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Sample records for blood platelet function

  1. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable.

  2. Role of reactive nitrogen species in blood platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2007-12-01

    Blood platelets, in analogy to other circulating blood cells, can generate reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that may behave as second messengers and may regulate platelet functions. Accumulating evidence suggest a role of ROS/RNS in platelet activation. On the other hand, an increased production of ROS/RNS causes oxidative stress, and thus, may contribute to the development of different diseases, including vascular complications, inflammatory and psychiatric illnesses. Oxidative stress in platelets leads to chemical changes in a wide range of their components, and platelet proteins may be initial targets of ROS/RNS action. It has been demonstrated that reaction of proteins with ROS/RNS results in the oxidation and nitration of some amino acid residues, formation of aggregates or fragmentation of proteins. In oxidized proteins new carbonyl groups and protein hydroperoxides are also formed. In platelets, low molecular weight thiols such as glutathione (GSH), cysteine and cysteinylglycine and protein thiols may be also target for ROS/RNS action. This review describes the chemical structure and biological activities of reactive nitrogen species, mainly nitric oxide ((*)NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and their effects on blood platelet functions, and the mechanisms involved in their action on platelets.

  3. Resveratrol, a phenolic antioxidant with effects on blood platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2005-08-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the currently available evidence of antiplatelet properties of resveratrol (3,4('),5-trihydroxystilbene). Resveratrol, a phenolic compound found naturally in fruits, nuts, flowers, seeds and bark of different plants is integral part of human diet. It exhibits a wide range of biological effects, including antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimutagenic and antifungal properties. It is also a potent antioxidant, reactive oxygen species scavenger and metal chelators. Resveratrol reduces lipid peroxidation, oxidation and nitration of platelet and plasma proteins. This review article describes the chemical structure of resveratrol, its biological activity, the effects on blood platelet functions and the mechanisms involved in its action on blood platelets, the cells which play an important role not only in the haemostatic process, but also in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Is platelet function as measured by Thrombelastograph monitoring in whole blood affected by platelet inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lori A; Sistino, Joseph J; Uber, Walter E

    2005-03-01

    Platelet inhibitors, especially the glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists, have demonstrated their effectiveness in reducing the acute ischemic complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and in improving clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary crisis. Three common platelet inhibitors observed in emergent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for failed PCI are abciximab, eptifibatide, and tirofiban. An in vitro model was constructed in two parts to determine whether platelet aggregation inhibition induced by platelet inhibitors would be demonstrated by the Thrombelastograph (TEG) monitor when compared with baseline samples with no platelet inhibitor. In part A, 20 mL of fresh whole blood was divided into four groups: group I = baseline, group A = abcix-imab microg/mL, group E = eptifibatide ng/mL, and group T = tirofiban ng/mL. Platelet inhibitor concentrations in whole blood were derived starting with reported serum concentrations with escalation to achieve 80% platelet inhibition using the Medtronic hemoSTATUS and/or Lumi-aggregometer. A concentration range determined by our in vitro tests were chosen for each drug using concentrations achieving less than, equal to, or greater than 80% platelet inhibition. In part B, TEG analysis was then performed using baseline and concentrations for each drug derived in part A. Parameters measured were clot formation reaction time (R), coagulation time (K), maximum amplitude (MA) and alpha angle (A). Groups E1000 and E2000 extended R over control by 37% and 23%, respectively (p = 0.01 and 0.03). Groups E1000 and E2000 increased K times by 45% and 58% (p = .02 and .04). T160 samples prolonged K by 20% (p = 0.01). The angle or clot strength (A) was decreased in groups T160 and E1000 by 23% (+ 7.06 SD) and 18% (+ 11.23 SD), respectively (p = 0.001 and 0.01). The MA decrease was statistically significant in the T160, E1000 and E2000 by 9%, 6% and 13% respectively (p = 0.01). Samples treated with abciximab

  5. Effect of serotonin on platelet function in cocaine exposed blood

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Hadden, Coedy; Li, Yicong; Lowery, Curtis Lee; Singh, Preeti; Ucer, Serra S.; Mercado, Charles P.; Gu, Howard H.; Kilic, Fusun

    2014-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors counteract the pro-thrombotic effect of elevated plasma 5-HT by down-regulating the 5-HT uptake rates of platelets. Cocaine also down-regulates the platelet 5-HT uptake rates but in contrast, the platelets of cocaine-injected mice show a much higher aggregation rate than the platelets of control mice. To examine the involvement of plasma 5-HT in cocaine-mediated platelet aggregation, we studied the function of platelets isolated from wild-type and transgenic, peripheral 5-HT knock-out (TPH1-KO) mice, and cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter knock in (DAT-KI) mice. In cocaine-injected mice compared to the control mice, the plasma 5-HT level as well as the surface level of P-selectin was elevated; in vitro platelet aggregation in the presence of type I fibrillar collagen was enhanced. However, cocaine injection lowered the 5-HT uptake rates of platelets and increased the plasma 5-HT levels of the DAT-KI mice but did not change their platelets aggregation rates further which are already hyper-reactive. Furthermore, the in vitro studies supporting these in vivo findings suggest that cocaine mimics the effect of elevated plasma 5-HT level on platelets and in 5-HT receptor- and transporter-dependent pathways in a two-step process propagates platelet aggregation by an additive effect of 5-HT and nonserotonergic catecholamine. PMID:25091505

  6. Development of a high-throughput ELISA assay for platelet function testing using platelet-rich plasma or whole blood.

    PubMed

    Salles, Isabelle; Broos, Katleen; Fontayne, Alexandre; Szántó, Tímea; Ruan, Changgeng; Nurden, Alan T; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Deckmyn, Hans

    2010-08-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the development of cardiovascular diseases and are the target of several agents that can inhibit their function. Despite the existence of a wide array of techniques to study platelet function, an assay to evaluate several platelet signalling pathways in a high-throughput fashion, combined with minimal blood volume and handling is still needed. We have developed a sensitive assay in the form of a sandwich ELISA where monoclonal antibodies against P-selectin or alphaIIbbeta3 and GPIbalpha were used to capture and detect platelets, respectively, in the presence of five different agonists [ADP, TRAP (thrombin receptor agonist), U46619 (thromboxane A2 analogue), collagen-related-peptide, and arachidonic acid]. Binding of platelets to the antibodies increased dose-dependently with the concentration of either agonist, while binding of ADP-activated platelets was abrogated when inhibitors of platelet activation were concomitantly added. The test showed good sample reproducibility in 15 healthy donors with conserved platelet response to agonists throughout the assay. Healthy subjects could be identified as normal-, hypo- or hyper-responders for each agonist, which for most cases (73%) was confirmed upon retesting. Finally, we demonstrated that the platelet ELISA assay can not only be used in platelet-rich plasma but also in whole blood; it now awaits large scale studies to assess its full screening and diagnostic values.

  7. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    PubMed

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  8. Novel function for blood platelets and podoplanin in developmental separation of blood and lymphatic circulation.

    PubMed

    Uhrin, Pavel; Zaujec, Jan; Breuss, Johannes M; Olcaydu, Damla; Chrenek, Peter; Stockinger, Hannes; Fuertbauer, Elke; Moser, Markus; Haiko, Paula; Fässler, Reinhard; Alitalo, Kari; Binder, Bernd R; Kerjaschki, Dontscho

    2010-05-13

    During embryonic development, lymph sacs form from the cardinal vein, and sprout centrifugally to form mature lymphatic networks. Separation of the lymphatic from the blood circulation by a hitherto unknown mechanism is essential for the homeostatic function of the lymphatic system. O-glycans on the lymphatic endothelium have recently been suggested to be required for establishment and maintenance of distinct blood and lymphatic systems, primarily by mediating proper function of podoplanin. Here, we show that this separation process critically involves platelet activation by podoplanin. We found that platelet aggregates build up in wild-type embryos at the separation zone of podoplanin(+) lymph sacs and cardinal veins, but not in podoplanin(-/-) embryos. Thus, podoplanin(-/-) mice develop a "nonseparation" phenotype, characterized by a blood-filled lymphatic network after approximately embryonic day 13.5, which, however, partially resolves in postnatal mice. The same embryonic phenotype is also induced by treatment of pregnant mice with acetyl salicylic acid, podoplanin-blocking antibodies, or by inactivation of the kindlin-3 gene required for platelet aggregation. Therefore, interaction of endothelial podoplanin of the developing lymph sac with circulating platelets from the cardinal vein is critical for separating the lymphatic from the blood vascular system.

  9. Fusaric acid, a mycotoxin, and its influence on blood coagulation and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Girish, Kesturu S; Santhosh, Martin S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Nayaka, Siddaiah C; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2013-06-01

    The current study intended to explore the effect of fusaric acid on blood coagulation including plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation. Fusaric acid exhibited biphasic effects on citrated human plasma recalcification time. At concentrations below 50 ng, fusaric acid decreased the clotting time of plasma dose-dependently from 130 ± 3s control value to 32 ± 3s; however, above 50 ng, fusaric acid increased the clotting time from 32 ± 3s and reached a maximum of 152 s at 100 ng and remained unaltered thereafter for the increased dose of fusaric acid. Fusaric acid without damaging red blood cells and platelets, inhibited agonists such as collagen, ADP, thrombin, and epinephrine-induced aggregation of both platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelets preparations of human. Interestingly, fusaric acid showed biphasic effects only in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelets, and at lower concentration (below 900 ng) it activated platelet aggregation; however, in increased concentration (above 900 ng) it inhibited the platelet aggregation of washed platelets. In addition, fusaric acid also inhibited the agonist ADP-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelet suspension but did not show biphasic effect. Further, fusaric acid did not induce the platelets to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that clearly suggests that the induction of platelet function could be the result of the fusaric acid-mediated receptor interaction but not through the morphological shape change.

  10. Functional assay of antiplatelet drugs based on margination of platelets in flowing blood

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Colin D.; Fogelson, Aaron L.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A novel functional assay of antiplatelet drug efficacy was designed by utilizing the phenomena of platelet margination in flowing blood and transient platelet contacts with surface-immobilized platelet agonists. Flow margination enhances transient contacts of platelets with the walls of flow chambers covered with surface-immobilized proteins. Depending on the type and the surface density of the immobilized agonists, such transient interactions could “prime” the marginated platelet subpopulation for enhanced activation and adhesion downstream. By creating an upstream surface patch with an immobilized platelet agonist, platelet flow margination was used to test how effective antiplatelet drugs are in suppressing downstream platelet activation and adhesion. The platelet adhesion downstream was measured by a so-called “capture” patch region close to the distal end of the flow chamber. Platelet adhesion downstream was found to be dose-dependent on the upstream surface coverage of the “priming” patch, with immobilized fibrinogen acting as a platelet agonist. Several antiplatelet agents (acetylsalicylic acid, eptifibatide, and tirofiban) were evaluated for their efficacy in attenuating downstream adhesion after upstream platelet priming. The activation of the platelet population was found to be dependent on both the extent of the upstream agonist stimulus and the antiplatelet drug concentration. Such a relationship provides an opportunity to measure the efficacy of specific antiplatelet agents against the type and concentration of upstream platelet agonists. PMID:27030476

  11. Low-power laser irradiation of blood inhibits platelet function: role of cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Alexander G.; Brill, Gregory E.; Shenkman, Boris; Tamarin, Ilya; Dardik, Rima; Varon, David; Savion, Naphtali

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate effect of low power laser irradiation (LPLI) on platelet function in vitro. He-Ne laser (Optronix, USA; (lambda) - 632.8 nm, output power - 7 mW) was employed. Platelet adhesion and aggregation in whole blood (WB) under defined shear conditions were assayed by a Cone and Plate(let) Analyzer. Platelet activation was evaluated by flow cytometry. Level of platelet cGMP was estimated by immunoenzyme assay. Experiments performed showed that LPLI of WB resulted in decrease of platelet deposition on extracellular matrix at high shear rate (1300 s-1). Similar results were obtained using surfaces precoated with either collagen type I or von Willebrand factor. LPLI inhibited fibrinogen binding as well as P-selectin expression on the platelet membrane, induced by thrombin analogue. It was found out that primary acceptor of laser energy responsible for the effect on platelets was located in platelets themselves and not in blood plasma or in other blood cells. LPLI of gel- filtered platelets resulted in increase of intracellular level of cGMP both in the absence and in presence of izobutylmethylxantine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suggesting stimulation of synthesis rather than destruction of cGMP under the influence of LPLI. It is suggested that guanylate cyclase and/or NO-synthase might serve as primary acceptors of He-Ne laser light in platelets.

  12. Evaluation of blood platelet count and function in patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, M; Akdemir, F; Okulu, E; Ener, K; Ozayar, A; Gudeloglu, A

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated and compared blood total platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) values of patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and control subjects. A total 57 male patients (mean age 49.7 ± 12 years) with ED and 59 control men (mean age 49.7 ± 10.7 years) were included in the study. All patients were evaluated using medical history with International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, physical examination and routine blood analysis. Total blood count, including white blood cell (WBC), total platelet counts, MPV and PDW parameters, were recorded in both groups. MPV values were detected to be significantly higher in patients with ED than control group: 10.7 ± 1 and 9.72 ± 1.5, respectively (P = 0.001). Similarly, PDW values were significantly higher in patients with ED than control group: 14.6 ± 2.8 and 12.9 ± 1.9, respectively (P = 0.001). However, mean platelet and mean WBC counts were similar in both groups (P = 0.45). We demonstrated that MPV and PDW values significantly increased in patients with ED compared with the control group. According to these findings, platelet function might play an important role in patients with ED that warrants further research.

  13. Effect of blood nitrite and nitrate levels on murine platelet function.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Piknova, Barbora; Huang, Paul L; Noguchi, Constance T; Schechter, Alan N

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) appears to play an important role in the regulation of thrombosis and hemostasis by inhibiting platelet function. The discovery of NO generation by reduction of nitrite (NO₂⁻) and nitrate (NO₃⁻) in mammals has led to increased attention to these anions with respect to potential beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that nitrite anions at 0.1 µM inhibit aggregation and activation of human platelet preparations in vitro in the presence of red blood cells and this effect was enhanced by deoxygenation, an effect likely due to NO generation. In the present study, we hypothesized that nitrite and nitrate derived from the diet could also alter platelet function upon their conversion to NO in vivo. To manipulate the levels of nitrite and nitrate in mouse blood, we used antibiotics, NOS inhibitors, low nitrite/nitrate (NOx) diets, endothelial NOS knock-out mice and also supplementation with high levels of nitrite or nitrate in the drinking water. We found that all of these perturbations affected nitrite and nitrate levels but that the lowest whole blood values were obtained by dietary restriction. Platelet aggregation and ATP release were measured in whole blood and the results show an inverse correlation between nitrite/nitrate levels and platelet activity in aggregation and ATP release. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nitrite-supplemented group has a prolonged bleeding time compared with control or low NOx diet group. These results show that diet restriction contributes greatly to blood nitrite and nitrate levels and that platelet reactivity can be significantly affected by these manipulations. Our study suggests that endogenous levels of nitrite and nitrate may be used as a biomarker for predicting platelet function and that dietary manipulation may affect thrombotic processes.

  14. Diminished adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils with CD47 functionalized blood contacting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Finley, Matthew J; Rauova, Lubica; Alferiev, Ivan S; Weisel, John W; Levy, Robert J; Stachelek, Stanley J

    2012-08-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that, through signaling mechanisms mediated by signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα1), functions as a biological marker of 'self-recognition'. We showed previously that inflammatory cell attachment to polymeric surfaces is inhibited by the attachment of biotinylated recombinant CD47 (CD47B). We test herein the hypothesis that CD47 modified blood conduits can reduce platelet and neutrophil activation under clinically relevant conditions. We appended a poly-lysine tag to the C-terminus of recombinant CD47 (CD47L) allowing for covalent linkage to the polymer. SIRPα1 expression was confirmed in isolated platelets. We then compared biocompatibility between CD47B and CD47L functionalized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces and unmodified control PVC surfaces. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of blood cell attachment to CD47B and CD47L surfaces, via scanning electron microscopy, showed strikingly fewer platelets attached to CD47 modified surfaces compared to control. Flow cytometry analysis showed that activation markers for neutrophils (CD62L) and platelets (CD62P) exposed to CD47 modified PVC were equivalent to freshly acquired control blood, while significantly elevated in the unmodified PVC tubing. In addition, ethylene oxide gas sterilization did not inhibit the efficacy of the CD47 modification. In conclusion, CD47 modified PVC inhibits both the adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils.

  15. Evaluation of store lesion in platelet obtained by apheresis compared to platelet derived from whole blood and its impact on the in vitro functionality.

    PubMed

    Quintero, M; Núñez, M; Mellado, S; Maldonado, M; Wehinger, S

    2015-12-01

    Platelet units for transfusion purposes are obtained manually from whole blood or by apheresis, in an automated process. In both methods, platelets during storage present a characteristics grouped under the name "storage lesion" that are associated with adverse effects on platelet units. Oxidative stress has been claimed to be one of major causes, leading to activation and apoptosis processes affecting their post transfusion functionality. In this work, we observed an association between apheresis and a reduced presence of oxidative stress and better results in functional markers in stored platelets, compared to manually obtained platelets. Then, apheresis which would ensure a greater number of functional platelets during the 5 days of storage, compared to concentrates obtained from whole blood.

  16. Functional Comparison of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell- and Blood-Derived GPIIbIIIa Deficient Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jessica; Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Gärtner, Florian; Jung, Christian Billy; Zieger, Barbara; Parrotta, Elvira; Kurnik, Karin; Sinnecker, Daniel; Wanner, Gerhard; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Massberg, Steffen; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a versatile tool to model genetic diseases and are a potential source for cell transfusion therapies. However, it remains elusive to which extent patient-specific hiPSC-derived cells functionally resemble their native counterparts. Here, we generated a hiPSC model of the primary platelet disease Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), characterized by dysfunction of the integrin receptor GPIIbIIIa, and compared side-by-side healthy and diseased hiPSC-derived platelets with peripheral blood platelets. Both GT-hiPSC-derived platelets and their peripheral blood equivalents showed absence of membrane expression of GPIIbIIIa, a reduction of PAC-1 binding, surface spreading and adherence to fibrinogen. We demonstrated that GT-hiPSC-derived platelets recapitulate molecular and functional aspects of the disease and show comparable behavior to their native counterparts encouraging the further use of hiPSC-based disease models as well as the transition towards a clinical application. PMID:25607928

  17. Platelet Function Tests.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally developed for diagnosis of bleeding disorders, platelet function assays have become increasingly used in basic research on platelet physiology, in phenotype-genotype associations in bleeding disorders, in drug development as surrogate endpoints of efficacy of new antiplatelet therapy, and to an extent, in the monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in clinical practice to predict thrombotic and bleeding risk. A multiplicity of platelet function assays is available to measure the level of platelet activity in various settings. These include assays that are restricted to a specialized laboratory as well as point-of-care instruments meant to investigate platelet function at patient bedside. Unlike tests that determine a defined quantity or measurement of a clinical biomarker (e.g., cholesterol or blood pressure), platelet function testing assesses the dynamics of living cells, which immediately presents a series of unique problems to any laboratory or clinic. This article presents currently used platelet function assays and discusses important variables to take into account when performing these assays, including preanalytical issues and difficulties in interpreting platelet function test results.

  18. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  19. Alterations of adenine nucleotide metabolism and function of blood platelets in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Michno, Anna; Bielarczyk, Hanna; Pawełczyk, Tadeusz; Jankowska-Kulawy, Agnieszka; Klimaszewska, Joanna; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2007-02-01

    Increased activity of blood platelets contributes to vascular complications in patients with diabetes. The aim of this work was to investigate whether persisting hyperglycemia in diabetic patients generates excessive accumulation of ATP/ADP, which may underlie platelet hyperactivity. Platelet ATP and ADP levels, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species synthesis, and aggregation of platelets from patients with diabetes were 18-82% higher than in platelets from healthy participants. In patients with diabetes, platelet stimulation with thrombin caused about two times greater release of ATP and ADP than in the healthy group while decreasing intraplatelet nucleotide content to similar levels in both groups. This indicates that the increased content of adenylate nucleotides in the releasable pool in the platelets of diabetic patients does not affect their level in metabolic cytoplasmic/mitochondrial compartments. Significant correlations between platelet ATP levels and plasma fructosamine, as well as between platelet ATP/ADP and platelet activities, have been found in diabetic patients. In conclusion, chronic hyperglycemia-evoked elevations of ATP/ADP levels and release from blood platelets of patients with diabetes may be important factors underlying platelet hyperactivity in the course of the disease.

  20. Adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine modified with boron cluster pharmacophores as new classes of human blood platelet function modulators.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Wojtczak, Błazej A; Sułowska, Zofia; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2010-05-03

    Novel types of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine derivatives containing boron clusters at positions C2', N6, or C8 were synthesized. The effect of these modified compounds on platelet function was studied. Modification of adenosine at the C2' position with a para-carborane cluster (C(2)B(10)H(11)) results in efficient inhibition of platelet function, including aggregation, protein secretion, and P-selectin expression induced by thrombin or ADP. These preliminary findings and the new chemistry proposed form the basis for the development of a new class of adenosine analogues that modulate human blood platelet activities.

  1. [Morphology, ultrastructure and function of glycosylation-modified chilled blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Han, Ying; Quan, Guo-Bo; Liu, Min-Xia; Liu, An

    2008-04-01

    The glycosylation of platelets may prolong their life-span when being transfused after preservation under 4 degrees C, therefore this study was aimed to investigate the effect of glycosylation on morphology, ultrastructure, function and membrane glycoprotein of platelets. The experiments were divided into 3 groups: group preserved in room temperature (RT group), group preserved in 4 degrees C (4T group) and group UDP-Gal glycosylated and preserved in 4 degrees C (U+4T group). The binding rate of RCA I lectin and expression of platelet surface markers CD62P, CD42b were determined by flow cytometry. Morphology and ultrastructure of platelets were observed by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Platelets aggregation was detected by aggregometer. The results showed that the binding rate of RCAI in U+4T group significantly higher than that in RT group (p<0.01), no obvious changes was found in ultrastructure of glycosylated platelets, as compared with fresh platelets. Some morphologic changes, such as pseudopodium could be observed in 4T group. The aggregation rate of platelets in U+4T group reached to 50% of RT group. The expression levels of CD42b and CD62P, and the binding rate of annexin V in U+4T group were not significantly different from that in RT group. It is concluded that UDP-Gal can effectively cause galactosylation of platelets, and the platelets modified with UDP-Gal remain normal morphology, ultrastructure and function.

  2. Measurement of platelet aggregation functions using whole blood migration ratio in a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong Seog; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Han, Miran; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Cho, Chi Hyun; An, Seong Soo A; Lim, Chae Seung; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a major role in maintaining endothelial integrity and hemostasis. Of the various soluble agonists, ADP is an important in vivo stimulus for inducing platelet aggregation. In this study, a simple, rapid, and affordable method was designed for testing bleeding time (BT) and platelet aggregation with a two-channel microfluidic chip. Whole blood migration ratio (MR) from a microchip system was evaluated in comparison to the closure time (CT) from PFA-100 assays (Siemens, Germany) and CD62P expression on platelets. To induce platelet aggregation, a combination of collagen (1.84 mg/ml) and ADP (37.5 mg/ml) were used as agonists. After adding the agonists to samples, whole blood MR from the microchip system was measured. The outcome of the assessment depended on reaction time and agonist concentration. MR of whole blood from the microchip system was significantly correlated with CT from PFA-100 (r = 0.61, p <  0.05, n = 60). In addition, MR was negatively correlated with CD62P expression (r =-0.95, p <  0.05, n = 60). These results suggest that the measurement of MR using agonists is an easy, simple and efficient method for monitoring platelet aggregation in normal and ADP-receptors defective samples, along with the BT test. Thus, usage of the current microfluidic method could expand to diverse applications, including efficacy assessments in platelet therapy.

  3. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  4. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  5. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic. PMID:26733371

  6. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhishek; Graveline, Amanda; Waterhouse, Anna; Vernet, Andyna; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-01-06

    Accurate assessment of blood haemostasis is essential for the management of patients who use extracorporeal devices, receive anticoagulation therapy or experience coagulopathies. However, current monitoring devices do not measure effects of haemodynamic forces that contribute significantly to platelet function and thrombus formation. Here we describe a microfluidic device that mimics a network of stenosed arteriolar vessels, permitting evaluation of blood clotting within small sample volumes under pathophysiological flow. By applying a clotting time analysis based on a phenomenological mathematical model of thrombus formation, coagulation and platelet function can be accurately measured in vitro in patient blood samples. When the device is integrated into an extracorporeal circuit in pig endotoxemia or heparin therapy models, it produces real-time readouts of alterations in coagulation ex vivo that are more reliable than standard clotting assays. Thus, this disposable device may be useful for personalized diagnostics and for real-time surveillance of antithrombotic therapy in clinic.

  7. Pneumatic tube system transport does not alter platelet function in optical and whole blood aggregometry, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and fibrinogen in patients on anti-platelet drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Enko, Dietmar; Mangge, Harald; Münch, Andreas; Niedrist, Tobias; Mahla, Elisabeth; Metzler, Helfried; Prüller, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess pneumatic tube system (PTS) alteration on platelet function by the light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and whole blood aggregometry (WBA) method, and on the results of platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen. Materials and methods Venous blood was collected into six 4.5 mL VACUETTE® 9NC coagulation sodium citrate 3.8% tubes (Greiner Bio-One International GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) from 49 intensive care unit (ICU) patients on dual anti-platelet therapy and immediately hand carried to the central laboratory. Blood samples were divided into 2 Groups: Group 1 samples (N = 49) underwent PTS (4 m/s) transport from the central laboratory to the distant laboratory and back to the central laboratory, whereas Group 2 samples (N = 49) were excluded from PTS forces. In both groups, LTA and WBA stimulated with collagen, adenosine-5’-diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin-receptor-activated-peptide 6 (TRAP-6) as well as platelet count, PT, APTT, and fibrinogen were performed. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between blood samples with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) PTS transport (P values from 0.064 – 0.968). The AA-induced LTA (bias: 68.57%) exceeded the bias acceptance limit of ≤ 25%. Conclusions Blood sample transportation with computer controlled PTS in our hospital had no statistically significant effects on platelet aggregation determined in patients with anti-platelet therapy. Although AA induced LTA showed a significant bias, the diagnostic accuracy was not influenced. PMID:28392742

  8. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  9. Platelet function tests: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Liotta, Agatina Alessandrello; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation - adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation - have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered.

  10. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  11. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  12. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches.

  13. The role of peroxides as modulators of human blood platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, R.L.; Hess, M.L. )

    1990-02-26

    The ability to peroxidize lipid in the vicinity of arterial walls has been demonstrated through oxidation of the LDL-particle by monocytes/macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. The authors questioned what effect increased levels of peroxides might have on platelet function. Platelet aggregation, studied trubidometrically, was initiated by arachidonic acid (AA) alone or in the presence of a low concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (which by itself could not initiate aggregation). Aggregation was analyzed quantitatively by measuring the time it took to reach 1/2 the maximal extent of aggregation (T1/2Max). Using the minimal concentration of AA still able to initiate aggregation (0.2-0.45 mM) the T1/2Max was 112{+-}35 (n=10). With 50% of the respective AA conc. plus 17 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the T1/2Max was 52{+-}21. Under similar circumstances, the amount of AA able to initiate aggregation could be reduced by 80% with the addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. These effects could be duplicated by glucose oxidase, 0.015-0.15 IU, and could be eliminated by the addition of catalase (<25 U/ml) at any time prior to the start of aggregation. With non-aggregating concentrations of AA alone, synthesis of Thromboxane B{sub 2} was negligible; with aggregation by the same AA plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} it was 550{+-}79 pg/10{sup 3} platelets. Both aggregation and TxB{sub 2} synthesis were completely inhibited by aspirin or indomethacin, and by the antioxidants phenol and nor-dihydroguaretic acid, at concentrations known to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In platelets with a defect in the second wave of ADP induced aggregation, but having normal aggregation with added AA (indicating the cyclooxygenase-thromboxane axis was intact), sub-aggregating concentrations of AA, plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in brisk aggregation.

  14. Platelet function and constituents of platelet rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, M H; Malhotra, A; Brighton, T; Walsh, W R; Lindeman, R

    2013-01-01

    Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapies require blood to be processed prior to application, however, the full assessment of the output of platelet sequestration devices is lacking. In this study the products of the Autologous Fluid Concentrator (Circle BiologicsTM, Minneapolis, MN) and the Gravitational Platelet Separation System (GPS, Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) were evaluated in terms of platelet viability and PRP constituents. The AFC and GPS produced 6.4 (±1.0) ml and 6.3 (±0.4) ml of PRP, with platelet recovery of 46.4% (±14.7%) and 59.8% (±24.2%) producing fold increases of platelets of 4.19 (±1.62) and 5.19 (±1.62), respectively. Fibrinogen concentration was increased above baseline PPP produced with the AFC. pH was lower for both of the processed samples than for whole blood. White Blood Cell count was increased around 5 fold. Functional tests showed preserved viability with both devices. This represents essential knowledge that every treating physician should have before they can confidently administer PRP therapy produced by any method. These are the first published results of platelet function for the GPS system and the first performance results of the AFC system. The PRP produced is classified according to broad classifications as Leukocyte-PRP (L-PRP) for both devices.

  15. [Covalent chloramine inhibitors of blood platelet functions: computational indices for their reactivity and antiplatelet activity].

    PubMed

    Roshchupkin, D I; Murina, M A; Sergienko, V I

    2011-01-01

    The quantum mechanics computation of the reactivities of chloramine derivatives of amino acids and taurine has been accomplished. A pair of computational indices that reflect a predisposition of alpha amino acid chloramines to chemical decay have been revealed. One of the indices was the dihedral angle for the chain of four atoms: carbons at beta- and alpha-positions, carbon of the carboxyl group, and carbonyl oxygen. The second index was the sum of partial charges for three or two carbon atoms in the chain. The amino acid chloramines with high values of the indices showed enhanced stability. Partial charges for active chlorine in known chloramines having different structures have been computed. The charges correlate with the rate constants of the reaction between chloramines and the thiol group of reduced glutathione. New derivatives of taurine chloramines have been constructed via the introduction of different substituents into the chloramine part. Among them, the amidoderivatives had the greatest charges of active chlorine (0.19-0.23). It was found in the study of the reactions of N-acetyl-N-chlorotaurine and N-propyonyl-N-chlorotaurine with amino acids and peptides possessing the thiol, thioester, or disulphide groups that the amidoderivatives manifested the thiol chemoselectivity. N-Acetyl-N-chlorotaurine and N-propionyl-N-chlorotaurine suppress the aggregation activity of blood platelets under their activation by the agonists ADP and collagen. It is not excluded that the amidoderivatives studied prevent platelet aggregation by a modification of the critical thiol group in the purine receptor P2Y12.

  16. The role of blood platelets in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sabrkhany, Siamack; Griffioen, Arjan W; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A

    2011-04-01

    Coagulation abnormalities occur frequently in cancer patients. It is becoming evident that blood platelets have an important function in this process. However, understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still very modest. In this review, we discuss the role of platelets in tumor angiogenesis and growth and suggest their potential significance in malignancies. Platelets contain various pro-and antiangiogenic molecules, which seem to be endocytosed and sequestered in different populations of α-granules. Furthermore, tumor endothelial cells are phenotypically and functionally different from endothelial cells in healthy tissue, stimulating local platelet adhesion and subsequent activation. As a consequence, platelets are able to secrete their angiogenic and angiostatic content, most likely in a regulated manner. The overall effect of these platelet-endothelium interactions appears to be proangiogenic, stimulating tumor angiogenesis. We favor the view that local adhesion and activation of blood platelets and dysregulation of coagulation represent underestimated pathways in the progression of cancer.

  17. Mimicking adhesive functionalities of blood platelets using ligand-decorated liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Modery, Christa L; Wong, Timothy L; Dzuricky, Michael; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2012-06-20

    Platelet transfusion is used for treating a variety of bleeding complications. Natural platelet-based transfusion products have very short storage life (3-7 days) and high risks of biological contamination and side effects. Consequently, there is significant clinical interest in synthetic platelet-mimetic constructs that can promote hemostasis, while allowing convenient large-scale production, easy portability, long storage life, and minimal biological risks. To this end, research efforts are being directed toward particles that can amplify aggregation of activated platelets or can mimic platelet's ability to undergo adhesion to various vascular matrix proteins. Here, we report on a synthetic construct design that combines the mimicry of platelet's shear-dependent adhesion to vWF and shear-independent adhesion to collagen under flow, on a single particle. For this, we have used 150-nm-diameter liposomes as model particles and have decorated their surface simultaneously with vWF-binding and collagen-binding recombinant protein fragments or synthetic peptide motifs. We demonstrate in vitro that these surface-modified liposomes are able to adhere onto vWF surfaces in a shear-dependent fashion and onto collagen surfaces in a shear-independent fashion under flow. Moreover, when the vWF-binding and the collagen-binding were integrated on a single liposomal platform, the resultant heteromultivalent liposomes showed significantly enhanced adhesion to a vWF/collagen mixed surface compared to liposomes bearing vWF-binding or collagen-binding ligands only, as long as the ligand motifs did not spatially interfere with each other. Altogether, our results establish the feasibility of efficiently mimicking platelet's dual adhesion mechanisms on synthetic particles.

  18. Human blood platelets lack nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Anke; Gambaryan, Stepan; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Reports on expression and functionality of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in human blood platelets and erythrocytes are contradictory. We used a specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to detect NOS activity in human platelets. The method measures simultaneously [(15)N]nitrite and [(15)N]nitrate formed from oxidized (15)N-labeled nitric oxide ((15)NO) upon its NOS-catalyzed formation from the substrate l-[guanidino-(15)N2]-arginine. Using this GC-MS assay, we did not detect functional NOS in non-stimulated platelets and in intact platelets activated by various agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin, or von Willebrand factor) or lysed platelets. l-[guanidino-nitro]-Arginine-inhibitable NOS activity was measured after addition of recombinant human endothelial NOS to lysed platelets. Previous and recent studies from our group challenge expression and functionality of NOS in human platelets and erythrocytes.

  19. [The synthesis of proteins in unnucleated blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michał; Saluk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michał Błażej Ponczek; Nowak, Paweł; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2013-07-23

    Platelets are the smallest, unnucleated blood cells that play a key role in maintaining normal hemostasis. In the human body about 1x1011 platelets are formed every day, as a the result of complex processes of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of megakaryocytes. Studies done over 4 decades ago demonstrated that circulating in blood mature platelets can synthesize proteins. Recent discoveries confirm protein synthesis by unnucleated platelets in response to activation. Moreover, protein synthesis alters the phenotype and function of platelets. Platelets synthesize several proteins involved in hemostasis (COX, αIIbβ3, TF PAI-1, Factor XI, protein C inhibitor) and in inflammatory process (IL-1β, CCL5/RANTES). In spite of lack of transcription platelets have a stable mRNA transcripts with a long life correlated with platelet life span. Platelets also show expression of two important key regulators of translation eIF4E and EIF-2α and have a variety of miRNA molecules responsible for translational regulation. This article describes the historical overview of research on protein synthesis by platelets and presents the molecular mechanisms of protein synthesis in activated platelets (and synthesis of the most important platelet proteins).

  20. Platelet and red blood cell indices in Harris platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naina, Harris V K; Harris, Samar

    2010-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) or macro thrombocytopenias are relatively rare, but their prevalence is likely underestimated from complexities of diagnosis and a spectrum of subclinical phenotypes. Harris platelet syndrome (HPS) is the most common IGPD reported from the Indian subcontinent. Of note there are an increased number of hemoglobinopathies reported from the geographic location. We analysed red blood cell and platelet indices of blood donors with HPS from the north eastern part of India and compared them with blood indices of blood donors of south India. We found a statistically significant lower platelet count in blood donors with HPS (median, range) 132 (71-267) vs. 252 (160-478) as compared to donors from south India (P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in donors with HPS 13.1, (range 12-21.9 fl) as compared to donors from south India 7.35 (range 6-9.2 fl) (P < 0.001). This study showed that blood donors with HPS had a low median platelet bio-mass 0.17 (0.10-0.38%) vs. 0.19 (0.13-0.28%) in donors from south India. The platelet distribution width (PDW) was 17.4 (14.9-19.6) in donors with HPS vs. 16.38 (15.2-18.5) in south Indian blood donors (P < 0.001). Thirty-three donors with HPS had a normal platelet count with MPV more than 12 fL. Only donors with HPS had giant platelets and thrombocytopenia on peripheral blood smear examination. None of these donors had Dohle body inclusion in their leukocytes. Compared to donors from south India, donors with HPS had a significantly lower hemoglobin 13.8 (12-16.3 gm/dL) vs. 14.8 (12-18) respectively (P < 0.001) while red distribution width (RDW) was higher in HPS 13.6 (11.5-16.7) vs. 12.8 (11.4-15.1). However we did not find any statistically significant difference in MCV, MCH, MCHC between the two groups. Peripheral blood smear did not show any obvious abnormal red blood cell morphology. In the blood donors with HPS we found a statistically higher MPV

  1. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  2. The effects of cytochalasin D and abciximab on hemostasis in canine whole blood assessed by thromboelastography and the PFA-100® platelet function analyzer system.

    PubMed

    Brainard, Benjamin M; Abed, Janan M; Koenig, Amie

    2011-07-01

    The selective inhibition of platelet function in whole blood coagulation testing may allow insights into the nature of hypercoagulability in dogs with critical illness. To determine the effects of cytochalasin D and abciximab on hemostatic parameters in canine citrated whole blood, an in-vitro study was designed using thromboelastography (TEG) and a platelet function analyzer (PFA-100®). 8 clinically healthy mixed breed dogs donated blood that was anticoagulated with 3.2% sodium citrate in a 9:1 blood-to-citrate ratio. Addition of cytochalasin D to citrated whole blood from 6 dogs at concentrations ranging from 0 µg/ml to 10 µg/ml caused a maximal reduction of TEG maximum amplitude (MA) at a concentration of 7.5 µg/ml (52.7 ± 4.3 to 14.3 ± 7.8 mm). Addition of abciximab to canine citrated whole blood at concentrations of either 20 µg/ml or 40 µg/ml did not affect the TEG tracing; however, addition of abciximab to citrated canine whole blood at concentrations of 10 µg/ml and 20 µg/ml significantly prolonged PFA-100 closure times (72.5 ± 15 to 149.2 ± 91 sec and 275.6 ± 54 sec, respectively, P < 0.04). Inhibition of canine platelet function by cytochalasin D is demonstrated by TEG, but abciximab did not change TEG tracings. Abciximab does, however, inhibit platelet aggregation under shear stress as measured by the PFA-100. Inhibition of canine platelet function with cytochalasin D may allow further TEG studies in dogs with clinical disease.

  3. Single-step separation of platelets from whole blood coupled with digital quantification by interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC).

    PubMed

    Basabe-Desmonts, L; Ramstrom, S; Meade, G; O'Neill, S; Riaz, A; Lee, L P; Ricco, A J; Kenny, D

    2010-09-21

    We report the efficient single-step separation of individual platelets from unprocessed whole blood, enabling digital quantification of platelet function using interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC) on a chip. iPC is accomplished by the precision micropatterning of platelet-specific protein surfaces on solid substrates. By separating platelets from whole blood using specific binding to protein spots of a defined size, iPC implements a simple incubate-and-rinse approach, without sample preparation, that enables (1) the study of platelets in the physiological situation of interaction with a protein surface, (2) the choice of the number of platelets bound on each protein spot, from one to many, (3) control of the platelet-platelet distance, including the possibility to study noninteracting single platelets, (4) digital quantification (counting) of platelet adhesion to selected protein matrices, enabling statistical characterization of platelet subpopulations from meaningfully large numbers of single platelets, (5) the study of platelet receptor expression and spatial distribution, and (6) a detailed study of the morphology of isolated single platelets at activation levels that can be manipulated. To date, we have demonstrated 1-4 of the above list. Platelets were separated from whole blood using iPC with fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and anti-CD42b antibody printed "spots" ranging from a fraction of one to several platelet diameters (2-24 μm). The number of platelets captured per spot depends strongly on the protein matrix and the surface area of the spot, together with the platelet volume, morphology, and activation state. Blood samples from healthy donors, a May-Hegglin-anomaly patient, and a Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia patient were analyzed via iPC to confirm the specificity of the interaction between protein matrices and platelets. For example, the results indicate that platelets interact with fibrinogen spots only through the fibrinogen receptor (

  4. Microfluidics for simultaneous quantification of platelet adhesion and blood viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Park, Jun Hong; Kang, Yang Jun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Platelet functions, including adhesion, activation, and aggregation have an influence on thrombosis and the progression of atherosclerosis. In the present study, a new microfluidic-based method is proposed to estimate platelet adhesion and blood viscosity simultaneously. Blood sample flows into an H-shaped microfluidic device with a peristaltic pump. Since platelet aggregation may be initiated by the compression of rotors inside the peristaltic pump, platelet aggregates may adhere to the H-shaped channel. Through correlation mapping, which visualizes decorrelation of the streaming blood flow, the area of adhered platelets (APlatelet) can be estimated without labeling platelets. The platelet function is estimated by determining the representative index IA·T based on APlatelet and contact time. Blood viscosity is measured by monitoring the flow conditions in the one side channel of the H-shaped device. Based on the relation between interfacial width (W) and pressure ratio of sample flows to the reference, blood sample viscosity (μ) can be estimated by measuring W. Biophysical parameters (IA·T, μ) are compared for normal and diabetic rats using an ex vivo extracorporeal model. This microfluidic-based method can be used for evaluating variations in the platelet adhesion and blood viscosity of animal models with cardiovascular diseases under ex vivo conditions. PMID:27118101

  5. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  6. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  7. [The formation, metabolism and the evolution of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Saluk, Joanna; Bijak, Michał; Ponczek, Michał B; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2014-04-10

    Platelets are the smallest, depleted of nucleus blood cells which contain a typical cellular organelles including the mitochondria, so that have active metabolism. Platelets possess the highly organized cytoskeleton, specific secretory granules and unique membrane receptors system responsible for their high reactivity. The key role of blood platelets is to maintain normal hemostasis, but they also play important roles in inflammation, immune processes and the cancer progression. The anucleated, small platelets occur in representatives of all clusters of mammals, so it seems to be an adaptation feature. In other vertebrates similar hemostatic functions are played by large nucleated platelets, which are much more weakly reactive. Small, reactive platelets, appearing in the evolution of mammals, allowed the formation of clots faster and slower blood loss in case of injury, but also increased the risk of thromboembolic and cardiovascular diseases. Daily the human body forms about 1x10¹¹ platelets, which are produced by a process of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of the cytoplasm of mature megakaryocytes. The emergence of platelets is the final stage of megakaryocyte differentiation and is followed by formation of the direct precursors called proplatelets. The anucleated platelets are regarded as terminally differentiated cells, which are not capable of further cell division. However, despite the absence of a nucleus, in blood platelets the synthesis and transcription of mitochondrial DNA and protein synthesis occurring on the basis of mRNA from megakaryocytes has been confirmed. However, recent studies published in 2012 show that the platelets are capable not only of the process of protein synthesis, but also of generation of new cells, which are functionally and structurally similar to the parent platelets.

  8. The PFA-100R cannot detect blood group-dependent inhibition of platelet function by eptifibatide or abciximab at therapeutic plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Feuring, M; Ruf, A; Schultz, A; Wehling, M

    2010-01-01

    Previous investigations revealed that AB0 blood groups are associated with divergent concentrations of several coagulation factors. Concentrations of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and factor VIII are lower in individuals with blood group 0 compared to subjects with blood group A, B or AB, which might in turn result in a reduced inhibition of platelet aggregation in individuals with blood group 0. The aim of the present in vitro investigation was to elucidate the impact of AB0 blood group-dependent vWF concentrations on eptifibatide and abciximab mediated inhibition of GPIIb/IIIa function. Platelet function was measured with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100(R) at baseline and at increasing concentrations of eptifibatide and abciximab. It was stratified for blood group 0 vs A. If measured with the collagen/ADP cartridge, blood group 0 was associated with a prolonged mean baseline closure time in comparison with blood group A (94.3 +/- 14.6 s vs. 74.6 +/- 9.9 s, p = 0.007) which was paralleled by reduced concentrations of vWF and factor VIII. In contrast, no statistically significant differences in closure times (167.4 +/- 83.9 s vs. 140.1 +/- 99.0 s, p = 0.562) could be found in the presence of eptifibatide (0.1 microg/ml). Higher concentrations of abciximab (1 microg/ml) than those of eptifibatide were needed to increase the closure times in both cartridges of the PFA-100, but at this concentration of abciximab differences in closure times could not be detected most probably due to higher variability at these drug concentrations. The PFA-100(R) is not suitable for monitoring abciximab or eptifibatide within the therapeutic concentration range because the highest concentrations where the PFA-100(R) had measurable closure times of below 300 s is much too low to lead to the necessary platelet inhibition and, consequently, does not resemble the in vivo situation.

  9. Modulatory effect of coffee on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Shobha; Rauf, Arun A

    2010-01-01

    Blood platelets play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and thrombosis. Conflicting information exists regarding the effect of coffee consumption on the cardiovascular system. We have investigated whether the consumption of moderate amount of coffee affect platelet functions and primary hemostasis in vivo in normal and high fat diet fed rats. Coffee fed group showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in mean platelet volume, platelet crit and platelet distribution width as compared to high fat diet (HFD) group. The concentration of malondialdehyde in platelets increased in atherosclerotic group indicates the increased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) production from membrane arachidonic acid and it was decreased in coffee treated group. Platelet aggregation studies with ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and epinephrine showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in aggregation in coffee fed group. Scanning electron microscopic studies revealed that platelet aggregation tendency increased in HFD group and was reduced in coffee fed group. These results indicate that coffee is active in inhibiting platelet aggregation, a critical step involved in thrombosis.

  10. Apoptotic markers in human blood platelets treated with peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Barbara; Rywaniak, Joanna Zofia; Nowak, Paweł

    2008-12-01

    Platelets are anucleated cells that upon activation by agonists or during storage may develop apoptotic events. The role of peroxynitrite and its reactive intermediates in apoptotic process in blood platelets is unknown. In order to study the appearance of biomarkers of apoptosis in platelets after treatment with peroxynitrite and with thrombin different markers were chosen: annexin V binding (phosphatidylserine exposure), platelet microparticle formation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 activation and P-selectin expression. In gel-filtrated platelets treated with different concentrations of peroxynitrite (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 mM, 10 minute, 37 degrees C) a significant increase of phosphatidylserine exposure (about 36% at the highest concentration, p < 0.01) and the platelet microparticle formation were observed. Peroxynitrite caused a dose-dependent caspase-3 activation and depolarization of mitochondrial potential. The same apoptotic markers were appeared in thrombin-activated platelets. Dose-dependent tyrosine nitration in platelet proteins caused by peroxynitrite was reduced in the presence of (-)-epicatechin. Moreover, (-)-epicatechin distinctly reduced the level of apoptotic markers. The obtained results indicate that peroxynitrite responsible for oxidative/nitrative stress and changes in platelet function may promote in vitro apoptotic events in human gel-filtrated platelets via intrinsic pathway. Nitration of tyrosine seems to be partly associated with the appearance of apoptotic markers in platelets.

  11. New trends in bioanalytical microdevices to assess platelet function.

    PubMed

    Basabe-Desmonts, Lourdes; Meade, Gerardene; Kenny, Dermot

    2010-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality globally. The role of platelets and antiplatelet drugs in the treatment of cardiovascular disease is widely appreciated. Platelets have a less well-known role in cancer and inflammation and as the role of platelets in cancer and inflammation is increasingly understood, there is a compelling need to develop diagnostic assays of platelet function to guide clinical management. Most current platelet-function tests are focused on platelet aggregation, are cumbersome, require dedicated laboratory personnel, measure a single response to a single agonist and artificially separate platelets from blood, thus, these assays do not reflect the pathophysiolgical environment of complex disease states. New technology platforms are emerging that address the physiological adhesive function of platelets to vascular-specific matrices using small volumes of whole blood, giving rapid results. These technologies will guide therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and probably in risk management in both cancer and atherosclerosis.

  12. Blood platelet aggregation and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C D; Thomas, G; Olewine, D; Zyzanski, S J; Simpson, M T; Hames, C G

    1975-12-01

    Changes in blood platelet aggregation may precipitate episodes of arterial occlusive diseases. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of psychological traits, emotional states and other behavioral stressors on platelet aggregation phenomena. This study examined 46 healthy college men at rest and after submaximal treadmill exercise. Associations were found between the duration of platelet aggregation and a number of scores from the California Psychological Inventory and self-administered anxiety scales. The more socially adequate, poised and dominant persons--those with more mature ego development and less overt anxiety--had platelets with more prolonged aggregation reactions to the in vitro introduction of noradrenalin. Irreversible aggregation of platelets occurred more regularly to lower in vitro concentrations of noradrenalin in platelet samples drawn from subjects who were less anxious and tended to be more rigidly defensive. It is premature to attempt to derive clinical implications from this exploratory work, but some implications for the design of future research are discussed.

  13. Modifications of blood platelet proteins of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids in plasma, blood platelets and neurons in patients with schizophrenia was described. The aim of our present study was to evaluate oxidative/nitrative modifications of blood platelets proteins by measurement the level of biomarkers of oxidative stress such as carbonyl groups, thiol groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins in patients with schizophrenia and compare with a control group. Levels of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine residues in platelet proteins were measured by ELISA and competition ELISA, respectively. The method with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid) has been used to analyse thiol groups in platelet proteins. We demonstrated for the first time in platelet proteins from patients with schizophrenia a statistically significant increase of the level of biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress such as carbonyl groups or 3-nitrotyrosine; in schizophrenic patients the amount of thiol groups in platelet proteins was lower than in platelets from healthy subjects. Our results strongly indicate that in patients with schizophrenia reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species induce not only peroxidation of lipids, but also may stimulate oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins. The consequence of these modifications may be the alteration of platelet protein structure and function.

  14. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  15. Microfluidic Flow Chambers Using Reconstituted Blood to Model Hemostasis and Platelet Transfusion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Aelst, Britt; Feys, Hendrik B; Devloo, Rosalie; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Compernolle, Veerle

    2016-03-19

    Blood platelets prepared for transfusion gradually lose hemostatic function during storage. Platelet function can be investigated using a variety of (indirect) in vitro experiments, but none of these is as comprehensive as microfluidic flow chambers. In this protocol, the reconstitution of thrombocytopenic fresh blood with stored blood bank platelets is used to simulate platelet transfusion. Next, the reconstituted sample is perfused in microfluidic flow chambers which mimic hemostasis on exposed subendothelial matrix proteins. Effects of blood donation, transport, component separation, storage and pathogen inactivation can be measured in paired experimental designs. This allows reliable comparison of the impact every manipulation in blood component preparation has on hemostasis. Our results demonstrate the impact of temperature cycling, shear rates, platelet concentration and storage duration on platelet function. In conclusion, this protocol analyzes the function of blood bank platelets and this ultimately aids in optimization of the processing chain including phlebotomy, transport, component preparation, storage and transfusion.

  16. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  17. Platelet function in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Bernardo, Esther; Feltes, Gisela; Escaned, Javier; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; De Agustín, José Alberto; Vivas, David; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TK) includes a transient left ventricular dysfunction without obstructive coronary disease, sometimes after stressful situations with elevated cathecolamines. Since catecholamines activate platelets we aimed to study the platelet influence in a TK setting. We included 32 patients with a TK diagnosis, 13 with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 18 healthy volunteers. Once consent informed was obtained, blood samples were extracted and processed (at admission and after 3 months follow-up). Clinical, ecg, echocardiographic and angiographic features were thoroughly recorded.Previous treatment before admission was similar between groups. No differences were observed in clinical features or any of the acute markers studied regarding platelet reactivity between TK compared to ACS. After follow-up, aggregation levels and platelet reactivity showed differences, mainly due to the antithrombotic therapy prescribed at discharge, but similar to volunteers. Circulating epinephrine during the acute phase was significantly higher in TK (p < 0.001). Patients with higher levels of epinephrine had elevated platelet activation and aggregation after 3 months. No differences were observed in Takotsubo acute platelet aggregation compared to patients with ACS, in spite of higher blood levels of adrenaline. Takotsubo patients had elevated platelet aggregation and activation compared with ACS patients at 3 months follow-up because they were less frequently on chronic clopidogrel and ASA. However, they had similar platelet aggregation and activation levels to healthy volunteers despite treatment with low-dose ASA. Takotsubo patients who had higher levels of adrenaline in the acute phase displayed increased platelet reactivity during follow-up.

  18. Anti-apoptotic role of sonic hedgehog on blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sharda; Chaurasia, Susheel N; Kumar, Kailash; Dash, Debabrata

    2014-12-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an essential morphogen involved in vertebrate organogenesis. Perturbation of Hh signaling is associated with pathological consequences like tumor formation and chronic lung fibrosis. Platelets are highly sensitive circulating blood cells responsible for hemostasis, while hyperactivity of these cells lead to morbidities like ischemic heart diseases and stroke. Despite being terminally differentiated cells with life span of 10-12 days, platelets have recently been shown to respond to Wnt ligand, another developmental signal similar to Shh. In this study, we demonstrate that components of Shh signaling, Patched and Gli3, are expressed in human platelets consistent with existence of functional Hedgehog signaling in these cells. Shh had potent inhibitory effect on platelet apoptosis induced by ABT-737 or thrombin through attenuation of caspase-3 activity. The Shh-mediated pathway may thus represent a novel endogenous mechanism for regulating platelet activity and life span.

  19. Evaluation of coagulation factors and platelet function from an off-line modified ultrafiltration technique for post-cardiopulmonary bypass circuit blood recovery.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, S; Lynn, P; Miller, S; Harris, R; DiMarco, R F; Ross, J E

    2013-05-01

    Modified ultrafiltration (MUF) is a technique that hemoconcentrates residual CPB circuit blood and the patient at the same time. Hemoconcentration and MUF are Class 1-A recommendations in the anesthesia and surgical blood conservation guidelines. This study evaluated the off-line MUF process of the Hemobag (HB, Global Blood Resources, Somers, CT, USA) to quantitate coagulation factor levels, platelet (PLT) count and function in one facility and cellular growth factor concentrations of the final product that were transfused to the patient in another facility In two cardiac surgery facilities, after decannulation, the extracorporeal circuit (ECC) blood from 22 patients undergoing cardiac surgery was processed with the HB device. In eleven patients from the first facility by the study design, blood samples for coagulation factor levels and PLT aggregation were drawn from the reservoir of the MUF device pre- and post-processing. The samples (n = 11) were sent to a reference laboratory where testing for prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), reptilase time, fibrinogen, clotting factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, ADAMTS-13, protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), and platelet (PLT) aggregation were performed. A portion of the final concentrated HB blood samples (n = 5-10) from the second facility by design were evaluated for transforming and platelet-derived cellular growth factor concentrations. On average, approximately 800 - 2000 mls of whole blood were removed from the ECC post-CPB for processing in the HB device. After processing, there was, on the average, approximately 300 - 950 mls of concentrated whole blood salvaged for reinfusion. The PT and INR were significantly lower in the post-processing product compared to the pre-processing samples while the aPTT times were not significantly different. All coagulation factors and natural anti-coagulants were significantly

  20. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  1. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  2. Roll, adhere, spread and contract: structural mechanics of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Simona; Studt, Jan-Dirk; Medalia, Ohad; Tanuj Sapra, K

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are involved in life-sustaining processes such as hemostasis, wound healing, atherothrombosis and angiogenesis. Mechanical trauma to blood vessels causes platelet activation resulting in their adherence and clot formation at the damaged site, culminating in clot retraction and tissue repair. Two of the major players underlying this process are the cytoskeleton, i.e., actin and microtubules, and the membrane integrin receptors. Rare congenital bleeding disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia and Bernard-Soulier syndrome are associated with genetic alterations of platelet surface receptors, also affecting the platelet cytoskeletal structure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about platelet structure and adhesion, and delve into the mechanical aspects of platelet function. Platelets lack a nucleus, and can thus provide a minimal model of a biological cell. New biophysical tools may help to scrutinize platelets anew and to extend the existing knowledge on cell biology.

  3. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  4. Functional platelet defects in children with severe chronic ITP as tested with 2 novel assays applicable for low platelet counts.

    PubMed

    van Bladel, Esther R; Laarhoven, Annemieke G; van der Heijden, Laila B; Heitink-Pollé, Katja M; Porcelijn, Leendert; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Haas, Masja; Roest, Mark; Vidarsson, Gestur; de Groot, Philip G; Bruin, Marrie C A

    2014-03-06

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with a complex heterogeneous pathogenesis and a bleeding phenotype that is not necessarily correlated to platelet count. In this study, the platelet function was assessed in a well-defined cohort of 33 pediatric chronic ITP patients. Because regular platelet function test cannot be performed in patients with low platelet counts, 2 new assays were developed to determine platelet function: first, the microaggregation test, measuring in platelets isolated from 10 mL of whole blood the platelet potential to form microaggregates in response to an agonist; second, the platelet reactivity assay, measuring platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), convulxin (CVX), and thrombin receptor activator peptide in only 150 μL of unprocessed whole blood. Patients with a severe bleeding phenotype demonstrated a decreased aggregation potential upon phorbol myristate acetate stimulation, decreased platelet degranulation following ADP stimulation, and a higher concentration of ADP and CVX needed to activate the glycoprotein IIbIIIa complex compared with patients with a mild bleeding phenotype. In conclusion, here we have established 2 functional tests that allow for evaluation of platelet function in patients with extremely low platelet counts (<10(9)). These tests show that platelet function is related to bleeding phenotype in chronic ITP.

  5. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited.

  6. Effects of argon laser on in vitro aggregation of platelets in platelet rich plasma and whole blood

    SciTech Connect

    Doerger, P.T.; Glueck, H.I.; McGill, M.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of an Argon laser on platelet aggregation were studied, since platelets may be exposed to laser energy when used intravascularly. Various preparations of platelets in platelet rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood, with or without aspirin, were tested with the aggregating agents ADP, collagen, thrombin, and epinephrine. Simultaneous release of ATP was also measured in PRP. At relatively low levels of irradiation, platelet aggregation was potentiated. Enhancement was evidenced by an increase in percent aggregation, earlier onset of the reaction, and reduction in the amount of aggregating agent required. In PRP, the mechanism of laser potentiation appeared to be the release of endogenous ATP from platelets. At relatively high levels of irradiation, platelets were destroyed and aggregation abolished. In whole blood, the mechanism was somewhat more complicated since release of ATP occurred from RBCs as well as platelets. Spontaneous aggregation following laser treatment occurred in isolated instances in PRP and in every trial in whole blood preparations. Aspirin ingestion inhibited the laser's effects in PRP but not in whole blood. These results may have important clinical implications for laser angioplasty, and the potentiated aggregation response may prove useful in laboratory studies of platelet function.

  7. Antioxidant and antiaggregatory effects of an extract from Conyza canadensis on blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Nowak, Pawel; Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Gancarz, Roman; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2006-09-01

    The antioxidative activity of the polysaccharide extract from Conyza canadensis in blood platelets treated with peroxynitrite (ONOO-) was studied. Peroxynitrite as a strong biological oxidant has toxic effects on blood platelets and induces the oxidation of thiols, carbonylation and nitration of platelet proteins and lipid peroxidation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the natural extract from herbal plant, Conyza Canadensis, may protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by ONOO-. In our study we measured oxidative damage of platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of this extract by estimation of the level of carbonyl groups and nitrotyrosine (a marker of platelet protein nitration). We also used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this extract to change O2-* generation in platelets. Moreover, we determined the effects of the extract on blood platelet aggregation induced by ADP. We observed that the extract from Conyza canadensis distinctly reduced oxidation and nitration of proteins in blood platelets treated with ONOO-(0.1mM) and O2-* production in these cells. The extract from Conyza canadensis also inhibited platelet aggregation. The ability of the extract to decrease O2-* generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. The present study suggests that the natural polysaccharide extract from Conyza canadensis has antiaggregatory and antioxidative activities, and therefore may be beneficial in the prevention of peroxynitrite-related diseases, such as cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases.

  8. Mechanism of platelet activation induced by endocannabinoids in blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Brantl, S Annette; Khandoga, Anna L; Siess, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis, and circulating endocannabinoids might modulate platelet function. Previous studies concerning effects of anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) on platelets, mainly performed on isolated cells, provided conflicting results. We therefore investigated the action of three main endocannabinoids [anandamide, 2-AG and virodhamine (arachidonoylethanolamine)] on human platelets in blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). 2-AG and virodhamine induced platelet aggregation in blood, and shape change, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in PRP. The EC50 of 2-AG and virodhamine for platelet aggregation in blood was 97 and 160 µM, respectively. Lower concentrations of 2-AG (20 µM) and virodhamine (50 µM) synergistically induced aggregation with other platelet stimuli. Platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine resembled arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation: shape change, the first platelet response, ATP secretion and aggregation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine were all blocked by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or the specific thromboxane A2 (TXA2) antagonist daltroban. In addition, platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine in blood and PRP were inhibited by JZL184, a selective inhibitor of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). In contrast to 2-AG and virodhamine, anandamide, a substrate of fatty acid amidohydrolase, was inactive. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) agonists lacked stimulatory as well as inhibitory platelet activity. We conclude that 2-AG and virodhamine stimulate platelets in blood and PRP by a MAGL-triggered mechanism leading to free AA and its metabolism by platelet cyclooxygenase-1/thromboxane synthase to TXA2. CB1, CB2 or non-CB1/CB2 receptors are not involved. Our results imply that ASA and MAGL inhibitors will protect platelets from activation by high endocannabinoid levels, and that

  9. [The role of blood platelets in infections].

    PubMed

    Micota, Bartłomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Różalska, Barbara

    2015-05-17

    Platelets are primarily associated with their main function, hemostasis, although it is known that these cells also exhibit biological activity in cancer progression, inflammation and infectious processes. During infection platelets, due to the expression of specific receptors - Toll-like receptors (TLRs) - which recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens - pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) - are activated by the presence of microorganism components and/or substances released from damaged cells/tissue. Further antimicrobial activity of platelets is based on their capacity for phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the synthesis, storage and release of proteins/peptides with antimicrobial activity. Another mechanism of platelet action is their immunomodulatory activity. It is based mainly on the ability to secrete chemotactic factors allowing the accumulation of professional immunocompetent cells at the site of infection, thus enhancing the effective eradication of an infectious agent. In chronic infections, platelets, due to release of numerous growth factors and various cytokines, support mechanisms of acquired immunity. They accelerate the maturation of dendritic cells, stimulate B cells to be immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells and potentiate the activity of T cells. Unfortunately, in certain situations (the existence of specific risk factors) the interaction of microorganisms with activated platelets may also be the cause of pathology within the cardiovascular system.

  10. The Platelet Function Defect of Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    fibrinolytic and coagulation systems occur during CPB,1 a platelet function defect is generally considered to be the primary CPB-induced hemostatic...platelets.39 OKM5 (provided by Dr. Patricia Rao, Ortho Diagnostic Systems , Raritan, NJ) is directed against platelet membrane GPIV.40 Flow Cytometric...22 after degranulation.7-14-16-18 Utilizing washed platelet systems , Nieuwenhuis et al.14 found a modest increase during CPB of the platelet

  11. Expression and function of purinergic receptors in platelets from apheresis-derived platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Koessler, Juergen; Weber, Katja; Koessler, Angela; Yilmaz, Pinar; Boeck, Markus; Kobsar, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background The storage of platelets affects platelet integrity and functionality, a process named platelet storage lesion (PSL). Reduced adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation is a typical manifestation of PSL. However, the role of ADP receptors in this context has not been evaluated yet. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate surface expression and function of the purinergic receptors P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 in stored platelet concentrates. Material and methods Platelets were obtained from venous whole blood and from apheresis-derived platelet concentrates stored for 0, 2 and 5 days. Purinergic receptor expression was measured by flow cytometry and western blot analysis. Receptor function was determined by calcium-induced fluorescence (P2Y1 and P2X1) or by flow cytometric measurement of the platelet reactivity index (P2Y12). Results The basal surface expression and total content of purinergic receptors remained unchanged throughout storage. After an initial reduction during apheresis, P2X1-mediated calcium flux was maintained, whereas the P2Y1-mediated increase of calcium flux gradually decreased during the course of storage. In contrast, the platelet reactivity index was comparable in freshly obtained and stored platelets. Discussion The function of the P2Y12 receptor is maintained during storage of apheresis-derived platelet concentrates. However, the impairment of P2X1 and especially of P2Y1 receptor function indicated by decreased receptor-mediated calcium flux is an important mechanism contributing to reduced ADP responsiveness of stored platelets. PMID:26674810

  12. Blood platelets in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gowert, Nina S; Donner, Lili; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Eisele, Yvonne S; Towhid, Seyda T; Münzer, Patrick; Walker, Britta; Ogorek, Isabella; Borst, Oliver; Grandoch, Maria; Schaller, Martin; Fischer, Jens W; Gawaz, Meinrad; Weggen, Sascha; Lang, Florian; Jucker, Mathias; Elvers, Margitta

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurotoxic amyloid-ß plaque formation in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Besides CAA, AD is strongly related to vascular diseases such as stroke and atherosclerosis. Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs in AD patients leading to alterations in blood flow that might play an important role in AD pathology with neuronal loss and memory deficits. Platelets are the major players in hemostasis and thrombosis, but are also involved in neuroinflammatory diseases like AD. For many years, platelets were accepted as peripheral model to study the pathophysiology of AD because platelets display the enzymatic activities to generate amyloid-ß (Aß) peptides. In addition, platelets are considered to be a biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Effects of Aß peptides on platelets and the impact of platelets in the progression of AD remained, however, ill-defined. The present study explored the cellular mechanisms triggered by Aß in platelets. Treatment of platelets with Aß led to platelet activation and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and membrane scrambling, suggesting enhanced platelet apoptosis. More important, platelets modulate soluble Aß into fibrillar structures that were absorbed by apoptotic but not vital platelets. This together with enhanced platelet adhesion under flow ex vivo and in vivo and platelet accumulation at amyloid deposits of cerebral vessels of AD transgenic mice suggested that platelets are major contributors of CAA inducing platelet thrombus formation at vascular amyloid plaques leading to vessel occlusion critical for cerebrovascular events like stroke.

  13. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  14. Platelet dynamics in three-dimensional simulation of whole blood.

    PubMed

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Diamond, Scott L; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-06-03

    A high-fidelity computational model using a 3D immersed boundary method is used to study platelet dynamics in whole blood. We focus on the 3D effects of the platelet-red blood cell (RBC) interaction on platelet margination and near-wall dynamics in a shear flow. We find that the RBC distribution in whole blood becomes naturally anisotropic and creates local clusters and cavities. A platelet can enter a cavity and use it as an express lane for a fast margination toward the wall. Once near the wall, the 3D nature of the platelet-RBC interaction results in a significant platelet movement in the transverse (vorticity) direction and leads to anisotropic platelet diffusion within the RBC-depleted zone or cell-free layer (CFL). We find that the anisotropy in platelet motion further leads to the formation of platelet clusters, even in the absence of any platelet-platelet adhesion. The transverse motion, and the size and number of the platelet clusters are observed to increase with decreasing CFL thickness. The 3D nature of the platelet-RBC collision also induces fluctuations in off-shear plane orientation and, hence, a rotational diffusion of the platelets. Although most marginated platelets are observed to tumble just outside the RBC-rich zone, platelets further inside the CFL are observed to flow with an intermittent dynamics that alters between sliding and tumbling, as a result of the off-shear plane rotational diffusion, bringing them even closer to the wall. To our knowledge, these new findings are based on the fundamentally 3D nature of the platelet-RBC interaction, and they underscore the importance of using cellular-scale 3D models of whole blood to understand platelet margination and near-wall platelet dynamics.

  15. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  16. Cellular prion protein in blood platelets associates with both lipid rafts and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Brouckova, Adela; Holada, Karel

    2009-11-01

    The recently shown transmissibility of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) by blood transfusion emphasises the need for better understanding of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) in blood. A substantial amount of cell-associated PrPc in blood resides in platelets. Platelet activation leads to up-regulation of PrPc on the platelet surface and its release on exosomes and microparticles. The sub-cellular localisation and function of platelet PrPc, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the association of PrPc with platelet lipid rafts and the platelet cytoskeleton. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy showed that the signals of PrPc and P-selectin, both of which occupy intracellular alpha granules, were separated on the membrane, suggesting organisation in different membrane domains. A flotation assay of platelet lysates demonstrated that a relatively small portion of platelet PrPc floats with lipid rafts, regardless of platelet activation status. This was reversed by depolymerisation of the platelet cytoskeleton, which led to flotation of most platelet PrPc, suggesting that interactions with the cytoskeleton prevent flotation of PrPc rafts. This association of PrPc with the platelet cytoskeleton was confirmed by its presence in both the isolated membrane skeleton and actin cytoskeleton. Platelet activation significantly increased the amount of PrPc associated with the cytoskeleton. Our results indicate that the localisation of PrPc in platelets is complex, with the majority of PrPc present within platelet lipid rafts linked to the platelet cytoskeleton. This localisation places PrPc in a position where it can interact with proteins involved in platelet signalling and eventually with vCJD prions.

  17. Generation of functional platelets from canine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Toshiya; Hatoya, Shingo; Kanegi, Ryoji; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijewardana, Viskam; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Miyuu; Yamate, Jyoji; Izawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kawate, Noritoshi; Tamada, Hiromichi; Imai, Hiroshi; Inaba, Toshio

    2013-07-15

    Thrombocytopenia (TTP) is a blood disease common to canines and human beings. Currently, there is no valid therapy for this disease except blood transfusion. In this study, we report the generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) from canine embryonic fibroblasts, and a novel protocol for creating mature megakaryocytes (MKs) and functional platelets from ciPSCs. The ciPSCs were generated using lentiviral vectors, and differentiated into MKs and platelets on OP9 stromal cells supplemented with growth factors. Our ciPSCs presented in a tightly domed shape and showed expression of a critical pluripotency marker, REX1, and normal karyotype. Additionally, ciPSCs differentiated into cells derived from three germ layers via the formation of an embryoid body. The MKs derived from ciPSCs had hyperploidy and transformed into proplatelets. The proplatelets released platelets early on that expressed specific MK and platelet marker CD41/61. Interestingly, these platelets, when activated with adenosine diphosphate or thrombin, bind to fibrinogen. Moreover, electron microscopy showed that the platelets had the same ultrastructure as peripheral platelets. Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time the generation of ciPSCs that are capable of differentiating into MKs and release functional platelets in vitro. Our system for differentiating ciPSCs into MKs and platelets promises a critical therapy for canine TTP and appears to be extensible in principle to resolve human TTP.

  18. Platelet concentrates, from whole blood or collected by apheresis?

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F

    2013-04-01

    Platelet concentrates can be isolated from donated whole blood with the platelet-rich plasma-method or the buffy coat-method. Alternatively, platelets can be obtained by apheresis, harvesting the platelets but returning all other cells to the donor. The quality and characteristics of platelets during storage are affected by a number of factors, such as anticoagulant, centrifugation and processing after collection, and pre- or post storage pooling, but when comparing literature on the various methods, most differences balance out. To have sufficient platelets to treat an adult patient, whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates need pooling of multiple donations, thereby increasing the risk of infectious agent transmission at least two-fold as compared with apheresis units. Allo immunization rates, acute reaction rates, and transfusion related acute lung injury rates are not different. Apheresis donation procedures have fewer adverse events. All these factors need to be considered and weighed when selecting a method of platelet collection for a blood center.

  19. The functional role of platelets in the regulation of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tony G; Metharom, Pat; Berndt, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Functionally, platelets are primarily recognized as key regulators of thrombosis and hemostasis. Upon vessel injury, the typically quiescent platelet interacts with subendothelial matrix to regulate platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation, with subsequent induction of the coagulation cascade forming a thrombus. Recently, however, newly described roles for platelets in the regulation of angiogenesis have emerged. Platelets possess an armory of pro- and anti-angiogenic proteins, which are actively sequestered and highly organized in α-granule populations. Platelet activation facilitates their release, eliciting potent angiogenic responses through mechanisms that appear to be tightly regulated. In conjunction, the release of platelet-derived phospholipids and microparticles has also earned merit as synergistic regulators of angiogenesis. Consequently, platelets have been functionally implicated in a range of angiogenesis-dependent processes, including physiological roles in wound healing, vascular development and blood/lymphatic vessel separation, whilst facilitating aberrant angiogenesis in a range of diseases including cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetic retinopathy. Whilst the underlying mechanisms are only starting to be elucidated, significant insights have been established, suggesting that platelets represent a promising therapeutic strategy in diseases requiring angiogenic modulation. Moreover, anti-platelet therapies targeting thrombotic complications also exert protective effects in disorders characterized by persistent angiogenesis.

  20. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  1. Oxidative stress in blood platelets from schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Dietrich-Muszalska, A; Olas, B; Rabe-Jablonska, J

    2005-11-01

    Oxidative stress in blood platelets is observed in various diseases, including neuropsychiatric disorders. The aim of our study was to evaluate oxidative stress in blood platelets from patients with schizophrenic disorders by measuring the activity of the platelet antioxidative enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD), concomitant with the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). In blood platelets obtained from schizophrenic patients (with paranoid schizophrenia according to DSM-IV criteria) and from healthy volunteers the level of reactive oxygen species was also measured via chemiluminescence. In resting blood platelets from schizophrenic patients the chemiluminescence was higher than in platelets from control subjects (P < 0.05), but in thrombin-activated platelets an increase (about 53%) of chemiluminescence was observed, however this increase was lower than in thrombin-stimulated platelets from healthy subjects (101.5%). The results indicate that in platelets from schizophrenic patients generation of reactive oxygen species is enhanced. Moreover, we observed that SOD activity in blood platelets from schizophrenic patients was significantly lower than in control platelets and that a correlation exists between increased lipid peroxidation and inhibition of the activity of this antioxidative enzyme in schizophrenic platelets.

  2. Microfluidic whole blood testing of platelet response to pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruizhi; Grosser, Tilo; Diamond, Scott L

    2017-01-19

    Platelets present a number of intracellular and transmembrane targets subject to pharmacological modulation, either for cardiovascular disease reduction or as an unintended drug response. Microfluidic devices allow human blood to clot on a defined surface under controlled hemodynamic and pharmacological conditions. The potencies of a number of antiplatelet and anticancer drugs have been tested with respect to platelet deposition on collagen under flow. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) reduce platelet deposition, either when added ex vivo to blood or ingested orally by patients prior to testing. Some individuals display a functional "aspirin-insensitivity" in microfluidic assay. When certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are taken orally, they block COX-1 acetylation by aspirin with concomitant reduction of aspirin efficacy against platelets in microfluidic assay. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 inhibitors reduce platelet deposition under flow, as do NO donors and iloprost that target the guanylate cyclase and the prostacyclin receptor, respectively. In a microfluidic assay of 37 kinase inhibitors, dasatinib had potent antiplatelet activity, while bosutinib was less potent. Dasatinib and bosutinib have known profiles against numerous kinases, revealing overlapping and nonoverlapping activities relevant to their unique actions against platelets. Also, dasatinib caused a marked and specific inhibition of GPVI signaling induced by convulxin, consistent with a dasatinib-associated bleeding risk. Microfluidic devices facilitate drug library screening, dose-response testing, and drug-drug interaction studies. Kinase inhibitors developed as anticancer agents may present antiplatelet activities that are detectable by microfluidic assay and potentially linked to bleeding risks.

  3. Blood platelet counts, morphology and morphometry in lions, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, L

    2009-09-01

    Due to logistical problems in obtaining sufficient blood samples from apparently healthy animals in the wild in order to establish normal haematological reference values, only limited information regarding the blood platelet count and morphology of free-living lions (Panthera leo) is available. This study provides information on platelet counts and describes their morphology with particular reference to size in two normal, healthy and free-ranging lion populations. Blood samples were collected from a total of 16 lions. Platelet counts, determined manually, ranged between 218 and 358 x 10(9)/l. Light microscopy showed mostly activated platelets of various sizes with prominent granules. At the ultrastructural level the platelets revealed typical mammalian platelet morphology. However, morphometric analysis revealed a significant difference (P < 0.001) in platelet size between the two groups of animals. Basic haematological information obtained in this study may be helpful in future comparative studies between animals of the same species as well as in other felids.

  4. Lower-Extremity Functional Electrical Stimulation Decreases Platelet Aggregation and Blood Coagulation in Persons With Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Nighat N; Feldman, Susan P; Bauman, William A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) develop premature cardiovascular disease. Regular exercise reduces the incidence and symptoms of cardiovascular disease in able-bodied individuals; these salutary effects of exercise have not been documented in persons with SCI. Objective: To evaluate the effects of functional electrical stimulation leg cycle ergometry (FES-LCE) exercise training on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation in persons with SCI. Participants: Subjects (n  =  14) with stable chronic (>1 year) paraplegia (T1–T10) or tetraplegia (C4–C8). Methods: Blood samples were collected before and after the first and eighth sessions (2 sessions per week for 4 weeks) of FES exercise. Results: Platelet aggregation was inhibited by 20% after the first session and by 40% (P < 0.001) after the eighth session. Thrombin activity was unchanged after the first session (10.7 ± 0.85 s to 10.43 ± 0.56 s) and decreased after the eighth session (12.5 ± 1.98 s to 11.1 ± 1.7 s; P < 0.0003). Antithrombin III activity increased after the first (103.8% ± 8.9% to 110% ± 6.9%; P < 0.0008) and eighth sessions (107.8% ± 12.1% to 120.4% ± 13.1%; P < 0.0001). Cyclic adenosine monophosphate increased after the first (9.9% ± 2.5% to 15.8% ± 3%; P < 0.001) and eighth sessions (17.8% ± 4.2% to 36.5% ± 7.6%; P < 0.0001). After the eighth session, factors V and X increased significantly (88% ± 27% to 103% ± 23%, P < 0.0001; 100% ± 40% to 105% ± 7%, P < 0.01, respectively); factors VII and VIII and fibrinogen did not change significantly. A significant reduction in platelet activation/aggregation was demonstrated in response to FES-LCE. The decrease in thrombin level was caused by the simultaneous increase in antithrombin activity. Conclusion: These findings provide new insight into the potential protective effects of FES-LCE against the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20486534

  5. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  6. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Renaud, S

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that several environmental factors are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Most of them are predisposing factors known also as risk factors. Other factors appear to have preventive effects. Blood lipids have been considered the main blood mediator between most of these factors and CHD. In recent years, this concept has been challenged since many of these factors did not affect serum lipids. By contrast blood platelets, involved in both thrombosis and atherosclerosis, appear to have their functions markedly changed by most of the factors associated with CHD. To determine whether saturated fats would affect platelet functions as shown in animals and in pilot studies in man, groups of male farmers (40-45 years) from 2 regions of France (Var and Moselle) in which the mortality rate from CHD differed markedly were studied, particularly regarding their platelet functions in relation to the intake of saturated fats. No difference could be observed in blood between the 2 regions concerning total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides, the coagulation was markedly accelerated, as well as the platelet clotting activity in farmers from Moselle. The response of platelets mostly to thrombin but also to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), epinephrine, and collagen was more elevated in Moselle farmers. In Moselle farmers, there was significantly higher intake of saturated fats (16% of the calories) as compared to Var (12%). To determine whether the abnormal platelet response in Moselle farmers was really due to the diet or whether a genetic factor might be involved, a group of 50 Moselle farmers were persuaded to change their dietary habits in order to lower their intake of saturated fats to 10% of the calories and that of polyunsaturated to approximately 12%. 1 year after diet modification, the clotting time (PCT) and clotting activity of platelets were considerably prolonged and the response to thrombin drastically reduced. These

  7. An association of platelet indices with blood pressure in Beijing adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Tao, Lixin; Mahara, Gehendra; Yan, Yan; Cao, Kai; Liu, Xiangtong; Chen, Sipeng; Xu, Qin; Liu, Long; Wang, Chao; Huang, Fangfang; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Aoshuang; Ping, Zhao; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The quadratic inference function (QIF) method becomes more acceptable for correlated data because of its advantages over generalized estimating equations (GEE). This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between platelet indices and blood pressure using QIF method, which has not been studied extensively in real data settings. A population-based longitudinal study was conducted in Beijing from 2007 to 2012, and the median of follow-up was 6 years. A total of 6515 cases, who were aged between 20 and 65 years at baseline and underwent routine physical examinations every year from 3 Beijing hospitals were enrolled to explore the association between platelet indices and blood pressure by QIF method. The original continuous platelet indices were categorized into 4 levels (Q1–Q4) using the 3 quartiles of P25, P50, and P75 as a critical value. GEE was performed to make a comparison with QIF. After adjusting for age, usage of drugs, and other confounding factors, mean platelet volume was negatively associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP)   in males and positively linked with systolic blood pressure (SBP)  . Platelet distribution width was negatively associated with SBP  . Blood platelet count was associated with DBP   in males. Adults in Beijing with prolonged exposure to extreme value of platelet indices have elevated risk for future hypertension and evidence suggesting using some platelet indices for early diagnosis of high blood pressure was provided. PMID:27684843

  8. Multiscale prediction of patient-specific platelet function under flow.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Matthew H; Colace, Thomas V; Chatterjee, Manash S; Jing, Huiyan; Zhou, Songtao; Jaeger, Daniel; Brass, Lawrence F; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2012-07-05

    During thrombotic or hemostatic episodes, platelets bind collagen and release ADP and thromboxane A(2), recruiting additional platelets to a growing deposit that distorts the flow field. Prediction of clotting function under hemodynamic conditions for a patient's platelet phenotype remains a challenge. A platelet signaling phenotype was obtained for 3 healthy donors using pairwise agonist scanning, in which calcium dye-loaded platelets were exposed to pairwise combinations of ADP, U46619, and convulxin to activate the P2Y(1)/P2Y(12), TP, and GPVI receptors, respectively, with and without the prostacyclin receptor agonist iloprost. A neural network model was trained on each donor's pairwise agonist scanning experiment and then embedded into a multiscale Monte Carlo simulation of donor-specific platelet deposition under flow. The simulations were compared directly with microfluidic experiments of whole blood flowing over collagen at 200 and 1000/s wall shear rate. The simulations predicted the ranked order of drug sensitivity for indomethacin, aspirin, MRS-2179 (a P2Y(1) inhibitor), and iloprost. Consistent with measurement and simulation, one donor displayed larger clots and another presented with indomethacin resistance (revealing a novel heterozygote TP-V241G mutation). In silico representations of a subject's platelet phenotype allowed prediction of blood function under flow, essential for identifying patient-specific risks, drug responses, and novel genotypes.

  9. [Blood platelets and biological response to 'danger' signals and subsequent inflammation: towards a new paradigm?].

    PubMed

    Garraud, O; Damien, P; Berthet, J; Arthaud, C-A; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Cognasse, F

    2011-04-01

    Blood platelets are cellular elements of primary haemostasis. During the last decade research on platelets has been subsequently based on this paradigm, with separate observations on issues such as the ability for platelets to bind infectious agents or even engulf them, to drop in counts in case of evolving infectious processes, etc. More recently, novel work has set up bases for novel functions for platelets, as members of functional immune cells, principally in innate immunity but capable of influencing adaptive immunity. Platelets are thus essential to haemostasis and to inflammation, questioning their essential functionality and the set up of a novel paradigm: could platelets be tissue-repairing cells? Such an assumption would open an entire new field of investigations. The present "State of the Art" essay attempts to discuss the main arguments on this.

  10. Blood platelets contain tumor-derived RNA biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, R Jonas A; Balaj, Leonora; Hulleman, Esther; van Rijn, Sjoerd; Pegtel, D Michiel; Walraven, Maudy; Widmark, Anders; Gerritsen, Winald R; Verheul, Henk M; Vandertop, W Peter; Noske, David P; Skog, Johan; Würdinger, Thomas

    2011-09-29

    Diagnostic platforms providing biomarkers that are highly predictive for diagnosing, monitoring, and stratifying cancer patients are key instruments in the development of personalized medicine. We demonstrate that tumor cells transfer (mutant) RNA into blood platelets in vitro and in vivo, and show that blood platelets isolated from glioma and prostate cancer patients contain the cancer-associated RNA biomarkers EGFRvIII and PCA3, respectively. In addition, gene-expression profiling revealed a distinct RNA signature in platelets from glioma patients compared with normal control subjects. Because platelets are easily accessible and isolated, they may form an attractive platform for the companion diagnostics of cancer.

  11. [Activation and inhibitory mechanisms of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of platelets to subendothelial matrices initiates physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Under high shear stress, von Willebrand factor bridges newly exposed collagen to glycoprotein (GP) Ib on platelets. This initial tethering facilitates association between the collagen receptor GPVI and collagen, which generates tyrosine kinase-dependent activation signals, followed by release of secondary mediators and integrin activation. Activated integrin can bind to their ligands including fibrinogen. The released secondary mediators, ADP and thromboxane A2, activate integrin of flowing platelets, which enables formation of platelet thrombi by binding of activated flowing platelets and adhered platelets to collagen via binding between activated aIIbbeta3 integrin and fibrinogen. Platelets also have inhibitory mechanisms, which help to prevent unwanted platelet activation in vivo.

  12. Increased platelet adhesion under flow conditions is induced by both thalassemic platelets and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Neta; Spectre, Galia; Brill, Alexander; Zelig, Orly; Goldfarb, Ada; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Varon, David

    2008-11-01

    Thromboembolic complications are not uncommon in thalassemia. Previous studies suggest increased platelet aggregation and a potential role of pathological changes in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid membrane, induced by oxidative stress. In the present study, platelet adhesion and the effect of thalassemic RBC on platelet adhesion under flow conditions were evaluated, using the Cone and Plate (let) Analyzer(CPA). Twenty-two beta-thalassemia patients and 22 blood type-matched healthy controls were studied. An increased platelet adhesion (% surface coverage, SC), was observed in patients as compared to controls (p < 0.05). When platelet count and haematocrit were normalized by autologous reconstitution, a significant increase in platelet aggregation (average size, AS) was observed (p < 0.05). Increased platelet adhesion (SC and AS), was demonstrated in six patients with a history of thrombosis as compared to 16 patients without any history of thrombosis (p < or = 0.007) and in 17 splenectomized patients as compared to five non-splenectomized patients (p = 0.003). In reconstitution studies, thalassemic RBC mixed with normal platelet-rich plasma significantly increased platelet adhesion compared to normal RBC (SC p < 0.03, AS p < 0.02). Thalassemic platelets reconstituted with normal RBC, had increased aggregation (AS, p < 0.004) in comparison with normal platelets. The results indicate that increased platelet adhesion in beta-thalassemia is induced by both platelets and RBC. Increased platelet adhesion correlated with clinical thrombotic events and thus may suggest a mechanism of thrombosis in thalassemic patients. The potential application of the CPA in identifying thalassemic patients with high risk for thrombosis should be studied prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

  13. [Cardiology. Platelet function testing for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Pellaton, Cyril; Eeckhout, Eric; Silvain, Johanne; Montalescot, Gilles; Collet, Jean-Phillipe

    2014-01-15

    Platelet P2YI2 receptor inhibition with clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor plays a key role to prevent recurrent ischaemic events after percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes or elective settings. The degree of platelet inhibition depends on the antiplatelet medication used and is influenced by clinical and genetic factors. A concept of therapeutic window exists. On one side, efficient anti-aggregation is required in order to reduce cardio-vascular events. On the other side, an excessive platelet inhibition represents a risk of bleeding complications. This article describes the current knowledge about some platelet function tests and genetic tests and summarises their role in the clinical practice.

  14. Megakaryocytes and platelets express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but nicotine does not affect megakaryopoiesis or platelet function.

    PubMed

    Schedel, Angelika; Kaiser, Kerstin; Uhlig, Stefanie; Lorenz, Florian; Sarin, Anip; Starigk, Julian; Hassmann, Dennis; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In our previous investigations we have shown that platelets and their precursors express nicotinic α7 acetylcholine receptors (nAChRα7) that are involved in platelet function and in vitro differentiation of the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. In this study, we were interested in the expression analysis of additional nAChR and the effects of nicotine in an ex vivo model using megakaryocytic cells differentiated from cord blood derived CD34(+) cells (CBMK) and an in vivo model using blood samples from smokers. CBMK were differentiated with thrombopoietin (TPO) for up to 17 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to investigate nAChR expression (nAChRα7, nAChRα4, nAChRβ2) and nicotine effects. In blood samples of 15 nonsmokers and 16 smokers platelet parameters (count, mean platelet volume--MPV and platelet distribution width--PDW) were determined as indicators for changes of in vivo megakaryopoiesis. Platelet function was determined by the use of whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The functional role of nAChR was evaluated using specific antagonists in aggregometry. CHRNA7, CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 gene transcripts and the corresponding proteins could be identified in CBMK during all stages of differentiation. Platelets contain nAChRα7 and nAChRβ2 but not nAChRα4. Nicotine had no effect on TPO-induced differentiation of CBMK. There was no significant difference in all platelet parameters of the smokers compared to the nonsmokers. In line with this, cholinergic gene transcripts as well as the encoded proteins were equally expressed in both the study groups. Despite our observation of nAChR expression in megakaryopoiesis and platelets, we were not able to detect effects of nicotine in our ex vivo and in vivo models. Thus, the functional role of the nAChR in these cells remains open.

  15. Platelet function in the postprandial period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia have been related to cardiovascular events. Among different underlying mechanisms platelet activation seems to be responsible too. No comparable data between various tests in normo- vs. hyperlipidemics before and at different time intervals are available after a fat meal. We aimed to compare 9 of them within the same patients at several time points in postprandial hyperlipidemia. Results For some tests baseline values between the groups were significantly different (TXB2, platelet sensitivity, sedimentation and WU-test). However, hyperlipidemia revealed a variable influence on the tests examined. Some of the available tests apparently sensitive to show platelet activation reflect the increase in triglycerides (TG), such as the sedimentation index. ADP-induced platelet aggregatory activity in count adjusted washed isolated platelet samples during postprandial hyperlipidemia indicates mildly enhanced platelet activity, but does not seem to induce significant changes in aggregation. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 400 mg/dl fasting) changes in platelet function are more pronounced due to delayed decay and may last up to 16 hours paralleling TG reaching the prevalue. The overwhelming majority of platelet function tests do not significantly respond to postprandial hyperlipidemia. The correlation between the tests applied is poor. For standardization purpose, platelet aggregation tests, aimed to examine proaggregatory capacity in atherosclerosis, should only be performed at the same time of the day after a fasting period > 6 hours. The great variation in preanalytical work-up on comparison of various tests, large number of platelet tests available and their respective potential value are discussed. Conclusions At present, the suspicion that platelet function is significantly activated in the postprandial period cannot be supported by any of the tests used. The information provided is valuable to

  16. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  17. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Meyer, Claudius U.; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen + ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin + UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established. PMID:24749844

  18. Mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets of depressive patients.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk; Kitzlerová, Eva; Zvěřová, Martina; Raboch, Jiří

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidences include mitochondrial dysfunctions in pathophysiology of mood disorders. We examined association between depressive disorders and mitochondrial respiration using both intact and permeabilized blood platelets. In intact platelets, physiological respiration, maximal capacity of electron transport system and respiratory rate after complex I inhibition were decreased in depressive patients, who reached partial remission, compared to healthy controls. Respiratory rates were unchanged in several respiratory states in permeabilized platelets. Results indicate that changes in respiratory rate in intact platelets can be used as biological marker of depressive disorder. The hypothesis that decreased mitochondrial respiratory rate participate in pathophysiology of depression was supported.

  19. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Negative T cells than B6.lpr mice. This suggests that the absence of PF4 alleviates some tissue damage in the lupus prone mice. 6...mice with PF4-/- mice may alleviate multi organ dysfunction in Lupus prone mice. Reportable Outcomes Nothing to report Conclusions We have...dysfunction in lupus models. We have evaluated the relationship between Syk and platelets and have thus far identified a role for Syk in platelet lodging in

  20. Determinants of ABH expression on human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Laura L W; Kelly, Kathleen; Barton, James; Hwang, Debbie; Koerner, Theodore A W; Olson, John D

    2005-04-15

    Platelets express ABH antigens, which can adversely effect platelet transfusion recovery and survival in ABH-incompatible recipients. To date, there has been no large, comprehensive study comparing specific donor factors with ABH expression on platelet membranes and glycoconjugates. We studied ABH expression in 166 group A apheresis platelet donors by flow cytometry, Western blotting, and thin layer chromatography relative to donor age, sex, A1/A2 subgroup, and Lewis phenotype. Overall, A antigen on platelet membranes, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids was linked to an A1 red blood cell (RBC) phenotype. Among A1 donors, platelet ABH varied significantly between donors (0%-87%). Intradonor variability, however, was minimal, suggesting that platelet ABH expression is a stable, donor-specific characteristic, with 5% of A1 donors typing as either ABH high- or low-expressers. Group A2 donors, in contrast, possessed a Bombay-like phenotype, lacking both A and H antigens. Unlike RBCs, ABH expression on platelets may be determined primarily by H-glycosyltransferase (FUT1) activity. Identification of A2 and A1 low expressers may increase the availability and selection of crossmatched and HLA-matched platelets. Platelets from group A2 may also be a superior product for patients undergoing A/O major mismatch allogeneic progenitor cell transplantation.

  1. Platelet adhesion from shear blood flow is controlled by near-wall rebounding collisions with erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, A A; Butylin, A A; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2011-02-16

    The efficacy of platelet adhesion in shear flow is known to be substantially modulated by the physical presence of red blood cells (RBCs). The mechanisms of this regulation remain obscure due to the complicated character of platelet interactions with RBCs and vascular walls. To investigate this problem, we have created a mathematical model that takes into account shear-induced transport of platelets across the flow, platelet expulsion by the RBCs from the near-wall layer of the flow onto the wall, and reversible capture of platelets by the wall and their firm adhesion to it. This model analysis allowed us to obtain, for the first time to our knowledge, an analytical determination of the platelet adhesion rate constant as a function of the wall shear rate, hematocrit, and average sizes of platelets and RBCs. This formula provided a quantitative description of the results of previous in vitro adhesion experiments in perfusion chambers. The results of the simulations suggest that under a wide range of shear rates and hematocrit values, the rate of platelet adhesion from the blood flow is mainly limited by the frequency of their near-wall rebounding collisions with RBCs. This finding reveals the mechanism by which erythrocytes physically control platelet hemostasis.

  2. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-02

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile.

  3. Mathematical model and numerical method for studying platelet adhesion and aggregation during blood clotting

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelson, A.L.

    1984-10-01

    The repair of small blood vessels and the pathological growth of internal blood clots involve the formation of platelet aggregates adhering to portions of the vessel wall. Our microscopic model represents blood by a suspension of discrete massless platelets in a viscous incompressible fluid. Platelets are initially noncohesive; however, if stimulated by an above-threshold concentration of the chemical ADP or by contact with the adhesive injured region of the vessel wall, they become cohesive and secrete more ADP into the fluid. Cohesion between platelets and adhesion of a platelet to the injured wall are modeled by creating elastic links. Repulsive forces prevent a platelet from coming too close to another platelet or to the wall. The forces affect the fluid motion in the neighborhood of an aggregate. The platelets and secreted ADP both move by fluid advection and diffusion. The equations of the model are studied numerically in two dimensions. The platelet forces are calculated implicitly by minimizing a nonlinear energy function. Our minimization scheme merges Gill and Murray's (Math. Programming 7 (1974), 311) modified Newton's method with elements of the Yale sparse matix package. The stream-function formulation of the Stokes' equations for the fluid motion under the influence of platelet forces is solved using Bjorstad's biharmonic solver (''Numerical Solution of the Biharmonic Equation,'' Ph.D. Thesis, Stanford University, 1980). The ADP transport equation is solved with an alternating-direction implicit scheme. A linked-list data structure is introduced to keep track of changing platelet states and changing configurations of interplatelet links.

  4. Topographic Cues Reveal Two Distinct Spreading Mechanisms in Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, Rabea; Köster, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Blood platelets are instrumental in blood clotting and are thus heavily involved in early wound closure. After adhering to a substrate they spread by forming protrusions like lamellipodia and filopodia. However, the interaction of these protrusions with the physical environment of platelets while spreading is not fully understood. Here we dynamically image platelets during this spreading process and compare their behavior on smooth and on structured substrates. In particular we analyze the temporal evolution of the spread area, the cell morphology and the dynamics of individual filopodia. Interestingly, the topographic cues enable us to distinguish two spreading mechanisms, one that is based on numerous persistent filopodia and one that rather involves lamellipodia. Filopodia-driven spreading coincides with a strong response of platelet morphology to the substrate topography during spreading, whereas lamellipodia-driven spreading does not. Thus, we quantify different degrees of filopodia formation in platelets and the influence of filopodia in spreading on structured substrates.

  5. Topographic Cues Reveal Two Distinct Spreading Mechanisms in Blood Platelets.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Rabea; Köster, Sarah

    2016-03-03

    Blood platelets are instrumental in blood clotting and are thus heavily involved in early wound closure. After adhering to a substrate they spread by forming protrusions like lamellipodia and filopodia. However, the interaction of these protrusions with the physical environment of platelets while spreading is not fully understood. Here we dynamically image platelets during this spreading process and compare their behavior on smooth and on structured substrates. In particular we analyze the temporal evolution of the spread area, the cell morphology and the dynamics of individual filopodia. Interestingly, the topographic cues enable us to distinguish two spreading mechanisms, one that is based on numerous persistent filopodia and one that rather involves lamellipodia. Filopodia-driven spreading coincides with a strong response of platelet morphology to the substrate topography during spreading, whereas lamellipodia-driven spreading does not. Thus, we quantify different degrees of filopodia formation in platelets and the influence of filopodia in spreading on structured substrates.

  6. Daily prickly pear consumption improves platelet function.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, R; Budinsky, A; Efthimiou, Y; Stomatopoulos, J; Oguogho, A; Sinzinger, H

    2003-07-01

    Prickly pear is traditionally used by Pima Indians as a dietary nutrient against diabetes mellitus. We examined the effect of daily consumption of 250 g in 8 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with mild familial heterozygous hypercholesterolemia on various parameters of platelet function. Beside its action on lipids and lipoproteins, prickly pear consumption significantly reduced the platelet proteins (platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin), ADP-induced platelet aggregation and improved platelet sensitivity (against PGI2 and PGE1) in volunteers as well as in patients. Also plasma 11-DH-TXB2 and the WU-test showed a significant improvement in both patients and volunteers. In contrast, collagen-induced platelet aggregation and the number of circulating endothelial cells showed a significant response in patients only. No influence of prickly pear ingestion on peripheral platelet count was monitored. The dietary run-in period did not influence any of the parameters of haemostasis examined. No sex difference was seen. Prickly pear may induce at least part of its beneficial actions on the cardiovascular system via decreasing platelet activity and thereby improving haemostatic balance.

  7. Inherited Platelet Function Disorders: Algorithms for Phenotypic and Genetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Bury, Loredana; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) manifest with mucocutaneous bleeding and are frequently difficult to diagnose due to their heterogeneity, the complexity of the platelet activation pathways and a lack of standardization of the platelet function laboratory assays and of their use for this purpose. A rational diagnostic approach to IPFDs should follow an algorithm where clinical examination and a stepwise laboratory evaluation play a crucial role. A streamlined panel of laboratory tests, with consecutive steps of increasing level of complexity, allows the phenotypic characterization of most IPFDs. A first-line diagnosis of a significant fraction of the IPFD may be made also at nonspecialized centers by using relatively simple tests, including platelet count, peripheral blood smear, light transmission aggregometry, measurement of platelet granule content and release, and the expression of glycoproteins by flow cytometry. Some of the most complex, second- and third-step tests may be performed only in highly specialized laboratories. Genotyping, including the widespread application of next-generation sequencing, has enabled discovery in the last few years of several novel genes associated with platelet disorders and this method may eventually become a first-line diagnostic approach; however, a preliminary clinical and laboratory phenotypic characterization nowadays still remains crucial for diagnosis of IPFDs.

  8. Platelet function and hemolysis in centrifugal pumps: in vitro investigations.

    PubMed

    Steines, D; Westphal, D; Göbel, C; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1999-08-01

    The effects of centrifugal pumps on blood components other than erythrocytes, namely platelets and their interaction with the coagulation system, are not very well known. In a comparative study with three centrifugal pumps (BioMedicus BP-80, St. Jude Isoflow, and Sarns Delphin) and the Stockert roller pump hemolysis, platelet counts, thromboplastin and partial thromboplastin times, as well as resonance thrombography (RTG) parameters for the assessment of platelet and coagulation function were evaluated in vitro. Normalized indices of hemolysis (NIH) with ACD anticoagulation after 360 minutes were 0.008+/-0.004 (Isoflow), 0.018+/-0.017 (BP-80), 0.085+/-0.051 (Delphin), and 0.049+/-0.010 g/1001 (roller pump). Plasmatic coagulation was activated in all circuits. Platelet function was severely inhibited by the BP-80, indicated by increase in RTG platelet time to 358%+/-150% of initial values compared to 42%+/-29% (Isoflow), 40%+/-20% (Delphin), and 12%+/-10% (roller pump). Fibrin polymerization was affected similarly. The large surface area of the BP-80 leads to an extensive activation of platelets and plasminogen.

  9. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  10. [Blood platelets and asthma caused by aspirin].

    PubMed

    Joseph, M; Capron, A; Ameisen, J C; Martinot, J B; Tonnel, A B

    1987-10-01

    Platelets isolated from patients with aspirin-induced asthma (ASA patients) react abnormally in vitro to aspirin and to non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), by generating cytocidal molecules, that can kill parasitic larvae and to oxygen-dependent free radicles, which may be detected by chemiluminescence, although these drugs do not have a similar effect on platelets from normal donors or allergic asthmatics. The abnormality appears to be associated with the inhibiting properties of NSAID and aspirin on the cyclo-oxygenase pathway, that leads to a defect of the binding of prostaglandin endoperoxide PGH2 to its receptors on the platelet membrane. In addition, another metabolite from the lipoxygenase pathway which is at present poorly defined seems to participate in the anomaly. Sodium salicylate, a naturally produced catabolite of aspirin, that is well-tolerated by ASA patients, inhibits the abnormal response of the platelets and this opens new perspectives in the management of aspirin-sensitive intolerance.

  11. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  12. Proteomic approaches to dissect platelet function: half the story

    PubMed Central

    Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Perrotta, Peter L.; Bahou, Wadie F.

    2006-01-01

    Platelets play critical roles in diverse hemostatic and pathologic disorders and are broadly implicated in various biological processes that include inflammation, wound healing, and thrombosis. Recent progress in high-throughput mRNA and protein profiling techniques has advanced our understanding of the biological functions of platelets. Platelet proteomics has been adopted to decode the complex processes that underlie platelet function by identifying novel platelet-expressed proteins, dissecting mechanisms of signal or metabolic pathways, and analyzing functional changes of the platelet proteome in normal and pathologic states. The integration of transcriptomics and proteomics, coupled with progress in bioinformatics, provides novel tools for dissecting platelet biology. In this review, we focus on current advances in platelet proteomic studies, with emphasis on the importance of parallel transcriptomic studies to optimally dissect platelet function. Applications of these global profiling approaches to investigate platelet genetic diseases and platelet-related disorders are also addressed. PMID:16926286

  13. Blood Coagulation and Platelet Economy in Subjects with Primary Gout

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, J. F.; Murphy, E. A.; Ogryzlo, M. A.; Smythe, H. A.

    1963-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there is an increased incidence of degenerative vascular disease in patients with gout and an increased rate of turnover of blood platelets in patients and animals with atherosclerosis. A disturbed uric acid metabolism and “secondary” gout have long been known to occur with bone marrow diseases. A study of platelet economy and blood clotting factors in subjects with primary gout was therefore undertaken. Twenty-two male subjects with gout but with no clinical evidence of vascular disease were studied. Half of these had a negative family history for vascular disease and half had less fortunate ancestors. The most striking differences were found when gouty patients with a negative family history for vascular disease were compared with similar control subjects. The mean platelet half-life was 2.85 days in the gouty subjects and 3.74 days in the controls. The mean platelet turnover (number/c.mm./day) was 58,750 in gouty subjects, 42,370 in controls. Platelet adhesiveness and plasma thromboplastic activity were correspondingly increased in the gouty subjects. Control subjects with a positive family history all showed relatively active clotting system and platelet turnover, similar to the values found in atherosclerotic subjects. The data indicated that there is increased platelet destruction and production in some patients with primary gout. The relation between this anomaly and the vascular disease, and disturbed urate metabolism in gouty subjects, remains to be investigated. PMID:14084698

  14. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    2004; Danese et al., 2003). Recent studies have demonstrated a role for platelets in the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses...mediated modulation of adaptive immunity. A communication link between innate and adaptive immune compartments. Immunity 19:9-19. 4. Fleming, S.D., M...Monestier, and G.C. Tsokos. 2004. Accelerated ischemia/reperfusion- induced injury in autoimmunity-prone mice. Journal of immunology 173:4230-4235

  15. The effect of ex vivo anticoagulants on whole blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Madeleine L; Potura, Lukasz; Scharbert, Gisela; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A

    2009-02-01

    Pre- and intraoperative platelet function monitoring is increasingly recommended in order to detect risk factors for bleeding and to target coagulation management. The ideal anticoagulant for accurate platelet aggregometry remains controversial. The aim of this experimental trial was to compare platelet aggregability in whole blood stored in citrate, heparin and direct thrombin inhibitors. Whole blood was drawn from 11 healthy adult volunteers who had not taken any medication in the previous 14 days. Blood was stored in trisodium citrate, unfractionated heparin, melagatran, lepirudin and argatroban. Platelet aggregation was performed using the impedance aggregometer Multiplate (Dynabyte, Munich, Germany) with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP), collagen, arachidonic acid and ristocetin as agonists. Samples were analysed immediately after blood sampling (baseline), as well as 30 and 120 min afterwards. At baseline there were no significant differences in aggregability between samples containing direct thrombin inhibitors and heparin. In contrast, aggregation in response to all agonists except for ristocetin was significantly impaired in citrated blood. During storage the response to arachidonic acid and collagen was maintained by direct thrombin inhibitors and heparin, whereas ADP-, TRAP- and ristocetin-induced aggregation varied considerably over time in all ex vivo anticoagulants tested. Pre-analytical procedures should be standardized because storage duration and anticoagulants significantly affect platelet aggregability in whole blood. For point-of-care monitoring with immediate analysis after blood withdrawal all tested direct thrombin inhibitors as well as unfractionated heparin can be used as anticoagulants whereas citrate is not recommended.

  16. Serotonin Uptake Is Largely Mediated by Platelets versus Lymphocytes in Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT), a primary target for many antidepressants, is expressed in the brain and also in peripheral blood cells. Although platelet SERT function is well accepted, lymphocyte SERT function has not been definitively characterized. Due to their small size, platelets often are found in peripheral blood mononuclear cell preparations aimed at isolating lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. The presence of different cells makes it difficult to assign SERT expression and function to specific cell types. Here, we use flow cytometry and IDT307, a monoamine transporter substrate that fluoresces after uptake into cells, to investigate SERT function in lymphocyte and platelet populations independently, as well as simultaneously without prior isolation. We find that murine lymphocytes exhibit temperature-dependent IDT307 transport but uptake is independent of SERT. Lack of measurable SERT function in lymphocytes was corroborated by chronoamperometry using serotonin as a substrate. When we examined rhesus and human mixed blood cell populations, we found that platelets, and not lymphocytes, were primary contributors to SERT function. Overall, these findings indicate that lymphocyte SERT function is minimal. Moreover, flow cytometry, in conjunction with the fluorescent transporter substrate IDT307, can be widely applied to investigate SERT in platelets from populations of clinical significance. PMID:23336055

  17. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  18. Immediate adverse reactions to platelet transfusions: whole blood derived versus apheresis platelets.

    PubMed

    Salam, A; Hosain, G M; Hosain, M M; Narvios, A; Sazama, K; Lichtiger, B

    2013-01-01

    The transfusion of whole blood derived platelets (WBDPs) or apheresis platelets (APs) is standard support for cancer patients. However, disputes remain about which type of platelets are ideal in terms of efficacy, cost, and the risk of adverse reactions. This cross sectional study included 141 cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy or hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation and received platelet transfusions at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 2002 and 2003 were retrospectively evaluated. A total of 141 patients who did not differ significantly in terms of age or sex had a reaction to transfusions (WBDPs, n=123; APs, n=18), for a frequency of 0.66% in patients who received WBDPs and 0.45% in patients who received APs, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.13). More WBDP-related reactions occurred in patients transfused with older platelets (>2 days old) than in patients transfused with fresh platelets, but the difference compared with AP-associated reactions was not statistically significant. However, the rate of reactions to WBDP may increase if WBDPs are stored for a prolonged time (>2 days). Until evidence becomes available that clearly refutes this; the more fresh platelets as possible may be used.

  19. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except

  20. Platelets in the neonatal period: developmental differences in platelet production, function, and hemostasis and the potential impact of therapies.

    PubMed

    Sola-Visner, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem among sick neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Frequently, platelet transfusions are given to thrombocytopenic infants in an attempt to decrease the incidence or severity of hemorrhage, which is often intracranial. Whereas there is very limited evidence to guide platelet transfusion practices in this population, preterm infants in the first week of life (the highest risk period for bleeding) are nearly universally transfused at higher platelet counts than older infants or children. To a large extent, this practice has been influenced by the observation that neonatal platelets are hyporeactive in response to multiple agonists in vitro, although full-term infants exhibit normal to increased primary hemostasis. This apparently paradoxical finding is due to factors in the neonatal blood that enhance the platelet-vessel wall interaction and counteract the platelet hyporeactivity. Relatively few studies have evaluated the platelet function and primary hemostasis of preterm infants, the subset of neonates at highest risk of bleeding and those most frequently transfused. Current understanding of platelet production and function in preterm and full-term neonates, how these factors affect their response to thrombocytopenia and their primary hemostasis, and the implications of these developmental differences to transfusion medicine are reviewed herein.

  1. Blood flow simulation on a role for red blood cells in platelet adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu

    2016-11-01

    Large-scale blood flow simulations were conducted and a role for red blood cells in platelet adhesion was discussed. The flow conditions and hematocrit values were set to the same as corresponding experiments, and the numerical results were compared with the measurements. Numerical results show the number of platelets adhered on the wall is increased with the increase in hematocrit values. The number of adhered platelets estimated from the simulation was approximately 28 (per 0.01 square millimeter per minute) for the hematocrit value of 20%. These results agree well with the experimental results qualitatively and quantitatively, which proves the validity of the present numerical model including the interaction between fluid and many elastic bodies and the modeling of platelet adhesion. Numerical simulation also reproduces the behavior of red blood cells in the blood flow and their role in platelet adhesion. Red blood cells deform to a flat shape and move towards channel center region. In contrast, platelets are pushed out and have many chances to contact with the wall. As a result, the large number of adhered platelets is observed as hematocrit values becomes high. This result indicates the presence of red blood cells plays a crucial role in platelet adhesion.

  2. Resveratrol and vitamin C as antioxidants in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2002-04-15

    We investigated the effects of two different compounds with potential antioxidative action (found in many fruits, which can be used in therapy of cardiovascular disorders): trans-resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) and vitamin C on oxidative stress in blood platelets. Oxidative stress in blood platelets was estimated by the measurement of: (1) the generation of superoxide radicals (O(2)(-*)) (reduction of cytochrome c) and other reactive oxygen species--ROS: H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen and organic radicals (chemiluminescence), (2) the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the level of conjugate dienes as markers of lipid peroxidation. We have shown that vitamin C at the concentrations of 750-3000 microM, but not at the concentration of 100 microM (prooxidative action) significantly inhibited peroxidation of lipids (measured by TBARS and conjugate dienes) and the production of ROS in blood platelets. After the incubation of blood platelets for 30 min at 37 degrees C with vitamin C at the concentration of 3000 microM, inhibition of ROS generation (above 90%) was achieved. The inhibition of ROS production caused by resveratrol at physiological plasma concentrations 0.05-2 microM was lower than by vitamin C. At the highest concentration of vitamin C used (3000 microM), the inhibition of O(2)(-*) generation was about 40%. Moreover, we did not observe any synergistic action of resveratrol and vitamin C at antioxidative dose (3000 microM) on the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and the production of O(2)(-*) or ROS in blood platelets. Resveratrol as an antioxidant reduced oxidative stress in blood platelets caused by vitamin C at prooxidative dose (100 microM).

  3. Simulation of the Effect of Red Blood Cell Collisions on Platelet Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbon, Sean; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The adsorption of platelets to the endothelial wall is an important first step in the clotting process, which is critical to stopping blood loss after trauma. Initial platelet arrest is controlled by very short range interaction between two proteins, von Willibrand Factor and GPIb, so the rate of platelet adsorption is expected to be strongly dependent on the rate at which the platelets sample the wall. With Peclet numbers in the range (103 - 105) , simple diffusive arguments are not sufficient to explain the high rates of platelet adsorption. Using Stokes flow simulations, we show that the platelets' wall sampling rate is significantly increased by interactions with red blood cells. Our simulation models platelets as rigid bodies suspended in a Stokesian linear shear flow. We solve for the flow using standard boundary integral techniques with the appropriate single wall bounded Green's function. Receptor-ligand interactions are represented as Hookean springs with characteristic lifetimes, sizes, and stiffness coefficients. Drag forces are calculated with the reciprocal theorem, and RBC collisions are modelled as AR processes extracted from the large scale suspension simulations of Zhao et al.

  4. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  5. Adjusting MtDNA Quantification in Whole Blood for Peripheral Blood Platelet and Leukocyte Counts

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lazaro, Monica; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) in the blood (mitochondrial to nuclear DNA ratio) appear associated with several systemic diseases, including primary mitochondrial disorders, carcinogenesis, and hematologic diseases. Measuring mtDNAcn in DNA extracted from whole blood (WB) instead of from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or buffy coat may yield different results due to mitochondrial DNA present in platelets. The aim of this work is to quantify the contribution of platelets to mtDNAcn in whole blood [mtDNAcn(WB)] and to propose a correction formula to estimate leukocytes' mtDNAcn [mtDNAcn(L)] from mtDNAcn(WB). Blood samples from 10 healthy adults were combined with platelet-enriched plasma and saline solution to produce artificial blood preparations. Aliquots of each sample were combined with five different platelet concentrations. In 46 of these blood preparations, mtDNAcn was measured by qPCR. MtDNAcn(WB) increased 1.07 (95%CI 0.86, 1.29; p<0.001) per 1000 platelets present in the preparation. We proved that leukocyte count should also be taken into account as mtDNAcn(WB) was inversely associated with leukocyte count; it increased 1.10 (95%CI 0.95, 1.25, p<0.001) per unit increase of the ratio between platelet and leukocyte counts. If hematological measurements are available, subtracting 1.10 the platelets/leukocyte ratio from mtDNAcn(WB) may serve as an estimation for mtDNAcn(L). Both platelet and leukocyte counts in the sample are important sources of variation if comparing mtDNAcn among groups of patients when mtDNAcn is measured in DNA extracted from whole blood. Not taking the platelet/leukocyte ratio into account in whole blood measurements, may lead to overestimation and misclassification if interpreted as leukocytes' mtDNAcn. PMID:27736919

  6. Development of a New Method for Platelet Function Test and Its Shearing Condition in Microfludic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Choi, Seawhan; Shin, Sehyun; Korea University Department of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2015-11-01

    Platelet is a crucial blood cell on hemostasis. As platelet exposed to high shear stress, it can be activated showing morphological and functional changes to stop bleeding. When platelet is abnormal, there is high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, quick and precise assay for platelet function is important in clinical treatment. In this study, we design a microfluidic system, which can test platelet function exposed with the stimulation of shear and agonists. The microfluidic system consists of three parts: 1) a shear mechanism with rotating stirrer; 2) multiple microchannels to flow samples and to stop; 3) camera-interfaced migration distance(MD) analyzing system. When sheared blood is driven by pressure through the microchannel, shear-activated platelets adhere to a collagen-coated surface, causing blood flow to significantly slow and eventually stop. As the micro-stirrer speed increases, MD decreases exponentially at first, but it increases beyond a critical rpm after all. These results are coincident with data measured by FACS flowcytometry. These results imply that the present system could quantitatively measure the degree of activation, aggregation and adhesion of platelets and that blood MD is potent index for measuring the shear-dependence of platelet function.

  7. Platelets in leucocyte recruitment and function.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Platelets have a longstanding recognition as an essential cellular component of the coagulation system. However, substantial research over the last decade has added another important aspect to platelet function in that they are also an integral part of the innate immune system. Complex organisms are facing a constant threat of infections by invading pathogens, and they have developed a sophisticated and elegant measure to combat this threat, namely the immune system. Leucocyte recruitment to sites of infections is an essential step at the forefront of the immune response. Platelets have been shown to be involved in several steps of this process and they are an integrated connecting element among haemostasis, host defence, and additional immunological functions (e.g. neutrophil extracellular traps formation). However, the immune system also requires a tight regulation, as an overshooting immune response carries the risk of harming the host itself. This review aims at highlighting the unique features and molecular mechanisms that allow for the interactions of platelets and leucocytes and the regulation of this process. Furthermore, this article identifies the functional relevance of these events for the immune response.

  8. Size Dependent Platelet Subpopulations: Relationship of Platelet Volume to Ultrastructure Enzymatic Activity, and Function.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-10

    of the present apheresis instruments to separate the larger more functional platelets from the smaller ones. The selective isolation of large... PLATELET VOLUME T. -(U) BOSTON UNIV MA SCHOOL OF I MEDICINE C B THOMPSON ET RL 10 MAR 83 BUSM-93-89 UNIIDN919CA89 /68 6ilfflfllflflflflll l...N00014-79-C-0168 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 83-08 SIZE DEPENDENT PLATELET SUBPOPULATIONS: RELATIONSHIP OF PLATELET VOLUME TO ULTRASTRUCTURE. ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY

  9. Autologous blood preparations rich in platelets, fibrin and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    FIORAVANTI, C.; FRUSTACI, I.; ARMELLIN, E.; CONDÒ, R.; ARCURI, C.; CERRONI, L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality after infectious diseases. The greatest regenerative power was obtained with autologous tissue, primarily the bone alive, taken from the same site or adjacent sites, up to the use centrifugation of blood with the selection of the parts with the greatest potential regenerative. In fact, various techniques and technologies were chronologically successive to cope with an ever better preparation of these concentrates of blood. Our aim is to review these advances and discuss the ways in which platelet concentrates may provide such unexpected beneficial therapeutic effects. Methods The research has been carried out in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database by choosing keywords as “platelet rich plasma”, “platelet rich fibrin”, “platelet growth factors”, and “bone regeneration” and “dentistry”. Results Autologous platelet rich plasma is a safe and low cost procedure to deliver growth factors for bone and soft tissue healing. Conclusion The great heterogeneity of clinical outcomes can be explained by the different PRP products with qualitative and quantitative difference among substance. PMID:28042422

  10. Function of eltrombopag-induced platelets compared to platelets from control patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Haselboeck, Johanna; Kaider, Alexandra; Pabinger, Ingrid; Panzer, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Data on the in vivo function of platelets induced by the thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag are scarce. To assess a possible influence of eltrombopag we compared platelet function of eltrombopag-treated immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients (group 1; n=10) after treatment response to that from control ITP patients (group 2; n=12). We further analysed platelet function at baseline and after one, three, and four weeks of eltrombopag treatment and estimated daily changes of platelet function during the eltrombopag-induced platelet rise. The formation of platelet-monocyte aggregates (PMA), P-selectin expression [MFI], and platelet adhesion under high shear conditions (surface coverage, SC) in vivo and after in vitro addition of agonists (ADP, TRAP-6, Collagen) were similar between both groups after response to eltrombopag treatment. Only TRAP-6 induced a lower SC in the eltrombopag group (p=0.03). All platelet function parameters except for Collagen-induced P-selectin expression changed significantly during treatment with eltrombopag. PMA, naïve and after addition of ADP or TRAP-6 increased with increasing platelet counts. P-selectin expression decreased, when measured without and upon addition of ADP, increased in the presence of TRAP-6, and remained unchanged after addition of Collagen. SC increased during the eltrombopag-induced platelet rise. All significant changes of platelet function correlated to changes in platelet counts. Two patients developed venous thromboses during eltrombopag treatment, but no association with any distinct single platelet function parameter or combinations thereof was identifiable. Thus, eltrombopag-induced platelets function similar to those from control ITP patients without discernible increased hyper-reactivity.

  11. The blood platelets contribution to innate host defense - what they have learned from their big brothers.

    PubMed

    Zander, Dorit M W; Klinger, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    Bactericidal effects of blood platelets have been known for more than 120 years, but the underlying mechanisms are largely obscure. Keeping in mind structural and functional analogies of platelets to neutrophils, three different mechanisms are thinkable: Engulfment of pathogens, release of microbicidal proteins, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we focus on the release of ROS and a possible contribution of blood plasma and thrombin to the bactericidal effects. Killing of bacteria was evaluated by DNA fluorescence labeling and electron microscopy. Release of ROS by platelets was measured photometrically by cytochrome C and phenol red/peroxidase assays and was further evaluated by topological methods. We found that (i) platelets produce 1500 times less O(2) (-) and 4000 times less H(2)O(2) compared to neutrophils, (ii) ROS do not affect the killing rates, and (iii) no local enrichment of ROS was detectable. On the other hand, thrombin and plasma proteins with a molecular mass of >100 kDa are essential for bactericidal effects. We suggest that platelets contribute to the innate host defense by providing a catalytical surface for synthesis of thrombin. In the presence of a heat-instable plasma protein, thrombin may generate a strong bactericidal complex, which is only effective in close vicinity to the platelet membrane.

  12. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function.

  13. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for five days released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol’s beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  14. The use of regression analysis in determining reference intervals for low hematocrit and thrombocyte count in multiple electrode aggregometry and platelet function analyzer 100 testing of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Gerhardus J A J M; Houben, Rik; Wetzels, Rick J H; Verhezen, Paul W M; van Oerle, Rene; Ten Cate, Hugo; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Lancé, Marcus D

    2017-01-09

    Low platelet counts and hematocrit levels hinder whole blood point-of-care testing of platelet function. Thus far, no reference ranges for MEA (multiple electrode aggregometry) and PFA-100 (platelet function analyzer 100) devices exist for low ranges. Through dilution methods of volunteer whole blood, platelet function at low ranges of platelet count and hematocrit levels was assessed on MEA for four agonists and for PFA-100 in two cartridges. Using (multiple) regression analysis, 95% reference intervals were computed for these low ranges. Low platelet counts affected MEA in a positive correlation (all agonists showed r(2) ≥ 0.75) and PFA-100 in an inverse correlation (closure times were prolonged with lower platelet counts). Lowered hematocrit did not affect MEA testing, except for arachidonic acid activation (ASPI), which showed a weak positive correlation (r(2) = 0.14). Closure time on PFA-100 testing was inversely correlated with hematocrit for both cartridges. Regression analysis revealed different 95% reference intervals in comparison with originally established intervals for both MEA and PFA-100 in low platelet or hematocrit conditions. Multiple regression analysis of ASPI and both tests on the PFA-100 for combined low platelet and hematocrit conditions revealed that only PFA-100 testing should be adjusted for both thrombocytopenia and anemia. 95% reference intervals were calculated using multiple regression analysis. However, coefficients of determination of PFA-100 were poor, and some variance remained unexplained. Thus, in this pilot study using (multiple) regression analysis, we could establish reference intervals of platelet function in anemia and thrombocytopenia conditions on PFA-100 and in thrombocytopenia conditions on MEA.

  15. Proteins, Platelets, and Blood Coagulation at Biomaterial Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  16. Defining Platelet Function During Polytrauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b . ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 772 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 2 Table of...al by our k by base ata stratifie nd injuries er groups. ry and sho evere shoc ck severity s injury an ee betwee re shock g f subjects b creased wit...s when stra preselected ed by pro definition excess < - d by ISS a and seve Blood pr ck. There k groups ( b are given d shock c n mild and

  17. Reticulated platelet levels in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma of dogs with various platelet counts measured by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Haruhiko; Yamagami, Hirozumi; Watari, Toshihiro; Kano, Rui; Fujino, Yasuhito; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Reticulated platelets (RP) are young platelets that contain residual RNA, and measurement of RP has been to assess thrombopoiesis. In the present study, flow cytometric counts of RP were compared using paired specimens elicited from dogs with various platelet counts by different RP collection procedures, the whole blood method (WBM) and platelet rich plasma method (PRPM). The flow cytometric counts of RP for the specimens collected by WBM showed good and stable agreement with those taken by PRPM from the same canine subjects. The result revealed that WBM, as well as PRPM, can be used clinically to determine RP levels in dogs with abnormal platelet counts.

  18. Reelin is a platelet protein and functions as a positive regulator of platelet spreading on fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Lien; Huang, Chien-Ling; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Chang-Huei; Stern, Arnold; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2010-02-01

    Abnormalities of platelet functions have been linked to reelin-impaired neuronal disorders. However, little attention has been given to understanding the interplay between reelin and platelet. In this study, reelin was found to present in the human platelets and megakaryocyte-like leukemic cells. Reelin-binding assays revealed that extracellular reelin can interact with platelets through the receptor belonging to the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family. The reelin-to-platelet interactions enhance platelet spreading on fibrinogen concomitant with the augmentation of lamellipodia formation and F-actin bundling. In contrast, reelin has no effect on integrin alphaIIbbeta3 activation and agonist-induced platelet aggregation. Molecular analysis revealed that the up-regulation of Rac1 activity and the inhibition of protein kinase C delta-Thr505 phosphorylation are important for reelin-mediated enhancement of platelet spreading on fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate for the first time that reelin is present in platelets and the reelin-to-platelet interactions play a novel role in platelet signaling and functions.

  19. Blood mean platelet volume and platelet lymphocyte ratio as new predictors of hip osteoarthritis severity.

    PubMed

    Taşoğlu, Özlem; Şahin, Ali; Karataş, Gülşah; Koyuncu, Engin; Taşoğlu, İrfan; Tecimel, Osman; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2017-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a low grade systemic inflammatory disease in which many inflammatory mediators are known to be elevated in the peripheric blood. Blood platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and mean platelet volume (MPV) are accepted as novel markers in many of the systemic inflammatory disorders, but have not been investigated in synovitis-free radiographic OA yet.The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of blood PLR and MPV in radiographic hip OA. A total of 880 patients were evaluated retrospectively and after certain exclusion criteria, 237 of them who have primary hip OA were included. Age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), PLR, and MPV levels were recorded, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading of the hip joints were performed. Patients were then divided into 2 groups as KL grades 1 to 2 (mild-moderate) and KL grades 3 to 4 (severe) hip OA.Mean age, mean neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, mean MPV, mean PLR, and mean ESR were statistically significantly different between mild/moderate hip OA group and severe hip OA group. In univariate analysis, older age and higher MPV, PLR, and ESR were severely associated with severe hip OA. In multiple logistic regression analysis, MPV, PLR, and ESR emerged as independent predictors of severe hip OA.The results of the present study, for the first time in the literature, suggest blood PLR and MPV as novel inflammatory markers predicting the radiographic severity of hip OA in the daily practice.

  20. Blood mean platelet volume and platelet lymphocyte ratio as new predictors of hip osteoarthritis severity

    PubMed Central

    Taşoğlu, Özlem; Şahin, Ali; Karataş, Gülşah; Koyuncu, Engin; Taşoğlu, İrfan; Tecimel, Osman; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a low grade systemic inflammatory disease in which many inflammatory mediators are known to be elevated in the peripheric blood. Blood platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and mean platelet volume (MPV) are accepted as novel markers in many of the systemic inflammatory disorders, but have not been investigated in synovitis-free radiographic OA yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of blood PLR and MPV in radiographic hip OA. A total of 880 patients were evaluated retrospectively and after certain exclusion criteria, 237 of them who have primary hip OA were included. Age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), PLR, and MPV levels were recorded, Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grading of the hip joints were performed. Patients were then divided into 2 groups as KL grades 1 to 2 (mild–moderate) and KL grades 3 to 4 (severe) hip OA. Mean age, mean neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, mean MPV, mean PLR, and mean ESR were statistically significantly different between mild/moderate hip OA group and severe hip OA group. In univariate analysis, older age and higher MPV, PLR, and ESR were severely associated with severe hip OA. In multiple logistic regression analysis, MPV, PLR, and ESR emerged as independent predictors of severe hip OA. The results of the present study, for the first time in the literature, suggest blood PLR and MPV as novel inflammatory markers predicting the radiographic severity of hip OA in the daily practice. PMID:28178164

  1. Platelet Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donating platelets, can I still donate blood? What blood types should donate platelets? Can I donate plasma at ... Community Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood ...

  2. Platelet function tests in clinical cardiology: unfulfilled expectations.

    PubMed

    Gorog, Diana A; Fuster, Valentin

    2013-05-28

    This review is a critical evaluation of publications in the past decade on the usefulness of platelet function tests (PFTs) in clinical cardiology, in aiding diagnosis, predicting risk, and monitoring therapy. The ideal PFT should: 1) detect baseline platelet hyperreactivity; 2) allow individualization of antiplatelet medication; 3) predict thrombotic risk; and 4) predict bleeding risk. The practicalities of clinical cardiology demand rapid, accurate, and reliable tests that are simple to operate at the bedside and available 24 h a day, 7 days a week. Point-of-care PFTs most widely evaluated clinically include PFA-100 and VerifyNow. None of these tests can reliably detect platelet hyperreactivity and thus identify a prothrombotic state. Identification of antiplatelet nonresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness is highly test specific, and does not allow individualization of therapy. The power of PFTs in predicting thrombotic events for a given individual is variable and often modest, and alteration of antithrombotic treatment on the basis of the results of PFTs has not been shown to alter clinical outcome. PFTs in current mainstream use cannot reliably assess bleeding risk. These tests have been in use for over a decade, but the hopes raised by PFTs in clinical practice remain unfulfilled. Although physiologically relevant measurement of platelet function now is more important than ever, a critical reappraisal of available techniques in light of clinical requirements is needed. The use of native blood, global stimulus instead of individual agonists, contribution of thrombin generation by activated platelets to the test results, and establishment of a PFT therapeutic range for each antiplatelet drug should be considered and is discussed.

  3. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    For in vitro studies assessing the interaction of platelets with implant materials, common and standardized protocols for the preparation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) are lacking, which may lead to non-matching results due to the diversity of applied protocols. Particularly, the aging of platelets during prolonged preparation and storage times is discussed to lead to an underestimation of the material thrombogenicity. Here, we study the influence of whole blood- and PRP-storage times on changes in platelet morphology and function. Blood from apparently healthy subjects was collected according to a standardized protocol and examined immediately after blood collection, four hours and twenty four hours later. The capability of platelets to adhere and form stable aggregates (PFA100, closure time) was examined in sodium citrate anticoagulated whole blood (WB) using the agonists equine type I collagen and epinephrine bitartrate (collagen/epinephrine) as well as equine type I collagen and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (collagen/ADP). Circulating platelets were quantified at each time point. Morphology of platelets and platelet aggregates were visualized microscopically and measured using an electric field multi-channel counting system (CASY). The percentage of activated platelets was assessed by means of P-selectin (CD62P) expression of circulating platelets. Furthermore, platelet factor 4 (PF4) release was measured in platelet poor plasma (PPP) at each time point. Whole blood PFA100 closure times increased after stimulation with collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine. Twenty four hours after blood collection, both parameters were prolonged pathologically above the upper limit of the reference range. Numbers of circulating platelets, measured in PRP, decreased after four hours, but no longer after twenty four hours. Mean platelet volumes (MPV) and platelet large cell ratios (P-LCR, 12 fL - 40 fL) decreased over time. Immediately after blood collection, no debris or platelet

  4. Acetaminophen and meloxicam inhibit platelet aggregation and coagulation in blood samples from humans.

    PubMed

    Martini, Angela K; Rodriguez, Cassandra M; Cap, Andrew P; Martini, Wenjun Z; Dubick, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    Acetaminophen (Ace) and meloxicam (Mel) are the two types of analgesic and antipyretic medications. This study investigated the dose responses of acetaminophen and meloxicam on platelet aggregation and coagulation function in human blood samples. Blood samples were collected from six healthy humans and processed to make platelet-adjusted (100 × 10 cells/μl) blood samples. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Q-PAP, 100 mg/ml) was added at the doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 214 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Similarly, meloxicam (Metacam, 5 mg/ml) was added at doses of 0 μg/ml (control), 2.85 μg/ml (the standard dose, 1 ×), 4 ×, 8 ×, 10 ×, 12 ×, 16 ×, and 20 ×. Fifteen minutes after the addition of acetaminophen and/or meloxicam, platelet aggregation was stimulated with collagen (2 μg/ml) or arachidonic acid (0.5 mmol/l) and assessed using a Chrono-Log 700 aggregometer. Coagulation function was assessed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and using Rotem thrombelastogram. A robust inhibition by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam was observed in arachidonic acid-stimulated platelet aggregation starting at 1 × dose. Collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation was inhibited by ACE starting at 1 × (78 ± 10% of control), and by meloxicam starting at 4 × (72 ± 5% of control, both P < 0.05). The inhibitions by acetaminophen and meloxicam combined were similar to those by acetaminophen or meloxicam. aPTT was prolonged by meloxicam starting at 4 ×. No changes were observed in PT or any of Rotem measurements by acetaminophen and/or meloxicam. Acetaminophen and meloxicam compromised platelet aggregation and aPTT. Further effort is warranted to characterize the effects of acetaminophen and meloxicam on bleeding in vivo.

  5. Homocysteine and its thiolactone-mediated modification of fibrinogen affect blood platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Joanna; Olas, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcys) and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) concentrations in organism are correlated with a number of serious pathologies. In the literature, there are few papers describing studies on the effects of homocysteine on proteins that participate in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in human. However, mechanisms involved in the relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and hemostatic process are still unclear. The role of N- or S-homocysteinylation (induced by Hcys and its derivatives) of different hemostatic proteins, including fibrinogen is also still poorly known. The aim of this study was to establish the functional changes of the fibrinogen molecule induced by Hcys (at final doses of 10-100 µM) and the most reactive form of Hcys - its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (0.1-1 µM), and to examine the effects of these changes on the capability of fibrinogen to interact with human blood platelets (by measuring the platelet adhesion). Our present results demonstrated that Hcys-treated fibrinogen in comparison with native molecule had a distinct capability to mediate platelet adhesion. Both, unstimulated and thrombin-activated platelets showed a reduced ability to adhere to Hcys-mediated fibrinogen. HTL (at all tested concentrations) had similar properties when we used thrombin-activated platelets. In conclusion, the results reported in this study could be useful for a better understanding of changes in hemostasis during hyperhomocysteinemia.

  6. The effects of drugs used in anaesthesia on platelet membrane receptors and on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A

    2002-06-01

    Platelet dysfunctions are known origins of perioperative bleeding disorders which are a major concern in the management of surgical patients. Among multiple factors, interactions of drugs used in anaesthesia with platelets have been implicated to aggravate the risk of haemorrhagic complications. This paper reviews in vitro and in vivo studies which have examined the effects of inhalational, intravenous, and local anaesthetics, opioids, and muscle relaxants on platelets. A brief summary of platelet physiology, function tests, and flow cytometric assessment of membrane receptors is included. Although the results of many studies have been conflicting, it appears that halothane, sevoflurane, and propofol inhibit platelet function in a reversible and dose-related manner at concentrations used clinically. Ilalothane affects the intracellular activating second messenger inositol triphosphate, platelet calcium homeostasis, thromboxane A2 formation, and the inhibiting signal transduction pathway including cyclic adenosine monophosphate. The proposed platelet inhibiting mechanism of sevoflurane involves the suppression of thromboxane A2 formation. Propofol appears to cause platelet dysfunctions by inhibiting calcium mobilisation upon agonist stimulation. Nitrous oxide causes a modest suppression of calcium mobilisation. An interaction of local anaesthetics with components in the platelet membrane appears to account for their inhibiting effect, but only at concentrations far higher than that found during clinical use. A clinically relevant antithrombotic effect of regional anaesthesia has been observed, though. Isoflurane, enflurane, desflurane, barbiturates, etomidate, opioids, and muscle relaxants seem to have negligible effects on platelets at therapeutic concentrations. Anaesthetists should be aware of the potential impairment of the coagulation profile by anaesthetic agents.

  7. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  8. Mesoscopic Modeling of Blood Clotting: Coagulation Cascade and Platelets Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    The process of clot formation and growth at a site on a blood vessel wall involve a number of multi-scale simultaneous processes including: multiple chemical reactions in the coagulation cascade, species transport and flow. To model these processes we have incorporated advection-diffusion-reaction (ADR) of multiple species into an extended version of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method which is considered as a coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics method. At the continuum level this is equivalent to the Navier-Stokes equation plus one advection-diffusion equation for each specie. The chemistry of clot formation is now understood to be determined by mechanisms involving reactions among many species in dilute solution, where reaction rate constants and species diffusion coefficients in plasma are known. The role of blood particulates, i.e. red cells and platelets, in the clotting process is studied by including them separately and together in the simulations. An agonist-induced platelet activation mechanism is presented, while platelets adhesive dynamics based on a stochastic bond formation/dissociation process is included in the model.

  9. Cryopreservation of Autologous Blood (Red Blood Cells, Platelets and Plasma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebine, Kunio

    Prevention of post-transfusion hepatitis is still a problem in cardiovascular surgery. We initiated the cryopreservation of autologous blood for the transfusion in elective cardiovascular surgery since 1981. This study includes 152 surgical cases in which autologous frozen, allogeneic frozen, and/or allogeneic non-frozen blood were used. In the 152 surgical cases, there were 69 cases in which autologous blood only (Group I) was used; 12 cases with autologous and allogeneic frozen blood (Group II); 46 cases with autologous and allgeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group III); and 25 cases with allogeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group IV). No hepatitis developed in Groups I (0%) and II (0%), but there was positive hepatitis in Groups III (4.3%) and IV (8.0%) . In 357 cases of those who underwent surgery with allogeneic non-frozen whole blood during the same period, the incidence rate of hepatitis was 13.7% (49/357). Patients awaiting elective surgery can store their own blood in the frozen state. Patients who undergo surgery with the cryoautotransfusion will not produce any infections or immunologic reactions as opposed to those who undergo surgery with the allogeneic non-frozen blood.

  10. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Walter H A; Lo, Richard W; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Weyrich, Andrew S; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L

    2013-11-07

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2(-/-) mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2(-/-) platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2(-/-) platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2(-/-) bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2(-/-) mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production.

  11. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of (14C)serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of (14C)serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of (14C)serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of (14C)serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP.

  12. Normal platelet function in platelet concentrates requires non-platelet cells: a comparative in vitro evaluation of leucocyte-rich (type 1a) and leucocyte-poor (type 3b) platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, William R; Roides, Breana; Hwang, Julia; Mafilios, Michael; Story, Brooks; Bhattacharyya, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic success of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may vary based on the composition and preparation method. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cellular components of platelet concentrates produced by a leucocyte-rich (LR-PRP) and a leucocyte-poor PRP systems (LP-PRP). Methods Parameters evaluated included platelet recovery, platelet concentration, red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) composition, platelet growth factor release and stimulation of human tendon cell proliferation in vitro. Results Platelet recoveries were 52% for LP-PRP and 89% for LR-PRP. LR-PRP demonstrated greater reproducibility with a 4.2% coefficient of variation (CV) compared with 19.4% for LP-PRP (p<0.001). LR-PRP demonstrated a greater increase in platelet concentration (7.9-fold) than LP-PRP (2.2-fold; p<0.001). LP-PRP showed 5.0-fold reductions in WBCs, while LR-PRP showed a 4.0-fold increase (p<0.001). LP-PRP reduced RBCs to a haematocrit of 0.25, while LR-PRP reduced haematocrit to 11.8. LP-PRP did not coagulate robustly on reactivation with CaCl2, and released significantly lower levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) than whole blood (p<0.03). LP-PRP also did not stimulate tendon cell proliferation greater than whole blood. In contrast, LR-PRP showed increases in each growth factor on activation with CaCl2 (p<0.01) and stimulated greater proliferation (p<0.05) compared with whole blood. Forced activation of LP-PRP with exogenous thrombin rescued the coagulation deficiency and induced greater growth factor release than comparable whole blood (p<0.03). Conclusions These data suggest that non-platelet cellular components in platelet concentrates are important for proper platelet function, including thrombin generation, growth factor release and clot retraction. PMID:27900155

  13. [Changes of platelet aggregation function of apheresis collected platelets and soluble P-selectin during storage].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zuo-Ting; Yang, Li-Hong; Tao, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Ming-Shan; Hong, Jun-Ying; Zhou, Wu; Chen, Zeng-Qiang; Dai, Mei-Jie

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the changes of aggregation function of apheresis platelets and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) during storage. 20 samples of apheresis platelets were collected, and the aggregation function were examined by function test and the level of sP-selectin every day in storage of 5 days. The results showed that the aggregation function of platelets declined obviously during storage, there were significant differences between the first-day group and any of the other groups (p < 0.01). The max platelet aggregation rate was < or = 3% in the fourth-day group; sP-selectin level in plasma increased with prolong of storage time; there were significant differences between the first-day group and any of the other groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, platelets were activated continuously during storage, while its aggregation function declines significantly. The ability of platelet aggregation to response to ADP loses almost completely since the fourth day during platelet storage. It should be paid more attention to the damage of apheresis collected platelets during storage.

  14. Platelet function, activation and apoptosis during and after apheresis.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Rania; Sayed, Douaa; Galal, Hanan; Shaker, Sanaa

    2010-10-01

    Platelets are known to undergo shape change, activation, release reaction and apoptosis/necrosis during processing and storage. Apheresis may have a deleterious impact on platelet achievability and functional integrity. Platelet concentrates from 50 male volunteers obtained by COBE spectra were screened for platelet activation (CD62 and CD154) and apoptosis (phosphatidylserine detected by Annexin V). Donor samples before separation, during apheresis and at the third day of storage were used as baseline donor samples. Platelet aggregation to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen was performed. There was a statistically significant increase in the expression of activation markers in two different samples (during separation samples and third day samples). Although the increase in Annexin V expression was not so observable, it showed a significant increase also. There was marked decline in the platelet aggregation. The correlations between the values of CD62, CD154 and Annexin V were detected in baseline samples and increased during separation and at the third day of platelets storage. Correlation between values of platelet aggregation to collagen and Annexin V was relevant only in the baseline samples. No other correlations were encountered between platelet aggregation and markers of activation and apoptosis during apheresis and storage. Initial platelet activation induced by apheresis may have an impact on phosphatidylserine expression with no impact on aggregation function of platelets during storage.

  15. Platelets generated from human embryonic stem cells are functional in vitro and in the microcirculation of living mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shi-Jiang; Li, Feng; Yin, Hong; Feng, Qiang; Kimbrel, Erin A; Hahm, Eunsil; Thon, Jonathan N; Wang, Wei; Italiano, Joseph E; Cho, Jaehyung; Lanza, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Platelets play an essential role in hemostasis and atherothrombosis. Owing to their short storage time, there is constant demand for this life-saving blood component. In this study, we report that it is feasible to generate functional megakaryocytes and platelets from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on a large scale. Differential-interference contrast and electron microscopy analyses showed that ultrastructural and morphological features of hESC-derived platelets were indistinguishable from those of normal blood platelets. In functional assays, hESC-derived platelets responded to thrombin stimulation, formed microaggregates, and facilitated clot formation/retraction in vitro. Live cell microscopy demonstrated that hESC-platelets formed lamellipodia and filopodia in response to thrombin activation, and tethered to each other as observed in normal blood. Using real-time intravital imaging with high-speed video microscopy, we have also shown that hESC-derived platelets contribute to developing thrombi at sites of laser-induced vascular injury in mice, providing the first evidence for in vivo functionality of hESC-derived platelets. These results represent an important step toward generating an unlimited supply of platelets for transfusion. Since platelets contain no genetic material, they are ideal candidates for early clinical translation involving human pluripotent stem cells.

  16. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults.

  17. [The usefulness of platelet function evaluation in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Elalamy, Ismail; Gkalea, Vasiliki; Gerotziafas, Grigorios; Ketatni, Hela; Hatmi, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis. Functional testing of platelet response has been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances of light transmission aggregometry and development of more useful devices have demonstrated the clinical utility to enlarge platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of residual platelet response seems, with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events. Still a debate, it represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and the basic scientist. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia diagnosis is also difficult and a functional assay is now available for an easier and rapid method to rule out such a life-threatening situation. This review article will describe the available methods of measuring platelet response and will discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  18. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  19. Transporters in human platelets: physiologic function and impact for pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Greinacher, Andreas; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2012-04-12

    Platelets store signaling molecules (eg, serotonin and ADP) within their granules. Transporters mediate accumulation of these molecules in platelet granules and, on platelet activation, their translocation across the plasma membrane. The balance between transporter-mediated uptake and elimination of signaling molecules and drugs in platelets determines their intracellular concentrations and effects. Several members of the 2 major transporter families, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and solute carriers (SLCs), have been identified in platelets. An example of an ABC transporter is MRP4 (ABCC4), which facilitates ADP accumulation in dense granules. MRP4 is a versatile transporter, and various additional functions have been proposed, notably lipid mediator release and a role in aspirin resistance. Several other ABC proteins have been detected in platelets with functions in glutathione and lipid homeostasis. The serotonin transporter (SERT, SLC6A4) in the platelet plasma membrane represents a well-characterized example of the SLC family. Moreover, recent experiments indicate expression of OATP2B1 (SLCO2B1), a high affinity transporter for certain statins, in platelets. Changes in transporter localization and expression can affect platelet function and drug sensitivity. This review summarizes available data on the physiologic and pharmacologic role of transporters in platelets.

  20. FXR and its ligands inhibit the function of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Ali, Marfoua S.; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Sage, Tanya; Flora, Gagan D; Bye, Alex P; Kriek, Neline; Dorchies, Emilie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Dombrowicz, David; Staels, Bart; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective While initially seemingly paradoxical due to the lack of nucleus, platelets possess a number of transcription factors that regulate their function through DNA-independent mechanisms. These include the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), a member of the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that has been identified as a bile acid receptor. In this study, we show that FXR is present in human platelets and FXR ligands, GW4064 and 6-ECDCA, modulate platelet activation nongenomically. Approach and Results FXR ligands inhibited the activation of platelets in response to stimulation of collagen or thrombin receptors, resulting in diminished intracellular calcium mobilization and secretion, fibrinogen binding and aggregation. Exposure to FXR ligands also reduced integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling and thereby reduced the ability of platelets to spread and to stimulate clot retraction. FXR function in platelets was found to be associated with the modulation of cGMP levels in platelets and associated downstream inhibitory signaling. Platelets from FXR-deficient mice were refractory to the actions of FXR agonists on platelet function and cyclic nucleotide signaling, firmly linking the non-genomic actions of these ligands to the FXR receptor. Conclusion This study provides support for the ability of FXR ligands to modulate platelet activation. The athero-protective effects of GW4064, with its novel antiplatelet effects, indicate FXR as a potential target for prevention of athero-thrombotic disease. PMID:27758768

  1. The multifunctionality of berries toward blood platelets and the role of berry phenolics in cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2016-10-25

    Diet and nutrition have an important influence on the prophylaxis and progression of cardiovascular disease; one example is the inhibition of blood platelet functions by specific components of fruits and vegetables. Garlic, onion, ginger, dark chocolate and polyunsaturated fatty acids all reduce blood platelet aggregation. A number of fruits contain a range of cardioprotective antioxidants and vitamins, together with a large number of non-nutrient phytochemicals such as phenolic compounds, which may possess both antioxidant properties and anti-platelet activity. Fresh berries and berry extracts possess high concentrations of phenolic compounds, i.e. phenolic acid, stilbenoids, flavonoids and lignans. The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of current knowledge of the anti-platelet activity of berries, which form an integral part of the human diet. It describes the effects of phenolic compounds present in a number of berries, i.e. black chokeberries - aronia berries (Aronia melanocarpa), blueberries (Vaccinium myrtillus), cranberries (Vaccinium sect. Oxycoccus), sea buckthorn berries (Hippophae rhamnoides) and grapes (Vitis), as well as various commercial products from berries (i.e. juices), on platelets and underlying mechanisms. Studies show that the effects of berries on platelet activity are dependent on not only the concentrations of the phenolic compounds in the berries or the class of phenolic compounds, but also the types of berry and the form (fresh berry, juice or medicinal product). Different results indicate that berries may play a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disorders, but the development of well-controlled clinical studies with berries is encouraged.

  2. Association of MicroRNAs and YRNAs with Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Lukas H.; Barwari, Temo; Willeit, Peter; Pechlaner, Raimund; Sunderland, Nicholas P.; Willeit, Karin; Morton, Allison C.; Armstrong, Paul C.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lu, Ruifang; Yin, Xiaoke; Gracio, Filipe; Dudek, Katarzyna; Langley, Sarah R.; Zampetaki, Anna; de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Ye, Shu; Warner, Timothy D.; Saxena, Alka; Kiechl, Stefan; Storey, Robert F.; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Platelets shed microRNAs (miRNAs). Plasma miRNAs change upon platelet inhibition. It is unclear if plasma miRNA levels correlate with platelet function. Objective To link small RNAs to platelet reactivity. Methods and Results Next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in plasma revealed two peaks at 22-23 and 32-33 nucleotides corresponding to miRNAs and YRNAs, respectively. Among YRNAs, predominantly fragments of RNY4 and RNY5 were detected. Plasma miRNAs and YRNAs were measured in 125 patients with a history of ACS who had undergone detailed assessment of platelet function 30 days after the acute event. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions, 92 miRNAs were assessed in ACS patients on different anti-platelet therapies. Key platelet-related miRNAs and YRNAs were correlated with platelet function tests. MiR-223 (rp=0.28, n=121, P=0.002), miR-126 (rp=0.22, n=121, P=0.016), other abundant platelet miRNAs and YRNAs showed significant positive correlations with the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay. YRNAs, miR-126 and miR-223 were also among the small RNAs showing the greatest dependency on platelets, and strongly correlated with plasma levels of P-selectin, platelet factor 4 and platelet basic protein in the population-based Bruneck study (n=669). A single nucleotide polymorphism that facilitates processing of pri-miR-126 to mature miR-126 accounted for a rise in circulating platelet activation markers. Inhibition of miR-126 in mice reduced platelet aggregation. MiR-126 directly and indirectly affects ADAM9 and P2Y12 receptor expression. Conclusions Levels of platelet-related plasma miRNAs and YRNAs correlate with platelet function tests in ACS patients and platelet activation markers in the general population. Alterations in miR-126 affect platelet reactivity. PMID:26646931

  3. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  4. Adenosine diphosphate receptors on blood platelets: potential new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Rozalski, Marcin; Nocun, Marek; Watala, Cezary

    2005-01-01

    Platelets play a key role not only in physiological haemostasis, but also under pathological conditions such as thrombosis. Platelet activation may be initiated by a variety of agonists including thrombin, collagen, thromboxane or adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Although ADP is regarded as a weak agonist of blood platelets, it remains an important mediator of platelet activation evoked by other agonists, which induce massive ADP release from dense granules, where it occurs in molar concentrations. Thus, ADP action underlies a positive feedback that facilitates further platelet aggregation and leads to platelet plug formation. Additionally, ADP acts synergistically to other, even weak, agonists such as serotonin, adrenaline or chemokines. Blood platelets express two types of P2Y ADP receptors: P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). ADP-dependent platelet aggregation is initiated by the P2Y1 receptor, whereas P2Y(12) receptor augments the activating signal and promotes platelet release reaction. Stimulation of P2Y(12) is also essential for ADP-mediated complete activation of GPIIb-IIIa and GPIa-IIa, and further stabilization of platelet aggregates. The crucial role in blood platelet biology makes P2(Y12) an ideal candidate for pharmacological approaches for anti-platelet therapy.

  5. Mathematical models of blood coagulation and platelet adhesion: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Panteleev, M A; Ananyeva, N M; Ataullakhanov, F I; Saenko, E L

    2007-01-01

    At present, computer-assisted molecular modeling and virtual screening have become effective and widely-used tools for drug design. However, a prerequisite for design and synthesis of a therapeutic agent is determination of a correct target in the metabolic system, which should be either inhibited or stimulated. Solution of this extremely complicated problem can also be assisted by computational methods. This review discusses the use of mathematical models of blood coagulation and platelet-mediated primary hemostasis and thrombosis as cost-effective and time-saving tools in research, clinical practice, and development of new therapeutic agents and biomaterials. We focus on four aspects of their application: 1) efficient diagnostics, i.e. theoretical interpretation of diagnostic data, including sensitivity of various clotting assays to the changes in the coagulation system; 2) elucidation of mechanisms of coagulation disorders (e.g. hemophilias and thrombophilias); 3) exploration of mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents (e.g. recombinant activated factor VII) and planning rational therapeutic strategy; 4) development of biomaterials with non-thrombogenic properties in the design of artificial organs and implantable devices. Accumulation of experimental knowledge about the blood coagulation system and about platelets, combined with impressive increase of computational power, promises rapid development of this field.

  6. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  7. Metastasis: new functional implications of platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphael; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2016-07-07

    Platelets are essential components of hemostasis. Due to a plethora of factors released on activation, platelet functions are also connected to tumor growth, notably by acting on angiogenesis. It is now well recognized that major roles of platelets in the poor outcome of cancer patients occurs during hematogenous dissemination of cancer cells. In this review, we describe recent insights into the molecular mechanisms supporting the prometastatic activity of platelets. Platelets have been shown to promote survival of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream by conferring resistance to the shear stress and attack from natural killer cells. Recently, platelets were found to promote and/or maintain the state of epithelial to mesenchymal transition on CTCs through platelet secretion of transforming growth factor β in response to CTC activation. At a later stage in the metastatic process, platelets promote extravasation and establishment of metastatic cells in distant organs as observed in bone. This particular environment is also the site of hematopoiesis, megakaryocytopoiesis, and platelet production. Increasing the number of megakaryocytes (MKs) in the bone marrow results in a high bone mass phenotype and inhibits skeletal metastasis formation of prostate cancer cells. As a result of their specific location in vascular niches in the bone marrow, MK activity might contribute to the "seed and soil" suitability between CTCs and bone. In conclusion, recent findings have made a great advance in our knowledge on how platelets contribute to the metastatic dissemination of cancer cells and that may support the development of new antimetastasis therapies.

  8. CEACAM1 regulates integrin αIIbβ3-mediated functions in platelets.

    PubMed

    Yip, Jana; Alshahrani, Musaed; Beauchemin, Nicole; Jackson, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have implicated that the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, CEACAM1 may regulate integrin function. While CEACAM1 has been demonstrated to play a role as an inhibitory co-receptor of ITAM-associated GPVI/FcR γ-chain signaling pathways in platelets, its physiologic role in integrin αIIbβ3-mediated platelet function is unclear. In this study, we investigate the functional importance of Ceacam1 in murine platelets. We show that CEACAM1 is constitutively associated with integrin αIIbβ3 in resting human and mouse platelets as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation studies. Using Ceacam1-deficient mice, we show that they have prolonged tail bleeding times and volume of blood lost that is corrected by reconstitution with platelet Ceacam1. Ceacam1(-/-) platelets have moderate integrin αIIbβ3 mediated functional defects with impaired kinetics of platelet spreading on fibrinogen and failure to retract fibrin clots in vitro. This functional integrin αIIbβ3 defect could not be attributed to altered integrin αIIbβ3 expression. Ceacam1(-/-) platelets displayed normal "inside-out" signaling properties as demonstrated by normal agonist-induced binding of soluble (fluorescein isothiocyanate) FITC-fibrinogen, JON/A antibody binding, and increases in cytosolic free calcium levels. This study provides direct evidence that Ceacam1 is essential for normal integrin αIIbβ3-mediated platelet function and that disruption of mouse Ceacam1 induced moderate integrin αIIbβ3-mediated functional defects.

  9. Extracts from Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum aerial parts as modulators of blood platelet adhesion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Malinowska, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of reports indicate that some species of clover (Trifolium) may have remarkable medical importance; however, the effects of these plants on blood platelets and hemostasis are inadequately recognized. This work was designed to study the effects of Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum extracts on the functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were preincubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pallidum (phenolic fraction and clovamide fraction) and T. scabrum (phenolic fraction) at the final concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin (0.1 U/ml), thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 20 µM), or adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 1 µM) were used. The effects of Trifolium extracts on adhesion of blood platelets to fibrinogen and collagen were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Platelet aggregation was monitored on a dual-channel Chronolog aggregometer. In these studies, we also compared the action of tested plant extracts with the effects of another antiplatelet plant-derived compound - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The performed assays demonstrated that the tested extracts might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of all tested extracts on adhesion of thrombin-stimulated platelets to collagen was found. Both extracts from T. pallidum and from T. scabrum reduced the thrombin-induced platelet adhesion to fibrinogen. Furthermore, in the presence of all three extracts, the platelet aggregation induced by thrombin was slightly inhibited. Our results also indicate that the tested plant extracts (at the highest concentrations used of 50 µg/ml), similar to purified resveratrol, inhibit selected steps of platelet activation stimulated by both proteolytic (thrombin) and nonproteolytic agonists (TRAP or ADP). In the comparative studies, T. pallidum and T. scabrum extracts was not found

  10. Regulating billions of blood platelets: glycans and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Grozovsky, Renata; Giannini, Silvia; Falet, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The human body produces and removes 1011 platelets daily to maintain a normal steady state platelet count. Platelet production must be regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. Multifaceted and complex mechanisms control platelet production and removal in physiological and pathological conditions. This review will focus on different mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. It will also briefly address platelet transfusion and the role of glycans in the clearance of stored platelets. PMID:26330242

  11. Regulating billions of blood platelets: glycans and beyond.

    PubMed

    Grozovsky, Renata; Giannini, Silvia; Falet, Hervé; Hoffmeister, Karin M

    2015-10-15

    The human body produces and removes 10(11) platelets daily to maintain a normal steady state platelet count. Platelet production must be regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. Multifaceted and complex mechanisms control platelet production and removal in physiological and pathological conditions. This review will focus on different mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. It will also briefly address platelet transfusion and the role of glycans in the clearance of stored platelets.

  12. Imipramine binding in subpopulations of normal human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1984-02-01

    Imipramine binding was studied in platelet membranes isolated with different proportions of heavy (young) and light (old) platelets. The B/sub max/, a measure of the number of binding sites, was greater in the heavier platelets than in the light platelets. However, the dissociation constant K/sub d/ (a reflection of the affinity of imipramine binding) was greater in the lighter platelets compared to the heavy platelets. These results indicate that differences in K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ in particular membrane preparation, could be due to the differences in the relative proportion of heavy and light platelets.

  13. Platelet-Rich Blood Derivatives for Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Leijten, Jeroen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Platelet rich blood derivatives have been widely used in different fields of medicine and stem cell based tissue engineering. They represent natural cocktails of autologous growth factor, which could provide an alternative for recombinant protein based approaches. Platelet rich blood derivatives, such as platelet rich plasma, have consistently shown to potentiate stem cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Here, we review the spectrum of platelet rich blood derivatives, discuss their current applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, reflect on their effect on stem cells, and highlight current translational challenges. PMID:27047733

  14. Reversible translocation of glycoprotein Ib in plasmin-treated platelets: consequences for platelet function.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Soria, C; Soria, J; De Romeuf, C; Perrot, J Y; Tenza, D; Garcia, I; Caen, J P; Cramer, E M

    1993-12-01

    Understanding the effect of fibrinolysis on platelet function is of clinical importance. Plasmin is recognized to affect platelet adhesive function by reducing the interaction of platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib with von Willebrand factor (vWF) bound to the subendothelium. This platelet function is commonly explored in vitro by the ristocetin-induced agglutination test. Our previous study demonstrated a plasmin-induced redistribution of GP Ib molecules from the platelet surface to the linings of the surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS), a critical mechanism for understanding plasmin-induced GP Ib dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of plasmin by its inhibitors, aprotinin or tripeptide Val-Phe-Lys-CH2Cl, permits a time dependent recovery (within 30 min) of ristocetin-induced agglutination in the platelets which were stimulated by plasmin at < 1 CU ml-1. This functional recovery was accompanied with a restoration of a normal amount of GP Ib on the platelet surface, as measured by the binding of both monoclonal anti-GP Ib antibody SZ 2 and 125I-labelled vWF to the platelets. Cytochalasin D did not inhibit this recovery, suggesting that this process may be due to passive actin depolymerization. These findings were further confirmed by immunoelectron microscopic study. Utilizing the platelets pre-labelled with anti-GP Ib antibody prior to plasmin stimulation, it was demonstrated that the observed recovery is due to a reverse translocation from the SCCS to the plasma membrane of the same GP Ib molecules which were present initially at the cell surface.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. IVBT-documented platelet function correlates with flow cytometric data.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, J; Bonacker, G; Kretschmer, V; Schulzki, T; Heimanns, J

    1996-12-01

    Thrombocytopenic patients with identical platelet counts often show different bleeding tendencies owing to significant differences in the platelet function. This could be demonstrated by the in vitro bleeding test (IVBT). Using flow cytometry, we tried to find characteristics of platelet antigen expression in order to explain these differences in function. Thirty patients with bone marrow hypoplasia receiving 65 platelet transfusions (mainly from a cell separator) were observed for 3 to 29 days. Size, granulation and fluorescence of platelet-rich plasma (n = 522 samples) were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies against GP IIIb (collagen receptor), GP IIb/IIIa (fibrinogen receptor) and GP Ib (thrombin receptor). We defined separate gates for each antibody using the results from 50 normals and by laying an orthograde cross over the gate to divide the gate into four equal quadrants. The platelet populations were divided into four different groups according to the occlusion time (OT) of the IVBT and the Simplate time (ST). The thrombocytes with the most impaired function (OT > or = 485 s/ST > 30 min) had significantly less platelet fluorescence when marked with antibodies against GP IIIb and GP Ib than those with short OT and ST (OT < 100 s/ST < 15 min). Similar results were obtained when evaluating the data relative to the bone marrow status: patients with < 1000 WBC/microliters showed significantly less platelet fluorescence when marked with anti-GP IIIb and anti-GP Ib than thrombocytopenic patients, who had a spontaneous platelet rise beyond 30,000 platelets/microliters a few days later. One day after platelet transfusion, significantly more platelets with high GP IIIb and Ib expression could be found. We were also able to document better transfusion efficacy of platelet concentrates with high GP IIIb and Ib expression. Finally, patients with high bleeding scores showed less GP Ib expression on the platelets than patients with low bleeding scores. In summary, the

  16. Bleeding tendency and platelet function during treatment with romiplostim in children with severe immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Suntsova, Elena V; Demina, Irina M; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Ershov, Nikolay M; Trubina, Natalia M; Dobrynina, Juliya; Serkova, Irina V; Supik, Zhanna S; Orekhova, Ekaterina V; Hachatryan, Lili A; Kotskaya, Natalia N; Pshonkin, Aleksey V; Maschan, Aleksey A; Novichkova, Galina A; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2017-03-07

    It has been suggested that platelet function in chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) may be abnormal. Thrombopoietin mimetics used for treatment can affect it, but the data remain limited. We investigated platelet function of 20 children diagnosed with severe ITP (aged 1-16 years, 12 females and eight males). Platelet functional activity in whole blood was characterized by flow cytometry before and after stimulation with SFLLRN plus collagen-related peptide. Levels of CD42b, PAC1, and CD62P, but not CD61 or annexin V, were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in resting platelets of patients before treatment compared with healthy donors. On average, PAC1 and CD62P in patients after activation were also significantly elevated, although some patients failed to activate integrins. Romiplostim (1-15 μg/kg/week s.c.) was prescribed to seven patients, with clinical improvement in six. Interestingly, one patient had clinical improvement without platelet count increase. Eltrombopag (25-75 mg/day p.o.) was given to four patients, with positive response in one. Others switched to romiplostim, with one stable positive response, one unstable positive response, and one non-responding. Platelet quality improved with romiplostim treatment, and their parameters approached the normal values. Our results suggest that platelets in children with severe ITP are pre-activated and abnormal, but improve with treatment.

  17. Comparative studies on homocysteine and its metabolite-homocysteine thiolactone action in blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, B; Kedzierska, M; Wachowicz, B

    2008-11-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy), an intermediate formed during the catabolism of the essential dietary amino acid methionine, and its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (TL) formed from Hcy in plasma, may be implicated in pathological haemostasis and atherosclerosis. The mechanism by which TL exerts the prothrombotic effect and influences blood platelets remains unclear. Activation of blood platelets plays an important role in prothrombotic events. The aim of our study was to establish and compare the influence of a reduced form of homocysteine (at final doses of 10-100 microM) and its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (0.1-1 microM), on platelet activation induced by thrombin (platelet aggregation), on platelet protein modifications (determined by parameters such as level of protein carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine residues in proteins) and on superoxide anion radicals ( O2-*) generation using the model system in vitro. We have observed that TL, like its precursor, Hcy, stimulates the generation of O2* in platelets and causes an augmentation of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. Our present results in vitro also demonstrate that Hcy (10-100 microM) and TL at lower doses than Hcy (0.1-1 microM) cause modification of platelet proteins: diminished formation of carbonyl groups and distinctly decreased tyrosine nitration in platelet proteins after thrombin stimulation, but increased platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. TL like Hcy (at concentrations corresponding to concentrations in blood during hyperhomocysteinemia) modifies platelet responses to an important physiological agonist--thrombin.

  18. Platelet and red blood cell utilization and transfusion independence in umbilical cord blood and allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Solh, Melhem; Brunstein, Claudio; Morgan, Shanna; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have substantial transfusion requirements. Factors associated with increased transfusions and the extent of blood product use in umbilical cord blood (UCB) recipients are uncertain. We reviewed blood product use in 229 consecutive adult recipients of allogeneic HCT at the University of Minnesota: 147 with leukemia, 82 lymphoma or myeloma; 58% received unrelated UCB and 43% sibling donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts. Although neutrophil recovery was prompt (UCB median 17, range: 2-45 days, and PBSC 14, range: 3-34 days), only 135 of 229 (59% cumulative incidence) achieved red blood cell (RBC) independence and 157 (69%) achieved platelet independence by 6 months. Time to platelet independence was prolonged in UCB recipients (median UCB 41 versus PBSC 14 days) and in patients who had received a prior transplant (median 48 versus 32 days). Patients who received UCB grafts required more RBC through day 60 post-HCT (mean UCB 7.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7-8.9) versus PBSC 5.2 (3.7-6.7) transfusions, P = .04), and more platelet transfusions (mean 25.2 (95% CI 22.1-28.2) versus 12.9 (9.4-16.4), P < .01) compared to PBSC recipients. Patients receiving myeloablative (MA) conditioning required more RBC and platelet transfusions during the first 2 months post-HCT compared to reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) (7.4 versus 6.2, P = .30 for RBC; 23.2 versus 17.5, P = .07 for platelets). Despite prompt neutrophil engraftment, UCB recipients had delayed platelet recovery as well as more prolonged and costly blood product requirements. Enhanced approaches to accelerate multilineage engraftment could limit the transfusion-associated morbidity and costs accompanying UCB allotransplantation.

  19. A simple method for ex vivo evaluation of biomaterial interaction with blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, F; Marconi, W; Caprino, L; Goglia, G; Togna, G

    1980-09-01

    The process of thrombus formation, as a consequence of the interaction of artificial surfaces with blood, is related to the activation of blood platelets. A simple ex vivo method, which is suitable for the evaluation of the platelet-surface interaction is described. This method has been used to compare the haemocompatibility of several artificial materials, including nylon-6, Silastic and pyrolytic carbon.

  20. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrate abrogates lymphocyte activation without affecting platelet function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, R.A.; Duffy, B.F.; Rodey, G.G.

    1985-11-01

    We studied the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on platelet concentrates. Samples irradiated at 310 mm for 30 minutes at a dose of 1782 J per m2 showed no loss of platelet function in vitro as determined by adenosine diphosphate, collagen, or ristocetin-induced aggregation. Lymphocytes isolated from irradiated units were unable to act as responders or stimulators in a mixed-lymphocyte reaction. These data suggest that UV radiation of platelet concentrates may result in a cell suspension that is unable to evoke an immunological response.

  1. Effects of cisplatin and selenite on the level of thiols in pig blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, B; Krajewski, T; Olas, B; Zbikowska, H M

    1995-03-01

    The level of free sulfhydryl groups of glutathione and proteins in pig blood platelets after short lasting incubation (30 min.) of these cells with cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II) and sodium selenite was investigated in vitro. The concentration of the platelet thiols after sodium selenite or cisplatin treatment distinctly decreased (p < 0.001). Pretreatment of blood platelets with sodium selenite at the low concentration (0.1 microM) protected platelet glutathione against the reaction with cisplatin (p < 0.001). The present study shows that in blood platelets after the incubation with cisplatin the GS-platinum complex was formed. The results of our experiments demonstrated also that the extracellular GSH (1 mM) had the protective effect against cisplatin-induced peroxidation of platelet lipids.

  2. Evaluation of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus on biological properties of blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus in blood platelets stimulated by thrombin was studied. Thrombin as a strong physiological agonist induces the enzymatic peroxidation of endogenous arachidonic acid, the formation of different reactive oxygen species, including superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text](·)) and the platelet aggregation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the polyphenolic fraction from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus may change the biological properties of blood platelets activated by thrombin. We used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this fraction to change [Formula: see text](·) generation in platelets. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin (8-EPI) F(2). Moreover, we determined the effects of the fraction on blood platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. We observed that the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced [Formula: see text](·), 8-EPI and TBARS production in these cells. The ability of the fraction to decrease the [Formula: see text](·) generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. This study may suggest that the tested plant fraction might be a good candidate for protecting blood platelets against changes of their biological functions, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular disorders.

  3. Morphological and functional platelet abnormalities in Berkeley sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Shet, Arun S; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jirouskova, Marketa; Janczak, Christin A; Stevens, Jacqueline R M; Adamson, Adewole; Mohandas, Narla; Manci, Elizabeth A; Cynober, Therese; Coller, Barry S

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley sickle cell mice are used as animal models of human sickle cell disease but there are no reports of platelet studies in this model. Since humans with sickle cell disease have platelet abnormalities, we studied platelet morphology and function in Berkeley mice (SS). We observed elevated mean platelet forward angle light scatter (FSC) values (an indirect measure of platelet volume) in SS compared to wild type (WT) (37+/-3.2 vs. 27+/-1.4, mean+/-SD; p<0.001), in association with moderate thrombocytopenia (505+/-49 x 10(3)/microl vs. 1151+/-162 x 10(3)/microl; p<0.001). Despite having marked splenomegaly, SS mice had elevated levels of Howell-Jolly bodies and "pocked" erythrocytes (p<0.001 for both) suggesting splenic dysfunction. SS mice also had elevated numbers of thiazole orange positive platelets (5+/-1% vs. 1+/-1%; p<0.001), normal to low plasma thrombopoietin levels, normal plasma glycocalicin levels, normal levels of platelet recovery, and near normal platelet life spans. Platelets from SS mice bound more fibrinogen and antibody to P-selectin following activation with a threshold concentration of a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide compared to WT mice. Enlarged platelets are associated with a predisposition to arterial thrombosis in humans and some humans with SCD have been reported to have large platelets. Thus, additional studies are needed to assess whether large platelets contribute either to pulmonary hypertension or the large vessel arterial occlusion that produces stroke in some children with sickle cell disease.

  4. Inhibition of Platelet Aggregation by Supernates from Stored Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    platelet aggregates in fresh whole blood.[10] In those experiments , we observed that platelets in blood incubated with supernates from stored RBC...volumes in sterile cryovials, and the vials were stored at -80C. For each experiment , aliquots were thawed quickly in a 37°C water bath just before...The final ratio of whole blood to supernate was 2:1. For each experiment , blood was collected first into one red top Vacutainer tube (no anti

  5. Effect of intravascular neutrophil chemotactic factors on blood neutrophil and platelet kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Issekutz, A.C.; Ripley, M.

    1986-02-01

    Intravenous infusion of an analogue (f-met-leu-phe (FMLP)) of a bacterial-derived polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) chemotactic factor, or of the complement-derived chemotactic stimulus, zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP, containing C5ades Arg) into rabbits induces acute PMNL margination in the pulmonary vasculature. The pulmonary PMNL sequestration is accompanied by thrombocytopenia. Because of the role platelets and PMNLs play in hemostasis and defense against infection, we studied the fate of these blood elements following sequestration induced by chemotactic factors. By employing 111In-labelled platelets and external radioisotope scanning, platelets were found to sequester in the pulmonary vasculature during FMLP infusion. Simultaneous 51Cr PMNL and 111In-platelet studies showed that following sequestration, PMNLs returned to the circulation and disappeared with a normal half-life (T1/2) whereas the T1/2 of the platelets was markedly shortened (T1/2 of control = 49 +/- 3.0 hr; FMLP or ZAP infused T1/2 = 27 +/- 2.7 hr). Infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) induced PMN and platelet sequestration with similar abnormalities in platelet kinetics. Studies with 51Cr- and 14C-serotonin-labelled platelets showed that platelets did not release serotonin during FMLP, ZAP, or low dose PAF-induced sequestration. In contrast to platelet survival, platelet size, platelet aggregation responses, and platelet glycoproteins were not affected by transient sequestration. These results indicate that during PMNL margination induced by relatively pure PMNL stimuli such as FMLP, platelets may reversibly marginate and subsequently be cleared at an accelerated rate. The reason for accelerated platelet clearance is not a result of circulating platelet aggregates or detectable proteolytic modification of membrane glycoproteins.

  6. Platelet and Red Blood Cell Utilization and Transfusion Independence in Umbilical Cord Blood and Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Solh, Melhem; Brunstein, Claudio; Morgan, Shanna; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have substantial transfusion requirements. Factors associated with increased transfusions and the extent of blood product use in umbilical cord blood (UCB) recipients are uncertain. We reviewed blood product use in 229 consecutive adult recipients of allogeneic HCT at the University of Minnesota: 147 with leukemia, 82 lymphoma or myeloma; 58% received unrelated UCB and 43% sibling donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts. Although neutrophil recovery was prompt (UCB median 17, range 2–45 days, and PBSC 14, range 3–34 days), only 135 of 229 (59% cumulative incidence, CI) achieved RBC independence and 157 (69%) achieved platelet independence by 6 months. Time to platelet independence was prolonged in UCB recipients (median UCB 41 vs. PBSC 14 days) and in patients who had received a prior transplant (median 48 vs. 32 days). Patients who received UCB grafts required more RBC through day 60 post HCT (mean UCB 7.8 (95% CI 6.7–8.9) vs. PBSC 5.2 (3.7–6.7) transfusions, p=0.04), and more platelet transfusions (mean 25.2 (95% CI 22.1–28.2) vs. 12.9 (9.4–16.4), p<0.01) compared to PBSC recipients. Patient receiving myeloablative (MA) conditioning required more RBC and platelet transfusions during the first 2 months post HCT compared to reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) (7.4 vs. 6.2, p=0.3 for RBC; 23.2 vs 17.5, p=0.07 for platelets). Despite prompt neutrophil engraftment, UCB recipients had delayed platelet recovery as well as more prolonged and costly blood product requirements. Enhanced approaches to accelerate multilineage engraftment could limit the transfusion-associated morbidity and costs accompanying UCB allotransplantation. PMID:20813199

  7. Platelet membrane glycoproteins and their function: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, T J

    1989-07-01

    The membrane glycoproteins (GP) of human platelets act as receptors that mediate two important functions, adhesion to the subendothelial matrix and platelet-platelet cohesion, or aggregation. Many of these glycoprotein receptors exist as noncovalently linked heterodimers, including those that belong to the supergene family of adhesion receptors called the integrins. Human platelets contain at least five members of this integrin family, including a collagen receptor (GP Ia-IIa; alpha 2, beta 1), a fibronectin receptor (GP Ic-IIa; alpha 5, beta 1), a laminin receptor (GP Ic'-IIa; alpha 6, beta 1), a vitronectin receptor (VnR; alpha v, beta 3), and a promiscuous, activation-dependent receptor that is thought to be the receptor most responsible for fibrinogen-dependent, platelet-platelet cohesion (GP IIb-IIIa; alpha IIb, beta 3). Some, but not all, of the integrins bind to a tripeptide sequence, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), on the adhesive proteins. In addition to the integrins, platelets contain other membrane glyco-proteins: GP Ib-IX, a receptor for von Willebrand factor, which is thought to be the receptor most responsible for platelet adhesion to the subendothelial matrix in a flowing system; GP V, which may be associated with GP Ib-IX and whose function remains unknown; and GP IV (GP IIIb), which functions as a receptor for thrombospondin and collagen.

  8. Alterations of platelet function and clot formation kinetics following in vitro exposure to anti-A and -B antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Refaai, Majed A.; Carter, Jessie; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Davidson, Donna C.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Casey, Ann E.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Phipps, Richard P.; Francis, Charles W.; Blumberg, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Background ABO mismatched platelets are commonly transfused despite reported complications. We hypothesized that because platelets possess A and B antigens on their surface, ABO mismatched transfused or recipient platelets could become activated and/or dysfunctional after exposure to anti-A or -B antibodies in the transfused or recipient plasma. We present here in vitro modeling data on the functional effects of exposure of platelets to ABO antibodies. Methods Platelet functions of normal platelets of all ABO types were assessed before and after incubation with normal saline, ABO identical plasmas, or O plasmas with varying titers of anti-A and anti-B (anti-A/B) antibodies. Assays used for this assessment include: platelet aggregation, clot kinetics, thrombin generation, platelet cytoskeletal function, and mediator release. Results Exposure of antigen bearing platelets to O plasma with moderate to high titers of anti-A/B antibodies significantly inhibits aggregation, prolongs PFA-100 epinephrine closure time, disrupts clot formation kinetics, accelerates thrombin generation, reduces total thrombin production, alters platelet cytoskeletal function, and influences pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic mediator release. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a wide range of effects that anti-A/B antibodies have on platelet function, clot formation, thrombin generation, platelet cytoskeletal function, and mediator release. These data provide potential explanations for clinical observations of increased red cell utilization in trauma and surgical patients receiving ABO non-identical blood products. Impaired hemostasis caused by anti-A/B antibodies interacting with A and B antigens on platelets, soluble proteins, and perhaps even endothelial cells is a potential contributing factor to hemorrhage in patients receiving larger volumes of ABO non-identical transfusions. PMID:22624532

  9. In Vitro and Ex Vivo Approaches to Evaluate Next-Generation Tobacco and Non-Tobacco Products on Human Blood Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Sherry L.; Lannan, Katie L.; Loelius, Shannon G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Human blood platelets are major hemostatic regulators in the circulation and important in the mediation of chronic inflammation and immunomodulation. They are key elements that promote cardiovascular pathogenesis that leads to atherosclerosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. New information on tobacco use and platelet dysregulation shows that these highly understudied vascular cells are dysregulated by tobacco smoke. Thus, platelet function studies should be an important consideration for the evaluation of existing and next-generation tobacco and non-tobacco products. Novel in vitro approaches are being sought to investigate these products and their influence on platelet function. Platelets are ideally suited for product assessment, as robust and novel in vitro translational methods are available to assess platelet function. Furthermore, the use of human biological systems has the advantage that risk predictions will better reflect the human condition. PMID:28337466

  10. Platelet microparticles: detection and assessment of their paradoxical functional roles in disease and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Goubran, Hadi Alphonse; Chou, Ming-Li; Devos, David; Radosevic, Mirjana

    2014-07-01

    There is increasing research on and clinical interest in the physiological role played by platelet microparticles (PMPs). PMPs are 0.1-1-μm fragments shed from plasma membranes of platelets that are undergoing activation, stress, or apoptosis. They have a phospholipid-based structure and express functional receptors from platelet membranes. As they are the most abundant microparticles in the blood and they express the procoagulant phosphatidylserine, PMPs likely complement, if not amplify, the functions of platelets in hemostasis, thrombosis, cancer, and inflammation, but also act as promoters of tissue regeneration. Their size and structure make them instrumental in platelet-cell communications as a delivery tool of platelet-borne bioactive molecules including growth factors, other signaling molecules and micro (mi)RNA. PMPs can therefore be a pathophysiological threat or benefit to the cellular environment when interacting with the blood vasculature. There is also increasing evidence that PMP generation is triggered during blood collection, separation into components, and storage, a phenomenon potentially leading to thrombotic and inflammatory side effects in transfused patients. Evaluating PMPs requires strict pre-analytical and analytical procedures to avoid artifactual generation and ensure accurate assessment of the number, size repartitioning, and functional properties. This review describes the physical and functional methods developed for analyzing and quantifying PMPs. It then presents the functional roles of PMPs as markers or triggers of diseases like thrombosis, atherosclerosis, and cancer, and discusses the possible detrimental immunological impact of their generation in blood components. Finally we review the potential function of PMPs in tissue regeneration and the prospects for their use in therapeutic strategies for human health.

  11. [Risk Assessment of Single-Donor (Apheresis) Platelet Concentrates and Pooled Whole-Blood-Derived Platelet Concentrates].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter; Hutschenreuter, Gabriele; Wartensleben, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    According to the risk estimates of the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the Paul Ehrlich-Institute (PEI) an equivalence cannot be assumed to exist between the two different platelet preparations. Differences between single-donor (apheresis) platelet concentrates (ATK) and pooled whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates (PTK) result from donor populations, donation intervals, and preparation techniques. There are no prospective randomized studies with regard to the clinical efficacy, which would unambiguously demonstrate equivalence of the therapeutic efficacy of PTK (buffy coat method) in comparison to ATK. The German Association of Blood Transfusion Services (StKB) points out that, due to the non-equivalence of PTK and ATK, it is incumbent on the transfusion physician to select the platelet concentrate, make the appropriate disclosures, and assume treatment responsibility. Proper compensation for ATK and PTK must be ensured by the health insurance companies, whereby a special indication for the selection of either PTK or ATK is not given. Exceptions are patients with known HLA antibodies in which only selected platelet concentrates may be administered. Otherwise, no indication exists in the selection of the different platelet concentrates (Article is in German).

  12. The first comprehensive and quantitative analysis of human platelet protein composition allows the comparative analysis of structural and functional pathways.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Julia M; Vaudel, Marc; Gambaryan, Stepan; Radau, Sonja; Walter, Ulrich; Martens, Lennart; Geiger, Jörg; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2012-10-11

    Antiplatelet treatment is of fundamental importance in combatting functions/dysfunction of platelets in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Dysfunction of anucleate platelets is likely to be completely attributable to alterations in posttranslational modifications and protein expression. We therefore examined the proteome of platelets highly purified from fresh blood donations, using elaborate protocols to ensure negligible contamination by leukocytes, erythrocytes, and plasma. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we created the first comprehensive and quantitative human platelet proteome, comprising almost 4000 unique proteins, estimated copy numbers for ∼ 3700 of those, and assessed intersubject (4 donors) as well as intrasubject (3 different blood samples from 1 donor) variations of the proteome. For the first time, our data allow for a systematic and weighted appraisal of protein networks and pathways in human platelets, and indicate the feasibility of differential and comprehensive proteome analyses from small blood donations. Because 85% of the platelet proteome shows no variation between healthy donors, this study represents the starting point for disease-oriented platelet proteomics. In the near future, comprehensive and quantitative comparisons between normal and well-defined dysfunctional platelets, or between platelets obtained from donors at various stages of chronic cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases will be feasible.

  13. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  14. Platelets in blood stored in untreated and siliconed glass bottles and plastic bags. I. Studies in vitro.

    PubMed

    KISSMEYER-NIELSEN, F

    1961-11-01

    The number and function (clot retraction) of platelets in blood stored at 4 degrees C. for three weeks in plastic bags and in untreated and siliconed glass containers were determined using EDTA and acid-citrate dextrose (ACD) as anticoagulants. No essential differences were found.

  15. Interactions of human blood-platelets with vaccinia

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, C.E.B.

    1989-01-01

    These investigations were conducted to determine whether vaccinia (strain WR) adsorbs to the human platelet and alters specific platelet activities, namely, the uptake of {sup 14}C-serotonin, the release of {sup 14}C-serotonin and also the release of {sup 14}C-serotonin stimulated by thrombin. Vaccinia did not alter the platelet uptake of {sup 14}C-serotonin. To determine if vaccinia induces a release of {sup 14}C-serotonin from platelets, vaccinia was added to washed or unwashed {sup 14}C-serotonin labeled platelets, and the release of {sup 14}C-Serotonin into the supernatant was measured. Less than 8% of the {sup 14}C-Serotonin was released. The action of vaccinia to alter the platelet release of {sup 14}C-serotonin induced by thrombin was monitored by measuring the radioactivity released from thrombin stimulated {sup 14}C-serotonin labeled platelets incubated with or without vaccinia. Vaccinia inhibited the thrombin induced release of {sup 14}C-serotonin from platelets at a virus to platelet ratios of 5 through 80 plaque forming units (p.f.u.)/platelet. The inhibition was dose dependent. The binding of virus to platelets was determined by a plaque assay of a washed mixture of vaccinia virus and platelets. After inoculation of mixture onto a monolayer of BSC40 cells at a virus to platelet ratio of 0.1 p.f.u./platelet, 50 cell-bound-virus per 130,000-150,000 platelets were enumerated. Vaccinia was observed to inhibit the thrombin induced clot formation of plasma by a thrombin clotting time test. Scanning electron micrographs of the clot formed in the presence of vaccinia revealed a close packed fibrous structure lacking the cross-linked mesh-like pattern seen in a normal clot. Transmission electron micrographs showed an increase in the length and a close packing of the fibrin threads.

  16. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity following distance running.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, J B; Brodthagen, U; Gormsen, J; Jordal, R; Nørregaard-Hansen, K; Paulev, P E

    1982-11-01

    6 long distance runners from the Danish marathon elite and 6 non-runners completed test runs of 28 and 12 km, respectively. Distance runners and non-runners showed the same responses in platelet function. We found a significant decrease in ADP induced platelet aggregability, a decreased serotonin release induced by ADP and collagen and an increase in platelet factor 4 immediately following the run. The antithrombin III levels remained constant. Euglobulin lysis time was shortened (by approximately 50%) and the plasminogen levels significantly increased. The last 2 findings indicate an equal increase in fibrinolytic activity during distance running in both groups. While short term, strenuous exercise induces platelet hyperaggregation, long term distance running induces a state of exhaustion of platelet aggregation capacity.

  17. [Acquired platelet function disorders: pathogenesis, classification, frequency, diagnosis, clinical management].

    PubMed

    Scharf, R E

    2008-12-01

    Given the high consumption of pharmacological agents in western societies, it is not surprising at all that drugs represent the most common cause of acquired platelet dysfunction. While acetylsalicylic acid, clopigogrel and integrin alphaIIbbeta3 (GPIIb-IIIa) receptor antagonists are well-known as prototypes of antiplatelet drugs, other widely used agents including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and volume expanders can also impair platelet function and cause or aggravate haemorrhages. Besides pharmacological agents, certain clinical conditions are often associated with qualitative platelet disorders and bleeding diathesis. Consequently, in contrast to inherited platelet disorders, acquired platelet function defects are much more frequent in clinical practice and deserve special attention. Their pathogenesis is widespread and heterogeneous with various, sometimes overlapping abnormalities. Moreover, acquired platelet dysfunctions can occur at any age and range in severity from mild to life-threatening haemorrhages. Due to their heterogeneity, acquired platelet function disorders will be classified and discussed according to the underlying clinical setting or disease.

  18. Platelet-derived microparticles and platelet function profile in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Youssef, Omneya Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (PMPs) and function profile in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) have not been widely explored. We investigated platelet aggregation, flow cytometric platelet surface receptors (P-selectin and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa) and PMPs in 23 children with cyanotic CHD (CCHD), 30 children with acyanotic CHD (ACHD) and 30 healthy controls correlating these variables to hematological and coagulation parameters including von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF Ag) as a marker of endothelial dysfunction. Hemoglobin, hematocrit (HCT), D-dimer, and vWF Ag were significantly higher in CCHD than ACHD group. Platelet MPs and P-selectin expression were increased in patients than controls, particularly in CCHD and positively correlated to HCT, D-dimer, and vWF Ag while platelet count, aggregation, and GP IIb/IIIa expression were decreased in CCHD compared with ACHD group and negatively correlated to HCT. The overproduction of PMPs and platelet activation with suppressed aggregation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of coagulation/hemostatic abnormalities in children with CCHD.

  19. Homocysteine and its thiolactone may promote apoptotic events in blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Malinowska, Joanna; Rywaniak, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    The actions of homocysteine and its major metabolite, cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone on endothelial cells, blood platelets, plasmatic fibrinogen and plasminogen--the important major components of haemostasis, regulating the flowing properties of blood--are complex and sometimes controversial. Homocysteine (Hcys) can promote apoptosis in endothelial cells, but the role of Hcys and its thiolactone in the apoptotic process in blood platelets is unknown. In order to study the appearance of apoptosis in platelets after treatment with the reduced form of Hcys or its thiolactone different markers were chosen: annexin V binding (phosphatidylserine exposure), platelet microparticle formation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and αIIbβ3 expression in vitro. Apoptotic events and platelet activation were measured by a flow cytometer. In gel-filtered platelets treated with different concentrations of the reduced form of Hcys (25, 50 and 100 µM, 10 min) a significant increase of phosphatidylserine exposure (about 37% at the highest concentration, p < 0.001) and platelet microparticle formation were observed. Homocysteine caused also a dose-dependent depolarization of mitochondrial potential. The same apoptotic markers appeared in HTL-treated platelets (0.2 and 1 µM). Moreover, resveratrol (25 µM), a well known antioxidant, distinctly reduced the level of apoptotic markers. The obtained results indicate that Hcys and its thiolactone may promote in vitro apoptotic events in human gel-filtered platelets.

  20. Platelet function alterations and their relation to P-selectin (CD62P) expression in children with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Zuhal K; Orhan, Mehmet F; Büyükavcı, Mustafa

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) may cause platelet aggregation dysfunction and this can be reversed by iron therapy. On the other hand, it has been reported that the platelet fractions carrying the platelet activation markers, CD62P and CD63, are increased in thalassemic patients and there is a significant correlation between the increased levels of soluble P-selectin and free iron in sickle cell disease. This study was performed to investigate the alterations of platelet functions and whether iron deficiency results in diminished expression of activation marker (P-selectin; CD62P) leading to platelet aggregation dysfunction in children with IDA. Hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices (mean erythrocyte volume and red blood cell distribution width), serum levels of iron, transferrin and ferritin, platelet aggregation tests (with ADP, collagen, and ristocetin), PFA-100 closure time, and CD62P expression were evaluated in fasting blood samples of 22 children with IDA and 20 children without anemia. CD62P expression was detected by flow cytometry in normal and 5 μmol/l ADP-activated platelets. Mean closure times were longer in the patient group than control. In platelet aggregation tests, mean values of maximum aggregation times by ristocetin, ADP, and collagen were also more prolonged in patient group. Ristocetin-induced maximum aggregation rates (amplitude) were significantly higher in patients. However, ADP and collagen induction did not produce the same effect. CD62P expressions were significantly higher on activated platelets of the patient group, although they were similar in both groups before activation by ADP. These findings suggest that platelet aggregation and adhesion have been delayed in children with IDA; however, platelet function abnormalities are not associated with CD62P expression on platelet surface.

  1. Investigating the fluid mechanics behind red blood cell-induced lateral platelet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting; they adhere to damaged tissue and release chemicals that activate other platelets. Yet in order to adhere, platelets must first come into contact with the injured vessel wall. Under arterial flow conditions, platelets have an enhanced concentration near blood vessel walls. This non-uniform cell distribution depends on the fluid dynamics of blood as a heterogeneous medium. We use a parallelized lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to solve the flow dynamics of red cells and platelets in a periodic 2D vessel with no-slip boundary conditions. Red cells are treated as biconcave immersed boundary objects with isotropic Skalak membrane tension and an internal viscosity five times that of the surrounding plasma. Using this method we analyze the influence of shear rate, hematocrit, and red cell membrane properties on lateral platelet motion. We find that the effective diffusion of platelets is significantly lower near the vessel wall compared to the center of the vessel. Insight gained from this work could lead to significant improvements to current models for platelet adhesion where the presence of red blood cells is neglected due to computational intensity.

  2. The ultrastructure of camel blood platelets: a comparative study with human, bovine, and equine cells.

    PubMed

    Gader, Abdel Galil M Abdel; Ghumlas, Abeer K Al; Hussain, Mansour F; Haidari, Ahmed Al; White, James G

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies indicated that the camel has a very active haemostatic mechanism with a short bleeding time and thrombocytosis. However, platelet function, when tested by agonist-induced aggregation and PFA 100 closure time, showed marked inhibition compared to humans. Since camels are also far more resistant to long exposure to excessive heat and high body temperature than humans, it seemed worthwhile to explore fundamental morphological differences between human and camel platelets and those from other species. The present study has examined the ultrastructure of camel platelets and compared them with the fine structures of human, bovine and equine thrombocytes. Camel platelets, like bovine and equine cells, are discoid in shape and about two-thirds the size of human platelets. A circumferential coil of microtubular supports the disk-like form of camel platelets. Their cytoplasm, like bovine and equine platelets, is filled with alpha granule twice as large as those in human platelets, but lacking the organized matrix of equine alpha granules. Dense bodies are present in camel platelets with whip-like extensions not present on bovine or equine thrombocytes, but found on occasional human platelet dense bodies. Camel platelets, like bovine and equine thrombocytes, lack an open canalicular system (OCS) and must secrete granule products by fusion with the cell wall rather than an OCS. Future studies will determine if the differences in ultrastructural anatomy protect camel platelets from heat more than human thrombocytes.

  3. An ultrastructural analysis of platelets, erythrocytes, white blood cells, and fibrin network in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; du Plooy, Jenny; Soma, Prashilla; Gasparyan, Armen Yuri

    2014-07-01

    The study suggests that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) present with distinct inflammatory ultrastructural changes such as platelets blebbing, generation of platelet-derived microparticles, spontaneous formation of massive fibrin network and fusion of the erythrocytes membranes. Lupoid platelets actively interact with other inflammatory cells, particularly with white blood cells (WBCs), and the massive fibrin network facilitates such an interaction. It is possible that the concerted actions of platelets, erythrocytes and WBC, caught in the inflammatory fibrin network, predispose to pro-thrombotic states in patients with SLE.

  4. [Structure of peripheral blood platelets surface in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kiktenko, A I; Zlobina, G P; Brusov, O S; Zakharova, M N

    2005-01-01

    Using scanning electronic microscopy of peripheral blood platelets in 32 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 6 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), platelets activation, emerging in pseudopodiums formation, aggregation and lysis, was found. Platelets activation was more pronounced in ALS than in MS. It was most markedly seen for quantitative evaluation of the above traits. The features of platelet activation found in the study support the evidence for considering ALS as a systemic disorder being characterized by a broad spectrum of alterations of biological processes.

  5. Comparison of Platelet Transfusion as Fresh Whole Blood Versus Apheresis Platelets for Massively Transfused Combat Trauma patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    T R A N S F U S I O N P R A C T I C E Comparison of platelet transfusion as fresh whole blood versus apheresis platelets for massively transfused...J. Rentas, Charles E . Wade, John B. Holcomb, and the 31st Combat Support Hospital Research Group BACKGROUND: At major combat hospitals, the military...Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Avenue, NW, Washing- ton, DC 20307; e -mail: Jeremy.perkins1@us.army.mil. The opinions or assertions

  6. Evidence for direct transfer of tissue factor from monocytes to platelets in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Sovershaev, Mikhail A; Egorina, Elena M; Osterud, Bjarne; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-06-01

    Varying specificity of anti-tissue factor (anti-TF) antibodies gives rise to erroneous conclusions on TF positivity of platelets. Although monocytes are a well established source of TF in whole blood, there is no consensus whether platelets express or acquire TF from external sources. To test whether platelets can acquire TF expressed in monocytes, we studied a transfer of TF-yellow fluorescent protein (TF-YFP) from monocytes nucleofected with TF-YFP to platelets in a whole blood model. Platelets isolated from whole blood were found positive for TF when immunostained with anti-TF antibody from one supplier, whereas no platelet TF antigen was found in whole blood immunostained with anti-TF antibody from another supplier. Both antibodies recognized TF in monocytes. Platelets isolated from whole blood reconstituted with monocytes expressing TF-YFP fusion protein were found positive for TF-YFP only after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, TF protein could be transferred from monocytes upon stimulation with LPS.

  7. Relationship between the Increased Haemostatic Properties of Blood Platelets and Oxidative Stress Level in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with the Secondary Progressive Stage.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Bijak, Michał; Miller, Elżbieta; Rywaniak, Joanna; Miller, Sergiusz; Saluk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with complex pathogenesis, different clinical courses and recurrent neurological relapses and/or progression. Despite various scientific papers that focused on early stage of MS, our study targets selective group of late stage secondary progressive MS patients. The presented work is concerned with the reactivity of blood platelets in primary hemostasis in SP MS patients. 50 SP MS patients and 50 healthy volunteers (never diagnosed with MS or other chronic diseases) were examined to evaluate the biological activity of blood platelets (adhesion, aggregation), especially their response to the most important physiological agonists (thrombin, ADP, and collagen) and the effect of oxidative stress on platelet activity. We found that the blood platelets from SP MS patients were significantly more sensitive to all used agonists in comparison with control group. Moreover, the platelet hemostatic function was advanced in patients suffering from SP MS and positively correlated with increased production of O2 (-∙) in these cells, as well as with Expanded Disability Status Scale. We postulate that the increased oxidative stress in blood platelets in SP MS may be primarily responsible for the altered haemostatic properties of blood platelets.

  8. Platelets in blood stored in untreated and siliconed glass bottles and plastic bags. II. Survival studies.

    PubMed

    KISSMEYER-NIELSEN, F; MADSEN, C B

    1961-11-01

    Platelet survival was determined using untreated and siliconed glass bottles and plastic bags (Fenwal) for collecting and storing blood. The platelets were tagged in vivo with P(32) in six polycythaemic patients undergoing treatment with P(32). The results showed that fresh ACD blood collected in untreated glass, siliconed glass, and plastic gave the same recovery of platelets in the recipients. The use of EDTA (Fenwal formula) as anticoagulant gave results inferior to those obtained with blood using ACD as anticoagulant. Even after storage up to 24 hours in untreated glass bottles (ordinary bank blood) a satisfactory recovery of platelets was observed. After storage for 72 hours the recovery was less but not negligible.

  9. Carbon nanotubes activate store-operated calcium entry in human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Silvia H De Paoli; Semberova, Jana; Holada, Karel; Simakova, Olga; Hudson, Steven D; Simak, Jan

    2011-07-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to potentiate arterial thrombosis in animal models, which raises serious safety issues concerning environmental or occupational exposure to CNTs and their use in various biomedical applications. We have shown previously that different CNTs, but not fullerene (nC60), induce the aggregation of human blood platelets. To date, however, a mechanism of potentially thrombogenic CNT-induced platelet activation has not been elucidated. Here we show that pristine multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) penetrate platelet plasma membrane without any discernible damage but interact with the dense tubular system (DTS) causing depletion of platelet intracellular Ca(2+) stores. This process is accompanied by the clustering of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) colocalized with Orai1, indicating the activation of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Our findings reveal the molecular mechanism of CNT-induced platelet activation which is critical in the evaluation of the biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials with blood.

  10. How do the full-generation poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers activate blood platelets? Activation of circulating platelets and formation of "fibrinogen aggregates" in the presence of polycations.

    PubMed

    Watala, Cezary; Karolczak, Kamil; Kassassir, Hassan; Talar, Marcin; Przygodzki, Tomasz; Maczynska, Katarzyna; Labieniec-Watala, Magdalena

    2016-04-30

    Direct use of poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers as drugs may be limited, due to uncertain (cyto)toxicity. Peripheral blood components, which constitute the first line of a contact with administered pharmaceuticals, may become vastly affected by PAMAM dendrimers. The aim of this study was to explore how PAMAMs' polycationicity might affect blood platelet activation and reactivity, and thus trigger various haemostatic events. We monitored blood platelet reactivity in rats with experimental diabetes upon a long-term administration of the unmodified PAMAM dendrimers. In parallel, the effects on blood flow in a systemic circulation was recorded intravitally in mice administered with PAMAM G2, G3 or G4. Compounding was the in vitro approach to monitor the impact of PAMAM dendrimers on blood platelet activation and reactivity and on selected haemostatic and protein conformation parameters. We demonstrated the activating effects of polycations on blood platelets. Some diversity of the revealed outcomes considerably depended on the used approach and the particular technique employed to monitor blood platelet function. We discovered undesirable impact of plain PAMAM dendrimers on primary haemostasis and their prothrombotic influence. We emphasize the need of a more profound verifying of all the promising findings collected for PAMAMs with the use of well-designed in vivo preclinical studies.

  11. Platelets and coronary artery disease: Interactions with the blood vessel wall and cardiovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Reinthaler, Markus; Braune, Steffen; Lendlein, Andreas; Landmesser, Ulf; Jung, Friedrich

    2016-06-08

    In view of the rare presence of studies concerning platelet function as risk factor in atherosclerotic patients, processes underlying thromboembolic events are reviewed in this paper. The morphology and the structural organization-membrane receptors, the open canalicular and dense tubular systems, the cytoskeleton, mitochondria, granules, lysosomes, and peroxisomes-of platelets are described. Platelet function under physiological conditions in atherosclerosis and after implantation of cardiovascular devices is summarized.

  12. Effect on platelet functions of derivatives of cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Pareti, F I; Carrera, D; Mannucci, L; Mannucci, P M

    1978-04-30

    Derivatives of cyclic nucleotides were evaluated for their ability to inhibit platelet aggregation and the release reaction. Derivatives substituted in position 8 (mainly 8-Br-cyclic GMP) were more active than 3'-5' cyclic AMP, and their relative potency in inhibiting platelet aggregation and 14C-serotonin release was comparable to that of N62-0'-dibutyryl-cyclic AMP. Compounds substituted in position 6 or 2'-0 were not effective. The active compounds, which were also tested for their ability to stimulate platelet adenylate cyclase or to inhibit cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, did not modify the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Since previous animal experiments have shown that these derivatives cause less side effects than cyclic AMP and its dibutyryl derivative in animals, it is suggested that modification of the cyclophosphate molecule might make it possible to find compounds active only on platelet function without interfering with other biological systems.

  13. Era of blood component therapy: time for mandatory pre-donation platelet count for maximizing donor safety and optimizing quality of platelets.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, R U; Biswas, Dipak

    2013-12-01

    Blood bank regulatory agencies including the Drug and Cosmetics Act (DCA) of India do not mandate a predonation platelet count in whole blood donation. Mandating such practice will definitely optimize the quality of random donor platelets (RDP) in terms of platelet yield and patient therapeutic benefit. We observed poor platelet yield in RDP concentrates prepared at our center with a significant number not meeting the DCA guideline of ≥ 4.5 × 10(10) per bag processed from 450 ml of whole blood. Therefore we planned this study to evaluate the pre-donation hematological values in our blood donor population and effect of these values on the quality of platelet concentrates. The prospective study included 221 blood donors eligible for donating 450 ml of whole blood (WB). Following the departmental standard operating procedure (SOP) RDPs were prepared using the 'Top & Bottom' quadruple bag system and automated component extractor. Quality of RDP was assessed as per departmental protocol. All results were recorded and subsequently transcribed to SPSS working sheet. A significant (p<0.001) decrement of donor blood counts has been observed after WB donation. Mean donor Hb and platelets reduced by 0.72 g/dl and 22.1 × 10(6)/ml respectively. Quality of RDPs in terms of platelet yield was significantly better (p<0.001) when donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Although platelet yield significantly correlated with the donor platelet count however quality of RDPs in terms of red cell contamination showed no correlation with the donor hematocrit. Platelet yield in random donor platelets is a concern in Eastern India. A platelet yield of 4.5 × 10(10) per bag as mandated by the DCA of India was only achieved when the donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Posttransfusion platelet recovery (PPR) was unsatisfactory in the transfused patient. Introduction of pre-donation platelet count in whole blood donation will maximize donor safety and optimize patient platelet

  14. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-04-01

    Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood-islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation.

  15. Microfluidic assessment of functional culture-derived platelets in human thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Muthard, Ryan W; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Despite their clinical significance, human platelets are not amenable to genetic manipulation, thus forcing a reliance on mouse models. Culture-derived platelets (CDPs) from human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells can be genetically altered and may eventually be used for transfusions. By use of microfluidics, the time-dependent incorporation of CD41(+)CD42(+) CDPs into clots was measured using only 54,000 CDPs doped into 27 μL of human whole blood perfused over collagen at a wall shear rate of 100 sec(-1). With the use of fluorescence-labeled human platelets (instead of CDPs) doped between 0.25% and 2% of total platelets, incorporation was highly quantitative and allowed monitoring of the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonism that occurred after collagen adhesion. CDPs were only 15% as efficient as human platelets in their incorporation into human thrombi under flow, although both cell types were equally antagonized by αIIbβ3 inhibition. Transient transfection allowed the monitoring of GFP(+) human CDP incorporation into clots. This assay quantifies genetically altered CDP function under flow.

  16. [Activators, receptors and signal transduction pathways of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Shaturnyĭ, V I; Shakhidzhanov, S S; Sveshnikova, A N; Panteleev, M A

    2014-01-01

    Platelet participation in hemostatic plug formation requires transition into an activated state (or, rather, variety of states) upon action of agonists like ADP, thromboxane A , collagen, thrombin, and others. The mechanisms of action for different agonists, their receptors and signaling pathways associated with them, as well as the mechanisms of platelet response inhibition are the subject of the present review. Collagen exposed upon vessel wall damage induced initial platelet attachment and start of thrombus formation, which involves numerous processes such as aggregation, activation of integrins, granule secretion and increase of intracellular Ca2+. Thrombin, ADP, thromboxane A , and ATP activated platelets that were not initially in contact with the wall and induce additional secretion of activating substances. Vascular endothelium and secretory organs also affect platelet activation, producing both positive (adrenaline) an d negative (prostacyclin, nitric oxide) regulators, thereby determining the relation of activation and inhibition signals, which plays a significant role in the formation of platelet aggregate under normal and pathological conditions. The pathways of platelet signaling are still incompletely understood, and their exploration presents an important objective both for basic cell biology and for the development of new drugs, the methods of diagnostics and of treatment of hemostasis disorders.

  17. Effect of varying nitric oxide release to prevent platelet consumption and preserve platelet function in an in vivo model of extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Skrzypchak, Amy M; Lafayette, Nathan G; Bartlett, Robert H; Zhou, Zhengrong; Frost, Megan C; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Reynolds, Melissa M; Annich, Gail M

    2007-05-01

    The gold standard for anticoagulation during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) remains systemic heparinization and the concomitant risk of bleeding in an already critically ill patient could lead to death. Normal endothelium is a unique surface that prevents thrombosis by the release of antiplatelet and antithrombin agents. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most potent, reversible antiplatelet agents released from the endothelium. Nitric oxide released from within a polymer matrix has been proven effective for preventing platelet activation and adhesion onto extracorporeal circuits. However, the critical NO release (NO flux) threshold for thrombus prevention during ECC has not yet been determined. Using a 4-hour arteriovenous (AV) rabbit model of ECC, we sought to find this threshold value for ECC circuits, using an improved NO-releasing coating (Norel-b). Four groups of animals were tested at variable NO flux levels. Hourly blood samples were obtained for measurement of arterial blood gases, platelet counts, fibrinogen levels and platelet function (via aggregometry). A custom-built AV circuit was constructed with 36 cm of poly(vinyl)chloride (PVC) tubing, a 14 gauge (GA) angiocatheter for arterial access and a modified 10 French (Fr) thoracic catheter for venous access. The Norel-b coating reduced platelet activation and thrombus formation, and preserved platelet function - in all circuits that exhibited an NO flux of 13.65 x 10(10) mol x cm(-2) x min(-1). These results were significant when compared with the controls. With the Norel-b coating, the NO flux from the extracorporeal circuit surface can be precisely controlled by the composition of the polymer coating used, and such coatings are shown to prevent platelet consumption and thrombus formation while preserving platelet function in the animal.

  18. The physiology of blood platelets and changes of their biological activities in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Barbara; Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elżbieta; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that blood platelets contribute to diverse processes that extend beyond hemostasis. Many of the same mechanisms that play a role in hemostasis and thrombosis facilitate platelets the participation in other physiological and pathological processes, particularly in the inflammation, the immune response and central nervous system disorders. Platelets are involved in pathophysiology of central nervous system diseases, especially in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, but their role appears to be neglected. Platelets contribute to the inflammation and cooperate with immune cells in inflammatory and immune responses. These blood cells were identified in inflamed spinal cord and in the brain in chronic active lesions of multiple sclerosis and in the related animal models referred as Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis. This review summarizes recent insights in the platelet activation accompanied by the exocytosis of bioactive compounds stored in granules, formation of platelet microparticles, expression of specific membrane receptors, synthesis of numerous biomediators, generation of free radicals, and introduces the mechanisms by which activated platelets may be involved in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. Understanding the role of platelets in multiple sclerosis may be essential for improved therapies.

  19. Effect of 1-aminoadamantanes on adenine nucleotide and serotonin storage in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, W; Muschalek, G; Stöltzing, H; von Pusch, I; Paul, N

    1981-12-01

    The platelet release reaction, the liberation of adenine nucleotides and serotonin (5-HT) from osmiophilic dense granules, can be induced in human platelets by C-alkyl-derivatives of the antiviral and anti-Parkinson drug 1-aminoadamantane (D 1). The release-inducing activity is enhanced with increasing chain length and with the number of C-alkylsubstituents, respectively. The parent compound, D 1, liberates only 5-HT. Analyses of LDH activity in the incubation medium of the platelets and electron micrographs of platelets treated with 1-aminoadamantanes support the assumption that ATP, ADP, and 5-HT are released from the organelles by an exocytosis-like process rather than by destruction of the plasma and organelle membranes. The number of osmiophilic dense granules in platelets isolated from human and rabbit blood is decreased by the action of the drugs. This is in contrast to other subcellular structures where no morphological changes can be observed. The ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation is inhibited by preincubation with 1-aminoadamantanes. The inhibitory activity of the drugs on platelet aggregation parallels the effects observed after induction of the release reaction: the inhibition of platelet aggregation is enhanced with increasing C-alkylation. Hence, the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation can be used to screen for the releasing activity of 1-aminoadamantanes which have, as far as tested, similar effects on 5-HT storage in blood platelets and in the CNS. The time-, temperature, and concentration-dependent 5-HT uptake by platelets (K = 0.75 micro M; V max = 0.22 nmoles/min X 10 9 cells) is noncompetitively inhibited by the drugs with K1-values varying from 10 to 100 micro M depending on the degree of C-alkylation.

  20. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A.; Chikova, Elena D.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  1. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  2. No associations exist between mean platelet volume or platelet distribution width and thyroid function in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaojun; Meng, Zhaowei; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Mei; He, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Song, Kun; Jia, Qiyu; Jia, Qiang; Li, Xue; Tan, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Renfei; Liu, Na; Hu, Tianpeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) are morphometric indices of size distribution and variability of platelet. We aimed to explore the associations between MPV or PDW and thyroid function in a large Chinese cohort. This was a cross-sectional study with a recruitment of 13,622 self-reported healthy Chinese (8424 males, 5198 females). Clinical data of the participants comprised of anthropometric measurements, hepatic function, renal function, serum levels of lipid, glucose, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, platelet, MPV, PDW, and thyroid hormones. Database was sorted by sex, and the associations between MPV or PDW and thyroid function were analyzed by quartiles of MPV or PDW. Levels of MPV and PDW were compared in different thyroid function subgroups by 1-way analysis of variance and independent sample's t test. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was adopted to determine diagnostic values of MPV and PDW for thyroid dysfunction. Crude and adjusted odds ratios of MPV and PDW for thyroid dysfunction with 95% confidence intervals were analyzed by binary logistic regression models. MPV, PDW, and thyroid stimulation hormone were significantly higher in females than in males. Females showed significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism than males. However, there were no significant differences of MPV and PDW among different thyroid function subgroups in both sexes, and no obvious correlations were revealed between MPV or PDW and thyroid function. From ROC analysis, we demonstrated no diagnostic values of MPV and PDW for thyroid dysfunction. From binary logistic regression models, no risks of different MPV and PDW quartiles were identified for thyroid dysfunction in both sexes. We could not show any association between MPV or PDW and thyroid function. Prospective studies with better defined risk groups should be performed in the future for further verification and validation. PMID

  3. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  4. Preparation and pathogen inactivation of double dose buffy coat platelet products using the INTERCEPT blood system.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Mohammad R; Doverud, Ann-Charlotte

    2012-12-07

    Blood centers are faced with many challenges including maximizing production yield from the blood product donations they receive as well as ensuring the highest possible level of safety for transfusion patients, including protection from transfusion transmitted diseases. This must be accomplished in a fiscally responsible manner which minimizes operating expenses including consumables, equipment, waste, and personnel costs, among others. Several methods are available to produce platelet concentrates for transfusion. One of the most common is the buffy coat method in which a single therapeutic platelet unit (≥ 2.0 x10(11) platelets per unit or per local regulations) is prepared by pooling the buffy coat layer from up to six whole blood donations. A procedure for producing "double dose" whole blood derived platelets has only recently been developed. Presented here is a novel method for preparing double dose whole blood derived platelet concentrates from pools of 7 buffy coats and subsequently treating the double dose units with the INTERCEPT Blood System for pathogen inactivation. INTERCEPT was developed to inactivate viruses, bacteria, parasites, and contaminating donor white cells which may be present in donated blood. Pairing INTERCEPT with the double dose buffy coat method by utilizing the INTERCEPT Processing Set with Dual Storage Containers (the "DS set"), allows blood centers to treat each of their double dose units in a single pathogen inactivation processing set, thereby maximizing patient safety while minimizing costs. The double dose buffy coat method requires fewer buffy coats and reduces the use of consumables by up to 50% (e.g. pooling sets, filter sets, platelet additive solution, and sterile connection wafers) compared to preparation and treatment of single dose buffy coat platelet units. Other cost savings include less waste, less equipment maintenance, lower power requirements, reduced personnel time, and lower collection cost compared to the

  5. A myocardial ischemia- and reperfusion-induced injury is mediated by reactive oxygen species released from blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Christian; Prechtl, Gerald; Kusus-Seligmann, Magda; Daniel, Werner G

    2013-01-01

    In recent experimental studies, blood platelets have been found to exhibit some cardiodepressive effects in ischemic and reperfused guinea pig hearts independent of thrombus formation. These effects seemed to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the source of these ROS - platelets or heart - remained still unknown. Isolated, buffer-perfused and pressure-volume work performing guinea pig hearts were exposed to a low-flow ischemia (1 ml/min) of 30 min duration and reperfused at a constant flow of 5 ml/min. Human thrombocytes were administered as 1 min bolus (20 000 thrombocytes/µl perfusion buffer) in the 15th min of ischemia or in the 1st or 5th min of reperfusion in the presence of thrombin (0.3 U/ml perfusion buffer). Recovery of external heart work (REHW) was expressed as ratio between postischemic and preischemic EHW in percent. Intracoronary platelet retention (RET) was quantified as percent of platelets applied. In a second set of experiments, thrombocytes were incubated with 10 µM of the irreversible NADPH oxidase blocker diphenyliodonium chloride and washed twice, thereafter, and administered according to the same protocol as described above. Hearts exposed to ischemia and reperfusion in the presence of thrombin but without application of platelets served as controls. Controls without application of platelets did not reveal a severe compromisation of myocardial function (REHW 85.5 ± 1%). However, addition of platelets during ischemia or in the 1st or 5th min of reperfusion led to a significant reduction of REHW as compared with controls (REHW 62.4 ± 6, 53.9 ± 3, 40.5 ± 3, respectively). Application of platelets pretreated with diphenyliodonium chloride did not reveal any cardiodepressive effects being significantly different from controls without platelet application. Moreover, treatment of platelets with diphenyliodonium chloride did not significantly decrease intracoronary platelet retention. In conclusion, these results demonstrate

  6. Inhibitory effects of Cyperus digitatus extract on human platelet function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the mechanisms of antiplatelet action of Cyperus digitatus. The antiplatelet action of C. digitatus was studied on platelet function: secretion, adhesion, aggregation, and sCD40L release. The platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by CDA (ethyl acetate extract) at 0.1 mg/ml and after the incubation of whole blood with CDA, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 96 ± 3% (p < 0.001). At the same concentration, CDA significantly decreased sCD40L levels. The mechanism of antiplatelet action of CDA could be by NF-κB inhibition and that is cAMP independent. In conclusion, C. digitatus extract may serve as a new source of antiplatelet agents for food and nutraceutical applications.

  7. Platelet microparticles reprogram macrophage gene expression and function.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Benoit; Corduan, Aurélie; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lee, Chan Ho C; Boilard, Eric; Provost, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (MPs) represent the most abundant MPs subtype in the circulation, and can mediate intercellular communication through delivery of bioactives molecules, such as cytokines, proteins, lipids and RNAs. Here, we show that platelet MPs can be internalised by primary human macrophages and deliver functional miR-126-3p. The increase in macrophage miR-126-3p levels was not prevented by actinomycin D, suggesting that it was not due to de novo gene transcription. Platelet MPs dose-dependently downregulated expression of four predicted mRNA targets of miR-126-3p, two of which were confirmed also at the protein level. The mRNA downregulatory effects of platelet MPs were abrogated by expression of a neutralising miR-126-3p sponge, implying the involvement of miR-126-3p. Transcriptome-wide, microarray analyses revealed that as many as 66 microRNAs and 653 additional RNAs were significantly and differentially expressed in macrophages upon exposure to platelet MPs. More specifically, platelet MPs induced an upregulation of 34 microRNAs and a concomitant downregulation of 367 RNAs, including mRNAs encoding for cytokines/chemokines CCL4, CSF1 and TNF. These changes were associated with reduced CCL4, CSF1 and TNF cytokine/chemokine release by macrophages, and accompanied by a marked increase in their phagocytic capacity. These findings demonstrate that platelet MPs can modify the transcriptome of macrophages, and reprogram their function towards a phagocytic phenotype.

  8. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Ameln, Anne Klotzsche-von; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood–islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation. PMID:26676803

  9. Honokiol as a specific collagen receptor glycoprotein VI antagonist on human platelets: Functional ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzu-Yin; Chang, Chao-Chien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Yen, Ting-Lin; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Li, Jiun-Yi; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Honokiol, derived from Magnolia officinalis, has various pharmacological properties. Platelet activation plays a critical role in cardiovascular diseases. Honokiol has been reported to inhibit collagen-stimulated rabbit platelet aggregation. However, detailed further studies on the characteristics and functional activity of honokiol in platelet activation are relatively lacking. In the present study, honokiol specifically inhibited platelet aggregation and Ca+2 ion mobilization stimulated with collagen or convulxin, an agonist of glycoprotein (GP) VI, but not with aggretin, an agonist of integrin α2β1. Honokiol also attenuated the phosphorylation of Lyn, PLCγ2, PKC, MAPKs, and Akt after convulxin stimulation. Honokiol have no cytotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. Honokiol diminished the binding of anti-GP VI (FITC-JAQ1) mAb to human platelets, and it also reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of GP VI-bound Lyn after convulxin stimulation. The surface plasmon resonance results revealed that honokiol binds directly to GP VI, with a KD of 289 μM. Platelet function analysis revealed that honokiol substantially prolonged the closure time in human whole blood and increased the occlusion time of thrombotic platelet plug formation in mice. In conclusion, honokiol acts as a potent antagonist of collagen GP VI in human platelets, and it has therapeutic potential in the prevention of the pathological thrombosis. PMID:28054640

  10. Platelet function during cardiopulmonary bypass using multiple electrode aggregometry: comparison of centrifugal and roller pumps.

    PubMed

    Kehara, Hiromu; Takano, Tamaki; Ohashi, Noburo; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Amano, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood trauma may be lower with centrifugal pumps (CPs) than with roller pumps (RPs) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), because, unlike RPs, CPs do not compress the tubing, and shear stress is considered lower in CPs than in RPs. However, relative platelet function remains unclear. Using multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), we compared platelet function with CP and RP. Ten swine underwent CPB for 3 h, with five weaned off using CP and five using RP. Platelet function was measured using MEA, as were hemoglobin concentration and platelet count, before sternotomy, after heparin infusion, 30 min and 3 h after starting CPB, after protamine infusion, and 60 min after stopping CPB. Platelet activation was initiated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA), and thrombin receptor-activating protein 6 (TRAP). Fibrinogen, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and β-thromboglobin (β-TG) concentrations were measured before sternotomy and 60 min after stopping CPB. In the CP group and using ADP, aggregation was significantly reduced 30 min (P = 0.019) and 3 h (P = 0.027) after starting CPB, recovering to baseline 60 min after CPB was stopped. In the RP group, aggregation was significantly decreased 30 min (P = 0.007) and 3 h (P = 0.003) after starting CPB and after protamine administration (P = 0.028). With AA, aggregation significantly decreased 30 min after starting CPB in both the CP (P = 0.012) and RP (P = 0.016) groups, slightly increasing 3 h after starting CPB and after protamine infusion, and recovering to baseline 60 min after CPB cessation. With TRAP, aggregation in the CP and RP groups decreased 30 min after starting the pump, although changes were not significant; aggregation gradually recovered after 3 h and returned to baseline 60 min after the pumps were stopped. There were no significant differences at all sampling points of MEA. In both groups, fibrinogen, PF4, and β-TG concentrations were similar 60 min after pump cessation and before sternotomy

  11. Value of blood-pool subtraction in cardiac indium-111-labeled platelet imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldman, M.E.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.; Strashun, A.; Vaquer, R.; Phillips, R.A.; Fuster, V. )

    1989-09-01

    Blood-pool subtraction has been proposed to enhance {sup 111}In-labeled platelet imaging of intracardiac thrombi. We tested the accuracy of labeled platelet imaging, with and without blood-pool subtraction, in ten subjects with cardiac thrombi of varying age, eight with endocarditis being treated with antimicrobial therapy and ten normal controls. Imaging was performed early after labeled platelet injection (24 hr or less) and late (48 hr or more). Blood-pool subtraction was carried out. All images were graded subjectively by four experienced, blinded readers. Detection accuracy was measured by the sensitivity at three fixed levels of specificity estimated from receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and tested by three-way analysis of variance. Detection accuracy was generally improved on delayed images. Blood-pool subtraction did not improve accuracy. Although blood-pool subtraction increased detection sensitivity, this was offset by decreased specificity. For this population studied, blood-pool subtraction did not improve subjective detection of abnormal platelet deposition by 111In platelet imaging.

  12. Effect of Red Blood Cells on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation in Tortuous Arterioles.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K W; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can lead to myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombosis may form in tortuous microvessels, which are often seen throughout the human body, but the microscale mechanisms and processes are not well understood. In straight vessels, the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) is known to push platelets toward walls, which may affect platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. However in tortuous vessels, the effects of RBC interactions with platelets in thrombosis are largely unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this work was to determine the physical effects of RBCs, platelet size, and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A discrete element computational model was used to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, aggregation, and shear-induced platelet activation of hundreds of individual platelets and RBCs in thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Results showed that high shear stress near the inner sides of curved arteriole walls activated platelets to initiate thrombosis. RBCs initially promoted platelet activation, but then collisions of RBCs with mural thrombi reduced the amount of mural thrombus and the size of emboli. In the absence of RBCs, mural thrombus mass was smaller in a highly tortuous arteriole compared to a less tortuous arteriole. In the presence of RBCs however, mural thrombus mass was larger in the highly tortuous arteriole compared to the less tortuous arteriole. As well, smaller platelet size yielded less mural thrombus mass and smaller emboli, either with or without RBCs. This study shed light on microscopic interactions of RBCs and platelets in tortuous microvessels, which have implications in various pathologies associated with thrombosis and bleeding.

  13. [Mechanism of action of biogenic chloramines and hypochlorite on initial aggregation of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Murina, M A; Savel'eva, E L; Roshchupkin, D I

    2006-01-01

    The antiaggregant action of two reactive oxidants N,N-dichlorotaurine (chloramine of biogenic type) and sodium hypochlorite on the initial ADP-induced aggregation of rabbit blood platelets has been studied. Platelet aggregation in the reconstructed platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was measured by the nephelometric method, and the aggregation index was an increase in the intensity of small-angle light scattering. The introduction of chloramine at comparatively small concentrations (no greater than 1 mM active chlorine) directly into the reconstructed platelet-rich plasma induces the suppression of the initial aggregation (formation of small aggregates) several times stronger than in the case of its preliminary incubation with plasma alone. This suggests that N,N-dichlorotaurine exerts its antiaggeregant action on the platelet-rich plasma by direct interaction with cells. The effects of the inhibition of platelet aggregation in two variants of introduction of high concentrations of N,N-dichlorotaurine do not significantly differ. In this case a great amount of residual chloramine remains in the plasma, which just induces the suppression of platelet aggregation during subsequent reconstruction of the platelet-rich plasma. Similar data have been obtained in the study of the antiaggregant action of hypochlorite. N,N-Dichlorotaurine and hypochlorite at final concentrations of 0.2-0.3 and 0.15 mM, respectively, inhibit strongly the initial aggregation of isolated platelets (approximately 2 x 10(8) cells in 1 ml) preliminarily activated for 1.5 min by the addition of 100-500 nM ADP. However, the antiaggregants show a more profound suppression of aggregation of unstimulated platelets. The antiaggregant effects of N,N-dichlorotaurine and hypochlorite are probably due to the oxidative modification of sulfur-containing groups in platelet plasmatic membrane.

  14. Response of blood platelets to beta-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Królewska, Karolina; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The effects of the beta-D-glucan, a polysaccharide derived from the yeast cell walls of species such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on blood platelets activation induced by physiological agonists (thrombin, ADP, collagen) in vitro were studied. The aim of our study was to assess in vitro if beta-glucan, a naturally strong biological response modifier, may modify platelet activation, i.e. platelet aggregation and degranulation (release of proteins and adenine nucleotides) induced by thrombin, ADP and collagen. Cytochrome c reduction method was used to test the ability of beta-glucan to change superoxide anion generation in platelets. Moreover, we determined also its effect on enzymatic arachidonic acid cascade. The obtained results indicate that beta-glucan has the inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation and secretion. beta-glucan distinctly reduced the arachidonic acid pathway and superoxide anion radical generation in platelets stimulated by biological agonists. The results of the present study suggest that beta-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has antiplatelet and antioxidative activities, and therefore may be beneficial in the prevention of the excessive blood platelet activation-related diseases, such as cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases.

  15. Red cabbage anthocyanins as inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Saluk, Joanna; Bijak, Michal; Posmyk, Malgorzata M; Zbikowska, Halina M

    2015-09-01

    LPS is a Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, which is an important pro-inflammatory agent. Blood platelets take part both in inflammatory processes and in pathogenesis of septic shock following accumulation of LPS. As a platelet agonist LPS causes the intraplatelet overproduction of ROS/RNS that are responsible for adverse modifications in the structure of platelet compounds being associated with a development of platelet-dependent diseases. Existing evidence suggests that anthocyanins (ATH) are able to protect the circulatory system. The antioxidative properties of ATH are believed to be mainly responsible for their positive health effects. The main goal of the present in vitro study was to investigate the potential protective properties of red cabbage ATH against oxidative damage induced by LPS in blood platelets. Exposure of platelets to LPS resulted in carbonyl group increase, 3-nitrotyrosine formation, lipid peroxidation and O2(•-) generation. We have shown that ATH extract effectively decreased oxidative stress induced by LPSs. The in silico analysis demonstrated that both cyanin and LPS were located at the same region of human TLR4-MD-2 complex. Our findings suggest that there could be two-way ATH platelet protection mechanism, by their antioxidant properties and directly by binding with TLRs.

  16. Statin-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets in rats and human with dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Vevera, J; Fišar, Z; Nekovářová, T; Vrablík, M; Zlatohlávek, L; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Raboch, J; Valeš, K

    2016-11-23

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used drugs for lowering blood lipid levels and preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, statins can have serious adverse effects, which may be related to development of mitochondrial dysfunctions. The aim of study was to demonstrate the in vivo effect of high and therapeutic doses of statins on mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets. Model approach was used in the study. Simvastatin was administered to rats at a high dose for 4 weeks. Humans were treated with therapeutic doses of rosuvastatin or atorvastatin for 6 weeks. Platelet mitochondrial respiration was measured using high-resolution respirometry. In rats, a significantly lower physiological respiratory rate was found in intact platelets of simvastatin-treated rats compared to controls. In humans, no significant changes in mitochondrial respiration were detected in intact platelets; however, decreased complex I-linked respiration was observed after statin treatment in permeabilized platelets. We propose that the small in vivo effect of statins on platelet energy metabolism can be attributed to drug effects on complex I of the electron transport system. Both intact and permeabilized platelets can be used as a readily available biological model to study changes in cellular energy metabolism in patients treated with statins.

  17. Grow with the flow: a spatial–temporal model of platelet deposition and blood coagulation under flow

    PubMed Central

    Leiderman, Karin; Fogelson, Aaron L.

    2011-01-01

    The body's response to vascular injury involves two intertwined processes: platelet aggregation and coagulation. Platelet aggregation is a predominantly physical process, whereby platelets clump together, and coagulation is a cascade of biochemical enzyme reactions. Thrombin, the major product of coagulation, directly couples the biochemical system to platelet aggregation by activating platelets and by cleaving fibrinogen into fibrin monomers that polymerize to form a mesh that stabilizes platelet aggregates. Together, the fibrin mesh and the platelet aggregates comprise a thrombus that can grow to occlusive diameters. Transport of coagulation proteins and platelets to and from an injury is controlled largely by the dynamics of the blood flow. To explore how blood flow affects the growth of thrombi and how the growing masses, in turn, feed back and affect the flow, we have developed the first spatial–temporal mathematical model of platelet aggregation and blood coagulation under flow that includes detailed descriptions of coagulation biochemistry, chemical activation and deposition of blood platelets, as well as the two-way interaction between the fluid dynamics and the growing platelet mass. We present this model and use it to explain what underlies the threshold behaviour of the coagulation system's production of thrombin and to show how wall shear rate and near-wall enhanced platelet concentrations affect the development of growing thrombi. By accounting for the porous nature of the thrombus, we also demonstrate how advective and diffusive transport to and within the thrombus affects its growth at different stages and spatial locations. PMID:20439306

  18. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Letitia D.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L) is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT) mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1). As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND. PMID:26986758

  19. Specific binding of magnetic nanoparticle probes to platelets in whole blood detected by magnetorelaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberbeck, Dietmar; Wiekhorst, Frank; Steinhoff, Uwe; Schwarz, Kay Oliver; Kummrow, Andreas; Kammel, Martin; Neukammer, Jörg; Trahms, Lutz

    2009-05-01

    The binding of monoclonal antibodies labelled with magnetic nanoparticles to CD61 surface proteins expressed by platelets in whole blood samples was measured by magnetorelaxometry. This technique is sensitive to immobilization of the magnetic labels upon binding. Control experiments with previous saturation of the epitopes on the platelet surfaces demonstrated the specificity of the binding. The kinetics of the antibody antigen reaction is accessible with a temporal resolution of 12 s. The minimal detectable platelet concentration is about 2000 μL -1 (sample volume 150 μL). The proportionality of the magnetic relaxation amplitude to the number of bound labels allows a quantification of the antibody binding capacity.

  20. Does the liquid method of electret forming influence the adhesion of blood platelets?

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Szymanowicz, M

    1995-01-01

    This work presents the results of the effect of the electric charge on the adhesion of blood platelets. All experiments were carried out on polyethylene foil. The liquid method was used to form electrets. The evaluation of the electret effect influence on the adhesion of blood platelets was made on the basis of the observation of the electret surface after the contact with fresh citrate human blood group O Rh+ in an electron scanning microscope. Experimental results confirmed the essential influence of the electric charge on the process of adhesion of blood platelets. It was noticed that the preliminary aging of electrets decreases the density of the surface charge and improves the athrombogenic characteristics of polyethylene foil.

  1. Genomic landscape of megakaryopoiesis and platelet function defects

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Norfo, Ruggiero; Pennucci, Valentina; Zini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Megakaryopoiesis is a complex, stepwise process that takes place largely in the bone marrow. At the apex of the hierarchy, hematopoietic stem cells undergo a number of lineage commitment decisions that ultimately lead to the production of polyploid megakaryocytes. On average, megakaryocytes release 1011 platelets per day into the blood that repair vascular injuries and prevent excessive bleeding. This differentiation process is tightly controlled by exogenous and endogenous factors, which have been the topics of intense research in the hematopoietic field. Indeed, a skewing of megakaryocyte commitment and differentiation may entail the onset of myeloproliferative neoplasms and other preleukemic disorders together with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, whereas quantitative or qualitative defects in platelet production can lead to inherited platelet disorders. The recent advent of next-generation sequencing has prompted mapping of the genomic landscape of these conditions to provide an accurate view of the underlying lesions. The aims of this review are to introduce the physiological pathways of megakaryopoiesis and to present landmark studies on acquired and inherited disorders that target them. These studies have not only introduced a new era in the fields of molecular medicine and targeted therapies but may also provide us with a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying normal megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis that can inform efforts to create alternative sources of megakaryocytes and platelets. PMID:26787733

  2. Perilla oil improves blood flow through inhibition of platelet aggregation and thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang-Sei; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of perilla oil on the platelet aggregation in vitro and thrombosis in vivo were investigated in comparison with aspirin, a well-known blood flow enhancer. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with perilla oil and aggregation inducers collagen or thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Perilla oil significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations, in which the thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were administered once daily by gavage with perilla oil for 1 week, carotid arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Perilla oil delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 0.5 mL/kg. In addition, a high dose (2 mL/kg) of perilla oil greatly prevented the occlusion, comparable to the effect of aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that perilla oil inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is proposed that perilla oil could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24707301

  3. Identification of D/sub 1/-like dopamine receptors on human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    De Keyser, J.; De Waele, M.; Convents, A.; Ebinger, G.; Vauquelin, G.

    1988-01-01

    Dopamine is able to inhibit the epinephrine-induced aggregation of human blood platelets, but the mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study the authors report that membranes from human blood platelets possess high affinity, saturable and stereoselective binding sites for the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 appeared to label a single class of binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 18.6 +- 1.6 fmolmg protein and a K/sub D/ of 0.8 nM. The potencies of different dopaminergic antagonists and agonists in displacing (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 from blood platelet membranes were similar to those obtained for striatal membranes. Unlike the classically defined D/sub 1/ receptors, e.g. those in striatum, the D/sub 1/ receptor sites on platelets appeared no to be coupled to the adenylate cyclase system, hence the term D/sub 1/-like. The D/sub 1/ agonist SKF 38393 was more potent than dopamine in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, and the effects of dopamine and SKF 38393 were prevented by SCH 23390. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of dopamine on the epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through these D/sub 1/-like receptors

  4. Gender, Race, and Diet Affect Platelet Function Tests in Normal Subjects Contributing to a High Rate of Abnormal Results

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Garrett, Katherine; Stein, Sidney F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To assess sources of variability in platelet function tests in normal subjects, 64 healthy young adults were tested on 2–6 occasions at 2 week intervals using 4 methods: platelet aggregation (AGG) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the Bio/Data PAP-4 Aggregometer (BD) and Chrono-Log Lumi-Aggregometer (CL); and AGG in whole blood (WB) in the CL and Multiplate Platelet Function Analyzer (MP), with ATP release (REL) in CL-PRP and CL-WB. Food and medication exposures were recorded prospectively for 2 weeks prior to each blood draw. At least one AGG abnormality was seen in 21% of 81 drug-free specimens with CL-PRP, 15% with CL-WB, 13% with BD-PRP, and 6% with MP-WB, increasing with inclusion of REL to 28% for CL-PRP and 30% for CL-WB. Epinephrine AGG and REL were significantly reduced in males (P<0.0001). Ristocetin AGG and collagen and thrombin REL were significantly reduced in Blacks (P<0.0001). One-third of specimens drawn following flavonoid-rich food exposures had aberrant results, compared to 8.5% of specimens without such exposures (P=0.0035). PRP tests had less intra-individual variation than WB tests. Gender, race, diet, and test system affected results of platelet function testing in healthy subjects, suggesting caution when interpreting the results of platelet function testing in patients. PMID:24617520

  5. Evaluation of Dried Storage of Platelets for Transfusion: Physiologic Integrity and Hemostatic Functionality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    thrombogenic effects of rehydrated platelets involve the use of thrombocytopenic animals. We plan to use a COBE Spectra Blood Cell Separator apheresis ...34AD-A276 018 DT SFEB 2 199-4 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT F 2 4 February 1, 1993 - January 31, 1994 "Evaluation of Dried Storage of Platelets for Transfusion...canine platelets and assessment of multiple infusions of non-labelled rehydrated platelets . The attached subcontract report from Dr. Read and

  6. Morphological evaluation of canine platelets on Giemsa- and PAS-stained blood smears.

    PubMed

    Halmay, Dóra; Sótonyi, P; Vajdovich, P; Gaál, T

    2005-01-01

    The morphology of canine platelets (changes in size, shape, staining characteristics, degree of activation and clump formation, distribution of granules, appearance of vacuoles on Giemsa-stained smears) was investigated in 20 healthy control and 181 diseased dogs. In the group of the sick dogs 84 animals suffered from disorders affecting directly the haematological parameters or the haematopoietic organs such as bleeding, thymic haemorrhage, haemolytic disorders, lymphoma, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and other 97 dogs were affected by other diseases (hepatopathy, nephropathy, hepatic, splenic or intestinal neoplasm, skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, Cushing's syndrome, sepsis). The alterations found in platelet morphology were not specific for any disorder. The most common platelet abnormalities were polychromasia and the presence of giant platelets. These changes occurred in a high number in disorders accompanied by bleeding or haemolysis. Anisocytosis was the most frequent finding in hepatic, splenic or intestinal neoplasms and in certain endocrinopathies. Microcytosis was observed in immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, hepatic neoplasms and endocrine disorders. Extreme platelet activation was common in haemolysis, hepatopathies, neoplastic diseases and sepsis. Vacuolisation was present in thymic haemorrhage, pancreatitis, diabetes mellitus and Cushing's syndrome. A new morphologic phenomenon, i.e. a ring-like formation of granules, was described in the cytoplasm of the platelets both in healthy and diseased animals. In addition, two forms of pathologic granulation were also described for the first time in Giemsa-stained blood smears: the pseudonuclear and the spot-like formation of granules, which were observed especially in disorders affecting the blood cells. The granulation and morphological characteristics of platelets on smears stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction (PAS) were also studied. Three localisations of granulation were observed, such as

  7. Multicentre standardisation of a clinical grade procedure for the preparation of allogeneic platelet concentrates from umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Rebulla, Paolo; Pupella, Simonetta; Santodirocco, Michele; Greppi, Noemi; Villanova, Ida; Buzzi, Marina; De Fazio, Nicola; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to a largely prevalent use for bleeding prophylaxis, platelet concentrates from adult blood have also been used for many years to prepare platelet gels for the repair of topical skin ulcers. Platelet gel can be obtained by activation of fresh, cryopreserved, autologous or allogeneic platelet concentrates with calcium gluconate, thrombin and/or batroxobin. The high content of tissue regenerative factors in cord blood platelets and the widespread availability of allogeneic cord blood units generously donated for haematopoietic transplant but unsuitable for this use solely because of low haematopoietic stem cell content prompted us to develop a national programme to standardise the production of allogeneic cryopreserved cord blood platelet concentrates (CBPC) suitable for later preparation of clinical-grade cord blood platelet gel. Materials and methods Cord blood units collected at public banks with total nucleated cell counts <1.5×109, platelet count >150×109/L and volume >50 mL, underwent soft centrifugation within 48 hours of collection. Platelet-rich plasma was centrifuged at high speed to obtain a CBPC with target platelet concentration of 800–1,200×109/L, which was cryopreserved, without cryoprotectant, below −40 °C. Results During 14 months, 13 banks produced 1,080 CBPC with mean (± standard deviation) volume of 11.4±4.4 mL and platelet concentration of 1,003±229×109/L. Total platelet count per CBPC was 11.3±4.9×109. Platelet recovery from cord blood was 47.7±17.8%. About one-third of cord blood units donated for haematopoietic transplant could meet the requirements for preparation of CBPC. The cost of preparation was € 160.92/CBPC. About 2 hours were needed for one technician to prepare four CBPC. Discussion This study yielded valuable scientific and operational information regarding the development of clinical trials using allogeneic CBPC. PMID:26509822

  8. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P < 0.01) and significantly inhibited platelet aggregation (by 31-41% for raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P < 0.01). In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the extracts had no effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The effectiveness of the extracts in whole blood and the lack of their activity in PRP indicate that leukocytes are likely to participate in the platelet response to the extracts. Our experiments show that the extracts significantly reduced the amount of free radicals released by activated neutrophils in whole blood (P < 0.001), as well as in suspensions of isolated neutrophils (P < 0.05). Moreover, the reduced number of neutrophils leads to the decreased efficiency of the extracts in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, our findings show that the raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils.

  9. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII.

    PubMed

    Mattheij, Nadine J A; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C F M J; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Beckers, Erik A M; Suylen, Dennis P L; Nolte, Marc W; Hackeng, Tilman M; McCarty, Owen J T; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2016-04-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin α(IIb)β3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin α(IIb)β3 Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin α(IIb)β3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in α(IIb)β3(Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial α(IIb)β3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin α(IIb)β3.

  10. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, Nadine J.A.; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C.F.M.J.; van der Meijden, Paola E.J.; Henskens, Yvonne M.C.; Beckers, Erik A.M.; Suylen, Dennis P.L.; Nolte, Marc W.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin αIIbβ3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin αIIbβ3. Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin αIIbβ3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in αIIbβ3 (Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial αIIbβ3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26721892

  11. Functional property of von Willebrand factor under flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Miyata, Shigeki

    2002-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is produced in megakaryocytes and endothelial cells, is stored in the alpha-granule of platelets and in the Weibel-Palade body of endothelial cells, and is present in plasma and vascular subendothelium. This huge protein with a unique multimeric structure plays a pivotal role in both hemostasis and pathological intravascular thrombosis, in which vWF contributes to both platelet adhesion/aggregation and blood coagulation through its multiple adhesive functions for the platelet membrane receptors, glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex, integrin alphaIIbbeta3, heparin, various types of collagen, and coagulation factor VIII. Among various functions, the most characteristic feature of vWF is its determinant role on platelet thrombus formation under high-shear-rate conditions. Indeed, at in vivo rheological situations where platelets are flowing with high speed in the bloodstream, the only reaction that can initiate mural thrombogenesis is the interaction of vWF with platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha. The recent x-ray analysis of the crystal structure of various functional domains and functional studies of this protein under experimental flow conditions have rapidly advanced and revised our knowledge of the structure-function relationships of vWF, a key protein for hemostasis and arterial thrombosis.

  12. Validation of a P2Y12-receptor specific whole blood platelet aggregation assay.

    PubMed

    Amann, Michael; Ferenc, Miroslaw; Valina, Christian M; Bömicke, Timo; Stratz, Christian; Leggewie, Stefan; Trenk, Dietmar; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Hochholzer, Willibald

    2016-11-01

    Testing of P2Y12-receptor antagonist effects can support clinical decision-making. However, most platelet function assays use only ADP as agonist which is not P2Y12-receptor specific. For this reason P2Y12-receptor specific assays have been developed by adding prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) to reduce ADP-induced platelet activation via the P2Y1-receptor. The present study sought to evaluate a P2Y12-receptor specific assay for determination of pharmacodynamic and clinical outcomes. This study enrolled 400 patients undergoing coronary stenting after loading with clopidogrel or prasugrel. ADP-induced platelet reactivity was assessed by whole blood aggregometry at multiple time points with a standard ADP assay (ADPtest) and a P2Y12-receptor specific assay (ADPtest HS, both run on Multiplate Analyzer, Roche Diagnostics). Patients were clinically followed for 1 month and all events adjudicated by an independent committee. In total, 2084 pairs of test results of ADPtest and ADPtest HS were available showing a strong correlation between results of both assays (r = 0.96, p < 0.001). These findings prevailed in multiple prespecified subgroups (e.g., age; body mass index; diabetes). Calculated cutoffs for ADPtest HS and the established cutoffs of ADPtest showed a substantial agreement for prediction of ischemic and hemorrhagic events with a Cohen's κ of 0.66 and 0.66, respectively. The P2Y12-receptor specific ADPtest HS assay appears similarly predictive for pharmacodynamic and clinical outcomes as compared to the established ADPtest assay indicating its applicability for clinical use. Further evaluation in large cohorts is needed to determine if P2Y12-receptor specific testing offers any advantage for prediction of clinical outcome.

  13. An efficient method for isolation of representative and contamination-free population of blood platelets for proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Wrzyszcz, Aneta; Urbaniak, Joanna; Sapa, Agnieszka; Woźniak, Mieczysław

    2017-01-01

    To date, there has been no ideal method for blood platelet isolation which allows one to obtain a preparation devoid of contaminations, reflecting the activation status and morphological features of circulating platelets. To address these requirements, we have developed a method which combines the continuous density gradient centrifugation with washing from PGI2-supplemented platelet-rich plasma (PRP). We have assessed the degree of erythrocyte and leukocyte contamination, recovery of platelets, morphological features, activation status, and reactivity of isolated platelets. Using our protocol, we were able to get a preparation free from contaminations, representing well the platelet population prior to the isolation in terms of size and activity. Besides this, we have obtained approximately 2 times more platelets from the same volume of blood compared to the most widely used method. From 10 ml of whole citrated blood we were able to get on average 2.7 mg of platelet-derived protein. The method of platelet isolation presented in this paper can be successfully applied to tests requiring very pure platelets, reflecting the circulating platelet state, from a small volume of blood.

  14. Cathepsin G-Dependent Modulation of Platelet Thrombus Formation In Vivo by Blood Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Faraday, Nauder; Schunke, Kathryn; Saleem, Sofiyan; Fu, Juan; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Morrell, Craig; Dore, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies. PMID:23940756

  15. Antioxidative effects of extracts from Trifolium species on blood platelets exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Moniuszko-Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-12-01

    Clovers (Trifolium) may possess a significant therapeutic potential, but the effects of compounds from these plants on blood platelets and haemostasis have been poorly recognized. The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidative action of extracts from three species of clovers: Trifolium pratense, Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum in the protection of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with crude extract and phenolic fraction of T. pratense or phenolic fractions of T. scabrum and T. pallidum, at the final concentrations of 0.5-50 μg/ml. Then, for the induction of oxidative stress, 100 μM peroxynitrite was added. The antioxidative activity of plant extracts was assessed by measurements of the level of 3-nitrotyrosine, thiol groups and lipid peroxidation products (hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances). Despite the significant differences in the composition of the investigated extracts, we observed antioxidative effects of all used mixtures. The presence of Trifolium extracts considerably reduced the peroxynitrite-mediated modifications of proteins and diminished peroxidation of lipids in platelets. Our results indicate on a strong antioxidative activity of the tested extracts-statistically significant effects were found even for the lowest concentrations (0.5 μg/ml) of all extracts. This action may be useful in the protection of blood components, very susceptible to oxidative modifications. The obtained results suggest that the examined clovers are a promising source of compounds, valuable for the protection against oxidative stress-induced damage to blood platelets.

  16. How do the full-generation poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers activate blood platelets? Platelet membrane zeta potential and other membrane-associated phenomena.

    PubMed

    Watala, Cezary; Karolczak, Kamil; Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Maczynska, Katarzyna; Pieniazek, Anna; Labieniec-Watala, Magdalena

    2016-03-16

    We explored the hypothesis that zeta potential altered by polycations affects blood platelet activation and reactivity, the phenomena associated with membrane lipid fluidity and platelet mitochondrial bioenergetics. PAMAM dendrimers generation- and dose-dependently enhanced zeta potential of platelets (from -10.7 mV to -4.3 mV). Increased expressions of activation markers, P-selectin and the active complex αIIbβ3, as well as significantly enhanced fibrinogen binding occurred upon the in vitro incubation of blood platelets in the presence of PAMAMs G3 and G4 (resp. 62.1% and 69.4% vs. 1.4% and 2.7% in control for P-selectin, P<0.0001). PAMAM dendrimers increased fluidity of platelet membrane lipid bilayer, while they did not affect platelet mitochondria respiration. Increased platelet activation and their responses to agonists in vitro were statistically associated with the revealed alterations in zeta potential. Our results support the hypothesis that polycation-mediated "neutralized" zeta potential may underlie the activating effects of PAMAMs on blood platelets.

  17. A Real-Time Monitoring System to Assess the Platelet Aggregatory Capacity of Components of a Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessel Wall.

    PubMed

    Musa, Faiza Idris; Harper, Alan G S; Yang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Native blood vessels contain both an antiaggregatory intimal layer, which prevents platelet activation in the intact vessel, and a proaggregatory medial layer, which stimulates platelet aggregation upon vascular damage. Yet, current techniques for assessing the functional properties of tissue-engineered blood vessels may not be able to assess the relative effectiveness of both these pro- and antiaggregatory properties of the vessel construct. In this study, we present a novel technique for quantitatively assessing the pro- and antiaggregatory properties of different three-dimensional blood vessel constructs made using a layered fabrication method. This technique utilizes real-time measurements of cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling to assess platelet activation in fluorescently labeled human platelet suspensions using fluorescence spectrofluorimetry, while also permitting examination of thrombus formation upon the surface of the construct using fluorescent imaging of DiOC6-labeled platelets. Experiments using this method demonstrated that type I collagen hydrogels, commonly used as scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering, were unable to support significant platelet activation, while type I and III neo-collagen secreted from human coronary artery smooth muscle cells cultured within these hydrogels as the medial layer were able to support thrombus formation. The incorporation of an intimal layer consisting of human umbilical vein endothelial cells on top of the medial layer inhibited platelet activation and aggregation. These data demonstrate that the methodology presented here is able to quantitatively compare the capacity of different constructs to trigger or prevent platelet activation. As such, this technique may provide a useful tool for standardizing the assessment of the functional properties of tissue-engineered blood vessel constructs developed using different culturing techniques.

  18. Metalloproteases Affecting Blood Coagulation, Fibrinolysis and Platelet Aggregation from Snake Venoms: Definition and Nomenclature of Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kini, R. Manjunatha; Koh, Cho Yeow

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases, in addition to their contribution to the digestion of the prey, affect various physiological functions by cleaving specific proteins. They exhibit their activities through activation of zymogens of coagulation factors, and precursors of integrins or receptors. Based on their structure–function relationships and mechanism of action, we have defined classification and nomenclature of functional sites of proteases. These metalloproteases are useful as research tools and in diagnosis and treatment of various thrombotic and hemostatic conditions. They also contribute to our understanding of molecular details in the activation of specific factors involved in coagulation, platelet aggregation and matrix biology. This review provides a ready reference for metalloproteases that interfere in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation. PMID:27690102

  19. Resveratrol protects against peroxynitrite-induced thiol oxidation in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Nowak, Paweł; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-) is a reactive species produced in the reaction between the superoxide anion (O2*-) and nitric oxide (*NO). ONOO- is involved in several pathological conditions such as inflammation, arteriosclerosis, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular disorders. Our earlier results showed that ONOO- inhibits different steps of blood platelet activation and causes the depletion of platelet thiols. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol (3, 4', 5-trihydroxystilbene) and other antioxidants (uric acid and deferoxamine (DFO)) on the level of low molecular thiols such as glutathione, cysteine and cysteinylglycine (in reduced and oxidized form) in blood platelets treated with ONOO-. Our results showed that ONOO- (100 microM, 2 min) induces changes in these thiols (measured by HPLC method); these changes are diminished in the presence of resveratrol. Preincubation of human platelets with resveratrol at a concentration of 100 microM (30 min) has a protective effect against the oxidation of platelet thiols induced by ONOO- or its intermediate. The other tested antioxidants also have a protectory action. In conclusion, we suggest that the resveratrol present in the human diet may partially protect -SH groups from oxidation and may be responsible for redox regulation and control in platelets.

  20. Nattokinase improves blood flow by inhibiting platelet aggregation and thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang Sei; Park, Sung Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nattokinase on the in vitro platelet aggregation and in vivo thrombosis were investigated in comparison with aspirin. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with nattokinase and aggregation inducers collagen and thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Nattokinase significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations. Nattokinase also reduced thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were orally administered with nattokinase for 1 week, and their carotid arteries were exposed. Arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Nattokinase delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 160 mg/kg. In addition, a high dose (500 mg/kg) of nattokinase fully prevented the occlusion, as achieved with aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that nattokinase extracted from fermented soybean inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is suggested that nattokinase could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24396387

  1. Nattokinase improves blood flow by inhibiting platelet aggregation and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang Sei; Park, Sung Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2013-12-01

    The effects of nattokinase on the in vitro platelet aggregation and in vivo thrombosis were investigated in comparison with aspirin. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with nattokinase and aggregation inducers collagen and thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Nattokinase significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations. Nattokinase also reduced thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were orally administered with nattokinase for 1 week, and their carotid arteries were exposed. Arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Nattokinase delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 160 mg/kg. In addition, a high dose (500 mg/kg) of nattokinase fully prevented the occlusion, as achieved with aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that nattokinase extracted from fermented soybean inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is suggested that nattokinase could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow.

  2. Platelet concentrates for topical use: bedside device and blood transfusion technology. Quality and versatility.

    PubMed

    Borzini, Piero; Balbo, Valeria; Mazzucco, Laura

    2012-06-01

    More or less after a decade of experimental and pioneering manual procedures to prepare platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for topical use, several portable and bedside devices were made available to prepare the PRP at the point-of-care. This technical opportunity increased the number of patients who got access to the treatment with autologous PRP and PRP-gel. Since topical treatment of tissue with PRP and PRP-gel was restricted to autologous preparation, blood transfusion centers that professionally prepare donor-derived platelet concentrates were not able to cover the overwhelming request for autologous PRP supply. Principally for logistic and organization reasons blood transfusion centers usually fail the challenge of prompt delivery of PRP to the physician over large territory. Nevertheless the blood bank production of platelet concentrates is associated with high standardization and quality controls not achievable from bedside and portable devices. Furthermore it easy to demonstrate that high-volume blood bank-produced platelet concentrates are less expensive than low-volume PRP produced by portable and bedside devices. Taking also in consideration the ever-increasing safety of the blood components, the relationship between bedside device-produced and blood-bank-produced PRP might be reconsidered. Here we discuss this topic concluding that the variety of sources of PRP production is an opportunity for versatility and that, ultimately, versatility is an opportunity for the patient's care.

  3. The proton gradient of secretory granules and glutamate transport in blood platelets during cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by methyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Ostapchenko, Ludmila

    2011-11-01

    Glutamate transport in blood platelets resembles that in brain nerve terminals because platelets contain neuronal Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, glutamate receptors in the plasma membrane, vesicular glutamate transporters in secretory granules, which use the proton gradient as a driving force, and can release glutamate during aggregation/activation. The acidification of secretory granules and glutamate transport were assessed during acute treatment of isolated platelets with cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Confocal imaging with the cholesterol-sensitive fluorescent dye filipin showed a quick reduction of cholesterol level in platelets. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we demonstrated that the acidification of secretory granules of human and rabbit platelets was decreased by ∼15% and 51% after the addition of 5 and 15mM MβCD, respectively. The enrichment of platelet plasma membrane with cholesterol by the application of complex MβCD-cholesterol (1:0.2) led to the additional accumulation of acridine orange in secretory granules indicating an increase in the proton pumping activity of vesicular H(+)-ATPase. MβCD did not evoke release of glutamate from platelets that was measured with glutamate dehydrogenase assay. Flow cytometric analysis did not reveal alterations in platelet size and granularity in the presence of MβCD. These data showed that the dissipation of the proton gradient of secretory granules rather than their exocytosis caused MβCD-evoked decrease in platelet acidification. Thus, the depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol in the presence of MβCD changed the functional state of platelets affecting storage capacity of secretory granules but did not evoke glutamate release from platelets.

  4. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  5. Serotonin uptake in blood platelets of psychiatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, H.Y.; Arora, R.C.; Baber, R.; Tricou, B.J.

    1981-12-01

    Platelet serotonin (5-HT) uptake was determined in 72 newly admitted, unmedicated psychiatric patients. Decreased maximum velocity (Vmax) of 5-HT uptake was present in unipolar and bipolar depressed patients as well as schizoaffective depressed patients. The apparent Michaelis constant (km) of 5-HT uptake was normal in these groups, as was Vmax and Km in manic-depressive and chronic schizophrenic patients. Treatment of depressed patients with notriptyline hydrochloride or imipramine hydrochloride increased Km significantly. There was a trend for the increase in Km in the nortriptyline-treated patients to correlate with clinical improvement. Decreased 5-HT uptake in platelets provides additional evidence for the role of 5-HT in the pathophysiologic process of some forms of depression.

  6. Effect of Blood Shear Forces on Platelet Mediated Thrombosis Inside Arterial Stenosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalej, Nabil

    Shear induced activation of platelets plays a major role in the onset of thrombosis in atherosclerotic arteries. Blood hemodynamics and its effect on platelet kinetics has been studied mainly in in vitro and in ex vivo experiments. We designed new in vivo methods to study blood hemodynamic effects on platelet kinetics in canine stenosed carotid arteries. A carotid artery-jugular vein anastomotic shunt was produced. Intimal damage and controlled variations in the degree of stenosis were produced on the artery. An inflatable cuff was placed around the jugular vein to control vascular resistance. An electromagnetic flowmeter was used to measure blood flow. Doppler ultrasound crystals were used to measure the velocity profiles inside and distal to the stenosis. Stenosis geometry was obtained using digital subtraction angiography and quantitative arteriography. Using these measurements we calculated the wall shear stress using the finite difference solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. To study platelet kinetics, autologous platelets were labeled with Indium Oxine and injected IV. A collimated Nal gamma counter was placed over the stenosis to detect radio-labeled platelet accumulation as platelet mediated thrombi formed in the stenosis. The radioactive count rate increased in an inverse parallel fashion to the decline in flow rate during thrombus formation. The platelet accumulation increased with the increase of percent stenosis and was maximal at the narrow portion of the stenosis. Acute thrombus formation leading to arterial occlusion was only observed for stenosis higher than 70 +/- 5%. Platelet accumulation rate was not significant until the pressure gradient across the stenosis exceeded 40 +/- 10 mmHg. Totally occlusive thrombus formation was only observed for shear stresses greater than a critical value of 100 +/- 10 Pa. Beyond this critical value acute platelet thrombus formation increased exponentially with shear. Increased shear stresses were found to

  7. Assessing anxiety levels and empathic tendency in blood and platelet donors.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Suar Çakı; Doğan, Erdoğan; Sevimligül, Gülgün; Yücel, Birsen; Bolat, Fatih; Kavakçı, Onder; Sencan, Mehmet

    2013-06-01

    In spite of a constantly-increasing requirement for blood transfusion in the world, blood donation does not exhibit an increase at the same rate. In Turkey with a population of 74 million, only 15 per 10,000 people donate blood regularly and rate of voluntary blood donation is very low compared to developed countries. The aim of this study is to determine empathic level of donors and anxiety levels of blood and platelet donors and also to enable comfort and motivation of donors by taking precautions for reducing their anxieties. This prospective and descriptive study was conducted with 100 voluntary donors (50 blood donors, 50 platelet donors) who admitted to Blood Centre of Cumhuriyet University Hospital between 15 March 2012 and 30 April 2012. Average age of these donors was 27 (19-48)years. The mean scores of donors from Empathic Tendency Scale (ETS), State Anxiety Invertory (SAI) and Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI) were 70 (49-83), 40 (33-45) and 34 (30-44), respectively. ETS score of those donating blood/platelet for the first time was low, >1 is higher in those who donated previously. SAI and TAI scores of blood donors were higher than those of platelet donors (p<0.001) and TAI score was higher in those who donate for the first time (p<0.007) compared to previously donated precipitants. In conclusion, this study underscores that the request of the donor to help others is the most important factor for donation. People frequently donate blood to unfamiliar people and recurring blood donations increase the level of empathy. Donation made during the continuous disclosure is an important factor for being a donor.

  8. A review and discussion of platelet nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase: do blood platelets produce nitric oxide from L-arginine or nitrite?

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, Stepan; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    The NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG system is one of the most powerful mechanisms responsible for platelet inhibition. In numerous publications, expression of functional NO synthase (NOS) in human and mouse platelets has been reported. Constitutive and inducible NOS isoforms convert L-arginine to NO and L-citrulline. The importance of this pathway in platelets and in endothelial cells for the regulation of platelet function is discussed since decades. However, there are serious doubts in the literature concerning both expression and functionality of NOS in platelets. In this review, we aim to present and critically evaluate recent data concerning NOS expression and function in platelets, and to especially emphasise potential pitfalls of detection of NOS proteins and measurement of NOS activity. Prevailing analytical problems are probably the main sources of contradictory data on occurrence, activity and function of NOS in platelets. In this review we also address issues of how these problems can be resolved. NO donors including organic nitrites (RONO) and organic nitrate (RONO2) are inhibitors of platelet activation. Endogenous inorganic nitrite (NO2 (-)), the product of NO autoxidation, and exogenous inorganic nitrite are increasingly investigated as NO donors in the circulation. The role of platelets in the generation of NO from nitrite is also discussed.

  9. Whole blood coagulation and platelet activation in the athlete: A comparison of marathon, triathlon and long distance cycling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serious thrombembolic events occur in otherwise healthy marathon athletes during competition. We tested the hypothesis that during heavy endurance sports coagulation and platelets are activated depending on the type of endurance sport with respect to its running fraction. Materials and Methods 68 healthy athletes participating in marathon (MAR, running 42 km, n = 24), triathlon (TRI, swimming 2.5 km + cycling 90 km + running 21 km, n = 22), and long distance cycling (CYC, 151 km, n = 22) were included in the study. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after completion of competition to perform rotational thrombelastometry. We assessed coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) after intrinsically activation and fibrin polymerization (FIBTEM). Furthermore, platelet aggregation was tested after activation with ADP and thrombin activating peptide 6 (TRAP) by using multiple platelet function analyzer. Results Complete data sets were obtained in 58 athletes (MAR: n = 20, TRI: n = 19, CYC: n = 19). CT significantly decreased in all groups (MAR -9.9%, TRI -8.3%, CYC -7.4%) without differences between groups. In parallel, MCF (MAR +7.4%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) and fibrin polymerization (MAR +14.7%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) were significantly increased in all groups. However, platelets were only activated during MAR and TRI as indicated by increased AUC during TRAP-activation (MAR +15.8%) and increased AUC during ADP-activation in MAR (+50.3%) and TRI (+57.5%). Discussion While coagulation is activated during physical activity irrespective of type we observed significant platelet activation only during marathon and to a lesser extent during triathlon. We speculate that prolonged running may increase platelet activity, possibly, due to mechanical alteration. Thus, particularly prolonged running may increase the risk of thrombembolic incidents in running athletes. PMID:20452885

  10. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003552.htm Platelet-associated antibodies blood test To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a ...

  11. The miRNA Profile of Platelets Stored in a Blood Bank and Its Relation to Cellular Damage from Storage.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Moreira-Nunes, Caroline de Fátima Aquino; Maués, Jersey Heitor da Silva; Lamarão, Letícia Martins; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mário Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Millions of blood products are transfused each year, and many lives are directly affected by transfusion. Platelet concentrate (PC) is one of the main products derived from blood. Even under good storage conditions, PC is likely to suffer cell damage. The shape of platelets changes after 5 to 7 days of storage at 22°C. Taking into consideration that some platelet proteins undergo changes in their shape and functionality during PC storage. Sixteen PC bags were collected and each PC bag tube was cut into six equal pieces to perform experiments with platelets from six different days of storage. Thus, on the first day of storage, 1/6 of the tube was used for miRNA extraction, and the remaining 5/6 was stored under the same conditions until extraction of miRNAs on each the following five days. Samples were sequenced on an Illumina Platform to demonstrate the most highly expressed miRNAs. Three miRNAs, mir127, mir191 and mir320a were validated by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) in 100 PC bags tubes. Our method suggests, the use of the miRNAs mir127 and mir320a as biomarkers to assess the "validity period" of PC bags stored in blood banks for long periods. Thus, bags can be tested on the 5th day of storage for the relative expression levels of mir127 and mir320a. Thus, we highlight candidate miRNAs as biomarkers of storage damage that can be used as tools to evaluate the quality of stored PC. The use of miRNAs as biomarkers of damage is unprecedented and will contribute to improved quality of blood products for transfusions.

  12. Could Microparticles Be the Universal Quality Indicator for Platelet Viability and Function?

    PubMed

    Maurer-Spurej, Elisabeth; Chipperfield, Kate

    2016-01-01

    High quality means good fitness for the intended use. Research activity regarding quality measures for platelet transfusions has focused on platelet storage and platelet storage lesion. Thus, platelet quality is judged from the manufacturer's point of view and regulated to ensure consistency and stability of the manufacturing process. Assuming that fresh product is always superior to aged product, maintaining in vitro characteristics should preserve high quality. However, despite the highest in vitro quality standards, platelets often fail in vivo. This suggests we may need different quality measures to predict platelet performance after transfusion. Adding to this complexity, platelets are used clinically for very different purposes: platelets need to circulate when given as prophylaxis to cancer patients and to stop bleeding when given to surgery or trauma patients. In addition, the emerging application of platelet-rich plasma injections exploits the immunological functions of platelets. Requirements for quality of platelets intended to prevent bleeding, stop bleeding, or promote wound healing are potentially very different. Can a single measurable characteristic describe platelet quality for all uses? Here we present microparticle measurement in platelet samples, and its potential to become the universal quality characteristic for platelet production, storage, viability, function, and compatibility.

  13. Could Microparticles Be the Universal Quality Indicator for Platelet Viability and Function?

    PubMed Central

    Chipperfield, Kate

    2016-01-01

    High quality means good fitness for the intended use. Research activity regarding quality measures for platelet transfusions has focused on platelet storage and platelet storage lesion. Thus, platelet quality is judged from the manufacturer's point of view and regulated to ensure consistency and stability of the manufacturing process. Assuming that fresh product is always superior to aged product, maintaining in vitro characteristics should preserve high quality. However, despite the highest in vitro quality standards, platelets often fail in vivo. This suggests we may need different quality measures to predict platelet performance after transfusion. Adding to this complexity, platelets are used clinically for very different purposes: platelets need to circulate when given as prophylaxis to cancer patients and to stop bleeding when given to surgery or trauma patients. In addition, the emerging application of platelet-rich plasma injections exploits the immunological functions of platelets. Requirements for quality of platelets intended to prevent bleeding, stop bleeding, or promote wound healing are potentially very different. Can a single measurable characteristic describe platelet quality for all uses? Here we present microparticle measurement in platelet samples, and its potential to become the universal quality characteristic for platelet production, storage, viability, function, and compatibility. PMID:28053805

  14. Trajectory of platelets in pregnancy - do low-risk women need an intrapartum full blood count prior to epidural?

    PubMed

    Duong, Christine; Kidson-Gerber, Giselle; Peters, Nancy; Listijono, Dave R; Henry, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether pregnant women with a normal 28-week gestation platelet count and no high-risk conditions for thrombocytopenia require a pre-epidural platelet count. All 1844 included women (platelet count > 150 × 10(9) /L at 28 weeks' gestation, term singleton birth, no thrombocytopenia risk conditions) had a platelet count > 100 × 10(9) /L prebirth, suggesting low-risk pregnant women do not require pre-epidural full blood count solely to check platelet count.

  15. Comparison of two platelet activation markers using flow cytometry after in vitro shear stress exposure of whole human blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    Platelet activation is the initiating step to thromboembolic complications in blood-contacting medical devices. Currently, there are no widely accepted testing protocols or relevant metrics to assess platelet activation during the in vitro evaluation of new medical devices. In this article, two commonly used platelet activation marker antibodies, CD62P (platelet surface P-selectin) and PAC1 (activated GP IIb/IIIa), were evaluated using flow cytometry. Anticoagulant citrate dextrose solution A (ACDA) and heparin anticoagulated human blood from healthy donors were separately exposed to shear stresses of 0, 10, 15, and 20 Pa for 120 s using a cone-plate rheometer model, and immediately mixed with the platelet marker antibodies for analysis. To monitor for changes in platelet reactivity between donors and over time, blood samples were also evaluated after exposure to 0, 2, and 20 µM of adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Following ADP stimulation, the percentage of both CD62P and PAC1 positive platelets increased in a dose dependent fashion, even 8 h after the blood was collected. After shear stress stimulation, both CD62P and PAC1 positive platelets increased significantly at shear stress levels of 15 and 20 Pa when ACDA was used as the anticoagulant. However, for heparinized blood, the PAC1 positive platelets decreased with increasing shear stress, while the CD62P positive platelets increased. Besides the anticoagulant effect, the platelet staining buffer also impacted PAC1 response, but had little effect on CD62P positive platelets. These data suggest that CD62P is a more reliable marker compared with PAC1 for measuring shear-dependent platelet activation and it has the potential for use during in vitro medical device testing.

  16. [Introduction of platelet additive solution in platelet concentrates: towards a decrease of blood transfusion reactions].

    PubMed

    Rebibo, D; Simonet, M; Hauser, L

    2008-11-01

    Platelet concentrates (PC) are used in thrombocytopenia for curative or preventive treatment for hemorrhagic risk. Since five years, additive solutions have been added in PCs for several reasons; one of them is to present an interest in the intolerance in plasma reactions. The literature data have shown that these solutions entail fewer allergic reactions than PCs kept in plasma. This study was reviewed on three years of transfusion in France. The main objective of this study was to see if there was a difference in frequency when these PCs were in solution or not. All adverse reactions in recipients (ARR) occurring among PCs recipients (with and without additive solution) were analysed. The categories of ARR specifically studied were: allergies, febril non haemolytic reactions (FNHR) and the category "unknown". This study shows that there is significantly lower incidence of allergies by introducing solution. For all ARRs, there is also a decrease in their frequency when PCs are in additive solution, it is significant except for the apheresis platelet concentrates. For categories FNHR and "unknown", the results are opposed and/or not significant. This study confirms that introduction of additive solutions in PCs is able to reduce some allergic transfusion reactions.

  17. Effect of an electrical left ventricular assist device on red blood cell and platelet survival in the cow. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Melaragno, A.J.; Vecchione, J.J.; Katchis, R.J.; Abdu, W.A.; Ouellet, R.P.

    1982-04-23

    Blood volume measurements were made in cows after infusion of human 125 iodine albumin and autologous 51 chromium-labeled red blood cells. Repeated intravenous infusions of iodinated human albumin did not appear to isosensitize the cows. When the cow red blood cells were incubated at 37 C after labeling with 51 chromium, there was elution of the 51 chromium, and the 51 chromium T 50 values were 45 hours in both healthy cows and cows with LVAD's. Measurements also were made in the cow platelets labeled with 51 chromium or 111 Indium-oxine. The platelets labeled with 51 chromium had T 50 values of 4 days, and platelets labeled with 111 Indium-oxine had T 50 values of 0.9 to 2.7 days. 51 chromium-labeled platelets had similar T 50 values in healthy cows and cows with LVAD's. Bovine platelets isolated from units of blood using serial differential centrifugation were labeled with 51 chromium or with 111 Indium-oxine, and after infusion in healthy cows and cows with LVAD's measurements were made of platelet circulation and distribution. The disappearance of platelet radioactivity from the blood was linear with time, and the platelet lifespan was 6-10 days. The presence of an LVAD did not affect initial recovery or lifespan of cow platelets.

  18. Response of blood platelets to resveratrol during a model of hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Joanna; Olas, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilben), a phenolic antioxidant synthesized in grapes and other plants, and also present in wine, has been suggested to help prevent cardiovascular events. In this study the influence of resveratrol on platelet aggregation during a model of hyperhomocysteinemia was investigated. We induced hyperhomocysteinemia using a reduced form of Hcys (final dose, 0.1 mM) and the most reactive form of Hcys, its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (HTL, 1 µM). The aim of our study in vitro was also to investigate superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) generation after incubation of platelets with Hcys, HTL, and resveratrol. We have observed that HTL, like its precursor Hcys, stimulated the generation of (O(2)(-) in platelets and caused an augmentation of platelet aggregation induced by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. Our results in vitro also demonstrated that resveratrol reduced the toxic action of Hcys and HTL on blood platelet aggregation and superoxide anion radical production in platelets, suggesting its potential protective effects on hemostasis are negatively influenced by homocysteine and its derivatives.

  19. Mechanism of inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase in human blood platelets by carbamate insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Krug, H F; Hamm, U; Berndt, J

    1988-01-01

    Carbamates are a widely used class of insecticides and herbicides. They were tested for their ability to affect human blood platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in platelets. (1) The herbicides of the carbamate type have no, or only little, influence up to a concentration of 100 microM; the carbamate insecticides, however, inhibit both aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in a dose- and time-dependent manner. (2) Carbaryl, the most effective compound, inhibits platelet aggregation and cyclo-oxygenase activity completely at 10 microM. The liberation of arachidonic acid from phospholipids and the lipoxygenase pathway are not affected, whereas the products of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway are drastically decreased. (3) By using [14C]carbaryl labelled in the carbamyl or in the ring moiety, it could be proved that the carbamyl residue binds covalently to platelet proteins. In contrast with acetylsalicylic acid, which acetylates only one protein, carbaryl carbamylates a multitude of platelet proteins. (4) One of the carbamylated proteins was found to be the platelet cyclo-oxygenase, indicating that carbaryl resembles in this respect acetylsalicylic acid, which is known to inhibit this enzyme specifically by acetylation. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3128272

  20. Long-term untreated streptozotocin-diabetes leads to increased expression and elevated activity of prostaglandin H2 synthase in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Siewiera, Karolina; Kassassir, Hassan; Talar, Marcin; Wieteska, Lukasz; Watala, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    In diabetes-related states of chronic hyperglycaemia elevated concentrations of glucose may alter the functioning of platelet enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism, including prostaglandin H2 synthase (cyclooxygenase) (PGHS, COX). Therefore, the principal aim of this study was to assess the effects of experimental chronic hyperglycaemia on platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) expression and activity. Blood platelet activation and reactivity were assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats with the 5-month streptozotocin (STZ) diabetes. The PGHS-1 abundance in platelets was evaluated with flow cytometry and Western blotting, while its activity monitored using a high resolution respirometry and the peroxidase fluorescent assay. The production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) in platelets were assayed immunoenzymatically. Circulating platelets from diabetic were characterised by increased size, elevated 'priming' and altered reactivity, compared to non-diabetic animals. Both Western blot analysis and flow cytometry revealed significantly elevated expressions of platelet PGHS-1 in STZ-diabetic rats (p < 0.05). We also observed significantly elevated platelet PGHS-1-related arachidonic acid metabolism in diabetic vs. non-diabetic animals, with the use of polarographic (p < 0.05) and total activity assay (p < 0.001). Such increases were accompanied by the elevated production of PGE2 (p < 0.001) and TXB2 (p < 0.05) in diabetic animals. The increased PGHS-1-dependent oxygen consumption and the total activity of PGHS-1 in diabetic animals remained very significant (p < 0.001) also upon adjusting for blood platelet PGHS-1 abundance. Therefore, our results further contribute to the explanation of the increased metabolism of arachidonic acid observed in diabetes.

  1. Migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Song, Suk-Heung; Lim, Chae-Seung; Shin, Sehyun

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation and adhesion of platelets to the vascular wall are shear-dependent processes that play critical roles in hemostasis and thrombosis at vascular injury sites. In this study, we designed a simple and rapid assay of platelet aggregation and adhesion in a microfluidic system. A shearing mechanism using a rotating stirrer provided adjustable shear rate and shearing time and induced platelet activation. When sheared blood was driven through the microchannel under vacuum pressure, shear-activated platelets adhered to a collagen-coated surface, causing blood flow to significantly slow and eventually stop. To measure platelet adhesion and aggregation, the migration distance (MD) of blood through the microchannel was monitored. As the microstirrer speed increased, MD initially decreased exponentially but then increased beyond a critical rpm. For platelet-excluded blood samples, there were no changes in MD with increasing stirrer speed. These findings imply that the stirrer provided sufficiently high shear to activate platelets and that blood MD is a potentially valuable index for measuring the shear-dependence of platelet activation. Our microfluidic system is quick and simple, while providing a precise assay to measure the effects of shear on platelet aggregation and adhesion.

  2. Dauricoside, a new glycosidal alkaloid having an inhibitory activity against blood-platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hu, S M; Xu, S X; Yao, X S; Cui, C B; Tezuka, Y; Kikuchi, T

    1993-10-01

    Dauricoside (1), a new glycosidal alkaloid, was isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum DC. along with dauricine (2), daurisoline (3), dauriporphine (4), menisporphine (5), and 6-O-demethylmenisporphine (6), and its structure was determined by means of spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1, 2, and 3 inhibited blood-platelet aggregation induced by adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP).

  3. Effect of n-tyrosol on blood viscosity and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, M B; Chernysheva, G A; Smol'yakova, V I; Maslov, M Yu; Cherkashina, I V; Krysin, A P; Sorokina, I V; Tolstikova, T G

    2007-01-01

    Experiments on rats showed that n-tyrosol limited the increase in blood viscosity during thermal exposure at a shear rate of 5-300 sec(-1) and inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The effects of n-tyrosol are comparable to that of pentoxyphylline.

  4. Aspirin insensitive thrombophilia: transcript profiling of blood identifies platelet abnormalities and HLA restriction.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Payam; Katz, Richard; Toma, Ian; Li, Ranyang; Reiner, Jonathan; VanHouten, Kiersten; Carpio, Larry; Marshall, Lorraine; Lian, Yi; Bupp, Sujata; Fu, Sidney W; Rickles, Frederick; Leitenberg, David; Lai, Yinglei; Weksler, Babette B; Rebling, Frederik; Yang, Zhaoqing; McCaffrey, Timothy A

    2013-05-15

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet agent because it is safe, efficient, and inexpensive. However, a significant subset of patients does not exhibit a full inhibition of platelet aggregation, termed 'aspirin resistance' (AR). Several major studies have observed that AR patients have a 4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other thrombotic events. Arachidonic acid-stimulated whole blood aggregation was tested in 132 adults at risk for ischemic events, and identified an inadequate response to aspirin therapy in 9 patients (6.8%). Expression profiling of blood RNA by microarray was used to generate new hypotheses about the etiology of AR. Among the differentially expressed genes, there were decreases in several known platelet transcripts, including clusterin (CLU), glycoproteins IIb/IIIa (ITGA2B/3), lipocalin (LCN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and the thrombopoetin receptor (MPL), but with increased mRNA for the T-cell Th1 chemokine CXCL10. There was a strong association of AR with expression of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DQA1. Similar HLA changes have been linked to autoimmune disorders, particularly antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which autoantibodies to phospholipid/protein complexes can trigger platelet activation. Consistent with APS, AR patients exhibited a 30% reduction in platelet counts. Follow-up testing for autoimmune antibodies observed only borderline titers in AR patients. Overall, these results suggest that AR may be related to changes in platelet gene expression creating a hyperreactive platelet, despite antiplatelet therapy. Future studies will focus on determining the protein levels of these differential transcripts in platelets, and the possible involvement of HLA restriction as a contributing factor.

  5. Changes in white blood cells and platelets in children with falciparum malaria: relationship to disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Shamez; Lowe, Brett; Cole, Andrew O; Kowuondo, Ken; Newton, Charles R J C

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the changes in white blood cells and platelets in children with falciparum malaria in endemic areas. We measured the white cell count (WCC) and platelets of 230 healthy children from the community, 1369 children admitted to hospital with symptomatic malaria, and 1461 children with other medical conditions. Children with malaria had a higher WCC compared with community controls, and leucocytosis was strongly associated with younger age, deep breathing, severe anaemia, thrombocytopenia and death. The WCC was not associated with a positive blood culture. In children with malaria, high lymphocyte and low monocyte counts were independently associated with mortality. A platelet count of less than 150 x 109/l was found in 56.7% of children with malaria, and was associated with age, prostration and parasite density, but not with bleeding problems or mortality. The mean platelet volume was also higher in children with malaria compared with other medical conditions. This may reflect early release from the bone marrow in response to peripheral platelet destruction. Thus, leucocytosis was associated with both severity and mortality in children with falciparum malaria, irrespective of bacteraemia, whereas thrombocytopenia, although very common, was not associated with adverse outcome.

  6. Keishibukuryogan, a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Inhibits Platelet Aggregation in Guinea Pig Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Noguchi, Masamichi; Yuzurihara, Mitsutoshi; Omiya, Yuji; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Effects of keishibukuryogan (KBG) on platelet aggregation were investigated. To ensure the specificity of KBG, tokishakuyakusan (TSS) and kamisyoyosan (KSS), which are known to have platelet aggregation-inhibiting effects, and rikkunshito (RKT) and shakuyakukanzoto (SKT), which are considered to be devoid of such effects, were used for comparison. The platelet aggregation of each test drug was measured by the screen filtration pressure method using whole blood of guinea pigs and expressed as a collagen-induced pressure rate (%) or a collagen concentration required for 50% increase in the pressure rate (PATI value). KBG suppressed the collagen-induced whole blood pressure rate increase and increased the PATI value, like TSS and KSS. Neither RKT nor SKT showed these effects. The Moutan cortex and Cinnamomi cortex, the constituent crude drugs of KBG, showed KBG-like pressure rate suppression and PATI-increasing effects. Furthermore, paeonol, a representative component of Moutan cortex, and aspirin which is known to have platelet aggregation-inhibiting activity (COX-1 inhibitor) also showed similar effects. These results suggest that the platelet aggregation-inhibiting activity of the constituent crude drugs Moutan cortex and Cinnamomi cortex is involved in the improving effects of KBG on impaired microcirculation and that paeonol plays a role in these effects. PMID:26379740

  7. Potential use of blood bank platelet concentrates to accelerate wound healing of diabetic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Deok-Woo; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Hong, Yong-Taek; Woo, Hong-Suh; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Gottrup, Finn

    2007-11-01

    Many clinical trials have shown the effectiveness of platelet releasates on diabetic wound healing, but large volumes of blood must be aspirated from patients and a platelet separator is required. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential of blood bank platelet concentrate (BBPC) for accelerating diabetic wound healing. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) contents in BBPC were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in vitro, and the in vivo study involved comparing extents of wound healing in BBPC-treated and control groups using diabetic mouse wound models. In the in vitro study, 5.2 +/- 1.2 pg of PDGF-BB was found to be released by 1 million platelets in fresh BBPC, and adding thrombin to BBPC significantly increased the levels of PDGF-BB released. Our in vivo study in diabetic mice revealed that BBPC treatment greatly accelerated wound healing. Our results suggest that BBPC has potential to accelerate the healing of diabetic ulcers.

  8. Effects of polyphenol-rich extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa on the markers of oxidative stress and blood platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kedzierska, Magdalena; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive substances found in numerous foods can be successfully and safely used to modify various cellular functions and affect the oxidative stress. Aronia melanocarpa fruits (Rosaceae) are one of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances shown to have anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidative and antiplatelet activities. We investigated antioxidant properties of the extract from berries of A. melanocarpa by the estimation of the selected and other biomarkers of oxidative stress, i.e. the level of 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2) (8-EPI) (by immunoassay kit) and the amount of glutathione (by HPLC method) in control platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2). The expression of alpha(IIb)beta(3) (a marker of platelet activation) was measured by flow cytometer. The antioxidative and antiplatelet properties of the tested extract were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative and antiplatelet commercial monomeric polyphenol-resveratrol. The extract from berries of A. melanocarpa (at the highest tested concentration -100 microg/ml) decreased the production of 8-EPI (a marker of lipid peroxidation) in control blood platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2) (2 mM). A combined action of the tested plant extract and H(2)O(2) evoked a significant increase of reduced form of glutathione in platelets compared with cells treated with H(2)O(2) only. Moreover, the tested plant extract (at the highest used concentration -100 microg/ml) reduced the expression of alpha(IIb)beta(3) on blood platelets. Comparative studies indicate that the tested plant extract was found to be more reactive in blood platelets than the solution of pure resveratrol.

  9. Platelet function testing during 5-day storage of single and random donor plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Akay, O Meltem; Gündüz, Eren; Başyiğit, Hatice; Gulbas, Zafer

    2007-06-01

    Platelet concentrates are routinely manufactured from whole blood by differential centrifugation (random donor platelets-RDP) or by plateletpheresis (single donor platelets-SDP). These platelet concentrates have a storage period of 5 days and many different approaches exist to measure the condition of platelets during their storage. In this study, platelet aggregation testing using adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen and flow cytometric platelet activation analysis using CD41 FITC and CD62 PE before and after ADP was performed on days 1, 3 and 5 of storage of platelet preparations. Thirty three RDPs, stored in Baxter and Kansuk blood bags and 18 SDPs stored in Fresenius blood bags were evaluated. In RDPs and in SDPs; ADP and collagen induced PA responses were decreased significantly on the 3rd and 5th days compared to 1st day. CD62 positive platelet percentage after ADP were decreased significantly on the 3rd and 5th days compared to the 1st day in Kansuk bags. Flow cytometric analysis revealed minor changes in CD41 expression after ADP on the 3rd day compared to 1st day and on the 5th day compared to 3rd day. Differences in CD62 positive platelet percentage were not significant between the RDPs and SDPs. Our results suggest that: (1) ADP and collagen induced PA responses decrease both in RDPs and SDPs during storage. (2) Flow cytometric analysis does not show major significant changes in platelet activation after ADP during storage. (3) Continous shaking on the agitator does not cause a significant change in CD62 positive platelet percentage during storage. (4) Platelet aggregation responses in RDPs stored in Baxter and Kansuk blood bags do not differ during storage.

  10. Effects of tranexamic acid on platelet function and thrombin generation (ETAPlaT): WOMAN trial sub-study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has the potential to reduce bleeding and a large randomized placebo controlled trial of its effect in women with PPH (The WOMAN trial) is underway. TXA might also affect coagulation factors and platelets.  Objectives. To examine the effect of TXA on thrombin generation, platelet function, fibrinogen, D-dimer and coagulation factors in women with PPH.  Methods. We will conduct a sub-study within the WOMAN trial. Women with clinically diagnosed primary PPH after vaginal or caesarean delivery are eligible for inclusion. Blood samples will be collected at baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of study treatment. Using platelet poor plasma we will measure thrombin generation, fibrinogen, D-dimer, factor V and VIII, and Von Willebrand factor. Platelet function will be evaluated in whole blood using Multiplate® tests. Outcomes. The primary outcome is the effect of TXA on thrombin generation. Secondary outcomes include the effect of TXA on platelet function, fibrinogen, D-dimer and coagulation factors. PMID:28090594

  11. Differential inhibitory action of apixaban on platelet and fibrin components of forming thrombi: Studies with circulating blood and in a platelet-based model of thrombin generation

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Reverter, Joan Carles; Lopez-Farre, Antonio; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Badimon, Juan Jose; Escolar, Gines

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mechanisms of action of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) suggest a potential therapeutic use in the prevention of thrombotic complications in arterial territories. However, effects of DOACs on platelet activation and aggregation have not been explored in detail. We have investigated the effects of apixaban on platelet and fibrin components of thrombus formation under static and flow conditions. Methods We assessed the effects of apixaban (10, 40 and 160 ng/mL) on: 1) platelet deposition and fibrin formation onto a thrombogenic surface, with blood circulating at arterial shear-rates; 2) viscoelastic properties of forming clots, and 3) thrombin generation in a cell-model of coagulation primed by platelets. Results In studies with flowing blood, only the highest concentration of apixaban, equivalent to the therapeutic Cmax, was capable to significantly reduce thrombus formation, fibrin association and platelet-aggregate formation. Apixaban significantly prolonged thromboelastometry parameters, but did not affect clot firmness. Interestingly, results in a platelet-based model of thrombin generation under more static conditions, revealed a dose dependent persistent inhibitory action by apixaban, with concentrations 4 to 16 times below the therapeutic Cmax significantly prolonging kinetic parameters and reducing the total amount of thrombin generated. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate the critical impact of rheological conditions on the antithrombotic effects of apixaban. Studies under flow conditions combined with modified thrombin generation assays could help discriminating concentrations of apixaban that prevent excessive platelet accumulation, from those that deeply impair fibrin formation and may unnecessarily compromise hemostasis. PMID:28192448

  12. Evaluation of Dried Storage of Platelets for Transfusion: Physiologic Integrity and Hemostatic Functionality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-17

    ONR Grant No. N00014-92-J-1244 EVALUATION OF DRIED STORAGE OF PLATELETS FOR TRANSFUSION: PHYSIOLOGIC INTEGRITY AND HEMOSTATIC FUNCTIONALITY. Principal...protection for commercialization of the manufacture and use of lyophilized platelets in transfusion medicine is still pending in U.S. Patent Court and... platelets for correction of bleeding times in thrombocytopenic rabbits. Three different preparations, representing the platelets from a total of six units

  13. [Platelet concentrates from whole-blood donations (buffy-coat) or apheresis: which one to use?].

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Rivera, José; Vicente, Vicente

    2012-05-05

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) prepared either from whole-blood donations by the buffy-coat method (BC), or by plateletpheresis are indicated to prevent or treat acute hemorrhage secondary to thrombocytopenia, and there is an ongoing debate about which platelet product should be used. Usage of each of these two products is highly heterogeneous among countries and individual institutions, ranging from 10 to 90%, with a 50:50 ratio in Europe. In comparison of pooled platelets prepared by the BC method and apheresis PCs, data suggest similar efficacy of the products. Regarding recipients' adverse reactions, there is no advantage for apheresis concentrates. From the donor's point of view, evidence favours using the abundance of platelets available from whole-blood donation. As residual viral transmission risk continues to fall, the advantage of apheresis products related to the decrease to donor exposure lessens. While the cost-effectiveness of apheresis products is comparable to that of other accepted blood safety interventions, in case of emerging pathogens, probably pathogen inactivation of pooled BC PCs would be a more desirable strategy.

  14. I am the 9%: Making the case for whole-blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Seheult, J N; Triulzi, D J; Yazer, M H

    2016-06-01

    Over the last 15 years, there has been a trend in the United States towards the increasing use of apheresis platelet (AP) concentrates over whole-blood-derived platelets (WBP). Although 1-h- and 24-h-corrected count increments tend to be higher with AP, this does not translate into improved haemostatic efficiency when used to prevent bleeding in haematology/oncology patients. WBP expose the recipient to more donors than apheresis products. However, recent studies have shown no significant differences in the rates of bacterial contamination, human leukocyte antigen alloimmunisation, RhD alloimmunisation, transfusion-related acute lung injury or febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions between these two products. Given the overall low rates of virally contaminated units in the era of nucleic acid testing and rigorous donor screening, the difference in donor exposures of 4-6 vs 1 has minimal clinical relevance. Although studies point to a marginally increased risk of donor adverse events associated with WBP, the absolute risk is too miniscule to act as a deterrent to making whole-blood donations. Both types of platelet concentrates should therefore be considered clinically equivalent; in this light, the most responsible use of the community donor resource pool, which both optimises the utility of a whole-blood donation and meets the clinical needs of thrombocytopenic recipients, is to have a mix of both types of platelet products so as to mitigate the risk of shortages.

  15. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  16. Subcellular localization of the heparin-neutralizing factor in blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Da Prada, M; Jakábová, M; Lüscher, E F; Pletscher, A; Richards, J G

    1976-01-01

    1. The distribution of the heparin-neutralizing factor (platelet factor 4, PF4) in subcellular organelles of blood platelets of rabbits and man was investigated. 2. In both species the organelles storing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT storage organelles) contained only trivial amounts of PF4. 3. In contrast, the content of PF4 was highest in the subcellular fractions rich in alpha-granules. 4. In conclusion, PF4 is probably localized in the alpha-granules and therefore the platelets contain at least two types of organelles (5-HT organelles and alpha-granules) capable of releasing their contents in response to the same stimuli, such as exposure to collagen, thrombin, etc. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:950602

  17. Substituted alpah-methylbenzyl and tricyclic arylalkyl lactamimides as inhibitors of blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Grisar, J M; Claxton, G P; MacKenzie, R D

    1976-04-01

    N-[1-(p-Phenoxyphenyl)ethyl]hexahydro-2H-azepin-2-imine hydrochloride (10) and N-[1-(2-dibenzothienyl)-ethyl]hexahydro-2H-azepin-2-imine hydrochloride (22) were found to inhibit in vitro aggregation of human blood platelets induced by ADP with minimal release of procoagulant platelet factor 3. The compounds were selected from a series of substituted alpha-methylbenzyl and tricyclic arylalkyl lactamimides that were free of hypoglycemic and diuretic effects. Compounds 10 and 22, as well as N-[1-(1-naphthyl)ethyl]hexahydro-2H-azepin-2-imine hydrochloride (I) and N-(2,2-diphenylpentyl)hexahydro-2H-azepin-2-imine hydrochloride (II), were evaluated for effects on ADP-induced platelet aggregation after repeated oral administration to guinea pigs. Compound II (RMI 12,366A) showed in vivo activity in this system 2 h after the last of four daily doses of 100 mg/kg po.

  18. Alterations of platelet functions in children and adolescents with iron-deficiency anemia and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Ibrahim, Wafaa E; Kassim, Nevine A; Ragab, Iman A; Saad, Abeer A; Abdel Raheem, Heba G

    2015-01-01

    Several changes in platelets have been reported in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), so a relationship between iron metabolism and thrombopoiesis should be considered. We aimed to study the alterations of platelet functions in patients with IDA by assessment of platelet aggregation with epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and ristocetin and by measuring platelet function analyzer-100 (PFA-100) closure time together with the effect of iron therapy on the same tests. A follow-up study was conducted in Ain Shams University Children's hospital in the period from June 2011 to June 2012 including 20 patients with confirmed IDA and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched control. Bleeding manifestations were reported. Laboratory analysis included complete blood count, assessment of iron status by measuring serum iron, TIBC and ferritin, assessment of platelet functions by PFA-100 closure time and platelet aggregation with collagen, ADP and ristocetin. Patients with IDA were treated by oral iron therapy 6 mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate and post-therapeutic re-assessment was done. Mean age of IDA patients was 5.7 ± 4.2 years. Bleeding manifestations were more common in patients group. Mean PFA-100 closure times (with epinephrine) were significantly longer in patients (179.1 ± 86.4 seconds) compared to control group (115 ± 28.5 seconds) (p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by ADP (38.1 ± 22.2%), epinephrine (19.7 ± 14.2%) and ristocetin (58.8 ± 21.4%) were significantly reduced in patients compared to control (62.7 ± 6.2, 63.3 ± 6.9, 73.8 ± 8.3, respectively; p < 0.001). After treatment platelet aggregation tests induced by ADP (64.78 ± 18.25%), and epinephrine (55.47 ± 24%) were significantly increased in patients with IDA compared to before treatment (39.44 ± 21.85%, 20.33 ± 14.58%; p < 0.001). PFA-100 closure time as well showed significant decreased after treatment (118.4 ± 27.242) compared to before treatment (186.2 ± 90.35; p < 0.05). A negative

  19. Statistical analysis plan for the WOMAN-ETAPlaT study: Effect of tranexamic acid on platelet function and thrombin generation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening complication for women, and the leading cause of maternal mortality. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic used worldwide to treat uterine haemorrhage and to reduce blood loss in general surgery. TXA may have effects on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors as a result of its inhibition on the plasmin. Methods. WOMAN ETAPlaT is a sub-study of the World Maternal Antifibrinolitic trial (WOMAN trial). All adult women clinically diagnosed with PPH after a vaginal delivery or caesarean section, are eligible for inclusion in the study. Blood samples will be collected at the baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of study treatment is given. Platelet function will be evaluated in whole blood immediately after sampling with Multiplate® tests (ADPtest and TRAPtest). Thrombin generation, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and coagulation factors vW, V and VIII will be analysed using platelet poor plasma. Results. Recruitment to WOMAN ETAPlaT started on 04 November 2013 and closed on 13 January 2015, during this time  188 patients were recruited. The final participant follow-up was completed on 04 March 2015. This article introduces the statistical analysis plan for the study, without reference to unblinded data.   Conclusion. The data from this study will provide evidence for the effect of TXA on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors in women with PPH. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00872469; ISRCTN76912190

  20. Which platelet function test best reflects the in vivo plasma concentrations of ticagrelor and its active metabolite? The HARMONIC study.

    PubMed

    Koziński, Marek; Ostrowska, Małgorzata; Adamski, Piotr; Sikora, Joanna; Sikora, Adam; Karczmarska-Wódzka, Aleksandra; Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Boinska, Joanna; Laskowska, Ewa; Obońska, Ewa; Fabiszak, Tomasz; Kubica, Jacek

    2016-11-30

    Aim of this study was assessment of the relationship between concentrations of ticagrelor and its active metabolite (AR-C124910XX) and results of selected platelet function tests. In a single-centre, cohort study, patients with myocardial infarction underwent blood sampling following a 180 mg ticagrelor loading dose intake (predose, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 24 hours postdose) to perform pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments. Platelet reactivity was evaluated using the VASP-assay, the VerifyNow device and the Multiplate analyzer. Analysis of 36 patients revealed high negative correlations between ticagrelor concentrations and platelet reactivity evaluated with all three platelet function tests (the VASP-assay: RS=-0.722; p<0.0001; the VerifyNow device: RS=-0.715; p<0.0001; the Multiplate analyzer: RS=-0.722; p<0.0001), with no significant differences between correlation coefficients. Similar results were found for AR-C124910XX. Platelet reactivity values assessed with all three methods generally correlated well with each other; however, a significantly higher correlation (p<0.02) was demonstrated between the VerifyNow and Multiplate tests (RS=0.707; p<0.0001) than in other assay combinations (the VASP-assay and the VerifyNow device: RS=0.595; p<0.0001; the VASP-assay and the Multiplate analyzer: RS=0.588; p<0.0001). With respect to the recognition of high platelet reactivity, we found higher measurement concordance between the VerifyNow and Multiplate tests compared with other assay combinations, while for low platelet reactivity, only results of the VerifyNow and Multiplate assay were related to each other. Platelet reactivity measurements performed with the VASP, VerifyNow and Multiplate tests show comparably strong negative correlations with ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX concentrations.

  1. Platelets and platelet-like particles mediate intercellular RNA transfer

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonina; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Vitseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The role of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis is clearly established; however, the mechanisms by which platelets mediate inflammatory and immune pathways are less well understood. Platelets interact and modulate the function of blood and vascular cells by releasing bioactive molecules. Although the platelet is anucleate, it contains transcripts that may mirror disease. Platelet mRNA is only associated with low-level protein translation; however, platelets have a unique membrane structure allowing for the passage of small molecules, leading to the possibility that its cytoplasmic RNA may be passed to nucleated cells. To examine this question, platelet-like particles with labeled RNA were cocultured with vascular cells. Coculture of platelet-like particles with activated THP-1, monocytic, and endothelial cells led to visual and functional RNA transfer. Posttransfer microarray gene expression analysis of THP-1 cells showed an increase in HBG1/HBG2 and HBA1/HBA2 expression that was directly related to the transfer. Infusion of wild-type platelets into a TLR2-deficient mouse model established in vivo confirmation of select platelet RNA transfer to leukocytes. By specifically transferring green fluorescent protein, we also observed external RNA was functional in the recipient cells. The observation that platelets possess the capacity to transfer cytosolic RNA suggests a new function for platelets in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. PMID:22596260

  2. Reversibility of thrombin-induced decrease in platelet glycoprotein Ib function.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Menashi, S; Garcia, I; Cramer, E M; Li, H; Tenza, D; De Romeuf, C; Soria, J; Soria, C

    1993-09-01

    Thrombin induces a redistribution of glycoprotein (GP) Ib/GP IX complex from the platelet surface into the surface connected canalicular system (SCCS). This redistribution results in a reduced interaction of platelet GP Ib with von Willebrand factor (vWF) bound to subendothelium leading to impaired platelet adhesion. In this study we show that the platelet aggregation and degranulation require concentrations of thrombin above 0.05 U/ml, while the decrease in GP Ib function (about 50% of control value), as determined by ristocetin induced platelet agglutination, can be induced by lower concentrations (0.01-0.04 U/ml). Moreover, we show that when adding thrombin inhibitors to the platelets preincubated with < 0.04 U/ml thrombin for 5 min, their agglutinability by ristocetin was gradually recovered within 30 min, indicating that in these conditions the decrease in platelet adhesiveness is reversible. Immuno-electromicroscopic study showed that this restoration of platelet GP Ib function was associated with a reversed translocation of GP Ib from the SCCS to the plasma membrane. The data obtained from counting gold particles showed that the ratio of GP Ib immunolabelling on the external membrane versus that on the SCCS was 3.31 +/- 0.90 for resting platelets, down-regulated to 0.84 +/- 0.13 (P < 0.05 versus resting platelets) for the platelets treated with 0.04 U/ml thrombin and returned to 2.63 +/- 2.21 (P > 0.05 versus resting platelets) after incubation for 30 min with hirudin. However, the translocation of GP Ib was poorly reversed by thrombin inhibitors when higher concentrations of thrombin were used which induced platelet aggregation and large extent of degranulation. We conclude that thrombin affects platelets in a dose dependent manner, and that at low concentrations the decrease in platelet GP Ib related function is a reversible phenomenon.

  3. Resveratrol may reduce oxidative stress induced by platinum compounds in human plasma, blood platelets and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Blasiak, Janusz

    2005-07-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic compound found in grapes and wine, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-tumor and anti-platelet activities. Using different methods, we show that resveratrol reduces oxidative stress induced by cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II) and selenium-cisplatin conjugate ([NH(3)](2)Pt(SeO(3)), Se-Pt) in human blood platelets, lymphocytes and plasma. Resveratrol decreased the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2) (a biomarker of lipid peroxidation) in control blood platelets and platelets treated with platinum compounds (10 microg/ml), and markedly reduced activities of different anti-oxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) in these cells. A combined action of resveratrol and Se-Pt evoked a significant decrease of DNA damage (measured by comet assay) in lymphocytes compared with cells treated with Se-Pt only. Resveratrol also caused a distinct reduction of total anti-oxidant level in plasma after incubation with platinum compounds. Therefore, anti-oxidative activity of resveratrol may diminish oxidative stress and damage to cellular biomolecules (lipids, proteins and DNA) induced by platinum compounds.

  4. Bacterial contamination of platelet products in the Blood Transfusion Center of Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Farzad, Baghi Baghban; Farshad, Baghban; Zahra, Bamzadeh; Nahid, Akbari; Mahsa, Khosravi Bakhtiari

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Overall the risk of transfusion transmitted infections has decreased, especially viral infections like HIV and hepatitis B and C. Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components, however, remains a common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality. Platelets pose a special risk given their preservation methods. The incidence of these episodes needs to be assessed and updated on regular basis to accurately manage the risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial infections. Method: 2,000 platelet samples from the Blood Transfusion Center of Isfahan were examined randomly during a 5-month period by bacterial culture and molecular tests. Four platelet samples were found to be contaminated with bacteria, giving a rate of contamination of 500 (0.2%) of tested platelets. Isolated bacteria included one each of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Conclusion: Our study underlines the need for additional safety procedures like bacterial screening and pathogen reduction technology to further decrease the risk of transfusion associated bacterial infections.

  5. Bacterial contamination of platelet products in the Blood Transfusion Center of Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farzad, Baghi Baghban; Farshad, Baghban; Zahra, Bamzadeh; Nahid, Akbari; Mahsa, Khosravi Bakhtiari

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Overall the risk of transfusion transmitted infections has decreased, especially viral infections like HIV and hepatitis B and C. Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components, however, remains a common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality. Platelets pose a special risk given their preservation methods. The incidence of these episodes needs to be assessed and updated on regular basis to accurately manage the risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial infections. Method: 2,000 platelet samples from the Blood Transfusion Center of Isfahan were examined randomly during a 5-month period by bacterial culture and molecular tests. Four platelet samples were found to be contaminated with bacteria, giving a rate of contamination of 500 (0.2%) of tested platelets. Isolated bacteria included one each of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Conclusion: Our study underlines the need for additional safety procedures like bacterial screening and pathogen reduction technology to further decrease the risk of transfusion associated bacterial infections. PMID:28066700

  6. Platelet mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease. The Royal Kings and Queens Parkinson Disease Research Group.

    PubMed

    Krige, D; Carroll, M T; Cooper, J M; Marsden, C D; Schapira, A H

    1992-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that defective function of the mitochondrial enzyme NADH CoQ reductase (complex I) is involved not only in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity, but also in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Complex I deficiency has been identified in PD substantia nigra and appears to be disease-specific and selective for the substantia nigra within the central nervous system. We describe a method for preparation of an enriched mitochondrial fraction from 60 mL blood. Using this technique, we analyzed respiratory chain function in 25 patients with PD and 15 matched control subjects. We confirm a previous report of a specific complex I deficiency in PD platelet mitochondria. Although there was a statistically significant decrease in complex I activity in the PD group compared with the control group (p = 0.005), the defect was mild (16%); it was not possible to distinguish PD from control values on an individual basis. This deficiency is not detectable in platelet whole-cell homogenates, presumably reflecting the relative insensitivity of this preparation and the limited decrease in complex I activity in PD. The presence of a mild complex I defect in platelets together with a more severe defect in substantia nigra suggests either that the pharmacological characteristics shared by these two tissues render them susceptible to a particular toxin or toxins, or that the defect is widely distributed and other biochemical events enhance the deficiency in substantia nigra.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Investigating GABA and its function in platelets as compared to neurons.

    PubMed

    Kaneez, Fatima Shad; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2009-08-01

    We have recently suggested that platelets could be used as a model for neuronal receptors. In this paper we have investigated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism and GABA receptors in platelets and in cultured neurons to see whether platelets' GABA mimics neuronal GABA receptor activities. We used the ELISA technique for detecting the GABA concentration in platelet rich plasma and cultured neurons. The functional effects of GABA and its receptor ligands on platelets were determined using an aggregometer. We found that the GABA concentration is 30% lower in platelets than in neurons and in both preparations GABA was metabolized by GABA transaminase (GABA-T). GABA potentiated calcium dependent platelet aggregation with a higher value in washed platelets suspension (WPS) then in platelet rich plasma (PRP). This effect was inhibited by benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers and the selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase antagonist Wortmannin. GABA neurotransmission is involved in most aspects of normal brain function and can be perturbed in many neuropathologic conditions. We concluded that platelets could be further developed to be used as a peripheral model to study neuronal GABAergic function and its abnormality in diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Furthermore our results indicated that PI3-kinase is involved in calcium dependent GABA induced platelet aggregation as this synergistic effect is inhibited by Wortmannin in dose dependent manner.

  8. Ibrutinib treatment affects collagen and von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Levade, Marie; David, Elodie; Garcia, Cédric; Laurent, Pierre-Alexandre; Cadot, Sarah; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Tam, Constantine; Sié, Pierre; Ysebaert, Loïc; Payrastre, Bernard

    2014-12-18

    The oral Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib, has recently demonstrated high efficiency in patients with relapsed B-cell malignancies. Occurrence of bleeding events has been reported in a subgroup of ibrutinib-treated patients. We demonstrate that ibrutinib selectively inhibits platelet signaling and functions downstream of the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and strongly affects firm platelet adhesion on von Willebrand factor (VWF) under arterial flow. A longitudinal study of 14 patients indicated a correlation between occurrence of bleeding events and decreased platelet aggregation in response to collagen in platelet-rich plasma and firm adhesion on VWF under arterial flow. The addition of 50% untreated platelets was sufficient to efficiently reverse the effects of ibrutinib, and platelet functions recovered after treatment interruption as physiological platelet renewal occurred. These data have important clinical implications and provide a basis for hemostasis management during ibrutinib treatment.

  9. Platelet-derived CXCL12 regulates monocyte function, survival, differentiation into macrophages and foam cells through differential involvement of CXCR4–CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; von Ungern-Sternberg, S N I; Seizer, P; Schlegel, F; Büttcher, M; Sindhu, N A; Müller, S; Mack, A; Gawaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and release CXCL12 (SDF-1), which governs differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into either endothelial or macrophage-foam cells. CXCL12 ligates CXCR4 and CXCR7 and regulates monocyte/macrophage functions. This study deciphers the relative contribution of CXCR4–CXCR7 in mediating the effects of platelet-derived CXCL12 on monocyte function, survival, and differentiation. CXCL12 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that ligate CXCR4–CXCR7 induced a dynamic bidirectional trafficking of the receptors, causing CXCR4 internalization and CXCR7 externalization during chemotaxis, thereby influencing relative receptor availability, unlike MCP-1. In vivo we found enhanced accumulation of platelets and platelet-macrophage co-aggregates in peritoneal fluid following induction of peritonitis in mice. The relative surface expression of CXCL12, CXCR4, and CXCR7 among infiltrated monocytes was also enhanced as compared with peripheral blood. Platelet-derived CXCL12 from collagen-adherent platelets and recombinant CXCL12 induced monocyte chemotaxis specifically through CXCR4 engagement. Adhesion of monocytes to immobilized CXCL12 and CXCL12-enriched activated platelet surface under static and dynamic arterial flow conditions were mediated primarily through CXCR7 and were counter-regulated by neutralizing platelet-derived CXCL12. Monocytes and culture-derived-M1–M2 macrophages phagocytosed platelets, with the phagocytic potential of culture-derived-M1 macrophages higher than M2 involving CXCR4–CXCR7 participation. CXCR7 was the primary receptor in promoting monocyte survival as exerted by platelet-derived CXCL12 against BH3-mimetic induced apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential). In co-culture experiments with platelets, monocytes predominantly differentiated into CD163+ macrophages, which was attenuated upon CXCL12 neutralization and CXCR4/CXCR7 blocking antibodies

  10. Microfluidic cytometers with integrated on-chip optical systems for red blood cell and platelet counting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Li, Qin; Hu, Xiaoming; Lo, Yuhwa

    2016-11-01

    A microfluidic cytometer with integrated on-chip optical systems was designed for red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) counting. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the microfluidic cytometer with on-chip optical signal detection were described. With process using only a single mask, the device that integrates optical fibers and on-chip microlens with microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane layer by standard soft photolithography. This compact structure increased the sensitivity of the device and eliminated time-consuming free-space optical alignments. The microfluidic cytometer was used to count red blood cells and platelets. Forward scatter and extinction were collected simultaneously for each cell. Experimental results indicated that the microfluidic cytometer exhibited comparable performance with a conventional cytometer and demonstrated superior capacity to detect on-chip optical signals in a highly compact, simple, truly portable, and low-cost format that is well suitable for point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  11. Regulation of platelet function by class B scavenger receptors in hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets constitutively express class B scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-BI, two closely related pattern recognition receptors best known for their roles in lipoprotein and lipid metabolism. The biological role of scavenger receptors in platelets is poorly understood. However, in vitro and in vivo data suggest that class B scavenger receptors modulate platelet function and contribute significantly to thrombosis by sensing pathological or physiological ligands, inducing prothrombotic signaling, and increasing platelet reactivity. Platelet CD36 recognizes a novel family of endogenous oxidized choline phospholipids that accumulate in plasma of hyperlipidemic mice and in plasma of subjects with low HDL levels. This interaction leads to the activation of specific signaling pathways and promotes platelet activation and thrombosis. Platelet SR-BI, on the other hand, plays a critical role in the induction of platelet hyper-reactivity and accelerated thrombosis in conditions associated with increased platelet cholesterol content. Intriguingly, oxidized HDL, aSR-BI ligand, can suppress platelet function. These recent findings demonstrate that platelet class B scavenger receptors play roles in thrombosis in dyslipidemia and may contribute to acute cardiovascular events in vivo in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21071700

  12. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  13. Effects of ergotamine and methysergide on blood platelet aggregation responses of migrainous subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Barbara P.; Zilkha, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    Platelet aggregation responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were measured in plasma from migrainous subjects taking either methysergide maleate or ergotamine tartrate and were found to be reduced. Blood 5-HT levels of subjects free of headache were not affected by these drugs. The results support the hypothesis that methysergide and ergotamine act by occupying 5-HT uptake sites in vessel walls, leaving 5-HT molecules available to occupy receptors concerned with vasoconstriction. PMID:4836755

  14. Inhibition of glutamate receptors reduces the homocysteine-induced whole blood platelet aggregation but does not affect superoxide anion generation or platelet membrane fluidization.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Kamil; Pieniazek, Anna; Watala, Cezary

    2017-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an excitotoxic amino acid. It is potentially possible to prevent Hcy-induced toxicity, including haemostatic impairments, by antagonizing glutaminergic receptors. Using impedance aggregometry with arachidonate and collagen as platelet agonists, we tested whether the blockade of platelet NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) and kainate receptors with their inhibitors: MK-801 (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate, [5R,10S]-[+]-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine), CNQX (7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile) and UBP-302 (2-{[3-[(2S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin 1(2H)-yl]methyl}benzoic acid) may hamper Hcy-dependent platelet aggregation. All the tested compounds significantly inhibited Hcy-augmented aggregation of blood platelets stimulated either with arachidonate or collagen. Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion in whole blood samples in a concentration-dependent manner; however, this process appeared as independent on ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as on NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C, and was not apparently associated with the extent of either arachidonate- or collagen-dependent platelet aggregation. Moreover, Hcy acted as a significant fluidizer of surface (more hydrophilic) and inner (more hydrophobic) regions of platelet membrane lipid bilayer, when used at the concentration range from 10 to 50 µmol/l. However, this effect was independent on the Hcy action through glutamate ionotropic receptors, since there was no effects of MK-801, CNQX or UBP-302 on Hcy-mediated membrane fluidization. In conclusion, Hcy-induced changes in whole blood platelet aggregation are mediated through the ionotopic excitotoxic receptors, although the detailed mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated.

  15. (Dicer)phering roles of microRNA in platelets.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-04-07

    In this issue of Blood, Rowley et al report that noncoding RNAs precisely regulate the messenger RNA (mRNA) profile in platelets. Interfering in this process using genetically engineered mice affects hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets.

  16. Normalization methods in time series of platelet function assays

    PubMed Central

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Roest, Mark; Vukicevic, Milan; Beran, Maud; Lauwereins, Bart; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Henskens, Yvonne; Lancé, Marcus; Marcus, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Platelet function can be quantitatively assessed by specific assays such as light-transmission aggregometry, multiple-electrode aggregometry measuring the response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and thrombin-receptor activating peptide and viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). The task of extracting meaningful statistical and clinical information from high-dimensional data spaces in temporal multivariate clinical data represented in multivariate time series is complex. Building insightful visualizations for multivariate time series demands adequate usage of normalization techniques. In this article, various methods for data normalization (z-transformation, range transformation, proportion transformation, and interquartile range) are presented and visualized discussing the most suited approach for platelet function data series. Normalization was calculated per assay (test) for all time points and per time point for all tests. Interquartile range, range transformation, and z-transformation demonstrated the correlation as calculated by the Spearman correlation test, when normalized per assay (test) for all time points. When normalizing per time point for all tests, no correlation could be abstracted from the charts as was the case when using all data as 1 dataset for normalization. PMID:27428217

  17. Nucleation of platelets with blood-borne pathogens on Kupffer cells precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Connie H Y; Jenne, Craig N; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L; Kubes, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of intravital imaging of the liver, we demonstrate a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating blood-borne bacterial infection. Under basal conditions, platelets, via the platelet-adhesion receptor GPIb, formed transient 'touch-and-go' interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria such as Bacillus cereus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from 'touch-and-go' adhesion to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GPIbα-deficient mice had more endothelial and KC damage than did their wild-type counterparts, which led to more fluid leakage, substantial polycythemia and rapid mortality. Our study identifies a previously unknown surveillance mechanism by which platelets survey macrophages that rapidly converts to a critical host response to blood-borne bacteria.

  18. Autologous platelet-labeling in thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Vinazzer, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies performed with peripheral platelets obtained from 6 male volunteers aged 23 to 29 years revealed an extraordinary dependence of labeling efficiency on incubation time and platelet concentration after {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling. Since the monitoring of in vivo-platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia may cause problems due to insufficient labeling results and homologous platelets may show a different in vivo behaviour to autologous ones, we have searched for the minimal amount of platelets necessary to allow appropriate labeling and imaging in patients with thrombocytopenia. In 15 patients with untreated thrombocytopenia aged 14 to 79 years demonstrating a mean peripheral platelet count of 2.509 +/- 1.45 x 10(4) cells/microliters autologous {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling was performed. The results indicate that approximately 1 x 10(8) (concentrated) platelets/ml are necessary to obtain an adequate labeling efficiency and recovery. This platelet concentration can be easily achieved by drawing one more Monovette of whole blood per each 5 x 10(4) platelets/microliter peripheral platelet count less than 2 x 10(5)/microliter. It is concluded, that calculation of the required number of platelets in advance, variation of the blood volume drawn and the volume of incubation buffer allow informative, qualitative and quantitative results using autologous platelets. The method presented effectively circumvents the requirement of homologous platelets for radiolabeling in thrombocytopenia.

  19. Effect of electric charge on the adhesion of human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Szymonowicz, M

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research into the effect of the size and depth of the implanted electric charge on the adhesion of human blood platelets. The experiments were carried out on polyethylene terephthalate PET foil of 36 microns thickness. The electret formation process was carried out in an electron-beam device. The electrization conditions were such that electrets with the excess electric charge accumulated at various depths were obtained. The selection of conditions was verified by investigating the space charge distribution with the use of the virtual electrode method. The microscopic observation of non-electrified foils and electrets as well as the quantitative examination of the adhesion of human blood platelets has explicitly confirmed the positive influence of the electret effect on the thrombogenesis of PET foil. This made it possible to define the optimum electrization conditions. The research has additionally indicated that the relationship between the amount of adherent blood platelets and the size of the electric charge is not a simple relation of the kind: the larger negative charge, the more thrombogenic material. The decisive and positive effect of the space charge has been confirmed by analysing the effectiveness of the surface and space charge.

  20. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  1. Intraoperative hemodilution and autologous platelet rich plasma collection: two techniques for collecting fresh autologous blood.

    PubMed

    Triulzi, D J; Ness, P M

    1995-03-01

    Intraoperative hemodilution (IH) and autologous platelet rich plasma (APRP) collection are two techniques used to obtain autologous blood in the operating room. They have been used to reduce allogeneic blood exposure in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Both components have the advantage of providing fresh blood not subject to the storage lesion. Whole blood (IH) or platelet rich plasma is removed from the patient as anesthesia is induced and replaced with acellular fluid. The blood is transfused back after bypass or major bleeding has ceased. Although used commonly, the data supporting the use of either technique are controversial. Methodologic problems which have confounded studies evaluating their utility include: poorly defined transfusion criteria, concommitant use of other blood conservation techniques (i.e. cell salvage, pharmacologic agents, hypothermia, controlled hypotension) and changing transfusion practices with greater tolerance of normovolemic anemia. Randomized controlled studies with well defined up to date transfusion criteria are needed to identify patients likely to benefit from these techniques.

  2. Antioxidative properties of curcumin in the protection of blood platelets against oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The present in vitro study was designed to estimate the antioxidative activity of curcumin in the protection of human blood platelets and plasma against peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-induced oxidative stress. The effects of curcumin (12.5-50 µg/ml) on ONOO(-)-induced damage of proteins and lipids were determined by the estimation of protein carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) generation. Exposure of blood platelets and plasma to 100 µM ONOO(-) resulted in an increased level of carbonyl groups, nitration of protein tyrosine residues, and enhanced lipid peroxidation. Curcumin inhibited carbonyl group formation in plasma and in platelet proteins. The highest dose of curcumin (50 µg/ml) reduced blood platelet protein carbonylation by approximately 40%. In the protection of blood plasma protein, the lower doses of curcumin (12.5 and 25 µg/ml) were more effective. Curcumin partially prevented 3-nitrotyrosine formation in plasma proteins; the effect of curcumin was only statistically significant in blood platelets at the highest dose (50 µg/ml). The antioxidative action of curcumin in the protection against lipid peroxidation caused by ONOO(-) was also observed. Curcumin suppressed the formation of TBARS both in blood platelets and in plasma samples. The highest concentration of curcumin (50 µg/ml) decreased the TBARS level by approximately 35% in both blood platelets and plasma samples. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the antioxidative properties of curcumin and its protective effects against oxidative/nitrative changes of blood platelets and plasma components, especially proteins and lipids.

  3. Interactions of Lipid Vesicles with Blood Proteins and Platelets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIlED F/G 611i H lEEEEEEEEEEli Ilflflflflfllllllfll I lllllllfffffff Lwi W2 W T~AL L3j)jQ 28 11111 M.1 CROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART MATIONAl... moglobin ’containing liposomes and of~ liposomes composed of polymerizable phospholipids with blood cells and proteinsY All types of liposomes studied...brilliant blue; purified serum proteins( lanes C- H ) were used as standards Fig I Reducing conditions Fig 2 Non-reducing conditions A) Hb liposomes B

  4. Pre-activated blood platelets and a pro-thrombotic phenotype in APP23 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jarre, Andrea; Gowert, Nina S; Donner, Lili; Münzer, Patrick; Klier, Meike; Borst, Oliver; Schaller, Martin; Lang, Florian; Korth, Carsten; Elvers, Margitta

    2014-09-01

    Platelet activation and thrombus formation play a critical role in primary hemostasis but also represent a pathophysiological mechanism leading to acute thrombotic vascular occlusions. Besides, platelets modulate cellular processes including inflammation, angiogenesis and neurodegeneration. On the other hand, platelet activation and thrombus formation are altered in different diseases leading to either bleeding complications or pathological thrombus formation. For many years platelets have been considered to play a role in neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) and strongly related to vascular diseases with platelets playing a critical role in the progression of AD because exposure of platelets to Aβ induces platelet activation, platelet Aβ release, and enhanced platelet adhesion to collagen in vitro and at the injured carotid artery in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms and the relation between vascular pathology and amyloid-β plaque formation in the pathogenesis of AD are not fully understood. Compelling evidence is suggestive for altered platelet activity in AD patients. Thus we analyzed platelet activation and thrombus formation in aged AD transgenic mice (APP23) known to develop amyloid-β deposits in the brain parenchyma and cerebral vessels. As a result, platelets are in a pre-activated state in blood of APP23 mice and showed strongly enhanced integrin activation, degranulation and spreading kinetics on fibrinogen surfaces upon stimulation. This enhanced platelet signaling translated into almost unlimited thrombus formation on collagen under flow conditions in vitro and accelerated vessel occlusion in vivo suggesting that these mice are at high risk of arterial thrombosis leading to cerebrovascular and unexpectedly to cardiovascular complications that might be also relevant in AD patients.

  5. THE EFFECT OF ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID ON PLATELET FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Geoffrey; Packham, Marian A.; Nishizawa, Edward E.; Mustard, James F.; Murphy, Edmund A.

    1968-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) and sodium salicylate inhibit platelet aggregation induced by collagen, antigen-antibody complexes, gamma globulin-coated particles or thrombin. These compounds suppress the release of platelet constituents, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and serotonin, induced by such stimuli. Since ASA and sodium salicylate do not inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation, it appears that their effect on the action of the other stimuli is due to a decrease in the amount of ADP released. The administration of ASA to rabbits (in doses which inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation) impaired hemostasis, prolonged platelet survival, and diminished the amount of deposit formed in an extracorporeal shunt. PMID:4176225

  6. Plasma protein regulation of platelet function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M S; Bang, N U

    1979-04-02

    This reviews summarizes our evidence suggesting that the plasma protein enviroment influences platelet aggregation potential and metabolic activity. Cationic proteins are capable of restoring the aggreation potential of washed human platelets. The aggregation restoring effect of gamma globulin is inhibited by more anionic proteins in subfractions of Cohn fraction IV and fractions V and VI. Artificial enhancement of the net negative charge of plasma proteins through acylation produces derivatives capable of inhibiting platelet rich plasma. The oxygen consumption of washed human platelets is lower than in platelet rich plasma while the lactate production is identical. Autologus plasma, albumin or IgG immunoglobulin restores the oxygen consumption of washed platelets to values comparable to those obtained for platelet rich plasma, while the lactate production is unaffected. Fibrinogen on IgA myeloma protein increases the lactate production, but not the oxygen consumption. Cyclic AMP levels are considerably lower in washed platelets than in platelet rich plasma. Gamma globulin and albumin causes a futher decrease, which is progressive with time. Fibrinogen causes no change in platelet cyclic AMP content. It is suggested that these observations may in part be explained by the equilibriun between anionic and cationic proteins in the platelet microenvironment. This hypothesis appears applicable in certain situations.

  7. Ethanol has different effects on Ca(2+)-transport ATPases of muscle, brain and blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Mitidieri, F; de Meis, L

    1995-01-01

    The effects of ethanol on different sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-transport ATPases (SERCAs) were studied. In sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, ethanol concentrations varying from 5 to 20% promoted a progressive inhibition of Ca2+ uptake, enhancement of Ca2+ efflux, activation of the ATPase activity, increase of the enzyme phosphorylation by ATP and inhibition of enzyme phosphorylation by P1. The effects of ethanol on Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ efflux were antagonized by Mg2+, P(i) and spermine. The increased efflux promoted by ethanol was antagonized by Ca2+ and thapsigargin. In brain and platelet vesicles a biphasic effect of ethanol was observed, so that activation occurred at low concentrations (5-10%) and inhibition at higher concentrations. The activation was not observed with the use of n-propanol and n-butanol. Different from the situation in sarcoplasmic reticulum, the decrease of the Ca2+ uptake in brain and platelet vesicles was associated with an inhibition of the ATPase activity. Mg2+ and P(i) antagonized the enhancement of Ca2+ efflux and the inhibition of Ca2+ uptake promoted by ethanol. However, thapsigargin and Ca2+ did not arrest the Ca2+ efflux promoted by ethanol in brain and platelet preparations. These results suggest that, in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, ethanol uncouples the pump, promoting its activity as a Ca2+ channel. The SERCA isoform found in skeletal muscle has different properties from the isoforms found in brain and blood platelets. PMID:8554513

  8. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2 (-∙)) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5- 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2 (-∙) in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  9. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2−∙) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5– 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2−∙ in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:26933473

  10. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  11. Genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function: application in clinical practice and drug development.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marlene S; Weiss, Ethan J; Sabatine, Marc S; Simon, Daniel I; Bahou, Wadie F; Becker, Lewis C; Parise, Leslie V; Dauerman, Harold L; French, Patricia A; Smyth, Susan S; Becker, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    Understanding genetic contributions to platelet function could have profound clinical ramifications for personalizing platelet-directed pharmacotherapy, by providing insight into the risks and possible benefits associated with specific genotypes. This article represents an integrated summary of presentations related to genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function given at the Fifth Annual Platelet Colloquium in January 2010. It is supplemented with additional highlights from the literature covering (1) approaches to determining and evidence for the associations of genetic variants with platelet hypo- and hyperresponsive phenotypes, (2) the ramifications of these polymorphisms with regard to clinical responses to antiplatelet therapies, and (3) the role of platelet function/genetic testing in guiding antiplatelet therapy.

  12. Blood Product Supply in Germany: The Impact of Apheresis and Pooled Platelet Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Karin; Schopohl, Dorothee; Wittmann, Georg; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Helmut; Rieger, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background In Germany, about 60% of all produced platelet concentrates (PCs) are apheresis PCs (APCs). Ongoing discussions on APC reimbursement and costs might lead to a potential shift in pooled PC (PPC)/APC production. Objective of this analysis was to build a comprehensive model from the societal perspective to evaluate consequences associated with shifts in platelet supply and demand. Methods Literature search, desktop researches on platelet supply and demand. Model calculations, time horizon one year: model input from the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, data 2013. Base case: 19.2% of annual whole blood donations (WBDs) were used for production of 38.5% PPCs, decay of 46,218 PCs (8.0%). Scenarios calculated: variation in PPC proportion of 10-100%. Results Base case: during PPC production 41,957-83,913 red blood cell concentrates (RBCCs) are estimated to be lost, which corresponds to 1-2% of annual RBCCs in Germany. Scenarios were calculated for a production of 60-100% PPCs: loss is estimated to be 1.5-5.0% of annual RBCCs (65,430-218,099), decay 54,189-69,022 PCs (9.4-12.0%). Conclusion Production of different blood components is interlinked and sensitive to unidimensional decisions. Increasing PPC proportion has negative impact on the RBCC production and on the antigen-matched APC donor pool. Completion of the model calculations to predict the optimal PPC/APC proportion would require evidence on the number of refractory patients, donor pool sizes, and incidences of diseases requiring platelet transfusions. PMID:27994524

  13. Circulating primers enhance platelet function and induce resistance to antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blair, T A; Moore, S F; Hers, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists are antiplatelet compounds that are used clinically in patients with thrombosis. However, some patients are ‘resistant’ to antiplatelet therapy, which increases their risk of developing acute coronary syndromes. These patients often present with an underlying condition that is associated with altered levels of circulating platelet primers and platelet hyperactivity. Platelet primers cannot stimulate platelet activation, but, in combination with physiologic stimuli, significantly enhance platelet function. Objectives To explore the role of platelet primers in resistance to antiplatelet therapy, and to evaluate whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) contributes to this process. Methods and Results We used platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 production and ex vivo thrombus formation as functional readouts of platelet activity. Platelets were treated with the potent P2Y12 inhibitor AR-C66096, aspirin, or a combination of both, in the presence or absence of the platelet primers insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and thrombopoietin (TPO), or the Gz-coupled receptor ligand epinephrine. We found that platelet primers largely overcame the inhibitory effects of antiplatelet compounds on platelet functional responses. IGF-1-mediated and TPO-mediated, but not epinephrine-mediated, enhancements in the presence of antiplatelet drugs were blocked by the PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Conclusions These results demonstrate that platelet primers can contribute to antiplatelet resistance. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that there are PI3K-dependent and PI3K-independent mechanisms driving primer-mediated resistance to antiplatelet therapy. PMID:26039631

  14. The relative safety of pooled whole-blood-derived platelets prepared by the buffy-coat method versus single-donor (apheresis) platelets.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C

    2010-01-01

    Conversion to a single-donor (apheresis) platelet inventory in Western Europe and other countries that provide similar health care to the US but rely on buffy-coat pooled whole-blood-derived platelets will confer the benefit of a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of all emerging transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). In Europe, this benefit will include a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of acquiring variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) from platelet transfusion. In countries that use buffy coats from first-time donors to produce platelet pools, there will also be a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infections. Conversion to a single-donor inventory collected from male donors (or female donors without a history of pregnancy or shown not to have white-blood-cell antibodies) should also reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury, although this prediction is based on theory and may not materialize or prove hard to document. Because conversion to a single-donor inventory can effect a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of all TTIs without incurring any risk, it is a more advantageous risk-reduction strategy for emerging TTIs compared with the introduction of pathogen-reduction systems for platelets. The latter cannot protect from vCJD and potentially also from some other emerging TTIs; moreover, they have recently been associated with an increased risk of bleeding.

  15. Homocysteine is a novel risk factor for suboptimal response of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid in coronary artery disease: a randomized multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Kamil; Kamysz, Wojciech; Karafova, Anna; Drzewoski, Jozef; Watala, Cezary

    2013-08-01

    The incomplete inhibition of platelet function by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), despite the patients are receiving therapeutic doses of the drug ('aspirin-resistance'), is caused by numbers of risk factors. In this study we verified the idea that plasma homocysteine (Hcy) contributes to 'aspirin-resistance' in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-designed randomized controlled intervention study has been performed (126 CAD pts incl. 26 with T2DM) to determine whether increasing ASA dose from 75mg to 150mg daily may result in the increased antiplatelet effect, in the course of four-week treatment. Platelet response to collagen (coll) or arachidonic acid (AA) was monitored with whole blood aggregometry, plasma thromboxane (Tx), and Hcy levels were determined immunochemically. The ASA-mediated reductions in platelet response to coll (by 12±3%) or AA (by 10±3%) and in plasma Tx (by 20±9%; p<0.02 or less) were significantly greater for higher ASA dose and significantly correlated with plasma Hcy, which was significantly lower in "good" ASA responders compared to "poor" responders (p<0.001). Higher plasma Hcy appeared a significant risk factor for blood platelet refractoriness to low ASA dose (OR=1.11; ±95%CI: 1.02-1.20, p<0.02, adjusted to age, sex and CAD risk factors). Hcy diminished in vitro antiplatelet effect of low ASA concentration and augmented platelet aggregation (by up to 62% (p<0.005) for coll and up to 15% (p<0.005) for AA), whereas its acetyl derivative acted oppositely. Otherwise, Hcy intensified antiplatelet action of high ASA. Hyperhomocysteinaemia may be a novel risk factor for the suppressed blood platelet response to ASA, and homocysteine may act as a specific sensitizer of blood platelets to some agonists. While homocysteine per se acts as a proaggregatory agent to blood platelets, its acetylated form is able to reverse this effect. Thus, these findings reveal a possibly new

  16. Platelets possess functional TGF-beta receptors and Smad2 protein.

    PubMed

    Lev, P R; Salim, J P; Marta, R F; Osorio, M J Mela; Goette, N P; Molinas, F C

    2007-02-01

    TGF-beta1 plays a main role in tissue repair by regulating extracellular matrix production and tissue granulation. Platelets are one of the main sources of this cytokine in the circulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of the TGF-beta receptors on platelets, the effect of TGF-beta1 on platelet aggregation and the underlying intracellular mechanisms. TGF-beta receptors on platelets were studied by flow cytometry and their mRNA by PCR. Platelet aggregation was assessed by turbidimetric methods and intracellular pathways by Western blot. TGF-beta receptor type II and mRNA codifying for TbetaRI and TbetaRII were found in platelets. We demonstrated that TGF-beta1 did not trigger platelet aggregation by itself but had a modulating effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Either inhibition or increase in platelet aggregation, depending on the exposure time to TGF-beta1 and the ADP concentration used, were shown. We found that platelets possess Smad2 protein and that its phosphorylation state is increased after exposure to TGF-beta1. Besides, TGF-beta1 modified the pattern of ADP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Increased phosphorylation levels of 64-, 80- and 125-kDa proteins during short time incubation with TGF-beta1 and increased phosphorylation of 64- and 125-kDa proteins after longer incubation were observed. The modulating effect of TGF-beta1 on platelet aggregation could play a role during pathological states in which circulating TGF-beta1 levels are increased and intravascular platelet activation is present, such as myeloproliferative disorders. In vascular injury, in which platelet activation followed by granule release generates high local ADP concentrations, it could function as a physiological mechanism of platelet activation control.

  17. Beta-lactam antibiotic-mediated changes in platelet reactivity and vascular endothelial functions.

    PubMed

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Caprino, L

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate vascular and platelet compatibility of intravenous administration of beta-lactam antibiotics, we assessed the effects of therapeutic concentrations of ceftriaxone, aztreonam, and ceftazidime on platelet reactivity to different agonists (sodium arachidonate, collagen and adenosine diphosphate) and on selected vascular endothelial functions (adenosine diphosphatase activity, prostacyclin production and t-PA release). Ceftriaxone and, to a lesser degree, aztreonam, enhanced platelet reactivity, evaluated as onset of platelet aggregating response, and increased thromboxane production to subthreshold concentrations of arachidonate. There was no modification in platelet reactivity after ceftazidime treatment. Ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, but not aztreonam, inhibited endothelial adenosine diphosphatase activity. Prostacyclin production and t-PA release were inhibited only by ceftriaxone at high concentrations. While it is difficult to establish which marker (platelet or endothelial functions) has more clinical reference in human vascular compatibility, it seems feasible to consider aztreonam the most compatible of the beta-lactams studied.

  18. Interaction of D-LSD with blood platelets of rabbits: shape change and specific binding.

    PubMed

    Laubscher, A; Pletscher, A; Noll, H

    1981-02-01

    In blood platelets of rabbits, the shape change-inducing effect of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (D-LSD) has been compared with the D-LSD-binding. D-LSD, but not L-LSD, caused a shape change reaction (EC50 1.3 x 10(-9) M) which was inhibited by various 5-HT antagonists (methergoline and neuroleptic drugs), butaclamol showing marked stereospecificity. Strong inhibitors of 5 HT uptake were only weak in counteracting the D-LSD-induced shape change. Furthermore, D-[3H]LSD bound to platelets at a single saturable, high affinity, stereoselective site [Kd = (31.1 +/- 3.3) x 10(-9) M; Bmax = 28.9 +/- 2.7 fmols per 10(8) platelets]. This binding was strongly antagonized by D-LSD and methergoline and less by the hallucinogenic drugs, psilocin, bufotenin and N'N'-dimethyltryptamine. L-LSD an 5 HT, inhibitors of 5 HT uptake and neuroleptics, especially spiroperidol and butaclamol, had only a weak antagonistic effect. The latter showed stereospecificity. It is concluded that 1) the shape change reaction caused by D-LSD in platelets is mediated by the specific 5 HT-receptor, 2) the sites mediating the D-LSD-induced shape change reaction are not identical with those responsible for D-[3H]LSD-binding and both these sites are different from the 5 HT-transport sites and 3) with respect to D-LSD-binding sites, platelets and neurons are not exactly identical.

  19. A multiple time stepping algorithm for efficient multiscale modeling of platelets flowing in blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3-4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations.

  20. A Multiple Time Stepping Algorithm for Efficient Multiscale Modeling of Platelets Flowing in Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3-4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations.

  1. A Multiple Time Stepping Algorithm for Efficient Multiscale Modeling of Platelets Flowing in Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Na; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiple time-stepping (MTS) algorithm for multiscale modeling of the dynamics of platelets flowing in viscous blood plasma. This MTS algorithm improves considerably the computational efficiency without significant loss of accuracy. This study of the dynamic properties of flowing platelets employs a combination of the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and the coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) methods to describe the dynamic microstructures of deformable platelets in response to extracellular flow-induced stresses. The disparate spatial scales between the two methods are handled by a hybrid force field interface. However, the disparity in temporal scales between the DPD and CGMD that requires time stepping at microseconds and nanoseconds respectively, represents a computational challenge that may become prohibitive. Classical MTS algorithms manage to improve computing efficiency by multi-stepping within DPD or CGMD for up to one order of magnitude of scale differential. In order to handle 3–4 orders of magnitude disparity in the temporal scales between DPD and CGMD, we introduce a new MTS scheme hybridizing DPD and CGMD by utilizing four different time stepping sizes. We advance the fluid system at the largest time step, the fluid-platelet interface at a middle timestep size, and the nonbonded and bonded potentials of the platelet structural system at two smallest timestep sizes. Additionally, we introduce parameters to study the relationship of accuracy versus computational complexities. The numerical experiments demonstrated 3000x reduction in computing time over standard MTS methods for solving the multiscale model. This MTS algorithm establishes a computationally feasible approach for solving a particle-based system at multiple scales for performing efficient multiscale simulations. PMID:25641983

  2. NF-E2 p45 is important for establishing normal function of platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Rie; Takayama-Tsujimoto, Mariko; Satoh, Hironori; Gutiérrez, Laura; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Sarai, Akinori; Bresnick, Emery H; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2013-07-01

    NF-E2 is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of p45 and small Maf subunits. Since p45(-/-) mice display severe thrombocytopenia, p45 is recognized as a critical regulator of platelet production from megakaryocytes. To identify direct p45 target genes in megakaryocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing to analyze the genome-wide chromatin occupancy of p45 in primary megakaryocytes. p45 target gene candidates obtained from the analysis are implicated in the production and function of platelets. Two of these genes, Selp and Myl9, were verified as direct p45 targets through multiple approaches. Since P-selectin, encoded by Selp, plays a critical role in platelet function during thrombogenesis, we tested whether p45 determines the intrinsic reactivity and potency of platelets generated from megakaryocytes. Mice expressing a hypomorphic p45 mutant instead of wild-type p45 in megakaryocytes (p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg mice) displayed platelet hypofunction accompanied by mild thrombocytopenia. Furthermore, lung metastasis of melanoma cells, which requires platelet activation, was repressed in p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg mice compared to control mice, validating the impaired function of platelets produced from p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg megakaryocytes. By activating genes in megakaryocytes that mediate platelet production and function, p45 determines the quantity and quality of platelets.

  3. NF-E2 p45 Is Important for Establishing Normal Function of Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Rie; Takayama-Tsujimoto, Mariko; Satoh, Hironori; Gutiérrez, Laura; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Sarai, Akinori; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2013-01-01

    NF-E2 is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of p45 and small Maf subunits. Since p45−/− mice display severe thrombocytopenia, p45 is recognized as a critical regulator of platelet production from megakaryocytes. To identify direct p45 target genes in megakaryocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing to analyze the genome-wide chromatin occupancy of p45 in primary megakaryocytes. p45 target gene candidates obtained from the analysis are implicated in the production and function of platelets. Two of these genes, Selp and Myl9, were verified as direct p45 targets through multiple approaches. Since P-selectin, encoded by Selp, plays a critical role in platelet function during thrombogenesis, we tested whether p45 determines the intrinsic reactivity and potency of platelets generated from megakaryocytes. Mice expressing a hypomorphic p45 mutant instead of wild-type p45 in megakaryocytes (p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg mice) displayed platelet hypofunction accompanied by mild thrombocytopenia. Furthermore, lung metastasis of melanoma cells, which requires platelet activation, was repressed in p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg mice compared to control mice, validating the impaired function of platelets produced from p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg megakaryocytes. By activating genes in megakaryocytes that mediate platelet production and function, p45 determines the quantity and quality of platelets. PMID:23648484

  4. Impact of high dose vitamin C on platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Bassem M; Sanford, Kimberly W; Fisher, Bernard J; Martin, Erika J; Contaifer Jr, Daniel; Warncke, Urszula Osinska; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S; Chalfant, Charles E; Brophy, Donald F; Fowler III, Alpha A; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    AIM To examine the effect of high doses of vitamin C (VitC) on ex vivo human platelets (PLTs). METHODS Platelet concentrates collected for therapeutic or prophylactic transfusions were exposed to: (1) normal saline (control); (2) 0.3 mmol/L VitC (Lo VitC); or (3) 3 mmol/L VitC (Hi VitC, final concentrations) and stored appropriately. The VitC additive was preservative-free buffered ascorbic acid in water, pH 5.5 to 7.0, adjusted with sodium bicarbonate and sodium hydroxide. The doses of VitC used here correspond to plasma VitC levels reported in recently completed clinical trials. Prior to supplementation, a baseline sample was collected for analysis. PLTs were sampled again on days 2, 5 and 8 and assayed for changes in PLT function by: Thromboelastography (TEG), for changes in viscoelastic properties; aggregometry, for PLT aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in response to collagen or adenosine diphosphate (ADP); and flow cytometry, for changes in expression of CD-31, CD41a, CD62p and CD63. In addition, PLT intracellular VitC content was measured using a fluorimetric assay for ascorbic acid and PLT poor plasma was used for plasma coagulation tests [prothrombin time (PT), partial thrombplastin time (PTT), functional fibrinogen] and Lipidomics analysis (UPLC ESI-MS/MS). RESULTS VitC supplementation significantly increased PLTs intracellular ascorbic acid levels from 1.2 mmol/L at baseline to 3.2 mmol/L (Lo VitC) and 15.7 mmol/L (Hi VitC, P < 0.05). VitC supplementation did not significantly change PT and PTT values, or functional fibrinogen levels over the 8 d exposure period (P > 0.05). PLT function assayed by TEG, aggregometry and flow cytometry was not significantly altered by Lo or Hi VitC for up to 5 d. However, PLTs exposed to 3 mmol/L VitC for 8 d demonstrated significantly increased R and K times by TEG and a decrease in the α-angle (P < 0.05). There was also a fall of 20 mm in maximum amplitude associated with the Hi VitC compared to

  5. Uptake of taurine, GABA, 5-HT, and dopamine by blood platelets in progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, E M

    1979-10-01

    The uptakes of four neurotransmitters (taurine, GABA, 5-HT, and dopamine) by blood platelets from patients with degenerative-type progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) and from controls were studied using different incubation times and different concentrations. Only the uptakes of taurine differed significantly between patients and controls: patients' uptakes were 70% to 80% of control values at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min of incubation time. Km values were approximately the same, but Vmax values in PME patients were lower, showing quantitative but not qualitative differences in taurine uptake by platelets in PME. These results suggest that a defect or an inhibitory mechanism of some factor needed in the transport or binding of taurine (but not of GABA, 5-HT, and dopamine) is present in PME.

  6. [Dynamics of morphometric parameters of peripheral blood platelets as a criterion in assessing thrombogenicity of dialysis membranes].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, E A; Vasilenko, I A; Suslov, V P; Pashkin, I N

    2011-01-01

    The study enrolled 45 patients with terminal chronic renal failure (CRF) aged 24-57 years on hemodialysis (a study group) and 30 healthy subjects of matched age (a control group). Morphofunctional condition of circulating platelets in situ was assessed by vital computer morphometry using computer phase-interference microscope, the analysis was made of opticogeometric parameters and morphological features of live platelets reflecting the degree of their activation. CRF patients' proportion of different platelet types in circulating population was 56.5, 34, 8.7 and 0.8% (platelets in situ, platelets with low, high activation, degenerative) versus 59.4, 28.1, 10.5 and 2% in the controls, respectively. Changes in morphological composition and opticogeometric parameters of circulating platelets were found in the dialysis membrane after a hemodialysis procedure. The changes were less or more pronounced depending on the dialysis membrane type. Thus, vital morphometric platelet parameters reflect condition of the platelets allowing quantitative assessment of impairment of the structure and functional activity of the cells in CRF progression. Hemodialysis procedure results in characteristic alterations of morphofunctional status of circulating platelets related, to a certain degree, to the material of extracorporeal outline. This dictates necessity of objective evaluation of such impact and prognosis of thrombogenic complications. Morphometric parameters of platelets can serve objective criteria of dialysis membrane thromboginicity.

  7. The extract from hop cones (Humulus lupulus) as a modulator of oxidative stress in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Jędrejek, Dariusz; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    The plant Humulus lupulus is known as the raw material of the brewing industry. Hop cones, rich in polyphenolic compounds and acyl phloroglucides, are widely used to preserve beer and to give it a characteristic aroma and flavor. Hop cones have long been used for medicinal purposes. In particular, hop preparations were mainly recommended for the treatment of sleeping disorders. The antioxidative action of hop cones, however, is poorly understood. The aim of our present study was to investigate in vitro changes in human blood platelets induced by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-), the compound of particular importance for vascular thrombosis and inflammatory process) in the presence of hop cone extract (Humulus lupulus). The antioxidative action of the extract was also compared with the properties of a well-characterized antioxidative commercial monomeric polyphenol, resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) in a model system in vitro. Various biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress, such as carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were estimated. The 3-nitrotyrosine formation and carbonyl group generation was assessed by the use of a competition ELISA test and ELISA test, respectively. Tested plant extract (12.5-50 µg/ml), like resveratrol, significantly inhibited protein carbonylation and nitration in the blood platelets treated with ONOO(-) (0.1 mM). The extract from hop cones, like resveratrol, also caused a distinct reduction of platelet lipid peroxidation induced by ONOO(-). The present results indicate that the hope cone extract has in vitro protective effects against ONOO(-), such as induced oxidative/nitrative damage to the human platelet proteins and lipids. However, in comparative studies the extract was not found to be a more effective antioxidant than the solution of pure resveratrol.

  8. An in vitro assessment of the interaction of cadmium selenide quantum dots with DNA, iron, and blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Dunpall, Rekha; Nejo, Adeola Ayodeji; Pullabhotla, Viswanadha Srirama Rajasekhar; Opoku, Andy R; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Shonhai, Addmore

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots have gained increased attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. This has raised interest in assessing their toxicity. In this study, water-soluble, cysteine-capped CdSe nanocrystals with an average size of 15 nm were prepared through a one-pot solution-based method. The CdSe nanoparticles were synthesized in batches in which the concentration of the capping agent was varied with the aim of stabilizing the quantum dot core. The effects of the CdSe quantum dots on DNA stability, aggregation of blood platelets, and reducing activity of iron were evaluated in vitro . DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 200 μg/mL of CdSe quantum dots. Furthermore, the CdSe nanocrystals exhibited high reducing power and chelating activity, suggesting that they may impair the function of haemoglobin by interacting with iron. In addition, the CdSe quantum dots promoted aggregation of blood platelets in a dose dependent manner.

  9. Platelet function and activation in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tong, Linda J; Hosgood, Giselle L; French, Anne T; Irwin, Peter J; Shiel, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess platelet closure time (CT), mean platelet component (MPC) concentration, and platelet component distribution width (PCDW) in dogs with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease. ANIMALS 89 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and 39 control dogs (not CKCSs). PROCEDURES Platelet count, MPC concentration, PCDW, and Hct were measured by use of a hematology analyzer, and CT was measured by use of a platelet function analyzer. Murmur grade and echocardiographic variables (mitral valve regurgitant jet size relative to left atrial area, left atrial-to-aortic diameter ratio, and left ventricular internal dimensions) were recorded. Associations between explanatory variables (sex, age, murmur grade, echocardiographic variables, platelet count, and Hct) and outcomes (CT, MPC concentration, and PCDW) were examined by use of multivariate regression models. RESULTS A model with 5 variables best explained variation in CT (R(2), 0.74), with > 60% of the variance of CT explained by mitral valve regurgitant jet size. The model of best fit to explain variation in MPC concentration included only platelet count (R(2), 0.24). The model of best fit to explain variation in PCDW included platelet count and sex (R(2), 0.25). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, a significant effect of mitral valve regurgitant jet size on CT was consistent with platelet dysfunction. However, platelet activation, as assessed on the basis of the MPC concentration and PCDW, was not a feature of subclinical chronic valvular heart disease in CKCSs.

  10. Inhibitory effects of cardiotonic pills on platelet function in dogs fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hui-Min; Meng, Yong-Xia

    2006-06-01

    Insulin resistance and the consequent metabolic disorders are associated with a state of platelet hyperactivity. Oxidative stress is responsible for the persistent platelet activation. We sought to study the inhibitory effect of cardiotonic pills, an oral herbal component, on platelet function in a dog model with insulin resistance induced by high-fat feeding. We fed 18 dogs with a high-fat diet and six dogs with normal chow as control for 6 months. Then, six dogs were fed with a high-fat diet and received additional aspirin (250 mg/day), and another six dogs received additional cardiotonic pills (1,000 mg/day) for 4 months. Time-course changes in metabolic parameters and platelet function were detected. After high-fat feeding for 6 months, 18 dogs developed a series of metabolic disorders including obesity, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. In addition, a platelet hyperactivity state, characterized by increased agonist (arachidonic acid, ADP and collagen) induced platelet aggregation, platelet expression of adhesion molecules (P-selectin and GP IIb/IIIa), and platelet intracellular calcium concentration, was indicated. Cardiotonic pills showed a significant antioxidative activity by presenting an increase in plasma superoxide dismutase and decrease in erythrocyte glutathione, as well as a lipid-lowering effect (decrease in both plasma cholesterol and triglyceride). Either aspirin or cardiotonic pills could significantly reverse the platelet hypersensitivity and hyperfunction. Compared with aspirin, cardiotonic pills showed a more exaggerated inhibitory effect on platelet function (a significantly decreased collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation, and expression of adhesion molecules). In conclusion, cardiotonic pills inhibited platelet hyperfunction in dogs with insulin resistance. This inhibitory effect may mainly be explained by antioxidative activity and metabolic control.

  11. Measurement of platelet P-selectin for remote testing of platelet function during treatment with clopidogrel and/or aspirin.

    PubMed

    Fox, S C; May, J A; Shah, A; Neubert, U; Heptinstall, S

    2009-06-01

    There is great interest in assessing the efficacy of treatment with clopidogrel and aspirin in patients with cardiovascular disease using procedures that can be used in a remote setting. Here we have established methods to assess the effects of clopidogrel and aspirin on platelets based on measurements of platelet P-selectin. Platelets were stimulated in whole blood by adding the combination of adenosine diphosphate and the TXA(2) mimetic U46619 (ADP/U4, designed to assess P2Y(12) inhibition) or the combination of arachidonic acid and epinephrine (AA/Epi, designed to assess COX-1 inhibition). The stimulated samples were then fixed using a fixative solution that provides stability for at least 9 days, and sent to a central laboratory for analysis of P-selectin by flow cytometry. Measurements were performed in blood from healthy volunteers and patients with cardiovascular disease. The inhibitory effects of clopidogrel and aspirin were assessed ex vivo and the effects of the direct acting P2Y(12) antagonist cangrelor and aspirin were assessed in vitro. Measurements of platelet aggregation were also performed for comparison. In healthy volunteers clopidogrel ex vivo and cangrelor in vitro markedly inhibited P-selectin expression induced by ADP/U4. Aspirin did not inhibit and did not interfere with the effects of clopidogrel or cangrelor using this test. There was very little overlap of results obtained in the absence and presence of clopidogrel or cangrelor. In contrast, over half of 42 patients with cardiovascular disease did not respond well to clopidogrel treatment, although cangrelor was still effective. Aspirin markedly inhibited P-selectin expression induced by AA/Epi. Clopidogrel had much less effect and did not interfere with the effects of aspirin. There was no overlap of results obtained in the absence and presence of aspirin. Aspirin provided near-complete inhibition in 29 of 30 patients with cardiovascular disease. Aggregometry measurements agreed well with

  12. Intrinsic platelet reactivity before start with clopidogrel as predictor for on-clopidogrel platelet function and long-term clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Hochholzer, Willibald; Valina, Christian M; Bömicke, Timo; Amann, Michael; Stratz, Christian; Nührenberg, Thomas; Trenk, Dietmar; Neumann, Franz-Josef

    2015-07-01

    High on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity is associated with worse clinical outcome. Previous data suggest that intrinsic platelet reactivity before initiation of clopidogrel contributes significantly to on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity. It is unknown whether intrinsic reactivity can sufficiently predict on-clopidogrel reactivity and therefore identify patients with insufficient response to clopidogrel before initiation of treatment and at risk for worse clinical outcome. This analysis included 765 consecutive patients undergoing elective coronary stent implantation. Platelet reactivity was assessed by light transmission aggregometry (5 µM ADP) before administration of clopidogrel 600mg and after intake of first maintenance dose of clopidogrel on day 1 following coronary stenting. Patients were followed for up to seven years. The combined primary endpoint was death of any cause or non-fatal myocardial infarction. Intrinsic and on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity were significant correlated (r=0.31; p < 0.001). Among all tested clinical and genetic factors including the cytochrome P450 2C19*2 polymorphism, intrinsic platelet reactivity was the strongest predictor for on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity. However, intrinsic platelet reactivity could only explain 8 % of variability of on-clopidogrel platelet function. Only on-treatment platelet reactivity was predictive for long-term clinical outcome (HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.05-2.05; p = 0.02) whereas intrinsic platelet reactivity was not (HR 1.03, 95 % CI 0.74-1.43; p = 0.86). In conclusion, intrinsic platelet reactivity before initiation of clopidogrel is the strongest predictor of early on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity but can only explain a minor proportion of its variability and is not significantly associated with clinical outcome. Thus, baseline testing cannot substitute on-clopidogrel platelet function testing.

  13. Unravelling the different functions of protein kinase C isoforms in platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Poole, Alastair W

    2011-06-23

    Platelets tightly regulate haemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in most platelet responses implicated in thrombus formation. Recent pharmacological and mouse gene knockout approaches show that the conventional PKC isoforms and the novel PKC isoforms contribute in distinct ways to these platelet responses. We hypothesize that, in platelets and other cells, the characteristic functions of PKC isoforms are established through unique activation mechanisms and unique interacting protein partners, which result in isoform-specific patterns of substrate phosphorylation. For identifying the substrate proteins in a living cell, new methodology is available and discussed.

  14. The nitrative and oxidative stress in blood platelets isolated from breast cancer patients: the protectory action of aronia melanocarpa extract.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Piekarski, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    Since mechanisms involved in the relationship between oxidative stress and breast cancer are still unclear, the aim of our present study was to evaluate oxidative/nitrative modifications of blood platelet proteins by measuring the level of biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress such as carbonyl groups, thiol groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins in patients with benign breast diseases and in patients with invasive breast cancer, and compare with the control group. Levels of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine residues in platelet proteins were measured by ELISA and a competition ELISA, respectively. The method with 5,5′-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid) has been used to analyse free thiol groups in platelet proteins. Patients were hospitalized in the Department of Oncological Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. Exogenous antioxidants reduce oxidative stress, therefore we also investigated in a model system in vitro the effects of a polyphenol rich extract of Aronia melanocarpa (Rosaceae, final concentration of 50 µg/ml, 5 min, 37°C) on modified blood platelet proteins as well from patients with breast cancer and from the healthy group. We demonstrated in platelet proteins from patients with invasive breast cancer a higher level of carbonyl groups than in the control healthy group (p < 0.02). The level of 3-nitrotyrosine in platelet proteins from patients with invasive breast cancer was also significantly higher than in the healthy subject group (p < 0.001). In contrast, the amount of thiol groups in platelet proteins from patients was significantly lower (about < 50%) than in control blood platelets. In a model system in vitro we also observed that the extract from berries of A. melanocarpa (50 µg/ml, 5 min, 37°C) due to antioxidant action, significantly reduced the oxidative/nitrative stress (measured by thiol groups and 3-nitrotyrosine) in platelets, not only from the healthy group, but also from patients with benign breast diseases and in

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylated c-Cbl regulates platelet functional responses mediated by outside-in signaling.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Langdon, Wallace Y; Sanjay, Archana; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2011-11-17

    c-Cbl protein functions as an E3 ligase and scaffolding protein, where 3 residues, Y700, Y731, and Y774, upon phosphorylation, have been shown to initiate several signaling cascades. In this study, we investigated the role of these phospho-tyrosine residues in the platelet functional responses after integrin engagement. We observed that c-Cbl Y700, Y731 and Y774 undergo phosphorylation upon platelet adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen, which was inhibited in the presence of PP2, a pan-src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor, suggesting that c-Cbl is phosphorylated downstream of SFKs. However, OXSI-2, a Syk inhibitor, significantly reduced c-Cbl phosphorylation at residues Y774 and Y700, without affecting Y731 phosphorylation. Interestingly, PP2 inhibited both platelet-spreading on fibrinogen as well as clot retraction, whereas OXSI-2 blocked only platelet-spreading, suggesting a differential role of these tyrosine residues. The physiologic role of c-Cbl and Y731 was studied using platelets from c-Cbl KO and c-Cbl(YF/YF) knock-in mice. c-Cbl KO and c-Cbl(YF/YF) platelets had a significantly reduced spreading over immobilized fibrinogen. Furthermore, clot retraction with c-Cbl KO and c-Cbl(YF/YF) platelets was drastically delayed. These results indicate that c-Cbl and particularly its phosphorylated residue Y731 plays an important role in platelet outside-in signaling contributing to platelet-spreading and clot retraction.

  16. An overview of platelet indices for evaluating platelet function in children with scorpion envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Konca, Capan; Tekin, Mehmet; Colak, Pinar; Uckardes, Fatih; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between platelet indices and scorpion envenomations (SE). Medical records of 76 children who were hospitalised for scorpion stings in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between February 2013 and November 2013, and 55 healthy children who were similar to the patient group in terms of age and sex, were analysed retrospectively. The leucocyte (WBC), thrombocyte (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), platelet distribution width (PDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values of the 76 children with SE were recorded. These values were compared with the healthy control group. Significantly higher WBC and PDW values were noted in patients with SE in comparison to the controls. Patients with SE had significantly lower mean MPV values compared to the healthy controls (9.03 ± 1.26 compared to 10.43 ± 1.44 fL, respectively; p < 0.001). Although the mean platelet count was slightly elevated in the SE group, no statistically significant difference existed between the two groups (p = 0.097). Furthermore, the mean PCT values in the SE group compared to the control group were slightly decreased, but this decrease was not statistically significant (p = 0.141). A significant inverse correlation existed between the MPV values and the WBC (r = -0.450, p < 0.01) and PLT counts (r = -0.420, p < 0.01). The PLT values were significantly correlated with the PCT values (r = 0.687, p < 0.01). This study demonstrated that SE may lead to several alterations in platelet indices. Significantly lower values of MPV and higher values of PDW were detected in SE patients. However, the increase in the platelet counts and the decrease in the PCT values were not significant. PMID:26417303

  17. Effect of the crude extract of Cestrum parqui on carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema and aggregation of human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Shehnaz, D; Hamid, F; Baqai, F T; Uddin Ahmad, V

    1999-08-01

    An extract of Cestrum parqui aerial parts in methanol:water (1:1) showed inhibition of carrageenin-induced oedema. The aggregation of human blood platelets induced by adenosine diphosphate and platelet activating factor was also inhibited (IC(50)s were 3 and 2 mg/mL, respectively). On the contrary, the extract did not inhibit arachidonic acid-mediated platelet aggregation.

  18. [The specific distribution of erythrocytes and blood platelets according to the volume of cells in different-age children].

    PubMed

    Matiushichev, V B; Sharmatova, V G

    2005-01-01

    The reference volumes of erythrocytes and blood platelets were evaluated for different age groups of children. The mean volume of cells and the parameters of its distribution, i.e. SD, As and Ex, were found. The mean volume of erythrocytes and the value of positive Ex for the volume of blood platelets were shown to be reliably higher in adults. The investigated blood parameters in children were proven to depend in children on their age and sex. It was concluded that the mentioned peculiarities should be considered in the practice of clinical laboratory examinations.

  19. Time-dependent effects of aspirin on blood pressure and morning platelet reactivity: a randomized cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Bonten, Tobias N; Snoep, Jaapjan D; Assendelft, Willem J J; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Eikenboom, Jeroen; Huisman, Menno V; Rosendaal, Frits R; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2015-04-01

    Aspirin is used for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention by millions of patients on a daily basis. Previous studies suggested that aspirin intake at bedtime reduces blood pressure compared with intake on awakening. This has never been studied in patients with CVD. Moreover, platelet reactivity and CVD incidence is highest during morning hours. Bedtime aspirin intake may attenuate morning platelet reactivity. This clinical trial examined the effect of bedtime aspirin intake compared with intake on awakening on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement and morning platelet reactivity in patients using aspirin for CVD prevention. In this randomized open-label crossover trial, 290 patients were randomized to take 100 mg aspirin on awakening or at bedtime during 2 periods of 3 months. At the end of each period, 24-hour blood pressure and morning platelet reactivity were measured. The primary analysis population comprised 263 (blood pressure) and 133 (platelet reactivity) patients. Aspirin intake at bedtime did not reduce blood pressure compared with intake on awakening (difference systolic/diastolic: -0.1 [95% confidence interval, -1.0, 0.9]/-0.6 [95% confidence interval, -1.2, 0.0] mm Hg). Platelet reactivity during morning hours was reduced with bedtime aspirin intake (difference: -22 aspirin reaction units [95% confidence interval, -35, -9]). The intake of low-dose aspirin at bedtime compared with intake on awakening did not reduce blood pressure of patients with CVD. However, bedtime aspirin reduced morning platelet reactivity. Future studies are needed to assess the effect of this promising simple intervention on the excess of cardiovascular events during the high risk morning hours.

  20. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  1. Quantitative validation of different protein precipitation methods in proteome analysis of blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Maria; Winkler, Wolfgang; Hayden, Hubert; Diestinger, Michael; Eliasen, Maja; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Miller, Ingrid; Chang, Martina; Kungl, Andreas; Roth, Erich; Oehler, Rudolf

    2005-06-01

    For the preparation of proteins for proteome analysis, precipitation is frequently used to concentrate proteins and to remove interfering compounds. Various methods for protein precipitation are applied, which rely on different chemical principles. This study compares the changes in the protein composition of human blood platelet extracts after precipitation with ethanol (EtOH) or trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Both methods yielded the same amount of proteins from the platelet preparations. However, the EtOH-precipitated samples had to be dialyzed because of the considerable salt content. To characterize single platelet proteins, samples were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence differential gel electrophoresis. More than 90% of all the spots were equally present in the EtOH- and TCA-precipitated samples. However, both precipitation methods showed a smaller correlation with nonprecipitated samples (EtOH 74.9%, TCA 79.2%). Several proteins were either reduced or relatively enriched in the precipitated samples. The proteins varied randomly in molecular weight and isoelectric point. This study shows that protein precipitation leads to specific changes in the protein composition of proteomics samples. This depends more on the specific structure of the protein than on the precipitating agent used in the experiment.

  2. The effect of protein corona composition on the interaction of carbon nanotubes with human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Silvia H; Diduch, Lukas L; Tegegn, Tseday Z; Orecna, Martina; Strader, Michael B; Karnaukhova, Elena; Bonevich, John E; Holada, Karel; Simak, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most promising nanomaterials for use in medicine. The blood biocompatibility of CNT is a critical safety issue. In the bloodstream, proteins bind to CNT through non-covalent interactions to form a protein corona, thereby largely defining the biological properties of the CNT. Here, we characterize the interactions of carboxylated-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTCOOH) with common human proteins and investigate the effect of the different protein coronas on the interaction of CNTCOOH with human blood platelets (PLT). Molecular modeling and different photophysical techniques were employed to characterize the binding of albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG), γ-globulins (IgG) and histone H1 (H1) on CNTCOOH. We found that the identity of protein forming the corona greatly affects the outcome of CNTCOOH's interaction with blood PLT. Bare CNTCOOH-induced PLT aggregation and the release of platelet membrane microparticles (PMP). HSA corona attenuated the PLT aggregating activity of CNTCOOH, while FBG caused the agglomeration of CNTCOOH nanomaterial, thereby diminishing the effect of CNTCOOH on PLT. In contrast, the IgG corona caused PLT fragmentation, and the H1 corona induced a strong PLT aggregation, thus potentiating the release of PMP.

  3. [Persistent thrombocytopenia in a child: morphological examination of blood platelets established the diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome].

    PubMed

    Latger-Cannard, V; Lacroix, F; Devignes, J; Salignac, S; Bensoussan, D; Salmon, A; Mansuy, L; Bordigoni, P; Lecompte, T

    2008-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia frequently occurs in laboratory practice. The present work illustrates, through the presentation of a case report of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, the difficulties encountered to identify and characterize thrombocytopenia. The clinicobiological validation of a low platelet count involves both the biologist, who must assume the validation of numeration while mentioning the morphological characteristics of the platelets and other blood cells, as well as the physician who has to interpret these data according to the clinical context.

  4. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS.

  5. Hemostatic Function of Apheresis Platelets Stored at 4 deg C and 22 deg C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    function (5). Cold storage at 4-C could prolong shelf life by diminishing the risk of bacterial sepsis , decreasing platelet metabolism, and...glucose and lactate accumulation that occurs from continuous metabolic activity (37, 38). These markers represent different molecular events of...These data suggest that distinct mechanisms of activation are triggered at each storage temperature tested. While platelet activation at RT is

  6. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  7. Blood Pressure and Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Forbang, Nketi; Ix, Joachim; Criqui, Michael; Rifkin, Dena

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension in older adults is a dynamic process, with significant diurnal fluctuation. Little research has been done on the associations between increased short-term blood pressure variability and blunted night-time dipping in respect to decreased physical function in the elderly. Our aim is to use a cross-sectional analysis to illuminate any associations. Methods: A cross-sectional sub-study (mean age: 72, 67.5% female) was performed on selected participants from the San Diego Population Study (Criqui, et al, 2003). Blood pressure was measured both in the office (3 independent blood pressure readings) and using a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring cuff. Blood pressure variability was measured using average real variability (ARV). Physical function was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test. Statistical analysis was performed on IBM SPSS Statistics (1911) software. Results: An unadjusted univariate analysis adjusted for age and gender showed associations between 24-hr ARV of SBP (P = .001), 24-hr ARV pulse pressure (P < .001), and percent systolic dipping (P = .011) and SPPB score. After multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender was performed, the results were substantially attenuated. However, the association of ARV of SBP was not significant with a P-value of .052 and the ARV of pulse pressure remained significant with a P-value of .022. Multivariate hierarchical linear regression models revealed insignificant trends. Conclusions: Increased short-term variability and blunted night-time dipping were associated physical function but were not independent of age and body mass index (BMI). Further research can be done as to the biology of how both age and BMI influence blood pressure patterns. The trends observed in this study may warrant the investigation of abnormal blood pressure patterns in those who are either elderly or have increased BMI.

  8. Enumeration of feline platelets in ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid anticoagulated blood with the ADVIA 2120 system and two manual methods: Leucoplate and Thrombo-TIC.

    PubMed

    Tvedten, Harold W; Ljusner, Jessika; Lilliehöök, Inger E

    2013-07-01

    A manual method (Thrombo-TIC; Bioanalytic GmbH, Umkirch/Freiburg, Germany) was advertised to disaggregate platelet clumps and to make human platelets spherical to improve platelet enumeration. The current study's hypothesis was that this method would perform better than current methods for feline blood anticoagulated with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), which often contains platelet aggregates. Platelet concentrations (PLTs) were determined in 21 feline blood samples by 3 methods. Thrombo-TIC was compared to the manual method (Leucoplate; Sobioda, Montbonnot-Saint-Martin, France) currently used in the authors' laboratory along with an ADVIA 2120 (Siemens AG, Eschborn, Germany) optical platelet concentration. Feline blood samples often contained platelet aggregates. ADVIA flagged for platelet aggregates in 11 of the 21 feline blood samples, and examination of blood smear revealed platelet aggregates in 14 of the 21 samples. The hemocytometers displayed more platelet aggregates with the Thrombo-TIC method than with Leucoplate. The method giving the greatest PLT was considered most accurate. The Leucoplate median PLT (238 × 10(9)/1) was greater than Thrombo-TIC (202 × 10(9)/1) or ADVIA (157 × 10(9)/1). Intra-assay precision was determined for the 3 methods using the 21 feline blood samples. Median Thrombo-TIC and Leucoplate precision (7.4% and 7.3% coefficient of variation [CV], respectively) were similar and not much worse than ADVIA (5.9% CV). The Thrombo-TIC method did not appear to perform better than the current manual method (Leucoplate). Leucoplate appeared least affected by platelet aggregation in feline blood. The ADVIA automated PLT appeared to be most negatively affected by platelet aggregation. The Thrombo-TIC method did not appear to prevent platelet aggregation in feline EDTA blood samples and, thus, is not recommended for such use.

  9. Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals molecular and functional platelet bias of aged haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Amit; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Giustacchini, Alice; Gambardella, Adriana; Macaulay, Iain; Mancini, Elena; Luis, Tiago C.; Mead, Adam; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aged haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate more myeloid cells and fewer lymphoid cells compared with young HSCs, contributing to decreased adaptive immunity in aged individuals. However, it is not known how intrinsic changes to HSCs and shifts in the balance between biased HSC subsets each contribute to the altered lineage output. Here, by analysing HSC transcriptomes and HSC function at the single-cell level, we identify increased molecular platelet priming and functional platelet bias as the predominant age-dependent change to HSCs, including a significant increase in a previously unrecognized class of HSCs that exclusively produce platelets. Depletion of HSC platelet programming through loss of the FOG-1 transcription factor is accompanied by increased lymphoid output. Therefore, increased platelet bias may contribute to the age-associated decrease in lymphopoiesis. PMID:27009448

  10. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) –bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm2. Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm2 and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm2. However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm2 when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm2) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall. PMID:26136249

  11. FXIa and platelet polyphosphate as therapeutic targets during human blood clotting on collagen/tissue factor surfaces under flow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Travers, Richard J; Morrissey, James H; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-09-17

    Factor XIIa (FXIIa) and factor XIa (FXIa) contribute to thrombosis in animal models, whereas platelet-derived polyphosphate (polyP) may potentiate contact or thrombin-feedback pathways. The significance of these mediators in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions on tissue factor (TF) -bearing surfaces remains inadequately resolved. Human blood (corn trypsin inhibitor treated [4 μg/mL]) was tested by microfluidic assay for clotting on collagen/TF at TF surface concentration ([TF]wall) from ∼0.1 to 2 molecules per μm(2). Anti-FXI antibodies (14E11 and O1A6) or polyP-binding protein (PPXbd) were used to block FXIIa-dependent FXI activation, FXIa-dependent factor IX (FIX) activation, or platelet-derived polyP, respectively. Fibrin formation was sensitive to 14E11 at 0 to 0.1 molecules per µm(2) and sensitive to O1A6 at 0 to 0.2 molecules per µm(2). However, neither antibody reduced fibrin generation at ∼2 molecules per µm(2) when the extrinsic pathway became dominant. Interestingly, PPXbd reduced fibrin generation at low [TF]wall (0.1 molecules per µm(2)) but not at zero or high [TF]wall, suggesting a role for polyP distinct from FXIIa activation and requiring low extrinsic pathway participation. Regardless of [TF]wall, PPXbd enhanced fibrin sensitivity to tissue plasminogen activator and promoted clot retraction during fibrinolysis concomitant with an observed PPXbd-mediated reduction of fibrin fiber diameter. This is the first detection of endogenous polyP function in human blood under thrombotic flow conditions. When triggered by low [TF]wall, thrombosis may be druggable by contact pathway inhibition, although thrombolytic susceptibility may benefit from polyP antagonism regardless of [TF]wall.

  12. Implementation of concurrent red blood cell and platelet collection by apheresis in a university haemapheresis unit.

    PubMed

    Moog, R

    2004-04-01

    The present study analyses the number of concurrently collected red blood cell (RBC) units in plateletpheresis donors and the reasons why donors were deferred from multicomponent collection. Donors undergoing concurrent collection of RBCs and platelets (PLTs) were retrospectively evaluated for haemoglobin values and the reasons for deferral over a period of 1 year. A total of 404 RBC units were concurrently collected with PLTs. An average of 1.8 RBC units per year was collected from each donor. The baseline haemoglobin values were almost equal for the RBC donations. An RBC unit was not collected in 190 aphereses. Most frequent reasons for the noncollection of an RBC product were a donation interval of less than 3 months (20.5%), haematoma and blood flow problems (18.9%) and low pre-haemoglobin values (17.4%). Donor eligibility has to be taken into account to optimize concurrent RBC collection in plateletpheresis.

  13. Platelet Indices of Selenium Status in Healthy and Selenium-Deficient Sheep: a Comparison with Selenium Indices in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Bahrami, Yaser; Rezaei, Siamak Asri; Anassori, Ehsan; Janalipour, Ali; Khosravi, Voria

    2015-11-01

    Several biomarkers have been used to evaluate selenium (Se) status in livestock. However, there is no report on the potential usefulness of the Se indices of platelets in diagnosis of Se deficiency in large animals. In the current study, Se concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in platelets of 38 healthy and 142 Se-deficient ewes were assessed, and their correlation with plasma Se concentration, plasma GPx activity, whole blood Se concentration, and erythrocyte GPx activity was determined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cutoff values of Se concentration and GPx activity of the platelets and to summarize the diagnostic performance of these biomarkers. In Se-deficient ewes, consistent with other indices, Se concentration and GPx activity in platelets were significantly lower than those of the healthy ewes. There was a positive significant correlation between Se concentration and GPx activity in platelets with plasma Se concentration, whole blood Se concentration, and erythrocyte GPx activity. Based on the ROC curve analysis, the best cutoff value to predict inadequate plasma selenium concentration was ≤0.0055 attogram/platelet for the platelet Se concentration, with a sensitivity of 100.0 %, specificity of 92.4 %, and AUC of 0.94. For platelet GPx activity, the cutoff value was ≤203.6 U/g protein with a sensitivity of 97.4 %, specificity of 77.7 %, and AUC of 0.90. The results of this study suggested that the platelet Se concentration and GPx activity can be considered a reliable and valid intermediate-term surrogate parameter in assessment of dietary Se intake in sheep.

  14. Storage of platelets on flatbed agitators in polyvinyl chloride blood bags plasticized with tri(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate.

    PubMed

    Champion, A B; Chong, C; Carmen, R A

    1987-01-01

    Data are presented showing that platelets in polyvinyl chloride blood bags plasticized with tri(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate can be stored on flatbed agitators (shakers) without the pH falling below 6.0. The lowest pH seen after 7 days of storage in 46 units with platelet yields ranging from 3.6 to 13.3 X 10(10) per unit was 6.43. These bags have a O2 transmission rate of 13.3 mumol per hour per bag. Platelet bags with a O2 transmission rate of 7.9 mumol per hour per bag experience a pH fall after 5 days of storage on the shaker in units whose platelet yield on average exceeds 10 X 10(10). Platelets can be stored on first-generation shakers (70 cycles/min, stroke = 1 inch) without an attempt at manual resuspension of the platelet button. The count after 30 minutes on the shaker averaged 89 +/- 15 percent of the expected count, indicating that resuspension was nearly complete after a relatively short period. Red cells, but not platelets, settled out during storage on the shaker.

  15. In vitro interactions of blood, platelet, and fibroblast with biodegradable magnesium-zinc-strontium alloys.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Y; Cipriano, A F; Guan, Ren-Guo; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Liu, Huinan

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloy is an attractive class of metallic biomaterial for cardiovascular applications due to its biodegradability and mechanical properties. In this study, we investigated the degradation in blood, thrombogenicity, and cytocompatibility of Magnesium-Zinc-Strontium (Mg-Zn-Sr) alloys, specifically four Mg-4 wt % Zn-xSr (x = 0.15, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 wt %) alloys, together with pure Mg control and relevant reference materials for cardiovascular applications. Human whole blood and platelet rich plasma (PRP) were used as the incubation media to investigate the degradation behavior of the Mg-Zn-Sr alloys. The results showed that the PRP had a greater pH increase and greater concentration of Mg(2+) ions when compared with whole blood after 2 h of incubation with the same respective Mg alloys, suggesting that the Mg alloys degraded faster in PRP than in whole blood. The Mg alloy with 4 wt % Zn and 0.15 wt % Sr (named as ZSr41A) was identified as the most promising alloy for cardiovascular stent applications, because it showed slower degradation and less thrombogenicity, as indicated by the lower concentrations of Mg(2+) ions released and less deposition of platelets. Additionally, ZSr41 alloys were cytocompatible with fibroblasts in direct exposure culture in which the cells adhered and proliferated around the samples, with no statistical difference in cell adhesion density compared with the blank reference. Future studies on the ZSr41 alloys are necessary to investigate their direct interactions with other important cells in cardiovascular system, such as vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

  16. Studies on antioxidant properties of polyphenol-rich extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, B; Wachowicz, B; Nowak, P; Kedzierska, M; Tomczak, A; Stochmal, A; Oleszek, W; Jeziorski, A; Piekarski, J

    2008-12-01

    The antioxidant properties of extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa (chokeberry) containing: anthocyanidines, phenolic acids and quercetine glycosides on oxidative/nitrative stress induced by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-), a powerful physiological oxidant, nitrating species and inflammatory mediator) in human blood platelets were studied in vitro. The extract from A. melanocarpa (5 - 50 microg/mL) significantly inhibited platelet protein carbonylation (measured by ELISA method) and thiol oxidation estimated with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid) (DTNB) induced by peroxynitrite (0.1 mM) (IC(50)--35 microg/mL for protein carbonylation, and IC(50)--33 microg/mL for protein thiol oxidation). The tested extract only slightly reduced platelet protein nitration (measured by C- ELISA method). The extract also caused a distinct reduction of platelet lipid peroxidation induced by peroxynitrite. Moreover, in our preliminary experiments we observed that the extract (50 microg/mL) reduced oxidative/nitrative stress in blood platelets from patients with breast cancer. The obtained results indicate that in vitro the extract from A. melanocarpa has the protective effects against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative/nitrative damage to the human platelet proteins and lipids. The extract from A. melanocarpa seems to be also useful as an antioxidant in patients with breast cancer.

  17. Syncytiotrophoblast Extracellular Vesicles from Pre-Eclampsia Placentas Differentially Affect Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Tannetta, Dionne S.; Hunt, Kathryn; Jones, Chris I.; Davidson, Naomi; Coxon, Carmen H.; Ferguson, David; Redman, Christopher W.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Sargent, Ian L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates around 3% of all pregnancies and is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of PE remains unclear however its underlying cause originates from the placenta and manifests as raised blood pressure, proteinuria, vascular or systemic inflammation and hypercoagulation in the mother. Women who develop PE are also at significantly higher risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. In PE, the failing endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative and inflammatory stressed syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta sheds increased numbers of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV) into the maternal circulation. Platelet reactivity, size and concentration are also known to be altered in some women who develop PE, although the underlying reasons for this have not been determined. In this study we show that STBEV from disease free placenta isolated ex vivo by dual placental perfusion associate rapidly with platelets. We provide evidence that STBEV isolated from normal placentas cause platelet activation and that this is increased with STBEV from PE pregnancies. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with aspirin, currently prescribed for women at high risk of PE to reduce platelet aggregation, also inhibits STBEV-induced reversible aggregation of washed platelets. Increased platelet reactivity as a result of exposure to PE placenta derived STBEVs correlates with increased thrombotic risk associated with PE. These observations establish a possible direct link between the clotting disturbances of PE and dysfunction of the placenta, as well as the known increased risk of thromboembolism associated with this condition. PMID:26551971

  18. Interaction of blood platelets with a microfibrillar extract from adult bovine aorta: requirement for von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Fauvel, F; Grant, M E; Legrand, Y J; Souchon, H; Tobelem, G; Jackson, D S; Caen, J P

    1983-01-01

    Adult bovine aortic tissue was treated with 6 M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteinase inhibitors to obtain an extract that was essentially devoid of collagenous components and appeared homogeneous by electron microscopy. When this extract was dispersed by sonication it was found to be a very potent inducer of human platelet aggregation. This interaction required the presence of von Willebrand factor and of its receptor (glycoprotein Ib) on platelet membrane. This was demonstrated by the fact that the aggregation of normal blood platelets resuspended in plasmas deficient in von Willebrand factor was significantly diminished as compared to aggregation in control plasma. Moreover, this aggregation was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody, IgG AN51, to platelet glycoprotein Ib. These studies provide direct biochemical evidence for the existence of a thrombogenic constituent of the vessel wall that is noncollagenous and von Willebrand factor-dependent. Images PMID:6601274

  19. Extracts from two frequently consumed spices--cumin (Cuminum cyminum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa)--inhibit platelet aggregation and alter eicosanoid biosynthesis in human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, K C

    1989-07-01

    In the traditional Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda, several spices and herbs are claimed to possess medicinal properties, such as being antithrombotic, antiatherosclerotic, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory etc. Earlier we have reported that extracts from several spices behave as antiaggregatory agents and inhibit eicosanoid synthesis. Similar studies with extracts prepared from cumin (Cuminum cyminum) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) were undertaken. Ethereal extract of both cumin and turmeric inhibited arachidonate-induced platelet aggregation. Extracts from these spices inhibited thromboxane B2 production from exogenous (14C) arachidonic acid (AA) in washed platelets; a simultaneous increase in the formation of lipoxygenase-derived products was observed. Less TxB2 was produced in blood samples treated with turmeric extract when they were allowed to clot. Turmeric extract inhibited incorporation of (14C)AA into platelet phospholipids and deacylation of AA-labelled phospholipids on stimulation with calcium ionophore A23187. Cumin extract was devoid of such effects. Extracts from the two spices reduced the formation of (14C)TxB2 from AA-labelled platelets when they were challenged with A23187. The anti-inflammatory property of turmeric may, in part, be explained by its effect on eicosanoid biosynthesis.

  20. Beginner's luck--the first in vivo demonstration of functioning platelets; William Duke, 1910.

    PubMed

    Boulton, F

    2012-04-01

    Blood platelets remained obscure until the early 20th century although from the 1880 s claims that low numbers were associated with certain types of 'purpura' began to gain favour. This article re-appraises critically, but with due consideration to the limited technology of the times, the first remarkable in vivo demonstration of the effects of platelets demonstrated by the serial 'Bleeding Times' reported by William Duke in 1910, when fresh blood was transfused to two thrombocytopenic people. It also speculates on the possible causes of the thrombocytopenia with which Duke's main patient presented.

  1. Clinical value of mean platelet volume for impaired cardiopulmonary function in very old male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hua; Liu, Lin; Wei, Zhimin; Wang, Delong; Hu, Yixin; Hu, Guoliang; Fan, Li

    2012-01-01

    High mean platelet volume (MPV) is a marker of platelet activation. The present study was designed to test if high MPV is associated with impaired cardiopulmonary function in patients with COPD. One hundred and sixteen male outpatients (mean age, 86.03±4.29 years) with COPD were recruited. Blood samples were collected for measurements of MPV and other laboratory data. Lung function and cardiac function were also assessed. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that MPV was negatively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction (β=-0.252, p=0.008) and the predicted value of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)% predicted) (β=-0.384, p=0.0001), whereas MPV was positively correlated with right pulmonary arterial diameter (β=0.311, p=0.005). The present study showed an association between high MPV, a marker of platelet activation, and impaired cardiopulmonary function in elderly COPD male patients. High MPV may be regarded as an early predictive marker of impaired cardiopulmonary function in COPD.

  2. Comparison of corneal epitheliotrophic capacities among human platelet lysates and other blood derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Sun, Yi-Chen; Christopher, Karen; Pai, Amy Shih-I; Lu, Chia-Ju; Hu, Fung-Rong; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Li

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the corneal epitheliotropic abilities of two commercialized human platelet lysates (HPLs) and to compare the results with other blood derivatives, including human peripheral serum (HPS) and bovine fetal serum (FBS). Methods In vitro, human corneal epithelial cells were incubated in various concentrations (0%, 3%, 5% and 10%) of blood derivatives. Two commercialized HPLs, including UltraGRO TM (Helios, Atlanta, GA) and PLTMax (Mill Creek, Rochester, MI), were tested and compared with HPS and FBS. Scratch-induced directional wounding assay was performed to evaluate cellular migration. MTS assay was used to evaluate cellular proliferation. Cellular differentiation was examined by scanning electron microscopy, inverted microscopy and transepithelial electrical resistance. Sprague-Dawley rats were used to evaluate the effects of the blood derivatives on corneal epithelial wound healing in vivo. Different blood derivatives were applied topically every 2 hours for 2 days after corneal epithelial debridement. The concentrations of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor -β1 (TGF-β1), fibronectin, platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB), PDGF-BB, and hyaluronic acid in different blood derivatives were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results In vitro experiments demonstrated statistically comparable epitheliotropic characteristics in cellular proliferation, migration, and differentiation for the two commercialized HPLs compared to FBS and HPS. Cells cultured without any serum were used as control group. The epitheliotropic capacities were statistically higher in the two commercialized HPLs compared to the control group (p<0.05). Among the different concentrations of blood derivatives, the preparations with 3% yielded better outcomes compared to 5% and 10%. In rats, HPLs also caused improved but not statistically significant wound healing compared to HPS. All the blood derivatives had better wound healing

  3. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic

  4. Effects of garcinol and guttiferone K isolated from Garcinia cambogia on oxidative/nitrative modifications in blood platelets and plasma.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Masullo, Milena; Olas, Beata; Piacente, Sonia; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    The effects of garcinol and guttiferone K, two polyisoprenylated benzophenones occurring a food plant called Garcinia cambogia, on oxidative/nitrative protein damage (determined by parameters such as levels of protein carbonyl groups and nitrotyrosine residues) in human blood platelets and plasma after treatment with peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) were studied in vitro. We also investigated the effects of garcinol and guttiferone K on lipid peroxidation in blood platelets and plasma induced by ONOO(-) (100 microM). Exposure of blood platelets or plasma to peroxynitrite (100 microM) resulted in an increased level of carbonyl groups and nitrotyrosine residues in proteins, and an increase of lipid peroxidation measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). In the presence of garcinol and guttiferone K (0.1-25 microg/ml), a distinct reduction in the formation of carbonyl groups in plasma and platelet proteins together with the decrease of TBARS caused by 100 microM peroxynitrite, was observed. However, garcinol and guttiferone K did not inhibit plasma and platelet protein nitration induced by peroxynitrite. Polyisoprenylated benzophenones present in human diet such as garcinol or guttiferone K in vitro have protective effects against lipid and protein oxidation and may have some promising effects in vivo because they are good antioxidants in the tested models in vitro. Garcinol and guttiferone K can be also useful as protecting factors against diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  5. Comparison of modified Thrombelastograph and Plateletworks whole blood assays to optical platelet aggregation for monitoring reversal of clopidogrel inhibition in elective surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Craft, Robert M; Chavez, Jack J; Snider, Carolyn C; Muenchen, Robert A; Carroll, Roger C

    2005-06-01

    Clinically monitoring recovery from clopidogrel and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) inhibition requires whole blood assays corresponding to a standard methodology such as platelet-rich plasma aggregation monitored optically (OPA). We compared OPA, using an ED 50 dose of adenosine diphosphate activation, with 2 whole blood assays, Plateletworks (PWA) and modified Thrombelastograph (TEG). Two sets of assays were performed on 43 surgery patients while on clopidogrel and off clopidogrel to determine the reversal of absolute and relative inhibition. The modified TEG had Spearman correlations with OPA for absolute (rho = .424; P = .006) and relative inhibition (rho = .742; P < .0001). PWA correlations with OPA gave absolute (rho = .28; P = .08) and relative inhibition (rho = .46; P = .004) values. Bland-Altman analysis indicated agreement of both tests with OPA, showing constant biases of about 18% and some dependency on mean magnitude error. Cohen effect size thresholds defined nonresponders as < 7.7% clopidogrel inhibition relative to baseline recovery of full platelet function. Apparent nonresponse to clopidogrel or lack of platelet recovery did not correlate with statin or NSAID therapies. These PWA and modified TEG whole blood assays could prove useful for monitoring the reversal of clopidogrel and NSAID inhibition before surgery. More important, these assays done at baseline and after beginning clopidogrel therapy could monitor the effectiveness for the individual patients with cardiovascular disease and help identify the need for alternative therapies.

  6. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  7. Apelin: an antithrombotic factor that inhibits platelet function.

    PubMed

    Adam, Frédéric; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Lopez, Jose Javier; Vatier, Camille; Turpin, Sabrina; Muscat, Adeline; Soulet, Fabienne; Aries, Anne; Jardin, Isaac; Bobe, Régis; Stepanian, Alain; de Prost, Dominique; Dray, Cédric; Rosado, Juan Antonio; Valet, Philippe; Feve, Bruno; Siegfried, Geraldine

    2016-02-18

    Apelin peptide and its receptor APJ are directly implicated in various physiological processes ranging from cardiovascular homeostasis to immune signaling. Here, we show that apelin is a key player in hemostasis with an ability to inhibit thrombin- and collagen-mediated platelet activation. Mice lacking apelin displayed a shorter bleeding time and a prothrombotic profile. Their platelets exhibited increased adhesion and a reduced occlusion time in venules, and displayed a higher aggregation rate after their activation by thrombin compared with wild-type platelets. Consequently, human and mouse platelets express apelin and its receptor APJ. Apelin directly interferes with thrombin-mediated signaling pathways and platelet activation, secretion, and aggregation, but not with ADP and thromboxane A2-mediated pathways. IV apelin administration induced excessive bleeding and prevented thrombosis in mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that apelin and/or APJ agonists could potentially be useful adducts in antiplatelet therapies and may provide a promising perspective for patients who continue to display adverse thrombotic events with current antiplatelet therapies.

  8. Preoperative platelet count and postoperative blood loss in patients undergoing hip surgery: an inverse correlation.

    PubMed

    Monreal, M; Lafoz, E; Llamazares, J; Roncales, J; Roca, J; Granero, X

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study we tried to assess the clinical usefulness of platelet count (PlC) to confirm whether postoperative pulmonary embolism could be suspected early. Unexpectedly, the 19 patients who subsequently developed pulmonary embolism had significantly lower mean PlC levels even before surgery. In an attempt to discover whether the preoperative PlC levels were associated with a different incidence of postoperative blood loss, we decided to retrospectively study the relationship between preoperative PlC levels and the consequences of blood loss. There were 459 consecutive patients undergoing hip surgery. After excluding 5 patients who died during the first 3 postoperative days, and 16 patients who bled from a definitive anatomic site, there were 438 patients. Blood loss was considered to be excessive when two or more of the following conditions were present: (1) total transfusion requirements exceeding 1,000 ml whole blood or 2 units of packed red cells; (2) a drop in hemoglobin level of 5 g/dl or more, and (3) a hemoglobin level below 8 g/dl at any moment during the first 8 postoperative days. Blood loss was considered to be excessive in 91 patients. Preoperative PlC levels were significantly lower in these patients as compared to patients without the condition (204 +/- 52 vs. 236 +/- 79 x 10(9) liter-1; p = 0.0002). When patients were classified according to the quartiles of preoperative PlC, the odds ratio of developing excessive blood loss was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.38-1.26) in patients in the second quartile; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.30-1.06) in the third quartile, and 0.27 (95% CI: 0.13-0.57) in patients in the highest quartile. After adjusting for age, sex, type of surgery and type of prophylaxis, the preoperative PlC levels maintained a statistically significant inverse correlation with postoperative blood loss.

  9. On the origin of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Wrzyszcz, Aneta; Wozniak, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    To date, several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been identified in human platelets. In most research studies, the platelets are obtained using the isolation method from plasma by centrifugation and washing. The metalloproteinase content in the platelets can be affected by the isolation technique and the leukocyte contamination. In this work, we studied the influence of the isolation method on the detection of platelet MMPs and explore the expression of these enzymes in megakaryoblastic MEG-01 cells. We investigated the expression of mRNAs encoding for MMP-2 and -9 in platelets and MEG-01 cells. Using gelatin zymography and western blotting, we examined the expression and release of MMP-2 and 9 by platelets and MEG-01 cells and checked whether the amount of the released MMPs depends on the volume of tested platelet and leukocyte contamination. To investigate the MMP-2 expression profile, we used zymography and flow cytometry. Platelets, in contrast to the MEG-01 cells, neither contain mRNA for MMP-2 nor -9. The platelets contain pro-MMP-2 and release it during the activation. The population of uncontaminated (leukocytes<0.02%) platelets contained no MMP-9 or the active form of MMP-2. We have observed that the activity of MMP-2 in platelet lysate is proportional to their mean volume and that the MMP-2 activity may not be detected if very small platelets are examined. We conclude that the detection of gelatinases in platelets depends on platelet isolation techniques and the degree of leukocyte contamination.

  10. Comparison between human and porcine thromboelastograph parameters in response to ex-vivo changes to platelets, plasma, and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Sondeen, Jill L; de Guzman, Rodolfo; Amy Polykratis, Irene; Dale Prince, Malcolm; Hernandez, Orlando; Cap, Andrew P; Dubick, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    In the acute care setting, both the tracings and numeric outputs (R time, angle, and MA) of thrombelastography (TEG) may be used to inform treatment decisions. The objective was to determine the sensitivity of TEG to isolated changes in platelet count, hematocrit and fibrinogen concentration in human blood. As pigs have a similar coagulation system, we also compared the responses of the pig blood. Eight volunteers (>18 years of age, no anticoagulation or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory therapy, not pregnant) were enrolled into this study. Four female anesthetized donor pigs were instrumented percutaneously with a catheter for blood collection. All blood was collected into sodium citrate. The concentration of each component (platelets, fibrinogen, and red blood cells) was changed while keeping the other components constant by use of centrifugation or preparation of each individual's plasma into platelet poor plasma, platelet rich plasma, cryoprecipitate, purified washed platelets, and packed red blood cells as appropriate. TEG (Haemoscope) analysis was performed and compared with the patients' whole blood diluted with lactated Ringer's solution. We demonstrated that the major factor affecting the MA and angle was the platelet count. In fact, reducing platelets alone resulted in TEG profiles and parameters that were similar to lactated Ringer's dilution profiles. Swine blood responses were parallel to that of human blood, although there were offsets especially of TEG-R and angle that confirmed that the swine are hypercoagulable compared with humans. Superficially similar TEG tracing patterns can be produced by divergent mechanisms associated with altered concentrations of blood components.

  11. How I transfuse red blood cells and platelets to infants with the anemia and thrombocytopenia of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Many aspects of hematopoiesis are either incompletely developed in preterm infants or still functioning to serve the fetus (i.e., the intrauterine counterpart to a liveborn preterm neonate). This delayed development and/or slow adaptation to extrauterine life diminishes the capacity of the neonate to produce red blood cells (RBCs), platelets (PLTs), and neutrophils—particularly during the stress of life-threatening illnesses encountered after preterm birth such as sepsis, severe pulmonary dysfunction, necrotizing enterocolitis, and immune cytopenias. The serious medical and/or surgical problems of preterm birth can be further complicated by phlebotomy blood losses, bleeding, hemolysis, and consumptive coagulopathy. To illustrate, some preterm infants, especially those with birth weight less than 1.0 kg and respiratory distress, are given numerous RBC transfusions early in life owing to several interacting factors. Neonates delivered before 28 weeks of gestation (birth weight, <1.0 kg) are born before the bulk of iron transport has occurred from mother to fetus via the placenta and before the onset of marked erythropoietic activity of fetal marrow during the third trimester. Soon after preterm birth, severe respiratory disease can lead to repeated blood sampling for laboratory studies and, consequently, to replacement RBC transfusions. Additionally, preterm infants are unable to mount an effective erythropoietin (EPO) response to decreasing numbers of RBCs, and this factor contributes to the diminished ability to compensate for anemia—thus enhancing need for RBC transfusions. PMID:18194380

  12. A whole blood flow cytometric determination of platelet activation by unfractionated and low molecular weight heparin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klein, Bernd; Faridi, Andreé; von Tempelhoff, G F; Heilmann, Lothar; Mittermayer, Christian; Rath, Werner

    2002-12-15

    The influence of unfractionated (Heparin-Natrium) and low-molecular heparin (Fragmin(R)) on platelet activation in whole blood was investigated by FACS analysis in vitro using antibodies against glycoprotein (gp) IIb/IIIa (CD 41), GMP 140 (CD 62P), gp 53 (CD 63) and fibrinogen. Samples were also labeled with anti-gp Ib (CD 42b). Neither unfractionated heparin (UFH) nor low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) led to significant (i.e., p<0.05) changes in fluorescence intensities of platelets labeled with anti-gp IIb/IIIa or anti-gp 53. Significant platelet activation due to unfractionated heparin could be observed by labeling with anti-GMP 140 (UFH: p=0.009; LMWH: p=0.16). The proportion of platelets with surface-bound fibrinogen was significantly increased (UFH: p=0.00006; LMWH: p=0.008). After incubation with heparins, activation ability of platelets by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was significantly increased. The potentiating action of unfractionated heparin was larger. Therefore, flow cytometric results of platelet activation in patients receiving heparin should be interpreted carefully.

  13. A comparative evaluation of the blood clot, platelet-rich plasma, and platelet-rich fibrin in regeneration of necrotic immature permanent teeth: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Isha; Mittal, Neelam; Mishra, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed as a clinical trial to evaluate and compare the regenerative potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and blood clot in immature necrotic permanent teeth with or without associated apical periodontitis. Methods: Access preparation was done under rubber dam isolation. Copious irrigation was done with 2.5% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste was placed as an intracanal medicament. After 4 weeks, the cases were divided into four groups with five patients in each group. The study design had three test arms and one control arm. Group I in which mineral trioxide aggregate apexification was carried out and it was kept as control group to evaluate the regenerative potential of blood clot and platelet concentrates, Group II in which blood clot was used as scaffold in the canal, Group III in PRF was used as scaffold, and Group IV in which PRP carried on collagen was used as a scaffold. Results: The clinical and radiographic evaluation after 6 and 18 months was done by two independent observers who were blinded from the groups. The scoring was done as: None score was denoted by, Fair by 1, Good by 2, and Excellent by 3. The data were then analyzed statistically by Fisher's exact test using Statistics and Data 11.1(PRP Using harvest Smart PReP2) which showed statistically significant values in Group III as compared to other Groups. Conclusion: PRF has huge potential to accelerate the growth characteristics in immature necrotic permanent teeth as compared to PRP and blood clot. PMID:25684914

  14. A novel conditional platelet depletion mouse model reveals the importance of platelets in protection against S. aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wuescher, Leah M.; Takashima, Akira; Worth, Randall G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets are critical cells for maintaining vascular hemostasis but their activities in other processes are becoming apparent. Specifically, the ability of platelets to recognize and respond to infectious agents is an important area of investigation. To understand the physiological roles of platelets in vivo, most researchers have used antibody-mediated platelet depletion, which has certain limitations. Objective To develop an optimal system to study the contribution of platelets to protection from S. aureus blood infection. Methods Here we describe a novel experimental model of conditional platelet depletion based on the Cre-recombinase cell ablation system. Using this technology, the simian diphtheria toxin receptor was expressed in platelet factor 4 (PF4) positive cells (megakaryocytes and platelets). Results Systemic administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) every 48 hours results in reduced platelet numbers that become undetectable after six days. While platelets are depleted, no other blood cells are affected. Using this newly-developed model, the functional contributions of platelets in protection against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteremia was examined. Platelet-depleted mice succumbed to infection more rapidly than wild-type (WT) mice and contained significantly higher bacterial burden in kidneys, increased serum markers of kidney damage and elevated levels of cytokines indicative of septic shock. Conclusions Here we illustrate a new mouse model for conditional platelet depletion and implicate platelets as important participants of the immune response to bacterial blood infections. PMID:25418277

  15. Liberation of serotonin from rabbit blood platelets by bacterial cell walls and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, K; Kotani, S; Takada, H; Tsujimoto, M; Hirachi, Y; Kusumoto, S; Shiba, T; Kawata, S; Yokogawa, K; Nishimura, H; Kitaura, T; Nakajima, T

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the activity of various bacterial cell walls and peptidoglycans to liberate serotonin from rabbit blood platelets. All of the test cell walls or peptidoglycans prepared from 27 strains of 21 bacterial species were shown to cause a marked release of serotonin, regardless of differences in types of peptidoglycan and non-peptidoglycan moieties and in some biological properties. The assay made with the water-soluble "digests" of Staphylococcus epidermidis cell wall peptidoglycans, which were prepared by use of appropriate enzymes, revealed that a polymer of peptidoglycan subunits (a disaccharide-stempeptide) was definitely active in the release of serotonin, but a structural unit monomer was inactive. Among a variety of synthetic muramylpeptides and their 6-O-acyl derivatives, only 6-O-(3-hydroxy-2-docosylhexacosanoyl)-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl- L-lysyl-D-alanine was found to hold a strong serotonin-liberating activity. Images PMID:7129634

  16. Effect of solute concentration on intracellular water volume and hydraulic conductivity of human blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, W J

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular water volume of human blood platelets was determined using tritiated water. The cells responded as osmometers over an observed range of solute concentration from 0.292 to 2.180 osmol kg-1. Only 87% of intracellular water was apparently osmotically active (i.e. Ponder's R was 0.87). Changes in cell volume induced by small step changes in external osmolality were followed photometrically and the time constant for the exponential approach of cell volume to its new equilibrium value was determined. Hydraulic conductivity (LP) was calculated from the time constant and was 1.41 X 10(-6) cm atm-1 s-1 under isotonic conditions at 37 degrees C. LP was inversely dependent on extracellular solute concentration, but it was independent of the direction of movement of water across the plasma membrane. PMID:3746695

  17. Seasonal variation of imipramine binding in the blood platelets of normal controls and depressed patients

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Imipramine binding (IB) was studied in the blood platelets from normal controls and depressed patients over a 4-year period (1981-1984) to determine if seasonal variation was present in Bmax or KD. Bimonthly variation in the Bmax of IB was found in normal controls studied longitudinally. No such variation was found when individual values from normal controls were examined on a monthly or seasonal basis. Bmax in depressed patients showed a significant seasonal, but not monthly, variation. KD of IB varied in normal controls using monthly or seasonal data, but not in the probably more reliable bimonthly data. These results suggest that IB studies comparing groups of subjects should match groups for season of the year or, for greater accuracy, month of the year.

  18. Hyperthermia inhibits platelet haemostatic functions and selectively regulates the release of alpha-granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Etulain, J; Lapponi, MJ; Patrucchi, SJ; Romaniuk, MA; Benzadón, R; Klement, GL; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Hyperthermia is one of the main disturbances of homeostasis occurring during sepsis or hypermetabolic states such as cancer. Platelets are important mediators of the inflammation that accompany these processes, but very little is known about the changes in platelet function that occur at different temperatures. Objectives To explore the effect of higher temperatures on platelet physiology. Methods Platelet responses including adhesion, spreading (fluorescence microscopy), αIIbbeta;3 activation (flow cytometry), aggregation (turbidimetry), ATP release (luminescence), thromboxane A2 generation, alpha-granule protein secretion (ELISA), and protein phosphorylation from different signaling pathways (immunoblotting) were studied. Results Preincubation of platelets at temperatures higher than 37°C (38.5°–42°C) inhibited thrombin-induced haemostasis including platelet adhesion, aggregation, ATP release, and thromboxane A2 generation. The expression of P-selectin and CD63, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release were completely inhibited by hyperthermia, whereas von Willebrand factor (vWF) and endostatin levels remained substantially increased at high temperatures. This suggested that release of proteins from platelet granules is modulated not only by classical platelet agonists but also by microenvironmental factors. The observed gradation of response involved not only antiangiogenesis regulators, but also other cargo proteins. Some signaling pathways were more stable than others. While ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation were resistant to changes in temperature, Src, Syk, p38 phosphorylation as well as IkappaB degradation were decreased in a temperature-dependent fashion. Conclusions Higher temperatures, such as those observed with fever or tissue invasion, inhibit the haemostatic functions of platelets and selectively regulate the release of alpha-granule proteins. PMID:21649851

  19. Oral administration of Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors impairs GPVI-mediated platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Joseph E.; Healy, Laura D.; Wallisch, Michael; Thierheimer, Marisa L. D.; Loren, Cassandra P.; Pang, Jiaqing; Hinds, Monica T.; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Tec family kinase Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays an important signaling role downstream of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in hematopoietic cells. Mutations in Btk are involved in impaired B-cell maturation in X-linked agammaglobulinemia, and Btk has been investigated for its role in platelet activation via activation of the effector protein phospholipase Cγ2 downstream of the platelet membrane glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Because of its role in hematopoietic cell signaling, Btk has become a target in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma; the covalent Btk inhibitor ibrutinib was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of these conditions. Antihemostatic events have been reported in some patients taking ibrutinib, although the mechanism of these events remains unknown. We sought to determine the effects of Btk inhibition on platelet function in a series of in vitro studies of platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation. Our results show that irreversible inhibition of Btk with two ibrutinib analogs in vitro decreased human platelet activation, phosphorylation of Btk, P-selectin exposure, spreading on fibrinogen, and aggregation under shear flow conditions. Short-term studies of ibrutinib analogs administered in vivo also showed abrogation of platelet aggregation in vitro, but without measurable effects on plasma clotting times or on bleeding in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of Btk significantly decreased GPVI-mediated platelet activation, spreading, and aggregation in vitro; however, prolonged bleeding was not observed in a model of bleeding. PMID:26659727

  20. The changes of blood platelet activation in breast cancer patients before surgery, after surgery, and in various phases of the chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Czernek, Urszula; Szydłowska-Pazera, Katarzyna; Potemski, Piotr; Piekarski, Janusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Olas, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Blood platelets from patients with cancer (before or after the surgery) exhibit a variety of qualitative abnormalities. Different anti-cancer drugs may also induce the oxidative/nitrative stress in blood platelets and change their hemostatic properties. The aim of our study was to explain the effect of superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text]) production on hemostatic properties of blood platelets (activated by a strong physiological agonist - thrombin) from breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases (I-IV) of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). Patients were hospitalized in the Department of Oncological Surgery and at the Department of Chemotherapy, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. We measured the platelet aggregation as the marker of hemostatic activity of blood platelets. We observed an increase of [Formula: see text] in thrombin-activated blood platelets from patients with breast cancer (before or after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy) compared to the healthy group. Our other experiments demonstrated that aggregation (induced by thrombin) of blood platelets from patients with breast cancer before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases of the chemotherapy differs from aggregation of platelets obtained from healthy volunteers. Moreover, our results showed the correlation between the [Formula: see text] generation and changes of platelet aggregation in breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after the chemotherapy (I and IV phases). Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the production of [Formula: see text] in blood platelets (activated by thrombin) obtained from breast cancer patients may induce the changes of platelet aggregation, which may contribute in thrombosis in these patients.

  1. Assessment of the influence of the inflammatory process on the activation of blood platelets and morphological parameters in patients with ulcerative colitis (colitis ulcerosa).

    PubMed

    Polińska, Beata; Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (colitis ulcerosa) is a non-specific inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The symptoms which are observed in the course of ulcerative colitis are: an increase in the number of leukocytes and blood platelets, an increase in the concentration of IL-6 and anemia. Blood platelets are the key element, linking the processes of hemostasis, inflammation and the repair of damaged tissues. Activation of blood platelets is connected with changes in their shape and the occurrence of the reaction of release. P-selectin appears on the surfaces of activated blood platelets and the concentration level of soluble P-selectin increases in the blood plasma. The aim of this study was to define whether the increased number of blood platelets in patients with ulcerative colitis accompanies changes in their activation and morphology. A total of 16 subjects with ulcerative colitis and 32 healthy subjects were studied. Mean platelet count, morphological parameters of platelets and MPC were measured using an ADVIA 120 hematology analyzer. Concentrations of sP-selectin and IL-6 in serum were marked by immunoassay (ELISA). MPC, concentration of sP-selectin and IL-6 were significantly higher in subjects with ulcerative colitis compared to those in the healthy group. There was a decrease of MPV in patients with ulcerative colitis, which is statistically significant. Chronic inflammation in patients with ulcerative colitis causes an increase in the number of blood platelets, a change in their morphology and activation. Decreased MPV value reflects activation and the role blood platelets play in the inflammatory process of the mucous membrane of the colon. A high concentration of sP-selectin, which is a marker of blood platelet activation, demonstrates their part in the inflammatory process. The increase in the concentration of sP-selectin correlated positively with the increase in concentration of IL-6. This is why it may be a useful marker of the activity of colitis

  2. The Effect of Hyperparathyroid State on Platelet Functions and Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yorulmaz, Göknur; Akalın, Aysen; Akay, Olga Meltem; Şahin, Garip; Bal, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Coagulation and fibrinolysis defects were reported in primary hyperparathyroid patients. However, there are not enough data regarding platelet functions in this group of patients. Our aim was to evaluate the platelet functions in primary and secondary hyperparathyroid patients and to compare them with healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: In our study 25 subjects with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), 25 subjects with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), and 25 healthy controls were included. Platelet functions of the subjects were evaluated by using platelet-rich plasma and platelet aggregation tests induced with epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, and ristocetin. Serum P selectin levels, which indicate platelet activation level, were measured in all subjects. Bone mineral densitometry was performed for all patients. Results: There was no significant difference between the groups with PHPT and SHPT and the control group regarding the platelet aggregation tests and serum P selectin levels. There was also no significant correlation between parathormone levels and aggregation parameters (ristocetin, epinephrine, collagen, and ADP: respectively p=0.446, 0.537, 0.346, and 0.302) and between P selectin (p=0.516) levels. When we separated the patients according to serum calcium levels, there was also no significant difference between aggregation parameters and serum P selectin levels between the patients with hypercalcemia and the patients with normocalcemia. We could not find any significant correlation between aggregation parameters, P selectin levels, and serum calcium levels in this group of patients. Bone loss was greater in patients with PHPT. Conclusion: There is no significant effect of PHPT or SHPT and serum calcium levels on platelet functions when evaluated by aggregation tests. PMID:26377856

  3. High-resolution particle analysis--its application to platelet counting and suggestions for further application in blood cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Haynes, J L

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of an instrument for high-resolution particle analysis in flow are discussed. It employs a combination of hydrodynamic focusing, fluid resistors, and electronic techniques to achieve precision and ease of use heretofore unobtainable in a moderate-cost clinical instrument. Its application to whole blood platelet counting is discussed, and suggestions are made for its possible application to a wide variety of blood cell measurements.

  4. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  5. The influence of herbal medicine on platelet function and coagulation: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Herbal medicines have been traditionally used in the management of CVD and can play a role in modifying CVD progression, particularly in platelet function, and have the potential of altering platelet function tests, as well as some coagulation parameters. Herbal medicines, such as feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginseng, motherwort, St John's wort, and willow bark, were found to reduce platelet aggregation. In vitro studies show promise in the reduction of platelet aggregation for Andrographis, feverfew, garlic, ginger, Ginkgo, ginseng, hawthorn, horse chestnut, and turmeric. In addition, cranberry, danshen, dong quai, Ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, and St John's wort were found to have potential interactions with warfarin. Furthermore, St John's wort interacted with clopidogrel and danshen with aspirin. Therefore, repeat testing of platelet function and coagulation studies, particularly for patients on warfarin therapy, may be required after exclusion of herbal medicines that could have possibly affected initial test results.

  6. Interaction of a Monoclonal Antibody to Glycoprotein IV (CD36) with Human Platelets and its Effect on Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Legrand, C; Pidard, D; Beiso, P; Tenza, D; Edelman, L

    1991-01-01

    FA6-152, a monoclonal antibody to platelet membrane glycoprotein IV (CP IV), was used to quantify the expression of this glycoprotein on platelets, as well as to evaluate its role in platelet aggregation. On resting platelets, 19 400 ± 7700 molecules of the (125)I-labelled IgC could bind per platelet (n = 20). Binding was not modified following stimulation of the platelets with ADP (10 µmol/l) or thrombin (0.1 U/ml). Fab fragments prepared from the antibody by papain digestion also bound to the platelet surface in a saturable manner. Both the intact IgC and its Fab fragments were found to inhibit platelet aggregation and secretion induced by ADP or collagen in platelet-rich plasma and by thrombin in platelet suspensions. Under nonstirred conditions, whereby the release reaction was only minimally affected, the antibody markedly inhibited thrombin-induced surface expression of α-granule thrombospondin (TSP), whereas it did not alter the concomitant expression of α-granule fibrinogen. In addition, electron microscopy revealed a predominant distribution of TSP and T;P IV on pseudopodia and between adherent cells on thrombin-stimulated platelets. These findings thus support the hypothesis that the interaction of TSP with GP IV on the platelet surface is required for an optimal platelet aggregation/secretion process to occur.

  7. Activity of platelet hemostasis in children with spinal deformities.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N; Lapshina, E V; Zavalishina, S Yu

    2010-10-01

    An increase of adhesion and aggregation functions of platelets in vivo and in vitro was detected in 5-6-year-old children with scoliosis. These disorders were caused by hyperproduction of von Willebrand's factor in the vascular wall and intensification of thromboxane production in blood platelets. Activation of thromboxane formation is the main cause of platelet hyperactivity in children with scoliosis. Correction of platelet hemostasis may include pathogenetically substantiated complex of therapeutic exercises, swimming, and massage.

  8. Platelets can enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Paré, Alexandre; Farndale, Richard W; Schumacher, H Ralph; Nigrovic, Peter A; Lacroix, Steve; Boilard, Eric

    2012-08-09

    Platelets survey blood vessels, searching for endothelial damage and preventing loss of vascular integrity. However, there are circumstances where vascular permeability increases, suggesting that platelets sometimes fail to fulfill their expected function. Human inflammatory arthritis is associated with tissue edema attributed to enhanced permeability of the synovial microvasculature. Murine studies have suggested that such vascular leak facilitates entry of autoantibodies and may thereby promote joint inflammation. Whereas platelets typically help to promote microvascular integrity, we examined the role of platelets in synovial vascular permeability in murine experimental arthritis. Using an in vivo model of autoimmune arthritis, we confirmed the presence of endothelial gaps in inflamed synovium. Surprisingly, permeability in the inflamed joints was abrogated if the platelets were absent. This effect was mediated by platelet serotonin accumulated via the serotonin transporter and could be antagonized using serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. As opposed to the conventional role of platelets to microvascular leakage, this demonstration that platelets are capable of amplifying and maintaining permeability adds to the rapidly growing list of unexpected functions for platelets.

  9. Caspase-9 mediates the apoptotic death of megakaryocytes and platelets, but is dispensable for their generation and function.

    PubMed

    White, Michael J; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Josefsson, Emma C; Jarman, Kate E; Henley, Katya J; James, Chloé; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Jackson, Shaun P; Huang, David C S; Kile, Benjamin T

    2012-05-03

    Apoptotic caspases, including caspase-9, are thought to facilitate platelet shedding by megakaryocytes. They are known to be activated during platelet apoptosis, and have also been implicated in platelet hemostatic responses. However, the precise requirement for, and the regulation of, apoptotic caspases have never been defined in either megakaryocytes or platelets. To establish the role of caspases in platelet production and function, we generated mice lacking caspase-9 in their hematopoietic system. We demonstrate that both megakaryocytes and platelets possess a functional apoptotic caspase cascade downstream of Bcl-2 family-mediated mitochondrial damage. Caspase-9 is the initiator caspase, and its loss blocks effector caspase activation. Surprisingly, steady-state thrombopoiesis is unperturbed in the absence of caspase-9, indicating that the apoptotic caspase cascade is not required for platelet production. In platelets, loss of caspase-9 confers resistance to the BH3 mimetic ABT-737, blocking phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and delaying ABT-737-induced thrombocytopenia in vivo. Despite this, steady-state platelet lifespan is normal. Casp9(-/-) platelets are fully capable of physiologic hemostatic responses and functional regulation of adhesive integrins in response to agonist. These studies demonstrate that the apoptotic caspase cascade is required for the efficient death of megakaryocytes and platelets, but is dispensable for their generation and function.

  10. The Effect of an Electrical Left Ventricular Assist Device on Red Blood Cell and Platelet Survival in the Cow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-23

    lifespan was 6-10 days. The presence of an LVAD did not affect initial recovery or lifespan of cow platelets. 4 wr..1".1* .5i UNCLASST FIED S R C_.a 𔄃...blood was linear with time, and the platelet lifespan was 6-10 days. The presence of an LVAD did not affect initial recovery or lifespan of cow...of double-valved left ventricular assist devices ( LVADs ) being used in patients with reversible ventricular dysfunction or with myocardial fibrosis

  11. Recovery Time of Platelet Function After Aspirin Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeonghun; Kim, Jeong Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hee; Dunuu, Tsagaan; Park, Sang-Ho; Park, Sang Joon; Kang, Ji Yeon; Choi, Rak Kyeong; Hyon, Min Su

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate antiplatelet therapy discontinuation increases the risk of thrombotic complications and bleeding after dental procedures. To determine the platelet reactivity recovery time after aspirin withdrawal in vivo, our study was conducted in patients with low-risk cardiovascular disease who can stop aspirin administration following the guidelines stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. The time it takes for platelet activity to normalize and the diagnostic accuracy of testing methods were assessed for a residual antiplatelet activity with multiple electrode aggregometry. Our study included patients with clinically indicated hypertension preparing for a dental extraction procedure. Materials and methods A total of 212 patients not taking aspirin (control group) and 248 patients with hypertension receiving long-time aspirin treatment at a 100-mg daily dose were prospectively included in the study, which involved stopping aspirin intake before dental extraction. The residual platelet activity and dental bleeding in patients who stopped aspirin intake were analyzed and compared with those of the control group. In addition, platelet reactivity recovery time and bleeding risk in patients who stopped taking aspirin every 24 hours for 0 to 5 days (0–143 hours) before dental extraction was also assessed. Results Platelet reactivity normalized 96 hours after aspirin withdrawal. The cut-off value of 49 arbitrary units in the arachidonic acid platelet aggregation test excluded the effect of aspirin with 91% sensitivity and 66% specificity. AUC showed 0.86 (P < 0.001) diagnostic accuracy. The immediate bleeding complications in all treatment groups were similar to those seen in the control group and were successfully managed with local hemostatic measures. Conclusions The antiplatelet effects of aspirin disappeared 96 hours after aspirin withdrawal in our study, and dental extractions may be safely performed in this period when appropriate

  12. Platelet mimicry: The emperor's new clothes?

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities to include in vivo targeting of damaged blood vessels and binding to platelet-adhering opportunistic pathogens. We present views for improved, and pharmaceutically viable nanoparticle design strategies.

  13. [Automated measurement of reticulocyte count by flow cytometry. II: Analysis of the blood containing abnormal erythrocytes or giant platelets].

    PubMed

    Oyamatsu, T; Shimizu, N; Takeuchi, K; Yamamoto, M; Kawai, Y; Watanabe, K; Iri, H

    1989-07-01

    We have examined the influence of erythrocytes containing inclusion bodies, nucleated red cells or giant platelets on the measurement of reticulocyte count by automated machine, R-1000. Correlation of the reticulocyte count between automated and conventional method was extremely good in the blood containing red cells with Jolly bodies, Pappenheimer bodies or basophilic stippling . However, correlation was poor when the sample contained the nucleated red cells. Reticulocyte count was decreased in the blood with significant amounts of nucleated red cells. Since nucleated red cells themselves are not counted as reticulocytes in the machine, this was considered to be due to increased young reticulocytes which frequently appeared with nucleated red cells. Both cold agglutinated red cells and giant platelets apparently influenced the reticulocyte count by the R-1000. These results suggest that red cells with Jolly bodies, Pappenheimer bodies or basophilic stippling do not influence the automatic counting of reticulocytes. Although nucleated red cells, cold agglutinated red cells and giant platelets affected the reticulocyte count, the machine shows abnormal flags in most of above cases (except highly agglutinated red cells), so that one can recount reticulocytes by conventional method. We conclude the machine can safely count the reticulocytes even in the blood containing abnormal red cells or platelets.

  14. Essential Roles of Dopamine and Serotonin in Tooth Repair: Functional Interplay Between Odontogenic Stem Cells and Platelets.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Anne; Alleaume-Butaux, Aurélie; Dimitrova-Nakov, Sasha; Goldberg, Michel; Schneider, Benoît; Launay, Jean-Marie; Kellermann, Odile

    2015-08-01

    Characterizing stem cell intrinsic functions is an ongoing challenge for cell therapies. Here, we report that two independent A4 and H8 stem cell lines isolated from mouse molar pulp display the overall functions of bioaminergic cells. Both clones produce neurotrophins and synthesize, catabolize, store, and transport serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) and dopamine (DA). They express 5-HT1D,2B,7 and D1,3 autoreceptors, which render pulpal stem cells competent to respond to circulating 5-HT and DA. We show that injury-activated platelets are the source of systemic 5-HT and DA necessary for dental repair since natural dentin reparation is impaired in two rat models with monoamine storage-deficient blood platelets. Moreover, selective inhibition of either D1, D3, 5-HT2B, or 5-HT7 receptor within the pulp of wild-type rat molars after lesion alters the reparative process. Altogether our data argue that 5-HT and DA coreleased by pulp injury-activated platelets are critical for stem cell-mediated dental repair through 5-HT and DA receptor signalings.

  15. Survival and function of transfused platelets. Studies in two patients with congenital deficiencies of platelet membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Jesus M; Vecino, Ana M

    2009-05-01

    Platelets of patients suffering from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) and Bernard Soulier Syndrome (BSS) are defective in different membrane glycoproteins. Since these integrins can be identified by monoclonal antibodies, normal infused platelets could be distinguished from defective platelets and followed by using flow cytometry (FC). We studied this aspect in two recipients suffering, one from GT and the other one, who underwent splenectomy, from BSS. One hour after transfusion, normal platelets comprised 17% of the total platelet population in the patient with GT. Aggregation tests detected a measurable response to collagen (increase of 15% of transmittance). The presence of transfused platelets decreased progressively to 0.8% on day 4, which corresponded with a half-life of 2.6 days. Studies performed in the patient suffering from BSS found that 1 hour after transfusion, 53% of the platelet population corresponded to normal platelets. There was a progressive decay until day 6, which corresponded to a half-life of 4.6 days. Aggregation tests also detected a platelet response to ristocetin from 1 hour after transfusion (47% increase of transmittance) to day 3. FC is useful to measure platelet lifespan in these kinds of patients. We also report the first studies of platelet aggregation after platelet transfusion.

  16. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  17. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states.

  18. The Influence of Reserpine and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid (EDTA) on Serotonin Storage Organelles of Blood Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Jonathan M.; Rao, Gundu H. R.; White, James G.

    1977-01-01

    The present investigation has evaluated the influence of reserpine on the serotonin-rich organelles bodies) in platelets from dogs, rabbits, and humans. Reserpine markedly depresses the levels of stored serotonin in human and animal platelets, accompanied by a small decrease in platelet ATP but no change in platelet ADP content. Thin sections of human platelets showed no change in the number or morphology of serotonin storage organelles during reserpine therapy, whereas a profound decrease in the size and number of dense bodies occurred in platelets from rabbits treated with reserpine. Dog platelets also showed a decrease in the number and density of serotonin storage organelles after reserpine therapy. The basis for the difference between rabbit and human platelets was explored by fixing platelets in glutaraldehyde and osmium in the presence or absence of the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Most of the dense bodies in fixed human platelets were removed by EDTA while rabbit platelet dense bodies remained essentially intact. The results suggested that the opacity of rabbit platelet dense bodies following fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium relate primarily to their serotonin content, while the electron density of human serotonin storage organelles in fixed cells is due primarily to their calcium content. Further confirmation of this concept came from studies of platelets using the whole mount technique. Rabbit platelet serotonin storage organelles were found to lack the inherent opacity of the human dense bodies, a finding consistent with the lower concentration of calcium in the rabbit organelles. ImagesFigures 1A-DFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figures 5 and 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:405872

  19. Pathogen Reduction Technology Treatment of Platelets, Plasma and Whole Blood Using Riboflavin and UV Light

    PubMed Central

    Marschner, Susanne; Goodrich, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacterial contamination and emerging infections combined with increased international travel pose a great risk to the safety of the blood supply. Tests to detect the presence of infection in a donor have a ‘window period’ during which infections cannot be detected but the donor may be infectious. Agents and their transmission routes need to be recognized before specific tests can be developed. Pathogen reduction of blood components represents a means to address these concerns and is a proactive approach for the prevention of transfusion-transmitted diseases. The expectation of a pathogen reduction system is that it achieves high enough levels of pathogen reduction to reduce or prevent the likelihood of disease transmission while preserving adequate cell and protein quality. In addition the system needs to be non-toxic, non-mutagenic and should be simple to use. The Mirasol® Pathogen Reduction Technology (PRT) System for Platelets and Plasma uses riboflavin (vitamin B2) plus UV light to induce damage in nucleic acid-containing agents. The system has been shown to be effective against clinically relevant pathogens and inactivates leukocytes without significantly compromising the efficacy of the product or resulting in product loss. Riboflavin is a naturally occurring vitamin with a well-known and well-characterized safety profile. The same methodology is currently under development for the treatment of whole blood, making pathogen reduction of all blood products using one system achievable. This review gives an overview of the Mirasol PRT System, summarizing the mechanism of action, toxicology profile, pathogen reduction performance and clinical efficacy of the process. PMID:21779202

  20. Enforced fucosylation of cord blood hematopoietic cells accelerates neutrophil and platelet engraftment after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Popat, Uday; Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun; Fox, Patricia; Kondo, Kayo; Marin, David; McNiece, Ian; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra; Olson, Amanda; Parmar, Simrit; Shah, Nina; Andreeff, Michael; Kebriaei, Partow; Kaur, Indreshpal; Yvon, Eric; de Lima, Marcos; Cooper, Laurence J N; Tewari, Priti; Champlin, Richard E; Nieto, Yago; Andersson, Borje S; Alousi, Amin; Jones, Roy B; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Bashir, Qaiser; Ciurea, Stefan; Ahmed, Sairah; Anderlini, Paolo; Bosque, Doyle; Bollard, Catherine; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Thomas, Michael; Miller, Leonard; Wolpe, Steve; Simmons, Paul; Robinson, Simon; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A; Shpall, Elizabeth J

    2015-05-07

    Delayed engraftment is a major limitation of cord blood transplantation (CBT), due in part to a defect in the cord blood (CB) cells' ability to home to the bone marrow. Because this defect appears related to low levels of fucosylation of cell surface molecules that are responsible for binding to P- and E-selectins constitutively expressed by the marrow microvasculature, and thus for marrow homing, we conducted a first-in-humans clinical trial to correct this deficiency. Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received myeloablative therapy followed by transplantation with 2 CB units, one of which was treated ex vivo for 30 minutes with the enzyme fucosyltransferase-VI and guanosine diphosphate fucose to enhance the interaction of CD34(+) stem and early progenitor cells with microvessels. The results of enforced fucosylation for 22 patients enrolled in the trial were then compared with those for 31 historical controls who had undergone double unmanipulated CBT. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 17 days (range, 12-34 days) compared with 26 days (range, 11-48 days) for controls (P = .0023). Platelet engraftment was also improved: median was 35 days (range, 18-100 days) compared with 45 days (range, 27-120 days) for controls (P = .0520). These findings support ex vivo fucosylation of multipotent CD34(+) CB cells as a clinically feasible means to improve engraftment efficiency in the double CBT setting. The trial is registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01471067.

  1. Supply with Platelet Concentrates from the Point of View of a Blood Donation Service of the Bavarian Red Cross.

    PubMed

    Weinauer, Franz

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: BACKGROUND: It is known that pooled platelet concentrates derived from buffy coat (PCs) have several disadvantages compared to platelet concentrates produced by platelet apheresis (APCs). Therefore, all blood products issued by the Bavarian Red Cross blood banks (BSD/BRK) (18,000 products/year) were produced by single donor apheresis. The main reason not to produce PCs was the elevated viral and bacterial infection risk during the last decade. But also the four-fold increased exposition to HLA and PLA antigens and the poor quality (in the sense of white and red cell contamination) of PCs (especially the ones produced with the platelet-rich plasma method) played a role to abstain from these products. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a risk assessment to evaluate both products with regard to the actual testing and production methods, considering recently published data. However, a statistical calculation of the risks associated with the use of PCs or APCs with regard to different infectious agents with various prevalences was not done. RESULTS: The dramatically reduced risk for the transmission of HIV, HBV or HCV accompanying the implementation of improved antibody tests and of NAT minipool testing, the introduction of 100% leukocyte filtration, the conversion of PC production from the platelet-rich to the buffy coat method, and recent data on the risk of transmission of bacterial infections resulted in a equal assessment of APCs and PCs. CONCLUSION: As a consequence of this revised risk assessment, we supply our hospitals with both products APCs and buffy coat-derived PCs (pools of 4 donors). For clinical use we considered both products as equally effective, except for patients who have multiple antibodies and need HLA-typed platelets.

  2. Biologic nanoparticles and platelet reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M; Hunter, Larry W; Chu, Kevin; Kaul, Vivasvat; Squillace, Phillip D; Lieske, John C; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2009-01-01

    Aim Nanosized particles (NPs) enriched in hydroxyapatite and protein isolated from calcified human tissue accelerate occlusion of endothelium-denuded arteries when injected intravenously into rabbits. Since platelet aggregation and secretory processes participate in normal hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular remodeling, experiments were designed to determine if these biologic NPs alter specific platelet functions in vitro. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrate anticoagulated human blood. Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion were monitored in response to thrombin receptor agonists peptide (10 μM) or convulxin (50 μg/ml) prior to and following 15 min incubation with either control solution, human-derived NPs, bovine-derived NPs or crystals of hydroxyapatite at concentrations of 50 and 150 nephelometric turbidity units. Results Incubation of platelets for 15 min with either human- or bovine-derived NPs reduced aggregation induced by thrombin receptor activator peptide and convulxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite caused a greater inhibition than either of the biologically derived NPs. Human-derived NPs increased ATP secretion by unstimulated platelets during the 15 min incubation period. Conclusion Effects of bovine-derived and hydroxyapatite NPs on basal release of ATP were both time and concentration dependent. These results suggest that biologic NPs modulate both platelet aggregation and secretion. Biologically derived NPs could modify platelet responses within the vasculature, thereby reducing blood coagulability and the vascular response to injury. PMID:19839809

  3. Evaluation of platelet function using the in vitro bleeding time and corrected count increment of transfused platelets. Comparison between platelet concentrates derived from pooled buffy coates and apheresis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, L; Kristensen, J; Olsson, K; Bring, J; Högman, C F

    1996-01-01

    The functional capacity of transfused platelets was evaluated with in vitro bleeding time (IVBT) and corrected count increment (CCI) in order to compare platelet concentrates (PCs) derived from pooled buffy coats (BC-PCs) with PCs collected by apheresis (A-PCs). The suspension medium in the BC-PCs was 30% CPD plasma and 70% of an additive solution (containing sodium and potassium chloride, sodium citrate and phosphate, mannitol), and in the A-PCs the medium was 100% CPD plasma. IVBT was evaluated using a Thrombostat 4000/2. BC-PC and A-PC were transfused 57 and 41 times, respectively to 36 patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PCs transfused within 2 days of donation were considered fresh, and those transfused within 3-5 days were considered stored. IVBT was determined before, as well as 10-30 min and 24 h after transfusion; CCI was determined 10-30 min and 24 h after transfusion. The median pretransfusion IVBT value was 486 s. It was measurable in 21 of 98 (21%) of the transfusions, i.e. below the cutoff limit of 486 s. Ten to 30 min after transfusion, the IVBT showed a measurable reduction in 90% of the transfusions with fresh BC-PCs, 92% of those with fresh a-PCs, 63% of those with stored BC-PCs and 79% of those with stored A-PCs. After 24 h, the corresponding values were 63% for fresh BC-PCs, 50% for fresh A-PCs, 26% for stored BC-PCs and 38% for stored A-PCs. The median value of CCI 10-30 min after transfusion was 20 for fresh BC-PCs, 17 for fresh A-PCs, 16 for stored BC-PCs and 14 for stored A-PCs. The difference in IVBT between fresh and stored BC-PCs was significant (p = 0.032), unlike that between fresh and stored A-PC. After 24 h the corresponding values were 7 for fresh BC-PCs, 4 for fresh A-PCs, 4 for stored BC-PCs and 3 for stored A-PCs. When all transfusions with fresh PCs (BC-PCs + A-PCs) were compared with all transfusions with stored PCs, a statistical difference was demonstrated in both CCI (p = 0.027) and IVBT (p = 0.043). Spearman

  4. Protective action of proanthocyanidin fraction from Medemia argun nuts against oxidative/nitrative damages of blood platelet and plasma components.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna; Głowacki, Rafał; Olas, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative/nitrative stress induced by different factors plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various disorders, including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Proanthocyanidins have antioxidative properties and may protect biomolecules (lipids, DNA, and proteins) exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The effects of proanthocyanidin fraction from Medemia argun nuts on oxidative/nitrative protein damages (determined by such parameters as level of thiol groups, carbonyl groups, and nitrotyrosine residues) and on the amount of glutathione (as an important component of redox status; using HPLC) in human blood platelets and plasma after treatment with peroxynitrite were studied in vitro. The preincubation of blood platelets and plasma with proanthocyanidin fraction from M. argun nuts (0.5-50 µg/ml) reduced the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, diminished oxidation of thiol groups, and decreased the level of carbonyl groups in proteins caused by 100 µM peroxynitrite. An action of tested plant fraction and ONOO(-) evoked a significant increase of GSH in platelets and plasma in comparison with platelets and plasma treated with ONOO(-) only. The proanthocyanidin fraction from M. argun nuts can be useful as a protecting factor against oxidative/nitrative stress associated with different diseases (cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases) and proanthocyanidins of M. argun nuts may be promising antioxidants.

  5. MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymer as a novel blood-compatible material: ex vivo platelet adhesion study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Ho; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Won Gon

    2004-02-01

    MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymers with both pendant polyethylene oxide (PEO) side chains and negatively chargeable side groups were synthesized by random copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), methoxy PEO monomethacrylate (MPEOMA; PEO mol. wt, 1000), and vinyl sulfonic acid sodium salt (VSA) monomers with different monomer composition to evaluate their blood compatibility. MMA/MPEOMA copolymer (with PEO side chains) and MMA/VSA copolymer (with negatively chargeable side groups) were also synthesized for the comparison purpose. The synthesized copolymers were coated onto polyurethane (PU) tubes (inner diameter, 4.6 mm) by a spin coating. The platelet adhesion of the MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymer-coated tube surfaces was compared with that of tube surface coated with MMA/MPEOMA or MMA/VSA copolymer with similar MPEOMA or VSA composition, using an ex vivo canine arterio-artery shunt method. The platelet adhesion was evaluated by radioactivity counting of technetium (99mTc)-labeled platelets adhered on the surfaces after 30 and 120 min of blood circulation. The MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymer (monomer molar ratio 9/0.5/0.5 or 8/1/1) was better in preventing platelet adhesion on the surface than the MMA/MPEOMA or MMA/VSA copolymer with similar MPEOMA or VSA composition, probably owing to the combined effects of highly mobile, hydrophilic PEO side chains and negatively charged VSA side groups.

  6. Multiwavelength UV/visible spectroscopy for the quantitative investigation of platelet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattley, Yvette D.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1998-04-01

    The quality of platelets transfused is vital to the effectiveness of the transfusion. Freshly prepared, discoid platelets are the most effective treatment for preventing spontaneous hemorrhage or for stopping an abnormal bleeding event. Current methodology for the routine testing of platelet quality involves random pH testing of platelet rich plasma and visual inspection of platelet rich plasma for a swirling pattern indicative of the discoid shape of the cells. The drawback to these methods is that they do not provide a quantitative and objective assay for platelet functionality that can be used on each platelet unit prior to transfusion. As part of a larger project aimed at characterizing whole blood and blood components with multiwavelength UV/vis spectroscopy, isolated platelets and platelet in platelet rich plasma have been investigated. Models based on Mie theory have been developed which allow for the extraction of quantitative information on platelet size, number and quality from multi-wavelength UV/vis spectra. These models have been used to quantify changes in platelet rich plasma during storage. The overall goal of this work is to develop a simple, rapid quantitative assay for platelet quality that can be used prior to platelet transfusion to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. As a result of this work, the optical properties for isolated platelets, platelet rich plasma and leukodepleted platelet rich plasma have been determined.

  7. Minimal amounts of kindlin-3 suffice for basal platelet and leukocyte functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Klapproth, Sarah; Moretti, Federico A; Zeiler, Marlis; Ruppert, Raphael; Breithaupt, Ute; Mueller, Susanna; Haas, Rainer; Mann, Matthias; Sperandio, Markus; Fässler, Reinhard; Moser, Markus

    2015-12-10

    Hematopoietic cells depend on integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling, which is induced by kindlin-3 and talin-1. To determine whether platelet and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) functions require specific thresholds of kindlin-3, we generated mouse strains expressing 50%, 10%, or 5% of normal kindlin-3 levels. We report that in contrast to kindlin-3-null mice, which die perinatally of severe bleeding and leukocyte adhesion deficiency, mice expressing as little as 5% of kindlin-3 were viable and protected from spontaneous bleeding and infections. However, platelet adhesion and aggregation were reduced in vitro and bleeding times extended. Similarly, leukocyte adhesion, extravasation, and bacterial clearance were diminished. Quantification of protein copy numbers revealed stoichiometric quantities of kindlin-3 and talin-1 in platelets and neutrophils, indicating that reduction of kindlin-3 in our mouse strains progressively impairs the cooperation with talin-1. Our findings show that very low levels of kindlin-3 enable basal platelet and neutrophil functions, whereas in stress situations such as injury and infection, platelets and neutrophils require a maximum of functional integrins that is achieved with high and stoichiometric quantities of kindlin-3 and talin-1.

  8. Physical proximity and functional interplay of PECAM-1 with the Fc receptor Fc gamma RIIa on the platelet plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Thai, Le M; Ashman, Leonie K; Harbour, Stacey N; Hogarth, P Mark; Jackson, Denise E

    2003-11-15

    We and others have recently defined that Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) functions as a negative regulator of platelet-collagen interactions involving the glycoprotein VI/Fc receptor gamma chain (GPVI/FcR-gamma chain) signaling pathway.1,2 In this study, we hypothesized that PECAM-1 may be physically and functionally associated with Fc gamma RIIa on the platelet membrane. The functional relationship between PECAM-1 and Fc gamma RIIa was assessed by determining the effect of anti-PECAM-1 monoclonal antibody Fab fragments on Fc gamma RIIa-mediated platelet aggregation and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HITS)-mediated platelet aggregation. Preincubation of washed platelets with monoclonal antibody fragments of 2BD4 directed against PECAM-1 and IV.3 directed against Fc gamma RIIa completely blocked Fc gamma RIIa-mediated platelet aggregation and HITS-mediated platelet aggregation, whereas anti-CD151 antibody had no blocking effect. Coengagement of Fc gamma RIIa and PECAM-1 resulted in negative regulation of Fc gamma RIIa-mediated phospholipase C gamma 2 activation, calcium mobilization, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, the physical proximity of Fc gamma RIIa and PECAM-1 was confirmed by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and coimmunoprecipitation studies. These results indicate that PECAM-1 and Fc gamma RIIa are colocalized on the platelet membrane and PECAM-1 down-regulates Fc gamma RIIa-mediated platelet responses.

  9. Bcl-xL-inhibitory BH3 mimetics can induce a transient thrombocytopathy that undermines the hemostatic function of platelets.

    PubMed

    Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Jarman, Kate E; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Hua, My; Qiao, Jianlin; White, Michael J; Josefsson, Emma C; Alwis, Imala; Ono, Akiko; Willcox, Abbey; Andrews, Robert K; Mason, Kylie D; Salem, Hatem H; Huang, David C S; Kile, Benjamin T; Roberts, Andrew W; Jackson, Shaun P

    2011-08-11

    BH3 mimetics are a new class of proapo-ptotic anticancer agents that have shown considerable promise in preclinical animal models and early-stage human trials. These agents act by inhibiting the pro-survival function of one or more Bcl-2-related proteins. Agents that inhibit Bcl-x(L) induce rapid platelet death that leads to thrombocytopenia; however, their impact on the function of residual circulating platelets remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that the BH3 mimetics, ABT-737 or ABT-263, induce a time- and dose-dependent decrease in platelet adhesive function that correlates with ectodomain shedding of the major platelet adhesion receptors, glycoprotein Ibα and glycoprotein VI, and functional down-regulation of integrin α(IIb)β(3). Analysis of platelets from mice treated with higher doses of BH3 mimetics revealed the presence of a subpopulation of circulating platelets undergoing cell death that have impaired activation responses to soluble agonists. Functional analysis of platelets by intravital microscopy revealed a time-dependent defect in platelet aggregation at sites of vascular injury that correlated with an increase in tail bleeding time. Overall, these studies demonstrate that Bcl-x(L)-inhibitory BH3 mimetics not only induce thrombocytopenia but also a transient thrombocytopathy that can undermine the hemostatic function of platelets.

  10. Effects of red blood cell deformability on the non-uniform distribution of platelet-sized particles in blood flow through microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara-Seki, Masako; Sakamoto, Keisuke; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Junji

    2016-11-01

    In blood flow through microvessels, platelets are known to have enhanced concentrations near the vessel wall, which is the so-called "near-wall excess (NWE)". This phenomenon is considered to be caused by the interaction with red blood cells (RBCs); since RBCs have a tendency to approach the vessel centerline due to their highly deformability, they may push away less deformable platelets toward the near-wall region. In order to examine this proposition by in vitro experiments, we measured the distribution of platelet-sized particles mixed in intact RBC or hardened RBC suspensions flowing through microchannels of 50 μm x 50 μm cross-section. Hardened RBCs were prepared by immersing human RBCs in glutaraldehayde solution of 40 - 4000 ppm. Fluorescent observations were conducted with the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope system with a high-speed video camera. It was found that platelet-sized particles exhibited high concentrations near the channel wall, i.e., NWE, when they were mixed in intact RBC suspensions. By contrast, the particles mixed in hardened RBC suspensions showed weak NWE or uniform distribution over the channel cross-section, indicating that deformability of RBCs plays an essential role in the NWE phenomenon.

  11. Activation of the platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1): its mechanism and participation in the physiological functions of platelets.

    PubMed

    Jung, S M; Moroi, M

    2000-10-01

    When platelets are stimulated by agonists, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) (GP Ia/IIa), one of the platelet collagen receptors, is activated to forms with high affinities for its ligand collagen. Here we describe our studies to characterize the binding kinetics of the activated integrin forms and the activation mechanism. Under low agonist concentrations, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) is activated through a mechanism involving ADP/ADP receptors; and under high agonist concentrations, multiple signaling pathways are involved in its activation. Such differences in mechanism at low and high agonist concentrations are also suggested in the activation of integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), the platelet fibrinogen receptor. We describe our flow adhesion studies, from which evidence was obtained about the involvement of integrin alpha(2)beta(1) activation in the physiological function of platelets, adhesion and thrombus formation.

  12. Platelets: production, morphology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate, discoid cells, roughly 2-3 μm in diameter that function primarily as regulators of hemostasis, but also play secondary roles in angiogensis and innate immunity. Although human adults contain nearly one trillion platelets in circulation that are turned over every 8-10 days, our understanding of the mechanisms involved in platelet production is still incomplete. Platelets stem from large (30-100 μm) nucleated cells called megakaryocytes that reside primarily in the bone marrow. During maturation megakaryocytes extend long proplatelet elongations into sinusoidal blood vessels from which platelets ultimately release. During this process, platelets develop a number of distinguishable structural elements including: a delimited plasma membrane; invaginations of the surface membrane that form the open canalicular system (OCS); a closed-channel network of residual endoplasmic reticulum that form the dense tubular system (DTS); a spectrin-based membrane skeleton; an actin-based cytoskeletal network; a peripheral band of microtubules; and numerous organelles including α-granules, dense-granules, peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria. Proplatelet elongation and platelet production is an elaborate and complex process that defines the morphology and ultrastructure of circulating platelets, and is critical in understanding their increasingly numerous and varied biological functions.

  13. [Effects of silkworm pupa oil on serum lipids level and platelet function in rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Huang, Lianzhen; Hu, Jianping; Li, Tao

    2002-08-01

    To observe the effects of silkworm pupa oil on serum lipids level and platelet function in rats, according to serum TG, TC level, 40 male Wistar rats are divided into four groups (normal control group, high fat control group, silkworm pupa oil group and silkworm pupa oil + VE group). The rats are fed different diets and six weeks later, serum lipids level and platelet function are measured. The results show that (1) Compared with high fat control group, serum TC, TG, LDL-C level, AI value, Platelet aggregability, plasma TXB2 level and T/P ratio decrease significantly while HDL-C level and 6-k-PGF1 level increase in silkworm pupa oil group; (2) Serum TC, LDL-C level, T/P ratio and platelet aggregability are significantly lower in silkworm pupa oil + VE group than in silkworm pupa oil group. It is suggested that silkworm pupa oil rich in alpha-linolenic acid can reduce serum lipids level and inhibit platelet aggregation, which is more effective with the supplementation with VE.

  14. Autologous platelet-rich plasma compared with whole blood for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis; a comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kianimehr, Lida; Ahrar, Mohmmad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intralesional injection of autologous blood-derived products has recently gained attention as a potential treatment for plantar fasciitis (PF). We compared platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) for the treatment of chronic PF. Materials and Methods: Patients with chronic PF received either an intralesional injection of 3 cc PRP prepared by double centrifuge technique or WB (n = 17 in each group). Overall, morning and walking pain severity were assessed by 11-point numerical rating scale, and function was assessed by the Roles and Maudsley score (RMS) at baseline and 1-month and 3 months after treatment. Ultrasonography was performed to measure plantar fascia thickness at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Results: Pain scores were reduced over the study in the PRP (mean change = −5.00 ± 1.17 to −5.47 ± 1.46) and WB groups (mean change = −5.29 ± 2.56 to −6.47 ± 2.83), with no difference between groups (P > 0.05). One month and 3 months after treatment, successful treatment (RMS of ≤ 2) was respectively observed in 29.4% and 82.3% of the PRP and in 47.1% and 76.4% of the WB groups (P > 0.05). Also, fascia thickness was decreased in both the PRP and WB groups (mean change = −1.74 ± 1.11 vs. −1.21 ± 0.73 mm, respectively, P = 0.115). Conclusions: Significant improvement in pain and function, as well as decrease in plantar fascia thickness, was observed by intralesional injection of the PRP and WB in patients with chronic PF. The study results indicate similar effectiveness between PRP and WB for the treatment of chronic PF in short-term. PMID:27274499

  15. Hydroxyl-platelet-activating factor exists in blood of healthy volunteers and periodontal patients.

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Tsoupras, Alexandros; Baltas, George; Kotsifaki, Helen; Mantzavinos, Zacharias; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2003-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are localized chronic inflammatory conditions of the gingival and underlying bone and connective tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory phospholipid mediator that has been previously detected in elevated levels in inflamed gingival tissues, in gingival crevicular fluid and in saliva, is implicated in periodontal disease. Our results from previous studies showed that the biologically active phospholipid detected in gingival crevicular fluid is a hydroxyl-PAF analogue. In this study, hydroxyl-PAF analogue was detected for the first time in human blood derived from patients with chronic periodontitis as well as from periodontally healthy volunteers. The hydroxyl-PAF analogue was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, detected by biological assays and identified by electrospray analysis. In addition, the quantitative determination of PAF and hydroxyl-PAF analogue (expressed as PAF-like activity) showed a statistically significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyl-PAF analogue levels to PAF levels in periodontal patients, suggesting that this bioactive lipid may play a role in oral inflammation. PMID:14514473

  16. Platelet factor 4 (CXCL4) seals blood clots by altering the structure of fibrin.

    PubMed

    Amelot, Aymeric A; Tagzirt, Madjid; Ducouret, Guylaine; Kuen, René Lai; Le Bonniec, Bernard F

    2007-01-05

    Platelet factor-4 (PF4/CXCL4) is an orphan chemokine released in large quantities in the vicinity of growing blood clots. Coagulation of plasma supplemented with a matching amount of PF4 results in a translucent jelly-like clot. Saturating amounts of PF4 reduce the porosity of the fibrin network 4.4-fold and decrease the values of the elastic and loss moduli by 31- and 59-fold, respectively. PF4 alters neither the cleavage of fibrinogen by thrombin nor the cross-linking of protofibrils by activated factor XIII but binds to fibrin and dramatically transforms the structure of the ensuing network. Scanning electron microscopy showed that PF4 gives rise to a previously unreported pattern of polymerization where fibrin assembles to form a sealed network. The subunits constituting PF4 form a tetrahedron having at its corners a RPRH motif that mimics (in reverse orientation) the Gly-His-Arg-Pro-amide peptides that co-crystallize with fibrin. Molecular modeling showed that PF4 could be docked to fibrin with remarkable complementarities and absence of steric clashes, allowing the assembly of irregular polymers. Consistent with this hypothesis, as little as 50 microm the QVRPRHIT peptide derived from PF4 affects the polymerization of fibrin.

  17. Aggregation and disaggregation kinetics of human blood platelets: Part I. Development and validation of a population balance method.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, P Y; Hellums, J D

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamic shear stress of sufficient intensity is known to cause platelet activation and aggregation and to alter the effects of biochemical platelet agonists and antagonists. In this work, a population balance equation (PBE) model is developed for analysis of platelet aggregation and disaggregation kinetics under the influence of a shear field. The model incorporates both aggregation and disaggregation by splitting and/or erosion mechanisms. This paper, the first of a series of three, deals with the formulation, simplification, and validation of the PBE and with the estimation of parameters involved in the PBE. These population parameters include collision efficiency, void fraction (related to the particle collision diameter), and the breakage rate coefficient. The platelet particle size distribution is determined experimentally, both initially and at some later times. The PBE can then be used to match satisfactorily the observed particle histograms, by appropriate choice of parameters of the model as functions of time, platelet size, and magnitude of physical or chemical stimuli. Besides providing information on adhesive forces and on the rates of aggregation and disaggregation, these parameters infer the physical properties of platelets and platelet aggregates. These properties are of potential value in increasing our understanding of the processes involved in thrombotic disease and/or therapy. A numerical procedure for solving the PBE is validated by application to simple cases for which analytical solutions are available. The model is applied to analysis of experiments, and parameter sensitivity studies are used to order the importance of the parameters and to reduce the complexity of the model. The simplified model is shown to give good agreement with experimental observations. PMID:8369441

  18. Detection of binding of a synthetic granzyme B-like peptide fluorescent conjugate within platelet-like structures in cancer-related peripheral blood specimens and tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wai Chun Jennifer; Luther, Donald Gene

    2014-09-01

    Platelets and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important whole blood components in peripheral blood. Studies have shown that platelets, from precursor megakaryocytes, are significant factors in cancer prognosis, cancer progression, and metastasis; but a direct platelet-cancer relationship remains unclear. CTL play an essential role in cancer surveillance by inducing cancer cell death with granzyme B. A recent report has shown the presence of binding targets with binding affinity to a synthetic granzyme B-like peptide fluorescent conjugate (GP1R) in different types of cancer cells grown in vitro. It suggests that these binding targets may serve as a "universal-pathologic-biomarker". It is not known if similar biomarkers may be present in platelets of cancer patients. We show with fluoroscopic images that GP1R can bind to binding targets: 1) within platelets in methanol-fixed whole blood smears of patients with breast cancer and lung cancer, and 2) within platelet-like structures in formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) nude mouse xenogeneic breast tumor tissues. Samples without cancer-association displayed no discernible GP1R-binding in platelet-like structures. Our data demonstrate for the first time that a similar "universal-pathologic-biomarker" detectable by GP1R-binding is present in circulating platelets of cancer patients. The data depict a co-existence of animal-platelets and human-breast cancer cells, both have a common pathologic biomarker detectable by GP1R, in the tumor growth. The fluoroscopic images indicate a visual direct connection between pathologic platelets and cancer. These preliminary results may lead to developments of novel platelet-based cancer diagnostics and therapeutics and a better understanding of the potential multifunction of GP1R and its relationship to megakaryocytes and PD1.

  19. Clovamide-rich extract from Trifolium pallidum reduces oxidative stress-induced damage to blood platelets and plasma.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Szajwaj, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2011-09-01

    Numerous plants (including clovers) have been widely used in folk medicine for the treatment of different disorders. This in vitro study was designed to examine the antioxidative effects of the clovamide-rich fraction, obtained from aerial parts of Trifolium pallidum, in the protection of blood platelets and plasma against the nitrative and oxidative damage, caused by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in blood platelet and plasma proteins were determined by ELISA tests. Thiol groups level was estimated by using 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid, DTNB). Plasma lipid peroxidation was measured spectrophotometrically as the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The results from our work indicate that clovamide-rich T. pallidum extract may reveal the pro