analysis using radial artery applanation tonometry in combination with inhaled salbutamol (0.4mg) to assess changes due to endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. HFDC did not significantly reduce blood pressure compared to baseline or LFDC. Heart rate was increased by LFDC compared to baseline, but not by HFDC. Vascular responses to salbutamol tended to be greater after HFDC. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen or the thromboxane analogue U46619 was unchanged after LFDC or HFDC, whereas both chocolates reduced responses to ADP and the thrombin receptor activator peptide, SFLLRNamide (TRAP6), relative to baseline. Pre-incubation of platelets with theobromine also attenuated platelet aggregation induced by ADP or TRAP6. We conclude that consumption of HFDC confers modest improvements in cardiovascular function. Platelet aggregation is modulated by a flavanol-independent mechanism that is likely due to theobromine.

  18. Investigating the fluid mechanics behind red blood cell-induced lateral platelet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting; they adhere to damaged tissue and release chemicals that activate other platelets. Yet in order to adhere, platelets must first come into contact with the injured vessel wall. Under arterial flow conditions, platelets have an enhanced concentration near blood vessel walls. This non-uniform cell distribution depends on the fluid dynamics of blood as a heterogeneous medium. We use a parallelized lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to solve the flow dynamics of red cells and platelets in a periodic 2D vessel with no-slip boundary conditions. Red cells are treated as biconcave immersed boundary objects with isotropic Skalak membrane tension and an internal viscosity five times that of the surrounding plasma. Using this method we analyze the influence of shear rate, hematocrit, and red cell membrane properties on lateral platelet motion. We find that the effective diffusion of platelets is significantly lower near the vessel wall compared to the center of the vessel. Insight gained from this work could lead to significant improvements to current models for platelet adhesion where the presence of red blood cells is neglected due to computational intensity.

  19. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  20. Utility of the ISTH bleeding assessment tool in predicting platelet defects in participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, G C; Lordkipanidzé, M; Watson on behalf of the uk gapp study group, S P

    2013-01-01

    Background The ISTH bleeding assessment tool (ISTH-BAT) was developed to record bleeding symptoms and to aid diagnosis in patients with a possible bleeding disorder. Objectives To investigate the utility of the ISTH-BAT in predicting functional defects in platelet activation in participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders. Patients/Methods Participants with clinical evidence of excessive bleeding and suspected inherited platelet function disorders and healthy volunteers were recruited to the Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study (GAPP; ISRCTN 77951167). The ISTH-BAT questionnaire was applied by a trained investigator prior to lumiaggregometry. Results One hundred participants were included (79 with suspected inherited platelet function disorders, and 21 healthy volunteers). The ISTH-BAT score in participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders (median 12; interquartile range [IQR] 8–16) was significantly higher than in healthy volunteers (median 0; IQR 0–0). There was no difference between participants with suspected inherited platelet function disorders with a platelet defect detected by lumiaggregometry (median 11; IQR 8–16) and those with normal platelet function (median 12; IQR 8–14) (P > 0.05). The ISTH-BAT score was not associated with a demonstrable platelet defect on platelet function testing (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.501 [95% confidence interval 0.372–0.630, P = 0.98] and odds ratio 1.01 [95% confidence interval 0.93–1.09, P = 0.91]). Conclusions The ISTH-BAT is a powerful tool for documenting lifelong bleeding history. However, the score obtained is not predictive of the presence of a platelet defect on lumiaggregometry in patients with suspected inherited platelet function disorders. PMID:23809206

  1. Free radical-mediated platelet activation by hemoglobin released from red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, L; Violi, F; Pedersen, J Z; Praticò, D; Rotilio, G; Balsano, F

    1992-12-01

    It is known that the rate of thrombus formation depends on interaction between platelets and erythrocytes, but the mechanism of this process has remained obscure. We here show that nanomolar levels of hemoglobin released from damaged red blood cells can induce platelet aggregation. The molecular mechanism is not receptor-based, but involves oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by platelet-derived hydrogen peroxide, with subsequent generation of a small unknown free radical species, detected by ESR spectroscopy. Methemoglobin and carbon monoxide-treated hemoglobin are unable to cause platelet activation or radical formation. The aggregation of platelets induced by hemoglobin is completely blocked by catalase or radical scavengers. These findings indicate a role for a novel extracellular free radical second messenger in the activation of platelets.

  2. Platelet Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, the platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach ...

  3. Effect of the esters of gallic acid on model and human blood platelet membranes studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, S P; Hu, P R

    1993-06-01

    Gallic acid is one of the components of Chinese herbal drug Radix paeoniae used for promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis. This paper studied the effects of gallic acid and its esters (e.g. ethyl, propyl, isobutyl and butyl gallate) on model and human blood platelet membranes by FTIR which was used for monitoring the physical state of the acyl chain, interfacial and head group region of the membrane lipid bilayer. From the experimental results it can be seen that the gallic acid and its esters have the modifying function on the pure and cholesterol-containing DPPC model membranes, and have the quantity-effective and structural-effective relationships. In addition, it is discovered that these esters have the modifying effect on the structure of human blood platelet membrane and can reverse the effect of ADP. That the effect of the esters of gallic acid counteracts the effect of cholesterol and ADP on human blood platelet perhaps provides a new explanation of the mechanism of Chinese herbal drugs used for promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis.

  4. Era of blood component therapy: time for mandatory pre-donation platelet count for maximizing donor safety and optimizing quality of platelets.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, R U; Biswas, Dipak

    2013-12-01

    Blood bank regulatory agencies including the Drug and Cosmetics Act (DCA) of India do not mandate a predonation platelet count in whole blood donation. Mandating such practice will definitely optimize the quality of random donor platelets (RDP) in terms of platelet yield and patient therapeutic benefit. We observed poor platelet yield in RDP concentrates prepared at our center with a significant number not meeting the DCA guideline of ≥ 4.5 × 10(10) per bag processed from 450 ml of whole blood. Therefore we planned this study to evaluate the pre-donation hematological values in our blood donor population and effect of these values on the quality of platelet concentrates. The prospective study included 221 blood donors eligible for donating 450 ml of whole blood (WB). Following the departmental standard operating procedure (SOP) RDPs were prepared using the 'Top & Bottom' quadruple bag system and automated component extractor. Quality of RDP was assessed as per departmental protocol. All results were recorded and subsequently transcribed to SPSS working sheet. A significant (p<0.001) decrement of donor blood counts has been observed after WB donation. Mean donor Hb and platelets reduced by 0.72 g/dl and 22.1 × 10(6)/ml respectively. Quality of RDPs in terms of platelet yield was significantly better (p<0.001) when donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Although platelet yield significantly correlated with the donor platelet count however quality of RDPs in terms of red cell contamination showed no correlation with the donor hematocrit. Platelet yield in random donor platelets is a concern in Eastern India. A platelet yield of 4.5 × 10(10) per bag as mandated by the DCA of India was only achieved when the donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Posttransfusion platelet recovery (PPR) was unsatisfactory in the transfused patient. Introduction of pre-donation platelet count in whole blood donation will maximize donor safety and optimize patient platelet

  5. Microfluidic assessment of functional culture-derived platelets in human thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Muthard, Ryan W; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Despite their clinical significance, human platelets are not amenable to genetic manipulation, thus forcing a reliance on mouse models. Culture-derived platelets (CDPs) from human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells can be genetically altered and may eventually be used for transfusions. By use of microfluidics, the time-dependent incorporation of CD41(+)CD42(+) CDPs into clots was measured using only 54,000 CDPs doped into 27 μL of human whole blood perfused over collagen at a wall shear rate of 100 sec(-1). With the use of fluorescence-labeled human platelets (instead of CDPs) doped between 0.25% and 2% of total platelets, incorporation was highly quantitative and allowed monitoring of the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonism that occurred after collagen adhesion. CDPs were only 15% as efficient as human platelets in their incorporation into human thrombi under flow, although both cell types were equally antagonized by αIIbβ3 inhibition. Transient transfection allowed the monitoring of GFP(+) human CDP incorporation into clots. This assay quantifies genetically altered CDP function under flow. PMID:26145051

  6. Microfluidic assessment of functional culture-derived platelets in human thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Muthard, Ryan W; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Despite their clinical significance, human platelets are not amenable to genetic manipulation, thus forcing a reliance on mouse models. Culture-derived platelets (CDPs) from human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells can be genetically altered and may eventually be used for transfusions. By use of microfluidics, the time-dependent incorporation of CD41(+)CD42(+) CDPs into clots was measured using only 54,000 CDPs doped into 27 μL of human whole blood perfused over collagen at a wall shear rate of 100 sec(-1). With the use of fluorescence-labeled human platelets (instead of CDPs) doped between 0.25% and 2% of total platelets, incorporation was highly quantitative and allowed monitoring of the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonism that occurred after collagen adhesion. CDPs were only 15% as efficient as human platelets in their incorporation into human thrombi under flow, although both cell types were equally antagonized by αIIbβ3 inhibition. Transient transfection allowed the monitoring of GFP(+) human CDP incorporation into clots. This assay quantifies genetically altered CDP function under flow.

  7. The effect of a platelet cholesterol modulation on the acetylsalicylic acid-mediated blood platelet inhibition in hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Luzak, Boguslawa; Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Wilk, Radoslaw; Stanczyk, Lidia; Czyz, Malgorzata; Rysz, Jacek; Watala, Cezary

    2011-05-11

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is widely used in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, but its beneficial effects may be restrained in some individuals, where the reduced ability of ASA to protect against arterial thrombotic events is observed. We analyzed the influence of the treatment with atorvastatin (10mg/day) on the platelet sensitivity to ASA monitored under in vitro conditions in hypercholesterolemic patients. The associations between plasma or platelet cholesterol parameters and the ASA-mediated inhibition of platelet reactivity or the extent of platelet protein acetylation by ASA were estimated in the patients treated with atorvastatin for 1, 3, or 6 months. Out of 27 patients, in 17 individuals platelets appeared significantly more sensitive to 50 μM ASA in arachidonic acid- or collagen-induced whole blood aggregation following 1 month atorvastatin therapy (inhibition by 60.9 ± 5.6% vs. 48.8 ± 5.4%, P<0.05 for 0.5mM arachidonic acid, 40.8 ± 2.9% vs. 27.0 ± 4.1%, P<0.05 for 1 μg/ml collagen), and this effect lasted for 3 and 6 months, remaining in a weak, although significant, relation to the reduction of platelet cholesterol content (R(S)=-0.277, P<0.002 for arachidonic acid, R(S)=-0.197, P<0.02 for collagen). It was, however, not dependent upon either antiplatelet action or plasma lipid-lowering activity of atorvastatin. In addition, in about 50% of patients, we noticed that ASA (50 μM) significantly and time-dependently diminished thromboxane B(2) concentration in atorvastatin-treated patients. The ASA-induced acetylation of platelet proteins significantly increased in the course of atorvastatin therapy and was associated with reduced platelet cholesterol (R(S)=-0.598, P<0.0001). In conclusion, statin therapy may improve platelet sensitivity to ASA in some hypercholesterolemic patients. This effect may extend beyond the action of atorvastatin as merely a lipid-lowering agent. The mechanisms of resistance of some patients to such a

  8. Inverse relationships between coronary blood flow obstruction and platelet reactivity in stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, M; Fransson, S G; Richter, A; Järemo, P

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates relationships between platelet reactivity and coronary blood flow obstruction in stable angina pectoris. Consented were 36 patients with single-vessel disease. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group (n=14) had less severe (<=80%) and the second group (n=22) had severe coronary flow impairment (90%). Before elective coronary angiography platelet in vitro reactivity in venous whole blood was determined using a flow cytometry technique. A thrombin-receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6) (0.77 and 0.06 g/l) and ADP (8.5 and 1.7 micromol/l) were used to activate platelets. The number of fibrinogen positive cells (%) i.e., activated platelets after stimulation was employed as experimental parameter. Less severe flow obstruction was associated with more reactive platelets. When stimulating with 0.77 g/l TRAP-6 the number of activated platelets was 64+/-15 (SD)%. The corresponding value for the group with severe flow obstruction was 40+/-17(SD)%. The difference is significant (P<0.001). 0.06 g/l TRAP-6 yielded similar results (P<0.01). Also when using 8.5 micromol/l ADP to challenge platelets less severe flow obstruction was associated with enhanced reactivity (P<0.01). 1.7 micromol/l ADP generated comparable results (P<0.05). Thus, in stable angina pectoris coronary flow obstruction is inversely related to platelet reactivity. PMID:16011966

  9. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  10. No associations exist between mean platelet volume or platelet distribution width and thyroid function in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaojun; Meng, Zhaowei; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Mei; He, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Song, Kun; Jia, Qiyu; Jia, Qiang; Li, Xue; Tan, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Renfei; Liu, Na; Hu, Tianpeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) are morphometric indices of size distribution and variability of platelet. We aimed to explore the associations between MPV or PDW and thyroid function in a large Chinese cohort. This was a cross-sectional study with a recruitment of 13,622 self-reported healthy Chinese (8424 males, 5198 females). Clinical data of the participants comprised of anthropometric measurements, hepatic function, renal function, serum levels of lipid, glucose, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, platelet, MPV, PDW, and thyroid hormones. Database was sorted by sex, and the associations between MPV or PDW and thyroid function were analyzed by quartiles of MPV or PDW. Levels of MPV and PDW were compared in different thyroid function subgroups by 1-way analysis of variance and independent sample's t test. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was adopted to determine diagnostic values of MPV and PDW for thyroid dysfunction. Crude and adjusted odds ratios of MPV and PDW for thyroid dysfunction with 95% confidence intervals were analyzed by binary logistic regression models. MPV, PDW, and thyroid stimulation hormone were significantly higher in females than in males. Females showed significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism than males. However, there were no significant differences of MPV and PDW among different thyroid function subgroups in both sexes, and no obvious correlations were revealed between MPV or PDW and thyroid function. From ROC analysis, we demonstrated no diagnostic values of MPV and PDW for thyroid dysfunction. From binary logistic regression models, no risks of different MPV and PDW quartiles were identified for thyroid dysfunction in both sexes. We could not show any association between MPV or PDW and thyroid function. Prospective studies with better defined risk groups should be performed in the future for further verification and validation. PMID

  11. A myocardial ischemia- and reperfusion-induced injury is mediated by reactive oxygen species released from blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Christian; Prechtl, Gerald; Kusus-Seligmann, Magda; Daniel, Werner G

    2013-01-01

    In recent experimental studies, blood platelets have been found to exhibit some cardiodepressive effects in ischemic and reperfused guinea pig hearts independent of thrombus formation. These effects seemed to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the source of these ROS - platelets or heart - remained still unknown. Isolated, buffer-perfused and pressure-volume work performing guinea pig hearts were exposed to a low-flow ischemia (1 ml/min) of 30 min duration and reperfused at a constant flow of 5 ml/min. Human thrombocytes were administered as 1 min bolus (20 000 thrombocytes/µl perfusion buffer) in the 15th min of ischemia or in the 1st or 5th min of reperfusion in the presence of thrombin (0.3 U/ml perfusion buffer). Recovery of external heart work (REHW) was expressed as ratio between postischemic and preischemic EHW in percent. Intracoronary platelet retention (RET) was quantified as percent of platelets applied. In a second set of experiments, thrombocytes were incubated with 10 µM of the irreversible NADPH oxidase blocker diphenyliodonium chloride and washed twice, thereafter, and administered according to the same protocol as described above. Hearts exposed to ischemia and reperfusion in the presence of thrombin but without application of platelets served as controls. Controls without application of platelets did not reveal a severe compromisation of myocardial function (REHW 85.5 ± 1%). However, addition of platelets during ischemia or in the 1st or 5th min of reperfusion led to a significant reduction of REHW as compared with controls (REHW 62.4 ± 6, 53.9 ± 3, 40.5 ± 3, respectively). Application of platelets pretreated with diphenyliodonium chloride did not reveal any cardiodepressive effects being significantly different from controls without platelet application. Moreover, treatment of platelets with diphenyliodonium chloride did not significantly decrease intracoronary platelet retention. In conclusion, these results demonstrate

  12. Platelet lipidomic.

    PubMed

    Dolegowska, B; Lubkowska, A; De Girolamo, L

    2012-01-01

    Lipids account for 16-19 percent dry platelet matter and includes 65 percent phospholipids, 25 percent neutral lipids and about 8 percent glycosphingolipids. The cell membrane that surrounds platelets is a bilayer that contains different types phospholipids symmetrically distributed in resting platelets, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. The collapse of lipid asymmetry is exposure of phosphatidylserine in the external leaflet of the plasma bilayer, where it is known to serve at least two major functions: providing a platform for development of the blood coagulation cascade and presenting the signal that induces phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. During activation, this asymmetrical distribution becomes disrupted, and PS and PE become exposed on the cell surface. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine is responsible for the platelet procoagulant activity. Exposure of phosphatidylserine is a flag for macrophage recognition and clearance from the circulation. Platelets, stored at room temperature for transfusion for more than 5 days, undergo changes collectively known as platelet storage lesions. Thus, the platelet lipid composition and its possible modifications over time are crucial for efficacy of platelet rich plasma therapy. Moreover, a number of substances derived from lipids are contained into platelets. Eicosanoids are lipid signaling mediators generated by the action of lipoxygenase and include prostaglandins, thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Isoprostanes have a chemical structure similar to this of prostanoids, but are differently produced into the particle, and are ligands for prostaglandins receptors, exhibiting biological activity like thromboxane A2. Endocannabinoids are derivatives from arachidonic acid which could reduce local pain. Phospholipids growth factors (sphingolipids, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-activating factor) are involved in tissue

  13. Inhibitory effects of Cyperus digitatus extract on human platelet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the mechanisms of antiplatelet action of Cyperus digitatus. The antiplatelet action of C. digitatus was studied on platelet function: secretion, adhesion, aggregation, and sCD40L release. The platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by CDA (ethyl acetate extract) at 0.1 mg/ml and after the incubation of whole blood with CDA, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 96 ± 3% (p < 0.001). At the same concentration, CDA significantly decreased sCD40L levels. The mechanism of antiplatelet action of CDA could be by NF-κB inhibition and that is cAMP independent. In conclusion, C. digitatus extract may serve as a new source of antiplatelet agents for food and nutraceutical applications. PMID:25548968

  14. Platelet microparticles reprogram macrophage gene expression and function.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Benoit; Corduan, Aurélie; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lee, Chan Ho C; Boilard, Eric; Provost, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (MPs) represent the most abundant MPs subtype in the circulation, and can mediate intercellular communication through delivery of bioactives molecules, such as cytokines, proteins, lipids and RNAs. Here, we show that platelet MPs can be internalised by primary human macrophages and deliver functional miR-126-3p. The increase in macrophage miR-126-3p levels was not prevented by actinomycin D, suggesting that it was not due to de novo gene transcription. Platelet MPs dose-dependently downregulated expression of four predicted mRNA targets of miR-126-3p, two of which were confirmed also at the protein level. The mRNA downregulatory effects of platelet MPs were abrogated by expression of a neutralising miR-126-3p sponge, implying the involvement of miR-126-3p. Transcriptome-wide, microarray analyses revealed that as many as 66 microRNAs and 653 additional RNAs were significantly and differentially expressed in macrophages upon exposure to platelet MPs. More specifically, platelet MPs induced an upregulation of 34 microRNAs and a concomitant downregulation of 367 RNAs, including mRNAs encoding for cytokines/chemokines CCL4, CSF1 and TNF. These changes were associated with reduced CCL4, CSF1 and TNF cytokine/chemokine release by macrophages, and accompanied by a marked increase in their phagocytic capacity. These findings demonstrate that platelet MPs can modify the transcriptome of macrophages, and reprogram their function towards a phagocytic phenotype. PMID:26333874

  15. Value of blood-pool subtraction in cardiac indium-111-labeled platelet imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldman, M.E.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.; Strashun, A.; Vaquer, R.; Phillips, R.A.; Fuster, V. )

    1989-09-01

    Blood-pool subtraction has been proposed to enhance {sup 111}In-labeled platelet imaging of intracardiac thrombi. We tested the accuracy of labeled platelet imaging, with and without blood-pool subtraction, in ten subjects with cardiac thrombi of varying age, eight with endocarditis being treated with antimicrobial therapy and ten normal controls. Imaging was performed early after labeled platelet injection (24 hr or less) and late (48 hr or more). Blood-pool subtraction was carried out. All images were graded subjectively by four experienced, blinded readers. Detection accuracy was measured by the sensitivity at three fixed levels of specificity estimated from receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and tested by three-way analysis of variance. Detection accuracy was generally improved on delayed images. Blood-pool subtraction did not improve accuracy. Although blood-pool subtraction increased detection sensitivity, this was offset by decreased specificity. For this population studied, blood-pool subtraction did not improve subjective detection of abnormal platelet deposition by 111In platelet imaging.

  16. Platelet proteomics and its advanced application for research of blood stasis syndrome and activated blood circulation herbs of Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Yin, Huijun; Chen, Keji

    2013-11-01

    The development of novel and efficient antiplatelet agents that have few adverse effects and methods that improve antiplatelet resistance has long been the focus of international research on the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Recent advances in platelet proteomics have provided a technology platform for high-quality research of platelet pathophysiology and the development of new antiplatelet drugs. The study of blood stasis syndrome (BSS) and activated blood circulation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the most active fields where the integration of TCM and western medicine in China has been successful. Activated blood circulation herbs (ABC herbs) of Chinese medicine are often used in the treatment of BSS. Most ABC herbs have antiplatelet and anti-atherosclerosis activity, but knowledge about their targets is lacking. Coronary heart disease (CHD), BSS, and platelet activation are closely related. By screening and identifying activated platelet proteins that are differentially expressed in BSS of CHD, platelet proteomics has helped researchers interpret the antiplatelet mechanism of action of ABC herbs and provided many potential biomarkers for BSS that could be used to evaluate the clinical curative effect of new antiplatelet drugs. In this article the progress of platelet proteomics and its advanced application for research of BSS and ABC herbs of Chinese medicine are reviewed.

  17. Platelet function in dogs with bacterial infections and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Abid, Monia; Kalbantner, Kerstin; Mischke, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial infections or leishmaniasis on primary haemostasis in dogs. Capillary bleeding time, automatic platelet function analysis (PFA-100), turbidimetric platelet aggregation, impedance aggregometry, platelet count and, in addition, the haematocrit were investigated in 25 dogs with bacterial infections or leishmaniasis . Results of these diseased dogs were compared to the control group and additionally classified into two subgroups based on criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (groups "SIRS" and "Non-SIRS"). Dogs with infections had a significantly prolonged closure time of the PFA-100 using both cartridges (e. g., collagen/ADP: 83 [55-301] vs. 65 [47-99 s; median [minimum-maximum]; p < 0.0001), a significant decrease in maximal aggregation of the turbidimetric aggregometry (e. g., ADP-induced: 45.2 ± 26.8 vs. 67.3 ± 21.8%; mean ± SD; P = 0.003), a significant increase of collagen-induced impedance aggregometry and a significant suppression of arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. An enhanced collagen-induced impedance aggregation was the only significant difference between subgroups "SIRS"and "Non-SIRS". In conclusion, although individual tests indicate enhanced platelet aggregation, most of the in vitro tests revealed a normal to moderately reduced functionality. The reduced aggregabiity may partly indicate preactivation of platelets. PMID:26281441

  18. Effect of Red Blood Cells on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation in Tortuous Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can lead to myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombosis may form in tortuous microvessels, which are often seen throughout the human body, but the microscale mechanisms and processes are not well understood. In straight vessels, the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) is known to push platelets toward walls, which may affect platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. However in tortuous vessels, the effects of RBC interactions with platelets in thrombosis are largely unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this work was to determine the physical effects of RBCs, platelet size, and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A discrete element computational model was used to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, aggregation, and shear-induced platelet activation of hundreds of individual platelets and RBCs in thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Results showed that high shear stress near the inner sides of curved arteriole walls activated platelets to initiate thrombosis. RBCs initially promoted platelet activation, but then collisions of RBCs with mural thrombi reduced the amount of mural thrombus and the size of emboli. In the absence of RBCs, mural thrombus mass was smaller in a highly tortuous arteriole compared to a less tortuous arteriole. In the presence of RBCs however, mural thrombus mass was larger in the highly tortuous arteriole compared to the less tortuous arteriole. As well, smaller platelet size yielded less mural thrombus mass and smaller emboli, either with or without RBCs. This study shed light on microscopic interactions of RBCs and platelets in tortuous microvessels, which have implications in various pathologies associated with thrombosis and bleeding. PMID:25022613

  19. Protein kinase C translocation in human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hoauyan; Friedman, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and translocation in response to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), serotonin (5-HT) and thrombin was assessed in human platelets. Stimulation with PMA and 5-HT for 10 minutes or thrombin for 1 minute elicited platelet PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. The catecholamines, norepinephrine or epinephrine at 10 {mu}M concentrations did not induce redistribution of platelet PKC. Serotonin and the specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-amino-propane (DOI) but not the 5-HT{sub 1A} or 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists, ({plus minus}) 8-hydroxy-dipropylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or 5-methoxy-3-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridin) 1H-indole succinate (RU 24969) induced dose-dependent PKC translocations. Serotonin-evoked PKC translocation was blocked by selective 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonists, ketanserin and spiroperidol. These results suggest that, in human platelets, PMA, thrombin and 5-HT can elicit PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. Serotonin-induced PKC translocation in platelets is mediated via 5-HT{sub 2} receptors.

  20. Does the liquid method of electret forming influence the adhesion of blood platelets?

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Szymanowicz, M

    1995-01-01

    This work presents the results of the effect of the electric charge on the adhesion of blood platelets. All experiments were carried out on polyethylene foil. The liquid method was used to form electrets. The evaluation of the electret effect influence on the adhesion of blood platelets was made on the basis of the observation of the electret surface after the contact with fresh citrate human blood group O Rh+ in an electron scanning microscope. Experimental results confirmed the essential influence of the electric charge on the process of adhesion of blood platelets. It was noticed that the preliminary aging of electrets decreases the density of the surface charge and improves the athrombogenic characteristics of polyethylene foil.

  1. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Letitia D; Jackson, Joseph W; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2016-01-01

    The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L) is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT) mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1). As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND.

  2. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Letitia D.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L) is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT) mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1). As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND. PMID:26986758

  3. Clinical and blood bank factors in the management of platelet refractoriness and alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, R C; Donnelly, S F; Boyd, J C; Gray, L S; Mintz, P D

    1993-06-15

    Numerous independent and interdependent factors are involved in the posttransfusion platelet response. Factors such as ABO match and platelet age are related to circumstances potentially under the control of the blood bank physician and therefore may permit circumvention by an active transfusion service. On the other hand, factors such as fever or sepsis may be unavoidable, being related more to the individual patient or clinical condition. To evaluate which factors could be circumvented, we prospectively followed the 1-hour corrected count increments (CCIs) for 962 single-donor apheresis platelet transfusions to 71 refractory hematologic oncology inpatients, with concomitant recording of implicated factors. Stepwise regression analysis allowed for determination of which concurrent and confounding clinical-, patient-, and blood bank-related factors significantly affected the CCIs. Although many implicated factors proved to be independently associated with an increased or decreased CCI, we found that no single variable consistently explained the CCI variation across the patient population. Each patient appeared sensitive to one or a few particular factors, but because of marked intraindividual variation, it was not possible to identify a priori which factors were important for a given patient. The single exception was a solid-phase red blood cell adherence assay used to cross-match platelets, but only for alloimmunized patients. We also evaluated the utility of requesting HLA-matched platelets from the local suppliers and maintained a clear distinction between platelets simply ordered as HLA matched and actually HLA-identical platelets. Accounting for the confounding clinical-, patient-, and blood bank-related factors, the cross-match assay was a better predictor of an adequate CCI than ordering platelets as HLA matched.

  4. Perilla oil improves blood flow through inhibition of platelet aggregation and thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang-Sei; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of perilla oil on the platelet aggregation in vitro and thrombosis in vivo were investigated in comparison with aspirin, a well-known blood flow enhancer. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with perilla oil and aggregation inducers collagen or thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Perilla oil significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations, in which the thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were administered once daily by gavage with perilla oil for 1 week, carotid arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Perilla oil delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 0.5 mL/kg. In addition, a high dose (2 mL/kg) of perilla oil greatly prevented the occlusion, comparable to the effect of aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that perilla oil inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is proposed that perilla oil could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24707301

  5. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-α and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37°C or 22°C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets. PMID:19965619

  6. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation during platelet storage: consequences for platelet recovery and hemostatic function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Canault, Matthias; Duerschmied, Daniel; Brill, Alexander; Stefanini, Lucia; Schatzberg, Daphne; Cifuni, Stephen M; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Denisa D

    2010-03-01

    Platelets undergo several modifications during storage that reduce their posttransfusion survival and functionality. One important feature of these changes, which are known as platelet storage lesion, is the shedding of the surface glycoproteins GPIb-alpha and GPV. We recently demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17) mediates mitochondrial injury-induced shedding of adhesion receptors and that TACE activity correlates with reduced posttransfusion survival of these cells. We now confirm that TACE mediates receptor shedding and clearance of platelets stored for 16 hours at 37 degrees C or 22 degrees C. We further demonstrate that both storage and mitochondrial injury lead to the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) in platelets and that TACE-mediated receptor shedding from mouse and human platelets requires p38 MAP kinase signaling. Protein kinase C, extracellular regulated-signal kinase MAPK, and caspases were not involved in TACE activation. Both inhibition of p38 MAPK and inactivation of TACE during platelet storage led to a markedly improved posttransfusion recovery and hemostatic function of platelets in mice. p38 MAPK inhibitors had only minor effects on the aggregation of fresh platelets under static or flow conditions in vitro. In summary, our data suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK or TACE during storage may significantly improve the quality of stored platelets.

  7. [Cyclooxygenase inhibitors in some dietary vegetables inhibit platelet aggregation function induced by arachidonic acid].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Shao, Dong-Hua; Liang, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Ru; Xin, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2011-10-01

    The study was purposed to investigate whether the cyclooxygenase inhibitors from some dietary vegetables can inhibit platelet aggregation function by the arachidonic acid (AA). The vegetable juice was mixed with platelet rich plasma (PRP), and asprin was used as positive control. The maximum ratio of platelet aggregation induced by AA was measured on the aggregometer; heme and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX(1)) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX(2)) were added to test tubes containing COX reaction buffer, the mixture was vortex-mixed and exposed to aspirin or vegetable juice, followed by addition of AA and then hydrochloric acid (1 mol/L) was added to stop the COX reaction, followed by chemical reduction with stannous chloride solution. The concentration of COX inhibitors was detected by the enzyme immunoassay kit; vegetable juice (aspirin as positive control) was mixed with whole blood, which was followed by the addition of AA, and then the reaction was stopped by adding indomethacin, centrifuged, then the supernatant was collected, and the plasma thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)) was measured by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that spinach juice, garlic bolt juice, blanched garlic leave juice and Chinese leek juice could inhibit by 80% human platelet aggregation induced by AA. 4 kinds of vegetables were all found a certain amount of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, which COX(1) and COX(2) inhibitor concentrations of spinach were higher than that of aspirin; 4 vegetable juice could significantly reduce the human plasma concentrations of TXB(2) induced by AA (p < 0.05). It is concluded that 4 kinds of raw vegetables containing cyclooxygenase inhibitors inhibit the production of TXA(2) and thus hinder platelet aggregation. Raw spinach, garlic bolt, blanched garlic and chinese leek inhibit significantly AA-induced human platelet aggregation in vitro. 4 kinds of vegetables may have a good potential perspective of anti-platelet aggregation therapy or prevention of thrombosis.

  8. Genomic landscape of megakaryopoiesis and platelet function defects

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Norfo, Ruggiero; Pennucci, Valentina; Zini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Megakaryopoiesis is a complex, stepwise process that takes place largely in the bone marrow. At the apex of the hierarchy, hematopoietic stem cells undergo a number of lineage commitment decisions that ultimately lead to the production of polyploid megakaryocytes. On average, megakaryocytes release 1011 platelets per day into the blood that repair vascular injuries and prevent excessive bleeding. This differentiation process is tightly controlled by exogenous and endogenous factors, which have been the topics of intense research in the hematopoietic field. Indeed, a skewing of megakaryocyte commitment and differentiation may entail the onset of myeloproliferative neoplasms and other preleukemic disorders together with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, whereas quantitative or qualitative defects in platelet production can lead to inherited platelet disorders. The recent advent of next-generation sequencing has prompted mapping of the genomic landscape of these conditions to provide an accurate view of the underlying lesions. The aims of this review are to introduce the physiological pathways of megakaryopoiesis and to present landmark studies on acquired and inherited disorders that target them. These studies have not only introduced a new era in the fields of molecular medicine and targeted therapies but may also provide us with a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying normal megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis that can inform efforts to create alternative sources of megakaryocytes and platelets. PMID:26787733

  9. Can the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 test substitute for the template bleeding time in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Francis, J; Francis, D; Larson, L; Helms, E; Garcia, M

    1999-01-01

    The bleeding time (BT) is widely used in clinical medicine as a screening test of platelet function, although its deficiencies in such a role are well recognized. The Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 measures the ability of platelets activated in a high-shear environment to occlude an aperture in a membrane treated with collagen and epinephrine (CEPI) or collagen and ADP (CADP). The time taken for flow across the membrane to stop (closure time) is recorded. This study compared the PFA-100 with the BT as a screening test of platelet dysfunction in 113 hospital inpatients. The PFA-100 test was performed initially using the CEPI cartridge; CADP tests were performed on those with abnormal (> 163 s) CEPI closure times. Whole blood platelet aggregation studies and chart review were performed on patients in whom the BT and PFA-100 results did not agree.Abnormal bleeding times and PFA-100 results were obtained in 20.4% and 35.4% of patients, respectively. The results of BT and PFA-100 agreed in 74.3% of patients. Of the 29 patients in whom the BT and PFA-100 results were discordant, whole blood platelet aggregation studies supported the PFA-100 result in 25 (86.2%). The PFA-100 was more sensitive to aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction and was more rapidly and cheaply performed than the BT. Since the PFA-100 test reflects platelet function better than the BT, we conclude that this test could replace the BT as a first-line screening test for platelet dysfunction in clinical practice.

  10. Can the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 test substitute for the template bleeding time in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Francis, J; Francis, D; Larson, L; Helms, E; Garcia, M

    1999-01-01

    The bleeding time (BT) is widely used in clinical medicine as a screening test of platelet function, although its deficiencies in such a role are well recognized. The Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 measures the ability of platelets activated in a high-shear environment to occlude an aperture in a membrane treated with collagen and epinephrine (CEPI) or collagen and ADP (CADP). The time taken for flow across the membrane to stop (closure time) is recorded. This study compared the PFA-100 with the BT as a screening test of platelet dysfunction in 113 hospital inpatients. The PFA-100 test was performed initially using the CEPI cartridge; CADP tests were performed on those with abnormal (> 163 s) CEPI closure times. Whole blood platelet aggregation studies and chart review were performed on patients in whom the BT and PFA-100 results did not agree.Abnormal bleeding times and PFA-100 results were obtained in 20.4% and 35.4% of patients, respectively. The results of BT and PFA-100 agreed in 74.3% of patients. Of the 29 patients in whom the BT and PFA-100 results were discordant, whole blood platelet aggregation studies supported the PFA-100 result in 25 (86.2%). The PFA-100 was more sensitive to aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction and was more rapidly and cheaply performed than the BT. Since the PFA-100 test reflects platelet function better than the BT, we conclude that this test could replace the BT as a first-line screening test for platelet dysfunction in clinical practice. PMID:16801082

  11. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P < 0.01) and significantly inhibited platelet aggregation (by 31-41% for raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P < 0.01). In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the extracts had no effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The effectiveness of the extracts in whole blood and the lack of their activity in PRP indicate that leukocytes are likely to participate in the platelet response to the extracts. Our experiments show that the extracts significantly reduced the amount of free radicals released by activated neutrophils in whole blood (P < 0.001), as well as in suspensions of isolated neutrophils (P < 0.05). Moreover, the reduced number of neutrophils leads to the decreased efficiency of the extracts in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, our findings show that the raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils.

  12. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P < 0.01) and significantly inhibited platelet aggregation (by 31-41% for raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P < 0.01). In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the extracts had no effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The effectiveness of the extracts in whole blood and the lack of their activity in PRP indicate that leukocytes are likely to participate in the platelet response to the extracts. Our experiments show that the extracts significantly reduced the amount of free radicals released by activated neutrophils in whole blood (P < 0.001), as well as in suspensions of isolated neutrophils (P < 0.05). Moreover, the reduced number of neutrophils leads to the decreased efficiency of the extracts in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, our findings show that the raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils. PMID:26836594

  13. Multicentre standardisation of a clinical grade procedure for the preparation of allogeneic platelet concentrates from umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Rebulla, Paolo; Pupella, Simonetta; Santodirocco, Michele; Greppi, Noemi; Villanova, Ida; Buzzi, Marina; De Fazio, Nicola; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to a largely prevalent use for bleeding prophylaxis, platelet concentrates from adult blood have also been used for many years to prepare platelet gels for the repair of topical skin ulcers. Platelet gel can be obtained by activation of fresh, cryopreserved, autologous or allogeneic platelet concentrates with calcium gluconate, thrombin and/or batroxobin. The high content of tissue regenerative factors in cord blood platelets and the widespread availability of allogeneic cord blood units generously donated for haematopoietic transplant but unsuitable for this use solely because of low haematopoietic stem cell content prompted us to develop a national programme to standardise the production of allogeneic cryopreserved cord blood platelet concentrates (CBPC) suitable for later preparation of clinical-grade cord blood platelet gel. Materials and methods Cord blood units collected at public banks with total nucleated cell counts <1.5×109, platelet count >150×109/L and volume >50 mL, underwent soft centrifugation within 48 hours of collection. Platelet-rich plasma was centrifuged at high speed to obtain a CBPC with target platelet concentration of 800–1,200×109/L, which was cryopreserved, without cryoprotectant, below −40 °C. Results During 14 months, 13 banks produced 1,080 CBPC with mean (± standard deviation) volume of 11.4±4.4 mL and platelet concentration of 1,003±229×109/L. Total platelet count per CBPC was 11.3±4.9×109. Platelet recovery from cord blood was 47.7±17.8%. About one-third of cord blood units donated for haematopoietic transplant could meet the requirements for preparation of CBPC. The cost of preparation was € 160.92/CBPC. About 2 hours were needed for one technician to prepare four CBPC. Discussion This study yielded valuable scientific and operational information regarding the development of clinical trials using allogeneic CBPC. PMID:26509822

  14. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  15. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, Nadine J.A.; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C.F.M.J.; van der Meijden, Paola E.J.; Henskens, Yvonne M.C.; Beckers, Erik A.M.; Suylen, Dennis P.L.; Nolte, Marc W.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin αIIbβ3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin αIIbβ3. Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin αIIbβ3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in αIIbβ3 (Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial αIIbβ3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26721892

  16. The in vitro effect of aspirin on increased whole blood platelet aggregation in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Norris, L A; Bonnar, J

    1994-05-01

    The effects of triphasic oral contraceptives on whole blood platelet aggregation in 36 Italian women are reported here. Aspirin's effects on platelet aggregation were also studied. 18 women took a triphasic oral contraceptive; 10 women took Trinordiol, while 8 took Trinovum for at least 90 days. The remaining 18 women took nothing and served as controls. The study was aligned with each woman's birth control pill cycle. Blood was taken daily on days 15-21 of their cycle. Either saline solution or acetylsalicylic acid was added to the blood samples and compared. All data was statistically analyzed using unpaired student's t-test. Effects of 3 aggregating agents, ADP, PAF, and EDTA, on platelet aggregation were studied. Arachidonic acid and adrenalin bitartrate were also studied in this manner. An increase in platelet aggregation was observed in women taking oral contraceptives. No difference was found between patients taking Trinordiol and those taking Trinovum. The results of this study indicate an increase in whole blood platelet sensitivity to collagen, adrenalin, and arachidonic acid when using oral contraceptives. Aspirin, at low doses, may have a role in preventing early thrombus formation in women taking oral contraceptives. PMID:8042198

  17. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  18. A Real-Time Monitoring System to Assess the Platelet Aggregatory Capacity of Components of a Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Faiza Idris

    2016-01-01

    Native blood vessels contain both an antiaggregatory intimal layer, which prevents platelet activation in the intact vessel, and a proaggregatory medial layer, which stimulates platelet aggregation upon vascular damage. Yet, current techniques for assessing the functional properties of tissue-engineered blood vessels may not be able to assess the relative effectiveness of both these pro- and antiaggregatory properties of the vessel construct. In this study, we present a novel technique for quantitatively assessing the pro- and antiaggregatory properties of different three-dimensional blood vessel constructs made using a layered fabrication method. This technique utilizes real-time measurements of cytosolic Ca2+ signaling to assess platelet activation in fluorescently labeled human platelet suspensions using fluorescence spectrofluorimetry, while also permitting examination of thrombus formation upon the surface of the construct using fluorescent imaging of DiOC6-labeled platelets. Experiments using this method demonstrated that type I collagen hydrogels, commonly used as scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering, were unable to support significant platelet activation, while type I and III neo-collagen secreted from human coronary artery smooth muscle cells cultured within these hydrogels as the medial layer were able to support thrombus formation. The incorporation of an intimal layer consisting of human umbilical vein endothelial cells on top of the medial layer inhibited platelet activation and aggregation. These data demonstrate that the methodology presented here is able to quantitatively compare the capacity of different constructs to trigger or prevent platelet activation. As such, this technique may provide a useful tool for standardizing the assessment of the functional properties of tissue-engineered blood vessel constructs developed using different culturing techniques. PMID:27260694

  19. Metalloproteases Affecting Blood Coagulation, Fibrinolysis and Platelet Aggregation from Snake Venoms: Definition and Nomenclature of Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kini, R. Manjunatha; Koh, Cho Yeow

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases, in addition to their contribution to the digestion of the prey, affect various physiological functions by cleaving specific proteins. They exhibit their activities through activation of zymogens of coagulation factors, and precursors of integrins or receptors. Based on their structure–function relationships and mechanism of action, we have defined classification and nomenclature of functional sites of proteases. These metalloproteases are useful as research tools and in diagnosis and treatment of various thrombotic and hemostatic conditions. They also contribute to our understanding of molecular details in the activation of specific factors involved in coagulation, platelet aggregation and matrix biology. This review provides a ready reference for metalloproteases that interfere in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation. PMID:27690102

  20. Nattokinase improves blood flow by inhibiting platelet aggregation and thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang Sei; Park, Sung Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nattokinase on the in vitro platelet aggregation and in vivo thrombosis were investigated in comparison with aspirin. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with nattokinase and aggregation inducers collagen and thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Nattokinase significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations. Nattokinase also reduced thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were orally administered with nattokinase for 1 week, and their carotid arteries were exposed. Arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Nattokinase delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 160 mg/kg. In addition, a high dose (500 mg/kg) of nattokinase fully prevented the occlusion, as achieved with aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that nattokinase extracted from fermented soybean inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is suggested that nattokinase could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24396387

  1. Nattokinase improves blood flow by inhibiting platelet aggregation and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang Sei; Park, Sung Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2013-12-01

    The effects of nattokinase on the in vitro platelet aggregation and in vivo thrombosis were investigated in comparison with aspirin. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with nattokinase and aggregation inducers collagen and thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Nattokinase significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations. Nattokinase also reduced thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were orally administered with nattokinase for 1 week, and their carotid arteries were exposed. Arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Nattokinase delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 160 mg/kg. In addition, a high dose (500 mg/kg) of nattokinase fully prevented the occlusion, as achieved with aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that nattokinase extracted from fermented soybean inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is suggested that nattokinase could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow.

  2. Platelet concentrates for topical use: bedside device and blood transfusion technology. Quality and versatility.

    PubMed

    Borzini, Piero; Balbo, Valeria; Mazzucco, Laura

    2012-06-01

    More or less after a decade of experimental and pioneering manual procedures to prepare platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for topical use, several portable and bedside devices were made available to prepare the PRP at the point-of-care. This technical opportunity increased the number of patients who got access to the treatment with autologous PRP and PRP-gel. Since topical treatment of tissue with PRP and PRP-gel was restricted to autologous preparation, blood transfusion centers that professionally prepare donor-derived platelet concentrates were not able to cover the overwhelming request for autologous PRP supply. Principally for logistic and organization reasons blood transfusion centers usually fail the challenge of prompt delivery of PRP to the physician over large territory. Nevertheless the blood bank production of platelet concentrates is associated with high standardization and quality controls not achievable from bedside and portable devices. Furthermore it easy to demonstrate that high-volume blood bank-produced platelet concentrates are less expensive than low-volume PRP produced by portable and bedside devices. Taking also in consideration the ever-increasing safety of the blood components, the relationship between bedside device-produced and blood-bank-produced PRP might be reconsidered. Here we discuss this topic concluding that the variety of sources of PRP production is an opportunity for versatility and that, ultimately, versatility is an opportunity for the patient's care.

  3. Pentamethylquercetin (PMQ) reduces thrombus formation by inhibiting platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ming-Lu; Da, Xing-Wen; He, Ao-Di; Yao, Guang-Qiang; Xie, Wen; Liu, Gang; Xiang, Ji-Zhou; Ming, Zhang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids exert both anti-oxidant and anti-platelet activities in vitro and in vivo. Pentamethylquercetin (PMQ), a polymethoxylated flavone derivative, has been screened for anti-carcinogenic and cardioprotective effects. However, it is unclear whether PMQ has anti-thrombotic effects. In the present study, PMQ (20 mg/kg) significantly inhibited thrombus formation in the collagen- epinephrine- induced acute pulmonary thrombosis mouse model and the ferric chloride-induced carotid injury model. To explore the mechanism, we evaluated the effects of PMQ on platelet function. We found that PMQ inhibited platelet aggregation and granule secretion induced by low dose agonists, including ADP, collagen, thrombin and U46619. Biochemical analysis revealed that PMQ inhibited collagen-, thrombin- and U46619-induced activation of Syk, PLCγ2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2. Therefore, we provide the first report to show that PMQ possesses anti-thrombotic activity in vivo and inhibited platelet function in vitro, suggesting that PMQ may represent a potential therapeutic candidate for the prevention or treatment of thrombotic disorders. PMID:26059557

  4. Visualization of nitric oxide production by individual platelets during adhesion in flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Maria Rita; Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Battiston, Monica; Momi, Stefania; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Miller, Edward Cole; De Zanet, Denise; Mazzucato, Mario; Gresele, Paolo; De Marco, Luigi

    2015-01-22

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts vasodilatatory, antiplatelet, antioxidant, and antiproliferative effects. Endothelium-derived NO has been shown to be of crucial importance in cardiovascular protection, whereas evidence that NO is synthesized by platelets and regulates platelet function is still controversial. By using a sensitive and specific fluorescent probe, 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM), we visualized NO production in individual platelets undergoing adhesion on a collagen substrate under flow conditions. NO production, monitored in real time, was dependent on the shear rates applied, increasing with the raising of the shear rates. Furthermore, NO production increased in the presence of l-arginine (nitric-oxide synthase [NOS] substrate), and it decreased in the presence of L-NG-monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA) (NOS inhibitor) but not of D-NG-monomethyl arginine (D-NMMA) (L-NMMA-inactive enantiomer). Platelet deposition, measured with mepacrine-labeled platelets, was inversely related to NO production. A correlation was evident between Ca(++) elevation and NO production, suggesting that platelet NO formation is triggered by intracytoplasmic Ca(++) elevation. Simultaneous measurement of NO and Ca(++) indicated that NO production in individual platelets is preceded by Ca(++) elevations, with a lag phase of 33 ± 9.5 s. Our studies provide the first direct demonstration of platelet NO production triggered by the interaction with an activating surface under flow and suggest that intraplatelet Ca(++) elevation elicits the production of NO which, in turn, modulates thrombus size. PMID:25480660

  5. Serotonin uptake in blood platelets of psychiatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, H.Y.; Arora, R.C.; Baber, R.; Tricou, B.J.

    1981-12-01

    Platelet serotonin (5-HT) uptake was determined in 72 newly admitted, unmedicated psychiatric patients. Decreased maximum velocity (Vmax) of 5-HT uptake was present in unipolar and bipolar depressed patients as well as schizoaffective depressed patients. The apparent Michaelis constant (km) of 5-HT uptake was normal in these groups, as was Vmax and Km in manic-depressive and chronic schizophrenic patients. Treatment of depressed patients with notriptyline hydrochloride or imipramine hydrochloride increased Km significantly. There was a trend for the increase in Km in the nortriptyline-treated patients to correlate with clinical improvement. Decreased 5-HT uptake in platelets provides additional evidence for the role of 5-HT in the pathophysiologic process of some forms of depression.

  6. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Leonard C; Simon, Lukas M; Lindsay, Cory R; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E; Chen, Edward S; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A; Bray, Paul F

    2014-11-27

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists.

  7. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  8. Effect of Blood Shear Forces on Platelet Mediated Thrombosis Inside Arterial Stenosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalej, Nabil

    Shear induced activation of platelets plays a major role in the onset of thrombosis in atherosclerotic arteries. Blood hemodynamics and its effect on platelet kinetics has been studied mainly in in vitro and in ex vivo experiments. We designed new in vivo methods to study blood hemodynamic effects on platelet kinetics in canine stenosed carotid arteries. A carotid artery-jugular vein anastomotic shunt was produced. Intimal damage and controlled variations in the degree of stenosis were produced on the artery. An inflatable cuff was placed around the jugular vein to control vascular resistance. An electromagnetic flowmeter was used to measure blood flow. Doppler ultrasound crystals were used to measure the velocity profiles inside and distal to the stenosis. Stenosis geometry was obtained using digital subtraction angiography and quantitative arteriography. Using these measurements we calculated the wall shear stress using the finite difference solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. To study platelet kinetics, autologous platelets were labeled with Indium Oxine and injected IV. A collimated Nal gamma counter was placed over the stenosis to detect radio-labeled platelet accumulation as platelet mediated thrombi formed in the stenosis. The radioactive count rate increased in an inverse parallel fashion to the decline in flow rate during thrombus formation. The platelet accumulation increased with the increase of percent stenosis and was maximal at the narrow portion of the stenosis. Acute thrombus formation leading to arterial occlusion was only observed for stenosis higher than 70 +/- 5%. Platelet accumulation rate was not significant until the pressure gradient across the stenosis exceeded 40 +/- 10 mmHg. Totally occlusive thrombus formation was only observed for shear stresses greater than a critical value of 100 +/- 10 Pa. Beyond this critical value acute platelet thrombus formation increased exponentially with shear. Increased shear stresses were found to

  9. Whole blood coagulation and platelet activation in the athlete: A comparison of marathon, triathlon and long distance cycling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serious thrombembolic events occur in otherwise healthy marathon athletes during competition. We tested the hypothesis that during heavy endurance sports coagulation and platelets are activated depending on the type of endurance sport with respect to its running fraction. Materials and Methods 68 healthy athletes participating in marathon (MAR, running 42 km, n = 24), triathlon (TRI, swimming 2.5 km + cycling 90 km + running 21 km, n = 22), and long distance cycling (CYC, 151 km, n = 22) were included in the study. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after completion of competition to perform rotational thrombelastometry. We assessed coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) after intrinsically activation and fibrin polymerization (FIBTEM). Furthermore, platelet aggregation was tested after activation with ADP and thrombin activating peptide 6 (TRAP) by using multiple platelet function analyzer. Results Complete data sets were obtained in 58 athletes (MAR: n = 20, TRI: n = 19, CYC: n = 19). CT significantly decreased in all groups (MAR -9.9%, TRI -8.3%, CYC -7.4%) without differences between groups. In parallel, MCF (MAR +7.4%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) and fibrin polymerization (MAR +14.7%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) were significantly increased in all groups. However, platelets were only activated during MAR and TRI as indicated by increased AUC during TRAP-activation (MAR +15.8%) and increased AUC during ADP-activation in MAR (+50.3%) and TRI (+57.5%). Discussion While coagulation is activated during physical activity irrespective of type we observed significant platelet activation only during marathon and to a lesser extent during triathlon. We speculate that prolonged running may increase platelet activity, possibly, due to mechanical alteration. Thus, particularly prolonged running may increase the risk of thrombembolic incidents in running athletes. PMID:20452885

  10. Standardisation of platelet counting accuracy in blood banks by reference to an automated immunoplatelet procedure: comparative evaluation of Cell-Dyn CD4000 impedance and optical platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, B; Haugen, T; Scott, C S

    2001-10-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic platelet transfusions are increasingly used for patients with conditions associated with thrombocytopenia in order to prevent the development of potentially life threatening bleeding. These clinical strategies have led to a significant expansion in platelet unit manufacture, and this now represents a major resource and cost commitment for blood banks. As part of the manufacturing process, blood banks are required to implement control procedures, and the determination of platelet counts in particular is necessary to confirm that the quality of platelet unit production meets the standards defined by national or international guidelines. Apart from linearity analysis and comparisons of platelet counts given by different instruments, there has been no systematic standardisation of platelet counting methods in blood bank practice because to date there has been no suitable reference method for counting platelets in citrate anticoagulants. The recent introduction of an automated immunoplatelet procedure on the Cell-Dyn CD4000 provides a means of determining a true platelet count that is unaffected by changes induced either by storage or anticoagulant. The CD4000 in its routine configuration also provides simultaneous impedance and optical platelet counts and this study was therefore undertaken in order to compare all three different platelet counting methods in parallel with a representative series of platelet units. Platelet counts determined after sub-sampling of platelet units into EDTA vs plain non-anticoagulated tubes revealed no differences in impedance or immunoplatelet counts but generally lower optical counts when aliquoted into tubes that did not contain EDTA. This study therefore routinely used EDTA for platelet unit sub-samples. Comparative results of platelet counts for buffy coat platelet units (n = 36) aliquoted into EDTA indicated that the impedance count was higher than the reference immunoplatelet count by a mean factor of 1

  11. Blood platelet-derived microparticles release and bubble formation after an open-sea air dive.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Gempp, Emmanuel; Ignatescu, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    Bubble-induced platelet aggregation offers an index for evaluating decompression severity in humans and in a rat model of decompression sickness. Endothelial cells, blood platelets, or leukocytes shed microparticles (MP) upon activation and during cell apoptosis. The aim was to study blood platelet MP (PMP) release and bubble formation after a scuba-air dive in field conditions. Healthy, experienced divers were assigned to 1 experimental group (n = 10) with an open-sea air dive to 30 msw for 30 min and 1 control group (n = 5) during head-out water immersion for the same period. Bubble grades were monitored with a pulsed doppler according to Kissman Integrated Severity Score (KISS). Blood samples for platelet count (PC) and PMP (annexin V and CD41) were taken 1 h before and after exposure in both groups. The result showed a decrease in post-dive PC compared with pre-dive values in experimental group with no significant change in the control group. We observed a significant increase in PMP values after the dive while no change was revealed in the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between the PMP values after the dive and the KISS bubble score. The present study highlighted a relationship between the post-dive decrease in PC, platelet MP release, and bubble formation. Release of platelet MPs could reflect bubble-induced platelet aggregation and could play a key role in alteration of the coagulation. Further studies must investigate endothelial and leukocyte MP release in the same field conditions.

  12. Chorioamnionitis is associated with increased CD40L expression on cord blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Sitaru, Ana-Gabriela; Speer, Christian P; Holzhauer, Susanne; Obergfell, Achim; Walter, Ulrich; Grossmann, Ralf

    2005-12-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CA) is a severe infection responsible not only for premature birth but also for many severe neonatal diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of CD40L and P-selectin on platelets and the plasma levels of their soluble forms in the umbilical cord blood in infants with documented chorioamnionitis. Umbilical cord blood samples were obtained from 10 healthy term newborns, 10 non-infected preterm infants, 10 preterm infants with premature rupture of membranes and 9 preterm infants with clinical and histological CA. The expression of CD40L and P-selectin on platelets was analyzed by flow cytometry. Soluble P-selectin (sCD62P), soluble CD40L (sCD40L) and interleukine-6 (IL-6) were measured in plasma by ELISA assays. Neonates with CA had significantly higher percentages of platelets expressing CD40L in basal conditions (5.3 +/- 2.9% vs. 1.6 +/- 0.7% and in non-infected preterm infants p < 0.05), while the percentages of P-selectin positive platelets were similar among all groups. In contrast, the level of sP-selectin was higher in infants with CA (222 +/- 128 ng/ml vs. 104 +/- 71 ng/ml in non-infected preterm infants, p < 0.05) but no differences were found in the levels of sCD40L. As expected, the levels of IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine were significantly higher in samples obtained from preterm neonates whose mothers had also elevated inflammatory parameters. Our observations suggest that platelets are involved in the complex inflammatory pathogenesis of CA. Neither P-selectin expression on cord blood platelets nor plasma sP-selectin or sCD40L were suitable platelet markers in CA, whereas CD40L was significantly elevated in histologically proven CA.

  13. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage

    PubMed Central

    Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions. PMID:26121269

  14. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Moreira-Nunes, Caroline de Fátima Aquino; Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions.

  15. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Moreira-Nunes, Caroline de Fátima Aquino; Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions. PMID:26121269

  16. Toward 21st century blood component replacement therapeutics: artificial oxygen carriers, platelet substitutes, recombinant clotting factors, and others.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Won; Greenburg, A Gerson

    2006-01-01

    In this brief overview, recent progress and current status of blood substitute research and development is summarized. Current blood substitute development efforts are focused on red blood cell substitutes but substitutes for platelets and other blood components are also in progress. Red cell substitutes currently in various stages of development are semi-synthetic or synthetic oxygen carriers that include "stealth" or "masked" red cells, hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers and perfluorocarbon-based oxygen carriers. Artificial platelets (or platelet substitutes) are in early stages of development and include human platelet fragments or particles of synthetic/semi-synthetic materials or recombinant human serum albumin coupled with platelet surface receptor fragments. Of note, some recombinant clotting factors (Factors VII, VIII, IX) have already been successfully developed and licensed for treatment of hemophilia. In addition, some future approaches and prospects of blood component replacement therapeutics are discussed.

  17. Effects of antihypertensive treatment on platelet function in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gomi, T; Ikeda, T; Shibuya, Y; Nagao, R

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of antihypertensive therapy on platelet activation in essential hypertension, the plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were examined in 45 patients with essential hypertension and 20 age-matched normotensive control subjects. Hypertensive patients were assigned to monotherapy with one of five different antihypertensive drugs for 6 months, and the change of plasma levels of beta-TG was reexamined after the completion of the monotherapy. The plasma beta-TG increased in hypertensive patients compared with levels in normotensive control subjects. Monotherapy with each drug resulted in sufficient blood pressure control in all hypertensive patients. The plasma beta-TG decreased significantly after monotherapy with an alpha-blocker or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI). The plasma beta-TG increased with the use of a diuretic but did not change with the use of a beta-blocker or calcium antagonist. The platelet activation observed in patients with essential hypertension is reversed by monotherapy with an alpha-blocker or an ACEI. It is possible that these drugs reduce the development of hypertensive vascular complications due to suppression of platelet activation in patients with essential hypertension.

  18. Effect of an electrical left ventricular assist device on red blood cell and platelet survival in the cow. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Melaragno, A.J.; Vecchione, J.J.; Katchis, R.J.; Abdu, W.A.; Ouellet, R.P.

    1982-04-23

    Blood volume measurements were made in cows after infusion of human 125 iodine albumin and autologous 51 chromium-labeled red blood cells. Repeated intravenous infusions of iodinated human albumin did not appear to isosensitize the cows. When the cow red blood cells were incubated at 37 C after labeling with 51 chromium, there was elution of the 51 chromium, and the 51 chromium T 50 values were 45 hours in both healthy cows and cows with LVAD's. Measurements also were made in the cow platelets labeled with 51 chromium or 111 Indium-oxine. The platelets labeled with 51 chromium had T 50 values of 4 days, and platelets labeled with 111 Indium-oxine had T 50 values of 0.9 to 2.7 days. 51 chromium-labeled platelets had similar T 50 values in healthy cows and cows with LVAD's. Bovine platelets isolated from units of blood using serial differential centrifugation were labeled with 51 chromium or with 111 Indium-oxine, and after infusion in healthy cows and cows with LVAD's measurements were made of platelet circulation and distribution. The disappearance of platelet radioactivity from the blood was linear with time, and the platelet lifespan was 6-10 days. The presence of an LVAD did not affect initial recovery or lifespan of cow platelets.

  19. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity during rest and exercise in borderline hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Vind, J; Winther, K

    1995-04-01

    In this study we examined whether the reduced fibrinolysis and increased platelet activity that are known to occur in hypertension are already present in borderline hypertension. Twelve patients with 'borderline' hypertension (diastolic blood pressure 90-95 mmHg) were found to have substantially reduced fibrinolytic activity, both at rest and during exercise, compared with 12 normotensive controls. Euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) was significantly higher in hypertensive subjects (218 min vs. 145 min; P < 0.05), and this difference persisted during exercise. Resting tissue plasminogen activator activity (t-PA) did not differ in the two groups, but the brisk increase in t-PA in controls during exercise (0.64 rising to 1.44 IU mL-1; P < 0.01) did not occur to the same extent in the borderline hypertensive subjects. Levels of the fast-acting t-PA inhibitor, normally referred to as PAI-1, were considerably higher in hypertensives (9.22 vs. 4.41 IU mL-1; P < 0.02), and this difference persisted in the upright posture, indicating a decrease in fibrinolytic activity. Platelet aggregability induced by ADP in vitro was not significantly higher in the hypertensive subjects, but indices of platelet activity in vivo (B-TG and PF-4 levels) revealed enhanced platelet function in the hypertensives. These results indicate that the indicators of altered haemostatic function known to occur in hypertension, namely diminished fibrinolytic activity and increased platelet function, are already detectable during the very earliest stage of the disease.

  20. Aspirin insensitive thrombophilia: Transcript profiling of blood identifies platelet abnormalities and HLA restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Payam; Katz, Richard; Toma, Ian; Li, Ranyang; Reiner, Jonathan; VanHouten, Kiersten; Carpio, Larry; Marshall, Lorraine; Lian, Yi; Bupp, Sujata; Fu, Sidney W.; Rickles, Frederick; Leitenberg, David; Lai, Yinglei; Weksler, Babette B.; Rebling, Frederik; Yang, Zhaoqing; McCaffrey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet agent because it is safe, efficient, and inexpensive. However, a significant subset of patients does not exhibit a full inhibition of platelet aggregation, termed ‘aspirin resistance’ (AR). Several major studies have observed that AR patients have a 4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other thrombotic events. Arachidonic acid-stimulated whole blood aggregation was tested in 132 adults at risk for ischemic events, and identified an inadequate response to aspirin therapy in 9 patients (6.8%). Expression profiling of blood RNA by microarray was used to generate new hypotheses about the etiology of AR. Among the differentially expressed genes, there were decreases in several known platelet transcripts, including clusterin (CLU), glycoproteins IIb/IIIa (ITGA2B/3), lipocalin (LCN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and the thrombopoetin receptor (MPL), but with increased mRNA for the T-cell Th1 chemokine CXCL10. There was a strong association of AR with expression of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DQA1. Similar HLA changes have been linked to autoimmune disorders, particularly antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which autoantibodies to phospholipid/protein complexes can trigger platelet activation. Consistent with APS, AR patients exhibited a 30% reduction in platelet counts. Follow-up testing for autoimmune antibodies observed only borderline titers in AR patients. Overall, these results suggest that AR may be related to changes in platelet gene expression creating a hyperreactive platelet, despite antiplatelet therapy. Future studies will focus on determining the protein levels of these differential transcripts in platelets, and the possible involvement of HLA restriction as a contributing factor. PMID:23454623

  1. Keishibukuryogan, a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Inhibits Platelet Aggregation in Guinea Pig Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Noguchi, Masamichi; Yuzurihara, Mitsutoshi; Omiya, Yuji; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Effects of keishibukuryogan (KBG) on platelet aggregation were investigated. To ensure the specificity of KBG, tokishakuyakusan (TSS) and kamisyoyosan (KSS), which are known to have platelet aggregation-inhibiting effects, and rikkunshito (RKT) and shakuyakukanzoto (SKT), which are considered to be devoid of such effects, were used for comparison. The platelet aggregation of each test drug was measured by the screen filtration pressure method using whole blood of guinea pigs and expressed as a collagen-induced pressure rate (%) or a collagen concentration required for 50% increase in the pressure rate (PATI value). KBG suppressed the collagen-induced whole blood pressure rate increase and increased the PATI value, like TSS and KSS. Neither RKT nor SKT showed these effects. The Moutan cortex and Cinnamomi cortex, the constituent crude drugs of KBG, showed KBG-like pressure rate suppression and PATI-increasing effects. Furthermore, paeonol, a representative component of Moutan cortex, and aspirin which is known to have platelet aggregation-inhibiting activity (COX-1 inhibitor) also showed similar effects. These results suggest that the platelet aggregation-inhibiting activity of the constituent crude drugs Moutan cortex and Cinnamomi cortex is involved in the improving effects of KBG on impaired microcirculation and that paeonol plays a role in these effects. PMID:26379740

  2. Grafting of phosphorylcholine functional groups on polycarbonate urethane surface for resisting platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Feng, Yakai; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Miao; Shi, Changcan; Khan, Musammir; Guo, Jintang

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the resistance of platelet adhesion on material surface, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) was grafted onto polycarbonate urethane (PCU) surface via Michael reaction to create biomimetic structure. After introducing primary amine groups via coupling tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TAEA) onto the polymer surface, the double bond of MPC reacted with the amino group to obtain MPC modified PCU. The modified surface was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results verified that MPC was grafted onto PCU surface by Michael reaction method. The MPC grafted PCU surface had a low water contact angle and a high water uptake. This means that the hydrophilic PC functional groups improved the surface hydrophilicity significantly. In addition, surface morphology of MPC grafted PCU film was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the grafted surface was rougher than the blank PCU surface. In addition, platelet adhesion study was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The PCU films after treated with platelet-rich plasma demonstrated that much fewer platelets adhered to the MPC-grafted PCU surface than to the blank PCU surface. The antithrombogenicity of the MPC-grafted PCU surface was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The result suggested that the MPC modified PCU may have potential application as biomaterials in blood-contacting and some subcutaneously implanted devices.

  3. The saliva proteome of the blood-feeding insect Triatoma infestans is rich in platelet-aggregation inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charneau, Sébastien; Junqueira, Magno; Costa, Camila M.; Pires, Daniele L.; Fernandes, Ellen S.; Bussacos, Ana C.; Sousa, Marcelo V.; Ricart, Carlos André O.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.

    2007-12-01

    The saliva of the bloodsucking bug Triatoma infestans vector of Chagas disease contains an anti-hemostatic molecular cocktail that prevents coagulation, vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation in a vertebrate prey. In order to characterize T. infestans saliva proteome, we separated the secreted saliva by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 200 salivary proteins were detected on the 2-DE map, mainly in the alkaline region. By nanoLC-MS/MS analysis using a LTQ-Orbitrap equipment followed by a combination of conventional and sequence-similarity searches, we identified 58 main protein spots. Most of such proteins possess potential blood-feeding associated functions, particularly anti-platelet aggregation proteins belonging to lipocalin and apyrase families. The saliva protein composition indicates a highly specific molecular mechanism of early response to platelet aggregation. This first proteome analysis of the T. infestans secreted saliva provides a basis for a better understanding of this fluid protein composition highly directed to counterpart hemostasis of the prey, thus promoting the bug's blood-feeding.

  4. Increased platelet oxidative metabolism, blood oxidative stress and neopterin levels after ultra-endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    de Lucas, Ricardo Dantas; Caputo, Fabrizio; Mendes de Souza, Kristopher; Sigwalt, André Roberto; Ghisoni, Karina; Lock Silveira, Paulo Cesar; Remor, Aline Pertile; da Luz Scheffer, Débora; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme Antonacci; Latini, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to identify muscle damage, inflammatory response and oxidative stress blood markers in athletes undertaking the ultra-endurance MultiSport Brazil race. Eleven well-trained male athletes (34.3 ± 3.1 years, 74.0 ± 7.6 kg; 172.2 ± 5.1 cm) participated in the study and performed the race, which consisted of about 90 km of alternating off-road running, mountain biking and kayaking. Twelve hours before and up to 15 minutes after the race a 10 mL blood sample was drawn in order to measure the following parameters: lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, protein carbonylation, respiratory chain complexes I, II and IV activities, oxygen consumption and neopterin concentrations. After the race, plasma lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities were significantly increased. Erythrocyte TBA-RS levels and plasma protein carbonylation were markedly augmented in post-race samples. Additionally, mitochondrial complex II activity and oxygen consumption in post-race platelet-rich plasma were also increased. These altered biochemical parameters were accompanied by increased plasma neopterin levels. The ultra-endurance event provoked systemic inflammation (increased neopterin) accompanied by marked oxidative stress, likely by increasing oxidative metabolism (increased oxidative mitochondrial function). This might be advantageous during prolonged exercise, mainly for efficient substrate oxidation at the mitochondrial level, even when tissue damage is induced.

  5. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  6. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases.

  7. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  8. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  9. Subcellular localization of the heparin-neutralizing factor in blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Da Prada, M; Jakábová, M; Lüscher, E F; Pletscher, A; Richards, J G

    1976-01-01

    1. The distribution of the heparin-neutralizing factor (platelet factor 4, PF4) in subcellular organelles of blood platelets of rabbits and man was investigated. 2. In both species the organelles storing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT storage organelles) contained only trivial amounts of PF4. 3. In contrast, the content of PF4 was highest in the subcellular fractions rich in alpha-granules. 4. In conclusion, PF4 is probably localized in the alpha-granules and therefore the platelets contain at least two types of organelles (5-HT organelles and alpha-granules) capable of releasing their contents in response to the same stimuli, such as exposure to collagen, thrombin, etc. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:950602

  10. Platelet functions in relation to dietary fats in farmers from two regions of France.

    PubMed

    Renaud, S; Dumont, E; Godsey, F; Suplisson, A; Thevenon, C

    1979-02-15

    To determine whether the long-term feeding of dietary fats affect platelet functions in man, platelet aggregation (to thrombin ADP, collagen, epinephrine) and clotting activity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), platelet-poor plasma and of washed platelets were studied in a mobile-laboratory in 44 healthy male farmers (40--45 years) from two French regions Var and Moselle, in relation to lipemia, glycemia, dietary nutriments, and platelet phospholipid composition. In the Moselle subjects, the platelet clotting activity of PRP and of washed platelets, the platelet aggregation to thrombin and ADP, were highly significantly (p less than 0.001) increased as compared to those of Var, but not the plasma cholesterol, which was identical in the two regions. In Moselle, the intake of total calories, total lipids and saturated fats was higher than in the Var. However, it was only with the saturated fat intake (mostly stearic acid) that the platelet clotting activity (p less than 0.01) and the platelet aggregation (p less than 0.001) were highly significantly correlated. The platelet clotting activity was also significantly (p less than 0.001) correlated with the fatty acid composition of the platelet phospholipid fractions phosphatidyl serine + phosphatidyl inositol.

  11. Life span and tissue distribution of 111indium-labeled blood platelets in hypomagnesemic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.; White, P.K.; Ramsey, N.

    1983-05-01

    Circulating platelets may be activated by exposed triple-helical collagen in atherosclerotic lesions in Mg-deficient ruminants. Autologous platelets, labeled in vitro with 111In and determined to be active, were injected into 5 hypomagnesemic and 3 control lambs fed semipurified diets with 100 or 2,000 mg of Mg/kg of feed for 3 months. During the first 68 hours, 111In concentrations were 11 times higher in packed cells than in plasma. Packed-cell 111In increased 60% during the first 2 hours, probably due to initial tissue sequestration and later release of labeled platelets. Thereafter, platelet half-life span averaged 60 and 63 hours for hypomagnesemic and control lambs. After 68 hours, lambs were injected with native vascular collagen fibrils at 500 micrograms/kg of body weight to initiate reversible platelet aggregation. Within 1 minute, 83% of packed-cell 111In disappeared from circulation. Thirty minutes later, the lambs were euthanatized and necropsied and in the lungs, liver, and spleen, 111In averaged 24%, 19%, and 9%, respectively, of 111In injected 68 hours earlier. Organ deposits were not affected by Mg intake, but 111In in the lungs was somewhat lower in 2 lambs injected with inactivated collagen. Pathologic changes induced by reversible platelet aggregation were compatible with right ventricular failure complicated by pulmonary edema, similar to changes in hypomagnesemic lambs that died spontaneously. Platelets in blood exposed to vascular lesions in hypomagnesemic ruminants could be a major mortality risk factor in grass tetany disease.

  12. [Ultrastructural and functional assessment on platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Jie-Xi; Han, Ying; Wang, Yan; Quan, Guo-Bo; Liu, Min-Xia; Gao, Feng; Liu, An

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of loading some small molecule carbohydrates into human platelets on ultrastucture and function. The ultrastructure of platelets were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM); the platelet counts and mean platelet volume (MPV) were measured by hemocytometer, the maximal platelet aggregation rate was measured optically in an aggregometer; the surface marker of platelet membranes CD62p and phosphatidyl serine were analyzed by flow cytometry. The results showed that no significant changes of the ultrastructure of platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates were seen. The aggregation responsiveness of platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates reached to 60% of the fresh control platelets. The values of platelet counts and MPV showed no significant differences. The expression level of CD62p and the binding rate with Annexin V before and after loading small molecule carbohydrates into platelets were no different. It is concluded that the platelets after loading with small molecule carbohydrates remained fine ultrastructure and function.

  13. Platelets and platelet-like particles mediate intercellular RNA transfer

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonina; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Vitseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The role of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis is clearly established; however, the mechanisms by which platelets mediate inflammatory and immune pathways are less well understood. Platelets interact and modulate the function of blood and vascular cells by releasing bioactive molecules. Although the platelet is anucleate, it contains transcripts that may mirror disease. Platelet mRNA is only associated with low-level protein translation; however, platelets have a unique membrane structure allowing for the passage of small molecules, leading to the possibility that its cytoplasmic RNA may be passed to nucleated cells. To examine this question, platelet-like particles with labeled RNA were cocultured with vascular cells. Coculture of platelet-like particles with activated THP-1, monocytic, and endothelial cells led to visual and functional RNA transfer. Posttransfer microarray gene expression analysis of THP-1 cells showed an increase in HBG1/HBG2 and HBA1/HBA2 expression that was directly related to the transfer. Infusion of wild-type platelets into a TLR2-deficient mouse model established in vivo confirmation of select platelet RNA transfer to leukocytes. By specifically transferring green fluorescent protein, we also observed external RNA was functional in the recipient cells. The observation that platelets possess the capacity to transfer cytosolic RNA suggests a new function for platelets in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. PMID:22596260

  14. Obstruction of the lung capillaries by blood platelet aggregates and leucocytes in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Tor-Arne; Jørgensen, Leif

    2010-12-01

    Altogether 34 cases of sudden infant death were studied postmortem with particular emphasis on the pathological changes in the lungs. Light microscopy, including application of immunohistochemical methods, and transmission electron microscopy were used for the identification of blood platelets and white blood cell types in alveolar capillaries. The main findings were platelet aggregates and a varying number of neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes in the lung capillaries, mixed with a smaller number of lymphocytes. The findings may be interpreted as an early sign of inflammation with capillary thrombosis, resulting in ischaemia, i.e. arrest of flow. In 21% of the cases, inflammatory cells had also expanded focally into alveolar spaces, creating the picture of localized areas of bronchopneumonia. An infant dying suddenly of a traumatic head injury served as a control. Neither platelets nor leucocytes were observed in the alveolar capillaries of this infant. In conclusion, in lungs from cases of sudden infant death syndrome, the alveolar capillaries are obstructed by platelet aggregates and leucocytes, interpreted as signs of an initial stage of lung inflammation with ischaemia. PMID:21091777

  15. A systematic review of four injection therapies for lateral epicondylosis: prolotherapy, polidocanol, whole blood and platelet rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Best, Thomas M.; Zgierska, Aleksandra E.; Zeisig, Eva; Ryan, Michael; Crane, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective To appraise existing evidence for prolotherapy, polidocanol, autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma injection therapies for lateral epicondylosis (LE) Design Systematic Review Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine. Search strategy: names and descriptors of the therapies and LE. Study Selection All human studies assessing the four therapies for LE. Main results Results of five prospective case series and four controlled trials (3 prolotherapy, 2 polidocanol, 3 autologous whole blood and 1 platelet-rich plasma) suggest each of the four therapies is effective for LE. In follow-up periods ranging from 9 to 108 weeks, studies reported sustained, statistically significant(p<0.05) improvement on visual analog scale primary outcome pain score measures and disease specific questionnaires; relative effect sizes ranged from 51% to 94%; Cohen’s d ranged from 0.68 to 6.68. Secondary outcomes also improved, including biomechanical elbow function assessment (polidocanol and prolotherapy), presence of abnormalities and increased vascularity on ultrasound (autologous whole blood and polidocanol). Subjects reported satisfaction with therapies on single-item assessments. All studies were limited by small sample size. Conclusions There is strong pilot-level evidence supporting the use of prolotherapy, polidocanol, autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma injections in the treatment of LE. Rigorous studies of sufficient sample size, assessing these injection therapies using validated clinical, radiological and biomechanical measures, and tissue injury/healing-responsive biomarkers, are needed to determine long-term effectiveness and safety, and whether these techniques can play a definitive role in the management of LE and other tendinopathies. PMID:19028733

  16. Proteomic methodological recommendations for studies involving human plasma, platelets, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Baukje; Duthie, Susan J; Polley, Abigael C J; Mulholland, Francis; Bouwman, Freek G; Heim, Carolin; Rucklidge, Garry J; Johnson, Ian T; Mariman, Edwin C; Daniel, Hannelore; Elliott, Ruan M

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to develop, optimize and validate protocols for blood processing prior to proteomic analysis of plasma, platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to determine analytical variation of a single sample of depleted plasma, platelet and PBMC proteins within and between four laboratories each using their own standard operating protocols for 2D gel electrophoresis. Plasma depleted either using the Beckman Coulter IgY-12 proteome partitioning kit or the Amersham albumin and IgG depletion columns gave good quality gels, but reproducibility appeared better with the single-use immuno-affinity column. The use of the Millipore Filter Device for protein concentration gave a 16% ( p < 0.005) higher recovery of protein in flow-through sample compared with acetone precipitation. The use of OptiPrep gave the lowest level of platelet contamination (1:0.8) during the isolation of PBMC from blood. Several proteins (among which are alpha-tropomyosin, fibrinogen and coagulation factor XIII A) were identified that may be used as biomarkers of platelet contamination in future studies. When identifying preselected spots, at least three out of the four centers found similar identities for 10 out of the 10 plasma proteins, 8 out of the 10 platelet proteins and 8 out of the 10 PBMC proteins. The discrepancy in spot identifications has been described before and may be explained by the mis-selection of spots due to laboratory-to-laboratory variation in gel formats, low scores on the peptide analysis leading to no or only tentative identifications, or incomplete resolution of different proteins in what appears as a single abundant spot. The average within-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the matched spots after automatic matching using either PDQuest or ProteomWeaver software ranged between 18 and 69% for depleted plasma proteins, between 21 and 55% for platelet proteins, and between 22 and 38% for PBMC proteins. Subsequent manual

  17. Platelet-derived CXCL12 regulates monocyte function, survival, differentiation into macrophages and foam cells through differential involvement of CXCR4–CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; von Ungern-Sternberg, S N I; Seizer, P; Schlegel, F; Büttcher, M; Sindhu, N A; Müller, S; Mack, A; Gawaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and release CXCL12 (SDF-1), which governs differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into either endothelial or macrophage-foam cells. CXCL12 ligates CXCR4 and CXCR7 and regulates monocyte/macrophage functions. This study deciphers the relative contribution of CXCR4–CXCR7 in mediating the effects of platelet-derived CXCL12 on monocyte function, survival, and differentiation. CXCL12 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that ligate CXCR4–CXCR7 induced a dynamic bidirectional trafficking of the receptors, causing CXCR4 internalization and CXCR7 externalization during chemotaxis, thereby influencing relative receptor availability, unlike MCP-1. In vivo we found enhanced accumulation of platelets and platelet-macrophage co-aggregates in peritoneal fluid following induction of peritonitis in mice. The relative surface expression of CXCL12, CXCR4, and CXCR7 among infiltrated monocytes was also enhanced as compared with peripheral blood. Platelet-derived CXCL12 from collagen-adherent platelets and recombinant CXCL12 induced monocyte chemotaxis specifically through CXCR4 engagement. Adhesion of monocytes to immobilized CXCL12 and CXCL12-enriched activated platelet surface under static and dynamic arterial flow conditions were mediated primarily through CXCR7 and were counter-regulated by neutralizing platelet-derived CXCL12. Monocytes and culture-derived-M1–M2 macrophages phagocytosed platelets, with the phagocytic potential of culture-derived-M1 macrophages higher than M2 involving CXCR4–CXCR7 participation. CXCR7 was the primary receptor in promoting monocyte survival as exerted by platelet-derived CXCL12 against BH3-mimetic induced apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential). In co-culture experiments with platelets, monocytes predominantly differentiated into CD163+ macrophages, which was attenuated upon CXCL12 neutralization and CXCR4/CXCR7 blocking antibodies

  18. [Potential and usefulness of the analysis of metallic elements in blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Catalani, S; Marini, M; Consolandi, O; Gilberti, M E; Apostoli, P

    2008-01-01

    Platelets represent an important fraction of blood, whose composition and interactions in many physiological and pathological processes were a subject of several studies. Determination of trace elements in this component was investigated in past studies (70-80's) on small samples and by analytical techniques giving rise to not always reliable results. This study was aimed at the development of a simple method for platelet isolation and determination of trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was applied on blood samples from 35 healthy males with mean age of 42.5 years. The obtained results gave us the opportunity to establish a reference range of trace elements in this matrix that can be used for the interpretation of results in occupationally/environmentally exposed people or hill subjects.

  19. Regulation of platelet function by class B scavenger receptors in hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets constitutively express class B scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-BI, two closely related pattern recognition receptors best known for their roles in lipoprotein and lipid metabolism. The biological role of scavenger receptors in platelets is poorly understood. However, in vitro and in vivo data suggest that class B scavenger receptors modulate platelet function and contribute significantly to thrombosis by sensing pathological or physiological ligands, inducing prothrombotic signaling, and increasing platelet reactivity. Platelet CD36 recognizes a novel family of endogenous oxidized choline phospholipids that accumulate in plasma of hyperlipidemic mice and in plasma of subjects with low HDL levels. This interaction leads to the activation of specific signaling pathways and promotes platelet activation and thrombosis. Platelet SR-BI, on the other hand, plays a critical role in the induction of platelet hyper-reactivity and accelerated thrombosis in conditions associated with increased platelet cholesterol content. Intriguingly, oxidized HDL, aSR-BI ligand, can suppress platelet function. These recent findings demonstrate that platelet class B scavenger receptors play roles in thrombosis in dyslipidemia and may contribute to acute cardiovascular events in vivo in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21071700

  20. Nucleation of platelets with blood-borne pathogens on Kupffer cells precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Connie H Y; Jenne, Craig N; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L; Kubes, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of intravital imaging of the liver, we demonstrate a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating blood-borne bacterial infection. Under basal conditions, platelets, via the platelet-adhesion receptor GPIb, formed transient 'touch-and-go' interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria such as Bacillus cereus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from 'touch-and-go' adhesion to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GPIbα-deficient mice had more endothelial and KC damage than did their wild-type counterparts, which led to more fluid leakage, substantial polycythemia and rapid mortality. Our study identifies a previously unknown surveillance mechanism by which platelets survey macrophages that rapidly converts to a critical host response to blood-borne bacteria.

  1. (Dicer)phering roles of microRNA in platelets.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of Blood, Rowley et al report that noncoding RNAs precisely regulate the messenger RNA (mRNA) profile in platelets. Interfering in this process using genetically engineered mice affects hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets. PMID:27056990

  2. Relative flow of blood cells, platelets, and microspheres in outer and inner renal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Ofjord, E.S.; Clausen, G.

    1986-08-01

    Blood platelets (Pl) may attain a relatively high marginal concentration in arterioles, perhaps also in arteries. Along a renal interlobular artery, blood passes several successive arterioles, each arteriole receiving a small flow fraction from a narrow zone adjacent to the artery wall. Thus, in theory, the Pl concentration should cumulatively decrease as the blood approaches the outer cortex, contrary to the concentration of red and white blood cells (RBC and WBC). This was tested by assessing the concentrations of these blood elements, and for comparison, the concentrations of 0.3-, 1.8-, and 3.5- m microspheres (MS), in serial blood samples from veins separately draining the outer and inner cortex in cat kidney. The outer-to-inner cortical concentration ratio was 1.28 for WBC, 1.04 for RBC, and 0.75 for Pl, confirming the working hypothesis. The RBC demargination corresponded to that of MS smaller that 1.8 m, the demargination of WBC to that of MS larger than 3.5 m. In contrast to Pl the even smaller 0.3- m MS were not marginated. Thus, the margination of platelets may not be due merely to their small size.

  3. Normalization methods in time series of platelet function assays

    PubMed Central

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Roest, Mark; Vukicevic, Milan; Beran, Maud; Lauwereins, Bart; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Henskens, Yvonne; Lancé, Marcus; Marcus, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Platelet function can be quantitatively assessed by specific assays such as light-transmission aggregometry, multiple-electrode aggregometry measuring the response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and thrombin-receptor activating peptide and viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). The task of extracting meaningful statistical and clinical information from high-dimensional data spaces in temporal multivariate clinical data represented in multivariate time series is complex. Building insightful visualizations for multivariate time series demands adequate usage of normalization techniques. In this article, various methods for data normalization (z-transformation, range transformation, proportion transformation, and interquartile range) are presented and visualized discussing the most suited approach for platelet function data series. Normalization was calculated per assay (test) for all time points and per time point for all tests. Interquartile range, range transformation, and z-transformation demonstrated the correlation as calculated by the Spearman correlation test, when normalized per assay (test) for all time points. When normalizing per time point for all tests, no correlation could be abstracted from the charts as was the case when using all data as 1 dataset for normalization. PMID:27428217

  4. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2 (-∙)) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5- 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2 (-∙) in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:26933473

  5. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2−∙) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5– 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2−∙ in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:26933473

  6. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2 (-∙)) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5- 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2 (-∙) in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  7. Small-size platelet microparticles trigger platelet and monocyte functionality and modulate thrombogenesis via P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Shantsila, Eduard; Hernández-Romero, Diana; Jover, Eva; Valdés, Mariano; Marín, Francisco; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the mechanisms of cellular activation by small-size platelet microparticles (sPMP) and to present the performance of high-resolution flow cytometry for the analysis of subcellular entities from different origins. Plasma counts of sPMP were analysed in coronary artery disease patients (n = 40) and healthy controls (n = 40). The effect of sPMP and platelet debris (PD) in pathophysiologically relevant doses on platelet and monocyte activation parameters and thrombogenesis was investigated via flow cytometry and thromboelastometry. New generation flow cytometry identifies differences in size, levels and surface molecules of sPMP derived in the absence of stimulus, thrombin activation and platelet disruption. Addition of sPMP resulted in platelet degranulation and P-selectin redistribution to the membrane (P = 0·019) in a dose and time-dependent manner. Blood clotting time decreased after addition of sPMP (P = 0·005), but was not affected by PD. Blocking P-selectin (CD62P) in sPMP markedly reverted the effect on thrombus kinetics (P = 0·035). Exposure to sPMP stimulated monocyte expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (P < 0·03) and decreased monocyte interleukin-6 receptor density (P < 0·01). These results implicate sPMP as a direct source of downstream platelet and monocyte activation. In pathological coronary artery disease conditions, higher levels of sPMP favour a prothrombotic state, partly through P-selectin expression.

  8. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity in hypertensive and normotensive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Rångemark, C; Hedner, J A; Carlson, J T; Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1995-04-01

    Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity was studied during rest and after ergometric exercise in 13 hypertensive or normotensive patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and in 10 sex- and weight-matched controls. All patients had undergone a complete polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA. The controls did not undergo any sleep investigation but had no history of snoring or witnessed apneas during sleep. On antihypertensive drug wash-out, two of the patients were normotensive, whereas 11 had mild to moderate hypertension. Platelet aggregation measured by adenosine 5'-diphosphate- or adrenaline-induced aggregation, platelet factor-4 or beta-thromboglobulin did not differ between patients and controls. During exercise beta-thromboglobulin decreased significantly in both OSA patients and controls. Plasma tissue plasminogen activator activity was similar in OSA patients and controls and increased significantly in both groups after exercise. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was 18.4 +/- 3.6 IU/ml in OSA patients compared with 8.2 +/- 1.7 IU/ml in controls (p < 0.029) during rest, indicating decreased fibrinolytic activity. The difference between groups remained after exercise (p < 0.017). Blood pressure elevation was more common and body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with OSA, but there was no direct relation between blood pressure level or BMI and PAI-1. Nevertheless, differences between groups were smaller when blood pressure and obesity were accounted for. It is concluded that patients with OSA may exhibit decreased fibrinolytic activity. Low fibrinolytic activity may represent a confounding pathophysiological mechanism behind the high incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with OSA.

  9. Functional and ultrastructural studies on In-111-Merc labeled concentrated human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Sedar, A.W.; McKenney, S.L.

    1985-05-01

    Human platelets (1 billion) labeled with 200 ..mu..Ci In-111-oxine in non-plasma medium have been reported to have impaired ultrastructure and function. The ultrastructure and function of platelets labeled in plasma with In-111-Merc was examined. Human platelets (2 billion) suspended in 0.5 ml plasma were incubated with 2 ..mu..g Merc and then labeled with 390-1170 ..mu..Ci In-111. Unlabeled platelets and those incubated with Merc and decayed In-111 solution served as controls. Radiation dose received by platelets in each preparation was estimated. Aggregability studies were performed and platelets were prepared for transmission electron microscopy. Three samples from each pellet were thin sectioned and examined at 4000 to 11,000 magnification. Electron micrographs were obtained from fields containing at least 10 platelets. Assuming uniform labeling and complete decay of In-111, radiation dose per platelet ranged from 367 Gy to 1100 Gy. The aggregability of labeled platelets was unaffected (93.5 +- 3.8%) and the velocity averaged 75.5 +- 3.9% of control. Electron micrographs revealed no change in morphology of mitochondria, alpha granules, dense granules, canalicular system, microtubules and particulate glycogen; these demonstrated normal distribution. The authors conclude that despite the high radiation dose, the function and ultrastructure of platelets labeled in plasma with In-111-Merc remain unaltered.

  10. Bench-to-bedside review: Platelets and active immune functions - new clues for immunopathology?

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2013-08-27

    Platelets display a number of properties besides the crucial function of repairing damaged vascular endothelium and stopping bleeding; these are exploited to benefit patients receiving platelet component transfusions, which might categorize them as innate immune cells. For example, platelets specialize in pro-inflammatory activities, and can secrete a large number of molecules, many of which display biological response modifier functions. Platelets also express receptors for non-self-infectious and possibly non-infectious danger signals, and can engage infectious pathogens by mechanisms barely explained beyond observation. This relationship with infectious pathogens may involve other innate immune cells, especially neutrophils. The sophisticated interplay of platelets with bacteria may culminate in sepsis, a severe pathology characterized by significant reductions in platelet count and platelet dysfunction. How this occurs is still not fully understood. Recent findings from in-depth platelet signaling studies reveal the complexity of platelets and some of the ways they evolve along the immune continuum, from beneficial functions exemplified in endothelium repair to deleterious immunopathology as in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and acute vascular diseases. This review discusses the extended role of platelets as immune cells to emphasize their interactions with infectious pathogens sensed as potentially dangerous.

  11. Differences in Whole Blood Platelet Aggregation at Baseline and in Response to Aspirin and Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel in Patients With Versus Without Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishank; Li, Xilong; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Sarode, Ravi; Toto, Robert D; Banerjee, Subhash; Hedayati, S Susan

    2016-02-15

    Thrombotic events while receiving antiplatelet agents (APAs) are more common in subjects with versus without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on antiplatelet effects of APA in CKD are scarce and limited by lack of baseline platelet function before APA treatment. We hypothesized subjects with stages 4 to 5 CKD versus no CKD have greater baseline platelet aggregability and respond poorly to aspirin and clopidogrel. In a prospective controlled study, we measured whole blood platelet aggregation (WBPA) in 28 CKD and 16 non-CKD asymptomatic stable outpatients not on APA, frequency-matched for age, gender, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. WBPA was remeasured after 2 weeks of each aspirin and aspirin plus clopidogrel. The primary outcome was percent inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) from baseline. The secondary outcome was residual platelet aggregability (RPA; proportion with <50% IPA). Baseline platelet aggregability was similar between groups except adenosine diphosphate-induced WBPA, which was higher in CKD versus non-CKD; median (interquartile range) = 13.5 (9.5 to 16.0) versus 9.0 (6.0 to 12.0) Ω, p = 0.007. CKD versus non-CKD participants had lower clopidogrel-induced IPA, 38% versus 72%, p = 0.04. A greater proportion of CKD versus non-CKD participants had RPA after clopidogrel treatment (56% vs 8.3%, p = 0.01). There were no significant interactions between CKD and the presence of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms for platelet aggregability in clopidogrel-treated participants. In conclusion, CKD versus non-CKD subjects exhibited similar platelet aggregation at baseline, similar aspirin effects and greater RPA on clopidogrel, which was independent of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms. PMID:26725101

  12. Differences in Whole Blood Platelet Aggregation at Baseline and in Response to Aspirin and Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel in Patients With Versus Without Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishank; Li, Xilong; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Sarode, Ravi; Toto, Robert D; Banerjee, Subhash; Hedayati, S Susan

    2016-02-15

    Thrombotic events while receiving antiplatelet agents (APAs) are more common in subjects with versus without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on antiplatelet effects of APA in CKD are scarce and limited by lack of baseline platelet function before APA treatment. We hypothesized subjects with stages 4 to 5 CKD versus no CKD have greater baseline platelet aggregability and respond poorly to aspirin and clopidogrel. In a prospective controlled study, we measured whole blood platelet aggregation (WBPA) in 28 CKD and 16 non-CKD asymptomatic stable outpatients not on APA, frequency-matched for age, gender, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. WBPA was remeasured after 2 weeks of each aspirin and aspirin plus clopidogrel. The primary outcome was percent inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) from baseline. The secondary outcome was residual platelet aggregability (RPA; proportion with <50% IPA). Baseline platelet aggregability was similar between groups except adenosine diphosphate-induced WBPA, which was higher in CKD versus non-CKD; median (interquartile range) = 13.5 (9.5 to 16.0) versus 9.0 (6.0 to 12.0) Ω, p = 0.007. CKD versus non-CKD participants had lower clopidogrel-induced IPA, 38% versus 72%, p = 0.04. A greater proportion of CKD versus non-CKD participants had RPA after clopidogrel treatment (56% vs 8.3%, p = 0.01). There were no significant interactions between CKD and the presence of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms for platelet aggregability in clopidogrel-treated participants. In conclusion, CKD versus non-CKD subjects exhibited similar platelet aggregation at baseline, similar aspirin effects and greater RPA on clopidogrel, which was independent of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms.

  13. Genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function: application in clinical practice and drug development.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marlene S; Weiss, Ethan J; Sabatine, Marc S; Simon, Daniel I; Bahou, Wadie F; Becker, Lewis C; Parise, Leslie V; Dauerman, Harold L; French, Patricia A; Smyth, Susan S; Becker, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    Understanding genetic contributions to platelet function could have profound clinical ramifications for personalizing platelet-directed pharmacotherapy, by providing insight into the risks and possible benefits associated with specific genotypes. This article represents an integrated summary of presentations related to genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function given at the Fifth Annual Platelet Colloquium in January 2010. It is supplemented with additional highlights from the literature covering (1) approaches to determining and evidence for the associations of genetic variants with platelet hypo- and hyperresponsive phenotypes, (2) the ramifications of these polymorphisms with regard to clinical responses to antiplatelet therapies, and (3) the role of platelet function/genetic testing in guiding antiplatelet therapy.

  14. [Recent development in platelet functions: roles beyond thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yukio; Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    In addition to their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis, there is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that platelets have diverse functions in various biological reactions. Of these, synthesis of specific proteins in a timely manner, involvement in inflammation, roles in anti-bacteria and anti-parasite protection, and supportive roles in liver regeneration have attracted the attention of a number of scientists. We have recently found a novel platelet-activating receptor, CLEC-2, which reacts with a snake venom, Rhodocytin. CLEC-2 has an intracellular signal transduction pathway quite similar to that of GOVI, except for its hemi-Y-xx-L motif. The endogenous ligand for CLEC-2 was identified by us as podoplanin, which is present in renal podocytes, lung alveolar macrophages, and lymphatic endothelial cells, and some types of malignant tumors. We found that CLEC-2/podoplanin interaction plays an important role in the metastasis of tumor cells with podoplanin expression. We have also found that hemophilic interaction between CLEC-2 molecules contributes to thrombus formation in vivo. CLEC-2 interaction with podoplan expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells appears to play an important role in the separation between veins and lymphatic vessels during the stage of fetal development. PMID:22416457

  15. Circulating primers enhance platelet function and induce resistance to antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blair, T A; Moore, S F; Hers, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists are antiplatelet compounds that are used clinically in patients with thrombosis. However, some patients are ‘resistant’ to antiplatelet therapy, which increases their risk of developing acute coronary syndromes. These patients often present with an underlying condition that is associated with altered levels of circulating platelet primers and platelet hyperactivity. Platelet primers cannot stimulate platelet activation, but, in combination with physiologic stimuli, significantly enhance platelet function. Objectives To explore the role of platelet primers in resistance to antiplatelet therapy, and to evaluate whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) contributes to this process. Methods and Results We used platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 production and ex vivo thrombus formation as functional readouts of platelet activity. Platelets were treated with the potent P2Y12 inhibitor AR-C66096, aspirin, or a combination of both, in the presence or absence of the platelet primers insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and thrombopoietin (TPO), or the Gz-coupled receptor ligand epinephrine. We found that platelet primers largely overcame the inhibitory effects of antiplatelet compounds on platelet functional responses. IGF-1-mediated and TPO-mediated, but not epinephrine-mediated, enhancements in the presence of antiplatelet drugs were blocked by the PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Conclusions These results demonstrate that platelet primers can contribute to antiplatelet resistance. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that there are PI3K-dependent and PI3K-independent mechanisms driving primer-mediated resistance to antiplatelet therapy. PMID:26039631

  16. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  17. Effect of activated platelets on expression of cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells - potential role of prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Waehre, Torgun; Damås, Jan Kristian; Yndestad, Arne; Taskén, Kjetil; Pedersen, Turid M; Smith, Camilla; Halvorsen, Bente; Frøland, Stig S; Solum, Nils O; Aukrust, Pål

    2004-12-01

    Platelets may act as inflammatory cells. To study the effects of soluble and cell-bound platelet factors on the expression of several cytokines and related mediators in leukocytes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with platelet-free supernatants from SFLLRN-activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or SFLLRN-activated PRP in itself. Our main findings were: (i) the gene expression of several chemokines and some cytokines were markedly increased by both activated PRP and supernatants, as also confirmed at the protein level for IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha; (ii) the selective protein kinase A type I (PKAI) antagonist Rp-8-Br-cAMP reduced this platelet-induced expression of IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha in PBMC, suggesting a role of cAMP/PKAI mediated mechanisms in this interaction; (iii) PGE(2) dose-dependently increased the release of IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha from PBMC mimicking the effect of activated platelets. Furthermore, activated platelets released comparable amounts of PGE(2), suggesting that platelet-derived PGE2 could interact with PBMC in co-cultures; (iv) IL-10 inhibited the platelet-inducing effect on IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha in PBMC, and notably, the addition PGE2 totally abolished this IL-10 effect suggesting that the suppressive effect of IL-10 on the plateletinduced activation of PBMC might at least partly involve PGE(2) related mechanisms. The present study supports a view of platelets as inflammatory cells, and suggests a potential role of platelet-derived PGE(2) in platelet-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:15583745

  18. A Multiple Time Stepping Algorithm for Efficient Multiscale Modeling of Platelets Flowing in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3–4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations. PMID:25641983

  19. Platelets and Infection – An Emerging Role of Platelets in Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Assinger, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis) are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years, more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients. Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favors platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen–antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies. All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count but also shape immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation, and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25566260

  20. Platelets and infection - an emerging role of platelets in viral infection.

    PubMed

    Assinger, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis) are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years, more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients. Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favors platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen-antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies. All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count but also shape immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation, and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  1. Mild and moderate hypothermia increases platelet aggregation induced by various agonists: a whole blood in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Scharbert, G; Kalb, M L; Essmeister, R; Kozek-Langenecker, S A

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms causing temperature-dependent bleeding, especially in hypothermic patients, warrant clarification. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate platelet aggregation at the clinically important temperature range of 30-34 degrees C. After obtaining informed consent citrated whole blood was drawn from 12 healthy adult male volunteers, who had not taken any medication in the previous 14 days. After venipuncture blood samples were incubated at 37 degrees C until platelet testing. Platelet aggregation was performed in whole blood using the impedance aggregometer Multiplate at five different test temperatures between 30 degrees C and 34 degrees C. Aggregation responses at 37 degrees C served as controls. At temperatures of mild and moderate hypothermia (30-34 degrees C), overall platelet aggregation was increased compared to 37 degrees C. Increases were recorded in response to collagen, thrombin receptor activating peptide and ristocetin between 31 degrees C and 34 degrees C and in response to adenosine diphosphate between 30 degrees C and 34 degrees C. Overall platelet aggregation is increased at mild and moderate hypothermia down to 30 degrees C. These results indicate that bleeding complications reported in mildly hypothermic patients are not due to hypothermia-induced platelet inhibition. The pathomechanism of the overall increased platelet aggregation between 30 degrees C and 34 degrees C requires further detailed study. PMID:19954411

  2. The extract from hop cones (Humulus lupulus) as a modulator of oxidative stress in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Jędrejek, Dariusz; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    The plant Humulus lupulus is known as the raw material of the brewing industry. Hop cones, rich in polyphenolic compounds and acyl phloroglucides, are widely used to preserve beer and to give it a characteristic aroma and flavor. Hop cones have long been used for medicinal purposes. In particular, hop preparations were mainly recommended for the treatment of sleeping disorders. The antioxidative action of hop cones, however, is poorly understood. The aim of our present study was to investigate in vitro changes in human blood platelets induced by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-), the compound of particular importance for vascular thrombosis and inflammatory process) in the presence of hop cone extract (Humulus lupulus). The antioxidative action of the extract was also compared with the properties of a well-characterized antioxidative commercial monomeric polyphenol, resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) in a model system in vitro. Various biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress, such as carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were estimated. The 3-nitrotyrosine formation and carbonyl group generation was assessed by the use of a competition ELISA test and ELISA test, respectively. Tested plant extract (12.5-50 µg/ml), like resveratrol, significantly inhibited protein carbonylation and nitration in the blood platelets treated with ONOO(-) (0.1 mM). The extract from hop cones, like resveratrol, also caused a distinct reduction of platelet lipid peroxidation induced by ONOO(-). The present results indicate that the hope cone extract has in vitro protective effects against ONOO(-), such as induced oxidative/nitrative damage to the human platelet proteins and lipids. However, in comparative studies the extract was not found to be a more effective antioxidant than the solution of pure resveratrol.

  3. Platelet-rich plasma does not decrease blood loss in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tingstad, Edwin M; Bratt, Sarah N; Hildenbrand, Kasee J; O'Malley, Brittany A; Mitchell, Elisabeth R; Gaddis, Corinne E; Jacobson, Charles A

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to assess the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The authors hypothesized that this would result in less blood loss and greater hemoglobin and hematocrit levels at discharge and would potentially decrease the length of hospital stay. Leukocyte rich PRP was used during the procedure and at wound closure. Two surgeons performed all procedures in a similar fashion. Two different TKA implants were used. Each surgeon used the same implant throughout the study. A limited medial parapatellar approach was used and drains were used at closure. No tranexamic acid preparations were used. Continuous passive motion machines were used in all patients during their hospital stay. A total of 102 consecutive TKAs were performed. The study group (n=46) consecutively received the PRP injections during the TKA, whereas the control group (n=47) did not. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were obtained pre- and postoperatively. Estimated blood loss was recorded during surgery, and the auto-collection reinfusion drain system output was measured. The length of hospital stay was collected and recorded. The study showed that hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were not different when comparing study and control groups. Age and sex differences were insignificant. Finally, no statistical difference was seen for the estimated blood loss and hospital stay between the 2 groups. Platelet-rich plasma use during TKA does not decrease hospital stay or reduce estimated blood loss in the perioperative period. PMID:25970373

  4. An in vitro assessment of the interaction of cadmium selenide quantum dots with DNA, iron, and blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Dunpall, Rekha; Nejo, Adeola Ayodeji; Pullabhotla, Viswanadha Srirama Rajasekhar; Opoku, Andy R; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Shonhai, Addmore

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots have gained increased attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. This has raised interest in assessing their toxicity. In this study, water-soluble, cysteine-capped CdSe nanocrystals with an average size of 15 nm were prepared through a one-pot solution-based method. The CdSe nanoparticles were synthesized in batches in which the concentration of the capping agent was varied with the aim of stabilizing the quantum dot core. The effects of the CdSe quantum dots on DNA stability, aggregation of blood platelets, and reducing activity of iron were evaluated in vitro . DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 200 μg/mL of CdSe quantum dots. Furthermore, the CdSe nanocrystals exhibited high reducing power and chelating activity, suggesting that they may impair the function of haemoglobin by interacting with iron. In addition, the CdSe quantum dots promoted aggregation of blood platelets in a dose dependent manner.

  5. Evidence for direct coupling of primary agonist-receptor interaction to the exposure of functional IIb-IIIa complexes in human blood platelets. Results from studies with the antiplatelet compound ajoene.

    PubMed

    Apitz-Castro, R; Jain, M K; Bartoli, F; Ledezma, E; Ruiz, M C; Salas, R

    1991-09-24

    Ajoene, (E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide, is a potent antiplatelet compound isolated from alcoholic extracts of garlic. In vitro, ajoene reversibly inhibits platelet aggregation as well as the release reaction induced by all known agonists. In this paper we show that ajoene has a unique locus of action, that is not shared by any other known antiplatelet compound. For example, ajoene inhibits agonist-induced exposure of fibrinogen receptors, as well as intracellular responses such as activation of protein kinase C and the increase in cytoplasmic free calcium induced by receptor-dependent agonists (collagen, ADP, PAF, low-dose thrombin). On the other hand, with agonists that can by-pass (at least partially) the receptor-transductor-effector sequence, such as high-dose thrombin, PMA, NaF, only the exposure of fibrinogen receptors is blocked by ajoene. Binding of fibrinogen to chymotrypsin-treated platelets is only slightly inhibited by ajoene. The results reported here also show that: (a) ajoene does not act as a calcium chelator, does not impair the initial agonist-receptor interaction and does not influence the basal levels of intracellular inhibitors of platelet activation such as cyclic GMP; (b) the locus of action of ajoene is a yet unknown molecular step that links, in the case of physiological agonists, specific agonist-receptor complexes to the sequence of the signal transduction system on the plasma membrane of platelets. In the case of non-physiological, receptor-independent agonists (PMA, NaF), we can only speculate on the hypothesis that they somehow mimic the effect of the agonist-receptor complexes on the signal transduction system; and (c) the exposure of fibrinogen receptors is not a direct consequence of other intracellular processes. These observations clearly show, for the first time, that the exposure of fibrinogen receptors is a membrane event proximally and obligatorily coupled to the occupancy of other membrane receptors by their

  6. Does calcium channel blockade and beta-adrenergic blockade affect platelet function and fibrinolysis to a varying degree?

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Mehlsen, J; Winther, K

    1995-01-01

    The effects of isradipine and atenolol on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity were studied in 10 male patients with mild untreated hypertension. After a 2-week placebo run-in period, the volunteers were randomized to either isradipine 2.5 mg twice daily or atenolol 100 mg daily for a 6-month period. Those initially receiving isradipine then received atenolol and vice versa. After each therapy regimen, blood was drawn at rest and 1 h after exercise during a maximum exercise test. Platelet activity in vivo was estimated as release of B-TG and PF-4. Fibrinolytic activity was estimated as the fast-acting inhibitor against tissue plasminogen activator usually termed PAI-1. During atenolol and isradipine therapy, blood pressure (BP) was equally reduced (p < 0.05). Heart rate (HR) decreased during atenolol treatment but was not changed by isradipine. Platelet activity in vivo estimated as B-TG and PF-4 decreased irrespective of therapy (p < 0.02). During atenolol, as during placebo therapy, exercise resulted in a significant increase in platelet activity, as shown by an increase in B-TG (p < 0.02) and in PF-4 (p < 0.01). Such increase was not observed during isradipine treatment. Both treatments tended to improve fibrinolysis, as shown by a decrease in PAI, 1 h after exercise. Reducing BP with isradipine or atenolol results in a similar decrease in platelet activity and PAI-level, tested at rest and 1 h after rest, respectively. During exercise, platelet activity increased during atenolol treatment; such change did not occur during isradipine treatment.

  7. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique "microenvironment" was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a "Trojan Horse" strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis.

  8. Haemostatic profile of reconstituted blood in a proposed 1:1:1 ratio of packed red blood cells, platelet concentrate and four different plasma preparations.

    PubMed

    Ponschab, M; Schöchl, H; Gabriel, C; Süssner, S; Cadamuro, J; Haschke-Becher, E; Gratz, J; Zipperle, J; Redl, H; Schlimp, C J

    2015-05-01

    The concept of haemostatic resuscitation implies early and high-volume plasma transfusion. We investigated the haemostatic profile of reconstituted whole blood prepared in a 1:1:1 ratio of blood, platelets and plasma. This consisted of packed red blood cells, platelet concentrate and four different plasma variants: fresh frozen; solvent-detergent; lyophilised quarantine; and lyophilised methylene blue-inactivated plasma. Haematocrit, platelet count, endogenous thrombin potential and coagulation factor activity were significantly lower in reconstituted blood compared with citrated whole blood (p < 0.01). Except for lyophilised methylene blue-inactivated plasma, no substantial differences between plasma variants in coagulation factor activity, endogenous thrombin potential and standard coagulation tests were observed. After reconstitution, haematocrit and platelet counts were slightly above recommended transfusion triggers, most thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®)) parameters were within the normal range and fibrinogen concentrations were between 1.57 g.l(-1) and 1.91 g.l(-1). Reconstitution of whole blood in a 1:1:1 ratio resulted in significant dilution of haematocrit and platelet count, but values remained above limits recommended by transfusion guidelines. Fibrinogen concentrations of reconstituted whole blood were also significantly reduced, and these were below the threshold value for supplementation recommended by recent guidelines.

  9. An overview of platelet indices for evaluating platelet function in children with scorpion envenomation.

    PubMed

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Colak, Pinar; Uckardes, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between platelet indices and scorpion envenomations (SE). Medical records of 76 children who were hospitalised for scorpion stings in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2013 and November 2013, and 55 healthy children who were similar to the patient group in terms of age and sex, were analysed retrospectively. The leucocyte (WBC), thrombocyte (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), platelet distribution width (PDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values of the 76 children with SE were recorded. These values were compared with the healthy control group. Significantly higher WBC and PDW values were noted in patients with SE in comparison to the controls. Patients with SE had significantly lower mean MPV values compared to the healthy controls (9.03 ± 1.26 compared to 10.43 ± 1.44 fL, respectively; p < 0.001). Although the mean platelet count was slightly elevated in the SE group, no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups (p = 0.097). Furthermore, the mean PCT values in the SE group compared to the control group were slightly decreased, but this decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.141). A significant inverse correlation existed between the MPV values and the WBC (r = -0.450, p < 0.01) and PLT counts (r = -0.420, p < 0.01). The PLT values were significantly correlated with the PCT values (r = 0.687, p < 0.01). This study demonstrated that SE may lead to several alterations in platelet indices. Significantly lower values of MPV and higher values of PDW were detected in SE patients. However, the increase in the platelet counts and the decrease in the PCT values were not significant. PMID:26417303

  10. Manipulation of oxygenation and flow-induced shear stress can increase the in vitro yield of platelets from cord blood.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Larry C; Sullenbarger, Brent

    2011-11-01

    A method to produce clinically useful platelets in vitro would help overcome the frequent shortages, donor deferrals, disease transmission, and alloimmunization with volunteer donor-derived platelets. Using CD34 positively selected cord blood cells, we investigated ways to increase platelet quality and yield in a three-dimensional modular perfusion bioreactor system. We found a two- to threefold increase in platelet numbers produced only when the early phases of the culture process were carried out at 5% oxygen, versus when 20% oxygen was used throughout the culture period (p<0.05), and much more than when 5% oxygen was used throughout. When the medium was routed through the cell-scaffold construct, versus when it flowed under and over the construct, or just intermittent feeding was used, the number of platelets increased two- to threefold (p<0.05), and enhanced collagen-induced aggregation. The 5% oxygen early in the culture process mimics the marrow adjacent to the bone where early progenitors proliferate. Flow through the cell-scaffold construct creates shear forces that mimic the flow in central venous sinuses of the marrow and enhances platelet production from proplatelets. The use of altered oxygen levels and cross flow enhanced platelet numbers and quality, and will contribute to eventual in vitro platelet production for clinical use.

  11. A functional integrin ligand on the surface of platelets: intercellular adhesion molecule-2.

    PubMed Central

    Diacovo, T G; deFougerolles, A R; Bainton, D F; Springer, T A

    1994-01-01

    Activated platelets express P-selectin and release leukocyte chemoattractants; however, they have not been known to express integrin ligands important in the stabilization of leukocyte interactions with the vasculature. We now demonstrate the presence of intercellular adhesion molecular-2 (ICAM-2) (CD102), and lack of expression of other beta 2-integrin ligands, ICAM-1 (CD54) and ICAM-3 (CD50), on the surface of resting and stimulated platelets. ICAM-2 isolated from platelets migrates as a band of 59,000 M(r) in reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Staining of bone marrow aspirates with anti-ICAM-2 mAb demonstrates strong reactivity to megakaryocytes. Using frozen thin sections and immunogold labeling, the antigen was shown to be present on the plasma membrane and surface-connected canalicular system of resting platelets. The average number of ICAM-2 molecules per platelet is 3,000 +/- 230 and does not change after activation. In adhesion assays, resting and stimulated platelets were capable of binding through ICAM-2 to purified leukocyte function-associated antigen-1. Activation of T lymphocytes with PMA stimulated binding to platelets that was Mg2+ dependent and could be specifically inhibited by mAbs to either ICAM-2 or leukocyte function-associated antigen-1. ICAM-2 is the only known beta 2-integrin ligand present on platelets, suggesting that it may play an important role in leukocyte-platelet interactions in inflammation and thrombosis. Images PMID:8083366

  12. Time-dependent effects of aspirin on blood pressure and morning platelet reactivity: a randomized cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Bonten, Tobias N; Snoep, Jaapjan D; Assendelft, Willem J J; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Eikenboom, Jeroen; Huisman, Menno V; Rosendaal, Frits R; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2015-04-01

    Aspirin is used for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention by millions of patients on a daily basis. Previous studies suggested that aspirin intake at bedtime reduces blood pressure compared with intake on awakening. This has never been studied in patients with CVD. Moreover, platelet reactivity and CVD incidence is highest during morning hours. Bedtime aspirin intake may attenuate morning platelet reactivity. This clinical trial examined the effect of bedtime aspirin intake compared with intake on awakening on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement and morning platelet reactivity in patients using aspirin for CVD prevention. In this randomized open-label crossover trial, 290 patients were randomized to take 100 mg aspirin on awakening or at bedtime during 2 periods of 3 months. At the end of each period, 24-hour blood pressure and morning platelet reactivity were measured. The primary analysis population comprised 263 (blood pressure) and 133 (platelet reactivity) patients. Aspirin intake at bedtime did not reduce blood pressure compared with intake on awakening (difference systolic/diastolic: -0.1 [95% confidence interval, -1.0, 0.9]/-0.6 [95% confidence interval, -1.2, 0.0] mm Hg). Platelet reactivity during morning hours was reduced with bedtime aspirin intake (difference: -22 aspirin reaction units [95% confidence interval, -35, -9]). The intake of low-dose aspirin at bedtime compared with intake on awakening did not reduce blood pressure of patients with CVD. However, bedtime aspirin reduced morning platelet reactivity. Future studies are needed to assess the effect of this promising simple intervention on the excess of cardiovascular events during the high risk morning hours.

  13. Maintaining Moderate Platelet Aggregation and Improving Metabolism of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Increase the Patency Rate of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yangxiao; Li, Li; Chen, Wen; Zeng, Wen; Zeng, Lingqin; Wen, Can; Zhu, Chuhong

    2015-07-01

    Small-diameter tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) have been associated with low, long-term patency rates primarily because of acute thrombosis in early stages and an inability to achieve early endothelialization. Platelets and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a key role in these processes. A nano delayed-release 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR)-bound TEBV was implanted in rat carotid arteries for 3 months. AICAR-bound TEBVs had a high patency rate compared with control TEBVs after 3 months. We found that AICAR maintained moderate platelet aggregation in vivo. In vitro data indicated that AICAR inhibits the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine and thromboxane A2 in activating platelets to reduce platelet aggregation. Then, we confirmed that AICAR strengthens the EPC energy state, which results in earlier endothelialization. The homing, migration, and paracrine function of EPCs were enhanced by AICAR in vitro. Besides, AICAR can contribute to the migration of endothelial cells near the anastomosis. The cellularization of TEBVs at different time points was observed too. In conclusion, our study suggests that the application of nanodelivery material containing AICAR can effectively improve small-diameter TEBVs by maintaining moderate platelet aggregation and improving metabolism of EPCs.

  14. Surface-mediated control of blood coagulation: the role of binding site densities and platelet deposition.

    PubMed Central

    Kuharsky, A L; Fogelson, A L

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model of the extrinsic or tissue factor (TF) pathway of blood coagulation is formulated and results from a computational study of its behavior are presented. The model takes into account plasma-phase and surface-bound enzymes and zymogens, coagulation inhibitors, and activated and unactivated platelets. It includes both plasma-phase and membrane-phase reactions, and accounts for chemical and cellular transport by flow and diffusion, albeit in a simplified manner by assuming the existence of a thin, well-mixed fluid layer, near the surface, whose thickness depends on flow. There are three main conclusions from these studies. (i) The model system responds in a threshold manner to changes in the availability of particular surface binding sites; an increase in TF binding sites, as would occur with vascular injury, changes the system's production of thrombin dramatically. (ii) The model suggests that platelets adhering to and covering the subendothelium, rather than chemical inhibitors, may play the dominant role in blocking the activity of the TF:VIIa enzyme complex. This, in turn, suggests that a role of the IXa-tenase pathway for activating factor X to Xa is to continue factor Xa production after platelets have covered the TF:VIIa complexes on the subendothelium. (iii) The model gives a kinetic explanation of the reduced thrombin production in hemophilias A and B. PMID:11222273

  15. The effect of protein corona composition on the interaction of carbon nanotubes with human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Silvia H; Diduch, Lukas L; Tegegn, Tseday Z; Orecna, Martina; Strader, Michael B; Karnaukhova, Elena; Bonevich, John E; Holada, Karel; Simak, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most promising nanomaterials for use in medicine. The blood biocompatibility of CNT is a critical safety issue. In the bloodstream, proteins bind to CNT through non-covalent interactions to form a protein corona, thereby largely defining the biological properties of the CNT. Here, we characterize the interactions of carboxylated-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTCOOH) with common human proteins and investigate the effect of the different protein coronas on the interaction of CNTCOOH with human blood platelets (PLT). Molecular modeling and different photophysical techniques were employed to characterize the binding of albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG), γ-globulins (IgG) and histone H1 (H1) on CNTCOOH. We found that the identity of protein forming the corona greatly affects the outcome of CNTCOOH's interaction with blood PLT. Bare CNTCOOH-induced PLT aggregation and the release of platelet membrane microparticles (PMP). HSA corona attenuated the PLT aggregating activity of CNTCOOH, while FBG caused the agglomeration of CNTCOOH nanomaterial, thereby diminishing the effect of CNTCOOH on PLT. In contrast, the IgG corona caused PLT fragmentation, and the H1 corona induced a strong PLT aggregation, thus potentiating the release of PMP.

  16. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  17. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS. PMID:27507559

  18. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Presenting with JMML-Like Blood Picture and Normal Sized Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rajesh B.; Shanmukhaiah, Chandrakala; Bamborde, Shailesh; Wasekar, Nilesh; Toshniwal, Manoj; Mohite, Aniket; Patil, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to report the case of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) that presented with unusual laboratory features. Clinical Presentation and Intervention. Male neonate admitted with symptoms related to thrombocytopenia, whose initial diagnosis was considered as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and JMML (juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia) but subsequently diagnosis was confirmed as WAS. Conclusion. This case shows that a suspicion of WAS is warranted in the setting of neonatal thrombocytopenia with JMML-like blood picture and normal sized platelets. PMID:27340577

  19. Recombinant factor VIIa enhances platelet deposition from flowing haemophilic blood but requires the contact pathway to promote fibrin deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Panckeri, K A; Fogarty, P F; Diamond, S L

    2015-03-01

    In prior microfluidic studies with haemophilic blood perfused over collagen, we found that a severe deficiency (<1% factor level) reduced platelet and fibrin deposition, while a moderate deficiency (1-5%) only reduced fibrin deposition. We investigated: (i) the differential effect of rFVIIa (0.04-20 nm) on platelet and fibrin deposition, and (ii) the contribution of the contact pathway to rFVIIa-induced haemophilic blood clotting. Haemophilic or healthy blood with low and high corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, 4 or 40 μg mL(-1) ) was perfused over collagen at an initial venous wall shear rate of 100 s(-1) . At 100 s(-1) wall shear rate, where FXIIa leads to thrombin production without added tissue factor, FXI-deficient blood (3%) or severely FVIII-deficient blood (<1%) produced no fibrin at either CTI level. Whereas rFVIIa potently enhanced platelet deposition, fibrin generation was not rescued. Distinct from the high CTI condition, engagement of the contact pathway (low CTI) in moderately FVIII-deficient (3%) or moderately FIX-deficient blood (5%) resulted in enhanced platelet and fibrin deposition following 4 nm rFVIIa supplementation. In mildly FVIII-deficient blood (15%) at <24 h since haemostatic therapy, rFVIIa enhanced both platelet and fibrin generation in either CTI condition although fibrin was produced more quickly and abundantly in low CTI. For tissue factor-free conditions of severe haemophilic blood clotting, we conclude that rFVIIa reliably generates low levels of 'signaling' thrombin sufficient to enhance platelet deposition on collagen, but is insufficient to drive fibrin polymerization unless potentiated by the contact pathway.

  20. Gasotransmitters and platelets.

    PubMed

    Truss, Nicola J; Warner, Timothy D

    2011-11-01

    Platelets are essential to prevent blood loss and promote wound healing. Their activation comprises of several complex steps which are regulated by a range of mediators. Over the last few decades there has been intense interest in a group of gaseous mediators known as gasotransmitters; currently comprising nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S). Here we consider the action of gasotransmitters on platelet activity. NO is a well established platelet inhibitor which mediates its effects predominantly through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase leading to a decrease in intraplatelet calcium. More recently CO has been identified as a gasotransmitter with inhibitory actions on platelets; CO acts through the same mechanism as NO but is less potent. The in vivo and platelet functions of the most recently identified gasotransmitter, H(2)S, are still the subject of investigations, but they appear generally inhibitory. Whilst there is evidence for the individual action of these mediators, it is also likely that combinations of these mediators are more relevant regulators of platelets. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that these mediators in combination alter the production of each other, and so modify the circulating levels of gasotransmitters. The use of gasotransmitters as therapeutic agents is also being explored for a range of indications. In conclusion, the importance of NO in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activity has long been understood. Other gasotransmitters are now establishing themselves as mediators of vascular tone, and recent evidence suggests that these other gasotransmitters may also modulate platelet function.

  1. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  2. Platelet functions in relation to diet and serum lipids in British farmers.

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, S; Morazain, R; Godsey, F; Dumont, E; Symington, I S; Gillanders, E M; O'Brien, J R

    1981-01-01

    Coagulation and platelet aggregation induced by thrombin, ADP, adrenaline, and collagen were studied in three contrasted groups, each of 20 to 22 middle-aged male farmers. Serum lipids were similar in the three groups. In the west of Scotland group, however, platelet reactivity was significantly greater than in the east of Scotland. This was associated with a dietary intake, evaluated by three different techniques, higher in saturated fat but also lower in polyunsaturated fat and alcohol. Platelet function in the southern England group also correlated with dietary fats and in addition inversely with calcium intake. On an individual basis in the 63 farmers, all the platelet function tests were significantly correlated with the intake of saturated fat regulated by that of calcium and alcohol. The dietary effects on platelets appear to be mediated by the fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and of platelet phospholipids. In that fraction, the fatty acids 20:3 omega 9, 22:3 omega 9 and 20:4 were the most closely related to the platelet function tests. the trienoic acid 20:3 omega 9, identified with essential fatty acid deficiency, was also correlated with the intake of saturated fat and calcium. In this study, platelet functions were more dependent upon the dietary factors associated with coronary heart disease such as saturated fats, calcium, and alcohol than upon serum lipids. PMID:7317223

  3. Platelets kill intraerythrocytic malarial parasites and mediate survival to infection.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Brendan J; Marshall, Vikki M; de Graaf, Carolyn; Drysdale, Karen E; Shabbar, Meriam; Smyth, Gordon K; Corbin, Jason E; Alexander, Warren S; Foote, Simon J

    2009-02-01

    Platelets play a critical role in the pathogenesis of malarial infections by encouraging the sequestration of infected red blood cells within the cerebral vasculature. But platelets also have well-established roles in innate protection against microbial infections. We found that purified human platelets killed Plasmodium falciparum parasites cultured in red blood cells. Inhibition of platelet function by aspirin and other platelet inhibitors abrogated the lethal effect human platelets exert on P. falciparum parasites. Likewise, platelet-deficient and aspirin-treated mice were more susceptible to death during erythrocytic infection with Plasmodium chabaudi. Both mouse and human platelets bind malarial-infected red cells and kill the parasite within. These results indicate a protective function for platelets in the early stages of erythrocytic infection distinct from their role in cerebral malaria.

  4. Activation-dependent surface expression of gC1qR/p33 on human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Murphy, Tara K; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2003-02-01

    GC1qR/p33 (gC1qR) is expressed by a variety of somatic and cultured cells, including blood platelets. It interacts with several cellular, viral, bacterial, and plasma proteins, suggesting a potential role in thrombosis, inflammation, and infection. Considerable controversy has surrounded the surface membrane localization of gC1qR, however, since its cDNA sequence does not predict a traditional membrane-anchoring domain, and bears a typical mitochondrial targeting sequence. The present study examined gC1qR expression on resting and activated human blood platelets using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with two monoclonal antibodies, 74.5.2 and 60.11, directed against gC1qR C-terminal amino acids 204-218, and N-terminal amino acids 76-93, respectively. Unstimulated platelets reacted minimally with either antibody. In contrast, platelet activation with TRAP, epinephrine, or ADP produced markedly increased gC1qR expression as reflected by 74.5.2 binding but not 60.11 binding. Platelet activation was verified using PAC-1 and anti CD 62 antibodies. Whereas PAC-1 binding to activated platelets could be reversed following platelet incubation with PGE1, 74.5.2 binding remained unchanged, suggesting the sustained expression of gC1qR following platelet stimulation. The data further demonstrate that detection of cell surface gC1qR may be dependent on antibody specificity. The ability of gC1qR to bind proteins involved in complement, coagulation, and kinin systems, as well as viral and bacterial pathogens including S. aureus protein A, supports the hypothesis that gC1qR expressed on activated platelets may contribute directly to thrombosis, inflammation, and endovascular infections.

  5. Effects of zomepirac on hemostasis in healthy adults and on platelet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mielke, C H; Kahn, S B; Muschek, L D; Tighe, J J; Ng, K T; Minn, F L

    1980-01-01

    Zomepirac, a new nonnarcotic analgesic, was studied in 25 healthy adults for possible effects on hemostasis. Given in a single 200-mg dose or for 15 days at 300 mg/day, zomepirac prolonged template bleeding time and caused transient decreases in platelet adhesiveness, in stimulated platelet aggregation, and in the release of platelet serotonin. The short duration of these effects contrasts with the known week-long duration of the effects of aspirin. Data from in vitro platelet function studies, correlated with plasma level determinations, indicate that these effects on platelet function in man are probably dependent only on the presence of intact zomepirac and not on any metabolites. The qualitative effects of zomepirac on platelets are assumed to be the consequence of reversible inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase in these cells. Platelet concentration and the humoral clotting mechanism were not affected by zomepirac. Although no unusual bleeding has been noted in patients given zomepirc postoperatively, it should be used with the same caution as aspirin in patients with known defects in platelet function or coagulation.

  6. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Uehara, A.; Hashikawa, K.; Mieno, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Handa, N.; Nakabayashi, S.; Imaizumi, M.; Kamada, T. )

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood.

  7. Effect of spirapril and hydrochlorothiazide on platelet function and euglobulin clot lysis time in patients with mild hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Petersen, J R; Mehlsen, J; Winther, K

    1996-10-01

    Thirteen patients with mild hypertension (untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95 to 114 mmHg) received, in random order, three successive treatments of four weeks with placebo, spirapril (6 mg daily), or hydrochlorothiazide (HCT2) (24 mg daily). At the end of each treatment, blood samples for assessment of platelet aggregation and platelet release of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and for assessment of fibrinolysis, estimated by tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1), and euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT), were taken, first at rest, then immediately after five to ten minutes of vigorous exercise, and finally after the subsequent hour of recovery rest. Platelet aggregation induced in vitro by adrenaline significantly decreased during treatment with HCT2, the threshold rising to 10 microM as compared with 1.0 with placebo (P < 0.05) at rest, and the threshold for adenosine diphosphate (ADP) aggregation also rose, from 2 microM to 4 (NS). The resting plasma PF4 value fell, although not significantly, during HCT2 treatment from the placebo value of 3.28 to 2.56 ng/mL. During spirapril treatment there was no change in the threshold of either adrenaline or ADP for aggregation of platelets sampled at rest, and the PF4 plasma levels showed no significant reductions at rest. However, during exercise PF4 showed an approximate doubling of the resting value irrespective of therapy. This exercise-induced increase in PF4 was significantly reduced by spirapril as compared with placebo (P < 0.05). ECLT and t-PA did not shift significantly from the placebo level during either therapy. PAI-1 did not change during spirapril therapy, but during HCT2 treatment it fell, although not significantly, to 9.36 IU/mL from 15.91 with placebo (NS). Spirapril and HCT2 did not produce any unwanted side effect on platelet function or fibrinolysis. HCT2 seems to decrease platelet activity at rest, whereas spirapril seems to some extent to decrease platelet

  8. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C.; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  9. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  10. R1: Platelets and Megakaryocytes contain functional NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Sherry L.; Casey, Ann E.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Gertz, Jacqueline M.; McMillan, David H.; Narasipura, Srinivasa D.; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Francis, Charles W.; Taubman, Mark B.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB transcription factor family is well-known for their role in eliciting inflammation and promoting cell survival. We discovered that human megakaryocytes and platelets express the majority of NF-κB family members including the regulatory Inhibitor (I)-κB and Inhibitor Kappa Kinase (IKK) molecules. Objective Investigate the presence and role of NF-κB proteins in megakaryocytes and platelets. Methods and Results Anucleate platelets exposed to NF-κB inhibitors demonstrated impaired fundamental functions involved in repairing vascular injury and thrombus formation. Specifically, NF-κB inhibition diminished lamellapodia formation, decreased clot retraction times and reduced thrombus stability. Moreover, inhibition of I-κB-α phosphorylation (BAY-11-7082) reverts fully spread platelets back to a spheroid morphology. Addition of recombinant IKK-β or I-κB-α protein to BAY inhibitor-treated platelets partially restore platelet spreading in I-κB-α inhibited platelets, and addition of active IKK-β increased endogenous I-κB-α phosphorylation levels. Conclusions These novel findings support a crucial and non-classical role for the NF-κB family in modulating platelet function and reveal that platelets are sensitive to NF-κB inhibitors. As NF-κB inhibitors are being developed as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agents, they may have unintended effects on platelets. Based on these data, NF-κB is also identified as a new target to dampen unwanted platelet activation. PMID:20042710

  11. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J; Morrissey, James H; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-09-17

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) -bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm(2). Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm(2) and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm(2). However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm(2) when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm(2)) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall. PMID:26136249

  12. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J; Morrissey, James H; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-09-17

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) -bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm(2). Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm(2) and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm(2). However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm(2) when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm(2)) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall.

  13. Tissue augmentation by white blood cell-containing platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Takeshi; Kim, Hak Hee

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a matrix of fibrin and platelets that releases cytokines that are important in wound healing. PRP is produced from the patient's blood and therefore has less risk of allergic reaction and infection. We have obtained PRP with an enhanced white blood cell component (W-PRP) by optimizing the centrifugal separation of PRP from plasma. Here we show that injection of W-PRP into the auricle of nude mice gave greater tissue augmentation compared to PRP. Further augmentation occurred when bFGF was added to W-PRP, and there was a significant increase in the number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in mice treated with W-PRP+bFGF. Our results suggest that W-PRP may have value in cosmetic surgery aimed at rejuvenation of wrinkled and sagging skin. W-PRP injection constitutes a new concept in cell transplantation, in which cells required for tissue regeneration are induced by cytokines released from the transplanted cells. PMID:22793069

  14. In-line filtration of platelet concentrates obtained with the Omnix blood cell separator.

    PubMed

    Moog, R; Müller, N; Nieper, A

    1995-12-01

    The quality of platelet concentrates (PC) obtained with the blood cell separator Omnix was investigated before and after in-line filtration. PC were filtered 2h (protocol A) and 4 h (protocol B) after the termination of apheresis. Platelet (PLT) yield after filtration was similar in both protocols (median 3.7 vs. 3.4 x 10(11)). Median white blood cell (WBC) contamination after leucocyte depletion was 0.07 x 10(6) (range 0.02-3.27 x 10(6)) in protocol A and 0.06 x 10(6) (range 0.02-2.1 x 10(6)) in protocol B. Glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, morphology score and pH value were not statistically different before and after filtration in both protocols. We conclude that in-line filtration results in sufficient leucocyte depletion of the PC. The prefiltration storage time did not influence the studied parameters of product quality. PMID:8646295

  15. Platelet Indices of Selenium Status in Healthy and Selenium-Deficient Sheep: a Comparison with Selenium Indices in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Bahrami, Yaser; Rezaei, Siamak Asri; Anassori, Ehsan; Janalipour, Ali; Khosravi, Voria

    2015-11-01

    Several biomarkers have been used to evaluate selenium (Se) status in livestock. However, there is no report on the potential usefulness of the Se indices of platelets in diagnosis of Se deficiency in large animals. In the current study, Se concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in platelets of 38 healthy and 142 Se-deficient ewes were assessed, and their correlation with plasma Se concentration, plasma GPx activity, whole blood Se concentration, and erythrocyte GPx activity was determined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cutoff values of Se concentration and GPx activity of the platelets and to summarize the diagnostic performance of these biomarkers. In Se-deficient ewes, consistent with other indices, Se concentration and GPx activity in platelets were significantly lower than those of the healthy ewes. There was a positive significant correlation between Se concentration and GPx activity in platelets with plasma Se concentration, whole blood Se concentration, and erythrocyte GPx activity. Based on the ROC curve analysis, the best cutoff value to predict inadequate plasma selenium concentration was ≤0.0055 attogram/platelet for the platelet Se concentration, with a sensitivity of 100.0 %, specificity of 92.4 %, and AUC of 0.94. For platelet GPx activity, the cutoff value was ≤203.6 U/g protein with a sensitivity of 97.4 %, specificity of 77.7 %, and AUC of 0.90. The results of this study suggested that the platelet Se concentration and GPx activity can be considered a reliable and valid intermediate-term surrogate parameter in assessment of dietary Se intake in sheep.

  16. In vitro interactions of blood, platelet, and fibroblast with biodegradable magnesium-zinc-strontium alloys.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Y; Cipriano, A F; Guan, Ren-Guo; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Liu, Huinan

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloy is an attractive class of metallic biomaterial for cardiovascular applications due to its biodegradability and mechanical properties. In this study, we investigated the degradation in blood, thrombogenicity, and cytocompatibility of Magnesium-Zinc-Strontium (Mg-Zn-Sr) alloys, specifically four Mg-4 wt % Zn-xSr (x = 0.15, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 wt %) alloys, together with pure Mg control and relevant reference materials for cardiovascular applications. Human whole blood and platelet rich plasma (PRP) were used as the incubation media to investigate the degradation behavior of the Mg-Zn-Sr alloys. The results showed that the PRP had a greater pH increase and greater concentration of Mg(2+) ions when compared with whole blood after 2 h of incubation with the same respective Mg alloys, suggesting that the Mg alloys degraded faster in PRP than in whole blood. The Mg alloy with 4 wt % Zn and 0.15 wt % Sr (named as ZSr41A) was identified as the most promising alloy for cardiovascular stent applications, because it showed slower degradation and less thrombogenicity, as indicated by the lower concentrations of Mg(2+) ions released and less deposition of platelets. Additionally, ZSr41 alloys were cytocompatible with fibroblasts in direct exposure culture in which the cells adhered and proliferated around the samples, with no statistical difference in cell adhesion density compared with the blank reference. Future studies on the ZSr41 alloys are necessary to investigate their direct interactions with other important cells in cardiovascular system, such as vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

  17. Platelet MAO and personality--function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Oreland, L; Hallman, J; Damberg, M

    2004-08-01

    Research on the association between platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity and personality traits, such as sensation seeking and impulsiveness, is reviewed with an emphasis on early history and current situation. The effects of MAO-inhibiting compounds in cigarette smoke for the interpretation of this association are discussed and recent results confirming a true association between platelet MAO activity and personality and vulnerability, for e.g. type 2 alcoholism are presented. From a clinical point of view, the link between platelet MAO activity, which is highly genetically regulated and is stable in the individual, and personality traits, has had its greatest impact on the understanding of the nature of constitutional factors making individuals vulnerable, for e.g. substance abuse and other forms of sociopathic behaviour. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between platelet MAO and behaviour are discussed and evidence that common transcriptional factors, e.g. within the AP-2 family, regulating both the expression of platelet MAO and components of the central monoaminergic systems, such as synthesising enzymes, receptors and transporters, are presented. A hypothesis is put forward, that such common transcription factors may not directly regulate platelet MAO expression, but rather mitochondrial density, or outer mitochondrial membrane surface. PMID:15279564

  18. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  19. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs.

  20. Cyclooxygenase Expression and Platelet Function in Healthy Dogs Receiving Low Dose Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Alicia; Thomason, John; Fritz, Sara; Grady, Jesse; Stokes, John; Wills, Robert; Pinchuk, Lesya; Mackin, Andrew; Lunsford, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin is used to prevent thromboembolic complications in dogs, but some animals are non-responsive to the anti-platelet effects of aspirin (‘aspirin resistance’). Hypothesis/Objectives That low dose aspirin would inhibit platelet function, decrease thromboxane synthesis, and alter platelet cyclooxygenase (COX) expression. Animals Twenty-four healthy dogs Methods A repeated measures study. Platelet function (PFA-100® closure time, collagen/epinephrine), platelet COX-1 and COX-2 expression, and urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (11-dTXB2) was evaluated prior to and during aspirin administration (1 mg/kg Q24 hours PO, 10 days). Based on prolongation of closure times after aspirin administration, dogs were divided into categories according to aspirin responsiveness: responders, non-responders, and inconsistent responders. Results Low dose aspirin increased closure times significantly (62% by Day 10, P<0.001), with an equal distribution among aspirin responsiveness categories, 8 dogs per group. Platelet COX-1 mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) increased significantly during treatment, 13% on Day 3 (range, −29.7%–136.1%) (P=0.047) and 72% on Day 10 (range, −0.37–210.36%) (P<0.001). Platelet COX-2 MFI increased significantly by 34% (range, −29.2–270.4%) on Day 3 (P = 0.003) and 74% (range, −19.7–226.2%) on Day 10 (P<0.001). Urinary 11-dTXB2 concentrations significantly (P=0.005, P<0.001) decreased at both time points. There was no difference between aspirin responsiveness and either platelet COX expression or thromboxane production. Conclusions and Clinical Importance Low dose aspirin consistently inhibits platelet function in approximately one third of healthy dogs, despite decreased thromboxane synthesis and increased platelet COX expression in most dogs. Pre-treatment COX isoform expression did not predict aspirin resistance. PMID:23278865

  1. Effect of erythrocytes and prostacyclin production in the effect of fructose and sorbitol on platelet activation in human whole blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, J P; Maximo, M A; Blanco, E; Moreno, A; Sánchez de la Cuesta, F

    1997-06-15

    We analyzed the in vitro effects of sorbitol and fructose on platelet function. Sorbitol and fructose increased platelet aggregation induced with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or collagen in whole blood, but had no effect in platelet-rich plasma. The concentration that increased basal aggregation by 50% with ADP as the inducer was 12.89 +/- 1.55 mmol/L for fructose, and 18.99 +/- 2.01 mmol/L for sorbitol. When collagen was the inducer, these concentrations were 15.02 +/- 0.98 mmol/L for fructose, and 12.94 +/- 1.57 mmol/L for sorbitol. Both sugars increased, in a concentration-dependent way, the proaggregatory effect of erythrocytes, and erythrocyte uptake of adenosine. Time to uptake of 50% adenosine was 2.1 +/- 0.3 min in control samples, 0.14 +/- 0.01 min in the presence of fructose, and 0.23 +/- 0.03 min with sorbitol. Both sugars reduced vascular prostacyclin synthesis, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 26.48 +/- 1.97 mmol/L for fructose, and 39.53 +/- 2.81 mmol/L for sorbitol. Both sugars also increased arterial lipid peroxidation by 30% (sorbitol) and 23% (fructose). We conclude that these two sugars enhance platelet function and disrupt the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio.

  2. Lyn and PECAM-1 function as interdependent inhibitors of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Zhangyin; Hu, Yu; Xiang, Jizhou; Polewski, Peter; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of platelet responsiveness is important to control pathologic thrombus formation. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and the Src family kinase Lyn inhibit platelet activation by the glycoprotein VI (GPVI) collagen receptor; however, it is not known whether PECAM-1 and Lyn function in the same or different inhibitory pathways. In these studies, we found that, relative to wild-type platelets, platelets derived from PECAM-1-deficient, Lyn-deficient, or PECAM-1/Lyn double-deficient mice were equally hyperresponsive to stimulation with a GPVI-specific agonist, indicating that PECAM-1 and Lyn participate in the same inhibitory pathway. Lyn was required for PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent binding of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2, SHP-2. These results support a model in which PECAM-1/SHP-2 complexes, formed in a Lyn-dependent manner, suppress GPVI signaling. PMID:21297004

  3. Platelets: crossroads of immunity and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N

    2014-07-31

    In this issue of Blood, Koupenova and colleagues report that platelets express functional TOLL-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and contribute to host survival during viral infection. Through a series of experiments utilizing mice deficient for TLR7 together with adoptive transfer of wild-type platelets, Koupenova et al demonstrate that platelets specifically respond to viral analogs and intact virus, leading to platelet activation and binding to various leukocyte subsets. Perhaps most importantly, this platelet activation appears absolutely essential for host survival during infection with some viral pathogens such as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV).

  4. Glycoprotein Ic-IIa functions as an activation-independent fibronectin receptor on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, R S; Orchekowski, R P; Nugent, D J; Yamada, K Y; Kunicki, T J

    1988-04-01

    Soluble fibronectin binds specifically to glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa on thrombin-activated platelets, and this binding is not observed with platelets of patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) which lack GPIIb-IIIa. Here we report that GT platelets retain the ability to interact with fibronectin-coated surfaces. Adhesion to fibronectin does not require platelet activation and is inhibited by soluble fibronectin, antibodies specific for fibronectin, peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp and polyclonal antibodies specific for band 3 of the chicken embryo fibroblast fibronectin receptor (anti-band 3). Using anti-band 3, we have purified a second fibronectin receptor from human platelets, a heterodimer composed of glycoproteins previously designated GPIc and GPIIa. The GPIc-IIa complex is found on both GT and normal platelets and appears to be identical to the GP138 kD-GP160 kD complex recently immunopurified by Giancotti et al. (1986. Exp. Cell Res. 163:47-62) and by Sonnenberg et al. (1987. J. Biol. Chem. 268:10376-10383). In this report, we provide the first evidence that GPIc-IIa actually mediates adhesion of platelets to fibronectin-coated surfaces. GPIc-IIa thus represents a second functional fibronectin receptor, distinct from GPIIb-IIIa, that is largely responsible for the adhesion of nonactivated platelets to fibronectin-coated surfaces.

  5. Dynamic monitoring of platelet deposition on severely damaged vessel wall in flowing blood. Effects of different stenoses on thrombus growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, R.; Badimon, J.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Badimon, L. )

    1990-03-01

    The formation of an arterial thrombus is a dynamic process that depends upon the characteristics of blood flow, the triggering substrate, and the blood components. We have developed and characterized a sensitive and specific computer-assisted nuclear scintigraphic method to study the dynamics of platelet deposition on severely damaged vessels both in vitro and in vivo in nonstenotic and stenotic flow conditions. Heparinized pig blood with Indium-111-labeled platelets was perfused for 50 minutes. Method variability in both static and flowing conditions was evaluated by Indium-111-labeled transferrin and Indium-111-labeled platelets. Positive scintigrams were obtained mainly in the presence of severe high grade stenoses on a thrombogenic substrate. Since the method is highly sensitive, computer-assisted axial dependence analysis was performed on the scintigraphic images to locate the thrombotic accumulation with respect to the area of the stenosis and to monitor the dynamic changes in platelet accumulation over time. Both in vitro and in vivo the highest level of platelet deposition occurred at the apex of the 80% stenosis, where embolization could be usually detected after 30 minutes of perfusion. This study is the first to assess the dynamics of thrombus growth in nonparallel flow streamlines such as are encountered in stenotic vessels. This method provides a new experimental tool with which to study factors affecting thrombus formation and stability.

  6. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  7. Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 18 Controls Both Platelet Generation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Delesque-Touchard, Nathalie; Pendaries, Caroline; Volle-Challier, Cécile; Millet, Laurence; Salel, Véronique; Hervé, Caroline; Pflieger, Anne-Marie; Berthou-Soulie, Laurence; Prades, Catherine; Sorg, Tania; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Savi, Pierre; Bono, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    RGS18 is a myeloerythroid lineage-specific regulator of G-protein signaling, highly expressed in megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelets. In the present study, we describe the first generation of a RGS18 knockout mouse model (RGS18-/-). Interesting phenotypic differences between RGS18-/- and wild-type (WT) mice were identified, and show that RGS18 plays a significant role in both platelet generation and function. RGS18 deficiency produced a gain of function phenotype in platelets. In resting platelets, the level of CD62P expression was increased in RGS18-/- mice. This increase correlated with a higher level of plasmatic serotonin concentration. RGS18-/- platelets displayed a higher sensitivity to activation in vitro. RGS18 deficiency markedly increased thrombus formation in vivo. In addition, RGS18-/- mice presented a mild thrombocytopenia, accompanied with a marked deficit in MK number in the bone marrow. Analysis of MK maturation in vitro and in vivo revealed a defective megakaryopoiesis in RGS18-/- mice, with a lower bone marrow content of only the most committed MK precursors. Finally, RGS18 deficiency was correlated to a defect of platelet recovery in vivo under acute conditions of thrombocytopenia. Thus, we highlight a role for RGS18 in platelet generation and function, and provide additional insights into the physiology of RGS18. PMID:25405900

  8. Apelin: an antithrombotic factor that inhibits platelet function.

    PubMed

    Adam, Frédéric; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Lopez, Jose Javier; Vatier, Camille; Turpin, Sabrina; Muscat, Adeline; Soulet, Fabienne; Aries, Anne; Jardin, Isaac; Bobe, Régis; Stepanian, Alain; de Prost, Dominique; Dray, Cédric; Rosado, Juan Antonio; Valet, Philippe; Feve, Bruno; Siegfried, Geraldine

    2016-02-18

    Apelin peptide and its receptor APJ are directly implicated in various physiological processes ranging from cardiovascular homeostasis to immune signaling. Here, we show that apelin is a key player in hemostasis with an ability to inhibit thrombin- and collagen-mediated platelet activation. Mice lacking apelin displayed a shorter bleeding time and a prothrombotic profile. Their platelets exhibited increased adhesion and a reduced occlusion time in venules, and displayed a higher aggregation rate after their activation by thrombin compared with wild-type platelets. Consequently, human and mouse platelets express apelin and its receptor APJ. Apelin directly interferes with thrombin-mediated signaling pathways and platelet activation, secretion, and aggregation, but not with ADP and thromboxane A2-mediated pathways. IV apelin administration induced excessive bleeding and prevented thrombosis in mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that apelin and/or APJ agonists could potentially be useful adducts in antiplatelet therapies and may provide a promising perspective for patients who continue to display adverse thrombotic events with current antiplatelet therapies.

  9. Rearranged EML4-ALK fusion transcripts sequester in circulating blood platelets and enable blood-based crizotinib response monitoring in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, R. Jonas A.; Karachaliou, Niki; Berenguer, Jordi; Gimenez-Capitan, Ana; Schellen, Pepijn; Teixido, Cristina; Tannous, Jihane; Kuiper, Justine L.; Drees, Esther; Grabowska, Magda; van Keulen, Marte; Heideman, Danielle A.M.; Thunnissen, Erik; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Viteri, Santiago; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Rosell, Rafael; Smit, Egbert F.; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Non-small-cell lung cancers harboring EML4-ALK rearrangements are sensitive to crizotinib. However, despite initial response, most patients will eventually relapse, and monitoring EML4-ALK rearrangements over the course of treatment may help identify these patients. However, challenges associated with serial tumor biopsies have highlighted the need for blood-based assays for the monitoring of biomarkers. Platelets can sequester RNA released by tumor cells and are thus an attractive source for the non-invasive assessment of biomarkers. Methods: EML4-ALK rearrangements were analyzed by RT-PCR in platelets and plasma isolated from blood obtained from 77 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, 38 of whom had EML4-ALK-rearranged tumors. In a subset of 29 patients with EML4-ALK-rearranged tumors who were treated with crizotinib, EML4-ALK rearrangements in platelets were correlated with progression-free and overall survival. Results: RT-PCR demonstrated 65% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of EML4-ALK rearrangements in platelets. In the subset of 29 patients treated with crizotinib, progression-free survival was 3.7 months for patients with EML4-ALK+ platelets and 16 months for those with EML4-ALK− platelets (hazard ratio, 3.5; P = 0.02). Monitoring of EML4-ALK rearrangements in the platelets of one patient over a period of 30 months revealed crizotinib resistance two months prior to radiographic disease progression. Conclusions: Platelets are a valuable source for the non-invasive detection of EML4-ALK rearrangements and may prove useful for predicting and monitoring outcome to crizotinib, thereby improving clinical decisions based on radiographic imaging alone. PMID:26544515

  10. Seasonal variation of imipramine binding in the blood platelets of normal controls and depressed patients

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Imipramine binding (IB) was studied in the blood platelets from normal controls and depressed patients over a 4-year period (1981-1984) to determine if seasonal variation was present in Bmax or KD. Bimonthly variation in the Bmax of IB was found in normal controls studied longitudinally. No such variation was found when individual values from normal controls were examined on a monthly or seasonal basis. Bmax in depressed patients showed a significant seasonal, but not monthly, variation. KD of IB varied in normal controls using monthly or seasonal data, but not in the probably more reliable bimonthly data. These results suggest that IB studies comparing groups of subjects should match groups for season of the year or, for greater accuracy, month of the year.

  11. Taurine transporter in fetal T lymphocytes and platelets: differential expression and functional activity.

    PubMed

    Iruloh, C G; D'Souza, S W; Speake, P F; Crocker, I; Fergusson, W; Baker, P N; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2007-01-01

    Transplacental transfer of taurine, a beta-amino acid essential for fetal and neonatal development, constitutes the primary source of taurine for the fetus. Placental transport of taurine is compromised in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction, resulting in a reduced concentration of taurine in cord plasma. This could impact on fetal cellular metabolism as taurine represents the most abundant intracellular amino acid in many fetal cell types. In the present study, we have used pure isolates of fetal platelets and T lymphocytes from cord blood of placentas, from normal, term pregnancies, as fetal cell types to examine the cellular uptake mechanisms for taurine by the system beta transporter and have compared gene and protein expression for the taurine transporter protein (TAUT) in these two cell types. System beta activity in fetal platelets was 15-fold higher compared with fetal T lymphocytes (P < 0.005), mirroring greater TAUT mRNA expression in platelets than T lymphocytes (P < 0.005). Cell-specific differences in TAUT protein moieties were detected with a doublet of 75 and 80 kDa in fetal platelets compared with 114 and 120 kDa in fetal T lymphocytes, with relatively higher expression in platelets. We conclude that greater system beta activity in fetal platelets compared with T lymphocytes is the result of relatively greater TAUT mRNA and protein expression. This study represents the first characterization of amino acid transporters in fetal T lymphocytes.

  12. Platelet lysate from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis-derived platelet concentrates for the isolation and expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: production process, content and identification of active components

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Natalie; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Fürst, Daniel; Maurer, Caroline; Dausend, Julia; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Mailänder, Volker; Lotfi, Ramin; Ignatius, Anita; Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Rojewski, Markus Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background aims The clinical use of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) requires ex vivo expansion in media containing supplements such as fetal bovine serum or, alternatively, human platelet lysate (PL). Methods Platelet concentrates were frozen, quarantine stored, thawed and sterile filtered to obtain PL. PL content and its effect on fibroblast-colony-forming unit (CFU-F) formation, MSC proliferation and large-scale expansion were studied. Results PL contained high levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), soluble CD40L (sCD40L), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA), platelet-derived growth factor AB/BB (PDGF-AB/BB), chemokine (C-C) ligand 5 (CCL5; RANTES) transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1/2/3 (GRO), with low batch-to-batch variability, and most were stable for up to 14 days. Inhibition of PDGF-BB and bFGF decreased MSC proliferation by about 20% and 50%, respectively. The strongest inhibition (about 75%) was observed with a combination of anti-bFGF + anti-PDGF-BB and anti-bFGF + anti-TGF-β1 + anti-PDGF-BB. Interestingly, various combinations of recombinant PDGF-BB, bFGF and TGF-β1 were not sufficient to promote cell proliferation. PL from whole blood-derived pooled platelet concentrates and apheresis platelet concentrates did not differ significantly in their growth-promoting activity on MSC. Conclusions PL enhances MSC proliferation and can be regarded as a safe tool for MSC expansion for clinical purposes. \\in particular, PDGF-BB and bFGF are essential components for the growth-promoting effect of PL, but are not sufficient for MSC proliferation. PMID:22296115

  13. The effect of ageing on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1995-08-01

    Twelve healthy male volunteers, mean age twenty-five, range twenty-one to thirty years, and 12 healthy middle-aged male volunteers mean age fifty-eight, range forty-four to seventy-two years, were tested regarding platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate and fibrinolytic activity, estimated as euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), and the fast-acting inhibitor against t-PA normally referred to as (PAI-1). Platelet aggregation increased significantly in the middle-aged group as compared with the young, as shown by a decrease in ADP thresholds for irreversible aggregation (P < 0.01). In healthy young volunteers, vigorous cycling exercise by itself caused platelet aggregability to decrease (P < 0.05). Such changes were not observed in the elderly. Fibrinolytic activity decreased significantly in the middle-aged group as shown by a prolongation of the ECLT (P < 0.01) and PAI-1, although not significantly, increased by approximately 100%, whereas t-PA significantly increased in the middle-aged group (P < 0.01). The present results suggest that increasing age is associated with not only increased platelet aggregability but also decreased fibrinolytic activity.

  14. The effects of plasma-processing conditions on the morphology of adherent human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Murugesan, R.; Hanley, E.; Lauer, J. L.; Shohet, J. L.; Albrecht, R. M.; Heintz, J. A.; Oliver, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    Hematocompatibility and nonfouling properties of materials are crucial for the development of small-scale biomedical devices. This study examines the adhesion and morphology of purified human platelets on plasma-polymerized tetraglyme-coated glass substrates. The effect of varying the plasma-processing parameters on platelet responses was determined using scanning electron microscopy. Images of platelets on the coated surfaces show that a significant reduction in platelet adhesion and spreading can be achieved as the processing parameters are varied.

  15. Aptamer-based electrochemical detection of picomolar platelet-derived growth factor directly in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rebecca Y; Plaxco, Kevin W; Heeger, Alan J

    2007-01-01

    We report an electrochemical, aptamer-based (E-AB) sensor for the detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) directly in blood serum. The E-AB approach employs alternating current voltammetry to monitor target-induced folding in a methylene blue-modified, PDGF-binding aptamer. The sensor is sensitive, highly selective, and essentially reagentless: we readily detect the BB variant of PDGF at 1 nM directly in undiluted, unmodified blood serum and at 50 pM (1.25 ng/mL) in serum-diluted 2-fold with aqueous buffer. The sensitivity and selectivity achieved by this sensor match or significantly exceed those of the best analogous optical approaches. For example, the detection limit attained in 50% serum is achieved against a >25 million-fold excess of contaminating blood proteins and represents a 4 order of magnitude improvement over the most sensitive optical PDGF aptasensor reported to date. Moreover, the E-AB sensor combines these promising attributes in a platform that is reusable, label-free, and electronic. Given these advantages, E-AB sensors appear well suited for implementation in portable microdevices directed at the direct detection of proteins and small molecules in complex, largely unprocessed clinical samples.

  16. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers.

  17. Effects of condensation products of biogenic amines on human platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Given, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Condensation products (CP) are formed by the reaction of biogenic amines with aldehydes and alpha-keto acids. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of CP on platelet function in vitro. The effect of CP on platelet aggregation was examined. Epinephrine-induced aggregation was inhibited, suggesting CP antagonistic activity on the platelet alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. Adenosine-diphosphate (ADP), collagen and arachidonic acid induced aggregation was inhibited only at high concentrations. Inhibition of epinephrine and ADP aggregation was reversible, suggesting CP are competitive inhibitors of these agonists. Binding affinities for the platelet alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptor were determined using (/sup 3/H)-yohimbine, a specific alpha/sup 2/-receptor antagonist. The order of potency for CP inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-yohimbine binding paralleled that determined for inhibition of epinephrine-induced aggregation. Platelet uptake of serotonin (5-HT) was competitively inhibited by CP, with the exception of salsolinol, which appears to be stimulatory. Release of 5-HT from platelets was induced by CP, with betacarbolines being more potent than tetrahydroisoquinolines. Evidence suggests that CP cause release by displacement of 5-HT from intraplatelet storage sites since this effect can be inhibited by imipramine, thus preventing accumulation of CP by platelets.

  18. Solubilization of a functionally active platelet-activating factor receptor from rabbit platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J E; Duronio, V; Wong, S I; McNeil, M; Salari, H

    1991-01-01

    Binding of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to a specific high-affinity membrane receptor has been demonstrated in numerous cell types, but very little is known about the molecular nature of this receptor. The receptor from rabbit platelets was solubilized using CHAPS, digitonin, octyl glucoside, Nonidet P-40 or sodium cholate, either with pre-bound [3H]PAF or in the absence of ligand. We have been able to demonstrate for the first time that the receptor solubilized with CHAPS, in the absence of ligand, could retain its binding activity. It migrated as a high molecular mass complex (greater than 350 kDa) on a Bio-Gel A-0.5 m gel filtration column. Binding to solubilized receptor rapidly reached an equilibrium at room temperature, but was much slower at 0 degrees C. Scatchard plots were used to calculate the number (approx. 100 per cell) and the affinity (Kd 2.5 +/- 1.4 nM) of the solubilized receptors. These values were comparable with those obtained from whole-cell binding experiments. Competition by PAF antagonists also verified that the assay was measuring PAF receptor binding activity. The presence of a protein in the receptor complex was demonstrated by heat and trypsin inactivation of binding activity. Trypsin had no effect on binding of PAF to whole cells, but was able to decrease binding activity in solubilized receptor preparations. Attempts to demonstrate the involvement of a glycoprotein by use of various lectin columns proved unsuccessful. The latter results are consistent with findings suggesting that the binding site of the PAF receptor may not be exposed at the cell surface. PMID:1654881

  19. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  20. Glucose ameliorates the metabolic profile and mitochondrial function of platelet concentrates during storage in autologous plasma

    PubMed Central

    Amorini, Angela M.; Tuttobene, Michele; Tomasello, Flora M.; Biazzo, Filomena; Gullotta, Stefano; De Pinto, Vito; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background It is essential that the quality of platelet metabolism and function remains high during storage in order to ensure the clinical effectiveness of a platelet transfusion. New storage conditions and additives are constantly evaluated in order to achieve this. Using glucose as a substrate is controversial because of its potential connection with increased lactate production and decreased pH, both parameters triggering the platelet lesion during storage. Materials and methods In this study, we analysed the morphological status and metabolic profile of platelets stored for various periods in autologous plasma enriched with increasing glucose concentrations (13.75, 27.5 and 55 mM). After 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days, high energy phosphates (ATP, GTP, ADP, AMP), oxypurines (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid), lactate, pH, mitochondrial function, cell lysis and morphology, were evaluated. Results The data showed a significant dose-dependent improvement of the different parameters in platelets stored with increasing glucose, compared to what detected in controls. Interestingly, this phenomenon was more marked at the highest level of glucose tested and in the period of time generally used for platelet transfusion (0–6 days). Conclusion These results indicate that the addition of glucose during platelet storage ameliorates, in a dose-dependent manner, the biochemical parameters related to energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. Since there was no correspondence between glucose addition, lactate increase and pH decrease in our experiments, it is conceivable that platelet derangement during storage is not directly caused by glucose through an increase of anaerobic glycolysis, but rather to a loss of mitochondrial functions caused by reduced substrate availability. PMID:22682337

  1. Platelets: Covert Regulators of Lymphatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Bertozzi, Cara C.; Hess, Paul R.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The field of platelet biology has rapidly expanded beyond the classical role of platelets in preventing blood loss and orchestrating clot formation. Despite the lack of transcriptional ability of these anuclear cell fragments, platelet function is now thought to encompass such diverse contexts as tissue repair, immune activation, primary tumor formation, and metastasis. Recent studies from multiple groups have turned the spotlight on an exciting new role for platelets in the formation of lymphatic vessels during embryonic development. Genetic experiments demonstrate that Podoplanin, a transmembrane protein expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells, engages the platelet CLEC-2 receptor when exposed to blood, leading to SYK-SLP-76-dependent platelet activation. When components of this pathway are disrupted, aberrant vascular connections form, resulting in blood-lymphatic mixing. Furthermore, platelet-null embryos manifest identical blood-lymphatic mixing. The identification of platelets as the critical cell type mediating blood-lymphatic vascular separation raises new questions in our understanding of lymphatic development and platelet biology. PMID:21071706

  2. Glutathione peroxidase potentiates the inhibition of platelet function by S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, J E; Frei, B; Welch, G N; Loscalzo, J

    1995-01-01

    GSH peroxidase (Px) catalyzes the reduction of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH), known metabolic products of platelets and vascular cells. Because interactions between these cells are modulated by nitric oxide (NO) and LOOH inactivate NO, we investigated the effect of GSH-Px on the inhibition of platelet function by the naturally occurring S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-glutathione (SNO-Glu). Concentrations of SNO-Glu that alone did not inhibit platelet function (subthreshold inhibitory concentrations) were added to platelet-rich plasma together with GSH-Px (0.2-20 U/ml); this led to a dose-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.6 U/ml GSH-Px. In the presence of subthreshold inhibitory concentrations of SNO-Glu, the LOOH, 5-hydroperoxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid, increased platelet aggregation, an effect reversed by GSH-Px. Glutathione and SNO-Glu were equally effective as cosubstrates for GSH-Px. Incubation of SNO-Glu with GSH-Px for 1 min led to a 48.5% decrease in the concentration of SNO-Glu. Incubation of SNO-Glu with serum albumin led to the formation of S-nitroso-albumin, an effect enhanced by GSH-Px. These observations suggest that GSH-Px has two functions: reduction of LOOH, thereby preventing inactivation of NO, and metabolism of SNO-Glu, thereby liberating NO and/or supporting further transnitrosation reactions. PMID:7615810

  3. The influence of herbal medicine on platelet function and coagulation: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Herbal medicines have been traditionally used in the management of CVD and can play a role in modifying CVD progression, particularly in platelet function, and have the potential of altering platelet function tests, as well as some coagulation parameters. Herbal medicines, such as feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginseng, motherwort, St John's wort, and willow bark, were found to reduce platelet aggregation. In vitro studies show promise in the reduction of platelet aggregation for Andrographis, feverfew, garlic, ginger, Ginkgo, ginseng, hawthorn, horse chestnut, and turmeric. In addition, cranberry, danshen, dong quai, Ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, and St John's wort were found to have potential interactions with warfarin. Furthermore, St John's wort interacted with clopidogrel and danshen with aspirin. Therefore, repeat testing of platelet function and coagulation studies, particularly for patients on warfarin therapy, may be required after exclusion of herbal medicines that could have possibly affected initial test results. PMID:25839871

  4. Human CalDAG-GEFI gene (RASGRP2) mutation affects platelet function and causes severe bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Canault, Matthias; Ghalloussi, Dorsaf; Grosdidier, Charlotte; Guinier, Marie; Perret, Claire; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Germain, Marine; Raslova, Hana; Peiretti, Franck; Morange, Pierre E.; Saut, Noemie; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Alan T.; Cambien, François; Pierres, Anne; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The nature of an inherited platelet disorder was investigated in three siblings affected by severe bleeding. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified the culprit mutation (cG742T) in the RAS guanyl-releasing protein-2 (RASGRP2) gene coding for calcium- and DAG-regulated guanine exchange factor-1 (CalDAG-GEFI). Platelets from individuals carrying the mutation present a reduced ability to activate Rap1 and to perform proper αIIbβ3 integrin inside-out signaling. Expression of CalDAG-GEFI mutant in HEK293T cells abolished Rap1 activation upon stimulation. Nevertheless, the PKC- and ADP-dependent pathways allow residual platelet activation in the absence of functional CalDAG-GEFI. The mutation impairs the platelet’s ability to form thrombi under flow and spread normally as a consequence of reduced Rac1 GTP-binding. Functional deficiencies were confined to platelets and megakaryocytes with no leukocyte alteration. This contrasts with the phenotype seen in type III leukocyte adhesion deficiency caused by the absence of kindlin-3. Heterozygous did not suffer from bleeding and have normal platelet aggregation; however, their platelets mimicked homozygous ones by failing to undergo normal adhesion under flow and spreading. Rescue experiments on cultured patient megakaryocytes corrected the functional deficiency after transfection with wild-type RASGRP2. Remarkably, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient to prevent bleeding, making CalDAG-GEFI a novel and potentially safe therapeutic target to prevent thrombosis. PMID:24958846

  5. Correlation between the In Vitro Functionality of Stored Platelets and the Cytosolic Esterase-Induced Fluorescence Intensity with CMFDA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiexi; Yi, Xiaoyang; Liu, Minxia; Zhou, Qian; Ren, Suping; Wang, Yan; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Jianwei; Han, Ying

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the cytosolic esterase-induced fluorescence intensity (CEIFI) from carboxy dimethyl fluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) in platelets may related to platelet functions. In the present study, we measured the change of CEIFI in platelets during storage, and examined the correlations of CEIFI with the in vitro functionality of stored platelets, including the ADP-induced aggregation activity, hypotonic shock response, expression of CD62P as well as platelet apoptosis. The CEIFI of fresh platelets, when tested at 10 μM CMFDA, the mean fluorescence intensity index (MFI) was 305.9 ± 49.9 (N = 80). After 1-day storage, it was 203.8 ± 34.4, the CEIFI of the stored platelets started to decline significantly, and reduced to 112.7 ±27.7 after 7-day storage. The change in CEIFI is highly correlated to all four functional parameters measured, with the correlation coefficients being 0.9813, 0.9848, -0.9945 and -0.9847 for the ADP-induced aggregation activity, hypotonic shock response (HSR), expression of CD62P and platelet apoptosis respectively. The above results show that the CEIFI measurement of platelets represents well the viability and functional state of in vitro stored platelets. This may be used as a convenient new method for quality evaluation for stored platelets if this result can be further validated by the following clinical trials.

  6. Sample collection and platelet function testing: influence of vacuum or aspiration principle on PFA-100 test results.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Ippolito, Luigi; Zobbi, Valentina; Sandei, Franca; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2013-09-01

    As for other tests of hemostasis, the investigation of platelet function is highly vulnerable to a broad series of preanalytical variables, which span from patient preparation to the final analysis of the specimen and issuance of test results. In particular, there remains much controversy about the influence of manual or vacuum aspiration of blood into primary collection tubes on platelet function testing. Accordingly, we investigated this for the PFA-100. In 12 healthy volunteers, a sample labeled as 'BD-V' was drawn into a 2.7 ml BD Vacutainer tube, whereas two additional samples were collected from the opposite arm into 5.0 ml Sarstedt S-Monovette tubes by vacuum (SD-V) or manual aspiration (SD-A). All sample were tested on PFA-100 with collagen and ADP (CADP) or collagen and epinephrine (CEPI). The values of both CEPI and CADP obtained in SD-A samples were significantly lower than those obtained in SD-V and BD-V tubes, whereas those of the two evacuated tubes did not significantly differ. On average, CEPI values were prolonged by 11% in SD-V and 13% in BD-V, whereas those of CADP were prolonged by 14% in SD-V and 10% in BD-V, respectively. These findings suggests that the lower shear stress generated by the manual aspiration of blood into the primary collection tube would prevent spurious hyper-activation of platelets, thus, preserving the integrity of their function for subsequent testing on PFA-100. This study underscores the need to define or validate local reference ranges for the PFA-100 based on the collection tube used. Different reference ranges of both CEPI and CADP may also be advisable when venous blood samples are collected with manual aspiration or vacuum principle.

  7. Platelet-active substances in the venom of Bothrops moojeni snake-a novel evaluation method using whole blood aggregometry.

    PubMed

    Demler, Christine; Bühler, Beatrice; Menin, Laure; Stöcklin, Reto; Wilmer, Marianne; Ernst, Beat; Perchuc, Anna Maria

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was an investigation of the crude Bothrops moojeni venom, aiming at the identification of new compounds with platelet-activating or -inhibiting activity. The venom was separated by gel filtration chromatography into 18 fractions, which were tested by means of whole blood aggregometry for their activities affecting the aggregation of blood platelets. In order to eliminate interferences caused by prothrombin activators or thrombin like-enzymes, which are frequently present in snake venoms, a test method for screening protein mixtures was developed. To avoid clotting of the blood samples, the thrombin inhibitor hirudin and the synthetic inhibitor of fibrin polymerization Pefabloc FG were applied. In the present study, a platelet aggregation activator with an activity resembling thrombocytin from B. atrox was identified in one of the examined venom fractions. In addition, a platelet antagonist-most likely a disintegrin-with broad inhibitory activity against aggregation triggered by collagen, adenosine diphosphate and thrombin receptor activating peptide, was identified. PMID:19938887

  8. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechanism to relay platelet activation process induced by ADP. CRP and pravastatin reduce PAR-1 expression in platelet by ADP pathway. PMID:26950455

  9. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  10. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  11. Platelets abrogate leukotriene B(4) generation by human blood neutrophils stimulated with monosodium urate monohydrate or f-Met-Leu-Phe in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Poubelle, Patrice E; Molière, Patrick; De Médicis, Rinaldo; Lussier, André; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Neutrophils are physiologically associated with platelets in whole blood. Inflammatory reactions can be modulated by the presence of platelets. To investigate the influence of platelets on neutrophil activity, we studied the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolic pathway in normal human blood neutrophils stimulated with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) or monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in the presence of autologous platelets. Platelets inhibited by more than 90% the synthesis of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE in neutrophils activated with fMLP or MSUM. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid did not reverse the inhibitory effect of platelets on 5-LOX-generated metabolites in fMLP- or MSUM-activated neutrophils. Preincubation of neutrophils with adenosine deaminase reversed the inhibitory effect of platelets in fMLP-treated neutrophils, indicating that adenosine was responsible for the platelet inhibition of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE formation. In contrast, adenosine deaminase had no influence on the inhibitory effects of platelets in MSUM-stimulated cells. These results suggest that platelets can inhibit the synthesis of 5-LOX products (a). by acting mainly downstream to phospholipase A(2) in cells stimulated by fMLP or MSUM, (b). through adenosine when neutrophils are activated with fMLP, and (c). by an adenosine-independent mechanism in MSUM-activated neutrophils by an as-yet-unidentified mediator.

  12. Enforced fucosylation of cord blood hematopoietic cells accelerates neutrophil and platelet engraftment after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Popat, Uday; Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun; Fox, Patricia; Kondo, Kayo; Marin, David; McNiece, Ian; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra; Olson, Amanda; Parmar, Simrit; Shah, Nina; Andreeff, Michael; Kebriaei, Partow; Kaur, Indreshpal; Yvon, Eric; de Lima, Marcos; Cooper, Laurence J N; Tewari, Priti; Champlin, Richard E; Nieto, Yago; Andersson, Borje S; Alousi, Amin; Jones, Roy B; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Bashir, Qaiser; Ciurea, Stefan; Ahmed, Sairah; Anderlini, Paolo; Bosque, Doyle; Bollard, Catherine; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Thomas, Michael; Miller, Leonard; Wolpe, Steve; Simmons, Paul; Robinson, Simon; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A; Shpall, Elizabeth J

    2015-05-01

    Delayed engraftment is a major limitation of cord blood transplantation (CBT), due in part to a defect in the cord blood (CB) cells' ability to home to the bone marrow. Because this defect appears related to low levels of fucosylation of cell surface molecules that are responsible for binding to P- and E-selectins constitutively expressed by the marrow microvasculature, and thus for marrow homing, we conducted a first-in-humans clinical trial to correct this deficiency. Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received myeloablative therapy followed by transplantation with 2 CB units, one of which was treated ex vivo for 30 minutes with the enzyme fucosyltransferase-VI and guanosine diphosphate fucose to enhance the interaction of CD34(+) stem and early progenitor cells with microvessels. The results of enforced fucosylation for 22 patients enrolled in the trial were then compared with those for 31 historical controls who had undergone double unmanipulated CBT. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 17 days (range, 12-34 days) compared with 26 days (range, 11-48 days) for controls (P = .0023). Platelet engraftment was also improved: median was 35 days (range, 18-100 days) compared with 45 days (range, 27-120 days) for controls (P = .0520). These findings support ex vivo fucosylation of multipotent CD34(+) CB cells as a clinically feasible means to improve engraftment efficiency in the double CBT setting. The trial is registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01471067.

  13. The role of point-of-care platelet function testing in predicting postoperative bleeding following cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Corredor, C; Wasowicz, M; Karkouti, K; Sharma, V

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis appraises the utility of point-of-care platelet function tests for predicting blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgical patients, and analyses whether their use within a transfusion management algorithm is associated with improved patient outcomes. We included 30 observational studies incorporating 3044 patients in the qualitative assessment, and nine randomised controlled trials including 1057 patients in the meta-analysis. Platelet function tests demonstrated significant variability in their ability to predict blood loss and transfusion requirements. Their use within a blood transfusion algorithm demonstrated a reduction in blood loss at longest follow-up (mean difference -102.9 ml (95% CI -149.9 to -56.1 ml), p < 0.001), and transfusion of packed red cells (RR 0.86 (95% CI 0.78-0.94), p = 0.001) and fresh frozen plasma (RR 0.42 (95% CI 0.30-0.59), p < 0.001). Viscoelastic methods used in combination with other platelet function tests achieved greater reduction in blood loss (mean difference -111.8 ml (95% CI -174.9 to -49.1 ml), p = 0.0005) compared with their use alone (mean difference -90.6 ml (95% CI 166.1-15.0 ml), p = 0.02). We conclude that incorporation of point-of-care platelet function tests into transfusion management algorithms is associated with a reduction in blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery patients. PMID:25916344

  14. Sulfasalazine and its metabolites inhibit platelet function in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    MacMullan, Paul A; Madigan, Anne M; Paul, Nevin; Peace, Aaron J; Alagha, Ahmed; Nolan, Kevin B; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Kenny, Dermot

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of sulfasalazine and its metabolites on platelet function in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). One hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of IA were screened. Those with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), taking anti-platelet agents or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were excluded. A total of 32 patients were investigated, 15 taking sulfasalazine and 17 taking other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and no sulfasalazine. These two cohorts were compared to 15 patients with stable CVD on long-term aspirin. The effect of sulfasalazine and its metabolites on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation was also tested in vitro in samples from healthy donors (n = 18). Demographics, CVD risk factors and disease activity indices were similar in the sulfasalazine and other DMARD groups. AA-induced platelet aggregation was significantly inhibited in the sulfasalazine group (9 ± 7 %) and comparable to that in the aspirin group (10 ± 6 %). In contrast, there was no effect on AA-induced platelet aggregation in the other DMARDs group (77 ± 12 %) (p < 0.001). Furthermore, sulfasalazine therapy had no effect on platelet aggregation in response to multiple other agonists. Sulfasalazine and its metabolites (5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine) exerted an additive and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on AA-induced platelet aggregation in vitro (p < 0.001). The inhibition of AA-induced platelet aggregation by sulfasalazine is comparable to that achieved by aspirin and is dependent on both sulfasalazine and its metabolites. This represents a potential mechanism that may contribute to the known cardioprotective effect of sulfasalazine in patients with IA. PMID:25253538

  15. Multiwavelength UV/visible spectroscopy for the quantitative investigation of platelet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattley, Yvette D.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1998-04-01

    The quality of platelets transfused is vital to the effectiveness of the transfusion. Freshly prepared, discoid platelets are the most effective treatment for preventing spontaneous hemorrhage or for stopping an abnormal bleeding event. Current methodology for the routine testing of platelet quality involves random pH testing of platelet rich plasma and visual inspection of platelet rich plasma for a swirling pattern indicative of the discoid shape of the cells. The drawback to these methods is that they do not provide a quantitative and objective assay for platelet functionality that can be used on each platelet unit prior to transfusion. As part of a larger project aimed at characterizing whole blood and blood components with multiwavelength UV/vis spectroscopy, isolated platelets and platelet in platelet rich plasma have been investigated. Models based on Mie theory have been developed which allow for the extraction of quantitative information on platelet size, number and quality from multi-wavelength UV/vis spectra. These models have been used to quantify changes in platelet rich plasma during storage. The overall goal of this work is to develop a simple, rapid quantitative assay for platelet quality that can be used prior to platelet transfusion to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. As a result of this work, the optical properties for isolated platelets, platelet rich plasma and leukodepleted platelet rich plasma have been determined.

  16. [Effect of lovastatin on adhesive and aggregation function of platelets in patients with arterial hypertension and dislipidemia].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N; Skoriatina, I A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate efficiency of correction of lipid profile disturbances and platelet dysfunction by lovastatin in patients with arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia. Lovastatin was given to 29 patients for 4 months. The main parameters measured included dynamics of blood lipid profile, lipid peroxidation in plasma and platelets, antioxidative protection of blood fluid and platelets, platelet activity. t-Students test was used to assess statistical significance of the results. It was shown that lovastatin has beneficial effect on dyslipoproteidemia and peroxidation syndrome. Moreover, it normalizes intraplatelet regulatory mechanisms and inhibits enhanced platelet activity. Effects of lovastatin in patients with arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia persist under conditions of long-term therapy.

  17. Minimal amounts of kindlin-3 suffice for basal platelet and leukocyte functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Klapproth, Sarah; Moretti, Federico A; Zeiler, Marlis; Ruppert, Raphael; Breithaupt, Ute; Mueller, Susanna; Haas, Rainer; Mann, Matthias; Sperandio, Markus; Fässler, Reinhard; Moser, Markus

    2015-12-10

    Hematopoietic cells depend on integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling, which is induced by kindlin-3 and talin-1. To determine whether platelet and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) functions require specific thresholds of kindlin-3, we generated mouse strains expressing 50%, 10%, or 5% of normal kindlin-3 levels. We report that in contrast to kindlin-3-null mice, which die perinatally of severe bleeding and leukocyte adhesion deficiency, mice expressing as little as 5% of kindlin-3 were viable and protected from spontaneous bleeding and infections. However, platelet adhesion and aggregation were reduced in vitro and bleeding times extended. Similarly, leukocyte adhesion, extravasation, and bacterial clearance were diminished. Quantification of protein copy numbers revealed stoichiometric quantities of kindlin-3 and talin-1 in platelets and neutrophils, indicating that reduction of kindlin-3 in our mouse strains progressively impairs the cooperation with talin-1. Our findings show that very low levels of kindlin-3 enable basal platelet and neutrophil functions, whereas in stress situations such as injury and infection, platelets and neutrophils require a maximum of functional integrins that is achieved with high and stoichiometric quantities of kindlin-3 and talin-1.

  18. Stability of lyophilized human platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Yang, C; Wan, W; Liu, M X; Ren, S P; Quan, G B; Han, Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-term preservation of platelets is a great challenge for blood transfusion centers, due to the required narrow storage temperature arange (22 ± 2 degree C). Short shelf life and potential bacterial growth often lead to the shortage of high-quality platelets. Freeze-dried preservation is thus believed to be a potential solution for long-term platelet storage without losing the hemostasis function. Here we report a new platelet preservation method, which uses small molecule carbohydrates to extend storage time and to maintain platelet function. The activities of lyophilized platelets that were stabilized with small molecule carbohydrate (e.g., cell viability, mean platelet volume, activation characteristics, and aggregation kinetics) were maintained after storage of 30, 60, and 90 days at room temperature, 4 degree C, and -20 degree C. The recovery of freeze-dried platelets was 87 percent in comparison to fresh platelets. The mean platelet volume of rehydrated platelets increased (from 6.8 fl to 8.0 fl). About 40 percent of rehydrated platelets was in the early-activated stage (PCA-1 positive) and 30 percent was in the terminal-activated stage (CD62P positive). The cell viability was about 60 percent as measured with CMFDA vital probes. The aggregation rate of rehydrated platelets after 90-day storage was similar to fresh platelets stored at 22 degree C ± 2 degree C.

  19. Endothelial and platelet function alterations in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gresele, P; Falcinelli, E; Sebastiano, M; Baldelli, F

    2012-03-01

    The HIV epidemic has huge dimensions: in 2009, 33.3million people worldwide, including 2.5million children, were affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) has significantly modified the course of HIV disease, with longer survival and improved quality of life, but it has simultaneously lead to the appearance of previously unrecognized complications, such as ischemic cardiovascular events. Many studies have shown a higher rate of premature atherosclerosis in patients with HIV infection, leading to coronary, cerebrovascular, or peripheral arterial disease. However, it is still debated whether cardiovascular complications are a consequence of HIV infection itself or of the long-term use of HAART. In particular, myocardial infarction has been suggested to be associated with the use of abacavir. Endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation are markers of atherosclerosis and of increased cardiovascular risk. Here we review the evidence that endothelial dysfunction and platelet alterations are associated with chronic HIV infection, the possible role of different HAARTs, and the possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. Potential therapeutic implications are also discussed.

  20. Role of glycoprotein IIa (beta 1 subunit of very late activation antigens) in platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, S; Catimel, B; McGregor, L; Leung, L L; McGregor, J L

    1991-10-15

    Very late activation antigens (VLAs) are glycoproteins (GPs) that play a major role in platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix. These GPs, members of the integrin family, are heterodimer complexes with different alpha subunits noncovalently associated with a common beta 1 subunit known as GPIIa. GPIa-IIa (also known as VLA2), GPIc-IIa (VLA5), and GPIc*-IIa (VLA6) are involved, respectively, in platelet adhesion to collagen, fibronectin, and laminin. At this stage, very little is known about the role of GPIIa in platelet adhesive functions. In this study, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (LYP22) directed against GPIIa. Immunoaffinity chromatography using LYP22 combined with two-dimensional nonreduced-reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that the antibody brings down all VLA subunits. Western blots indicate that the binding site of LYP22 on GPIIa is disulfide bridge-dependent. The number of LYP22 binding sites is not increased on stimulation with thrombin and is in the range of what is observed with another anti-GPIIa MoAb (A-1A5). LYP22 is the first anti-GPIIa MoAb to inhibit aggregation and secretion of washed platelets stimulated with collagen, thrombin, or arachidonic acid. Moreover, the lag-phase usually observed on collagen stimulation is significantly prolonged (by 60 seconds) in the presence of LYP22. This lag-phase, mediated by LYP22, is also observed in the presence of plasma proteins and is coupled with a reduced effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In addition, LYP22 affects the adhesion of resting platelets to type III collagen, but not to fibronectin, laminin, or type I collagen. These results strongly indicate that the site on GPIIa, bearing the LYP22 epitope, is an active participant in signal transduction controlling platelet functions.

  1. Autologous platelet-rich plasma compared with whole blood for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis; a comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kianimehr, Lida; Ahrar, Mohmmad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intralesional injection of autologous blood-derived products has recently gained attention as a potential treatment for plantar fasciitis (PF). We compared platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) for the treatment of chronic PF. Materials and Methods: Patients with chronic PF received either an intralesional injection of 3 cc PRP prepared by double centrifuge technique or WB (n = 17 in each group). Overall, morning and walking pain severity were assessed by 11-point numerical rating scale, and function was assessed by the Roles and Maudsley score (RMS) at baseline and 1-month and 3 months after treatment. Ultrasonography was performed to measure plantar fascia thickness at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Results: Pain scores were reduced over the study in the PRP (mean change = −5.00 ± 1.17 to −5.47 ± 1.46) and WB groups (mean change = −5.29 ± 2.56 to −6.47 ± 2.83), with no difference between groups (P > 0.05). One month and 3 months after treatment, successful treatment (RMS of ≤ 2) was respectively observed in 29.4% and 82.3% of the PRP and in 47.1% and 76.4% of the WB groups (P > 0.05). Also, fascia thickness was decreased in both the PRP and WB groups (mean change = −1.74 ± 1.11 vs. −1.21 ± 0.73 mm, respectively, P = 0.115). Conclusions: Significant improvement in pain and function, as well as decrease in plantar fascia thickness, was observed by intralesional injection of the PRP and WB in patients with chronic PF. The study results indicate similar effectiveness between PRP and WB for the treatment of chronic PF in short-term. PMID:27274499

  2. Human Platelet Antigen Alleles in 998 Taiwanese Blood Donors Determined by Sequence-Specific Primer Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Burnouf, Thierry; Chen, Jen-Wei; Lin, Liang-In

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphism of human platelet antigens (HPAs) leads to alloimmunizations and immune-mediated platelet disorders including fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP), and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR). HPA typing and knowledge of antigen frequency in a population are important in particular for the provision of HPA-matched blood components for patients with PTR. We have performed allele genotyping for HPA-1 through -6 and -15 among 998 platelet donors from 6 blood centers in Taiwan using sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction. The HPA allele frequency was 99.55, and 0.45% for HPA-1a and -1b; 96.49, and 3.51% for HPA-2a and -2b; 55.81, and 44.19% for HPA-3a and -3b; 99.75, and 0.25% for HPA-4a and -4b; 98.50, and 1.50% for HPA-5a and -5b; 97.75 and 2.25% for HPA-6a and -6b; 53.71 and 46.29% for HPA-15a and -15b. HPA-15b and HPA-3a, may be considered the most important, followed by HPA-2, -6, -1, -5, and -4 systems, as a cause of FNAIT, PTP, and PTR based on allele frequency. HPA-4b and HPA-5b role cannot be excluded based on their immunogenicity. A larger-scale study will now be conducted to confirm these hypotheses and to establish an apheresis donor database for the procurement of HPA-matched apheresis platelets for patients with PTR. PMID:23865077

  3. [Effects of silkworm pupa oil on serum lipids level and platelet function in rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Huang, Lianzhen; Hu, Jianping; Li, Tao

    2002-08-01

    To observe the effects of silkworm pupa oil on serum lipids level and platelet function in rats, according to serum TG, TC level, 40 male Wistar rats are divided into four groups (normal control group, high fat control group, silkworm pupa oil group and silkworm pupa oil + VE group). The rats are fed different diets and six weeks later, serum lipids level and platelet function are measured. The results show that (1) Compared with high fat control group, serum TC, TG, LDL-C level, AI value, Platelet aggregability, plasma TXB2 level and T/P ratio decrease significantly while HDL-C level and 6-k-PGF1 level increase in silkworm pupa oil group; (2) Serum TC, LDL-C level, T/P ratio and platelet aggregability are significantly lower in silkworm pupa oil + VE group than in silkworm pupa oil group. It is suggested that silkworm pupa oil rich in alpha-linolenic acid can reduce serum lipids level and inhibit platelet aggregation, which is more effective with the supplementation with VE.

  4. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever through identification of Salmonella typhi within 18 hours of specimen acquisition by culture of the mononuclear cell-platelet fraction of blood.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, F A; McWhirter, P D; Burr, D; Punjabi, N H; Lane, E; Kumala, S; Sudarmono, P; Pulungsih, S P; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P

    1990-01-01

    Detection of Salmonella typhi in blood by culture of the mononuclear cell-platelet layer was compared with other methods currently used for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Colonies of S. typhi were present in all mononuclear cell-platelet layer-positive cultures within 18 h of plating and were identified within an additional 10 min by a coagglutination technique. In contrast, identification of all positive cultures by conventional blood culture required 3 days. PMID:2332479

  5. Migraine: the platelet hypothesis after 10 years.

    PubMed

    Hanington, E

    1989-01-01

    The proposal that migraine is a blood disorder and caused by a primary abnormality of platelet behaviour was first put forward in 1978. This paper outlines the basis on which the proposal was made and the way in which the platelet hypothesis can account for the many facets of the disorder. It also reports further studies of platelet composition and function which have been undertaken by a large number of independent workers during the past ten years. The results of their investigations provide strong additional support for the platelet hypothesis in migraine.

  6. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Veneri, Dino; Targher, Giovanni; Zaffanello, Marco; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2008-01-01

    Inherited platelet disorders are a rare, but probably underdiagnosed, cause of symptomatic bleeding. They are characterized by abnormalities of platelet number (inherited thrombocytopenias), function (inherited disorders of platelet function) or both. This review briefly discusses the inherited platelet disorders with respect to molecular defects, diagnostic evaluation and treatment strategies.

  7. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis sensitises human blood platelets to epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Nylander, M; Lindahl, T L; Bengtsson, T; Grenegård, M

    2008-08-01

    Recent studies indicate connections between periodontitis and atherothrombosis, and the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has been found within atherosclerotic lesions. P. gingivalis-derived proteases, designated gingipains activate human platelets, probably through a "thrombin-like" activity on protease-activated receptors (PARs). However, the potential interplay between P. gingivalis and other physiological platelet activators has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to elucidate consequences and mechanisms in the interaction between P. gingivalis and the stress hormone epinephrine. By measuring changes in light transmission through platelet suspensions, we found that P. gingivalis provoked aggregation, whereas epinephrine alone never had any effect. Intriguingly, pre-treatment of platelets with a low, sub-threshold number of P. gingivalis (i.e. a density that did not directly provoke platelet aggregation) resulted in a marked aggregation response when epinephrine was added. This synergistic action was not inhibited by the cyclooxygenas inhibitor aspirin. Furthermore, fura-2-measurements revealed that epinephrine caused an intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in P. gingivalis pre-treated platelets, whereas epinephrine alone had no effect. Inhibition of the arg-specific gingipains, but not the lys-specific gingipains, abolished the aggregation and the Ca(2+) response provoked by epinephrine. Similar results were achieved by separate blockage of platelet alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors and PARs. In conclusion, the present study shows that a sub-threshold number of P. gingivalis sensitizes platelets to epinephrine. We suggest that P. gingivalis-derived arg-specific gingipains activates a small number of PARs on the surface of the platelets. This leads to an unexpected Ca(2+) mobilization and a marked aggregation response when epinephrine subsequently binds to the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor. The present results are consistent with a direct

  8. Poly (I:C) downregulates platelet production and function through type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Meiss, Roberto; Fondevila, Carlos; Gómez, Ricardo Martin; Schattner, Mirta

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of viral infections; the underlying mechanisms appear to depend on the identity of the virus involved. Previous research, including reports from our group, indicates that as well as having antiviral activity type I interferons (IFN I) selectively downregulate platelet production. In this study we extended understanding of the role of endogenous IFN I in megakaryo/thrombopoiesis by evaluating platelet and megakaryocyte physiology in mice treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)], a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA, Toll-like receptor-3 ligand and strong IFNβ inducer. Mice-treated with poly (I:C) showed thrombocytopaenia, an increase in mean platelet volume and abnormal haemostatic and inflammatory platelet-mediated functionality, indicated by decreased fibrinogen binding and platelet adhesion, prolonged tail bleeding times and impaired P-Selectin externalisation, RANTES release and thrombin-induced platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation. These changes were associated with an increase in size and an abnormal distribution of bone marrow megakaryocytes within the vascular niche and were directly correlated with the plasmatic and bone marrow IFNβ levels. All these effects were absent in genetically modified mice lacking the IFN I receptor. Our results suggest that IFN I is the central mediator of poly (I:C)-induced thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction and indicate that these abnormalities are due to changes in the last stages of megakaryocyte development. These data provide new evidence for the role of IFN I in megakaryocyte distribution in the bone marrow niches and its influence on thrombopoiesis and haemostasis. PMID:26134179

  9. [Effects of lysine clonixinate on platelet function. Comparison with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents].

    PubMed

    Kramer, E H; Sassetti, B; Kaminker, A J; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of action of non steroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consists of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. This explains many of the pharmacological effects and adverse events observed in medical practice. Administration of NSAIDs to patients with hemostatic disorders or perioperative conditions entails the risk of bleeding due to inhibition of platelet function. This study deals with platelet changes induced by lysine clonixinate vs diclofenac, ibuprofen and aspirin in classical tests such as platelet count, platelet factor 3 (PF3) activity and platelet aggregation with various inductors and more recent procedures such as P-selectin measurement by flow cytometry. Unlike control drugs, lysine clonixinate did not induce changes in platelet count or function when administered to healthy volunteers at the commonly used therapeutic doses.

  10. The association of thromboxane A2 receptor with lipid rafts is a determinant for platelet functional responses.

    PubMed

    Moscardó, A; Vallés, J; Latorre, A; Santos, M T

    2014-08-25

    We have investigated the presence of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor associated with lipid rafts in human platelets and the regulation of platelet function in response to TXA2 receptor agonists when lipid rafts are disrupted by cholesterol extraction. Platelet aggregation with TXA2 analogs U46619 and IBOP was almost blunted in cholesterol-depleted platelets, as well as αIIbβ3 integrin activation and P-selectin exposure. Raft disruption also inhibited TXA2-induced cytosolic calcium increase and nucleotide release, ruling out an implication of P2Y12 receptor. An important proportion of TXA2 receptor (40%) was colocalized at lipid rafts. The presence of the TXA2 receptor associated with lipid rafts in platelets is important for functional platelet responses to TXA2.

  11. Measurement of platelet function in dogs using a novel impedance aggregometer.

    PubMed

    Kalbantner, K; Baumgarten, A; Mischke, R

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the technique and establish reference values for whole blood aggregometry in dogs using a novel multiplate analyser. Measurements were performed on the hirudin-anticoagulated blood of healthy dogs using a wide range of agonists. Optimal agonist concentrations were 10 micromol/L of adenosine diphosphate, 5 microg/mL of collagen and 1 mmol/L of arachidonic acid. Ristocetin (at 0.2 and 1 mg/mL) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6 at 32 and 160 micromol/L) did not consistently induce platelet aggregation. Coefficients of variance for within-run imprecision (n=10 repetitions) varied from 5% to 18%. Measurement signals were significantly higher when analyses were performed on standard samples (hirudin-anticoagulated blood) compared to citrated blood or blood samples anticoagulated with citrate buffer, regardless of whether or not re-calcification was performed (P<0.05). The findings indicate that the analyser is suitable for the investigation of platelet aggregation in dogs and analysis should be performed on hirudin-anticoagulated blood using optimised agonist concentrations. PMID:19879171

  12. Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Schippinger, Gert; Prüller, Florian; Divjak, Manuela; Mahla, Elisabeth; Fankhauser, Florian; Rackemann, Steve; Raggam, Reinhard Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used for the treatment of sports injuries. It has been associated with improved healing and regeneration of soft tissues in elite athletes. Athletes are commonly receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As yet, the effect of these drugs on platelet function in PRP formulations has not been taken into consideration. Hypothesis The function of platelets in PRP produced under the influence of NSAIDs is inhibited and may lessen a possible healing effect on the site of injury. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods PRP was collected from patients receiving NSAIDs after elective orthopaedic surgery, and platelet function was evaluated using light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Results were compared with those obtained from healthy volunteers without a history of NSAID intake during the previous 2 weeks. Two different systems for blood collection and PRP production (Arthrex ACP double-syringe system and standard 4.5-mL sodium citrate blood collection tubes) were used and compared regarding the quality of PRP that was produced. Results For both groups, the baseline platelet counts of whole blood and the platelet counts of PRP formulations were found to be in the normal range. Both collection systems for PRP produced comparable results without significant differences between the groups. Platelet function testing with LTA revealed significantly impaired platelet aggregation in both PRP preparations, obtained from patients taking NSAIDs, irrespective of the type of NSAID (P < .001). All subjects from the control group showed normal platelet aggregation patterns when tested with LTA. Conclusion Autologous PRP produced from subjects after NSAID medication shows significantly impaired platelet function and may result in lower quality regarding the content of bioactive compounds. Clinical Relevance If required, the administration of NSAIDs should be performed after blood collection for

  13. The effect of the perfluorocarbon emulsion Oxycyte on platelet count and function in the treatment of decompression sickness in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Cronin, William A; Senese, Angela L; Arnaud, Francoise G; Regis, David P; Auker, Charles R; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-09-01

    Decompression from elevated ambient pressure is associated with platelet activation and decreased platelet counts. Standard treatment for decompression sickness (DCS) is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is a nonrecompressive therapy being examined that improves mortality in animal models of DCS. However, PFC emulsions are associated with a decreased platelet count. We used a swine model of DCS to study the effect of PFC therapy on platelet count, function, and hemostasis. Castrated male swine (n = 50) were fitted with a vascular port, recovered, randomized, and compressed to 180 feet of sea water (fsw) for 31 min followed by decompression at 30 fsw/min. Animals were observed for DCS, administered 100% oxygen, and treated with either emulsified PFC Oxycyte (DCS-PFC) or isotonic saline (DCS-NS). Controls underwent the same procedures, but were not compressed (Sham-PFC and Sham-NS). Measurements of platelet count, thromboelastometry, and coagulation were obtained 1 h before compression and 1, 24, 48, 96, 168 and 192 h after treatment. No significant changes in normalized platelet counts were observed. Prothrombin time was elevated in DCS-PFC from 48 to 192 h compared with DCS-NS, and from 96 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. Normalized activated partial thromboplastin time was also elevated in DCS-PFC from 168 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. No bleeding events were noted. DCS treated with PFC (Oxycyte) does not impact platelet numbers, whole blood clotting by thromboelastometry, or clinical bleeding. Late changes in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time associated with PFC use in both DCS therapy and controls warrant further investigation.

  14. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  15. Effect of Haemophilus influenzae infection and moxalactam on platelet function in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S L; Courtney, J T; Kenal, K A

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study, children with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis received moxalactam or ampicillin or chloramphenicol. Of 41 children, 6 had prolonged bleeding times (greater than 6 min), and 7 of 9 tested had abnormal platelet aggregation at hospital admission. At the end of therapy, no children in the ampicillin-chloramphenicol group, compared with 5 of 22 moxalactam-treated children (23%) (P = 0.08), had prolonged bleeding times (6.5 to 7.5 min). Our data suggest that H. influenzae meningitis and treatment with moxalactam may each have an effect on platelet function in children. PMID:3579263

  16. New families of adhesion molecules play a vital role in platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, S; Kaplan, C; Catimel, B; McGregor, J L

    1990-07-01

    Adhesion molecules play a crucial part in cell-matrix and in cell-cell interactions. These interactions, which are essential to the body's defense processes, involve adhesion molecules belonging to different families: integrins, immunoglobulins and selectins. Integrins are expressed by a large number of tissues, whereas other adhesion molecule families are restricted to a small number of cell types. A recent symposium dealt with the recruitment of circulating platelets at specific sites, their adhesion to extracellular matrix components and their activation by agonists leading to aggregation or attachment to other cells. These events, supporting hemostasis and thrombosis, involve integrins, selectins and other adhesion molecules. This report focuses on newly reported integrins (GPIa, GPIc, GPIIa), selectins (GMP-140) and GPIIIb, previously known as 'minor' surface oriented platelet glycoproteins. Major membrane glycoproteins such as GPIIb-IIIa (an integrin) and GPIb, which also play a vital role in platelet functions, have been extensively reviewed elsewhere.

  17. The prowess of platelets in immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Rory R

    2016-09-27

    Platelets not only serve as essential haemostatic cells, they also have important roles in immune defence and inflammation. Despite not having a nucleus, platelets contain physiologically relevant amounts of RNA, which can be spliced and translated into functional proteins. In addition, platelets have the ability to bind to numerous other cells, such as leukocytes and vascular cells. During those interactions, platelets can modulate cellular responses, resulting in e. g. inflammatory activation or apoptosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that platelets can influence the outcomes of bacterial and viral infection, as well as the extent of tissue injury after ischaemia. Platelets also carry considerable amounts of cytokines and growth factors in their secretory granules, preformed for rapid secretion. Those properties in combination with the sheer amount of platelets circulating in the blood stream make them an important force in the immune response during health and disease. In this overview, recent findings concerning those interesting properties of platelets beyond haemostasis are discussed.

  18. Separation of platelets from other blood cells in continuous-flow by dielectrophoresis field-flow-fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Piacentini, Niccolò; Mernier, Guillaume; Tornay, Raphaël; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We present a microfluidic device capable of separating platelets from other blood cells in continuous flow using dielectrophoresis field-flow-fractionation. The use of hydrodynamic focusing in combination with the application of a dielectrophoretic force allows the separation of platelets from red blood cells due to their size difference. The theoretical cell trajectory has been calculated by numerical simulations of the electrical field and flow speed, and is in agreement with the experimental results. The proposed device uses the so-called “liquid electrodes” design and can be used with low applied voltages, as low as 10 Vpp. The obtained separation is very efficient, the device being able to achieve a very high purity of platelets of 98.8% with less than 2% cell loss. Its low-voltage operation makes it particularly suitable for point-of-care applications. It could further be used for the separation of other cell types based on their size difference, as well as in combination with other sorting techniques to separate multiple cell populations from each other. PMID:22662047

  19. Preoperative platelet transfusions and perioperative red blood cell requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Matthew A.; Jia, Qing; Clifford, Leanne; Wilson, Gregory; Brown, Michael J.; Hanson, Andrew C.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perioperative hemorrhage impacts patient outcomes and health care resource utilization, yet the risks of transfusion therapies are significant. In patients with preoperative thrombocytopenia, the effects of prophylactic preoperative platelet (PLT) transfusion on perioperative bleeding complications remain uncertain. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study of noncardiac surgical patients between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Propensity-adjusted analyses were used to evaluate associations between preoperative thrombocytopenia, preoperative PLT transfusion, and the outcomes of interest, with a primary outcome of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. RESULTS A total of 13,978 study participants were included; 860 (6.2%) had a PLT count of not more than 100 × 109/L with 71 (8.3%) receiving PLTs preoperatively. Administration of PLTs was associated with higher rates of perioperative RBC transfusion (66.2% vs. 49.1%, p 0.0065); however, in propensity-adjusted analysis there was no significant difference between groups (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval {95% CI}], 1.68 [0.95–2.99]; p =0.0764]. Patients receiving PLTs had higher rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR [95% CI], 1.95 [1.10–3.46]; p =0.0224) and longer hospital lengths of stay (estimate [95% bootstrap CI], 7.2 [0.8–13.9] days; p =0.0006) in propensity-adjusted analyses. CONCLUSION Preoperative PLT transfusion did not attenuate RBC requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery. Moreover, preoperative PLT transfusion was associated with increased ICU admission rates and hospital duration. These findings suggest that more conservative management of preoperative thrombocytopenia may be warranted. PMID:26559936

  20. Comprehensive red blood cell and platelet antigen prediction from whole genome sequencing: proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Connie M.; Uy, Jon Michael; Aguad, Maria; Smeland‐Wagman, Robin; Kaufman, Richard M.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Green, Robert C.; Silberstein, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are 346 serologically defined red blood cell (RBC) antigens and 33 serologically defined platelet (PLT) antigens, most of which have known genetic changes in 45 RBC or six PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression. Polymorphic sites associated with antigen expression in the primary literature and reference databases are annotated according to nucleotide positions in cDNA. This makes antigen prediction from next‐generation sequencing data challenging, since it uses genomic coordinates. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The conventional cDNA reference sequences for all known RBC and PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression were aligned to the human reference genome. The alignments allowed conversion of conventional cDNA nucleotide positions to the corresponding genomic coordinates. RBC and PLT antigen prediction was then performed using the human reference genome and whole genome sequencing (WGS) data with serologic confirmation. RESULTS Some major differences and alignment issues were found when attempting to convert the conventional cDNA to human reference genome sequences for the following genes: ABO, A4GALT, RHD, RHCE, FUT3, ACKR1 (previously DARC), ACHE, FUT2, CR1, GCNT2, and RHAG. However, it was possible to create usable alignments, which facilitated the prediction of all RBC and PLT antigens with a known molecular basis from WGS data. Traditional serologic typing for 18 RBC antigens were in agreement with the WGS‐based antigen predictions, providing proof of principle for this approach. CONCLUSION Detailed mapping of conventional cDNA annotated RBC and PLT alleles can enable accurate prediction of RBC and PLT antigens from whole genomic sequencing data. PMID:26634332

  1. Towards Personalized Medicine Based on Platelet Function Testing for Stent Thrombosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Godschalk, Thea Cornelia; Hackeng, Christian Marcus; ten Berg, Jurriën Maria

    2012-01-01

    Stent thrombosis (ST) is a severe and feared complication of coronary stenting. Patients who have suffered from ST are usually treated according to the “one-size-fits-all” dosing regimen of aspirin and clopidogrel. Many ST patients show high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) despite this antiplatelet therapy (APT). It has been shown that HPR is a risk factor for major adverse cardiac events. Therefore, ST patients with HPR are at a high risk for recurrent atherothrombotic events. New insights into the variable response to clopidogrel and the advent of stronger P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have changed the attention from a fixed APT treatment strategy towards “personalized APT strategies.” Strategies can be based on platelet function testing, which gives insight into the overall response of a patient to APT. At our outpatient ST clinic, we practice personalized APT based on platelet function testing to guide the cardiologist to a presumed optimal antiplatelet treatment of ST patients. Beside results of platelet function testing, comedication, clinical characteristics, and genetics have to be considered to decide on personalized APT. Ongoing studies have yet to reveal the optimal personalized APT strategy for cardiologists to prevent their patients from atherothrombotic and bleeding events. PMID:23320159

  2. Influence of red algal sulfated polysaccharides on blood coagulation and platelets activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina V; Byankina, Anna O; Kalitnik, Alexandra A; Kim, Yong H; Bogdanovich, Larisa N; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Yermak, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The influence of sulfated polysaccharides (λ-, κ-, and κ/β-carrageenan and porphyran) - on platelet activation was studied. Carrageenans were much weaker inhibitors of a coagulation process than heparin, while porphyran had not that effect. Results of the aPTT and PT assays suppose that carrageenans affected mostly intrinsic pathway of coagulation, while their effect on the extrinsic pathway is extremely low (λ and κ/β) or absent (κ, LMW derivative of κ-carrageenan). λ-Carrageenan was the most potent anticoagulant agent in TT, aPTT, PT, and anti-factor Xa activity. This sample was also the strongest inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in PRP. Generally, the correlation of anticoagulant and antithrombotic action in PRP is preserved for carrageenans but not for heparin. Carrageenans and porphyran affected platelet adhesion to collagen by influencing glycoprotein VI. Low molecular weight κ-carrageenan had a similar effect on platelet adhesion mediated with both major collagen receptors: integrin α2 β1 and glycoprotein VI as native polysaccharide had. Carrageenans resulted in activation of platelets under platelet adhesion mediated by integrin αIIb β3 with less degree than heparin. The least sulfated κ/β-carrageenan that possessed an inhibiting effect on thrombin- and collagen-induced aggregation of washed platelets and on the PT test but it had no significant effect on TT was the weakest promoter of integrin αIIb β3 mediated platelet activation. In summary, our study showed that the polysaccharide action was complex, since it depended on its molecular mass, sulfation degree, and monosaccharide contents (3,6-anhydrogalactose).

  3. Gene frequencies of the HPA-1 to -6 and -15 human platelet antigens in Tunisian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Hadhri, S; Gandouz, R; Chatti, N; Bierling, P; Skouri, H

    2010-09-01

    Gene frequencies of mainly human platelet antigens (HPA) -1 to -6 and -15 were determined in 116 Tunisian blood donors. The distribution of HPA-1, -3 and -5 systems approach those found in other Maghrebian populations. Tunisians have the highest frequency of HPA-1b and -5b alleles. The distribution of HPA-1a allele and HPA-4, -6 and -15 systems is similar to Caucasians. Phylogenetic study using the neighbor-joining method and principal component multivariate analysis demonstrate that Tunisians are more closely related to western than to eastern Mediterraneans. This immunogenetic study highlights the relatedness between Mediterranean populations and will serve as a baseline study for future clinical research involving platelet disorders among Tunisians. PMID:20492600

  4. Effect of prenylated flavonoids and chalcones isolated from Artocarpus species on platelet aggregation in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Jantan, Ibrahim; Mohd Yasin, Yusyila H; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur; Sirat, Hasnah; Basar, Norazah

    2010-07-01

    Five prenylflavonoids and two prenylchalcones from Artocarpus lowii King, A. scortechinii King and A. teysmanii Miq., and acetylated derivatives of cycloheterophyllin and artonin E were investigated for their ability to inhibit arachidonic acid (AA), collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation in human whole blood by using an electrical impedance method. Among the tested compounds, only cycloheterophyllin inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation with an IC(50) value of 100.9 microM. It also showed strong inhibition against ADP-induced aggregation, with an IC(50) value of 57.1 microM. Isobavachalcone, 2',4'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3'-prenyldihydrochalcone, cycloartobiloxanthone, artonin E and artonin E triacetate showed selective inhibition against ADP-induced aggregation, with IC(50) values ranging from 55.3 to 192.0 microM, but did not show such effect against other inducers.

  5. Transfusion of Plasma, Platelets, and Red Blood Cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 Ratio and Mortality in Patients With Severe Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, John B.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Fox, Erin E.; Wade, Charles E.; Podbielski, Jeanette M.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Callcut, Rachael A.; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Cotton, Bryan A.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Inaba, Kenji; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Muskat, Peter; O’Keeffe, Terence; Rizoli, Sandro; Robinson, Bryce R. H.; Scalea, Thomas M.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Stein, Deborah M.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Callum, Jeannie L.; Hess, John R.; Matijevic, Nena; Miller, Christopher N.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Hoyt, David B.; Pearson, Gail D.; Leroux, Brian; van Belle, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severely injured patients experiencing hemorrhagic shock often require massive transfusion. Earlier transfusion with higher blood product ratios (plasma, platelets, and red blood cells), defined as damage control resuscitation, has been associated with improved outcomes; however, there have been no large multicenter clinical trials. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness and safety of transfusing patients with severe trauma and major bleeding using plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Pragmatic, phase 3, multisite, randomized clinical trial of 680 severely injured patients who arrived at 1 of 12 level I trauma centers in North America directly from the scene and were predicted to require massive transfusion between August 2012 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS Blood product ratios of 1:1:1 (338 patients) vs 1:1:2 (342 patients) during active resuscitation in addition to all local standard-of-care interventions (uncontrolled). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes were 24-hour and 30-day all-cause mortality. Prespecified ancillary outcomes included time to hemostasis, blood product volumes transfused, complications, incidence of surgical procedures, and functional status. RESULTS No significant differences were detected in mortality at 24 hours (12.7% in 1:1:1 group vs 17.0% in 1:1:2 group; difference, −4.2% [95% CI, −9.6% to 1.1%]; P = .12) or at 30 days (22.4% vs 26.1%, respectively; difference, −3.7% [95% CI, −10.2% to 2.7%]; P = .26). Exsanguination, which was the predominant cause of death within the first 24 hours, was significantly decreased in the 1:1:1 group (9.2% vs 14.6% in 1:1:2 group; difference, −5.4% [95% CI, −10.4% to −0.5%]; P = .03). More patients in the 1:1:1 group achieved hemostasis than in the 1:1:2 group (86% vs 78%, respectively; P = .006). Despite the 1:1:1 group receiving more plasma (median of 7 U vs 5 U, P < .001) and

  6. Preparation, quality criteria, and properties of human blood platelet lysate supplements for ex vivo stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi; Burnouf, Thierry

    2015-01-25

    Most clinical applications of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cell therapy, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and treatment of immune and inflammatory diseases require a phase of isolation and ex vivo expansion allowing a clinically meaningful cell number to be reached. Conditions used for cell isolation and expansion should meet strict quality and safety requirements. This is particularly true for the growth medium used for MSC isolation and expansion. Basal growth media used for MSC expansion are supplemented with multiple nutrients and growth factors. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) has long been the gold standard medium supplement for laboratory-scale MSC culture. However, FBS has a poorly characterized composition and poses risk factors, as it may be a source of xenogenic antigens and zoonotic infections. FBS has therefore become undesirable as a growth medium supplement for isolating and expanding MSCs for human therapy protocols. In recent years, human blood materials, and most particularly lysates and releasates of platelet concentrates have emerged as efficient medium supplements for isolating and expanding MSCs from various origins. This review analyzes the advantages and limits of using human platelet materials as medium supplements for MSC isolation and expansion. We present the modes of production of allogeneic and autologous platelet concentrates, measures taken to ensure optimal pathogen safety profiles, and methods of preparing PLs for MSC expansion. We also discuss the supply of such blood preparations. Produced under optimal conditions of standardization and safety, human platelet materials can become the future 'gold standard' supplement for ex vivo production of MSCs for translational medicine and cell therapy applications.

  7. Brain Function and Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassen, Niels A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of radioactive isotopes to graphically represent changes in the amount of blood flowing in areas of the human cerebral cortex, reflecting changes in the activity of those areas. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  8. Role of membrane glycoproteins in the interaction of blood platelets with the vessel wall--the study on platelet adhesion to in vitro cultured subendothelial matrix.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Y; Handa, M; Nagai, H; Kamata, T; Anbo, H; Kawano, K; Araki, Y; Yamamoto, M; Ikeda, Y; Watanabe, K

    1989-12-01

    Adhesion of platelets to the subendothelium is an essential step in hemostasis and thrombosis. Several receptors for adhesive macromolecules have been identified on platelets and are included in the integrin family. To clarify the role of platelet membrane glycoproteins in the interaction of platelets with the subendothelium, 51Cr-labeled platelet adhesion assay and antibody-blocking experiments were performed by using in vitro cultured subendothelium under the static condition. The platelet adhesion in this assay was inhibited by anti-GPIa (VLA-2), GPIc (VLA-5) and -GPIc'-(VLA-6) antibodies, while anti-GPIb and -GPIIb/IIIa antibodies had no effect. Platelets from the patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia could also attach to the subendothelium, whereas those from a patient whose platelets lacked GPIa failed to attach to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The monoclonal antibodies against fibronectin and laminin which recognized the cell binding domain of these molecules inhibited the platelet adhesion when they were pre-treated with ECM. Furthermore, antibody-blocking experiments revealed that the percent inhibition by the combination of anti-GPIa, -GPIc and -GPIc' antibodies used herein was approximately 75%. They did not completely inhibit the attachment. These results suggest that the interactions of collagen, fibronectin and laminin with their receptors on platelets are involved in the mechanism of platelet adhesion to subendothelium.

  9. Quantification of the Blood Platelet Reactivity in the ADP-Induced Model of Non-Lethal Pulmonary Thromboembolism in Mice with the Use of Laser Doppler Flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Przygodzki, Tomasz; Talar, Marcin; Blazejczyk, Agnieszka; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Watala, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The paper describes an alternative method for quantification of in vivo ADP-induced thromboembolism. The aim of the studies was to develop a method of quantification which would not require either extravasation or labelling of platelets. Our proposed approach is based on the monitoring of changes of blood flow with the use of laser Doppler flowmetry. Materials and Methods Mice of C57Bl strain were used in the study. ADP was injected to the vena cava and blood flow was monitored with the use of a laser Doppler flowmeter in the mesentery. Measurements in platelet-depleted mice, mice pretreated with cangrelor, an ADP receptor antagonist, and eptifibatide, a blocker of fibrinogen binding to GPIIbIIIa, were conducted as the proof-of-concept in the performed experiments. Intravital microscopy and ex vivo imaging of organs was performed to identify the sites of aggregate formation resulting from ADP injection. Results The injection of ADP resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of the blood flow in the mesentery. These responses were fully attributable to blood platelet aggregation, as shown by the lack of the effect in platelet-depleted mice, and significantly reduced responses in mice pretreated with cangrelor and eptifibatide. No platelet aggregate formation in mesenteric vessels was revealed by intravital microscopy, while ex vivo imaging showed accumulation of fluorescent labelled platelets in the lung. Conclusions Injection of ADP to the venous system results in the formation of platelet aggregates predominantly in the lung. This results in reversible blood flow cessation in peripheral blood vessels. The measurement of this blood flow cessation in the mesentery allows indirect measurement of ADP-induced pulmonary thromboembolism. We suggest that this approach can be useful for in vivo screening for antiplatelet drug candidates. PMID:26751810

  10. Cocoa flavanols and platelet and leukocyte function: recent in vitro and ex vivo studies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Heptinstall, Stan; May, Jane; Fox, Sue; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Zhao, Lian

    2006-01-01

    There is growing interest in possible beneficial effects of specific dietary components on cardiovascular health. Platelets and leukocytes contribute to arterial thrombosis and to inflammatory processes. Previous studies performed in vitro have demonstrated inhibition of platelet function by (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin, flavan-3-ols (flavanols) that are present in several foods including some cocoas. Also, some modest inhibition of platelet function has been observed ex vivo after the consumption of flavanol-containing cocoa products by healthy adults. So far there are no reports of effects of cocoa flavanols on leukocytes. This paper summarizes 2 recent investigations. The first was a study of the effects of cocoa flavanols on platelet and leukocyte function in vitro. The second was a study of the effects of consumption of a flavanol-rich cocoa beverage by healthy adults on platelet and leukocyte function ex vivo. Measurements were made of platelet aggregation, platelet-monocyte conjugate formation (P/M), platelet-neutrophil conjugate formation (P/N), platelet activation (CD62P on monocytes and neutrophils), and leukocyte activation (CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils) in response to collagen and/or arachidonic acid. In the in vitro study several cocoa flavanols and their metabolites were shown to inhibit platelet aggregation, P/M, P/N, and platelet activation. Their effects were similar to those of aspirin and the effects of a cocoa flavanol and aspirin did not seem to be additive. There was also inhibition of monocyte and neutrophil activation by flavanols, but this was not replicated by aspirin. 4'-O-methyl-epicatechin, 1 of the known metabolites of the cocoa flavanol (-)-epicatechin, was consistently effective as an inhibitor of platelet and leukocyte activation. The consumption of a flavanol-rich cocoa beverage also resulted in significant inhibition of platelet aggregation, P/M and P/N, and platelet activation induced by collagen. The inhibitory effects

  11. Heat shock protein 70 regulates platelet integrin activation, granule secretion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rigg, Rachel A; Healy, Laura D; Nowak, Marie S; Mallet, Jérémy; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Pang, Jiaqing; McCarty, Owen J T; Aslan, Joseph E

    2016-04-01

    Molecular chaperones that support protein quality control, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), participate in diverse aspects of cellular and physiological function. Recent studies have reported roles for specific chaperone activities in blood platelets in maintaining hemostasis; however, the functions of Hsp70 in platelet physiology remain uninvestigated. Here we characterize roles for Hsp70 activity in platelet activation and function. In vitro biochemical, microscopy, flow cytometry, and aggregometry assays of platelet function, as well as ex vivo analyses of platelet aggregate formation in whole blood under shear, were carried out under Hsp70-inhibited conditions. Inhibition of platelet Hsp70 blocked platelet aggregation and granule secretion in response to collagen-related peptide (CRP), which engages the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor-γ chain complex. Hsp70 inhibition also reduced platelet integrin-αIIbβ3 activation downstream of GPVI, as Hsp70-inhibited platelets showed reduced PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding. Ex vivo, pharmacological inhibition of Hsp70 in human whole blood prevented the formation of platelet aggregates on collagen under shear. Biochemical studies supported a role for Hsp70 in maintaining the assembly of the linker for activation of T cells signalosome, which couples GPVI-initiated signaling to integrin activation, secretion, and platelet function. Together, our results suggest that Hsp70 regulates platelet activation and function by supporting linker for activation of T cells-associated signaling events downstream of platelet GPVI engagement, suggesting a role for Hsp70 in the intracellular organization of signaling systems that mediate platelet secretion, "inside-out" activation of platelet integrin-αIIbβ3, platelet-platelet aggregation, and, ultimately, hemostatic plug and thrombus formation.

  12. EphB2 regulates contact-dependent and contact-independent signaling to control platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Sage, Tanya; Rana, Rekha H.; Schenk, Michael P.; Ali, Marfoua S.; Unsworth, Amanda J.; Jones, Chris I.; Stainer, Alexander R.; Kriek, Neline; Moraes, Leonardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The Eph kinases, EphA4 and EphB1, and their ligand, ephrinB1, have been previously reported to be present in platelets where they contribute to thrombus stability. Although thrombus formation allows for Eph-ephrin engagement and bidirectional signaling, the importance specifically of Eph kinase or ephrin signaling in regulating platelet function remained unidentified. In the present study, a genetic approach was used in mice to establish the contribution of signaling orchestrated by the cytoplasmic domain of EphB2 (a newly discovered Eph kinase in platelets) in platelet activation and thrombus formation. We conclude that EphB2 signaling is involved in the regulation of thrombus formation and clot retraction. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic tail of this Eph kinase regulates initial platelet activation in a contact-independent manner in the absence of Eph-ephrin ligation between platelets. Together, these data demonstrate that EphB2 signaling not only modulates platelet function within a thrombus but is also involved in the regulation of the function of isolated platelets in a contact-independent manner. PMID:25370417

  13. The interaction of sodium nitroprusside with human endothelial cells and platelets: nitroprusside and prostacyclin synergistically inhibit platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, R.I.; Weksler, B.B.; Jaffe, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (NP) is a potent vasodilator that also inhibits platelet aggregation. To test the hypothesis that NP causes both of these effects by altering the balance between prostacyclin (PGI2) produced by endothelial cells and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) produced by platelets, we incubated each of these cell types with NP for 5 minutes and assayed the PGI2 and TXA2 produced. NP at pharmacologically achieved doses (0.01--30 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet aggregation and resultant TXA2 synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p less than 0.001). The inhibition was not dependent on cAMP production, external calcium concentration, or suppression of TXA2 synthesis. NP did not alter the production of PGI2 by cultured human endothelial cells as measured by radioimmunoassay for 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha, the stable hydrolysis product of PGI2. However, supernates of NP-treated endothelial cells containing low, noninhibitory concentrations of NP unexpectedly inhibited platelet aggregation. This inhibition of platelet aggregation was due to synergy between PGI2 (0.1--3 nM) and NP (p interaction less than 0.03). The synergistic inhibition by NP and PGI2 of platelet aggregation and TXA2 synthesis in vivo may explain some of the beneficial actions of NP in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure.

  14. Relative activities on and uptake by human blood platelets of 5-hydroxytryptamine and several analogues

    PubMed Central

    Born, G. V. R.; Juengjaroen, Kanchana; Michal, F.

    1972-01-01

    1. The specificity of platelet receptor sites for 5-HT uptake and for the rapid morphological change and aggregation was investigated with 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) and seventeen analogues as well as with some antagonists of 5-HT. 2. The analogues, with the exception of 5-hydroxy-N'N'-dibutyltryptamine, caused the rapid morphological change in platelets. In concentrations below those needed to produce the agonistic action (viz. 0.05-2.0 μM), these analogues themselves inhibited competitively the shape change caused by 5-HT. 3. The velocity of change in shape caused by 5-HT was reduced in low Na media. 4. Ten analogues produced platelet aggregation; three of these, viz. 5-methoxy-α-methyltryptamine, 5-hydroxy-α-methyltryptamine and 5-hydroxy-N'N'-diisopropyltryptamine), were approximately equipotent with 5-HT. Six analogues did not induce platelet aggregation. 5. All the analogues which prevented the initial change in shape of platelets caused by 5-HT also inhibited its aggregating effect, apparently competitively with low Ki values (0.02-1.6 μM). 6. As with the inhibition of shape change, the inhibition of aggregation shows relatively low structural specificity of the receptor site. 7. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of shape change and aggregation (Ki∼0.03 μM); imipramine was much less inhibitory (Ki∼5-10 μM). 8. Only one analogue (5-hydroxy-α-methyltryptamine) was taken up like 5-HT by platelets. All the other analogues inhibited the uptake of 5-HT by platelets (Ki=0.2-2.7 μM). 9. Methysergide was a weak inhibitor of 5-HT uptake (Ki∼125 μM) whereas imipramine was very effective (Ki∼0.3 μM). 10. Our results show that the initial change in shape of platelets is required for and precedes aggregation. The structural specificity of the platelet receptor concerned with shape change and aggregation caused by 5-HT appears low whereas the uptake mechanism is a highly specific one. The uptake probably proceeds through more than one step, the

  15. A protein with characteristics of factor H is present on rodent platelets and functions as the immune adherence receptor.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J J; Hack, B K; Cunningham, P N; Quigg, R J

    2001-08-24

    Complement-coated particles interact with specific immune adherence receptors (IAR). In primates, this function is served by complement receptor 1 (CR1) on erythrocytes. In contrast, rodent platelets bear IAR distinct from CR1, the identity of which was studied here. A 150-kDa C3b-binding protein was isolated from rat platelets, which had immunochemical and biochemical identity to plasma factor H. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated that factor H was present on the surface of rat and mouse platelets, which could be removed by treatment with neuraminidase. Sheep erythrocytes bearing C3b underwent immune adherence with rat and mouse platelets, which was blocked with anti-factor H F(ab')(2) antibodies, but not with antibodies binding to the complement regulator, Crry, on the platelet surface. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using rat platelet RNA and primers designed from mouse factor H, a 472-base pair product was generated that was identical in sequence to that produced from rat liver RNA. The translated protein product was 85% similar to mouse liver factor H. The 3'-nucleotide sequence from platelets predicted a soluble factor H protein. By Northern analysis, liver and platelets had identically sized factor H mRNA. Thus, rat and mouse platelets have a membrane protein with characteristics of factor H that is linked via sialic acid residues and functions as the IAR. Whether platelet factor H is acquired by passive adsorption from sera and/or is produced by platelets remains to be determined.

  16. Platelet Functions and Coagulation Changes in Indian Children with Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Aliza; Aggarwal, Kailash Chandra; Saluja, Sumita; Aggarwal, Archana; Sureka, Binit

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Only little is known on the effect of the platelet function in the paediatric nephrotic syndrome. The earlier studies which had been done on hypercoagulability have mainly featured the secondary forms of the nephrotic syndrome and the data on the minimal change type of disease is limited. We therefore, made an effort to study the platelet functions and the coagulation profile in children with the nephrotic syndrome,to find the relationship between the steroid response and the coagulation profile, and to look for the correlation between thromboembolism and the hypercoagulable states. Methodology: Twenty nine children with the steroid responsive nephrotic syndromewere studied to see the platelet aggregation and the coagulation parameters and their response to the steroid therapy. Doppler studies were done for the renal vein and the inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus. Results: It was seen that an increased aggregability of the platelets occurred with Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen (out of the four agonists, ADP, Collagen, Ristocetin and Arachidonic acid) which were used as agonists for the assay. We also observed that the Partial thromboplastin time (PTT) had become prolonged and a significant decline in the high values of the procoagulant proteins (Protein C and Protein S) was seen after the steroid therapy and when the children went into remission. These findings were suggestive of a reversibility of the changes in the steroid responsive nephrotic syndrome with the steroid therapy. One child was found to have thrombosis of the inferior vena cava (IVC) on Doppler studies, which resolved with treatment subsequently. Conclusions: An increased platelet aggregability contributes to the hypercoagulable states, that may increase the incidence of thrombosis in such patients. Although the incidence of such complications is very low, in a given child with the hypercoagulable states, Doppler may be used to look for any evidence of a latent thrombus and

  17. Gut Microbial Metabolite TMAO Enhances Platelet Hyperreactivity and Thrombosis Risk.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weifei; Gregory, Jill C; Org, Elin; Buffa, Jennifer A; Gupta, Nilaksh; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Lin; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Mehrabian, Margarete; Sartor, R Balfour; McIntyre, Thomas M; Silverstein, Roy L; Tang, W H Wilson; DiDonato, Joseph A; Brown, J Mark; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-03-24

    Normal platelet function is critical to blood hemostasis and maintenance of a closed circulatory system. Heightened platelet reactivity, however, is associated with cardiometabolic diseases and enhanced potential for thrombotic events. We now show gut microbes, through generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), directly contribute to platelet hyperreactivity and enhanced thrombosis potential. Plasma TMAO levels in subjects (n > 4,000) independently predicted incident (3 years) thrombosis (heart attack, stroke) risk. Direct exposure of platelets to TMAO enhanced sub-maximal stimulus-dependent platelet activation from multiple agonists through augmented Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Animal model studies employing dietary choline or TMAO, germ-free mice, and microbial transplantation collectively confirm a role for gut microbiota and TMAO in modulating platelet hyperresponsiveness and thrombosis potential and identify microbial taxa associated with plasma TMAO and thrombosis potential. Collectively, the present results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanistic link between specific dietary nutrients, gut microbes, platelet function, and thrombosis risk.

  18. Gut Microbial Metabolite TMAO Enhances Platelet Hyperreactivity and Thrombosis Risk.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weifei; Gregory, Jill C; Org, Elin; Buffa, Jennifer A; Gupta, Nilaksh; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Lin; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Mehrabian, Margarete; Sartor, R Balfour; McIntyre, Thomas M; Silverstein, Roy L; Tang, W H Wilson; DiDonato, Joseph A; Brown, J Mark; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-03-24

    Normal platelet function is critical to blood hemostasis and maintenance of a closed circulatory system. Heightened platelet reactivity, however, is associated with cardiometabolic diseases and enhanced potential for thrombotic events. We now show gut microbes, through generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), directly contribute to platelet hyperreactivity and enhanced thrombosis potential. Plasma TMAO levels in subjects (n > 4,000) independently predicted incident (3 years) thrombosis (heart attack, stroke) risk. Direct exposure of platelets to TMAO enhanced sub-maximal stimulus-dependent platelet activation from multiple agonists through augmented Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Animal model studies employing dietary choline or TMAO, germ-free mice, and microbial transplantation collectively confirm a role for gut microbiota and TMAO in modulating platelet hyperresponsiveness and thrombosis potential and identify microbial taxa associated with plasma TMAO and thrombosis potential. Collectively, the present results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanistic link between specific dietary nutrients, gut microbes, platelet function, and thrombosis risk. PMID:26972052

  19. [Effect of prostaglandins F2 and F2 alpha on the pentosephosate pathway in human blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1983-01-01

    Rates of glucose-6-phosphate oxidation and formation of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate were increased after 10 min preincubation of human blood platelets with prostaglandins F2 and F2a. When the preincubation was prolonged up to 60 min, the prostaglandins activating effect was manifested only as an increase in sedoheptulose-7-phosphate content. Preincubation of thrombocytes with dibutyryl-cAMP led to an increase in the rate of ribose-5-phosphate consumption as well as of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate formation. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride decreased the rates of glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate oxidation in extracts of human thrombocytes and inhibited the activating effect of prostaglandins on sedoheptulose-7-phosphate formation.

  20. A point mutation in the EGF-4 domain of β3 integrin is responsible for the formation of the Seca platelet alloantigen and affects receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Ulrich J.; Bakchoul, Tamam; Eva, Olga; Giptner, Astrid; Bein, Gregor; Aster, Richard H.; Gitter, Maria; Peterson, Julie; Santoso, Sentot

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is caused by fetomaternal platelet incompatibility with maternal antibodies crossing the placenta and destroying fetal platelets. Antibodies against human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a) and HPA-5b are responsible for the majority of NAIT cases. We observed a suspected NAIT in a newborn with a platelet count of 25 G/l and petechial haemorrhages. Serological analysis of maternal serum revealed an immunisation against αIIbβ3 on paternal platelets only, indicating the presence of an antibody against a new rare alloantigen (Seca) residing on αIIbβ3. The location of Seca on αIIbβ3 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of paternal β3 revealed a single nucleotide exchange (G1818T) in exon 11 of the β3 gene (ITGB3), changing Lys580 (wild-type) to Asn580 (Seca). Two additional members of the family Sec were typed Seca positive, but none of 300 blood donors. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing Asn580, but not Lys580 αIIbβ3, bound anti-Seca, which was corroborated by immunoprecipitation. Adhesion of transfected cells onto immobilised fibrinogen showed reduced binding of the Asn580 variant compared to wild-type αIIbβ3. Analysis of transfected cells with anti-LIBS and PAC-1 antibody showed reduced binding when compared to the wild-type. No such effects were observed with Seca positive platelets, which, however, are heterozygous for the Lys580Asn mutation. In this study, we describe a NAIT case caused by maternal alloimmunisation against a new antigen on αIIbβ3. Analysis with mutant transfected cells showed that the Lys580Asn mutation responsible for the formation of the Seca antigenic determinant affects αIIbβ3 receptor function. PMID:22116617

  1. Role of the blood platelet in the pathogenesis and complications of experimental myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.

    1980-09-01

    Because new evidence contradicts a classic concept that obstructive coronary thrombosis is a major cause of sudden unexpected coronary death, we investigated the dynamic nature of a triple-helical collagen-platelet interaction in the systemic venous circulation of anesthetized/tranquilized guinea pigs. We propose that the swift LVP increase and the disruption of ECG conduction rhythm were caused by the biosynthesis and release of a burst of an ischemic chemical factor - a thromboxane A/sub 2/-like substance produced by the fresh platelet aggregates in the lungs.

  2. Correlation of statin-increased platelet APP ratios and reduced blood lipids in AD patients.

    PubMed

    Baskin, F; Rosenberg, R N; Fang, X; Hynan, L S; Moore, C B; Weiner, M; Vega, G L

    2003-06-24

    Platelets, like neurons, contain 120- to 130- and 110-kd amyloid precursor proteins (APPs). Their ratio is reduced in AD, further reductions correlating with reduced Mini-Mental Status Examination scores [r(11) = 0.69, p < 0.05]. As statins alter APP processing, platelet APPs were analyzed in patients with AD given anticholesterol drugs for 6 weeks. APP ratios increased [t(37) = -3.888, p = 0.0004], proportionally with reduced cholesterol [r(36) = -0.45, p = 0.005]. Longer trials may reveal slowed cognitive loss, validating this index. PMID:12821755

  3. 14-3-3ζ regulates the mitochondrial respiratory reserve linked to platelet phosphatidylserine exposure and procoagulant function

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwaelder, Simone M.; Darbousset, Roxane; Cranmer, Susan L.; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Orive, Stephanie L.; Sturgeon, Sharelle; Yuan, Yuping; Yao, Yu; Krycer, James R.; Woodcock, Joanna; Maclean, Jessica; Pitson, Stuart; Zheng, Zhaohua; Henstridge, Darren C.; van der Wal, Dianne; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.; Berndt, Michael C.; Andrews, Robert K.; James, David E.; Lopez, Angel F.; Jackson, Shaun P.

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of adaptor proteins regulate diverse cellular functions including cell proliferation, metabolism, adhesion and apoptosis. Platelets express numerous 14-3-3 isoforms, including 14-3-3ζ, which has previously been implicated in regulating GPIbα function. Here we show an important role for 14-3-3ζ in regulating arterial thrombosis. Interestingly, this thrombosis defect is not related to alterations in von Willebrand factor (VWF)–GPIb adhesive function or platelet activation, but instead associated with reduced platelet phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and procoagulant function. Decreased PS exposure in 14-3-3ζ-deficient platelets is associated with more sustained levels of metabolic ATP and increased mitochondrial respiratory reserve, independent of alterations in cytosolic calcium flux. Reduced platelet PS exposure in 14-3-3ζ-deficient mice does not increase bleeding risk, but results in decreased thrombin generation and protection from pulmonary embolism, leading to prolonged survival. Our studies define an important role for 14-3-3ζ in regulating platelet bioenergetics, leading to decreased platelet PS exposure and procoagulant function. PMID:27670677

  4. Metabolic, membrane, and functional responses of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, L M; Coates, T D; Allen, J M; Higgins, C P; Baehner, R L; Boxer, L A

    1982-06-01

    The phospholipid mediator of anaphylaxis, platelet-activating factor (PAF) is chemotactic for polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). We have examined this agent's effects on several other PMN functions. Human PMN were prepared from heparinized venous blood by Ficoll gradient. Metabolic burst was examined by measurement of O2 use and O2.- production in the presence or absence of PAF (10(-6)--10(-9) M). Unless cells were treated with cytochalasin-B (5 micrograms/ml), no significant respiratory burst was demonstrated. However, pretreatment with PAF (10(-7) M) enhanced approximately threefold the O2 utilization found when cells were subsequently stimulated with 10(-7) M FMLP. PAF also stimulated arachidonic acid metabolism in 14C-arachidonic acid-labeled PMN. Thin-layer chromatography analysis of chloroform-methanol extracts showed substances that comigrated with authentic 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid had a marked increase in radioactivity following PAF stimulation at 10(-7) M. PAF failed to stimulate release of granule enzymes, B-glucuronidase, lysozyme, or myeloperoxidase unless cytochalasin-B were added. PAF from 10(-6) M to 10(-10) M affected PMN surface responses. PMN labeled with the fluorescent dye, chlorotetracycline, showed decreased fluorescence upon addition of PAF, suggesting translocation of membrane-bound cations. Further, the rate of migration of PMN in an electric field was decreased following PAF exposure, a change consistent with reduced cell surface charge. PMN self-aggregation and adherence to endothelial cells were both influenced by PAF (10(-6) M--10(-9) M). Aggregation was markedly stimulated by the compound, and the percent PMN adhering to endothelial cell monolayers increased almost twofold in the presence of 10(-8) M PAF. Thus, PAF promotes a variety of PMN responses: enhances respiratory burst, stimulates arachidonic acid turnover, alters cell membrane cation content and surface charge, and promotes PMN self-aggregation as well as adherence to

  5. The effects of Lonomin V, a toxin from the caterpillar (Lonomia achelous), on hemostasis parameters as measured by platelet function.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Belsy; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L; Salazar, Ana M; Gil, Amparo; Sánchez, Elda E; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Lucena, Sara

    2011-09-15

    Platelets play a central role in hemostasis during vascular injury. Patients affected with the hemorrhagic syndrome caused by contact with Lonomia achelous caterpillars (Lac) Lepidoptera distributed in various South American countries, show digestive, pulmonary and intraperitoneal bleeding in combination with hematomas and echymosis. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of Lonomin V (serine protease isolated from Lac hemolymph) on some functional properties of platelets, evaluating its importance in primary hemostasis. Platelet adhesion to fibrinogen was reduced by 19, 20, 36, and 37% after pre-treated with 0.2, 2, 20 and 40 nM of Lonomin V, respectively. Pre-incubation of the platelets with 408 nM of Lonomin V, for 4 min at 37 °C, resulted in complete inhibition of the collagen-induced platelet aggregation, in contrast to 56% inhibition of the ADP - induced platelet aggregation. Lonomin V also inhibited anti-α(IIb)β(3) integrin binding to platelets by 56, 57, 52 and 54% at concentrations of 0.2, 2, 20 and 40 nM respectively. Additionally, Lonomin V inhibited anti-P-selectin binding to platelets by 28, 37, 33 and 33% at the same concentrations. The platelets tested with Lonomin V did not modify their viability. In summary, Lonomin V inhibited platelet aggregation, probably caused by the degradation of collagen. The anti-platelet activity of Lonomin V has been shown to be unique and a potentially useful tool for investigating cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions and for the development of antithrombotic agents in terms of their anti-adhesive activities.

  6. Proplatelets and stress platelets.

    PubMed

    Tong, M; Seth, P; Penington, D G

    1987-02-01

    The process of platelet formation by the fragmentation of megakaryocyte pseudopodia, termed proplatelets, demonstrable in the marrow sinusoids is poorly understood. "Stress" platelets produced under conditions of stimulated platelet production differ from normal circulating platelets with respect to volume and a number of functional characteristics. To clarify the relationship of stress platelets to proplatelets, rats were injected with heterologous platelet antiserum. Nondiscoid platelet forms, some characteristically beaded in appearance, strongly resembling bone marrow proplatelets, can be recovered in the circulation of normal rats. During the early period of recovery from acute thrombocytopenia, there was a substantial increase in the proportion of these elongated platelets in the citrated platelet rich plasma. Exposure to EDTA rendered them spherical. Circulating proplatelets may contribute significantly to the prompt increase in platelet volume during recovery from acute thrombocytopenia at a time prior to significant increase in megakaryocyte size and ploidy. PMID:3801667

  7. Activation of human blood platelets by arginine-vasopressin. Role of bivalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Pletscher, A.; Erne, P.; Buergisser, E.F.; Ferracin, F.

    1985-12-01

    Arginine-vasopressin caused platelet activation, i.e., a shape change reaction and a rise in intracellular free Ca/sup 2 +/ ((Ca/sup 2 +/)i) only in the presence of certain bivalent cations. The EC50 of arginine-vasopressin (concentration causing half-maximal shape change) decreased with rising concentrations of Mn/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, or Ca/sup 2 +/ in the medium, but was at least an order higher with Ca/sup 2 +/ than with Mn/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. The EC50 of the active bivalent cations (concentrations enabling 100 nM arginine-vasopressin to exert half-maximal shape change and rise in (Ca/sup 2 +/)i) varied with the individual cations, being by far the highest for Ca/sup 2 +/. The KD of (3H)arginine-vasopressin binding to platelet membranes and intact platelets markedly decreased when extracellular Mg/sup 2 +/ or Mn/sup 2 +/ were present, and the KD values were inversely related to the concentration of the cations. Ca/sup 2 +/ also lowered the KD values; however, the effect was less marked than that of Mg/sup 2 +/ or Mn/sup 2 +/ and, in physiological conditions, significant only in intact platelets. Vasopressin-1 antagonists counteracted arginine-vasopressin binding and the shape change reaction and (Ca/sup 2 +/)i rise induced by arginine-vasopressin. In the presence of Mn/sup 2 +/ in the medium, administration of arginine-vasopressin led to quenching of the intracellular fluorescence of 2-methyl-6-methoxy-8-nitroquinoline-loaded platelets, possibly due to influx of Mn/sup 2 +/. In conclusion, the dependency of the arginine-vasopressin-induced platelet activation on bivalent cations is at least partly due to an enhancement by these cations of the affinity of the vasopressin-1 receptor for arginine-vasopressin. Thereby, under physiological conditions, Mg/sup 2 +/ seems to be of primary importance. Other mechanisms may be involved, too, e.g., an enhancement by arginine-vasopressin of the influx of bivalent cations into the platelets.

  8. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  9. Nitric oxide therapies for local inhibition of platelets' activitation on blood-contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoako, Kagya Agyeman

    Blood-contacting devices interact with blood during their function much like the endothelium that modulates hemostasis. The surfaces of these devices however, lack endothelial-like properties, and consequently, upon blood contact, activate clotting factors to form clots. Systemic heparinization for inhibiting clot formation can cause bleeding and surface coatings show insignificant benefits. This research investigated nitric oxide (NO) production mimicry of the endothehum on artificial lungs (ALs) and pediatric catheters. Their surfaces were functionalized either by (1) entrapping NO donors inside their bulk, (2) incorporating catalysts to generate NO from NO-donors or (3) supplementing NO into sweep gas of artificial lungs. Pediatric catheters functionalized with NO-donor thin coats using method 1 is limited by short NO release duration. Method 2 has not been applied to large surface-area, low-flow devices like the AL. In this work NO-generating silicone membranes were synthesized and characterized to determine the relationship between surface properties, NO flux, and blood clotting time. These outcomes helped develop and optimize NO-generating gas-exchange silicone fibers that represent the majority of ALs surface area. The first NO-generating AL prototypes, using those fibers, were manufactured, incorporated into NO-generating circuits and tested for their non-thrombogenicity. To test for NO-release duration and non-thrombogenicity, catheters were fabricated to incorporate NO-donors inside their walls, characterized for NO flux and release duration by chemilumincscence, and tested for patency using a thrombogenicity model in rabbits. Methods 1-2 involve material modification using complicated and expensive chemical formulations and/or manufacturing. Method 3 however, functionalizes ALs by only adding NO into sweep gas. Decade-long anti-clotting testing using a wide range of NO concentrations has been conducted without knowledge of what concentration yields

  10. [Probe into the platelets adhesion to carbonaceous biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Li, Bogang; Na, Juanjuan; Yin, Guangfu; Yin, Jie; Zheng, Changqiong

    2004-02-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of blood coagulation for carbonaceous biomaterials, the plasma rich in platelet was obtaining through the centrifugation of fresh human blood containing anticoagulant. Adhesive tests of platelets to surfaces of DLC, diamond film(DF) and graphite was carried out at 37 degrees C. Then, morphology observation, counting and deformation index calculation of the platelets adhering to surfaces of the three kinds of materials were analyzed by SEM. It has been shown that there is no any platelet on the surface of DLC, but on DF and graphite, a lot of platelets are observed with serious deformation of type III-V. The adhesive amounts of platelet on the surface of graphite are more than those on DF, but deformation index of platelets on the surface of DF is more than that on graphite. Three major conclusions have been obtained through comparative analyses with our previous researches and related literatures: (1) Adhesion, deformation and collection of platelets occurred in succession on material surfaces resulting from protein adsorption are the major mechanism of blood coagulation of carbonaceous materials; (2) Deformation degree of platelets is more important hemocompatibility index than consumption ratio of platelets for carbonaceous materials; (3) The purer the DLC, the better is the hemocompatibility. These conclusions possess important directive function for improving and designing carbonaceous materials used in artificial mechanical heart valves.

  11. RNA-Seq of Tumor-Educated Platelets Enables Blood-Based Pan-Cancer, Multiclass, and Molecular Pathway Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Best, Myron G.; Sol, Nik; Kooi, Irsan; Tannous, Jihane; Westerman, Bart A.; Rustenburg, François; Schellen, Pepijn; Verschueren, Heleen; Post, Edward; Koster, Jan; Ylstra, Bauke; Ameziane, Najim; Dorsman, Josephine; Smit, Egbert F.; Verheul, Henk M.; Noske, David P.; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Nilsson, R. Jonas A.; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Wesseling, Pieter; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor-educated blood platelets (TEPs) are implicated as central players in the systemic and local responses to tumor growth, thereby altering their RNA profile. We determined the diagnostic potential of TEPs by mRNA sequencing of 283 platelet samples. We distinguished 228 patients with localized and metastasized tumors from 55 healthy individuals with 96% accuracy. Across six different tumor types, the location of the primary tumor was correctly identified with 71% accuracy. Also, MET or HER2-positive, and mutant KRAS, EGFR, or PIK3CA tumors were accurately distinguished using surrogate TEP mRNA profiles. Our results indicate that blood platelets provide a valuable platform for pan-cancer, multiclass cancer, and companion diagnostics, possibly enabling clinical advances in blood-based “liquid biopsies”. PMID:26525104

  12. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  13. Comparison of humoral insulin-like growth factor-1, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist concentrations among equine autologous blood-derived preparations.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Christiane R; Troillet, Antonia R; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W; Winter, Karsten; Brehm, Walter; Ionita, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare humoral insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) concentrations in plasma and 3 types of equine autologous blood-derived preparations (ABPs). SAMPLE Blood and ABP samples from 12 horses. PROCEDURES Blood samples from each horse were processed by use of commercial systems to obtain plasma, platelet concentrate, conditioned serum, and aqueous platelet lysate. Half of the platelet concentrate samples were additionally treated with a detergent to release intracellular mediators. Humoral IGF-1, PDGF-BB, TGF-β1, and IL-1Ra concentrations were measured with ELISAs and compared statistically. RESULTS Median IGF-1 concentration was highest in conditioned serum and detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by platelet concentrate and plasma; IGF-1 was not detected in platelet lysate. Mean PDGF-BB concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by detergent-treated platelet concentrate and conditioned serum; PDGF-BB was not detected in plasma and platelet concentrate. Median TGF-β1 concentration was highest in detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by conditioned serum, platelet lysate, and platelet concentrate; TGF-β1 was not detected in most plasma samples. Median IL-1Ra concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by conditioned serum; IL-1Ra was not detected in almost all plasma, detergent-treated platelet concentrate, and platelet concentrate samples. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Each ABP had its own cytokine profile, which was determined by the specific processing method. Coagulation and cellular lysis strongly increased humoral concentrations of cell-derived cytokines. No ABP had the highest concentrations for all cytokines. Further studies are needed to assess clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:27463555

  14. Luminal platelet aggregates in functional deficits in parenchymal vessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Victor; Flores, Rowena; Muller, Artur; Sehba, Fatima A.

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of early ischemic injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not understood. This study examined the acute effect of endovascular puncture-induced SAH on parenchymal vessel function in rat, using intravascular fluorescent tracers to assess flow and vascular permeability and immunostaining to assess structural integrity and to visualize platelet aggregates. In sham-operated animals, vessels were well filled with tracer administered 10 seconds before sacrifice, and parenchymal escape of tracer was rare. At ten minutes and 3 hours after hemorrhage, patches of poor vascular filling were distributed throughout the forebrain. Close examination of these regions revealed short segments of narrowed diameter along many profiles. Most vascular profiles with reduced perfusion contained platelet aggregates and in addition showed focal loss of collagen IV, a principal component of basal lamina. In contrast, vessels were well filled at 24 hours post-hemorrhage, indicating that vascular perfusion had recovered. Parenchymal escape of intravascular tracer was detected at 10 minutes post-hemorrhage and later as plumes of fluorescence emanating into parenchyma from restricted microvascular foci. These data demonstrate that parenchymal microvessels are compromised in function by 10 minutes after SAH and identify focal microvascular constriction and local accumulation of luminal platelet aggregates as potential initiators of that compromise. PMID:20654597

  15. Effect of troxerutin on laser-induced thrombus formation in rat mesenteric vessels, coagulation parameters and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Krupiński, K; Giedrojć, J; Bielawiec, M

    1996-01-01

    The antithrombotic effect of Troxerutin have been studied in an experimental model of thrombosis in which rat mesenteric vessels (arterioles and venules) 25-30 microns in diameter were injured by well defined argon laser lesions. Furthermore in vitro effect of this agent on coagulation parameters (IIa, Xa inhibition, TT, heptest), and platelet function (platelet adhesion to the siliconised glass and extracellular matrix, platelet spreading) has been investigated 2 h after oral drug administration. Troxerutin at a dose of 10 mg/kg markedly inhibited thrombus formation in venules. Higher dose (50 mg/kg) was needed to obtain the same antithrombotic effect when arterioles were studied. After application of a single dose of Troxerutin (100 mg/kg) antithrombotic effect lasted for 6 h to 7.5 h when venules were studied, and for 4.5 h to 6 h when arterioles were investigated. In in vitro study we did not observe any effect of Troxerutin on coagulation parameters. In concentrations of 100 micrograms/ml in platelet rich plasma Troxerutin significantly inhibited platelet adhesion to the extracellular matrix and siliconised glass as well as platelet spreading. It is likely that this drug possesses antithrombotic effect evaluated by inhibition of platelet function and protection of endothelial cells.

  16. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count.

  17. Markers of inflammation, activation of blood platelets and coagulation disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna

    2016-04-13

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It is a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal track with unknown etiology. Currently applied biomarkers include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. The etiopathogenesis of IBD is multifactorial. In patients with IBD in inflamed alimentary tract mucosa the number of recruited monocytes and activated macrophages which are source of cytokines. In IBD, the exacerbation is accompanied by thrombocytosis. Platelets play a crucial role in the hemostasis and inflammatory response. Selectins, which regulates the hemostasis and inflammatory response, stimulates the secretion of many inflammatory mediators such as β-thromboglobuline, CD40L, fibrinogen, IL-1β, platelet factor-4. In the course of IBD the following changes are observed: an increase in the number of platelets (reactive thrombocytosis), PDW and PCT, reduction in MPV, increased production and excretion of granular content products (P-selectin, GP53, β-TG, PF-4, vWF, fibrinolytic inhibitors).

  18. Isolation of a 5-Kilodalton Actin-Sequestering Peptide from Human Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safer, Daniel; Golla, Rajasree; Nachmias, Vivianne T.

    1990-04-01

    Resting human platelets contain ≈0.3 mM unpolymerized actin. When freshly drawn and washed platelets are treated with saponin, 85-90% of the unpolymerized actin diffuses out. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions shows that the bulk of this unpolymerized actin migrates with a higher mobility than does pure G-actin, profilactin, or actin-gelsolin complex. When muscle G-actin is added to fresh or boiled saponin extract, the added muscle actin is shifted to the high-mobility form. The saponin extract contains an acidic peptide having a molecular mass in the range of 5 kDa, which has been purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC. This peptide also shifts muscle actin to the high-mobility form. Addition of either boiled saponin extract or the purified peptide to muscle G-actin also strongly and stoichiometrically inhibits salt-induced polymerization, as assayed by falling-ball viscometry and by sedimentation. We conclude that this peptide binds to the bulk of the unpolymerized actin in platelets and prevents it from polymerizing.

  19. Receptor-mediated Modulation of Human Monocyte, Neutrophil, Lymphocyte, and Platelet Function by Phorbol Diesters

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Bonnie J.; Weinberg, J. Brice

    1982-01-01

    The tumor promoting phorbol diesters elicit a variety of responses from normal and leukemic blood cells in vitro by apparently interacting with cellular receptors. The biologically active ligand [20-3H] phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PDBu) bound specifically to intact human lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and platelets, but not to erythrocytes. Binding, which was comparable for all four blood cell types, occurred rapidly at 23° and 37°C, reaching a maximum by 20-30 min usually followed by a 30-40% decrease in cell associated radioactivity over the next 30-60 min. The time course for binding was temperature dependent with equilibrium binding occurring after 120-150 min at 4°C, with no subsequent loss of cell-associated radioactivity at this temperature. Bound [3H]PDBu could be eluted by addition of unlabeled PDBu. Scatchard analysis of data from 4°C binding studies revealed linear plots with high affinity receptors in these cell types with dissociation constants and receptors per cell of 60 nM and 7.8 × 105/cell for lymphocytes, 51 nM and 15.5 × 105/cell for monocytes, 38 nM and 4.0 × 105/cell for PMN, and 19 nM and 2.9 × 104/cell for platelets. Structure-activity studies using unlabeled phorbol-related compounds demonstrated a close correlation between their abilities to inhibit binding of [3H]PDBu to cells and their abilities to induce cellular responses (monocyte and PMN H2O2 secretion, lymphocyte 3HTdR incorporation, and platelet tritiated serotonin release); phorbol and 4-alpha phorbol were inactive while phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), PDBu, mezerein, and phorbol 12,13-diacetate (in decreasing order of potency) inhibited [3H]PDBu binding and elicited the various responses. Thus, these high affinity, specific receptors for the phorbol diesters, present on monocytes, lymphocytes, PMN, and platelets, mediate the pleiotypic effects induced by these ligands. PMID:6956584

  20. Platelet function: aggregation by PAF or sequestration in lung is not modified during immediate or late allergen-induced bronchospasm in man.

    PubMed

    Hemmendinger, S; Pauli, G; Tenabene, A; Pujol, J L; Bessot, J C; Eber, M; Cazenave, J P

    1989-05-01

    Among the mediators involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underly the reactions of the acute and delayed phases of bronchospasm induced by allergens in man, platelet-activating factor (PAF) could play an important role, in particular by its effects on platelets. In animals, inhalation or injection of PAF causes a platelet-dependent bronchoconstriction that is blocked by prior administration of an antiplatelet antiserum and accompanied by platelet accumulation in the pulmonary vessels. In man, inhalation of PAF causes a bronchospasm and induces a bronchial hyperreactivity. Abnormalities of platelet aggregation and the secretion into plasma of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin have been described in patients with asthma during induced bronchospasm. Platelet functions have been studied in 15 patients with asthma before and after allergen bronchial provocation tests. There was no difference between platelet counts, plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin, and platelet aggregation induced by several agonists (adrenaline, arachidonic acid, or PAF) before and immediately after the allergen bronchial provocation test. There was no platelet pulmonary sequestration as studied with 111Indium-labeled platelets during 24 hours after the antigen challenge, and the life span of circulating platelets was normal. Our results do not support an important direct role for PAF in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is still possible that the current methodology is too insensitive to detect amounts of PAF in the circulation or that PAF is acting locally. PMID:2523922

  1. Inhibition of whole blood platelet-aggregation by compounds in garlic clove extracts and commercial garlic products.

    PubMed

    Lawson, L D; Ransom, D K; Hughes, B G

    1992-01-15

    The inhibitory effects of adenosine and 16 quantitatively determined organosulfur compounds derived from garlic cloves or commercial garlic preparations on collagen stimulated in vitro platelet aggregation in whole blood were determined. An estimation of the anti-aggregatory activity of several brands of the major types of commercial garlic preparations was determined from the activities of the individual compounds present in each sample. In platelet rich plasma (PRP) most of the anti-aggregatory activity of garlic clove homogenates was due to adenosine; however, in whole blood neither adenosine nor the polar fraction had any effect and all of the anti-aggregatory activity was due to allicin and other thiosulfinates. Allicin was equally active in whole blood and PRP. Among brands there was a several-fold variation in content of the organosulfur compounds and activity for all types of garlic products tested. The best garlic powder tablets were equally as active as clove homogenates whereas steam-distilled oils were 35% as active and oil-macerates (due to low content) only 12% as active. A garlic product aged many months in aqueous alcohol had no activity. For steam-distilled oils, most of the activity was due to diallyl trisulfide. For the oil-macerates, most of the activity was due largely to the vinyl dithiins. Ajoene, an exclusive component of the oil-macerates, had highest specific activity of all the compounds tested but, because of its low concentration, had only 13% of the activity of diallyl trisulfide and 3% of the activity of allicin. Compounds which may be active in vivo are discussed. PMID:1579891

  2. Comparison of cytotoxic and anti-platelet activities of polyphenolic extracts from Arnica montana flowers and Juglans regia husks.

    PubMed

    Rywaniak, Joanna; Luzak, Boguslawa; Podsedek, Anna; Dudzinska, Dominika; Rozalski, Marcin; Watala, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds of plant origin are well known to be beneficial to human health: they exert protective effects on haemostasis and have a particular influence on blood platelets. However, the anti-platelet properties of polyphenolic compounds observed so far have not been weighed against their potential cytotoxic action against platelets. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that anti-platelet and cytotoxic effects on blood platelets may interfere and therefore, may often lead to confusion when evaluating the properties of plant extracts or other agents towards blood platelets. The anti-platelet and cytotoxic in vitro effects of plant extracts obtained from the husks of walnuts (J. regia) and flowers of arnica (A. montana) on platelet reactivity and viability were examined. Platelet function was assessed using standard methods (flow cytometry: P-selectin expression, activation of GPIIbIIIa complex, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, VASP index; turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry) and newly set assays (flow cytometric monitoring of platelet cytotoxicity). The results reveal that none of the studied plant extracts demonstrated cytotoxicity towards blood platelets. The phenolic acid-rich extract of A. montana (7.5 and 15 µg/ml) significantly reduced the ADP-induced aggregation in both whole blood and PRP, and decreased the platelet reactivity index (PRI; VASP phosphorylation) in whole blood, while showing excellent antioxidant capacity. The extract of J. regia husks significantly reduced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood when applied at 7.5 µg/ml, and only slightly decreased the PRI at 15 µg/ml. Both examined extracts suppressed platelet hyper-reactivity, and such influence did not interfere with cytotoxic effects of the extracts. Thus, its high polyphenol content, excellent antioxidant capacity and distinct anti-platelet properties, in combination with its lack of toxicity, make the extract of A. montana flowers a possible

  3. Effect of behavioral stress on platelet reactivity on polymeric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barbucci, R; Lamponi, S; Aloisi, A M

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that stressful stimuli change blood functions and platelet parameters are altered in humans and animals subjected to stress. We have examined the influences of behavioral stress on the morphological responses of platelets on a standard biomaterial, polyethylene (PE). Male rabbits were used. Blood was collected from the marginal vein of the ear 2 times per subject: the first sample was used as the baseline; 1 week later, the second was preceded in half of the subjects by 20 min of immobilization stress. In vitro adhesion of platelets on the PE was evaluated. The exposure of animals to stress induced a dramatic change in platelet morphology and functions on the PE: a higher degree of platelet adhesion, increased platelet spreading, and the appearance of pseudopodia. In the unstressed subjects there were no modifications of the platelets on the PE with respect to the baseline. The present experiment emphasizes for the first time the possible problems involved with the varying physiological conditions of patients before and after any biomaterial application surgery and of subjects who supply the blood for hemocompatibility tests performed on biomaterials. Therefore, in assessments of the performance of different biomaterials, the reactivity of blood factors in the patients should be considered and the test of blood compatibility should be performed with blood collected from donors in appropriate physiological conditions. PMID:10029143

  4. Synergistic effects of high blood cholesterol and hypertension on leukocyte and platelet recruitment in the cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Almeida-Paula, Lidiana D; Granger, Daniel N

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension or hypercholesterolemia can induce a proinflammatory and prothrombogenic phenotype in the microcirculation of the brain; however, less is known about how the combination of these risk factors affects the vasculature. We recently reported that a moderate (60%) increase in plasma cholesterol blunts the recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the cerebral microvessels elicited by hypertension. In this study, we examined whether larger increments in blood cholesterol (4-fold) exerts a similar modulating influence on the vasculature in the presence of hypertension. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice with deoxycorticosterone acetate salt-induced hypertension were placed on a high-cholesterol diet and exhibited exaggerated leukocyte and platelet adhesion responses in cerebral microvessels. Intermittent feeding (every fourth day) with high-cholesterol diet yielded similar phenotypic changes in the vasculature. Once the mice were placed on high-cholesterol diet, 4 days on normal diet (ND) were needed to revert to a normal vascular phenotype. Angiotensin II type 1 receptors and reactive oxygen species seem to contribute to the vascular responses induced by hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Our findings indicate that the combination of hypertension and large increases in plasma cholesterol concentration results in a severe, but reversible, inflammatory and thrombogenic phenotype in the cerebral microvasculature.

  5. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width to Platelet Ratio is Related to Histologic Severity of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Hongqin; Wang, Xiaomei; Wu, Ruihong; Gao, Xiuzhu; Jin, Qinglong; Niu, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to investigate whether red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and RDW to platelet ratio (RPR) were related to the histologic severity of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Seventy-three treatment-naïve PBC patients who had undergone a liver biopsy between January 2010 and January 2015 were enrolled in our study. The patients’ histological stages were based on the classifications of Ludwig and Scheuer. The patients were divided into early stage (Stage I) and advanced stage (Stage II, III, and IV) hepatic fibrosis according to their histological stage. All common patient demographics, clinical characteristics, hematological parameters, liver biochemistry, and antimitochondrial M2 antibody levels (AMA-M2) were retrospectively analyzed, and RDW, RPR, aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and fibrosis index based on the 4 factors (FIB-4) were calculated. A total of 28 (38.4%) patients had early stage PBC, whereas 45 (62.6%) were classified as advanced stage. Regarding age, no significant differences between the early and advanced stages were observed. Patients with advanced stage PBC had significantly higher RDW (13.6 vs 14.4; P = 0.019), conjugated bilirubin (10.1 vs 23.4; P = 0.029), and significantly lower cholinesterase (7901.1 vs 6060.8; P = 0.001) and platelets (212.6 vs 167.0; P = 0.006). However, no significant differences (P > 0.05) in other routine parameters previously evaluated in PBC, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and mean platelet volume, were found between the groups. The sensitivity and specificity of RDW were 33.3% and 92.9%, respectively, and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was 0.66. However, the sensitivity and specificity of RPR were 46.7% and 96.4%, respectively, and the corresponding AUROC was 0.74 (P < 0.001). Hence, compared with preexisting indicators, RPR showed a higher AUROC than APRI (0.648; P = 0.035) and FIB-4 (0.682; P

  6. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed. PMID:7767484

  7. Non-enzymatic modifications of prostaglandin H synthase 1 affect bifunctional enzyme activity - Implications for the sensitivity of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Talar, Marcin; Stec-Martyna, Emilia; Pawlowska, Zofia; Watala, Cezary

    2016-06-25

    Due to its ability to inhibit the blood platelet PGHS-1, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin(®)) is widely used as a preventive agent in atherothrombotic diseases. However, its beneficial effects seem to be lower in diabetic patients, suggesting that protein glycation may impair effective ASA-mediated acetylation process. On the other hand, it is proposed that ASA can prevent some of the late complications of diabetes by lowering the extent of glycation at protein free amino groups. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extents of non-enzymatic N-glycosylation (glycation) and acetylation of blood platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) and the competition between glycation and acetylation was investigated in order to demonstrate how these two reactions may compete against platelet PGHS-1. When PGHS-1 was incubated with glycating/acetylating agents (glucose, Glu; 1,6-bisphosphofructose, 1,6-BPF; methylglyoxal, MGO, acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), the enzyme was modified in 13.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 1.2 and 6.4 ± 1.1 mol/mol protein, respectively, and its activity was significantly reduced. The prior glycation/carbonylation of PGHS-1 with Glu, 1,6-BPF or MGO decreased the extent of acetylation from 6.4 ± 1.1 down to 2.5 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 5.2 ± 0.2 mol/mol protein, respectively, but the enzyme still remained susceptible to the subsequent inhibition of its activity with ASA. When PGHS-1 was first acetylated with ASA and then incubated with glycating/carbonylating agents, we observed the following reductions in the enzyme modifications: from 13.4 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 0.6 mol/mol protein for Glu, from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for 1,6-BPF and from 10.7 ± 1.2 to 7.5 ± 0.5 mol/mol protein for MGO, however subsequent glycation/carbonylation did not significantly affect PGHS-1 function. Overall, our outcomes allow to better understand the structural aspects of the chemical competition between glycation and acetylation of PGHS-1

  8. The effects of treatment with aspirin and an antithrombotic agent SH1117 upon platelet thrombus formation in living blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Honour, A. J.; Carter, R. D.; Mann, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The work reported here describes an in vivo study, over several days in each animal, of the formation and behaviour of platelet thrombi in injured living blood vessels in response to topically applied adenosine diphosphate in rabbits which have been treated with oral doses of SH1117 alone or together with acetyl-salicylic (ASA) before and after i.v. injection of alloxan. These two substances SH1117 and ASA when given together display a synergism which is similar to that described for dipyridamole and ASA, but the antithrombotic action of SH1117 and ASA seems to be more profound. It may be of significance that oral SH1117 given alone appears to confer a degree of insensitivity of the injured vessel in its response to ADP, as such an effect is not displayed by dipyridamole. PMID:588441

  9. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating -18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r (2) = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  10. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating −18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r2 = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  11. Selective inhibition of the platelet phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110beta as promising new strategy for platelet protection during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Andreas; Wendel, Hans Peter; Dietz, Klaus; Schiebold, Daniela; Peter, Karlheinz; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2008-03-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is used in cardiac surgery for cardiopulmonary bypass as well as in ventricular assist devices and for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Blood contact with the artificial surface and shear stress of ECC activates platelets and leukocytes resulting in a coagulopathy and proinflammatory events. Blockers of the platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (CD41/CD61) can protect platelet function during ECC, a phenomenon called "platelet anaesthesia", but may be involved in post-ECC bleeding. We hypothesized that the new selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110beta inhibitor TGX-221 that inhibits shear-induced platelet activation without prolonging the bleeding time in vivo may also protect platelet function during ECC. Heparinized blood of healthy volunteers (n = 6) was treated in vitro with either the GP IIb/IIIa blocker tirofiban, TGX-221 or as control and circulated in an ECC model. Before and after 30 minutes circulation CD41 expression on the ECC-tubing as measure for platelet-ECC binding and generation of the platelet activation marker beta-thromboglobulin were determined using ELISA. Platelet aggregation and platelet-granulocyte binding were analysed in flow cytometry. After log-transforming the data statistical evaluation was performed using multifactor ANOVA in combination with Tukey's HSD test (global alpha = 5%). Tirofiban and TGX-221 inhibited platelet-ECC interaction, platelet aggregation and platelet-granulocyte binding. Tirofiban also inhibited ECC-induced beta-thromboglobulin release. The observed inhibition of platelet-ECC interaction and platelet activation by tirofiban contributes to explain the mechanism of "platelet anaesthesia". TGX-221 represents a promising alternative to GP IIb/IIIa blockade and should be further investigated for use during ECC in vivo.

  12. Structural functional and folding scenario of an anti platelet and thrombolytic enzyme crinumin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar Awaneesh; Singh, Sanjay; Jagannadham, Medicherla V

    2014-07-01

    A folding pattern, conformational stability and therapeutic role of a protein helps in developing a suitable drug. Crinumin, a thrombolytic and anti platelet agent, has been studied for its functional and conformational properties by equilibrium unfolding methods. The crinumin belongs to α+β class of protein and exhibits a non native structure and two molten globule states at different conditions. Two domains in the molecular structure of the protein with altered stability are present that unfold sequentially. The enzyme maintains activity as well as structural integrity even in adverse conditions. These observations provide an understanding of protein folding as well as facilitate the development of a potential drug. PMID:24726528

  13. Helenalin and 11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin, two constituents from Arnica montana L., inhibit human platelet function via thiol-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H; Lösche, W; Strobach, H; Leven, W; Willuhn, G; Till, U; Schrör, K

    1990-03-15

    This study investigates the effect on human platelet function of two sesquiterpene lactones from Arnica montana L., helenalin (H) and 11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH). Both compounds inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, thromboxane formation and 5-hydroxytryptamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner at 3-300 microM. When arachidonic acid was used as stimulus, thromboxane formation remained unaffected despite of inhibition of platelet aggregation. Both H and DH reduced the number of acid-soluble sulfhydryl groups in platelets, by up to 78% at anti-aggregatory concentrations. Moreover, H- and DH-induced platelet inhibition could be prevented by the thiol containing amino acid cysteine. It is concluded that H and DH inhibit platelet function via interaction with platelet sulfhydryl groups, probably associated with reduced phospholipase A2 activity.

  14. Luteal blood flow and luteal function

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Akihisa; Tamura, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Ken; Asada, Hiromi; Taketani, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Aki; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Shimamura, Katsunori; Morioka, Hitoshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood flow in the corpus luteum (CL) is associated with luteal function. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether luteal function can be improved by increasing CL blood flow in women with luteal phase defect (LFD). Methods Blood flow impedance in the CL was measured by transvaginal color-pulsed-Doppler-ultrasonography and was expressed as a resistance index (RI). The patients with both LFD [serum progesterone (P) concentrations < 10 ng/ml during mid-luteal phase] and high CL-RI (≥ 0.51) were given vitamin-E (600 mg/day, n = 18), L-arginine (6 g/day, n = 14) as a potential nitric oxide donor, melatonin (3 mg/day, n = 13) as an antioxidant, or HCG (2,000 IU/day, n = 10) during the subsequent menstrual cycle. Results In the control group (n = 11), who received no medication to increase CL blood flow, only one patient (9%) improved in CL-RI and 2 patients (18%) improved in serum P. Vitamin-E improved CL-RI in 15 patients (83%) and improved serum P in 12 patients (67%). L-arginine improved CL-RI in all the patients (100%) and improved serum P in 10 patients (71%). HCG improved CL-RI in all the patients (100%) and improved serum P in 9 patients (90%). Melatonin had no significant effect. Conclusion Vitamin-E or L-arginine treatment improved luteal function by decreasing CL blood flow impedance. CL blood flow is a critical factor for luteal function. PMID:19144154

  15. Scalable Functionalized Graphene Nano-platelets as Tunable Cathodes for High-performance Lithium Rechargeable Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haegyeom; Lim, Hee-Dae; Kim, Sung-Wook; Hong, Jihyun; Seo, Dong-Hwa; Kim, Dae-chul; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Sungjin; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-01-01

    High-performance and cost-effective rechargeable batteries are key to the success of electric vehicles and large-scale energy storage systems. Extensive research has focused on the development of (i) new high-energy electrodes that can store more lithium or (ii) high-power nano-structured electrodes hybridized with carbonaceous materials. However, the current status of lithium batteries based on redox reactions of heavy transition metals still remains far below the demands required for the proposed applications. Herein, we present a novel approach using tunable functional groups on graphene nano-platelets as redox centers. The electrode can deliver high capacity of ~250 mAh g−1, power of ~20 kW kg−1 in an acceptable cathode voltage range, and provide excellent cyclability up to thousands of repeated charge/discharge cycles. The simple, mass-scalable synthetic route for the functionalized graphene nano-platelets proposed in this work suggests that the graphene cathode can be a promising new class of electrode. PMID:23514953

  16. Normalization methods in time series of platelet function assays: A SQUIRE compliant study.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Roest, Mark; Vukicevic, Milan; Beran, Maud; Lauwereins, Bart; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Henskens, Yvonne; Lancé, Marcus; Marcus, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Platelet function can be quantitatively assessed by specific assays such as light-transmission aggregometry, multiple-electrode aggregometry measuring the response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and thrombin-receptor activating peptide and viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).The task of extracting meaningful statistical and clinical information from high-dimensional data spaces in temporal multivariate clinical data represented in multivariate time series is complex. Building insightful visualizations for multivariate time series demands adequate usage of normalization techniques.In this article, various methods for data normalization (z-transformation, range transformation, proportion transformation, and interquartile range) are presented and visualized discussing the most suited approach for platelet function data series.Normalization was calculated per assay (test) for all time points and per time point for all tests.Interquartile range, range transformation, and z-transformation demonstrated the correlation as calculated by the Spearman correlation test, when normalized per assay (test) for all time points. When normalizing per time point for all tests, no correlation could be abstracted from the charts as was the case when using all data as 1 dataset for normalization. PMID:27428217

  17. The effects of haemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 solution on coagulation as assessed by thromboelastography and platelet receptor function studies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, P; Yang, K; Kershaw, G; Wong, G; Dunkley, S; Kam, P C A

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of haemodilution with either 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 (Voluven(®)) or 0.9% normal saline (NS) on blood coagulation in vitro. Haemodilution with 6% HES 130/0.4 impaired coagulation, as indicated by the changes in thromboelastographic parameters k-time, α-angle and maximum amplitude. Light transmission aggregometry and multiple electrode aggregometry demonstrated that impaired platelet receptor function occurred only at high levels of haemodilution (40%) with both fluids, but there was no significant difference between the two fluids (P=0.05). The thromboelastographic functional fibrinogen assay showed that the fibrinogen component of clot strength was significantly impaired with haemodilution with HES 130/0.4 compared with haemodilution with NS (whole blood [14.4 ± 4.6 mm] versus 40% HES dilution [3.7 ± 1.9], [P=0.001]; versus 40% NS dilution [10.4 ± 4.6], [P=0.129]). These findings suggest that there is little difference between HES or NS in relation to coagulation or platelet function during minor or moderate haemodilution, but at high levels of haemodilution with HES, fibrinogen activity is more impaired compared with NS. PMID:26603798

  18. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity in hypertension: differential effects of calcium antagonists and beta-adrenergic receptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Winther, K; Gleerup, G; Hedner, T

    1991-01-01

    Platelet function was investigated in healthy volunteers and patients with essential hypertension by measurement of thresholds for ADP and adrenaline-induced aggregation and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 (PF-4) and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) after administration of antihypertensive drugs. Fibrinolytic activity was investigated by the euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) activity. Compared to normotensive controls, patients with essential hypertension showed increased aggregation as evidenced by a decrease in ADP thresholds for ex vivo platelet aggregation. ECLT was significantly prolonged and t-PA significantly lowered, indicating impaired fibrinolytic activity in mild hypertension. In different studies, we have shown that various antihypertensive drug regimens differ in their effects on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity when given to healthy volunteers or patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension. In normal volunteers, treatment with the calcium antagonists verapamil, nifedipine, and felodipine lowered plasma concentrations of PF-4 and beta-TG, indicating a reduced platelet activity in vivo. Fibrinolytic activity was not influenced by calcium antagonist treatment in the normal volunteers. Interestingly, however, t-PA increased significantly in the hypertensive group. When compared to placebo or beta 1-selective blockers, propranolol, a non-selective beta-adrenergic blocker without partial agonist activity, reduced ADP and adrenaline threshold values for ex vivo platelet aggregation in hypertensive subjects and impaired fibrinolytic activity in the normal volunteers as well as in the hypertensive groups by increasing ECLT and reducing t-PA. Hypothetically, the effects of antihypertensive drugs on platelet function and fibrinolytic activity could be of importance for their proposed actions on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  19. Platelet deposition on von Willebrand factor-deficient vessels. Extracorporeal perfusion studies in swine with von Willebrand's disease using native and heparinized blood.

    PubMed

    Badimon, L; Badimon, J J; Rand, J; Turitto, V T; Fuster, V

    1987-11-01

    Native (nonanticoagulated) and heparinized blood from both normal swine and swine with von Willebrand's disease was exposed to de-endothelialized thoracic aorta from normal pigs under controlled flow conditions. We have shown that these normal de-endothelialized vessel segments do not contain von Willebrand factor (vWF) in the subendothelial surface; thus, the vascular model that we are using here is representative of the conditions in severe von Willebrand's disease. The blood was recirculated for selected periods of time through an extracorporeal circuit (carotid-jugular shunt), containing a tubular perfusion chamber that held the vessel segment. Flow rates and chamber diameters were selected such that the wall shear rates at the vascular segment were 212 to 3380 sec-1. Platelets were labeled with indium 111 and their total deposition determined by a gamma counter; selected areas were also observed by electron microscopy. When native blood was perfused, the deposition of platelets depended on platelet-plasma vWF only at high wall shear rates (1690 sec-1 or greater) typical of the microcirculation, but not at the lower shear rates (212 and 424 sec-1), more characteristic of the larger arteries and veins. In contrast, when heparinized blood was perfused, platelet deposition on the vascular segments depended on the presence of vWF over the entire range of shear conditions studied. These findings demonstrate in an extracorporeal perfusion system that the defect in platelet-vessel wall interaction in swine with von Willebrand's disease is influenced by both the local flow conditions and the level of activation of the coagulation system. In the presence of an intact coagulation system a synergistic interaction between procoagulant moieties and vWF was observed at high shear rates.

  20. The association between red blood cell and platelet transfusion and subsequently developing idiopathic pneumonia syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vusse, Lisa K. Vande; Madtes, David K.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Curtis, J. Randall; Watkins, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blood transfusions are common during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and may contribute to lung injury. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This study examined the associations between red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) transfusions and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) among 914 individuals who underwent myeloablative allogeneic HSCT between 1997 and 2001. Patients received allogeneic blood transfusions at their physicians' discretion. RBCs, PLTs, and a composite of “other” transfusions were quantified as the sum of units received each 7-day period from 6 days before transplant until IPS onset, death, or Posttransplant Day 120. RBC and PLT transfusions were modeled as separate time-varying exposures in proportional hazards models adjusted for IPS risk factors (age, baseline disease, irradiation dose) and other transfusions. Timing of PLT transfusion relative to myeloid engraftment and PLT ABO blood group (match vs. mismatch) were included as potential interaction terms. RESULTS Patients received a median of 9 PLT and 10 RBC units. There were 77 IPS cases (8.4%). Each additional PLT unit transfused in the prior week was associated with 16% higher IPS risk (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.23; p < 0.001). Recent RBC and PLT transfusions were each significantly associated with greater risk of IPS when examined without the other; only PLT transfusions retained significance when both exposures were included in the model. The PLT association was not modified by engraftment or ABO mismatch. CONCLUSION PLT transfusions are associated with greater risk of IPS after myeloablative HSCT. RBCs may also contribute; however, these findings need confirmation. PMID:24033082

  1. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  2. A platelet-inspired paradigm for nanomedicine targeted to multiple diseases.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Baldwin, William M; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-10-01

    Platelets are megakaryocyte-derived anucleated cells found in the blood. They are mainly responsible for rendering hemostasis or clotting to prevent bleeding complications. Decreased platelet numbers or deficiencies in platelet functions can lead to various acute or chronic bleeding conditions and hemorrhage. On the other hand, dysregulated hyperactivity of the clotting process can lead to thrombosis and vascular occlusion. There is significant evidence that beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets play crucial mechanistic roles in other disease scenarios such as inflammation, immune response and cancer metastasis by mediating several cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, as well as aiding the disease microenvironment via secretion of multiple soluble factors. Therefore, elucidating these mechanistic functions of platelets can provide unique avenues for developing platelet-inspired nanomedicine strategies targeted to these diseases. To this end, the current review provides detailed mechanistic insight into platelets' disease-relevant functions and discusses how these mechanisms can be utilized to engineer targeted nanomedicine systems.

  3. The impact of intratracheally instilled carbon black on the cardiovascular system of rats: elevation of blood homocysteine and hyperactivity of platelets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwa; Oh, Seok-Jeong; Kwak, Hui-Chan; Kim, Jong-Kyu; Lim, Cheol-Hong; Yang, Jeong-Sun; Park, Kwangsik; Kim, Sang-Kyum; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) is an industrial chemical with high potential for human exposure. Although the relationship between exposure to particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular disease is well documented, the risk of adverse cardiovascular effects attributed to CB particles has not been clearly characterized. This study was performed to (1) investigate the effects of CB on cardiovascular system and (2) identify the target tissue or potential biomarkers. Carbon black with a distinct particle size, N330 (ultrafine particle) and N990 (fine particle), was intratracheally instilled into rats at a doses of 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg. Measurements of thrombotic activity and determination of plasma homocysteine levels, cardiac functionality, and inflammatory responses were conducted at 24-h and 1-wk time points. Exposure to N330 accelerated platelet-dependent blood clotting at 10 mg/kg, the highest exposure tested. Unexpectedly, both N330 and N990 led to prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), whereas these CB particles failed to affect prothrombin time (PT). N990 produced a significant elevation in the level of plasma homocysteine, a well-established etiological factor in cardiovascular diseases. Both N330 and N990 induced apparent inflammation in the lungs; however, both particles failed to initiate systemic inflammation. Neither CB particle produced observable cardiac symptoms as detected by electrocardiography. Taken together, data show CB exposure enhanced the cardiovascular risk by inducing hyperhomocysteinemia and platelet hyperactivity, although these effects may be variable depending on particle size and exposure duration. Homocysteine may be a potential biomarker for cardiovascular toxicity following CB exposure.

  4. Is Platelet-rich plasma superior to whole blood in the management of chronic tennis elbow: one year randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral humeral epicondylitis, or ‘tennis elbow’, is a common condition with a variety of treatment options. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Autologous Whole Blood (AWB) represent new therapeutic options for chronic tendinopathies including tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the long term effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in patients with chronic tennis elbow. Methods Seventy six patients with chronic lateral humeral epicondylitis with duration of symptoms more than 3 months were included in this study and randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous leukocyte rich PRP (4.8 times of plasma) and group 2 with 2 mL of AWB. Tennis elbow strap, stretching and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS), Mayo score (modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at 0, 4, 8 weeks and 6 and 12 months. Results All pain variables including VAS, PPT and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups at each follow up intervals compared to baseline. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain, functional scores and treatment success rates in all follow up examinations (P >0/05). Conclusion PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective methods to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis and their efficacy persisted during long term follow up. PRP was not superior to AWB in long term follow up. PMID:24635909

  5. Acetyl eugenol, a component of oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum L.) inhibits aggregation and alters arachidonic acid metabolism in human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, K C; Malhotra, N

    1991-01-01

    In continuation of our studies with the oil of cloves--a common kitchen spice and a crude drug for home medicine--we have isolated yet another active component identified as acetyl eugenol (AE); the earlier reported active component being eugenol. The isolated material (IM) was found to be a potent platelet inhibitor; IM abolished arachidonate (AA)-induced aggregation at ca. 12 microM, a concentration needed to abolish the second phase of adrenaline-induced aggregation. Chemically synthesized acetyl eugenol showed similar effects on AA- and adrenaline-induced aggregation. A dose-dependent inhibition of collagen-induced aggregation was also observed. AE did not inhibit either calcium ionophore A23187- or thrombin-induced aggregation. Studies on aggregation and ATP release were done using whole blood (WB). AA-induced aggregation in WB was abolished at 3 micrograms/ml (14.6 microM) which persisted even after doubling the concentration of AA. ATP release was inhibited. Inhibition of aggregation appeared to be mediated by a combination of two effects: reduced formation of thromboxane and increased generation of 12-lipoxygenase product (12-HPETE). These effects were observed by exposing washed platelets to (14C)AA or by stimulating AA-labelled platelets with ionophore A23187. Acetyl eugenol inhibited (14C)TxB2 formation in AA-labelled platelets on stimulation with thrombin. AE showed no effect on the incorporation of AA into platelet phospholipids. PMID:2011614

  6. Effects of three novel metalloproteinases from the venom of the West African saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus on blood coagulation and platelets.

    PubMed

    Howes, J-M; Kamiguti, A S; Theakston, R D G; Wilkinson, M C; Laing, G D

    2005-06-20

    Two metalloproteinases, a 24-kDa P-I EoVMP1 and a 56-kDa P-III EoVMP2, have recently been isolated from the venom of the West African saw-scaled viper Echis ocellatus. We now reveal a new 65-kDa haemorrhagic group P-III metalloproteinase which we have designated EoVMP3. The aim of this study was to determine whether these three snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) affect platelets and blood coagulation. EoVMP1 had no effect on the aggregation of washed human platelets, whereas EoVMP2 inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In contrast, EoVMP3 did not inhibit the aggregation of platelets by collagen but instead activated platelets in the absence of any additional co-factors. All three SVMPs were capable of activating prothrombin to varying degrees and can therefore be described as procoagulants. EoVMP1, EoVMP2 and EoVMP3 share sequence identity with other members of the reprolysin family, but differ greatly in their effects on some of the components that control haemostasis. PMID:15863354

  7. [Examination of interleukin levels and growth factor from blood platelets in leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kiersnowska-Rogowska, B; Rogowski, F; Petelski, T; Citko, A; Jaroszewicz, E; Bielawiec, M

    1996-05-01

    Plasma concentrations of interleukines 1, 3, 6, 8 and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) were estimated in 45 patients with leukaemias. Among patients were 12 with acute myeloblastic leukaemia-AML (type M1 according to FAB classification), 9 with chronic granulocytic leukaemia-CGL, 10 with blastic crisis of CGL (CGL-BC) and 14 with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia-CLL (in 1 and 2 stage according to Rai classification). Additionally the concentration of IL-3 was measured in 10 patients with exacerbation of CLL. Control group consisted of 12 health volunteers. The concentrations of interleukines and PDGF were determined by means of radioimmunoassay or immunoradiometric assay. In the patients with AML, CGL-BC and CLL significant increase of concentrations of IL-1B, IL-6 were found. The patients suffers from CGL and CGL-BC had increase concentrations of IL-3, but patients with CLL-interleukin 8. The concentrations of PDGF were significantly decreased in the patients with AML, CGL-BC, and CGL. The differences of concentrations of studied interleukines can confirm their great significance in proliferation of leukaemic cells. The decrease of concentrations of PDGF in myelocytic leukaemias may reflect thrombopoietic disturbances in these illnesses.

  8. Influence of acceleration voltage on scanning electron microscopy of human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, E

    2010-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to view a variety of surface structures, molecules, or nanoparticles of different materials, ranging from metals, dental and medical instruments, and chemistry (e.g. polymer analysis) to biological material. Traditionally, the operating conditions of the SEM are very important in the material sciences, particularly the acceleration voltage. However, in biological sciences, it is not typically seen as an important parameter. Acceleration voltage allows electrons to penetrate the sample; thus, the higher the acceleration voltage the more penetration into the sample will occur. As a result, ultrastructural information from deeper layers will interfere with the actual surface morphology that is seen. Therefore, ultimately, if acceleration voltage is lower, a better quality of the surface molecules and structures will be produced. However, in biological sciences, this is an area that is not well-documented. Typically, acceleration voltages of between 5 and 20 kV are used. This manuscript investigates the influence of acceleration voltages ranging from 5 kV to as low as 300 V, by studying surface ultrastructure of a human platelet aggregate. It is concluded that, especially at higher magnifications, much more surface detail is visible in biological samples when using an acceleration voltage between 2 kV and 300 V.

  9. Nanosecond Pulse Electric Field Activated-Platelet Rich Plasma Enhances the Return of Blood Flow to Large and Ischemic Wounds in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Li, Francis

    2015-07-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a therapeutic strategy used for accelerating wound healing of a wide range of tissues through the release of platelet growth factors. Here, we describe a nonchemical, safe method for preparing platelet-rich plasma using nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) and investigated the effect of this platelet-rich plasma on reperfusion of blood in large skin flap or ischemic hind limb wounds in New Zealand White rabbits. Laser Doppler images of blood flow to the dorsal surface of skin flap wounds or to ischemic hind limb wounds were obtained from wounds treated with 0.9% saline or nanosecond-pulsed electric field prepared platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP). Reperfusion in the skin flap wounds was greater in the nsPRP-treated wounds than in the wounds treated with saline on postoperative days 3 (P < 0.001) and 21 (P < 0.03). Reperfusion in the ischemic hind-limb treated with nsPRP was greater than in the saline-treated limb on post-operative Day 3 (P < 0.001), post-operative week 1 (P < 0.025) and post-operative week 4 (P < 0.015). In the hind limb ischemic tissue, the number of endothelial cells, collagen, and cells containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was greater in the nsPRP-treated tissue. These results demonstrate that nsPRP improves blood flow in large surgical skin wounds and in ischemic wounds. PMID:26197934

  10. Nanosecond Pulse Electric Field Activated-Platelet Rich Plasma Enhances the Return of Blood Flow to Large and Ischemic Wounds in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Hargrave, Barbara; Li, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a therapeutic strategy used for accelerating wound healing of a wide range of tissues through the release of platelet growth factors. Here, we describe a nonchemical, safe method for preparing platelet-rich plasma using nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) and investigated the effect of this platelet-rich plasma on reperfusion of blood in large skin flap or ischemic hind limb wounds in New Zealand White rabbits. Laser Doppler images of blood flow to the dorsal surface of skin flap wounds or to ischemic hind limb wounds were obtained from wounds treated with 0.9% saline or nanosecond-pulsed electric field prepared platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP). Reperfusion in the skin flap wounds was greater in the nsPRP-treated wounds than in the wounds treated with saline on postoperative days 3 (P < 0.001) and 21 (P < 0.03). Reperfusion in the ischemic hind-limb treated with nsPRP was greater than in the saline-treated limb on post-operative Day 3 (P < 0.001), post-operative week 1 (P < 0.025) and post-operative week 4 (P < 0.015). In the hind limb ischemic tissue, the number of endothelial cells, collagen, and cells containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was greater in the nsPRP-treated tissue. These results demonstrate that nsPRP improves blood flow in large surgical skin wounds and in ischemic wounds. PMID:26197934

  11. Quantification of sphingosine 1-phosphate by validated LC-MS/MS method revealing strong correlation with apolipoprotein M in plasma but not in serum due to platelet activation during blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Andersson, Anders; Larsson, Benny; Guo, Li Jun; Norström, Eva; Happonen, Kaisa E; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a signalling sphingolipid affecting multiple cellular functions of vascular and immune systems. It circulates at submicromolar levels bound to HDL-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) or to albumin. S1P in blood is mainly produced by platelets and erythrocytes, making blood sampling for S1P quantification delicate. Standardisation of sampling is thereby of great importance to obtain robust data. By optimising and characterising the extraction procedure and the LC-MS/MS analysis, we have developed and validated a highly specific and sensitive method for S1P quantification. Blood was collected from healthy individuals (n = 15) to evaluate the effects of differential blood sampling on S1P levels. To evaluate correlation between S1P and apoM in different types of plasma and serum, apoM was measured by ELISA. The method showed good accuracy and precision in the range of 0.011 to 0.9 μM with less than 0.07 % carryover. We found that the methanol precipitation used to extract S1P co-extracted apoM and several other HDL-proteins from plasma. The platelet-associated S1P was released during coagulation, thus increasing the S1P concentration to double in serum as compared to that in plasma. Gel filtration chromatography revealed that the platelet-released S1P was mainly bound to albumin. This explains why the strong correlation between S1P and apoM levels in plasma is lost upon the clotting process and hence not observed in serum. We have developed, characterised and validated an efficient, highly sensitive and specific method for the quantification of S1P in biological material.

  12. Effect of platelet-activating factor on porcine pulmonary blood vessels in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pritze, S; Simmet, T; Peskar, B A

    1991-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) induced contractions of porcine pulmonary vein strips in a concentration-dependent manner, while porcine pulmonary artery strips were unresponsive. Exposure to the specific PAF-antagonists WEB 2086 or BN 52021 antagonized the contractile responses of pulmonary vein strips. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (LT) and thromboxane (TX) B2 were not detected in the bath fluid after stimulation with PAF suggesting that these eicosanoids as well as their precursors are not mediators of PAF-induced contractions of porcine pulmonary vein strips. Furthermor