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Sample records for blood pump development

  1. Engineering Aspects in Blood Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golding, Leonard; Veres, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    NASA turbomachinery computer codes assisted in the design of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation's centrifugal bladed blood pump. The codes were originally developed for the aerospace industry, but are applicable to the blood pump because of a high degree of synergy with this application. Traditional turbomachinery design criteria were used in the design of the blood pump centrifugal impeller and volute casing. The fluid dynamic performance of the blood pump is meeting the engineering design goals of flow rate and pressure rise.

  2. Development of a miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Outa, E; Ogino, S; Otake, Y; Shiozaki, H; Fujimoto, T; Tagusari, O; Kitamura, M

    1993-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as a totally implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). This pump consists of an impeller combined with a guide-vane, a tube housing, and a DC motor. The pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged to the ascending aorta. Our newly developed axial flow pump system has the following advantages: 1) it is a simple and compact system, 2) minimal blood stasis both in the device and the LV cavity, 3) minimal blood contacting surface of the pump, 4) easy accessibility with a less invasive surgical procedure, and 5) low cost. A pump flow > 5 L/min was obtained against 100 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. The pump could produce a passive pulsatile flow effect with a beating heart more efficiently than other non-pulsatile pumps because of minimal pressure drop and inertia along the bypass tract. Anatomic fit studies using dissected hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cadavers showed that this pump could smoothly pass through the aortic valve without any interference with mitral valve function. Recently, a dynamic pressure groove bearing and a miniature lip seal have been developed. The dynamic pressure groove bearing has a simple structure and acts as a pressure resistant sealing mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  4. Computational Approach for Developing Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the computational approach to developing a ventricular assist device (VAD) which utilizes NASA aerospace technology. The VAD is used as a temporary support to sick ventricles for those who suffer from late stage congestive heart failure (CHF). The need for donor hearts is much greater than their availability, and the VAD is seen as a bridge-to-transplant. The computational issues confronting the design of a more advanced, reliable VAD include the modelling of viscous incompressible flow. A computational approach provides the possibility of quantifying the flow characteristics, which is especially valuable for analyzing compact design with highly sensitive operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and rocket engine technology has been applied to modify the design of a VAD which enabled human transplantation. The computing requirement for this project is still large, however, and the unsteady analysis of the entire system from natural heart to aorta involves several hundred revolutions of the impeller. Further study is needed to assess the impact of mechanical VADs on the human body

  5. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  6. Development of the pulsation device for rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Yambe, Tomoyuki; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Shibata, Mune-ichi; Yamaguchi, Tasuku; Jian, Liu Hong; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Tanaka, Akira; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Sato, Fumihiro; Haga, You-ichi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tabayashi, Kouichi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Sasada, Hiroshi; Nitta, Shin-ichi

    2005-11-01

    A rotary blood pump (RP) is desirable as a small ventricular assist device (VAD). However, an RP is nonpulsatile. We tried to develop a device that attaches a pulse to the RP. We also tried to develop a pulse-generating equipment that was not air-pressure driven. The ball screw motor was considered a candidate. The application of a small-sized shape memory alloy was also attempted. An electrohydraulic system was adopted, and actuator power was connected to the diaphragm. The diaphragm was placed on the outer side of the ventricle. Most RPs that have been developed all over the world drain blood from the ventricle. The wave of a pulse should be generated if a pulse is added by the drawn part. The output assistance from the outer side of the ventricle was attempted in animal experiments, and the device operated effectively. This device can be used during implantable operation of RP. This may serve as an effective device in patients experiencing problems in peripheral circulation and in the function of internal organs.

  7. Development of a portable bridge-to-decision blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Kitamura, K

    2013-01-01

    We are developing an axial-flow pump with a cylindrical-impeller without airfoils. In the mock experiments of HA02 model a pressure of 13.3 kPa was obtained at a rotational speed of 12500 rpm and flow of 5L/min. The obtained pressure with HA02 was almost double than an airfoil-type impeller. The 2D analysis of hydrodynamic bearings for the pump revealed that a section with 3 or more arcs is stable with respect to angular position, and a minimum bearing gap of 100 µm can be attained at a design bearing gap of 150 µm and at a groove depth of 100 µm. PMID:24110291

  8. Development of a portable bridge-to-decision blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Kitamura, K

    2013-01-01

    We are developing an axial-flow pump with a cylindrical-impeller without airfoils. In the mock experiments of HA02 model a pressure of 13.3 kPa was obtained at a rotational speed of 12500 rpm and flow of 5L/min. The obtained pressure with HA02 was almost double than an airfoil-type impeller. The 2D analysis of hydrodynamic bearings for the pump revealed that a section with 3 or more arcs is stable with respect to angular position, and a minimum bearing gap of 100 µm can be attained at a design bearing gap of 150 µm and at a groove depth of 100 µm.

  9. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  10. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  11. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  12. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  13. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  14. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  15. Development of magnetic bearing system for a new third-generation blood pump.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Joo; Ahn, Chi Bum; Choi, Jaesoon; Park, Jun Woo; Song, Seung-Joon; Sun, Kyung

    2011-11-01

    A magnetic bearing system is a crucial component in a third-generation blood pump, particularly when we consider aspects such as system durability and blood compatibility. Many factors such as efficiency, occupying volume, hemodynamic stability in the flow path, mechanical stability, and stiffness need to be considered for the use of a magnetic bearing system in a third-generation blood pump, and a number of studies have been conducted to develop novel magnetic bearing design for better handling of these factors. In this study, we developed and evaluated a new magnetic bearing system having a motor for a new third-generation blood pump. This magnetic bearing system consists of a magnetic levitation compartment and a brushless direct current (BLDC) motor compartment. The active-control degree of freedom is one; this control is used for controlling the levitation in the axial direction. The levitation in the radial direction has a passive magnetic levitation structure. In order to improve the system efficiency, we separated the magnetic circuit for axial levitation by using a magnetic circuit for motor drive. Each magnetic circuit in the bearing system was designed to have a minimum gap by placing mechanical parts, such as the impeller blades, outside the circuit. A custom-designed noncontact gap sensor was used for minimizing the system volume. We fabricated an experimental prototype of the proposed magnetic bearing system and evaluated its performance by a control system using the Matlab xPC Target system. The noncontact gap sensor was an eddy current gap sensor with an outer diameter of 2.38 mm, thickness of 0.88 mm, and resolution of 5 µm. The BLDC motor compartment was designed to have an outer diameter of 20 mm, length of 28.75 mm, and power of 4.5 W. It exhibited a torque of 8.6 mNm at 5000 rpm. The entire bearing system, including the motor and the sensor, had an outer diameter of 22 mm and a length of 97 mm. The prototype exhibited sufficient levitation

  16. Development of magnetic bearing system for a new third-generation blood pump.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Joo; Ahn, Chi Bum; Choi, Jaesoon; Park, Jun Woo; Song, Seung-Joon; Sun, Kyung

    2011-11-01

    A magnetic bearing system is a crucial component in a third-generation blood pump, particularly when we consider aspects such as system durability and blood compatibility. Many factors such as efficiency, occupying volume, hemodynamic stability in the flow path, mechanical stability, and stiffness need to be considered for the use of a magnetic bearing system in a third-generation blood pump, and a number of studies have been conducted to develop novel magnetic bearing design for better handling of these factors. In this study, we developed and evaluated a new magnetic bearing system having a motor for a new third-generation blood pump. This magnetic bearing system consists of a magnetic levitation compartment and a brushless direct current (BLDC) motor compartment. The active-control degree of freedom is one; this control is used for controlling the levitation in the axial direction. The levitation in the radial direction has a passive magnetic levitation structure. In order to improve the system efficiency, we separated the magnetic circuit for axial levitation by using a magnetic circuit for motor drive. Each magnetic circuit in the bearing system was designed to have a minimum gap by placing mechanical parts, such as the impeller blades, outside the circuit. A custom-designed noncontact gap sensor was used for minimizing the system volume. We fabricated an experimental prototype of the proposed magnetic bearing system and evaluated its performance by a control system using the Matlab xPC Target system. The noncontact gap sensor was an eddy current gap sensor with an outer diameter of 2.38 mm, thickness of 0.88 mm, and resolution of 5 µm. The BLDC motor compartment was designed to have an outer diameter of 20 mm, length of 28.75 mm, and power of 4.5 W. It exhibited a torque of 8.6 mNm at 5000 rpm. The entire bearing system, including the motor and the sensor, had an outer diameter of 22 mm and a length of 97 mm. The prototype exhibited sufficient levitation

  17. Development of a polymer bileaflet valve to realize a low-cost pulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iijima, Kazuo; Inoue, Akira; Imachi, Kou; Ye, Chun Xiu

    2003-01-01

    The final goal of this study is to realize a low-cost pulsatile blood pump especially for patients with acute heart failure or postoperative low cardiac output syndrome. In support of the pump, two types of polymer bileaflet valves with different configuration of the valve seats were developed. Influence of the leaflet thickness on the hydrodynamics of the prototype was preliminarily investigated among 70 microm, 100 microm, and 150 microm. As to the valves with the thinner leaflets, buckling of the leaflets was observed, which induced a large amount of regurgitation at valve closure. However, by thickening the leaflet to 150 microm, the mean flow of the prototype and the second model could be successfully comparable to the Medtronic-Hall valve. Moreover, accelerated fatigue tests showed that reinforcement of the valve seat with the additional spokes in the second model extended the durability by four times as compared with the prototype, equivalent to an in vivo duration of over one month. PMID:12534717

  18. Current status of the gyro centrifugal blood pump--development of the permanently implantable centrifugal blood pump as a biventricular assist device (NEDO project).

    PubMed

    Nosé, Yukihiko; Furukawa, Kojiro

    2004-10-01

    The New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) project was started in 1995. The goal is the development of a multipurpose, totally implantable biventricular assist device (BVAD) that can be used for any patient who suffers from severe heart failure. Our C1E3 (two-week pump) centrifugal pump, called the Gyro pump, has three design characteristics: a magnetic coupling and double pivot bearing system, an eccentric inlet port, and secondary vanes on the bottom of the impeller. The pump was miniaturized. The C1E3 evolved into the NEDO PI-601, a totally implantable centrifugal pump for BVAD. The current NEDO PI-710 pump (five-year pump) system includes a centrifugal pump with pivot bearings, a hydraulically-levitated impeller, an rpm-controlled miniaturized actuator (all-in-one actuator plus controller), an emergency clamp on the left outflow, and a Frank-Starling-type flow control. The final mass production model is now finalized, and the final animal study and two-year endurance studies are ongoing.

  19. Mechanical drive for blood pump

    DOEpatents

    Bifano, N.J.; Pouchot, W.D.

    1975-07-29

    This patent relates to a highly efficient blood pump to be used as a replacement for a ventricle of the human heart to restore people disabled by heart disease. The mechanical drive of the present invention is designed to operate in conjunction with a thermoelectric converter power source. The mechanical drive system essentially converts the output of a rotary power into pulsatile motion so that the power demand from the thermoelectric converter remains essentially constant while the blood pump output is pulsed. (auth)

  20. Development of Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor for an alternative axial flow blood pump design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2006-05-01

    A Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed to provide delivery of both motoring torque and levitation force for an alternative axial flow blood pump design with an enclosed impeller. The axial flow pumps currently available introduce electromagnetic coupling from the motor's stator to the impeller by means of permanent magnets (PMs) embedded in the tips of the pump's blades. This design has distinct disadvantages, for example, pumping efficiency and electromagnetic coupling transmission are compromised by the constrained or poor geometry of the blades and limited pole width of the PMs, respectively. In this research, a Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed. It is composed of (i) an eight-pole PM hollow-cylindrical rotor assembly supposedly to house and enclose the impeller of an axial flow blood pump, and (ii) a six-pole stator with two sets of copper wire and different winding configurations to provide the motoring torque and levitating force for the rotor assembly. MATLAB's xPC Target interface hardware was used as the rapid prototyping tool for the development of the controller for the self-bearing motor. Experimental results on a free/simply supported rotor assembly validated the design feasibility and control algorithm effectiveness in providing both the motoring torque and levitation force for the rotor. When levitated, a maximum orbital displacement of 0.3 mm corresponding to 1050 rpm of the rotor was measured by two eddy current probes placed in the orthogonal direction. This design has the advantage of eliminating the trade-off between motoring torques, levitating force, and pumping efficiency of previous studies. It also indicated the benefits of enclosed-impeller design as having good dynamic response, linearity, and better reliability. The nonmechanical contact feature between rotating and stationary parts will further reduce hemolysis and thromboembolitic tendencies in a typical blood pump application. PMID:16683951

  1. Development of a miniaturized mass-flow meter for an axial flow blood pump based on computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In order to monitor the condition of patients with implantable left ventricular assist systems (LVAS), it is important to measure pump flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to measure the pump flow rate, especially in an implantable axial flow blood pump, because the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with regard to the pump flow rate. In this study, a miniaturized mass-flow meter for discharged patients with an implantable axial blood pump was developed on the basis of computational analysis, and was evaluated in in-vitro tests. The mass-flow meter makes use of centrifugal force produced by the mass-flow rate around a curved cannula. An optimized design was investigated by use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. On the basis of the computational analysis, a miniaturized mass-flow meter made of titanium alloy was developed. A strain gauge was adopted as a sensor element. The first strain gauge, attached to the curved area, measured both static pressure and centrifugal force. The second strain gauge, attached to the straight area, measured static pressure. By subtracting the output of the second strain gauge from the output of the first strain gauge, the mass-flow rate was determined. In in-vitro tests using a model circulation loop, the mass-flow meter was compared with a conventional flow meter. Measurement error was less than ±0.5 L/min and average time delay was 0.14 s. We confirmed that the miniaturized mass-flow meter could accurately measure the mass-flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:21537972

  2. Method for Reducing Pumping Damage to Blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Robert J. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for minimizing damage to blood in a blood pump wherein the blood pump comprises a plurality of pump components that may affect blood damage such as clearance between pump blades and housing, number of impeller blades, rounded or flat blade edges, variations in entrance angles of blades, impeller length, and the like. The process comprises selecting a plurality of pump components believed to affect blood damage such as those listed herein before. Construction variations for each of the plurality of pump components are then selected. The pump components and variations are preferably listed in a matrix for easy visual comparison of test results. Blood is circulated through a pump configuration to test each variation of each pump component. After each test, total blood damage is determined for the blood pump. Preferably each pump component variation is tested at least three times to provide statistical results and check consistency of results. The least hemolytic variation for each pump component is preferably selected as an optimized component. If no statistical difference as to blood damage is produced for a variation of a pump component, then the variation that provides preferred hydrodynamic performance is selected. To compare the variation of pump components such as impeller and stator blade geometries, the preferred embodiment of the invention uses a stereolithography technique for realizing complex shapes within a short time period.

  3. [Hemodynamic analysis of a centrifugal blood pump].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Li, Qilei; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This paper built the mathematical model of a centrifugal blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, combined it with that of the human cardiovascular system and simulated the coupling system using Matlab. Then we set up the experiment platform, linked the blood pump to mock human cardiovascular system in case of three-stage heart failure, and measured aortic pressure and flow under different speed. The comparison between experiment results and simulation results not only indicates the coupling model is correct and the blood pump works well, but also shows that with the increase of blood pump speed, the pulsation of aortic pressure and flow will be reduced, this situation will affect the structure and function of blood vessels.

  4. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support. PMID:19775262

  5. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support.

  6. Can we develop a permanent pulsatile rotary blood pump? Yes, we can.

    PubMed

    Poirier, V L

    1996-06-01

    Active U.S. participation in the development of artificial heart technology began in 1966 with the award of six contracts. Since that beginning, and continuing to this day, we have been asking the same question, "Can we develop a system to take the place of the natural heart?" There are four formidable barriers that must be overcome before success can be achieved: technological development (Can the system perform as designed?); economic challenges (Can we finance the development?); regulatory hurdles (Can we get it approved for general use?); and acceptance (Will it be used, and will society accept it for what it is?). After 30 years, all but the last barrier has been overcome. PMID:8817942

  7. Design of a Bearingless Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barletta, Natale; Schoeb, Reto

    1996-01-01

    In the field of open heart surgery, centrifugal blood pumps have major advantages over roller pumps. The main drawbacks to centrifugal pumps are however problems with the bearings and with the sealing of the rotor shaft. In this paper we present a concept for a simple, compact and cost effective solution for a blood pump with a totally magnetically suspended impeller. It is based on the new technology of the 'Bearingless Motor' and is therefore called the 'Bearingless Blood Pump.' A single bearingless slice motor is at the same time a motor and a bearing system and is able to stabilize the six degrees of freedom of the pump impeller in a very simple way. Three degrees of freedom are stabilized actively (the rotation and the radial displacement of the motor slice). The axial and the angular displacement are stabilized passively. The pump itself (without the motor-stator and the control electronics) is built very simply. It consists of two parts only: the impeller with the integrated machine rotor and the housing. So the part which gets in contact with blood and has therefore to be disposable, is cheap. Fabricated in quantities, it will cost less than $10 and will therefore be affordable for the use in a heart-lung-machine.

  8. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational

  9. Development of an Optical Detector of Thrombus Formation on the Pivot Bearing of a Rotary Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Ouchi, Katsuhiro; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Continuous optical monitoring of thrombus formation in extracorporeal mechanical circulatory support (EMCS) devices will contribute to safe, long-term EMCS. A clinically applicable optical detector must be able to distinguish among the optical characteristics of oxygen saturation (SaO2 ), hematocrit (Hct), and thrombus formation. In vitro studies of spectral changes at wavelengths from 400 to 900 nm associated with SaO2 , Hct, and thrombus formed around the top pivot bearing of a Gyro C1E3 pump were conducted. Fresh porcine blood anticoagulated with sodium citrate was circulated in a mock circuit using the pump. The SaO2 , Hct, and anticoagulation activity were altered using an oxygenator, autologous plasma, and calcium chlorite injection, respectively. Light from a xenon lamp was guided by an incident fiber perpendicularly fixed on the top bearing. This light was scattered by blood pooled between the male and female pivots. The detection fiber was perpendicularly fixed against the incident fiber, and the side-scattered light was detected and guided to a spectrophotometer. As a result, light at two different wavelengths, 420 and 810 nm, was identified as suitable for thrombus detection because it was negligibly influenced by SaO2 and was able to detect the optical characteristics of fibrin. The light at these two wavelengths responded more quickly to thrombus formation than the inlet or outlet pressure, and flow rate change. The optical changes showed the changes in Hct around the top pivot bearing, which is caused by the reduction in density of fibrin-trapped red blood cells (RBCs) due to the RBCs being swept away by the surrounding blood flow. The proposed method was also able to detect fibrin production by extracting subtle differences in the optical characteristics between the Hct and thrombus formation. PMID:27645394

  10. Piezohydraulic Pump Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Reciprocating piston piezohydraulic pumps were developed originally under the Smart Wing Phase II program (Lynch) and later under the CHAP program (CSA, Kinetic Ceramics). These pumps focused on 10 cm scale stack actuators operating below resonance and, more recently, at resonance. A survey of commercially available linear actuators indicates that obtaining power density and specific power greater than electromagnetic linear actuators requires driving the stacks at frequencies greater than 1 KHz at high fields. In the case of 10 cm scale actuators the power supply signal conditioning becomes large and heavy and the soft PZT stack actuators generate a lot of heat due to internal losses. Reciprocation frequencies can be increased and material losses significantly decreased through use of millimeter scale single crystal stack actuators. We are presently targeting the design of pumps that utilize stacks at the 1-10 mm length scale and run at reciprocating frequencies of 20kHz or greater. This offers significant advantages over current approaches including eliminating audible noise and significantly increasing the power density and specific power of the system (including electronics). The pump currently under development will comprise an LC resonant drive of a resonant crystal and head mass operating against a resonant fluid column. Each of these resonant systems are high Q and together should produce a single high Q second order system.

  11. Development of a novel centrifugal pump: magnetic rotary pump.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, S; Yambe, T; Sonobe, T; Kobayashi, S; Nitta, S

    1997-07-01

    The rotational axis of the centrifugal pump has some associated problems such as blood destruction and sealing between the axis and pump housing. To improve upon these deficits we have developed a new type of blood pump, the magnetic rotary pump (MRP). The MRP has an original design with no rotational axis and no impellers. We made a prototype MRP and examined its hemodynamics in mock circulation. The prototype MRP flow rate is only 1.0 L/min with an afterload of 30 mm Hg, and we have made some modifications in the size and drive mechanisms from these results. The modified MRP can achieve high flow rates and rotational speeds (6.0 L/min with an afterload of 100 mm Hg, 2,000 rpm) in a mock circuit, and the modified MRP was used for left heart assistance in an acute animal experiment. The MRP could maintain the hemodynamics of an anesthetized adult goat. These results suggest that the MRP needs to be improved in several areas, but the MRP may be useful as a blood pump. PMID:9212950

  12. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  13. The margin of safety in the use of a straight path centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T; Nojiri, C; Oshiyama, H; Horiuchi, K; Nogawa, A; Hamasaki, H; Ogihara, M; Katsuda, H S; Amano, N; Fukasawa, H

    1994-09-01

    A new centrifugal blood pump with a rotor that arranges 6 straight paths radially was developed for open heart surgery and temporary circulatory support. We describe comparative studies of the margin of safety in the practical use of the new pump. This pump was evaluated for temperature increase, cavitation, and pressure sensitivity. Two commercially available centrifugal pumps, the Biomedicus cone type and the Sarns 3M impeller type, were used as control pumps. The temperature increase in the new pump was four times slower than in the impeller pump when the outlet and the inlet of the pump was clamped. No sign of cavitation was observed when 0.1 ml air was introduced to the pump inlet under a negative pressure of 200 mm Hg in fresh bovine blood. As for pressure sensitivity of centrifugal pumps in practical applications, circuit resistance was a more essential factor than flow-pressure curves of the pump.

  14. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  15. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  16. A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a simple-structured disposable pump head.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Li, Lichuan; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2008-07-01

    A magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) has been developed for use in a disposable extracorporeal system. The design of the pump is intended to eliminate mechanical contact with the impeller, to facilitate a simple disposable mechanism, and to reduce the blood-heating effects that are caused by motors and magnetic bearings. The bearing rotor attached to the impeller is suspended by a two degrees-of-freedom controlled radial magnetic bearing stator, which is situated outside the rotor. In the space inside the ringlike rotor, a magnetic coupling disk is placed to rotate the rotor and to ensure that the pump head is thermally isolated from the motor. In this system, the rotor can exhibit high passive stiffness due to the novel design of the closed magnetic circuits. The disposable pump head, which has a priming volume of 23 mL, consists of top and bottom housings, an impeller, and a rotor with a diameter of 50 mm. The pump can provide a head pressure of more than 300 mm Hg against a flow of 5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis of the MedTech Dispo is 0.0025 +/- 0.0005 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 250 mm Hg. This is one-seventh of the equivalent figure for a Bio Pump BPX-80 (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), which has a value of 0.0170 +/- 0.0096 g/100 L. These results show that the MedTech Dispo offers high pumping performance and low blood trauma.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of the pediatric tiny centrifugal blood pump (TinyPump).

    PubMed

    Kido, Kazuyuki; Hoshi, Hideo; Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a tiny rotary centrifugal blood pump for the purpose of supporting circulation of children and infants. The pump is designed to provide a flow of 0.1-4.0 L/min against a head pressure of 50-120 mm Hg. The diameter of the impeller is 30 mm with six straight vanes. The impeller is supported by a hydrodynamic bearing at its center and rotated with a radial coupled magnetic driver. The bearing that supports rotation of the impeller of the tiny centrifugal blood pump is very critical to achieve durability, and clot-free and antihemolytic performance. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to quantify the secondary flow through the hydrodynamic bearing at the center of the impeller and investigated the effects of bearing clearance on shear stress to optimize hemolytic performance of the pump. Two types of bearing clearance (0.1 and 0.2 mm) were studied. The wall shear stress of the 0.1-mm bearing clearance was lower than that of 0.2-mm bearing clearance at 2 L/min and 3000 rpm. This was because the axial component of the shear rate significantly decreased due to the narrower clearance even though the circumferential component of the shear rate increased. Hemolysis tests showed that the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced to 0.0076 g/100 L when the bearing clearance was reduced to 0.1 mm. It was found that the CFD prediction supported the experimental trend. The CFD is a useful tool for optimization of the hydrodynamic bearing design of the centrifugal rotary blood pump to optimize the performance of the pump in terms of mechanical effect on blood cell elements, durability of the bearing, and antithrombogenic performance.

  18. Development of a disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) intended for bridge-to-bridge applications--two-week in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Someya, Takeshi; Kitao, Takashi; Kimura, Taro; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2010-09-01

    Last year, we reported in vitro pump performance, low hemolytic characteristics, and initial in vivo evaluation of a disposable, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Dispo. As the first phase of the two-stage in vivo studies, in this study we have carried out a 2-week in vivo evaluation in calves. Male Holstein calves with body weight of 62.4–92.2 kg were used. Under general anesthesia, a left heart bypass with a MedTech Dispo pump was instituted between the left atrium and the descending aorta via left thoracotomy. Blood-contacting surface of the pump was coated with a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Post-operatively, with activated clotting time controlled at 180–220 s using heparin and bypass flow rate maintained at 50 mL/kg/min, plasma-free hemoglobin (Hb), coagulation, and major organ functions were analyzed for evaluation of biocompatibility. The animals were electively sacrificed at the completion of the 2-week study to evaluate presence of thrombus inside the pump,together with an examination of major organs. To date, we have done 13 MedTech Dispo implantations, of which three went successfully for a 2-week duration. In these three cases, the pump produced a fairly constant flow of 50 mL/Kg/min. Neurological disorders and any symptoms of thromboembolism were not seen. Levels of plasma-free Hb were maintained very low. Major organ functions remained within normal ranges. Autopsy results revealed no thrombus formation inside the pump. In the last six cases, calves suffered from severe pneumonia and they were excluded from the analysis. The MedTech Dispo pump demonstrated sufficient pump performance and biocompatibility to meet requirements for 1-week circulatory support. The second phase (2-month in vivo study) is under way to prove the safety and efficacy of MedTech Dispo for 1-month applications.

  19. Application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, R; Athavale, M M; Makhijani, V B; Przekwas, A J

    1996-06-01

    Present-day computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques can be used to analyze the behavior of fluid flow in a variety of pumps. CFD can be a powerful tool during the design stage for rapid virtual prototyping of different designs, analyzing performance parameters, and making design improvements. Computational flow solutions provide information such as the location and size of stagnation zones and the local shear rate. These parameters can be correlated to the extent of hemolysis and thrombus formation and are critical to the success of a blood pump. CFD-ACE, an advanced commercial CFD code developed by CFD Research Corporation, has been applied to fluid flows in rotary machines, such as axial flow pumps and inducers. Preprocessing and postprocessing tools for efficient grid generation and advanced graphical flow visualization are integrated seamlessly with CFD-ACE. The code has structured multiblock grid capability, non-Newtonian fluid treatment, a variety of turbulence models, and an Eulerian-Langrangian particle tracking model. CFD-ACE has been used successfully to study the flow characteristics in an axial flow blood pump. An unstructured flow solver that greatly automates the process of grid generation and speeds up the flow simulation is under development. PMID:8817950

  20. Design of a centrifugal blood pump: Heart Turcica Centrifugal.

    PubMed

    Demir, Onur; Biyikli, Emre; Lazoglu, Ismail; Kucukaksu, Suha

    2011-07-01

    A prototype of a new implantable centrifugal blood pump system named Heart Turcica Centrifugal (HTC) was developed as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure. In the development of HTC, effects of blade height and volute tongue profiles on the hydraulic and hemolytic performances of the pump were investigated. As a result, the prototype was manufactured using the best blade height and volute tongue profiles. Performance of the prototype model was experimentally evaluated in a closed-loop flow system using water as the medium. The hydraulic performance requirement of an LVAD (5 L/min flow rate against a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg) was attained at 2800 rpm rotational speed.

  1. Implantable axialflow blood pump for left ventricular support.

    PubMed

    Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Artificial blood pumps, either ventricular assist devices (VADs) or total artificial hearts, are currently employed for bridge to recovery, bridge to transplant, and destination therapy situations. The clinical effectiveness of VADs has been demonstrated; however, all of the currently available pumps have a limited life because of either the damage they cause to blood or their limited mechanical design life. A magnetically suspended rotary blood pump offers the potential to meet the requirements of both extending design life and causing negligible blood damage due to superior hemodynamics. Therefore, over the last few years, efforts of an interdisciplinary research team at University of Virginia have been concentrated on the design and development of a fully implantable axial flow VAD with a magnetically levitated impeller (LEV-VAD). This paper details the second generation developmental prototype (LEV-VAD2 design configuration) and includes a complete CFD analysis of device performance. Based on encouraging results of the first design stage, including a good agreement between the CFD performance estimations and the experimental measurements, a second design phase was initiated in an attempt to enhance device flow performance and suspension system capabilities. Using iterative design optimization stages, the design of the impeller and the geometry of the stationary and rotating blades have been reevaluated. A thorough CFD analysis allowed for optimization of the blood flow path such that an optimal trade-off among the hydraulic performance, specific requirements of a blood pump, and manufacturing requirements has been achieved. Per the CFD results, the LEV-VAD2 produces 6 lpm and 100 mmHg at a rotational speed of 7,000 rpm. The pressure-flow performance predictions indicate the LEV-VAD2's ability to deliver adequate flow over physiologic pressures for rotational speeds varying from 5,000 to 8,000 rpm. The blood damage numerical predictions also demonstrate

  2. [Research on flow characteristics in a non-blade centrifugal blood pump based on CFD technology].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunzhang; Luo, Binhai; Wu, Wenquan; Jiang, Lei

    2010-10-01

    The problem of thrombus and hemolysis in blood pump has always been an important topic to study in the development of the blood pump. Numbers of research results show that it is the complicated flow and the high shear stress of the mechanical movement that result in the thrombus and hemolysis. In this study, with the cooperation of Shanghai Children's Medical Center, we have used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) commercial software FLUENT to compute and analyze the flow characteristics in a non-blade centrifugal blood pump. The results figure out that this pump has a reasonable flow distribution and the shear stress distribution is under the critical broken state of red blood cell; meanwhile, there is less thrombus and hemolysis in this pump. So it is in the foreground for clinical use.

  3. An electromagnetic pneumatic blood pump driver.

    PubMed

    Whalen, R L; Briskman, R N

    1988-01-01

    An electromagnetic pneumatic pump driver has been developed with the goals of enhanced mechanical reliability and simplicity of operation. The new driver eliminates failure prone components such as solenoid valves or pressure regulators common to conventional pneumatic drive systems, has only a single moving part, and provides for closed-loop operation in which stroke volume and dP/dT are controlled on each beat in real time. Power is provided by a high force (178 N) electromagnetic linear actuator. This assembly uses a high energy density neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnet, low loss vanadium alloy pole pieces, and an energized moving coil. The nominal stroke length of the actuator is 1.7 cm. During operation, the moving coil always remains within a fixed annular air gap, resulting in a measured force output versus applied power linearity of better than 92% over its stroke range. The coil is directly attached to the free end of a 10 cm diameter, 21 convolution, welded titanium metal bellows that forms the gas containing element of the system. The comparatively low pressure gradients across the bellows in this application result in a predicted life for the bellows in excess of 10(9) cycles. Bellows position and internal pressure are monitored continuously to control the pneumatic output. The linear actuator total excursion and velocity are adjusted on each beat using a closed-loop servo system. This results in a pump driver with no operator required adjustment of drive pressure. Instead, there are user selected settings of stroke volume, operating mode, and fill sensitivity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Tritium gas transfer pump development

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Non-lubricated, hermetically sealed pumps for tritium service have been selected to replace Sprengel pumps in the existing Tritium Facility. These pumps will be the primary gas-transfer pumps in the planned Replacement Tritium Facility. The selected pumps are Metal Bellows Corporation's bellows pumps and Normetex scroll pumps. Pumping range for a Normetex/Metal Bellows system is from 0.01 torr suction to 2300 torr discharge. Performance characteristics of both pumps are presented. 10 figs.

  5. Concept designs of nonrotating-type centrifugal blood pump and basic study on output characteristics of the oscillating disk-type centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kabei, N; Tuichiya, K; Sakurai, Y

    1994-09-01

    When designing a turbo-type blood pump as an artificial heart, the gap between a rotating shaft and a pump housing should be perfectly sealed to prevent any leakage or contamination through a seal. In addition, blood coagulation in a blood chamber must be avoided. To overcome these problems, we proposed five different nonrotating-type turbo pumps: a caudal-fin-type axial-flow pump, a caudal-fin-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-column-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-collapsible-tube-type centrifugal pump, and an oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump. We selected and developed the oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump that consists of a disk, a driving rod, a seal, an oscillation mechanism, and a pump housing. The disk is mounted on the end of the rod, which is connected to a high-speed DC motor through an oscillation mechanism. The rod and the disk do not rotate, but they oscillate in the pump housing. This movement of the disk generates forward fluid flow around the axis (i.e., the rotational fluid flow). Centrifugal force due to fluid rotation supports the pressure difference between the outlet and the inlet. The diameter of the disk is 39 mm, the maximum inner diameter of the pump housing is 40 mm, and the volume of the blood chamber for 25 degrees' oscillation is 16.9 ml. The performance of the pump was tested in a mock circulatory system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7998882

  6. Induction of ventricular collapse by an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amin, D V; Antaki, J F; Litwak, P; Thomas, D; Wu, Z J; Watach, M

    1998-01-01

    An important consideration for clinical application of rotary blood pump based ventricular assist is the avoidance of ventricular collapse due to excessive operating speed. Because healthy animals do not typically demonstrate this phenomenon, it is difficult to evaluate control algorithms for avoiding suction in vivo. An acute hemodynamic study was thus conducted to determine the conditions under which suction could be induced. A 70 kg calf was implanted with an axial flow assist device (Nimbus/UoP IVAS; Nimbus Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA) cannulated from the left ventricular apex to ascending aorta. On initiation of pump operation, several vasoactive interventions were performed to alter preload, afterload, and contractility of the left ventricle. Initially, dobutamine increased contractility and heart rate ([HR] = 139; baseline = 70), but ventricular collapse was not achievable, even at the maximal pump speed of 15,000 rpm. Norepinephrine decreased HR (HR = 60), increased contractility, and increased systemic vascular resistance ([SVR] = 24; baseline = 15), resulting in ventricular collapse at a pump speed of 14,000 rpm. Isoproterenol (beta agonist) increased HR (HR = 103) and decreased SVR (SVR = 12), but ventricular collapse was not achieved. Inferior vena cava occlusion reduced preload, and ventricular collapse was achieved at speeds as low as 11,000 rpm. Esmolol (beta1 antagonist) decreased HR (HR = 55) and contractility, and ventricular collapse was achieved at 11,500 rpm. Episodes of ventricular collapse were characterized initially by the pump output exceeding the venous return and the aortic valve remaining closed throughout the cardiac cycle. If continued, the mitral valve would remain open throughout the cardiac cycle. Using these unique states of the mitral and aortic valves, the onset of ventricular collapse could reliably be identified. It is hoped that the ability to detect the onset of ventricular collapse, rather than the event itself, will assist in

  7. Fluid dynamic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Asztalos, B; Tsutsui, T; Jikuya, T

    1997-01-01

    A monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump is a centrifugal pump under development with a magnetic suspension and a ceramic pivot to support the impeller with minimum contact. The pump size has been reduced by implementing a direct impeller drive mechanism in place of a magnetic coupling and motor. Flow visualization studies revealed that high shear, which seems to be closely related to hemolysis, concentrates in boundary layers near the walls. This implies that fluid dynamic shear can be reduced not by widening the gap, but by reducing the impeller velocity. Therefore, compared with the results of the previous semi-open curved vane impeller model, impeller velocity was reduced by 30% with a closed impeller having radial straight vanes, and smaller impeller/housing gaps. The volute shape around the impeller tip was also changed such that the outflow from the impeller enters along the center plane of the volute. To examine the effect of the improvements, hemolysis testing was conducted and found that the newly developed closed impeller model generated a lower level of hemolysis than the previous semi-open impeller model. PMID:9360122

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps. PMID:26526039

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design Optimization Method for Archimedes Screw Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Janiga, Gábor; Thévenin, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    An optimization method suitable for improving the performance of Archimedes screw axial rotary blood pumps is described in the present article. In order to achieve a more robust design and to save computational resources, this method combines the advantages of the established pump design theory with modern computer-aided, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based design optimization (CFD-O) relying on evolutionary algorithms and computational fluid dynamics. The main purposes of this project are to: (i) integrate pump design theory within the already existing CFD-based optimization; (ii) demonstrate that the resulting procedure is suitable for optimizing an Archimedes screw blood pump in terms of efficiency. Results obtained in this study demonstrate that the developed tool is able to meet both objectives. Finally, the resulting level of hemolysis can be numerically assessed for the optimal design, as hemolysis is an issue of overwhelming importance for blood pumps.

  10. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  19. Preliminary validation of a new magnetic wireless blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Hashi, Shuichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    In general, a blood pump must be small, have a simple configuration, and have sufficient hydrodynamic performance. Herein, we introduce new mechanisms for a wireless blood pump that is small and simple and provides wireless and battery-free operation. To achieve wireless and battery-free operation, we implement magnetic torque and force control methods that use two external drivers: an external coil and a permanent magnet with a DC-motor, respectively. Power harvesting can be used to drive an electronic circuit for wireless monitoring (the observation of the pump conditions and temperature) without the use of an internal battery. The power harvesting will be used as a power source to drive other electronic devices, such as various biosensors with their driving circuits. To have both a compact size and sufficient pumping capability, the fully magnetic impeller has five stages and each stage includes four backward-curved blades. The pump has total and inner volumes of 20 and 9.8 cc, respectively, and weighs 52 g. The pump produces a flow rate of approximately 8 L/min at 80 mm Hg and the power generator produces 0.3 W of electrical power at 120 Ω. The pump also produces a minimum flow rate of 1.5 L/min and a pressure of 30 mm Hg for circulation at a maximum distance of 7.5 cm.

  20. Preliminary validation of a new magnetic wireless blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Hashi, Shuichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    In general, a blood pump must be small, have a simple configuration, and have sufficient hydrodynamic performance. Herein, we introduce new mechanisms for a wireless blood pump that is small and simple and provides wireless and battery-free operation. To achieve wireless and battery-free operation, we implement magnetic torque and force control methods that use two external drivers: an external coil and a permanent magnet with a DC-motor, respectively. Power harvesting can be used to drive an electronic circuit for wireless monitoring (the observation of the pump conditions and temperature) without the use of an internal battery. The power harvesting will be used as a power source to drive other electronic devices, such as various biosensors with their driving circuits. To have both a compact size and sufficient pumping capability, the fully magnetic impeller has five stages and each stage includes four backward-curved blades. The pump has total and inner volumes of 20 and 9.8 cc, respectively, and weighs 52 g. The pump produces a flow rate of approximately 8 L/min at 80 mm Hg and the power generator produces 0.3 W of electrical power at 120 Ω. The pump also produces a minimum flow rate of 1.5 L/min and a pressure of 30 mm Hg for circulation at a maximum distance of 7.5 cm. PMID:23634711

  1. A straight path centrifugal blood pump concept in the Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T; Oshiyama, H; Horiuchi, K; Nogawa, A; Hamasaki, H; Amano, N; Nojiri, C; Fukasawa, H; Akutsu, T

    1993-07-01

    This article describes comparative studies of a newly developed "straight path" centrifugal pump (Capiox centrifugal pump) targeted for open-heart surgery and circulatory support. A unique straight path design of the rotor was very effective in reducing the pump's rotational speed and prime volume. This pump was evaluated for hydraulics, hemolysis, depriming characteristics, cavitation, and heat generation. Two commercially available centrifugal pumps, the Biomedicus cone-type pump and the Sarns 3M impeller-type pump, were used as controls. The new pump required the lowest pump speed to produce the same flow rates under the same pressure loads and demonstrated the lowest hemolysis and the lowest temperature rise with the outlet clamped. The air volume required to deprime the new pump was one-third to one-half that for the other pumps, and no sign of cavitation was observed even if a small amount of air was introduced to the pump inlet under a negative pressure of 200 mm Hg.

  2. A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump that is introduced through the left ventricular apex.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Kitamura, M; Eishi, K; Kawai, A; Tagusari, O; Niinami, H; Akimoto, T; Nojiri, C

    1992-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as an implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The pump consists of a tube housing (10 cm in length and 14 mm in diameter), a three-vane impeller combined with a guide vane, and a DC motor. This pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged into the ascending aorta. A pump flow of > 8 L/min was obtained against 90 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. In an acute dog model, this pump could produce a sufficient output of 200 ml/kg/min. In addition, the pump flow profile demonstrated a pulsatile pattern, although the rotation speed was fixed. This is mainly due to the changes in flow rate during a cardiac cycle--that is, during systole, the flow rate increases to the maximum, while the differential pressure between the LV and the aorta decreases to the minimum. Thus, this simple and compact axial flow blood pump can be a potential LVAD, with prompt accessibility and need for less invasive surgical procedures.

  3. Experimental determination of dynamic characteristics of the VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael K H; Zhang, Nong; Tansley, Geoff D; Qian, Yi

    2004-12-01

    The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump, intended for long-term ventricular assist, is under development and is currently being tested for its rotor-dynamic stability. The pump consists of a shaftless impeller, which also acts as the rotor of the brushless DC motor. The impeller remains passively suspended in the pump cavity by hydrodynamic forces, which result from the small clearances between the outside surfaces of the impeller and the pump cavity. These small clearances range from approximately 50 microm to 230 microm in size in the version of pump reported here. This article presents experimental investigation into the dynamic characteristics of the impeller-bearing-pump housing system of the rotary blood pump for increasing pump speeds at different flow rates. The pump was mounted on a suspension system consisting of a platform and springs, where the natural frequency and damping ratio for the suspension system were determined. Real-time measurements of the impeller's displacement were performed using Hall effect sensors. A vertical disturbance force was exerted onto the pump housing, causing the impeller to be displaced in vertical direction from its dynamic equilibrium position within the pump cavity. The impeller displacement was represented by a decaying sine wave, which indicated the impeller restoring to its equilibrium position. From the decaying sine wave the natural frequency and stiffness coefficient of the system were determined. Furthermore, the logarithmic decrement method was used to determine the damping ratio and eventually the damping coefficient of the system. Results indicate that stiffness and damping coefficients increased as flow rate and pump speed increased, representing an increase in stability with these changing conditions. However, pump speed had a greater influence on the stiffness and damping coefficients than flow rate did, which was evident through dynamic analysis. Overall the experimental method presented in this

  4. Development of an implantable motor-driven assist pump system.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Okamoto, E; Hirano, A; Mikami, T

    1990-02-01

    A motor-driven artificial pump and its transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) system have been developed. The artificial pump consists of a high-speed dc brushless motor driving a ball screw and magnetic coupling mechanism between the blood pump and ball screw. The ball screw transfers high-speed rotary motion into low-speed rectilinear motion by a single component. Magnetic coupling enables active blood filling without applying an excess negative pressure to the pump. The transcutaneous transformer is formed from a pair of concave/convex ferrite cores. This design minimizes lateral motion of the external core. Information on motor voltage is transmitted through the skin by infrared pulses. The motor voltage is regulated by controlling the duty ratio of the square pulse supplied to the primary coil. Pump flow of 5.6 l/min was obtained with a mean outlet pressure of 100 mmHg at a drive rate of 100 bpm under preload of 15 mmHg. The performance of synchronous pumping has been very satisfactory. Continuous pumping was maintained by the backup battery in the case of interruption of TET. 24 W were transmitted by TET system with 78 percent of efficiency. Temperature rise of the internal core was 0.2 C. The developed system is promising as an implantable assist pump system.

  5. Development of an implantable motor-driven assist pump system.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Okamoto, E; Hirano, A; Mikami, T

    1990-02-01

    A motor-driven artificial pump and its transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) system have been developed. The artificial pump consists of a high-speed dc brushless motor driving a ball screw and magnetic coupling mechanism between the blood pump and ball screw. The ball screw transfers high-speed rotary motion into low-speed rectilinear motion by a single component. Magnetic coupling enables active blood filling without applying an excess negative pressure to the pump. The transcutaneous transformer is formed from a pair of concave/convex ferrite cores. This design minimizes lateral motion of the external core. Information on motor voltage is transmitted through the skin by infrared pulses. The motor voltage is regulated by controlling the duty ratio of the square pulse supplied to the primary coil. Pump flow of 5.6 l/min was obtained with a mean outlet pressure of 100 mmHg at a drive rate of 100 bpm under preload of 15 mmHg. The performance of synchronous pumping has been very satisfactory. Continuous pumping was maintained by the backup battery in the case of interruption of TET. 24 W were transmitted by TET system with 78 percent of efficiency. Temperature rise of the internal core was 0.2 C. The developed system is promising as an implantable assist pump system. PMID:2312139

  6. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a radial magnetic driver.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Katakoa, Kiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Jun-ichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    A new magnetic bearing has been designed to achieve a low electronic power requirement and high stiffness. The magnetic bearing consists of 1) radial passive forces between the permanent magnet ring mounted inside the impeller rotor and the electromagnet core materials in the pump casing and 2) radial active forces generated by the electromagnets using the two gap sensor signals. The magnetic bearing was assembled into a centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) driven with a radial, magnetic coupled driver. The impeller vane shape was designed based upon the computational fluid dynamic simulation. The diameter and height of the CRBP were 75 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The magnetic bearing system required the power of 1.0-1.4 W. The radial impeller movement was controlled to within +/- 10 microm. High stiffness in the noncontrolled axes, Z, phi, and theta, was obtained by the passive magnetic forces. The pump flow of 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg head pressure was obtained at 1,800 rpm with the electrical to hydraulic efficiency being greater than 15%. The Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of the magnetic bearing CRBP was one fifth of the BioPump BP-80 and one half of the NIKKISO HPM-15 after 4 hours. The newly designed magnetic bearing with two degrees of freedom control in combination with optimized impeller vane was successful in achieving an excellent hemolytic performance in comparison with the clinical centrifugal blood pumps. PMID:15745136

  7. Axial type self-bearing motor for axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohji; Masuzawa, Toru; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Ohmori, Kunihiro; Yamane, Takashi; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Fukahori, Shinya; Ueno, Satoshi; Kim, Seung-Jong

    2003-10-01

    An axial self-bearing motor is proposed which can drive an axial blood pump without physical contact. It is a functional combination of the bi-directional disc motor and the axial active magnetic bearing, where it actively controls single degree-of-freedom motion, while other motions such as lateral vibration are passively stable. For application to a blood pump, the proposed self-bearing motor has the advantages of simple structure and small size. Through the finite element method (FEM) analysis and the experimental test, its good feasibility is verified. Finally, the axial flow pump is fabricated using the developed magnetically suspended motor. The pump test is carried out and the results are discussed in detail. PMID:14616531

  8. A passive magnetically and hydrodynamically suspended rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, Martin; Grasl, Christian; Pirker, Stefan; Raderer, Franz; Schistek, Roland; Huber, Leopold; Gittler, Philipp; Schima, Heinrich

    2009-03-01

    A combined hydrodynamic-magnetic bearing allows the design of rotary blood pumps that are not encumbered with mechanical bearings and magnets requiring sensors or electrical power. However, such pumps have so far needed very small and accurately manufactured gaps between rotor and housing to assure effective hydromagnetic bearing behavior. In order to use this concept in disposable pump heads, a design that allows larger rotor-housing gaps, and thus larger manufacturing tolerances, is needed. A pump with passive magnetic bearings and a gap between rotor and housing in the range of 0.5 mm was designed. Numerical simulations were performed to optimize the rotor geometry at low levels of shear stress. An experimental test stand was used to find a range of speeds and gap settings that resulted in low levels of vibration and useful pressure-flow relationships. Three different rotor geometries were tested using a viscosity-adjusted test fluid. Blood damage tests were conducted within the desirable range of speeds and gap settings. In this study stable pump performance was demonstrated at total gap widths between 0.3 and 0.7 mm at flows of 0-10 L/min, with afterloads up to 230 mm Hg. Best performance was achieved with rotors sliding on a fluid pillow between the rotor and the outer housing at a gap distance of 50 to 250 microm. The inner gap distance, between the rotor and the inner housing, could be as great as 500 microm. Hemolysis tests on the prototype within the chosen operating range showed lower values (NIH = 0.0029 +/- 0.0012 g/100 L) than the Biomedicus BP-80 pump (NIH = 0.0033 +/- 0.0011 g/100 L). In conclusion, it is possible to build rotary blood pumps with passive hydromagnetic bearings that have large gaps between their rotors and housings. Rotor behavior is sensitive to the position of the permanent magnetic drive unit. To minimize vibration and blood damage, the fluid gaps and the rotational speed have to be adjusted according to the desired operating

  9. Water Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Goldman, Jeff; Morris, Kim; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design, fabricate, and test a preflight prototype pump for use in the Extravehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump will accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting noncondensable gas without becoming "air locked." The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, sealless, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. Although the planned flight unit will use a sensorless motor with custom designed controller, the preflight prototype to be provided for this project incorporates Hall effect sensors, allowing an interface with a readily available commercial motor controller. This design approach reduced the cost of this project and gives NASA more flexibility in future PLSS laboratory testing. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES will simulate the vacuum environment in which the flight pump will operate. Testing will verify that the pump meets design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure rise, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, and restart capability. Pump testing is currently

  10. [Study on optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump with constraints on blood perfusion and on blood damage indexes].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Pan, Youlian; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tianyi; Lu, Lijun

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the optimal selection of structure of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal objective is determined according to requirements of clinical use. Possible schemes are generally worked out based on structural feature of vaneless centrifugal blood pump. The optimal structure is selected from possible schemes with constraints on blood perfusion and blood damage indexes. Using an optimal selection method one can find the optimum structure scheme from possible schemes effectively. The results of numerical simulation of optimal blood pump showed that the method of constraints of blood perfusion and blood damage is competent for the requirements of selection of the optimal blood pumps.

  11. Magnetically suspended rotary blood pump with radial type combined motor-bearing.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Kita, T; Matsuda, K; Okada, Y

    2000-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is being developed with a combined motor-bearing for long-term ventricular assist systems. The combined motor-bearing actively suspends a rotor in a radial direction to deal with radial force unbalance in the pump and rotates the rotor by using the electric magnetic field. Therefore, the pump has no mechanical parts such as bearings of the motor and has a long lifetime. The developed pump consists of a thin rotor with a semi open-type 6 vane impeller and a stator to suspend and rotate the rotor. The rotor has 4-pole permanent magnets on the circumferential surface. The outer diameter and the thickness of the rotor are 60 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Axial movement and tilt of the rotor are restricted by passive stability based on the thin rotor structure. Radial movements of the rotor, such as levitation in radial direction and rotation, are controlled actively by using electric magnets of the stator. The electric magnet coils to produce levitation and rotation forces are constructed on the periphery stator. The p +/- 2-pole algorithm and the synchronous motor mechanism are adopted to levitate and rotate the rotor. The radial gap between the rotor and the stator is 1 mm. A closed-loop circuit filled with water was connected to the developed pump to examine the basic performance of the pump and the magnetic suspension system. Maximum rotational speed, flow rate, and head were 2,800 rpm, 11 L/min, and 270 mm Hg, respectively. The rotor with the impeller could be suspended completely during the entire pumping process. We conclude the pump with the combined motor-bearing has sufficient performance for the blood pump. PMID:10886067

  12. Development and initial testing of a permanently implantable centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, T; Takami, Y; Benkowski, R; Ohtsubo, S; Yukio, O; Tayama, E; Ohtsuka, G; Niimi, Y; Glueck, J; Sueoka, A; Schmallegger, H; Schima, H; Wolner, E; Nosé, Y

    1997-07-01

    To be able to salvage heart failure patients, the need for an economical permanent ventricular assist device is increasing. To meet this increasing demand, a miniaturized centrifugal blood pump has been developed as a permanently implantable device. The Gyro permanently implantable model (PI-601) incorporates a sealless design with a blood stagnation free structure. The pump impeller is magnetically coupled to the driver magnet in a sealless manner. This pump is atraumatic and antithrombogenic and incorporates a double pivot bearing system. A miniaturized actuator was utilized in this system in collaboration with the University of Vienna. The priming volume of this pump is 20 ml. The overall size of the pump actuator package is 53 mm in height and 65 mm in diameter, 145 ml of displacement volume, and 305 g in weight. Testing to date has included in vitro hydraulic performance and hemolysis. This pump can provide 5 L/min against a 110 mm Hg total pressure head at 2,000 rpm and 8 L/min against 150 mm Hg at 2,500 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) value of this pump was 0.0028 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg. A preliminary anatomical study revealed the possibility of the implantability of 2 such systems in biventricular bypass at a preperitoneal location. This system is feasible for use as a permanently implantable biventricular assist device. PMID:9212924

  13. Pumped limiter development on ISX

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Edmonds, P.H.; Sheffield, J.

    1981-01-01

    Pumped limiter configurations are being suggested for FED and INTOR for helium ash exhaust and fuel particle control. The goal of the pump limiter studies in ISX is the selection of the most promising concept and its evaluation in the ISX-C device under the following conditions: (1) quasi steady state operation (less than or equal to 30s), (2) high edge power densities, and (3) particle control by means of mechanical devices. We are considering various options, including particle scraper and ballistic particle collection concepts as well as the current FED design. In ISX-B we will test a full-size pump limiter and directly compare the heat removal and particle control capabilities with a bundle divertor. In ISX-C the steady state operation characteristics of pump limiters will be explored.

  14. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26736252

  15. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  16. Circular pump support of blood circulation in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, A. E.; Fomin, V. M.; Prikhodko, Yu. M.; Cherniavskiy, A. M.; Fomichev, V. P.; Fomichev, A. V.; Chekhov, V. P.; Ruzmatov, T. M.

    2016-10-01

    The need of circulatory support systems in the treatment of chronic heart failure is increasing constantly, as 20% of patients in the waiting list die every year. Despite the great need for mechanical heart support systems, using of available systems is limited by the expensiveness. In addition, there is no one system that is 100% responsible to all medical and technical requirements, and would be completely safe for patient. Therefore, further research in the field of circu-latory support systems, considering health and technical requirements is relevant. One of the new directions in the study are disc pumps of viscous friction for liquid transporting, based on the Tesla pump principle. The operation principle of pumps based on the phenomenon of the boundary layer which is formed on the disk rotating in a fluid. There are experimental studies results of models with different variants of the rotor suspension, the various forms and the number of disks, forms the pump housing. However, none of the above samples was not brought to clinical trials. Furthermore, despite the promise of this model is still used today in some circulatory support systems are no similar type pump. Published data provide a basis for further development and testing of the pump model and allow to hope for leveling a number of significant shortcomings of modern left ventricular bypass systems.

  17. Development on mercury pump for JSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Haga, Katsuhiro; Wakui, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2009-02-01

    A permanent magnet rotating type induction pump (PM pump) was developed to provide mercury to a liquid mercury target system in Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS). Mechanical pumps, such as a gear pump and a centrifugal pump, have risk of leakage of mercury from the seal parts. Induction pumps can avoid mercury leakage because they have no seal parts. The PM pump could be compact compared with a conventional induction pump; however, power loss must be reduced to avoid overheating of the system. Then optimizations for the thickness of mercury duct wall and width of the duct were carried out to reduce heat loss due to the eddy current in the duct generated by the induction, and to reduce flow-induced loss. As for the flow-induced loss, backflow would occur at the outside of the duct because of the difference in the Lorentz force between inside and outside of the duct. Consequently, the developed PM pump could have sufficient performance for the target system in JSNS and operate with low vibration.

  18. Mechanical damage of red blood cells by rotary blood pumps: selective destruction of aged red blood cells and subhemolytic trauma.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryuki; Sobajima, Hideo; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Waguri, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Takatani, Setsuo

    2008-10-01

    In this study, mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) were measured to quantify RBC damage by rotary blood pumps. Six-hour hemolysis tests were conducted with a Bio-pump BPX-80, a Sarns 15200 roller pump, and a prototype mag-lev centrifugal pump (MedTech Heart) using fresh porcine blood circulated at 5 L/min against a 100 mm Hg head pressure. The temperature of the test and noncirculated control blood was maintained at 37 degrees C. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of each pump was determined by measuring the plasma-free hemoglobin level. The MCV was measured with a Coulter counter, and MCHC was derived from total hemoglobin and hematocrit. MCH was derived from MCV and MCHC. A multivariance statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences (n = 15, P < 0.05) in MCV, MCHC, and MCH between the blood sheared by the rotary blood pumps and the nonsheared control blood. Normalized to the control blood, the Bio-pump BPX-80 showed an MCV of 1.04 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.95 +/- 0.04, and an MCH of 0.98 +/- 0.02; the mag-lev MedTech Heart had an MCV of 1.02 +/- 0.02, an MCHC of 0.97 +/- 0.02, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01; and the roller pump exhibited an MCV of 1.03 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.96 +/- 0.03, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01. Per 0.01 increase in NIH, the BPX-80 showed a normalized MCV change of +10.1% and a normalized MCHC change of -14.0%; the MedTech Heart demonstrated a +6.9% MCV and -9.5% MCHC change; and the roller pump had a +0.5% MCV and -0.6% MCHC change. Due to shear in the pump circuits, the RBC increased while the MCHC decreased. The likely mechanism is that older RBCs with smaller size and higher hemoglobin concentration were destroyed fast by the shear, leaving younger RBCs with larger size and lower hemoglobin concentration. Subhemolytic trauma caused the intracellular hemoglobin to decrease due to gradual hemoglobin leakage through the micropores formed in the thinned

  19. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indices of the fluid, the pump casing, and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 12 kPa and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 22.9%.

  20. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Mehta, Mehul; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indecies of the fluid, the pump casing and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 90 mmHg and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 2.9%.

  1. Plasma Skimming in a Spiral Groove Bearing of a Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Plasma skimming is a phenomenon in which discharge hematocrit is lower than feed hematocrit in microvessels. Plasma skimming has been investigated at a bearing gap in a spiral groove bearing (SGB), as this has the potential to prevent hemolysis in the SGB of a blood pump. However, it is not clear whether plasma skimming occurs in a blood pump with the SGB, because the hematocrit has not been obtained. The purpose of this study is to verify plasma skimming in an SGB of a centrifugal blood pump by developing a hematocrit measurement method in an SGB. Erythrocyte observation using a high-speed microscope and a bearing gap measurement using a laser confocal displacement meter was performed five times. In these tests, bovine blood as a working fluid was diluted with autologous plasma to adjust the hematocrit to 1.0%. A resistor was adjusted to achieve a pressure head of 100 mm Hg and a flow rate of 5.0 L/min at a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was measured using an image analysis based on motion image of erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, the measured bearing gap, and a cross-sectional area of erythrocyte. Mean hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was linearly reduced from 0.97 to 0.07% with the decreasing mean bearing gap from 38 to 21 μm when the rotational speed was changed from 2250 to 3000 rpm. A maximum plasma skimming efficiency of 93% was obtained with a gap of 21 μm. In conclusion, we succeeded in measuring the hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB of the blood pump. Hematocrit decreased on the ridge region in the SGB and plasma skimming occurred with a bearing gap of less than 30 μm in the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:27645396

  2. Plasma Skimming in a Spiral Groove Bearing of a Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2016-09-01

    Plasma skimming is a phenomenon in which discharge hematocrit is lower than feed hematocrit in microvessels. Plasma skimming has been investigated at a bearing gap in a spiral groove bearing (SGB), as this has the potential to prevent hemolysis in the SGB of a blood pump. However, it is not clear whether plasma skimming occurs in a blood pump with the SGB, because the hematocrit has not been obtained. The purpose of this study is to verify plasma skimming in an SGB of a centrifugal blood pump by developing a hematocrit measurement method in an SGB. Erythrocyte observation using a high-speed microscope and a bearing gap measurement using a laser confocal displacement meter was performed five times. In these tests, bovine blood as a working fluid was diluted with autologous plasma to adjust the hematocrit to 1.0%. A resistor was adjusted to achieve a pressure head of 100 mm Hg and a flow rate of 5.0 L/min at a rotational speed of 2800 rpm. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was measured using an image analysis based on motion image of erythrocytes, mean corpuscular volume, the measured bearing gap, and a cross-sectional area of erythrocyte. Mean hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB was linearly reduced from 0.97 to 0.07% with the decreasing mean bearing gap from 38 to 21 μm when the rotational speed was changed from 2250 to 3000 rpm. A maximum plasma skimming efficiency of 93% was obtained with a gap of 21 μm. In conclusion, we succeeded in measuring the hematocrit on the ridge region in the SGB of the blood pump. Hematocrit decreased on the ridge region in the SGB and plasma skimming occurred with a bearing gap of less than 30 μm in the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  3. Coal pump development phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, R. O.; Sankur, V. D.; Gerbracht, F. G.; Mahajan, V.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques for achieving continuous coal sprays were studied. Coazial injection with gas and pressure atomization were studied. Coal particles, upon cooling, were found to be porous and fragile. Reactivity tests on the extruded coal showed overall conversion to gases and liquids unchanged from that of the raw coal. The potentials for applications of the coal pump to eight coal conversion processes were examined.

  4. Development of the sonic pump levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype levitating/positioning device termed the Sonic Pump Levitator was designed, built and successfully tested in full gravity and in the reduced gravity of the parabolic flight regime of the KC-135. Positioning is achieved by timely and appropriate application of gas momentum from one or more of six sonic pumps. The sonic pumps, which are arranged orthogonally in opposed pairs about the levitation region, are activated by an electro-optical, computer controlled, feedback system. The sonic pump is a transducer which is capable of converting sound energy into a directed flow of gas. It consists of a loudspeaker whose face is sealed by a closure perforated by one or more orifices. The diaphragm of the loudspeaker is the only moving part of the sonic pump, no valves being needed. This very low inertia electromechanical device was developed to provide the short response time necessary to keep pace with the demands of computerized position keeping.

  5. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD. PMID:24237361

  6. Study of a centrifugal blood pump in a mock loop system.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Beatriz; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Leão, Tarcísio; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump (ICBP) is being developed to be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) in patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. The ICBP system is composed of a centrifugal pump, a motor, a controller, and a power supply. The electricity source provides power to the controller and to a motor that moves the pump's rotor through magnetic coupling. The centrifugal pump is composed of four parts: external conical house, external base, impeller, and impeller base. The rotor is supported by a pivot bearing system, and its impeller base is responsible for sheltering four permanent magnets. A hybrid cardiovascular simulator (HCS) was used to evaluate the ICBP's performance. A heart failure (HF) (when the heart increases beat frequency to compensate for decrease in blood flow) was simulated in the HCS. The main objective of this work is to analyze changes in physiological parameters such as cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate in three situations: healthy heart, HF, and HF with left circulatory assistance by ICBP. The results showed that parameters such as aortic pressure and cardiac output affected by the HF situation returned to normal values when the ICBP was connected to the HCS. In conclusion, the test results showed satisfactory performance for the ICBP as a VAD.

  7. A new model of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass: design improvement, performance, and hemolysis tests.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; Fonseca, Jeison; Bock, Eduardo; da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Dos Santos, Alex Eugênio; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, José F

    2011-05-01

    A new model of blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) application has been developed and evaluated in our laboratories. Inside the pump housing is a spiral impeller that is conically shaped and has threads on its surface. Worm gears provide an axial motion of the blood column. Rotational motion of the conical shape generates a centrifugal pumping effect and improves pumping performance. One annular magnet with six poles is inside the impeller, providing magnetic coupling to a brushless direct current motor. In order to study the pumping performance, a mock loop system was assembled. Mock loop was composed of Tygon tubes (Saint-Gobain Corporation, Courbevoie, France), oxygenator, digital flowmeter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control. Experiments were performed on six prototypes with small differences in their design. Each prototype was tested and flow and pressure data were obtained for rotational speed of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. Hemolysis was studied using pumps with different internal gap sizes (1.35, 1.45, 1.55, and 1.7 mm). Hemolysis tests simulated CPB application with flow rate of 5 L/min against total pressure head of 350 mm Hg. The results from six prototypes were satisfactory, compared to the results from the literature. However, prototype #6 showed the best results. Best hemolysis results were observed with a gap of 1.45 mm, and showed a normalized index of hemolysis of 0.013 g/100 L. When combined, axial and centrifugal pumping principles produce better hydrodynamic performance without increasing hemolysis.

  8. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator. PMID:21382738

  9. Fault-tolerant strategies for an implantable centrifugal blood pump using a radially controlled magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2011-10-01

    In our laboratory, an implantable centrifugal blood pump (CBP) with a two degrees-of-freedom radially controlled magnetic bearing (MB) to support the impeller without contact has been developed to assist the pumping function of the weakened heart ventricle. In order to maintain the function of the CBP after damage to the electromagnets (EMs) of the MB, fault-tolerant strategies for the CBP are proposed in this study. Using a redundant MB design, magnetic levitation of the impeller was maintained with damage to up to two out of a total of four EMs of the MB; with damage to three EMs, contact-free support of the impeller was achieved using hydrodynamic and electromagnetic forces; and with damage to all four EMs, the pump operating point, of 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, was achieved using the motor for rotation of the impeller, with contact between the impeller and the stator.

  10. Comparison of a pulsatile blood pump and a peristaltic roller pump during hemoperfusion treatment in a canine model of paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Seong Wook; Kim, Jeong Chul; Lim, Ki Moo; Kim, Kyuseok; Jung, Sung Koo; Kwak, Young Ho; Shin, Sang Do; Jo, Ik Joon; Suh, Gil Joon; Min, Byoung Goo

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the treatment efficacy and the damage to the blood during hemoperfusion for treating paraquat poisoning using two blood pump mechanisms. Paraquat-poisoned animal models were prepared. A conventional hemodialysis machine, AK90, with a peristaltic roller pump and a cardiopulmonary support system, T-PLS, with a pulsatile blood pump were used during the animal experiments. A total of 12 dogs were treated with hemoperfusion using a charcoal column. Six dogs were treated with hemoperfusion and T-PLS, and the other six were treated with AK90. A paraquat dose of 30 mg/kg was administrated by an intravenous injection. Both pumps maintained blood flow rates of 125 mL/min measured by an ultrasonic flowmeter. For anticoagulation, heparin was administrated by an initial bolus (250 IU/kg) and a continuous injection (100 IU/kg/h). During the experiments, T-PLS and AK90 showed a similar toxin removal efficacy. Both devices decreased the plasma paraquat concentration to 10% of the initial dose within 4-h hemoperfusion. The two pumps showed similar hemolysis properties with acceptable levels. Although T-PLS was developed as a cardiopulmonary bypass system, it can also be used as a hemoperfusion treatment device. PMID:18638308

  11. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  12. A new design for a compact centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated rotor.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed using a radial magnetic bearing with a two-degree of freedom active control. The proposed magnetic bearing exhibits high stiffness, even in passively controlled directions, and low power consumption because a permanent magnet, incorporated with the rotor, suspends its weight. The rotor is driven by a Lorentz force type of built-in motor, avoiding mechanical friction and material wear. The built-in motor is designed to generate only rotational torque, without radial and axial attractive forces on the rotor, leading to low power consumption by the magnetic bearing. The fabricated centrifugal pump measured 65 mm in diameter and 45 mm in height and weighed 0.36 kg. In the closed loop circuit filled with water, the pump provided a flow rate of 4.5 L/min at 2,400 rpm against a pressure head of 100 mm Hg. Total power consumption at that point was 18 W, including 2 W required for magnetic levitation, with a total efficiency of 5.7%. The experimental results showed that the design of the compact magnetic bearing was feasible and effective for use in a centrifugal blood pump. PMID:15672787

  13. Centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices with low priming and ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Leme, Juliana; da Silva, Cibele; Fonseca, Jeison; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron

    2013-11-01

    A new model of centrifugal blood pump for temporary ventricular assist devices has been developed and evaluated. The design of the device is based on centrifugal pumping principles and the usage of ceramic bearings, resulting in a pump with reduced priming (35 ± 2 mL) that can be applied for up to 30 days. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is an efficient tool to optimize flow path geometry, maximize hydraulic performance, and minimize shear stress, consequently decreasing hemolysis. Initial studies were conducted by analyzing flow behavior with different impellers, aiming to determine the best impeller design. After CFD studies, rapid prototyping technology was used for production of pump prototypes with three different impellers. In vitro experiments were performed with those prototypes, using a mock loop system composed of Tygon tubes, oxygenator, digital flow meter, pressure monitor, electronic driver, and adjustable clamp for flow control, filled with a solution (1/3 water, 1/3 glycerin, 1/3 alcohol) simulating blood viscosity and density. Flow-versus-pressure curves were obtained for rotational speeds of 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 rpm. As the next step, the CFD analysis and hydrodynamic performance results will be compared with the results of flow visualization studies and hemolysis tests.

  14. Flow modulation algorithms for intra-aortic rotary blood pumps to minimize coronary steal.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Koenig, Steven C; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2013-01-01

    Intra-aortic rotary blood pumps (IARBPs) have been used for partial cardiac support during cardiogenic shock, myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and potentially viable for long-term circulatory support. Intra-aortic rotary blood pump support continuously removes volume from the aortic root, which lowers left ventricular preload, external work (LVEW), and improves end-organ perfusion. However, IARBP support diminishes aortic root pressure and coronary artery. It may also create "coronary steal," which may produce a myocardial hypoxic state adversely affecting patient outcomes. Our objective was to develop IARBP flow modulation algorithms to eliminate coronary steal and improve the myocardial supply-demand ratio without compromising the clinical benefits of restored end-organ perfusion and reduced LVEW. The hemodynamic responses of the native ventricle, coronary, and systemic vasculature to timing and synchronization of IARBP flow modulation (cyclic variation of pump flow) were investigated using a clinical heart failure (HF) computer simulation model. A total of more than 150 combinations of varying pulse widths and time-shifts to modulate IARBP flow were tested at mean IARBP flow rates of 2, 3, and 4 L/min, and compared with HF baseline values (no IARBP support). Increasing IARBP support augmented cardiac output and diminished LVEW. Nonmodulated IARBP support significantly diminished mean diastolic coronary flow (-49%) and myocardial supply-demand ratio (-12%) compared with HF baseline. Intra-aortic rotary blood pump flow modulation increased mean diastolic coronary flow (+17%) and myocardial supply-demand ratio (+24%) compared with nonmodulated IARBP (constant flow). Modulation and synchronization of IARBP support augmented coronary artery perfusion and myocardial supply-demand ratio in simulated clinical HF while also restoring end-organ perfusion and reducing LVEW. Implementation of IARBP support with flow modulation may prevent

  15. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass... cardiopulmonary bypass circuit during bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads. PMID:22320054

  17. Evaluation of hydraulic radial forces on the impeller by the volute in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Boehning, Fiete; Timms, Daniel L; Amaral, Felipe; Oliveira, Leonardo; Graefe, Roland; Hsu, Po-Lin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-08-01

    In many state-of-the-art rotary blood pumps for long-term ventricular assistance, the impeller is suspended within the casing by magnetic or hydrodynamic means. For the design of such suspension systems, profound knowledge of the acting forces on the impeller is crucial. Hydrodynamic bearings running at low clearance gaps can yield increased blood damage and magnetic bearings counteracting high forces consume excessive power. Most current rotary blood pump devices with contactless bearings are centrifugal pumps that incorporate a radial diffuser volute where hydraulic forces on the impeller develop. The yielding radial forces are highly dependent on impeller design, operating point and volute design. There are three basic types of volute design--singular, circular, and double volute. In this study, the hydraulic radial forces on the impeller created by the volute in an investigational centrifugal blood pump are evaluated and discussed with regard to the choice of contactless suspension systems. Each volute type was tested experimentally in a centrifugal pump test setup at various rotational speeds and flow rates. For the pump's design point at 5 L/min and 2500 rpm, the single volute had the lowest radial force (∼0 N), the circular volute yielded the highest force (∼2 N), and the double volute possessed a force of approx. 0.5 N. Results of radial force magnitude and direction were obtained and compared with a previously performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study.

  18. A cost-effective extracorporeal magnetically-levitated centrifugal blood pump employing a disposable magnet-free impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, W; Mamiya, T; Shinshi, T; Takatani, S

    2011-12-01

    In the field of rotary blood pumps, contactless support of the impeller by a magnetic bearing has been identified as a promising method to reduce blood damage and enhance durability. The authors developed a two-degrees-of-freedom radial controlled magnetic bearing system without a permanent magnet in the impeller in order that a low-cost disposable pump-head for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump could be manufactured more easily. Stable levitation and contactless rotation of the 'magnet-free' impeller were realized for a prototype blood-pump that made use of this magnetic bearing. The run-out of the impeller position at between 1000 r/min and 3000 r/min was less than 40 microm in the radial-controlled directions. The total power consumption of the magnetic bearing was less than 1 W at the same rotational speeds. When the pump was operated, a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 78.66 kPa was achieved at a rotational speed of 4000 r/min, which is sufficient for extracorporeal circulation support. The proposed technology offers the advantage of low-cost mass production of disposable pump heads.

  19. Automatic system for noninvasive blood pressure determination in rotary pump recipients.

    PubMed

    Schima, Heinrich; Boehm, Herbert; Huber, Leopold; Schmallegger, Helmut; Vollkron, Michael; Hiesmayr, Michael; Noisser, Robert; Wieselthaler, Georg

    2004-05-01

    In patients with implanted rotary pumps, the arterial pressure pulsatility is usually far lower than in normal individuals. Depending on the remaining degree of pulsatility, cuff-based systems such as the classical Riva-Rocci-determination of arterial blood pressure and correlated sounds or pressure measurements based on cuffpressure oscillations become inaccurate or even impossible. Therefore, a system was developed which evaluates the flow in the radial artery using an ultrasound wristwatch sensor, and this additional information is used for pressure determination. A computerized data acquisition and cuff-control system based on a PC using Matlab software, a wristwatch ultrasound device, and a compressor-driven pressure cuff was set up. The cuff was controlled for automatic inflation and deflation cycles. Cuff pressure and arterial flow was recorded. Several algorithm strategies were developed, which gave data for systolic blood pressure and heart rate together with a reliability index for data quality. Finally, the new algorithms were implemented in a microcontroller system. Comparisons with invasive measurements showed excellent correlation with systolic blood pressure (mean deltaP -0.3 mm Hg, n = 28). During exercise of rotary pump patients and therefore enhanced pulsatility the difference from manual evaluation was -2.1 mm Hg (n = 18). In conclusion, adaptation of the classical cuff-pressure method with ultrasound evaluation of peripheral flow allows reliable determination of blood pressure in patients with low pulsatility resulting from implanted rotary cardiac assist pumps. By development of a wristwatch sensor and an automatic control system a robust method for daily use could be developed.

  20. The effects of residual pump blood on patient plasma free haemoglobin levels post cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    H, Schotola; Aj, Wetz; Af, Popov; I, Bergmann; Bc, Danner; Fa, Schöndube; M, Bauer; A, Bräuer

    2016-09-01

    At the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there are invariably several hundred millilitres of residual pump blood in the reservoir, which can either be re-transfused or discarded. The objective of this prospective observational study was to investigate the quality of the residual pump blood, focusing on plasma free haemoglobin (pfHb) and blood cell counts. Fifty-one consecutive patients were included in the study. Forty-nine units of residual pump blood and 58 units of transfused red blood cell (RBC) concentrates were analysed. The mean preoperative pfHb of the patients was 0.057 ± 0.062 g/l, which increased gradually to 0.55 ± 0.36 g/l on arrival in the intensive care unit postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, the mean pfHb had returned to within the normal range. Our data showed that haemoglobin, haematocrit, and erythrocyte counts of residual pump blood were approximately 40% of the values in standardised RBC concentrates. Plasma free haemoglobin was significantly higher in residual pump blood compared to RBC concentrates, and nearly twice as high as the pfHb in patient blood samples taken contemporaneously. Our findings indicate that residual pump blood pfHb levels are markedly higher compared to patients' blood and RBC concentrates, but that its administration does not significantly increase patients' pfHb levels. PMID:27608341

  1. Parameter estimation and actuator characteristics of hybrid magnetic bearings for axial flow blood pump applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Cheng, Shanbao; Chua, Leok Poh

    2009-07-01

    Axial flow blood pumps are generally smaller as compared to centrifugal pumps. This is very beneficial because they can provide better anatomical fit in the chest cavity, as well as lower the risk of infection. This article discusses the design, levitated responses, and parameter estimation of the dynamic characteristics of a compact hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet brushless and sensorless motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five degree of freedom with proportional-integral-derivative controllers, among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMB system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air-in both the radial and axial directions. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamic characteristics of the HMB system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. By injecting a multifrequency excitation force signal onto the rotor through the HMBs, it is noticed in the experimental results the maximum displacement linear operating range is 20% of the static eccentricity with respect to the rotor and stator gap clearance. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamic properties under normal operating conditions with fluid. PMID:19566728

  2. Parameter estimation and actuator characteristics of hybrid magnetic bearings for axial flow blood pump applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Cheng, Shanbao; Chua, Leok Poh

    2009-07-01

    Axial flow blood pumps are generally smaller as compared to centrifugal pumps. This is very beneficial because they can provide better anatomical fit in the chest cavity, as well as lower the risk of infection. This article discusses the design, levitated responses, and parameter estimation of the dynamic characteristics of a compact hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet brushless and sensorless motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five degree of freedom with proportional-integral-derivative controllers, among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMB system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air-in both the radial and axial directions. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamic characteristics of the HMB system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. By injecting a multifrequency excitation force signal onto the rotor through the HMBs, it is noticed in the experimental results the maximum displacement linear operating range is 20% of the static eccentricity with respect to the rotor and stator gap clearance. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamic properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  3. Rotary blood pump control strategy for preventing left ventricular suction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    The risk for left ventricular (LV) suction while maintaining adequate perfusion over a range of physiologic conditions during continuous flow LV assist device (LVAD) support is a significant clinical concern. To address this challenge, we developed a suction prevention and physiologic control (SPPC) algorithm for use with axial and centrifugal LVADs. The SPPC algorithm uses two gain-scheduled, proportional-integral controllers that maintain a differential pump speed (ΔRPM) above a user-defined threshold to prevent LV suction, while maintaining an average reference differential pressure (ΔP) between the LV and aorta to provide physiologic perfusion. Efficacy and robustness of the proposed algorithm were evaluated in silico during simulated rest and exercise test conditions for (1) ΔP/ΔRPM excessive setpoint (ES); (2) rapid eightfold increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR); and (3) ES and PVR. Hemodynamic waveforms (LV pressure and volume; aortic pressure and flow) were simulated and analyzed to identify suction event(s), quantify total flow output (pump + cardiac output), and characterize the performance of the SPPC algorithm. The results demonstrated that the proposed SPPC algorithm prevented LV suction while maintaining physiologic perfusion for all simulated test conditions, and warrants further investigation in vivo. PMID:25248043

  4. Inducer analysis/pump model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.

    1994-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design information in a productive manner. The main goal of this study was to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes an extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving zonal interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. In the present study, three key components of the turbopump, the inducer, impeller, and diffuser, were investigated by the proposed pump model, and the numerical results were benchmarked by the experimental data provided by Rocketdyne. For the numerical calculation of inducer flows with tip clearance, the turbulence model and grid spacing are very important. Meanwhile, the development of the cross-stream secondary flow, generated by curved blade passage and the flow through tip leakage, has a strong effect on the inducer flow. Hence, the prediction of the inducer performance critically depends on whether the numerical scheme of the pump model can simulate the secondary flow pattern accurately or not. The impeller and diffuser, however, are dominated by pressure-driven flows such that the effects of turbulence model and grid spacing (except near leading and trailing edges of blades) are less sensitive. The present CFD pump model has been proved to be an efficient and robust analytical tool for pump design due to its very compact numerical structure (requiring small memory), fast turnaround computing time, and versatility for different geometries.

  5. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  6. Direct detection of red blood cell fragments: a new flow cytometric method to evaluate hemolysis in blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Linneweber, J; Chow, T W; Takano, T; Maeda, T; Nonaka, K; Schulte-Eistrup, S; Kawahito, S; Elert, O; Moake, J L; Nosé, Y

    2001-01-01

    Pump induced hemolysis is presently evaluated by measuring plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). However, this method has disadvantages because quantification of fHb depends on hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The aim of this work was to devise a hemoglobin independent method, capable of quantifying cell trauma directly by measuring the number of red blood cell (RBC) fragments. Whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify circulating RBC fragments derived from a roller pump (Sarns, Inc. Model 2 M 6,002) and a centrifugal pump (Gyro C1E3, Kyocera Corp.). The pumps were tested in a mock circuit for 2 hr (5 L/min flow against 100 mm Hg pressure head). Red blood cell fragments were quantified by a phycoerythrin (PE) labeled glycophorin A antibody specific for erythrocytes. Red blood cell fragments were smaller than the intact RBC population and overlapped in size with the platelet population (based on forward- and side-light scattering measurements). For the roller pump, the values for RBC fragments increased from 1,090 +/- 260/microl at 0 min to 14,880 +/- 5,900/microl after 120 min. In contrast, using the centrifugal pump, there was little increase in RBC fragments (from 730 +/- 270/microl at 0 min to 1,400 +/- 840/microl after 120 min). Flow cytometry can be used for the rapid, sensitive, hemoglobin independent evaluation of pump induced RBC trauma.

  7. Development of a simulated smart pump interface.

    PubMed

    Elias, Beth L; Moss, Jacqueline A; Shih, Alan; Dillavou, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Medical device user interfaces are increasingly complex, resulting in a need for evaluation in clinicallyaccurate settings. Simulation of these interfaces can allow for evaluation, training, and use for research without the risk of harming patients and with a significant cost reduction over using the actual medical devices. This pilot project was phase 1 of a study to define and evaluate a methodology for development of simulated medical device interface technology to be used for education, device development, and research. Digital video and audio recordings of interface interactions were analyzed to develop a model of a smart intravenous medication infusion pump user interface. This model was used to program a high-fidelity simulated smart intravenous medication infusion pump user interface on an inexpensive netbook platform. PMID:24189715

  8. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  9. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  10. [Numerical assessment of impeller features of centrifugal blood pump based on fast hemolysis approximation model].

    PubMed

    Shou, Chen; Guo, Yongjun; Su, Lei; Li, Yongqian

    2014-12-01

    The impeller profile, which is one of the most important factors, determines the creation of shear stress which leads to blood hemolysis in the internal flow of centrifugal blood pump. The investigation of the internal flow field in centrifugal blood pump and the estimation of the hemolysis within different impeller profiles will provide information to improve the performance of centrifugal blood pump. The SST kappa-omega with low Reynolds correction was used in our laboratory to study the internal flow fields for four kinds of impellers of centrifugal blood pump. The flow fields included distributions of pressure field, velocity field and shear stress field. In addition, a fast numerical hemolysis approximation was adopted to calculate the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH). The results indicated that the pressure field distribution in all kinds of blood pump were reasonable, but for the log spiral impeller pump, the vortex and backflow were much lower than those of the other pumps, and the high shear stress zone was just about 0.004%, and the NIH was 0.0089.

  11. Magnetic drive system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to design a novel magnetic drive and bearing system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP). The drive system consists of two components: (i) permanent magnets within the impeller of the CRBP; and (ii) the driving electromagnets. Orientation of the magnets varies from axial through to 60 degrees included out-lean (conical configuration). Permanent magnets replace the electromagnet drive to allow easier characterization. The performance characteristics tested were the axial force of attraction between the stator and rotor at angles of rotational alignment, Ø, and the corresponding torque at those angles. The drive components were tested for various magnetic cone angles, theta. The test was repeated for three backing conditions: (i) non-backed; (ii) steel-cupped; and (iii) steel plate back-iron, performed on an Instron tensile testing machine. Experimental results were expanded upon through finite element and boundary element analysis (BEM). The force/torque characteristics were maximal for a 12-magnet configuration at 0 degree cone angle with steel-back iron (axial force = 60 N, torque = 0.375 Nm). BEM showed how introducing a cone angle increases the radial restoring force threefold while not compromising axial bearing force. Magnets in the drive system may be orientated not only to provide adequate coupling to drive the CRBP, but to provide significant axial and radial bearing forces capable of withstanding over 100 m/s(2) shock excitation on the impeller. Although the 12 magnet 0 degree (theta) configuration yielded the greatest force/torque characteristic, this was seen as potentially unattractive as this magnetic cone angle yielded poor radial restoring force characteristics. PMID:18959665

  12. Sensorless Viscosity Measurement in a Magnetically-Levitated Rotary Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Rao, Jun; Abe, Shodai; Takatani, Setsuo; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2015-07-01

    Controlling the flow rate in an implantable rotary blood pump based on the physiological demand made by the body is important. Even though various methods to estimate the flow rate without using a flow meter have been proposed, no adequate method for measuring the blood viscosity, which is necessary for an accurate estimate of the flow rate, without using additional sensors or mechanisms in a noninvasive way, has yet been realized. We have developed a sensorless method for measuring viscosity in magnetically levitated rotary blood pumps, which requires no additional sensors or mechanisms. By applying vibrational excitation to the impeller using a magnetic bearing, we measured the viscosity of the working fluid by measuring the phase difference between the current in the magnetic bearing and the displacement of the impeller. The measured viscosity showed a high correlation (R(2)  > 0.992) with respect to a reference viscosity. The mean absolute deviation of the measured viscosity was 0.12 mPa·s for several working fluids with viscosities ranging from 1.18 to 5.12 mPa·s. The proposed sensorless measurement method has the possibility of being utilized for estimating flow rate. PMID:25920684

  13. Development of a windmill for water pumping for developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.P.; Chandra, S.K.; Mantrawadi, S.C.

    1983-12-01

    Development of an all-metal windmill with 5 meter wheel diameter and 12 blades is described. Sound methods of mechanical and aerodynamic design are used, even though the windmill is simple enough to be fabricated in a small workshop using commonly available mild steel sections. The windmill is connected to a single acting reciprocating pump which can be inserted in a tubewell. Stroke of the pump as well as pump diameter can be varied to suit the site conditions as the water table and wind velocity vary. The designed windspeed is kept low at 14 KMPH so that the windmill is suitable for low wind regimes and the cut-in wind speed is as low as 6 KMPH. The overall efficiency of the wind pump is found to be about 12-15 percent. The cost of the wind pump together with all metallic 7 meter high tower is about US $1,200, with a life expectancy of 20 years. Few of the windmills are already working and cost of water pumping is comparable to diesel or electric pumping.

  14. [Artificial heart--turbo type blood pump for long-term use].

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Teruaki

    2003-05-01

    Shortage of donor heart for transplantation necessitates long-term artificial assist heart. Turbo-pump is smaller, simpler and cheaper than the pulsatile displacement type pump, but the turbo-pump has defect of thrombus formation at the shaft seal. Our centrifugal pump with magnetically suspended impellers overcomes this defect and is ready for clinical trials now. The structures and functions are described and are compared with the other newly-developed pump of the same kinds with us. And also the pumps of centrifugal type and axial-type, of which impellers are supported by pivots, are reviewed briefly from the stand point for long-term use. Other pumps are referred too: pumps with hydrodynamic bearing and a pump with the shaft seal which is washed and cooled by saline solution.

  15. Recent Developments in Magnetically Coupled Vane Pumps for Tritium Service

    SciTech Connect

    Capuder, F. C.; Quigley, L. T.; Baker, C. K.

    1985-04-01

    Despite advances in shaft sealing, a totally reliable shaft seal for two-stage vane pumps has never been developed. Therefore, the magnetically coupled vane pump drive was developed to solve the critical problem of tritium leakage at the shaft seals of vane pumps. As a result, radioactive contamination of the work area and loss of valuable material can now be prevented.

  16. A sliding mode-based starling-like controller for implantable rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Bakouri, Mohsen A; Salamonsen, Robert F; Savkin, Andrey V; AlOmari, Abdul-Hakeem H; Lim, Einly; Lovell, Nigel H

    2014-07-01

    Clinically adequate implementation of physiological control of a rotary left ventricular assist device requires a sophisticated technique such as the recently proposed method based on the Frank-Starling mechanism. In this mechanism, the stroke volume of the heart increases in response to an increase in the volume of blood filling the left ventricle at the end of diastole. To emulate this process, changes in pump speed need to automatically regulate pump flow to ensure that the combined output of the left ventricle and pump match the output of the right ventricle across changing cardiovascular states. In this approach, we exploit the linear relationship between estimated mean pump flow (Q ̅ est) and pump flow pulsatility (PIQp) in a tracking control algorithm based on sliding mode control. The immediate response of the controller was assessed using a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and pump from which could be extracted both Q ̅ est and PIQp. Two different perturbations from the resting state in the presence of left ventricular failure were tested. The first was blood loss requiring a reduction in pump flow to match the reduced output from the right ventricle and to avoid the complication of ventricular suction. The second was exercise, requiring an increase in pump flow. The sliding mode controller induced the required changes in Qp within approximately five heart beats in the blood loss simulation and eight heart beats in the exercise simulation without clinically significant transients or steady-state errors.

  17. Numerical study of a centrifugal blood pump with different impeller profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the Kyoto-NTN magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with 16 forward-bending blades (16FB), 16 straight blades (16SB), and eight backward-bending blades (8BB) impellers were performed in this study. Commercial CFD software package FLUENT were used as the solver. The purpose of this study is to find out how the impeller blade profiles affect the inner flow and the performance of the centrifugal blood pump. The simulations were carried out with the same impeller rotating speed of 2,000 rpm and pump flow rate of 5 L/min to compare the three pump models. It was found that the 16SB impeller can produce higher pressure head than the 16FB and 8BB impellers under the same impeller rotating speed and pump flow rate. The flow particle tracing was carried out to estimate the blood damage level caused by the three different impeller profiles. It was found that the 16FB and 8BB models have caused the highest and lowest blood damage, respectively. The 16SB is recommended among the three pumps because it can generate the highest pressure head and induce mild blood damage index, although it was higher than that of the 8BB model.

  18. Design and parameter estimation of hybrid magnetic bearings for blood pump applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng; Yang, Juanjuan; Cheng, Shanbao; Low, Sze Hsien; Chua, Leok Poh; Wu, Xiaowei

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the design and parameter estimation of the dynamics characteristics of a high-speed hybrid magnetic bearings (HMBs) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet (PM) brushless and sensorless DC motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five-degree-of-freedom with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers; among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. Test results show that the rotor can be stably supported to speeds of 14,000 rpm. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMBs system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air—in both the radial and axial directions. The radial stiffness of the HMBs is compared to the Ansoft's Maxwell 2D/3D finite element magnetostatic results. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamics characteristics of the HMBs system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamics properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  19. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of

  20. Fluid dynamic design for low hemolysis in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support as a bridge to decision pump. The impeller is levitated using hydrodynamic bearings without any complicated control circuit or displacement sensor. However, the effect of the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area on the hemolytic property has not been clarified, even if the bearing gap is same size. The purpose of this study is to experimentally evaluate the effect of the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area in the bearing gaps on the hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We prepared three models for testing. These models have the same bearing gap size by adjusting the impeller levitation position. However, the outer circumferential velocity of the impeller and the bearing area in the minimum bearing gaps are different. The outer circumferential velocity of the impeller and the bearing area were assumed to be related to the maximum shear rate and the exposure time. For the evaluation, we conducted an impeller levitation performance test and an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) was reduced from 0.084 g/100 L to 0.040 g/100 L corresponding to a reduction in the outer circumferential velocity and a reduction in the bearing area, even if the minimum bearing gaps were same size. We confirmed that, even if the bearing gap was same size under the stably levitated condition, the outer circumferential velocity and the bearing area should be decreased in order to improve the hemolytic property.

  1. Power consumption of rotary blood pumps: pulsatile versus constant-speed mode.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Cotter, Chris; Bourque, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the power consumption of a HeartMate III rotary blood pump based on in vitro experiments performed in a cardiovascular simulator. To create artificial-pulse mode, we modulated the pump speed by decreasing the mean speed by 2000 rpm for 200 ms and then increasing speed by 4000 rpm (mean speeds plus 2000 rpm) for another 200 ms, creating a square waveform shape. The HeartMate III was connected to a cardiovascular simulator consisting of a hydraulic pump system to simulate left ventricle pumping action, arterial and venous compliance chambers, and an adjustable valve for peripheral resistance to facilitate the desired aortic pressure. The simulator operated based on Suga's elastance model to mimic the Starling response of the heart, thereby reproducing physiological blood flow and pressure conditions. We measured the instantaneous total electrical current and voltage of the pump to evaluate its power consumption. The aim was to answer these fundamental questions: (i) How does pump speed modulation affect pump power consumption? (ii) How does the power consumption vary in relation to external pulsatile flow? The results indicate that speed modulation and external pulsatile flow both moderately increase the power consumption. Increasing the pump speed reduces the impact of external pulsatile flow.

  2. Geometric optimization of a step bearing for a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yada, Toru; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller has been developed for mechanical circulatory assistance. However, a narrow bearing gap has the potential to cause hemolysis. The purpose of the present study is to optimize the geometric configuration of the hydrodynamic step bearing in order to reduce hemolysis by expansion of the bearing gap. First, a numerical analysis of the step bearing, based on lubrication theory, was performed to determine the optimal design. Second, in order to assess the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the hydrodynamic forces calculated in the numerical analysis were compared with those obtained in an actual measurement test using impellers having step lengths of 0%, 33%, and 67% of the vane length. Finally, a bearing gap measurement test and a hemolysis test were performed. As a result, the numerical analysis revealed that the hydrodynamic force was the largest when the step length was approximately 70%. The hydrodynamic force calculated in the numerical analysis was approximately equivalent to that obtained in the measurement test. In the measurement test and the hemolysis test, the blood pump having a step length of 67% achieved the maximum bearing gap and reduced hemolysis, as compared with the pumps having step lengths of 0% and 33%. It was confirmed that the numerical analysis of the step bearing was effective, and the developed blood pump having a step length of approximately 70% was found to be a suitable configuration for the reduction of hemolysis.

  3. Reversed intracranial blood flow in patients with an intra-aortic balloon pump.

    PubMed

    Brass, L M

    1990-03-01

    As a preliminary investigation into the cerebral effects of mechanical cardiac assist devices, using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography I examined the basal cerebral arteries in three patients placed on an intra-aortic balloon pump. Unassisted systoles had normal blood velocities and waveforms. When the pump was in use, diastolic blood velocity during balloon inflation increased. As the balloon was deflated and intra-aortic pressure was dramatically lowered, diastolic blood velocity within the intracranial vessels decreased sharply. In two patients there was a reversal of blood flow in the middle cerebral, anterior cerebral, basilar, and vertebral arteries during late diastole. Although the clinical effects of cessation and reversal of blood flow in the cerebral circulation while on an intra-aortic balloon pump remain to be determined, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography appears to be a useful tool for measuring these hemodynamic effects. It may also be helpful in quantifying the effects of such pumps on cerebral blood flow and devising inflation/deflation timing sequences that maximize forward blood flow.

  4. Fluid dynamic characterization of operating conditions for continuous flow blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Antaki, J F; Burgreen, G W; Butler, K C; Thomas, D C; Griffith, B P

    1999-01-01

    As continuous flow pumps become more prominent as long-term ventricular assist devices, the wide range of conditions under which they must be operated has become evident. Designed to operate at a single, best-efficiency, operating point, continuous flow pumps are required to perform at off-design conditions quite frequently. The present study investigated the internal fluid dynamics within two representative rotary fluid pumps to characterize the quality of the flow field over a full range of operating conditions. A Nimbus/UoP axial flow blood pump and a small centrifugal pump were used as the study models. Full field visualization of flow features in the two pumps was conducted using a laser based fluorescent particle imaging technique. Experiments were performed under steady flow conditions. Flow patterns at inlet and outlet sections were visualized over a series of operating points. Flow features specific to each pump design were observed to exist under all operating conditions. At off-design conditions, an annular region of reverse flow was commonly observed within the inlet of the axial pump, while a small annulus of backflow in the inlet duct and a strong disturbed flow at the outlet tongue were observed for the centrifugal pump. These observations were correlated to a critical nondimensional flow coefficient. The creation of a "map" of flow behavior provides an additional, important criterion for determining favorable operating speed for rotary blood pumps. Many unfavorable flow features may be avoided by maintaining the flow coefficient above a characteristic critical coefficient for a particular pump, whereas the intrinsic deleterious flow features can only be minimized by design improvement. Broadening the operating range by raising the band between the critical flow coefficient and the designed flow coefficient, is also a worthy goal for design improvement.

  5. An investigational study of minimum rotational pump speed to avoid retrograde flow in three centrifugal blood pumps in a pediatric extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joseph B; Guan, Yulong; McCoach, Robert; Kunselman, Allen R; Myers, John L; Undar, Akif

    2011-05-01

    During extracorporeal life support with centrifugal blood pumps, retrograde pump flow may occur when the pump revolutions decrease below a critical value determined by the circuit resistance and the characteristics of the pump. We created a laboratory model to evaluate the occurrence of retrograde flow in each of three centrifugal blood pumps: the Rotaflow, the CentriMag, and the Bio-Medicus BP-50. At simulated patient pressures of 60, 80, and 100 mmHg, each pump was evaluated at speeds from 1000 to 2200 rpm and flow rates were measured. Retrograde flow occurred at low revolution speeds in all three centrifugal pumps. The Bio-Medicus pump was the least likely to demonstrate retrograde flow at low speeds, followed by the Rotaflow pump. The CentriMag pump showed the earliest transition to retrograde flow, as well as the highest degree of retrograde flow. At every pump speed evaluated, the Bio-Medicus pump delivered the highest antegrade flow and the CentriMag pump delivered the least.

  6. Evaluation of performance parameters of indigenously developed roots pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqsood, M.; Usman, A.; Bodla, M. F.; Ali, J.

    2016-08-01

    Roots pumping systems are widely used in industries to generate vacuum with high pumping speed. In the present work, the performance parameters of indigenously developed Roots pumping system have been studied. The performance parameters being studied are the ultimate pressure, working temperature, compression ratio and pumping speed. Ultimate pressure of the Roots pump after continuous running of eight hours is found to be 1.1x10-3 mbar. The most important parameter of the roots pump is the zero-gas flow compression Ratio (Ko) which is found to be 18 for the pumping system under study. Efficiency of Roots pump is found to be 76% which is in good agreement as reported in the literature.

  7. Infusion pumps and red blood cell damage in transfusion therapy: an integrative revision of the academic literature 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ana Maria Miranda Martins; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to obtain information from scientific literature concerning infusion pumps used in administering erythrocyte (red blood cells) and to evaluate the implications in the practical use of this equipment by nurses when conducting transfusions. Method: an integrative revision of the following scientific databases: Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, the Virtual Library for Health, SciELO, Web of Science and Cochrane. The following descriptors were used: "infusion pumps", "blood transfusion", "transfused erythrocyte" and "hemolyis". There were no restrictions on the scope of the initial data and it was finalized in December 2014. 17 articles were identified in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: all of the publications included in the studies were experimental in vitro and covered the use of infusion pumps in transfusion therapy. A summary of the data was presented in a synoptic chart and an analysis of it generated the following categories: cellular damage and the infusion mechanism. Conclusion: infusion pumps can be harmful to erythrocytes based on the infusion mechanism that is used, as the linear peristaltic pump is more likely to cause hemolysis. Cellular damage is related to the plasmatic liberation of markers that largely dominate free hemoglobin and potassium. We reiterate the need for further research and technological investments to guide the development of protocols that promote safe practices and that can contribute to future clinical studies. PMID:27533272

  8. Development of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzyll, Lawrence R.; Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the current development status of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump for low-lift applications. The heat pump provides electronics cooling by evaporating a pure refrigerant from an absorbent/refrigerant mixture in a generator/cold plate. The current development focused on evaluation of absorbent/refrigerant pairs, corrosion testing, pump and compressor design, and electronic cold plate design. Two cycle configurations were considered. The first configuration utilized a standard mechanical compressor and pump. The second cycle configuration investigated pumps and compressors with non-moving parts. An innovative generator/cold plate design is also presented. The development to date shows that this cycle has about the same performance as standard vapor compression heat pumps with standard refrigerants but may have some performance and reliability advantages over vapor compression heat pumps.

  9. New methods for the development of pneumatic displacement pumps for cardiac assist.

    PubMed

    Knierbein, B; Rosarius, N; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1990-11-01

    The primary goal of the presented project was to develop a pump family with stroke volumes of 20, 50, 70 and 90 ml, which could be produced at low cost but with sufficient quality. The housing parts of the pump were thermoformed from technical semifinished materials. All blood contacting surfaces of the pump were coated with biomaterials in a controlled dipping process. During the design and fabrication process a professional CAD-system was used. This facilitated spatial presentations of pump components for first evaluations at the initial draft stages. The CAD-design data were then transformed to CNC-controlled lathes and mill's for the fabrication of pump tools. The stresses and strains of the moving blood pump components, such as membranes and valves, were precalculated by means of Finite-Element-Analysis (FEM). After completion of the pump, the internal flow fields were investigated by flow-visualization techniques using non-Newtonian test fluids, and the pump characteristics (function curves) were investigated in appropriate circulatory mock loops. The paper covers all above aspects from first draft to final fabrication and testing.

  10. Real-Time Observation of Thrombus Growth Process in an Impeller of a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump by Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the thrombus formation in cardiovascular devices such as rotary blood pumps is the most important issue in developing more hemocompatible devices. The objective of this study was to develop a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) method to visualize the thrombus growth process within a rotary blood pump and investigate the optical properties of the thrombus. An in vitro thrombogenic test was conducted using fresh porcine blood and a specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a transparent bottom. The pump rotating at 3000 rpm circulated the blood at 1.0 L/min. The bottom surface of the pump was illuminated with white light pulsed at the same frequency as the pump rotation, and the backward-scattered light was imaged using the HSI system. Using stroboscopic HSI and an image construction algorithm, dynamic spectral imaging at wavelengths ranging from 608 to 752 nm within the rotating pump was achieved. After completing the experiment, we collected the red thrombus formed in the pump impeller and quantified the thrombus hemoglobin concentration (Hbthrombus ). The spectrum changed around the center of the impeller, and the area of change expanded toward the impeller flow path. The shape corresponded approximately to the shape of the thrombus. The spectrum change indicated that the light scattering derived from red blood cells decreased. The Hbthrombus was 4.7 ± 1.3 g/dL versus a total hemoglobin of 13 ± 0.87 g/dL. The study revealed that Hbthrombus was reduced by the surrounding blood flow.

  11. Custom Unit Pump Development for the EVA PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, Michael; Kurwitz, Cable; Little, Frank; Oinuma, Ryoji; Larsen, Ben; Goldman, Jeff; Reinis, Filip; Trevino, Luis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effort by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) and Honeywell for NASA to design and test a pre-flight prototype pump for use in the Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) portable life support subsystem (PLSS). Major design decisions were driven by the need to reduce the pump s mass, power, and volume compared to the existing PLSS pump. In addition, the pump must accommodate a much wider range of abnormal conditions than the existing pump, including vapor/gas bubbles and increased pressure drop when employed to cool two suits simultaneously. A positive displacement, external gear type pump was selected because it offers the most compact and highest efficiency solution over the required range of flow rates and pressure drops. An additional benefit of selecting a gear pump design is that it is self priming and capable of ingesting non-condensable gas without becoming air locked. The chosen pump design consists of a 28 V DC, brushless, seal-less, permanent magnet motor driven, external gear pump that utilizes a Honeywell development that eliminates the need for magnetic coupling. The pump design was based on existing Honeywell designs, but incorporated features specifically for the PLSS application, including all of the key features of the flight pump. Testing at TEES verified that the pump meets the design requirements for range of flow rates, pressure drop, power consumption, working fluid temperature, operating time, gas ingestion, and restart capability under both ambient and vacuum conditions. The pump operated at 40 to 240 lbm/hr flow rate, 35 to 100 oF pump temperature, and 5 to 10 psid pressure rise. Power consumption of the pump controller at the nominal operating point in both ambient and vacuum conditions was 9.5 W, which was less than the 12 W predicted. Gas ingestion capabilities were tested by injecting 100 cc of air into the fluid line; the pump operated normally throughout this test.

  12. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump.

  13. Pediatric ECMO outcomes: comparison of centrifugal versus roller blood pumps using propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Cindy S; Jaggers, James J; Cook, E Francis; Graham, Dionne A; Yarlagadda, Vasmi V; Teele, Sarah A; Almond, Christopher S; Bratton, Susan L; Seeger, John D; Dalton, Heidi J; Rycus, Peter T; Laussen, Peter C; Thiagarajan, Ravi R

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal blood pumps are being increasingly utilized in children supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our aim was to determine if survival and ECMO-related morbidities in children supported with venoarterial (VA) ECMO differed by blood pump type.Children aged less than 18 years who underwent VA ECMO support from 2007 to 2009 and reported to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry were propensity score matched (Greedy 1:1 matching) using pre-ECMO characteristics.A total of 2,656 (centrifugal = 2,231, roller = 425) patients were identified and 548 patients (274 per pump type) were included in the propensity score-matched cohort. Children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of hemolysis (odds ratio [OR], 4.03 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.37-6.87), hyperbilirubinemia (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 2.62-11.49), need for inotropic support during ECMO (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.09-2.17), metabolic alkalosis (blood pH > 7.6) during ECMO (OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.49-6.54), and acute renal failure (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.10-2.39). Survival to hospital discharge did not differ by pump type.In a propensity score-matched cohort of pediatric ECMO patients, children supported with centrifugal pumps had increased odds of ECMO-related complications. There was no difference in survival between groups.

  14. Hemolytic performance of a MagLev disposable rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo): effects of MagLev gap clearance and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Hijikata, Wataru; Hara, Chikara; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical shaft seal bearing incorporated in the centrifugal blood pumps contributes to hemolysis and thrombus formation. In addition, the problem of durability and corrosion of mechanical shaft seal bearing has been recently reported from the safety point of view. To amend the shortcomings of the blood-immersed mechanical bearings, a magnetic levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo Model 1; Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan) has been developed for extracorporeal disposable application. In this study, the hemolytic performance of the MedTech Dispo Model 1 centrifugal blood pump system was evaluated, with special focus on the narrow blood path clearance at the magnetic bearing between rotor and stator, and on the pump housing surface roughness. A pump flow of 5 L/min against the head pressure of 100 mm Hg for 4 h was included in the hemolytic test conditions. Anticoagulated fresh porcine blood was used as a working fluid. The clearance of blood path at the magnetic bearing was in the range of 100-250 micro m. Pump housing surface roughness was controlled to be around Ra = 0.1-1.5 micro m. The lowest hemolytic results were obtained at the clearance of 250 micro m and with the polished surface (Ra = 0.1 micro m) yielding the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of less than 0.001 g/100 L, which was 1/5 of the Biopump BP-80 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA, and 1/4 of the BPX-80. In spite of rough surface and narrow blood path, NIH levels were less than clinically acceptable level of 0.005 g/100 L. The noncontact, levitated impeller system is useful to improve pump performance in blood environment.

  15. Application of indirect flow rate measurement using motor driving signals to a centrifugal blood pump with an integrated motor.

    PubMed

    Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishinaka, T; Oshikawa, M; Ohnishi, H; Tatsumi, E; Takano, H; Konishi, Y; Ito, K; Shimada, M

    2001-09-01

    The method of measuring the flow rate of a centrifugal blood pump from the input electric power, which will be indispensable for the long-term use of such devices, was developed and was applied to the direct-driven centrifugal blood pump that has been developed by our research group. The accuracy was evaluated in a chronic animal experiment using an adult goat. The results demonstrated that this method carries the sufficient potential of the instantaneous monitoring method, but errors due to electromagnetic and mechanical losses were not determined always precisely. The detection of adverse phenomena such as the obstruction of the inlet cannula was also possible from the estimated value of the flow rate and its waveform pattern.

  16. Numerical study of a bio-centrifugal blood pump with straight impeller blade profiles.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoliang; Chua, Leok Poh; Lim, Tau Meng

    2010-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations of the flow in the Kyoto-NTN (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a 16-straight-bladed impeller were performed in the present study. The flow in the pump was assumed as unsteady and turbulent, and blood was treated as a Newtonian fluid. At the impeller rotating speed of 2000 rpm and flow rate of 5 L/min, the pump produces a pressure head of 113.5 mm Hg according to the simulation. It was found that the double volute of the pump has caused symmetrical pressure distribution in the volute passages and subsequently caused symmetrical flow patterns in the blade channels. Due to the tangentially increasing pressure in the volute passages, the flow through the blade channels initially increases at the low-pressure region and then decreases due to the increased pressure. The reverse flow and vortices have been identified in the impeller blade channels. The high shear stress of the flow in the pump mainly occurred at the inlet and outlet of the blade channels, the beginning of the volute passages and the regions around the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate. Higher shear stress is obtained when the tips of the cutwater and splitter plate are located at the impeller blade trailing edges than when they are located at the middle of the impeller blade channel. It was found that the blood damage index assessed based on the blood corpuscle path tracing of the present pump was about 0.94%, which has the same order of magnitude as those of the clinical centrifugal pumps reported in the literature.

  17. Feasibility of Pump Speed Modulation for Restoring Vascular Pulsatility with Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) diminish vascular pressure pulsatility, which may be associated with clinically reported adverse events including gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic valve insufficiency, and hemorrhagic stroke. Three candidate CF LVAD pump speed modulation algorithms designed to augment aortic pulsatility were evaluated in mock flow loop and ischemic heart failure (IHF) bovine models by quantifying hemodynamic performance as a function of mean pump speed, modulation amplitude, and timing. Asynchronous and synchronous copulsation (high revolutions per minute [RPM] during systole, low RPM during diastole) and counterpulsation (low RPM during systole, high RPM during diastole) algorithms were tested for defined modulation amplitudes (±300, ±500, ±800, and ±1,100 RPM) and frequencies (18.75, 37.5, and 60 cycles/minute) at low (2,900 RPM) and high (3,200 RPM) mean LVAD speeds. In the mock flow loop model, asynchronous, synchronous copulsation, and synchronous counterpulsation algorithms each increased pulse pressure (ΔP = 931%, 210%, and 98% and reduced left ventricular external work (LVEW = 20%, 22%, 16%). Similar improvements in vascular pulsatility (1,142%) and LVEW (40%) were observed in the IHF bovine model. Asynchronous modulation produces the largest vascular pulsatility with the advantage of not requiring sensor(s) for timing pump speed modulation, facilitating potential clinical implementation. PMID:26102173

  18. Development of an intravascular pumping oxygenator using a new silicone membrane.

    PubMed

    Sueda, T; Fukunaga, S; Morita, S; Sueshiro, M; Hirai, S; Okada, K; Orihashi, K; Matsuura, Y

    1997-01-01

    A new intravascular pumping oxygenator (IVPO) was developed for intravascular gas exchange and circulatory assistance in critically ill patients with respiratory and circulatory failure. The IVPO utilizes new silicone hollow fibers (diameter, 1 mm; membrane width, 50 microns) and consists of two driving tubes for the oxygenation and pumping of circulating blood. The performance characteristics of the IVPO were studied using an experiment ex vivo model. With a mean hemoglobin concentration of 10.5 +/- 2.3 g/dl, total oxygen transfer was 5.6 +/- 1.5 ml/min at a blood flow of 200 ml/min and 6.3 +/- 2.2 ml/min at a blood flow of 250 ml/min. Total CO2 transfer was 3.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min at a blood flow of 200 ml/min and 4.2 +/- 1.6 ml/min at a blood flow of 250 ml/min. Blood flow increased to a maximum of 250 ml/min during IVPO pumping. This preliminary experiment demonstrated that the IVPO has the capacity to function both as circulatory assist pump and as an intravascular hollow fiber oxygenator.

  19. The activation of the sodium pump in pig red blood cells by internal and external cations.

    PubMed

    Brand, S C; Whittam, R

    1985-05-30

    A study has been made with pig red blood cells of the activation of the sodium pump by internal and external cations. Cell Na and K concentrations were altered using a PCMBS cation loading procedure. The procedure was characterised for resultant ionic conditions, maintenance of ATP levels and fragility. The activation of the sodium pump by external K was measured in cells suspended in choline (Na-free) solutions. External Cs was used as a substitute for K and elicited lower rates of pump activity. Both the Vmax and apparent Km for 42K influx and 134Cs influx increased as internal Na concentration was raised (within the non-saturating range). Vmax/apparent Km ratios for cation influx were constant. Raising external Cs concentration exerted a similar influence on pump activation by internal Na: both the maximum pump velocity and the apparent Na-site dissociation constant (K'Na) increased. The results provide evidence for a transmembrane connection between cation binding sites on opposite faces of the membrane and are consistent with a consecutive model for the sodium pump in pig red blood cells. PMID:2581622

  20. A fluid dynamic analysis of a rotary blood pump for design improvement.

    PubMed

    Treichler, J; Rosenow, S E; Damm, G; Naito, K; Ohara, Y; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y

    1993-09-01

    The proper design of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) requires an understanding of the pump's fluid dynamic and biocompatible properties. A hydraulically efficient system minimizes the power required for pumping. Biocompatibility refers to the ability to pump blood with minimal hemolysis and thrombus formation. Typically, shear stresses below a threshold level will not damage blood significantly. A fluid dynamic analysis of a prototype centrifugal pump designed for use as an LVAD was performed to establish flow characteristics. A flow visualization technique using Amberlite particles suspended in a glycerin/water blood analogue was used. The system was illuminated with a 1 mm planar beam strobed helium-neon laser, and the results were recorded photographically. An analysis of photographs revealed laminar and turbulent flows with vortices within an illuminated plane in both the inlet and outlet port areas. From these data, velocity and shear stress profiles were generated that showed possible areas of improvement. It was concluded that the outlet port design could be improved by changing its angle and the continuity of its expansion. The inlet port could also be improved by smoothing the transition area between the inlet tube and the pump body to allow for gradual acceleration of the entering fluid. PMID:8240074

  1. Analysis of a new PM motor design for a rotary dynamic blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Wang, F; Fu, M; Medvedev, A; Smith, W A; Golding, L A

    1997-01-01

    The permanent magnet (PM) motor for a rotary dynamic blood pump requires high power density to coordinate the motor size with the limited pump space and high efficiency to reduce the size and weight of the associated batteries. The motor also serves as a passive axial magnetic thrust bearing, a reacting hydraulic force, and provides a stabilizing force for the radial journal bearing. This article presents analysis of a new PM motor for the blood pump application. High power density is achieved by using the Halbach magnetic array, and high efficiency is accomplished by optimizing the rotor magnet assembly and the stator slots/windings. While both radial and axial forces are greatly enhanced, pulsating components of the torque and force are also significantly reduced. PMID:9360106

  2. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  3. Heat Pump Clothes Dryer Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer (HPCD) is an innovative appliance that uses a vapor compression system to dry clothes. Air circulates in a closed loop through the drum, so no vent is required. The condenser heats air to evaporate moisture out of the clothes, and the evaporator condenses water out of the air stream. As a result, the HPCD can achieve 50% energy savings compared to a conventional electric resistance dryer. We developed a physics-based, quasi-steady-state HPCD system model with detailed heat exchanger and compressor models. In a novel approach, we applied a heat and mass transfer effectiveness model to simulate the drying process of the clothes load in the drum. The system model is able to simulate the inherently transient HPCD drying process, to size components, and to reveal trends in key variables (e.g. compressor discharge temperature, power consumption, required drying time, etc.) The system model was calibrated using experimental data on a prototype HPCD. In the paper, the modeling method is introduced, and the model predictions are compared with experimental data measured on a prototype HPCD.

  4. Development of a numerical pump testing framework.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Tim A S; Gregory, Shaun D; Büsen, Martin R; Tansley, Geoff D; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    It has been shown that left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) increase the survival rate in end-stage heart failure patients. However, there is an ongoing demand for an increased quality of life, fewer adverse events, and more physiological devices. These challenges necessitate new approaches during the design process. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), lumped parameter (LP) modeling, mock circulatory loops (MCLs), and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are combined to develop a numerical Pump Testing Framework (nPTF) capable of analyzing local flow patterns and the systemic response of LVADs. The nPTF was created by connecting a CFD model of the aortic arch, including an LVAD outflow graft to an LP model of the circulatory system. Based on the same geometry, a three-dimensional silicone model was crafted using rapid prototyping and connected to an MCL. PIV studies of this setup were performed to validate the local flow fields (PIV) and the systemic response (MCL) of the nPTF. After validation, different outflow graft positions were compared using the nPTF. Both the numerical and the experimental setup were able to generate physiological responses by adjusting resistances and systemic compliance, with mean aortic pressures of 72.2-132.6 mm Hg for rotational speeds of 2200-3050 rpm. During LVAD support, an average flow to the distal branches (cerebral and subclavian) of 24% was found in the experiments and the nPTF. The flow fields from PIV and CFD were in good agreement. Numerical and experimental tools were combined to develop and validate the nPTF, which can be used to analyze local flow fields and the systemic response of LVADs during the design process. This allows analysis of physiological control parameters at early development stages and may, therefore, help to improve patient outcomes.

  5. Development and evaluation of oral osmotic pump of butorphanol tartrate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik; Raichandani, Yogesh; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2014-11-01

    Butorphanol is potent analgesic useful in pain management. However, because of high first-pass metabolism butorphanol is not available in market as oral dosage form. Drugs that undergo extensive first-pass metabolism can be delivered orally if protected in the stomach, and proximal small intestine. An oral controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) was designed to deliver butorphanol tartrate that can maintain therapeutic blood concentration up to 24 h. The target release profile for extended release formulation was calculated by Wagner Nelson de-convolution using published immediate release blood concentration data for oral route. Composition of the core and coating were optimized using USFDA approved ingredients by evaluation of the drug release. Drug release from the developed system was inversely proportional to the weight gain and directly related to the level of pore former. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the formation of pores in the coating membrane on contact with water which lead to drug to release. Kinetic models were applied to drug release data to establish the drug release mechanism. The developed osmotic system effectively delivers selected drug at a predetermined rate for extended period. PMID:24079361

  6. Development of an atraumatic small centrifugal pump for second-generation cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Jikuya, T; Sasaki, T; Aizawa, T; Shiono, M; Glueck, J A; Smith, C P; Feldman, L; Sakuma, I; Sekela, M E; Noda, T

    1992-12-01

    A small and light direct-drive centrifugal pump has been developed for cardiopulmonary bypass. In the development process, blood compatibility studies including a hemolysis study, an in vitro fluid dynamic performance study, and in vivo durability and feasibility studies were performed. The centrifugal pump with a 50 mm diameter impeller resulted in almost the same index of hemolysis value as did a Bio-Medicus centrifugal pump. Heat dissipation from the motor was prevented by using a flexible drive cable. Forty-eight-hour sealing durability around the driving axis was accomplished by using a fluoro-rubber V-ring that connected to the hard chrome-plated stainless steel. In vitro and in vivo performances of the pump were satisfactory. Thrombus formation behind the impeller was prevented by using a holed impeller that generated blood flow from the back to the surface of the impeller. Elimination of air during priming procedures was also easier with this modification. This centrifugal pump has one-quarter of the priming volume, size, and weight of magnetically coupled centrifugal pump systems.

  7. Onset of Buccal Pumping in Catshark Embryos: How Breathing Develops in the Egg Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Taketeru; Nakamura, Masaru; Sato, Keiichi; Takaoka, Hiroko; Toda, Minoru; Kawauchi, Junro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Respiration in fishes involves buccal pumping, which is characterized by the generation of nearly continuous water flow over the gills because of the rhythmic expansion/compression of the pharyngeal cavity. This mechanism is achieved by the functions of the vascular, skeletal, and muscular systems. However, the process by which the embryo establishes the mechanism remains a mystery. Morphological and kinematical observations on captive cloudy catsharks, Scyliorhinus torazame, have suggested that the embryo starts buccal pumping just before the respiratory slits open on the egg capsule. During the pre-opening period, the embryo acquires oxygen mainly via the external gill filaments. After slit opening, respiration of the embryo involves buccal pumping to pass water over the “internal gills.” The onset of buccal pumping accompanies four morphological changes: (1) regression of the external gill filaments, (2) development of blood vessels within the “internal gills,” (3) completion of the development of hyoid skeletal and muscular elements, and (4) development of the oral valve. A previous study showed that buccal pumping allows the embryo to actively regulate oxygen intake by changing the pumping frequency. Thus, establishment of buccal pumping in the egg capsule is probably important for embryo survival in the unstable oxygen environment of the egg capsule after slit opening. PMID:25329313

  8. Initial in vivo evaluation of the newly developed axial flow turbo pump with hydrodynamic bearings.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideyuki; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Mizuno, Toshihide; Hidaka, Tatsuya; Okubo, Takeshi; Osada, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Shinji; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    An implantable, compact rotary blood pump has been newly developed using an axial flow turbo pump with hydrodynamic bearings. The rotating impeller, which is hydrodynamically levitated with the assistance of repulsive magnetic force, has no contact with the inner surface of the pump. To evaluate the hemodynamic performance and biocompatibility, the pump was installed into four calves for up to 90 days. The pump was installed in the left heart bypass fashion, and placed paracorporeally in the first two calves and in the thoracic cavity in the other two calves. All calves received anticoagulation and antiaggregation therapy during the study. Aortic pressure, heart rate and pump-operating parameters were continuously measured. Hematologic and biochemical tests to evaluate anemia, hepato-renal function and the extent of hemolysis were performed on schedule. Each calf was killed at the termination of the experiments, and pathological analysis for the biocompatibility of the pump system was performed, including the thrombi in the device, emboli in the systemic organs and signs of infection. The pump stably produced a flow of 5 l/min. Each calf was supported for 78, 50, 90 and 90 days, respectively, with no incidence of hemorrhage, organ failure or significant hemolysis. No thrombus formation or mechanical wearing was observed inside the pump. There was no evidence of heat injury around the pump. Device-related infections were observed, but the severity of infection was mild in the implant case compared to the paracorporeal case. The pump demonstrated acceptable hemodynamic performance and biocompatibility in the initial in vivo testing.

  9. Modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Snyder, Alan J.

    2003-07-01

    The electromechanical behavior of dielectric elastomers is to be exploited for medical application in artificial blood pumps. It is required that the pump diaphragm achieves a swept volume increase of 70 cc into a systolic pressure of 120 mmHg with the main design objective being volumetric efficiency. As such, a model that accommodates large deformation behavior is used. In order to design prosthetic blood pumps that closely mimic the natural pumping chambers of the heart, a dielectric elastomer diaphragm design is proposed. The elastomer's change in shape in response to the applied electric field will permit it to be the active element of the pump just as the ventricular walls are in the natural heart. A comprehensive analytical model that accounts for the combined elastic and dielectric behavior of the membrane is used to compute the stresses and deformations of the inflated membrane. Dielectric elastomers are often pre-strained in order to obtain optimal electromechanical performance. The resulting model incorporates pre-strain and shows how system parameters such as pre-strain, pressure, electric field, and edge constraints affect membrane deformation. The model predicts more than adequate volume displacement for moderate pre-strain of the elastomer.

  10. Development of the sonic pump levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The process and mechanism involved in producing glass microballoons (GMBs) of acceptable quality for laser triggered inertial fusion through use of glass jet levitation and manipulation are considered. The gas jet levitation device, called sonic pumps, provides positioning by timely and appropriate application of gas mementum from one or more of six sonic pumps which are arranged orthogonally in opposed pairs about the levitation region and are activated by an electrooptical, computer controlled, feedback system. The levitation device was fabricated and its associated control systems were assembled into a package and tested in reduced gravity flight regime of the NASA KC-135 aircraft.

  11. FIELD TRIALS OF NEWLY DEVELOPED POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Beard; Leland Traylor

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this grant was to evaluate under real world conditions the performance of a new type of downhole pump, the hydraulically driven submersible diaphragm pump. This pump is supplied by Pumping Solutions Incorporated, Albuquerque NM. The original scope of the project was to install 10 submersible pumps, and compare that to 10 similar installations of rod pumps. As an operator, the system as tested was not ready for prime time. The PSI group did improve the product and offered excellent service. The latest design appears to be much better, but more test data is needed to show short run life is not a problem. This product should continue to be developed; the testing did not uncover any fundamental problems that would preclude it's widespread use. On the positive side, the pump was easy to run, was more power efficient then a rod pump, and is the only submersible that could handle the large quantities of solids typical of CBM production. The product shows much promise for the future, and with continued design and testing, this type of submersible pump has the potential to become the standard of the industry.

  12. New mechanism to reduce the size of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump: direct drive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Kijima, T; Maekawa, J

    1997-07-01

    Size reduction of the monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been achieved by reducing the size of the magnetic suspension and employing a direct drive mechanism in place of a brushless DC motor and a magnetic coupling. The flow has also been improved using a closed hollow impeller to remove flow obstruction at the inlet and using radial straight vanes to reduce the impeller speed by 30%. Hemolysis testing was conducted for the new models. Results showed that model DD1 presented only a slightly higher level of hemolysis than a regular extracorporeal centrifugal pump. PMID:9212927

  13. Development of blood extraction system designed by female mosquito's blood sampling mechanism for bio-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2005-02-01

    A compact and wearable wristwatch type Bio-MEMS such as a health monitoring system (HMS) to detect blood sugar level for diabetic patient, was newly developed. The HMS consists of (1) a indentation unit with a microneedle to generate the skin penetration force using a shape memory alloy(SMA) actuator, (2) a pumping unit using a bimorph PZT piezoelectric actuator to extract the blood and (3) a gold (Au) electrode as a biosensor immobilized GOx and attached to the gate electrode of MOSFET to detect the amount of Glucose in extracted blood. GOx was immobilized on a self assembled spacer combined with an Au electrode by the cross-link method using BSA as an additional bonding material. The device can extract blood in a few microliter through a painless microneedle with the negative pressure by deflection of the bimorph PZT piezoelectric actuator produced in the blood chamber, by the similar way the female mosquito extracts human blood with muscle motion to flex or relax. The performances of the liquid sampling ability of the pumping unit through a microneedle (3.8mm length, 100μm internal diameter) using the bimorph PZT piezoelectric microactuator were measured. The blood extraction micro device could extract human blood at the speed of 2μl/min, and it is enough volume to measure a glucose level, compared to the amount of commercial based glucose level monitor. The electrode embedded in the blood extraction device chamber could detect electrons generated by the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide produced by the reaction between GOx and glucose in a few microliter extracted blood, using the constant electric current measurement system of the MOSFET type hybrid biosensor. The output voltage for the glucose diluted in the chamber was increased lineally with increase of the glucose concentration.

  14. Generic Safety Requirements for Developing Safe Insulin Pump Software

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Ray, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors previously introduced a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model that identified common features and hazards shared by most insulin pumps on the market. The aim of this article is to extend our previous work on the GIIP model by articulating safety requirements that address the identified GIIP hazards. These safety requirements can be validated by manufacturers, and may ultimately serve as a safety reference for insulin pump software. Together, these two publications can serve as a basis for discussing insulin pump safety in the diabetes community. Methods In our previous work, we established a generic insulin pump architecture that abstracts functions common to many insulin pumps currently on the market and near-future pump designs. We then carried out a preliminary hazard analysis based on this architecture that included consultations with many domain experts. Further consultation with domain experts resulted in the safety requirements used in the modeling work presented in this article. Results Generic safety requirements for the GIIP model are presented, as appropriate, in parameterized format to accommodate clinical practices or specific insulin pump criteria important to safe device performance. Conclusions We believe that there is considerable value in having the diabetes, academic, and manufacturing communities consider and discuss these generic safety requirements. We hope that the communities will extend and revise them, make them more representative and comprehensive, experiment with them, and use them as a means for assessing the safety of insulin pump software designs. One potential use of these requirements is to integrate them into model-based engineering (MBE) software development methods. We believe, based on our experiences, that implementing safety requirements using MBE methods holds promise in reducing design/implementation flaws in insulin pump development and evolutionary processes, therefore improving

  15. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  16. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high. PMID:27022734

  17. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: effects of seal structure on long-term performance in liquid.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Amari, Shuichi; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya

    2011-03-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and hence has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We developed an MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism, and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Three types of MF seals were used. Seal A was a conventional seal without a shield. Seal B had the same structure as that of Seal A, but the seal was installed at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal C was a seal with a shield and the MF was set at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal A failed after 6 and 11 days. Seal B showed better results (20 and 73 days). Seal C showed long-term durability (217 and 275 days). The reason for different results in different seal structures was considered to be different flow conditions near the magnetic fluid. Fluid dynamics near the MF in the pump were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. We have developed an MF seal with a shield that works in liquid for >275 days. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  18. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm. PMID:23442235

  19. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (<4.0 mg/dl). We confirmed that the hemolytic property of the pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm.

  20. Sodium pump alpha2 subunits control myogenic tone and blood pressure in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Lee, Moo Yeol; Cavalli, Maurizio; Chen, Ling; Berra-Romani, Roberto; Balke, C William; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Patrizia; Hamlyn, John M; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Lingrel, Jerry B; Matteson, Donald R; Wier, W Gil; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2005-11-15

    A key question in hypertension is: How is long-term blood pressure controlled? A clue is that chronic salt retention elevates an endogenous ouabain-like compound (EOLC) and induces salt-dependent hypertension mediated by Na(+)/Ca(2)(+) exchange (NCX). The precise mechanism, however, is unresolved. Here we study blood pressure and isolated small arteries of mice with reduced expression of Na(+) pump alpha1 (alpha1(+/-)) or alpha2 (alpha2(+/-)) catalytic subunits. Both low-dose ouabain (1-100 nm; inhibits only alpha2) and high-dose ouabain (> or =1 microm; inhibits alpha1) elevate myocyte Ca(2)(+) and constrict arteries from alpha1(+/-), as well as alpha2(+/-) and wild-type mice. Nevertheless, only mice with reduced alpha2 Na(+) pump activity (alpha2(+/-)), and not alpha1 (alpha1(+/-)), have elevated blood pressure. Also, isolated, pressurized arteries from alpha2(+/-), but not alpha1(+/-), have increased myogenic tone. Ouabain antagonists (PST 2238 and canrenone) and NCX blockers (SEA0400 and KB-R7943) normalize myogenic tone in ouabain-treated arteries. Only the NCX blockers normalize the elevated myogenic tone in alpha2(+/-) arteries because this tone is ouabain independent. All four agents are known to lower blood pressure in salt-dependent and ouabain-induced hypertension. Thus, chronically reduced alpha2 activity (alpha2(+/-) or chronic ouabain) apparently regulates myogenic tone and long-term blood pressure whereas reduced alpha1 activity (alpha1(+/-)) plays no persistent role: the in vivo changes in blood pressure reflect the in vitro changes in myogenic tone. Accordingly, in salt-dependent hypertension, EOLC probably increases vascular resistance and blood pressure by reducing alpha2 Na(+) pump activity and promoting Ca(2)(+) entry via NCX in myocytes. PMID:16166162

  1. Effect of intra-aortic balloon pump on coronary blood flow during different balloon cycles support: A computer study.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Htet, Zwe Lin; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in clinical treatment as a mechanical circulatory support device for patients with heart failure. A computer model is used to study the effect on coronary blood flow (CBF) with different balloon cycles under both normal and pathological conditions. The model of cardiovascular and IABP is developed by using MATLAB SIMULINK. The effect on coronary blood flow has been studied under both normal and pathological conditions using different balloon cycles (balloon off; 1:4; 1:2; 1:1). A pathological heart is implemented by reducing the left ventricular contractility. The result of this study shows that the rate of balloon cycles is related to the level of coronary blood flow.

  2. Effect of intra-aortic balloon pump on coronary blood flow during different balloon cycles support: A computer study.

    PubMed

    Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Htet, Zwe Lin; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in clinical treatment as a mechanical circulatory support device for patients with heart failure. A computer model is used to study the effect on coronary blood flow (CBF) with different balloon cycles under both normal and pathological conditions. The model of cardiovascular and IABP is developed by using MATLAB SIMULINK. The effect on coronary blood flow has been studied under both normal and pathological conditions using different balloon cycles (balloon off; 1:4; 1:2; 1:1). A pathological heart is implemented by reducing the left ventricular contractility. The result of this study shows that the rate of balloon cycles is related to the level of coronary blood flow. PMID:26736998

  3. Solar-pumped gas laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The direct conversion of solar radiation into an inverted population for extraction in an optical cavity holds promise as a relatively simple system design. Broad-band photoabsorption in the visible or near-UV range is required to excite large volumes of gas and to ensure good solar absorption efficiency. The state excited must be a metastable state which is not quenched by the parent gas. The emission bandwidth must be less than approximately 10 A. The system should show chemical reversibility and an insensitivity to increasing temperature. Other properties such as good quantum efficiency and kinetic efficiency are also implied. A search of electronic-vibrational transitions in diatomic molecules satisfying these conditions is now in progress. A photodissociation-pumped atomic iodine laser is now being tested under solar pumping conditions. Photodissociation studies for thallium spin-flip metastable formation will begin in the near future.

  4. Mathematical model development and simulation of heat pump fruit dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Achariyaviriya, S.; Soponronnarit, S.; Terdyothin, A.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of a heat pump fruit dryer was developed to study the performance of heat pump dryers. Using the moisture content of papaya glace drying, the refrigerant temperature at the evaporator and condenser and the performance, was verified. It was found that the simulated results using closed loop heat pump dryer were close to the experimental results. The criteria for evaluating the performance were specific moisture extraction rate and drying rate. The results showed that ambient conditions affected significantly on the performance of the open loop dryer and the partially closed loop dryer. Also, the fraction of evaporator bypass air affected markedly the performance of all heat pump dryers. In addition, it was found that specific air flow rate and drying air temperature affected significantly the performance of all heat pump dryers.

  5. Design and development of absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. E.

    1986-12-01

    The aim of the research was to demonstrate an absorption heat pump capable of accepting heat from ambient air at building design temperatures, typically -1 C, and elevating it typically to 70 C to supply hydronic central heating systems. An absorbent consisting of a mixture of sodium and potassium hydroxide has been investigated with water as the working fluid and it has been demonstrated that it will accept heat at -5 C and deliver heat 68 degrees higher. If the condenser of the heat pump was operated at temperatures of around 80 C then the heat pump system would meet the above requirement. Liquid water, containing an anti-freeze component has successfully been evaporated at -5 C, and heat transfer coefficients for evaporation at these, and lower temperatures, have been measured. Both film flash evaporation have been investigated in a quantitative manner. The important matter of constructional materials has been investigated through literature review and consultation and no insuperable problems have been identified.

  6. Optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yasui, Kazuya; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal pump as a bridge-to-decision device. The purpose of the present study is to determine the optimal bearing gap of a multiarc radial bearing in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis. We prepared eight pump models having bearing gaps of 20, 30, 40, 80, 90, 100, 180, and 250 μm. The driving conditions were set to a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4 L/min. First, the orbital radius of the impeller was measured for the evaluation of the impeller stability. Second, the hemolytic property was evaluated in an in vitro hemolysis test. As a result, the orbital radius was not greater than 15 μm when the bearing gap was between 20 and 100 μm. The relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios in comparison with BPX-80 were 37.67 (gap: 20 μm), 0.95 (gap: 30 μm), 0.96 (gap: 40 μm), 0.82 (gap: 80 μm), 0.77 (gap: 90 μm), 0.92 (gap: 100 μm), 2.76 (gap: 180 μm), and 2.78 (gap: 250 μm). The hemolysis tended to increase at bearing gaps of greater than 100 μm due to impeller instability. When the bearing gap decreased from 30 to 20 μm, the relative NIH ratios increased significantly from 0.95 to 37.67 times (P < 0.01) due to high shear stress. We confirmed that the optimal bearing gap was determined between 30 and 100 μm in the developed blood pump for the reduction of hemolysis.

  7. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear.

  8. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. PMID:17343698

  9. Improvement of hemocompatibility in centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and semi-open impeller: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yada, Toru; Saito, Sakae; Hirai, Shusaku; Yamane, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a noncontact-type centrifugal blood pump with hydrodynamic bearings and a semi-open impeller for mechanical circulatory assist. The impeller is levitated by an original spiral-groove thrust bearing and a herringbone-groove journal bearing, without any additional displacement-sensing module or additional complex control circuits. The pump was improved by optimizing the groove direction of the spiral-groove thrust bearing and the pull-up magnetic force between the rotor magnet and the stator coil against the impeller. To evaluate hemocompatibility, we conducted a levitation performance test and in vitro hemocompatibility tests by means of a mock-up circulation loop. In the hemolysis test, the normalized index of hemolysis was reduced from 0.721 to 0.0335 g/100 L corresponding to an expansion of the bearing gap from 1.1 to 56.1 microm. In the in vitro antithrombogenic test, blood pumps with a wide thrust bearing gap were effective in preventing thrombus formation. Through in vitro evaluation tests, we confirmed that hemocompatibility was improved by balancing the hydrodynamic fluid dynamics and magnetic forces. PMID:19681836

  10. Well development by jetting using coiled tubing and simultaneous pumping.

    PubMed

    Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Bjelm, Leif

    2009-01-01

    During flow testing of a deep, 1927-m, gravel packed screen completed well, it became apparent that well development was needed to increase productivity. A hydrojetting system using coiled tubing in combination with simultaneous pumping was developed and tested and found to be successful. To verify whether the jetting improved the well, the results of a pumping test conducted before and after the jetting operation are compared. In addition, flowmeter logging and hydraulic properties obtained from pumping tests conducted during the jetting operation were also used to verify the improvements. Hydrojetting in combination with simultaneous pumping proved to be an effective cleaning method. After 100 min of pumping, around 110 m less drawdown and 15 L/s higher average flow rate were obtained compared to the values before the jetting operation. The skin factor was positive before the jetting operation and negative thereafter, thus providing additional evidence of improvements of the well. The flowmeter data also confirmed the improvements and were valuable in optimizing the jetting operation. It was also found, from the short-term pumping tests conducted during the jetting operation, that the Hantush-Jacob method for leaky confined aquifers is a valuable indicator of the well development. The combination of methods used for the well development in this case can easily be applied on other deep well projects to obtain a controlled and time-efficient well development. PMID:19473264

  11. Design analysis and performance assessment of hybrid magnetic bearings for a rotary centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhaohui; Jahanmir, Said; Heshmat, Hooshang; Hunsberger, Andrew Z; Walton, James F

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid magnetic bearing system was designed for a rotary centrifugal blood pump being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for heart failure patients. This design consists of two compact bearings to suspend the rotor in five degrees-of-freedom with single axis active control. Permanent magnets are used to provide passive radial support and electromagnets to maintain axial stability of the rotor. Characteristics of the passive radial and active thrust magnetic bearing system were evaluated by the electromagnetic finite element analysis. A proportional-integral-derivative controller with force balance algorithm was implemented for closed loop control of the magnetic thrust bearing. The control position is continuously adjusted based on the electrical energy in the bearing coils, and thus passive magnetic forces carry static thrust loads to minimize the bearing current. Performance of the magnetic bearing system with associated control algorithm was evaluated at different operating conditions. The bearing current was significantly reduced with the force balance control method and the power consumption was below 0.5 W under various thrust loads. The bearing parameters predicted by the analysis were validated by the experimental data. PMID:19381082

  12. Hemodynamics during Rotary Blood Pump support with speed synchronization in heart failure condition: A modelling study.

    PubMed

    Htet, Zwe Lin; Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the hemodynamic changes in the cardiovascular system under different modes of Rotary Blood Pump (RBP) support. Continuous mode (constant pump speed) and co-pulse mode (increased pump speed in systole) are studied. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the performances of these two modes under normal and pathological conditions. The pathological heart condition is simulated by reducing the maximum systolic elestance (Emax) in the cardiovascular system model. The model is implemented by using MATLAB Simulink. The pressure-volume loop of different heart conditions (normal heart: 100% of normal contractility, pathological heart: 30% of normal contractility) and the different modes of RBP support (8 krpm and 11 krpm in continuous mode, between 8 krpm and 11 krpm in co-pulse mode) are simulated. The results of this study show the slope of end systolic pressure volume relationship (ESPVR) changes in pathological condition. The reduction of area inside pressure volume loops depend on the increasing level of pump speed. The results indicated systolic aortic pressures in co-pulse mode are higher than in the continuous mode. In normal condition, the value of systolic aortic pressure in co-pulse mode is 113 mmHg and the values of systolic aortic pressures in continuous modes are 109 mmHg (8 k) and 95 mmHg (11 k). In pathological condition, the value of systolic aortic pressure in co pulse mode is 100 mmHg and the values of systolic aortic pressures in continuous modes are 90 mmHg (8 k) and 95 mmHg (11 k). The hemodynamics results of this study are comparable in vivo data, clinical data and other simulation studies. Therefore, this simulation enables hemodynamic studies in patients with end-stage heart failure, and patients under different modes of rotary blood pump support. PMID:26736999

  13. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  14. Development of a jet pump-assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is described. The concept utilizes a built-in capillary driven jet pump to remove vapor and gas from the artery and to prime it. The continuous pumping action also prevents depriming during operation of the heat pipe. The concept is applicable to fixed conductance and gas loaded variable conductance heat pipes. A theoretical model for the jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is presented. The model was used to design a prototype for laboratory demonstration. The 1.2 m long heat pipe was designed to transport 500 watts and to prime at an adverse elevation of up to 1.3 cm. The test results were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The heat pipe carried as much as 540 watts and was able to prime up to 1.9 cm. Introduction of a considerable amount of noncondensible gas had no adverse effect on the priming capability.

  15. Seal-less centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended rotor: rot-a-flot.

    PubMed

    Mendler, N; Podechtl, F; Feil, G; Hiltmann, P; Sebening, F

    1995-07-01

    Limitations of current centrifugal blood pumps are related to heat generation of bearings and leakage of seals, to dead water zones, and to poor efficiency. A new concept is proposed in this paper to ameliorate these problems based on a miniaturized magnetic drive, and a prototype is introduced. The pump rotor is suspended and driven by a radial permanent magnetic field that stabilizes the impeller in 4 of the 6 spatial degrees of freedom and allows it to be top-spun on a single blood-flushed pivot bearing with minimal load and friction. A shrouded impeller with an open center and 4 logarithmically curved channels is run inside a cone-and-plate-type housing with a spiral volute chamber. In vitro testing was performed comparing this design with the BioMedicus, St. Jude, and Sarns pumps. The prototype is demonstrated to have the smallest internal volume (35 ml), surface (190 qcm), and passage time (0.5 s at 4 L/min), as well as the highest hydraulic efficiency (up to 0.4) of all devices studied.

  16. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W.; Burger, Aaron F.; Day, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers’ initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  17. Seal-less centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended rotor: rot-a-flot.

    PubMed

    Mendler, N; Podechtl, F; Feil, G; Hiltmann, P; Sebening, F

    1995-07-01

    Limitations of current centrifugal blood pumps are related to heat generation of bearings and leakage of seals, to dead water zones, and to poor efficiency. A new concept is proposed in this paper to ameliorate these problems based on a miniaturized magnetic drive, and a prototype is introduced. The pump rotor is suspended and driven by a radial permanent magnetic field that stabilizes the impeller in 4 of the 6 spatial degrees of freedom and allows it to be top-spun on a single blood-flushed pivot bearing with minimal load and friction. A shrouded impeller with an open center and 4 logarithmically curved channels is run inside a cone-and-plate-type housing with a spiral volute chamber. In vitro testing was performed comparing this design with the BioMedicus, St. Jude, and Sarns pumps. The prototype is demonstrated to have the smallest internal volume (35 ml), surface (190 qcm), and passage time (0.5 s at 4 L/min), as well as the highest hydraulic efficiency (up to 0.4) of all devices studied. PMID:8572962

  18. Estimation of maximum ventricular elastance under assistance with a rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Telma K; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Baba, Atsushi

    2010-05-01

    The maximum ventricular elastance is a reliable index for assessing the cardiac function from changes in its pressure-volume relationship. The advantage of this index is that it can represent the contractility of either unassisted hearts or native hearts assisted with rotary blood pumps. However, there are situations in which changes in the ventricular load required for the conventional estimation method might be risky. For example, in a bridge-to-recovery the cardiac function should also be continuously observed after the implantation of a rotary blood pump. In this article, we present the results of the estimation of the maximum elastance with in vivo data using the parameter optimization method, which is a single-beat estimation method. The estimated values for the normal cardiac function (6.8 +/- 0.6, 4.5 +/- 0.9, 4.2 +/- 1.8 mm Hg/mL) were significantly different from those for the low cardiac function (3.2 +/- 1.5, 1.9 +/- 1.0, 1.9 +/- 1.2 mm Hg/mL) from the data of the three animals that were analyzed. Besides, the maximum elastance values were independent of the pump rotational speed. These results indicate that this index might be useful for the detection of the myocardial recovery.

  19. The Aachen MiniHLM--a miniaturized heart-lung machine for neonates with an integrated rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Arens, Jutta; Schnoering, Heike; Pfennig, Michael; Mager, Ilona; Vázquez-Jiménez, Jaime F; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    The operation of congenital heart defects in neonates often requires the use of heart-lung machines (HLMs) to provide perfusion and oxygenation. This is prevalently followed by serious complications inter alia caused by hemodilution and extrinsic blood contact surfaces. Thus, one goal of developing a HLM for neonates is the reduction of priming volume and contact surface. The currently available systems offer reasonable priming volumes for oxygenators, reservoirs, etc. However, the necessary tubing system contains the highest volumes within the whole system. This is due to the use of roller pumps; hence, the resulting placement of the complete HLM is between 1 and 2 m away from the operating table due to connective tubing between the components. Therefore, we pursued a novel approach for a miniaturized HLM (MiniHLM) by integrating all major system components in one single device. In particular, the MiniHLM is a HLM with the rotary blood pump centrically integrated into the oxygenator and a heat exchanger integrated into the cardiotomy reservoir which is directly connected to the pump inlet. Thus, tubing is only necessary between the patient and MiniHLM. A total priming volume of 102 mL (including arterial filter and a/v line) could be achieved. To validate the overall concept and the specific design we conducted several in vitro and in vivo test series. All tests confirm the novel concept of the MiniHLM. Its low priming volume and blood contact surface may significantly reduce known complications related to cardiopulmonary bypass in neonates (e.g., inflammatory reaction and capillary leak syndrome).

  20. Blood pressure regulation X: What happens when the muscle pump is lost? Post-exercise hypotension and syncope

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, John R.; Sieck, Dylan C.; Romero, Steven A.; Buck, Tahisha M.; Ely, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Syncope which occurs suddenly in the setting of recovery from exercise, known as post-exercise syncope, represents a failure of integrative physiology during recovery from exercise. We estimate that between 50 and 80% of healthy individuals will develop pre-syncopal signs and symptoms if subjected to a 15-min head-up tilt following exercise. Post-exercise syncope is most often neurally mediated syncope during recovery from exercise, with a combination of factors associated with post-exercise hypotension and loss of the muscle pump contributing to the onset of the event. One can consider the initiating reduction in blood pressure as the tip of the proverbial iceberg. What is needed is a clear model of what lies under the surface; a model that puts the observational variations in context and provides a rational framework for developing strategic physical or pharmacological countermeasures to ultimately protect cerebral perfusion and avert loss of consciousness. This review summarizes the current mechanistic understanding of post-exercise syncope and attempts to categorize the variation of the physiological processes that arise in multiple exercise settings. Newer investigations into the basic integrative physiology of recovery from exercise provide insight into the mechanisms and potential interventions that could be developed as countermeasures against post-exercise syncope. While physical counter maneuvers designed to engage the muscle pump and augment venous return are often found to be beneficial in preventing a significant drop in blood pressure after exercise, countermeasures that target the respiratory pump and pharmacological countermeasures based on the involvement of histamine receptors show promise. PMID:24197081

  1. The Effects of Ambulatory Accelerations on the Stability of a Magnetically Suspended Impeller for an Implantable Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gordon; Rezaienia, Mohammed Amin; Rahideh, Akbar; Munjiza, Ante; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the effects of ambulatory accelerations on the stability of a magnetically suspended impeller for use in implantable blood pumps. A magnetic suspension system is developed to control the radial position of a magnetic impeller using coils in the pump casing. The magnitude and periodicity of ambulatory accelerations at the torso are measured. A test rig is then designed to apply appropriate accelerations to the suspension system. Accelerations from 0 to 1 g are applied to the suspended impeller with ambulatory periodicity while the radial position of the impeller and power consumption of the suspension system are monitored. The test is carried out with the impeller suspended in air, water, and a glycerol solution to simulate the viscosity of blood. A model is developed to investigate the effects of the radial magnetic suspension system and fluid damping during ambulatory accelerations. The suspension system reduces the average displacement of the impeller suspended in aqueous solutions within its casing to 100 µm with a power consumption of below 2 W during higher magnitude ambulatory accelerations (RMS magnitude 0.3 g). The damping effect of the fluid is also examined and it is shown that buoyancy, rather than drag, is the primary cause of the damping at the low displacement oscillations that occur during the application of ambulatory accelerations to such a suspension system. PMID:27401117

  2. Implantable centrifugal blood pump with dual impeller and double pivot bearing system: electromechanical actuator, prototyping, and anatomical studies.

    PubMed

    Bock, Eduardo; Antunes, Pedro; Leao, Tarcisio; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Fonseca, Jeison; Leme, Juliana; Utiyama, Bruno; da Silva, Cibele; Cavalheiro, Andre; Filho, Diolino Santos; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, Jose; Andrade, Aron; Arruda, Celso

    2011-05-01

    An implantable centrifugal blood pump has been developed with original features for a left ventricular assist device. This pump is part of a multicenter and international study with the objective to offer simple, affordable, and reliable devices to developing countries. Previous computational fluid dynamics investigations and wear evaluation in bearing system were performed followed by prototyping and in vitro tests. In addition, previous blood tests for assessment of normalized index of hemolysis show results of 0.0054±2.46 × 10⁻³ mg/100 L. An electromechanical actuator was tested in order to define the best motor topology and controller configuration. Three different topologies of brushless direct current motor (BLDCM) were analyzed. An electronic driver was tested in different situations, and the BLDCM had its mechanical properties tested in a dynamometer. Prior to evaluation of performance during in vivo animal studies, anatomical studies were necessary to achieve the best configuration and cannulation for left ventricular assistance. The results were considered satisfactory, and the next step is to test the performance of the device in vivo.

  3. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. PMID:26736996

  4. Bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Yoshida, Fumihiko; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate a bearing gap adjustment for improvement of levitation performance in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level. The impeller levitates axially by balancing a gravitational force, buoyancy, a magnetic force, and hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. To adjust the levitation position of the impeller, the balance of acting forces on the impeller was adjusted by changing the shroud area on the bottom impeller. Three pumps having various shroud area were prepared as tested models: 817 mm(2) (HH-S), 875 mm(2) (HH-M) and 931 mm(2) (HH-L). First, for evaluating the bearing gap adjustment, the bearing gap was estimated by calculating a balancing position of the acting forces on the impeller. We actually measured the gravitational force, buoyancy and the magnetic force, and numerically analyzed hydrodynamic forces on the top and bottom sides of the impeller. Second, to verify accuracy of the estimated bearing gap, the measurement test of the bearing gap was performed. Finally, an in-vitro hemolysis test was performed to evaluate a hemolysis level of the pump. As a result, bottom bearing gaps were estimated as 40 μm (HH-S), 60 μm (HH-M) and 238 μm (HH-L). In the measurement test, bottom bearing gaps were measured as 63 μm (HH-S), 219 μm (HH-M), and 231 μm (HH-L). The estimated bearing gaps had positively correlated with the measured bearing gaps in relation to the shroud area on the impeller. In the hemolysis test, hemolysis level in every model was almost equivalent to that of BPX-80, when the bearing gap was adjusted greater than 60 μm. We could adjust the bearing gap by changing the shroud area on the impeller for improvement of levitation performance to realize a blood pump with a low hemolysis level.

  5. Development of PACS Digital Pump and implications for other industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banister, M.; Vohnout, S.; Kenman, D.

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the development and system integration of the Pulse Activated Cell System (PACS) Digital Pump technology using 2 types of electro-activated polymer (EAP) actuators. This is a platform specifically developed for the integration of sensor feedback loops to create an autonomous fluidic monitoring, reaction and delivery system. Initial, proof of concept, performance testing results are discussed as well as development for a medical drug delivery device and higher volume infusion therapy device. Uses and applications of the technology in other industries is considered as the PAC System provides a new ability to pump single or multiple fluid flows in a single pump that is programmable with the ability to vary direction, pressure and flow rates. The result is digital control of fluidic delivery, testing and mixing in application scaleable product packages. This technology will lead to new low cost yet sophisticated fluidic processing products and devices for many industries.

  6. Current Advances in Developing Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hannah Y; Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a significant challenge to future healthcare provision. An acronym ESKAPEE has been derived from the names of the organisms recognised as the major threats although there are a number of other organisms, notably Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that have become equally challenging to treat in the clinic. These pathogens are characterised by the ability to rapidly develop and/or acquire resistance mechanisms in response to exposure to different antimicrobial agents. A key part of the armoury of these pathogens is a series of efflux pumps, which effectively exclude or reduce the intracellular concentration of a large number of antibiotics, making the pathogens significantly more resistant. These efflux pumps are the topic of considerable interest, both from the perspective of basic understanding of efflux pump function, and its role in drug resistance but also as targets for the development of novel adjunct therapies. The necessity to overcome antimicrobial resistance has encouraged investigations into the characterisation of resistance-modifying efflux pump inhibitors to block the mechanisms of drug extrusion, thereby restoring antibacterial susceptibility and returning existing antibiotics into the clinic. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. This review discusses different bacterial EPIs originating from both natural source and chemical synthesis and examines the challenges to designing successful EPIs that can be useful against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26947776

  7. Strengthening blood programs in developing countries.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Terri Konstenius; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    The lack of an adequate and safe blood supply is a major limitation to health care in the developing world. It is estimated that about 80% of the worlds' population has access to only 20% of the world's blood supply. When experts from the developed world attempt to provide assistance to blood programs in the developing world, this must be done with respect for the situation and the people who often work under difficult conditions. Important factors in the potential to strengthen blood availability and safety are government support, a national blood policy, the nature and leadership of the blood organization, transfusion medicine expertise, and hospital relations. A key first step is to carry out a needs assessment of the policies, governmental support, organizations, public attitudes about blood donation, and personnel and operations involved in providing the current blood supply. The important facets of the assessment are: the tool itself, the manner in which the assessment is conducted, and the presentation of the results. The assessment should provide recommendations for infrastructure, operations, standard procedures, testing strategies, training programs, types of donors and donor recruitment, budgeting, quality systems, and hospital relations. A sound assessment provides the groundwork and strategy for moving forward. Technical assistance from developed world experts to colleagues in the developing world can be extremely valuable in improving blood availability, safety, and the quality of blood services in the developing world.

  8. Development of an autoflow cruise control system for a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Beppu, T; Nakajima, M; Nishinaka, T; Nakatani, H; Ihashi, K; Katsumata, T; Kitamura, M; Aomi, S; Endo, M

    1995-07-01

    To improve the ease of driving a centrifugal pump that is afterload dependent, we have developed an automatic flow control system for the Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system. This system consists of an autoflow cruise control system with a safety cutoff. The Capiox Pump Console 3000 was controlled by a personal computer through a serial communication line. In the usual manual mode, the motor speed knob works as a pump speed control, and in the autoflow mode, the same knob works as a blood flow rate control. After selecting and obtaining the desired flow rate, the mode was changed from manual to autoflow mode. In the autoflow mode, the computer compares the desired flow rate with the actual flow measured by an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter and adjusts the motor rotational speed accordingly. During both in vivo and in vitro testing, this autoflow mode was able to return the changed flow that was disrupted by either clamping and declamping of the tubing or by the bolus injection of a vasomotor drug to the selected flow rate within 10 s without any significant fluctuation. In conclusion, the newly developed computer controlled autoflow system was able to produce a reliable and effective flow regulation for a centrifugal pump.

  9. New generation extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with MedTech Mag-Lev, a single-use, magnetically levitated, centrifugal blood pump: preclinical evaluation in calves.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Eiki; Watanabe, Taiju; Miyagi, Naoto; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Mamiya, Taichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-05-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of a newly developed single-use, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Mag-Lev, in a 3-week extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) study in calves against a Medtronic Bio-Pump BPX-80. A heparin- and silicone-coated polypropylene membrane oxygenator MERA NHP Excelung NSH-R was employed as an oxygenator. Six healthy male Holstein calves with body weights of about 100 kg were divided into two groups, four in the MedTech group and two in the Bio-Pump group. Under general anesthesia, the blood pump and oxygenator were inserted extracorporeally between the main pulmonary artery and the descending aorta via a fifth left thoracotomy. Postoperatively, both the pump and oxygen flow rates were controlled at 3 L/min. Heparin was continuously infused to maintain the activated clotting time at 200-240 s. All the MedTech ECMO calves completed the study duration. However, the Bio-Pump ECMO calves were terminated on postoperative days 7 and 10 because of severe hemolysis and thrombus formation. At the start of the MedTech ECMO, the pressure drop across the oxygenator was about 25 mm Hg with the pump operated at 2800 rpm and delivering 3 L/min flow. The PO2 of the oxygenator outlet was higher than 400 mm Hg with the PCO2 below 45 mm Hg. Hemolysis and thrombus were not seen in the MedTech ECMO circuits (plasma-free hemoglobin [PFH] < 5 mg/dL), while severe hemolysis (PFH > 20 mg/dL) and large thrombus were observed in the Bio-Pump ECMO circuits. Plasma leakage from the oxygenator did not occur in any ECMO circuits. Three-week cardiopulmonary support was performed successfully with the MedTech ECMO without circuit exchanges. The MedTech Mag-Lev could help extend the durability of ECMO circuits by the improved biocompatible performances.

  10. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response.

  11. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications.

  12. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.

  13. A novel design of spiral groove bearing in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Zou, Jun; Ruan, Xiaodong; Fu, Xin; Yang, Huayong

    2012-08-01

    Good washout is very important in spiral groove bearing (SGB) designs when applied to blood pumps due to the micrometer scales of lubrication films and groove depths. To improve washout, flow rate or leakage through SGBs should be as large as possible. However, this special goal violates conventional SGB designs in which no leakage is desired as the leakage would decrease load-carrying capacity significantly. So, a design concept is formed fulfilling the two goals of high load-carrying capacity and large flow rate: let groove width decrease along flow path and the mating surface of the rotor rotate with a direction facilitating the flow through the grooves. Under this concept, a novel SGB is designed, contrary to conventional ones, with groove width decreasing with increasing spiral radius. This SGB is mounted on the motionless upper plate of our designed centrifugal blood pump, with the mating surface of rotor rotating with a direction facilitating the outward flow. To assess SGB designs, a characteristic plane is originally presented relating to pressure-normalized load-carrying capacity and flow rate. Comparisons between various kinds of SGB designs are made, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results are plotted in this characteristic plane from which load/flow performances can be directly read out. CFD and comparison results show that the new designs have superior load/flow characteristics. However, the impact of SGB designs upon hemolysis/thrombus formation is still to be verified according to the concept presented.

  14. [Research on magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump control based on a self-tuning fuzzy PI algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haibo; Han, Lu; Xu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the research and design of control system of magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump in our laboratory, and to briefly describe the structure of the magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump and principles of the body circulation model. The performance of blood pump is not only related to materials and structure, but also depends on the control algorithm. We studied the algorithm about motor current double-loop control for brushless DC motor. In order to make the algorithm adjust parameter change in different situations, we used the self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm and gave the details about how to design fuzzy rules. We mainly used Matlab Simulink to simulate the motor control system to test the performance of algorithm, and briefly introduced how to implement these algorithms in hardware system. Finally, by building the platform and conducting experiments, we proved that self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm could greatly improve both dynamic and static performance of blood pump and make the motor speed and the blood pump flow stable and adjustable. PMID:25764720

  15. [Research on magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump control based on a self-tuning fuzzy PI algorithm].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yang, Ming; Xu, Zihao; Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Haibo; Han, Lu; Xu, Liang

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the research and design of control system of magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump in our laboratory, and to briefly describe the structure of the magnetic coupling centrifugal blood pump and principles of the body circulation model. The performance of blood pump is not only related to materials and structure, but also depends on the control algorithm. We studied the algorithm about motor current double-loop control for brushless DC motor. In order to make the algorithm adjust parameter change in different situations, we used the self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm and gave the details about how to design fuzzy rules. We mainly used Matlab Simulink to simulate the motor control system to test the performance of algorithm, and briefly introduced how to implement these algorithms in hardware system. Finally, by building the platform and conducting experiments, we proved that self-tuning fuzzy PI control algorithm could greatly improve both dynamic and static performance of blood pump and make the motor speed and the blood pump flow stable and adjustable.

  16. Development of a mercury electromagnetic centrifugal pump for the SNAP-8 refractory boiler development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, R. A.; Schnacke, A. W.

    1974-01-01

    An electromagnetic pump, in which pressure is developed in mercury because of the interaction of the magnetic field and current which flows as a result of the voltage induced in the mercury contained in the pump duct, was developed for the SNAP-8 refractory boiler test facility. Pump performance results are presented for ten duct configurations and two stator sizes. These test results were used to design and fabricate a pump which met the SNAP-8 criteria of 530 psi developed pressure at 12,500 lb/hr. The pump operated continuously for over 13,000 hours without failure or performance degradation. Included in this report are descriptions of the experimental equipment, measurement techniques, all experimental data, and an analysis of the electrical losses in the pump.

  17. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) instrument has been developed to obtain simultaneous measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in supersonic combustion and generate databases for validation and development of CFD codes. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. Approximately one million dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  18. [Magnetic field numerical calculation and analysis for magnetic coupling of centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Lu, Lijun; Zhang, Tianyi; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-01

    This paper mainly studies the driving system of centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulation, with the core being disc magnetic coupling. Structure parameters of disc magnetic coupling are related to the ability of transferring magnetic torque. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out disc magnetic coupling permanent magnet pole number (n), air gap length (L(g)), permanent magnet thickness (L(m)), permanent magnet body inside diameter (R(i)) and outside diameter (R(o)), etc. thoroughly. This paper adopts the three-dimensional static magnetic field edge element method of Ansys for numerical calculation, and analyses the relations of magnetic coupling each parameter to transmission magnetic torque. It provides a good theory basis and calculation method for further optimization of the disc magnetic coupling.

  19. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano

    Successful design of hypersonic air-breathing engines requires new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence and turbulence-chemistry interaction in supersonic combustion. Unfortunately, not enough data are available to the modelers to develop and validate their codes, due to difficulties in taking measurements in such a harsh environment. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is a non-intrusive, non-linear, laser-based technique that provides temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in H2-air flames. A dual-pump CARS instrument has been developed to obtain measurements in supersonic combustion and generate databases for the CFD community. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. The facility provides a central jet of hot "vitiated air" simulating the hot air entering the engine of a hypersonic vehicle flying at Mach numbers between 5 and 7. Three different silicon carbide nozzles, with exit Mach number 1, 1.6 and 2, are used to provide flows with the effects of varying compressibility. H2 co-flow is available in order to generate a supersonic combusting free jet. Dual-pump CARS measurements have been obtained for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Approximately one million Dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N 2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  20. LED pumped Nd:YAG laser development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, G. I.; Kiang, Y. C.; Lynch, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a development program for light emitting diode (LED) pumped Nd:YAG lasers are described. An index matching method to increase the coupling efficiency of the laser is described. A solid glass half-cylinder of 5.0 by 5.6 centimeters was used for index matching and also as a pumping cavity reflector. The laser rods were 1.5 by 56 millimeters with dielectric coatings on both end surfaces. The interfaces between the diode array, glass cylinder, and laser rod were filled with viscous fluid of refractive index n = 1.55. Experiments performed with both the glass cylinder and a gold coated stainless steel reflector of the same dimensions under the same operating conditions indicate that the index matching cylinder gave 159 to 200 percent improvement of coupling efficiency over the metal reflector at various operating temperatures.

  1. Classification of Unsteady Flow Patterns in a Rotodynamic Blood Pump: Introduction of Non-Dimensional Regime Map.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Brackett, Jaclyn; Antaki, James F

    2015-09-01

    Rotodynamic blood pumps (also known as rotary or continuous flow blood pumps) are commonly evaluated in vitro under steady flow conditions. However, when these devices are used clinically as ventricular assist devices (VADs), the flow is pulsatile due to the contribution of the native heart. This study investigated the influence of this unsteady flow upon the internal hemodynamics of a centrifugal blood pump. The flow field within the median axial plane of the flow path was visualized with particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a transparent replica of the Levacor VAD. The replica was inserted in a dynamic cardiovascular simulator that synchronized the image acquisition to the cardiac cycle. As compared to steady flow, pulsatile conditions produced periodic, transient recirculation regions within the impeller and separation in the outlet diffuser. Dimensional analysis revealed that the flow characteristics could be uniquely described by the non-dimensional flow coefficient (Φ) and its time derivative ([Formula: see text]), thereby eliminating impeller speed from the experimental matrix. Four regimes within the Φ-[Formula: see text] plane were found to classify the flow patterns, well-attached or disturbed. These results and methods can be generalized to provide insights for both design and operation of rotodynamic blood pumps for safety and efficacy. PMID:26577357

  2. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump. PMID:19894088

  3. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump.

  4. FIELD TRIALS OF NEWLY DEVELOPED POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Beard

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this grant was to evaluate under real world conditions the performance of a new type of downhole pump, the hydraulically driven submersible diaphragm pump. This pump is supplied by Pumping Solutions Incorporated, Albuquerque NM. The original scope of the project was to install 10 submersible pumps, and compare that to 10 similar installations of rod pumps. As an operator, the system as tested was not ready for prime time, but has shown the ability to reduce costs, and increase production, if run times can be improved. The PSI group did improve the product and offered excellent service. The latest design appears to be much better, but more test data is needed to show short run life is not a problem. PSI and Beard Oil intend to continue testing the pump with non-government funding. The testing to date did not uncover any fundamental problems that would preclude the widespread use of this pump, and as an operator, I believe that with further improvement and testing, the pump can have a significant impact on stripper well costs. On the positive side, the pump was easy to run, was more power efficient then a rod pump, and is the only submersible that could handle the large quantities of solids typical of the production environment found at the Weber field and in CMB production. The product shows much promise for the future, and with continued design and testing, this type of submersible pump has the potential to become the standard of the industry.

  5. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for temporary ventricular support. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump (NRP) devices for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for NRP devices for temporary ventricular support. FDA is also revising the title and identification of the regulation for NRP devices in this order. PMID:26054096

  6. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH PERFORMANCE COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Travis; Groll, Eckhard A.; Braun, James E.

    2014-06-01

    The primary goals of the proposed project were to develop, test, and evaluate a high performance and cost-effective vapor compression air-source heat pump for use in cold climate regions. Vapor compression heat pumps are a proven technology, and have been used for many years to meet heating requirements for buildings in residential, commercial, and industrial applications. However, in climate regions that experience very low outdoor ambient temperatures both the heating capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) of traditional air-source vapor compression heat pumps drops dramatically with a decrease in the outdoor air temperature. The efficiency of heat pumping equipment has improved substantially over the past 20 years; however, the efficiencies of the highest rated equipment on the market are approaching practical limits that cannot be surpassed without modifications to the basic cycle and possibly the use of additional hardware. In this report, three technologies to improve the efficiency of vapor compression systems are described. These are a) vapor injected compression, b) oil flooded compression and c) hybrid flow control of the evaporator. Compressor prototypes for both, oil flooded and vapor injected compression were developed by Emerson Climate Technologies. For the oil flooded compressor, the oil injection port location was optimized and an internal oil separator was added using several design iterations. After initial testing at Emerson Climate Technologies, further testing was done at Purdue University, and compressor models were developed. These models were then integrated into a system model to determine the achievable improvement of seasonal energy efficiency (SEER) for Minneapolis (Minnesota) climate. For the oil flooded compression, a 34% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency was found while a 21% improvement in seasonal energy efficiency ratio was found for the vapor injected compression. It was found that one benefit of both tested

  8. Development of a Compact, Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Boeyen, Roger; Reeh, Jonathan; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A compact, low-power electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump is currently being developed by Lynntech, Inc. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, the pump is significantly lighter than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. Reliability and robustness is achieved with the absence of rotating or moving components (apart from the bellows). By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. Lynntech also demonstrated that these membranes possess the necessary mechanical strength, durability, and temperature range for long life space operation. The preliminary design for a Phase II prototype pump compares very favorably to the fluid cooling pumps currently used in space suit primary life support systems (PLSSs). Characteristics of the electrochemically-driven pump are described and the benefits of the technology as a replacement for electric motor pumps in mechanically pumped single-phase fluid loops is discussed.

  9. Development of a continuous-flow fluidic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.

    1985-08-01

    A study was made of a fluidic pump which utilizes gas pistons, a venturi-like reverse-flow-diverter, and a planar Y-type flow junction to produce a continuous flow of liquid from a system containing no moving parts. The study included an evaluation of the system performance and of methods for controlling the stability of the fluidic system. A mathematical model of the system was developed for steady-state operation using accepted theories of fluid mechanics. Although more elaborate models are needed for detailed design and optimization of specific systems, the model determined some of the main factors controlling the system performance and will be used in the development of more accurate models. 49 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. In vitro study to estimate particle release from a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Takami, Yoshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    Centrifugal pumps have been increasingly used in clinical settings. Like roller pumps, centrifugal pumps can cause debris release due to mechanical stress. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro the particle release from a centrifugal pump, Gyro Pump (Japan Medical Materials Co., Osaka, Japan), which is a pivot-bearing supported pump clinically used in Japan, and to identify the released particles. In the clean room Class 10,000, the pump was operated for 24 h at 4000 rpm and 6 L/min in a mock loop filled with lactated Ringer's solution. After 24 h, the sample fluid and a blank were filtered with a 0.45-microm membrane filter for microscopic counting, followed by observation with a scanning electron microscope and element analysis with an X-ray spectrometer. Microscopic countings were 128 +/- 42 in the test samples (n = 10) of the Gyro Pump and 98 +/- 42 in the blank samples (n = 10) (P = 0.12). The oxygen/carbon atomic ratio of the particles in the test samples was 0.32 +/- 0.06, which was similar to the ratio of the particles in the blank sample (0.34 +/- 0.06). The profiles of elements with an X-ray spectrometer showed that the released particles from the Gyro Pump were not derived from the pump materials. In conclusion, an in vitro test system has been established for estimation of particle release from a centrifugal pump. Based upon the results with the system, the Gyro Pump with a pivot-bearing system has little risk to release debris particles even in a severe condition.

  11. The spiral groove bearing as a mechanism for enhancing the secondary flow in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Felipe; Gross-Hardt, Sascha; Timms, Daniel; Egger, Christina; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The rapid evolution of rotary blood pump (RBP) technology in the last few decades was shaped by devices with increased durability, frequently employing magnetic or hydrodynamic suspension techniques. However, the potential for low flow in small gaps between the rotor and pump casing is still a problem for hemocompatibility. In this study, a spiral groove hydrodynamic bearing (SGB) is applied with two distinct objectives: first, as a mechanism to enhance the washout in the secondary flow path of a centrifugal RBP, lowering the exposure to high shear stresses and avoiding thrombus formation; and second, as a way to allow smaller gaps without compromising the washout, enhancing the overall pump efficiency. Computational fluid dynamics was applied and verified via bench-top experiments. An optimization of selected geometric parameters (groove angle, width and depth) focusing on the washout in the gap rather than generating suspension force was conducted. An optimized SGB geometry reduced the residence time of the cells in the gap from 31 to 27 ms, an improvement of 14% compared with the baseline geometry of 200 μm without grooves. When optimizing for pump performance, a 15% smaller gap yielded a slightly better rate of fluid exchange compared with the baseline, followed by a 22% reduction in the volumetric loss from the primary pathway. Finally, an improved washout can be achieved in a pulsatile environment due to the SGB ability to pump inwardly, even in the absence of a pressure head.

  12. Thrombosis and blood cells in atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, C; Hernández, M R; Villaverde, C A

    1988-06-01

    Hemorheological changes produced in blood cells seem to be essential in atheroma plaque development and thrombotic episodes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between blood cells count, thrombogenic situations and morphological mesenteric alterations in atherosclerotic rats. Atherosclerosis was induced by an atherogenic diet made up of two phases, the first a hypervitaminic diet, and the second a hyperlipidic one. Cell counts were performed with Thoma's camera. Morphological changes were observed directly in rat mesentery. Thrombogenic situations were investigated by a mesenteric microthrombosis induction method. In atherosclerotic animals we can observe a higher mesenteric opacity, increase in blood viscosity and a thickness in vessel wall. Thrombosis time is shortened at 3 days, which indicates a thrombogenic situation although at 10 days there is a lenthening in this parameter. Blood cell counts were not modified significantly, but modifications in differential leukocyte counts were significant. We found a direct relationship between lymphocyte number and thrombosis time whereas with granulocytes this relationship was inverse: shortening in thrombosis time appearing simultaneously with an increase in cell number. PMID:3419397

  13. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  14. Five-week use of a monopivot centrifugal blood pump as a right ventricular assist device in severe dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takamichi; Kitamura, Tadashi; Torii, Shinzo; Hanayama, Naoji; Oka, Norihiko; Itatani, Keiichi; Tomoyasu, Takahiro; Irisawa, Yusuke; Shibata, Miyuki; Hayashi, Hidenori; Ono, Minoru; Miyaji, Kagami

    2014-03-01

    Right heart failure is a critical complication in patients requiring mechanical ventricular support. However, it is often difficult to provide adequate right ventricular support in the acute phase. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy with severe right heart failure underwent implantation of a paracorporeal pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD, Nipro Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and a MERA monopivot centrifugal pump (Senko Medical Instrument Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) as a right ventricular assist device (RVAD). The patient developed ischemic enteritis 3 weeks after surgery, necessitating fasting and reversal of anticoagulation therapy. A target international normalized ratio of 1.5 was selected, and aspirin administration was discontinued. Following recovery without thromboembolic events, the patient failed the RVAD discontinuation test. Five weeks after surgery, the monopivot centrifugal pump was exchanged for a pulsatile pump. No thrombus was evident on the centrifugal pump. The patient was undergoing cardiac rehabilitation at the time of this writing and awaiting heart transplantation.

  15. Development of a nonazeotropic heat pump for crew hygiene water heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Deming, Glenn I.

    1991-01-01

    A heat pump system is currently under development to produce hot water for crew hygiene on future manned space missions. The heat pump uses waste heat sources and a nonazeotropic working fluid in a highly efficient cycle. The potential benefits include a reduction in peak power draw from 2 to 5 kW for electric cartridge heaters to just more than 100 W for the heat pump. As part of the heat pump development project, a unique high efficiency compressor was developed to maintain lubrication in a zero-gravity environment.

  16. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  17. Development of a solar-powered Rankine cycle heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancardi, F. R.; Melikian, G.; Sitler, J. W.

    1982-03-01

    The first prototype 18-ton solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump module was successfully designed, built and tested for more than 250 hr. in a specially-designed laboratory facility at UTRC. Operation in both the cooling and heat pump mode was demonstrated over a wide range of building, climatic, and collector/storage conditions. The design point performance of the heat pump in both the cooling and heat pump modes was confirmed, and performance mapping of the module completed. The heat pump demonstrated the wide operating range possible (using 200 to 300 F hot water) and high heat pump mode performance levels, such as a COP of 1.4 to 2.5 and 500,000 Btu/hr capacity. In cooling, a COP of 0.5 to 0.75 and up to 20 tons was demonstrated. In a simulation of operation in an actual building, the heat pump smoothly and accurately followed the building load for a full day. A detailed assessment of the individual module components was completed and performance, cost and reliability improvements were identified. No evidence of R11 decomposition or component wear or corrosion was found.

  18. Ground Source Integrated Heat Pump (GS-IHP) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V. D.; Rice, K.; Murphy, R.; Munk, J.; Ally, Moonis; Shen, Bo; Craddick, William; Hearn, Shawn A.

    2013-05-24

    Between October 2008 and May 2013 ORNL and ClimateMaster, Inc. (CM) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a groundsource integrated heat pump (GS-IHP) system for the US residential market. A initial prototype was designed and fabricated, lab-tested, and modeled in TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) to predict annual performance relative to 1) a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater) and 2) a state-of-the-art (SOA) two-capacity ground-source heat pump with desuperheater water heater (WH) option (GSHPwDS). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a 2600 ft{sup 2} (242 m{sup 2}) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 52 to 59%, averaging 55%, relative to the minimum efficiency suite. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 68 to 78% relative to resistance WH. Predicted total annual savings for the GSHPwDS relative to the same baseline averaged 22.6% with water heating energy use reduced by 10 to 30% from desuperheater contributions. The 1st generation (or alpha) prototype design for the GS-IHP was finalized in 2010 and field test samples were fabricated for testing by CM and by ORNL. Two of the alpha units were installed in 3700 ft{sup 2} (345 m{sup 2}) houses at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge and field tested during 2011. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the GS-IHPs it was projected that it would achieve >52% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at this specific site. A number of operational issues with the alpha units were identified indicating design changes needed to the system before market introduction could be accomplished. These were communicated to CM throughout the field test period. Based on the alpha unit test results and the diagnostic information coming from the field test

  19. Blood flow measurements within optic nerve head during on-pump cardiovascular operations. A window to the brain?

    PubMed

    Nenekidis, Ioannis; Geiser, Martial; Riva, Charles; Pournaras, Constantin; Tsironi, Evangelia; Vretzakis, Georgios; Mitilis, Vasilios; Tsilimingas, Nikolaos

    2011-05-01

    This observational study is conducted to demonstrate optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow alterations during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in routine on-pump cardiovascular operations in order to evaluate the perfusion status of important autoregulatory tissue vascular beds during moderate hypothermia. Twenty-one patients free from eye disease were prospectively enrolled in our database. Perioperative ONH blood flow measurements were performed using a hand-held portable ocular laser Doppler flowmeter just after administration of general anesthesia and during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) upon the lowest temperature point of moderate hypothermia. Important operative flow variables were correlated to optic nerve blood flow during surgical phases. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction of 32.1 ± 14.5% of mean ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P < 0.0001) compared to the reference flow values of phase 1. A negative univariate association between ECC time and ONH blood flow in phase 2 (P = 0.031) is noted. This angiokinetic approach can detect changes of flow within autoregulatory vascular tissue beds like ONH, thus creating a 'window' on cerebral microvasculature. ONH blood flow is reduced during CPB. Our data suggest that it is of paramount importance to avoid extracorporeal prolongation even in moderate hypothermic cardiovascular operations. PMID:21297131

  20. Successful bridge to recovery using a microaxial blood pump in a patient with electrical storm and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Henning, A; Schreieck, J; Riessen, R; Gawaz, M; May, A E

    2011-10-01

    A 59-year-old patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and incessant ventricular tachycardia leading to progressive cardiogenic shock is presented. Due to hemodynamic instability, high dose catecholamines were required in addition to the implantation of an intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), which, however, appeared to further augment the frequency and duration of ventricular tachycardias. The implantation of a microaxial blood pump allowed catecholamine administration to be terminated, thereby, ending this vicious circle of catecholamine-driven electrical storm. Within 5 days, the patient was hemodynamically stabilized and kidney and liver function recovered with the support of intensive antiarrhythmic therapy (amiodarone, mexiletine, sotalol). During a 24-month follow-up, the patient had no further ICD shocks and no rehospitalization was required for treatment of congestive heart failure. PMID:22038638

  1. THz Pump and X-Ray Probe Development at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan S; Durr, Hermann; Lindenberg, Aaron; Stanford U., Materials Sci.Dept.; Reis, David; Frisch, Josef; Loos, Henrik; Petree, Mark; Daranciang, Dan; Fuchs, Matthias; Ghimire, Shambhu; Goodfellow, John; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2011-11-08

    We report on measurements of broadband, intense, coherent transition radiation at terahertz frequencies, generated as the highly compressed electron bunches in Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) pass through a thin metal foil. The foil is inserted at 45{sup o} to the electron beam, 31 m downstream of the undulator. The THz emission passes downward through a diamond window to an optical table below the beamline. A fully compressed 350-pC bunch produces up to 0.5 mJ in a nearly half-cycle pulse of 50 fs FWHM with a spectrum peaking at 10 THz. We estimate a peak field at the focus of over 2.5 GV/m. A 20-fs Ti:sapphire laser oscillator has recently been installed for electro-optic measurements. We are developing plans to add an x-ray probe to this THz pump, by diffracting FEL x rays onto the table with a thin silicon crystal. The x rays would arrive with an adjustable time delay after the THz. This will provide a rapid start to user studies of materials excited by intense single-cycle pulses and will serve as a step toward a THz transport line for LCLS-II.

  2. Development and Verification of a TOPAZ-II Electromagnetic Pump Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.

    1994-07-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II electromagnetic (EM) pump is developed and incorporated into the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM). The magnetic field strength of the induction coil depends not only on the current supplied by the pump TFEs, but also on the temperature of the coil. All electric and thermal properties of the coolant, wall material of pump ducts, and the electric leads are taken to be temperature dependent. The pump model is benchmarked with experimental data at different coolant temperatures. Results show the pump model to be in good agreement with experimental data. The maximum deviation in the mass flow predictions obtained at different coolant temperatures and pump currents is less than 0.1 kg/s.

  3. Research and Development on Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning Applications: Proceedings of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, V. A.; Powell, R. H., Jr.

    1985-08-01

    This conference was planned to provide information on current activities in the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Building Equipment Research (BER) Program. It was primarily for the benefit of HVAC equipment manufacturers and other interested parties, including utilities, independent research and development organizations, universities, other government groups, and research funding and management organizations. The technical presentations were grouped into two principal subject areas: electric systems and thermally activated systems. Electric-system topics included field performance studies, laboratory experiments on cycling performance, analytical estimates of the benefits of variable capacity and zone control, nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures, ground-coupled systems, and an analysis of Stirling-cycle heat pumps. In the area of thermally activated heat pumps, presentations centered on the development of absorption systems, Stirling-engine-driven systems, and a linear, free-piston IC-engine compressor. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 27 presentations for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  4. Development of short pulse laser pumped x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Osterheld, A L; Hunter, J R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2000-02-22

    X-ray lasers have been extensively studied around the world since the first laboratory demonstration on the Novette laser at LLNL in 1984. The characteristic properties of short wavelength, high monochromaticity, collimation and coherence make x-ray lasers useful for various applications. These include demonstrations of biological imaging within the water window, interferometry of laser plasmas and radiography of laser-heated surfaces. One of the critical issues has been the high power pump required to produce the inversion. The power scaling as a function of x-ray laser wavelength follows a {approx} {lambda}{sup -4} to {approx} {lambda}{sup -6} law. The shortest x-ray laser wavelength of {approx}35 {angstrom} demonstrated for Ni-like Au was at the limit of Nova laser capabilities. By requiring large, high power lasers such as Nova, the shot rate and total number of shots available have limited the rapid development of x-ray lasers and applications. In fact over the last fifteen years the main thrust has been to develop more efficient, higher repetition rate x-ray lasers that can be readily scaled to shorter wavelengths. The recent state of progress in the field can be found in references. The objective of the project was to develop a soft x-ray laser (XRL) pumped by a short pulse laser of a few joules. In effect to demonstrate a robust, worlung tabletop x-ray laser at LLNL for the first time. The transient collisional scheme as proposed by Shlyaptsev et al. was the candidate x-ray laser for study. The successful endeavor of any scientific investigation is often based upon prudent early decisions and the choice of this scheme was both sound and fruitful. It had been demonstrated very recently for Ne-like Ti at 326 {angstrom} using a small tabletop laser but had not yet reached its full potential. We chose this scheme for several reasons: (a) it was a collisional-type x-ray laser which has been historically the most robust; (b) it had the promise of high efficiency

  5. Development of a Compact Efficient Cooling Pump for Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanBoeyen, Roger W.; Reeh, Jonathan A.; Trevino, Luis

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing demands placed on extravehicular activity (EVA) for the International Space Station (ISS) assembly and maintenance, along with planned lunar and Martian missions, the need for increased human productivity and capability becomes ever more critical. This is most readily achieved by reduction in space suit weight and volume, and increased hardware reliability, durability, and operating lifetime. Considerable progress has been made with each successive generation of space suit design; from the Apollo A7L suit, to the current Shuttle Extravehicular Mobile Unit (EMU) suit, and the next generation Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). However, one area of space suit design which has continued to lag is the fluid pump used to drive the water cooling loop of the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The two main types of fluid pumps typically used in space applications are rotodynamic pumps (pumping is achieved through a rotary vaned impeller) and displacement pumps (which includes rotary and diaphragm pumps). The rotating and moving parts found in the pumps and electric motor add significantly to the susceptibility to wear and friction, thermal mismatch, and complexity of the pumps. Electric motor-driven pumps capable of achieving high operational reliability are necessarily large, heavy, and energy inefficient. This report describes a development effort conducted for NASA by Lynntech, Inc., who recently demonstrated the feasibility of an electrochemically-driven fluid cooling pump. With no electric motor and minimal lightweight components, an electrochemically-driven pump is expected to be significantly smaller, lighter and achieve a longer life time than conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps. By employing sulfonated polystyrene-based proton exchange membranes, rather than conventional Nafion membranes, a significant reduction in the actuator power consumption was demonstrated. It was also demonstrated that these membranes possess the

  6. Development, testing, and certification of Calmac Mfg. Corp. solar collector and solar operated pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Development of a rubber tube solar collector and solar operated pump for use with solar heating and cooling systems is discussed. The development hardware, problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and certification statements of performance are included.

  7. Development of the Geothermal Heat Pump Market in China; Renewable Energy in China

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-03-01

    This case study is one in a series of Success Stories on developing renewable energy technologies in China for a business audience. It focuses on the development of the geothermal heat pump market in China.

  8. Rotary Blood Pumps as Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Review of a 15-Year Berlin Experience.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Roland; Kaufmann MEng, Friedrich; Potapov, Evgenij; Krabatsch, Thomas; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article reports our 15-year single-center experience with rotary blood pumps (RBPs) as long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) with emphasis on outcomes. For more than 15-year period, we have used various RBPs as bridge to transplantation or to myocardial recovery. Our group performed the first human implantation worldwide of RBCs, the MicroMed DeBakey ventricular assist device in November 1998 in a patient with end-stage heart failure who was supported for 47 days until his death. Based on this initial experience, we recognized the feasibility of providing long-term support and since then it has been our primary armamentarium in treating patients with heart failure. Between 1987 and September 2013, we have implanted 2208 ventricular assist devices ranging from pulsatile to continuous-flow systems, as short-term, long-term, or permanent support in patients with end-stage heart failure. In total, 1009 RBPs were implanted on 908 patients, and their outcomes are reported here. We have shared some milestones in MCS including the first implantation of Jarvik 2000 on the oldest patient (81-year old) in 2008 and the first worldwide implantation of a biventricular HeartWare. Over time, implantation techniques, anticoagulation, and postoperative care have been modified and individualized. A relevant aspect of our experience has been the incidence of pump thrombosis. This is particularly frustrating because the problem has occurred in the setting of full anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, guided by strict anticoagulation monitoring. It has become clear to us that the devices are still not perfect. Technical pump failures such as cable breaks also occur, prompting urgent pump exchange, and infection. A 15-year cumulative mortality rate is 46.9%. This report emphasizes that MCS with RBPs has evolved into a routine treatment in heart failure and is a highly feasible option for permanent therapy particularly for elderly patients. PMID:27568128

  9. Rotary Blood Pumps as Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Review of a 15-Year Berlin Experience.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Roland; Kaufmann MEng, Friedrich; Potapov, Evgenij; Krabatsch, Thomas; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    This article reports our 15-year single-center experience with rotary blood pumps (RBPs) as long-term mechanical circulatory support (MCS) with emphasis on outcomes. For more than 15-year period, we have used various RBPs as bridge to transplantation or to myocardial recovery. Our group performed the first human implantation worldwide of RBCs, the MicroMed DeBakey ventricular assist device in November 1998 in a patient with end-stage heart failure who was supported for 47 days until his death. Based on this initial experience, we recognized the feasibility of providing long-term support and since then it has been our primary armamentarium in treating patients with heart failure. Between 1987 and September 2013, we have implanted 2208 ventricular assist devices ranging from pulsatile to continuous-flow systems, as short-term, long-term, or permanent support in patients with end-stage heart failure. In total, 1009 RBPs were implanted on 908 patients, and their outcomes are reported here. We have shared some milestones in MCS including the first implantation of Jarvik 2000 on the oldest patient (81-year old) in 2008 and the first worldwide implantation of a biventricular HeartWare. Over time, implantation techniques, anticoagulation, and postoperative care have been modified and individualized. A relevant aspect of our experience has been the incidence of pump thrombosis. This is particularly frustrating because the problem has occurred in the setting of full anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, guided by strict anticoagulation monitoring. It has become clear to us that the devices are still not perfect. Technical pump failures such as cable breaks also occur, prompting urgent pump exchange, and infection. A 15-year cumulative mortality rate is 46.9%. This report emphasizes that MCS with RBPs has evolved into a routine treatment in heart failure and is a highly feasible option for permanent therapy particularly for elderly patients.

  10. Development of nonmetallic solar collector and solar-powered pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Design and building of two unique components for solar heating (1. flatplate solar collector using no metal components, and 2. solar powered pump for heating and cooling systems are outlined in report. Report also discusses hardware, deliverable end items, problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and performance certification.

  11. Capillary Pump Loop (CPL) heat pipe development status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The capillary pump loop (CPL) was re-introduced as a potential candidate for the management of large heat loads. It is currently being evaluated for application in the thermal management of large space structures. Test efforts were conducted to establish the feasibility of the CPL heat pipe design.

  12. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  13. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  14. Transfusion of blood products in off-pump coronary artery bypass and conventional coronary artery revascularization. A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Maciej; Tomczyk, Jadwiga; Camacho, Estillita; Ligowski, Marcin; Stefaniak, Sebastian; Jemielity, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There has been a growing interest in off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) grafting in recent years. Beating-heart surgery is believed to be less invasive as it allows the side effects of extracorporeal circulation to be avoided. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to compare blood product transfusion rates between two groups of patients undergoing surgery for ischemic heart disease with either the off-pump technique or using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Material and methods There were 152 patients enrolled in the prospective randomized study. All procedures were elective. There were 84 patients (62 men and 20 women) at the mean age of 63.74 ± 7 years who underwent OPCAB (group I), and 68 patients (54 men and 14 women) at the mean age of 63.51 ± 6 years who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass (group II). Results There were no perioperative deaths. The mean number of grafts was 2.27 ± 0.3 (OPCAB group) and 2.63 ± 0.6 (CPB group) (p < 0.05). The mean number of packed red blood cells transfused in the OPCAB group was 2.31 ± 0.18 units/patient and 3.94 ± 0.30 units/patient in the CPB group (p < 0.05). The mean number of fresh frozen plasma units transfused was 1.13 ± 0.13 in the OPCAB group vs. 1.57 ± 0.15 in the CPB group (p < 0.05). There were 12 patients (14%) in the OPCAB group who had no transfusion. Conclusions One of the most important advantages of the OPCAB technique is that it makes it possible to reduce the rate of blood product transfusions. PMID:26336410

  15. Development of a Prototype Water Pump for Future Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, David; Hodgson, Edward; Dionne, Steven; Gervais, Edward, III; Trevino, Luis

    2009-01-01

    NASA's next generation of space suit systems will place new demands on the pump used to circulate cooling water through the life support system and the crew's liquid cooling garment. Long duration missions and frequent EVA require increased durability and reliability; limited resupply mass requirements demand compatibility with recycled water, and changing system design concepts demand increased tolerance for dissolved and free gas and the ability to operate over a broader range of flow rates and discharge pressure conditions. This paper describes the development of a positive displacement prototype pump to meet these needs. A gerotor based design has been adapted to meet pump performance, gas tolerance, and durability requirements while providing a small, lightweight pump assembly. This design has been detailed and implemented using materials selected to address anticipated water quality and mission needs as a prototype unit for testing in NASA laboratories. Design requirements, pump technology selection and design, performance testing and test results will be discussed.

  16. Development of a Prototype Water Pump for Future Space Suit Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, David; Hodgson, Edward; Gervais, Edward, III; Trevino, Luis

    2008-01-01

    NASA s next generation of space suit systems will place new demands on the pump used to circulate cooling water through the life support system and the crew s liquid cooling garment. Long duration missions and frequent EVA require increased durability and reliability; limited resupply mass requirements demand compatibility with recycled water, and changing system design concepts demand increased tolerance for dissolved and free gas and the ability to operate over a broader range of flow rates and discharge pressure conditions. This paper describes the development of a positive displacement prototype pump to meet these needs. A gerotor based design has been adapted to meet pump performance, gas tolerance, and durability requirements while providing a small, lightweight pump assembly. This design has been detailed and implemented using materials selected to address anticipated water quality and mission needs as a prototype unit for testing in NASA laboratories. Design requirements, pump technology selection and design, performance testing and test results will be discussed.

  17. Development of a Proof of Concept Low Temperature Superfluid Magnetic Pump with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.

    State of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin coolers over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. Development of a proof of concept Superfluid Magnetic Pump is discussed in this work. This novel low temperature, no moving part pump can replace the existing bellows-piston driven 4He or 3He- 4He mixture compressor/circulators used in various sub Kelvin refrigeration systems such as dilution, Superfluid pulse tube, or active magnetic regenerative refrigerators. Due to its superior thermal transport properties this pump can also be used as a simple circulator of sub-Lambda 4He to distribute cooling over large surface areas. The pump discussed in this work was experimentally shown to produce a maximum flow rate of 440 mg/s (averaged over cycle), 665 mg/s (peak) and produced a maximum pressure difference of 2323 Pascal. This pump worked in an "ideal" thermodynamic state: The experimental results matched with the theoretical values predicted by a computer model. Pump curves were developed to map the performance of this pump. This successful demonstration will enable this novel pump to be put to test in suitable sub Kelvin refrigeration systems. Numerical modeling of an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses the Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid 3He-4He through a magnetic regenerator is presented as a potential application of such a pump.

  18. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  19. Development of Blood Analog Fluids Using Human Hair Protein Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shunichi; Morikawa, Hirohisa; Ishii, Shinji; Fujii, Toshihiro

    Model experiments of blood flow are very important in the study of mechanical aspects in cardiovascular research and the development of artificial organs. Several blood analog fluids, such as non-Newtonian fluids have been developed and used in model experiments. However, little is known about blood substitutes with biocompatible properties. We have developed novel procedures for preparing human hair protein films, and have fabricated protein particle suspensions from the films, by mechanical stimulation, for use as blood analog fluid. The average diameter of the protein particles was controlled and microscopic observations were done using a confocal microscope. The Casson’s plot patterns of the suspension containing the protein particles were similar to those of human blood. The protein particles also worked well as ultrasound contrast agents in the ultrasound Doppler flow velocity measurements in the model experiments. Therefore, the protein particle system is a promising alternative for blood cells in artificial blood.

  20. Preliminary study on the estimation of Emax using single-beat methods during assistance with rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Telma Keiko; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Baba, Atsushi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Recently, rotary blood pumps (RBPs) have been used as bridge to recovery. In such application the RBP might be weaned once the cardiac function has been recovered. In such cases, the detection of the cardiac function is fundamental for the treatment efficiency. However, most of the widely used cardiac function indices (CFIs) were proposed for unassisted hearts and have not been completely evaluated under assistance. In contrast, Emax, which is known as a reliable CFI, has already been validated under assistance with RBP. However, since the conventional method for the estimation of Emax has some limitations for the clinical application, the objective of this study was to evaluate different single-beat estimation methods qualitatively and also quantitatively using in vivo data. The preliminary results showed that although single-beat estimation have more clinical applicability, not all those estimation methods are suitable for the RBP assistance.

  1. Finite element analysis of stresses developed in the blood sac of a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Haut Donahue, T L; Dehlin, W; Gillespie, J; Weiss, W J; Rosenberg, G

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a 3D finite element (FE) model of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) to predict stresses in the blood sac. The hyperelastic stress-strain curves for the segmented poly(ether polyurethane urea) (SPEUU) blood sac were determined in both tension and compression using a servo-hydraulic testing system at various strain rates. Over the range of strain rates studied, the sac was not strain rate sensitive, however the material response was different for tension versus compression. The experimental tension and compression properties were used in a FE model that consisted of the pusher plate, blood sac and pump case. A quasi-static analysis was used to allow for nonlinearities due to contact and material deformation. The 3D FE model showed that blood sac stresses are not adversely affected by the location of the inlet and outlet ports of the device and that over the systolic ejection phase of the simulation the prediction of blood sac stresses from the full 3D model and an axisymmetric model are the same. Minimizing stresses in the blood sac will increase the longevity of the blood sac in vivo. PMID:19131267

  2. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. PMID:26146791

  3. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  4. Spallation and migration of silicone from blood-pump tubing in patients on hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, A.S.; Disney, A.P.; Gove, D.W.

    1982-01-21

    Spalled particles of silicone were observed in the livers of patients with chronic renal failure treated by hemodialysis. The refractile particles of silicone were associated with various degrees of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, and granulomatous hepatitis was evident in nine cases. Retrospective examination revealed the material in 18 of 38 liver-biopsy samples from patients on hemodialysis who had clinical hepatic dysfunction. Of 31 autopsies of patients who had undergone hemodialysis, 22 revealed silicone in the liver, and silicone was also present in the spleen in all cases and in the marrow, lungs, and nodes in some. Giant cells containing silicone were also observed in these organs. Silicone was present in patients who had undergone hemodialysis for six weeks to 84 months (mean, 24 months). The identity of the material was confirmed by atomic absorption and by electron microprobe analysis. The silicone was traced to a segment of silicone tubing located in the roller pump of the dialysis machine.

  5. LH2 pump component development testing in the electric pump room at test cell C inducer no. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, F. X.; Brunner, J. J.; Kirk, K. G.; Mathews, J. P.; Nishioka, T.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a turbine pump for use with the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles are discussed. It was determined that the pump will be a two stage centrifugal pump with both stages having backswept impellers and an inducer upstream of the first stage impeller. The test program provided demonstration of the ability of the selected design to meet the imposed requirements.

  6. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Garcia, J.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-29

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL)

  7. Development and numerical analysis of low specific speed mixed-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Huo, Y. W.; Pan, Z. B.; Zhou, W. C.; He, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    With the development of the city, the market of the mixed flow pump with large flux and high head is prospect. The KSB Shanghai Pump Co., LTD decided to develop low speed specific speed mixed flow pump to meet the market requirements. Based on the centrifugal pump and axial flow pump model, aiming at the characteristics of large flux and high head, a new type of guide vane mixed flow pump was designed. The computational fluid dynamics method was adopted to analyze the internal flow of the new type model and predict its performances. The time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed by SST k-ω turbulent model to adapt internal flow of guide vane with larger curvatures. The multi-reference frame(MRF) method was used to deal with the coupling of rotating impeller and static guide vane, and the SIMPLEC method was adopted to achieve the coupling solution of velocity and pressure. The computational results shows that there is great flow impact on the head of vanes at different working conditions, and there is great flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes at different working conditions, and all will affect the performance of pump. Based on the computational results, optimizations were carried out to decrease the impact on the head of vanes and flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes. The optimized model was simulated and its performance was predicted. The computational results show that the impact on the head of vanes and the separation at the tailing of the guide vanes disappeared. The high efficiency of the optimized pump is wide, and it fit the original design destination. The newly designed mixed flow pump is now in modeling and its experimental performance will be getting soon.

  8. Development of a nonazeotropic heat pump for crew hygiene water heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Deming, Glenn I.

    1991-01-01

    A Phase 2 SBIR Program funded by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a Nonazeotropic Heat Pump is described. The heat pump system which was designed, fabricated, and tested in the Foster-Miller laboratory, is capable of providing crew hygiene water heating for future manned missions. The heat pump utilizes a nonazeotropic refrigerant mixture which, in this application, provides a significant Coefficient of Performance improvement over a single-constituent working fluid. In order to take full advantage of the refrigerant mixture, compact tube-in-tube heat exchangers were designed. A high efficiency scroll compressor with a proprietary lubrication system was developed to meet the requirements of operation in zero-gravity. The prototype heat pump system consumes less than 200W of power compared to the alternative of electric cartridge heaters which would require 2 to 5 kW.

  9. Development of a pump-turbine runner based on multiobjective optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuhe, W.; Baoshan, Z.; Lei, T.; Jie, Z.; Shuliang, C.

    2014-03-01

    As a key component of reversible pump-turbine unit, pump-turbine runner rotates at pump or turbine direction according to the demand of power grid, so higher efficiencies under both operating modes have great importance for energy saving. In the present paper, a multiobjective optimization design strategy, which includes 3D inverse design method, CFD calculations, response surface method (RSM) and multiobjective genetic algorithm (MOGA), is introduced to develop a model pump-turbine runner for middle-high head pumped storage plant. Parameters that controlling blade shape, such as blade loading and blade lean angle at high pressure side are chosen as input parameters, while runner efficiencies under both pump and turbine modes are selected as objective functions. In order to validate the availability of the optimization design system, one runner configuration from Pareto front is manufactured for experimental research. Test results show that the highest unit efficiency is 91.0% under turbine mode and 90.8% under pump mode for the designed runner, of which prototype efficiencies are 93.88% and 93.27% respectively. Viscous CFD calculations for full passage model are also conducted, which aim at finding out the hydraulic improvement from internal flow analyses.

  10. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  11. In-vitro investigation of cerebral-perfusion effects of a rotary blood pump installed in the descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Rezaienia, Mohammad Amin; Paul, Gordon; Avital, Eldad; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin Terry; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2016-06-14

    This study describes use of a cardiovascular simulator to replicate the hemodynamic responses of the cerebrovascular system with a mechanical circulatory support device operating in the descending aorta. To do so, a cerebral autoregulation unit was developed which replicates the dilation and constriction of the native cerebrovascular resistance system and thereby regulates the cerebral flow rate within defined limits. The efficacy of the replicated autoregulation mechanism was investigated by introducing a number of step alterations in mean aortic pressure and monitoring the cerebral flow. The steady responses of the cerebral flow to changes in mean aortic pressure were in good agreement with clinical data. Next, a rotary pump, modeling a mechanical circulatory support device, was installed in the descending aorta and the hemodynamic responses of the cerebral system were investigated over a wide range of pump operating conditions. Insertion of a mechanical circulatory support device in the descending aorta presented an improved cardiac output as a result of afterload reduction. It was observed that the primary drop in cerebral flow, caused by the pump in the descending aorta, was compensated over the course of five seconds due to a gradual decrease in cerebrovascular resistance. The experimental results suggest that the implantation of a mechanical circulatory support device in the descending aorta, a less invasive procedure than typical mechanical circulatory support implantation, will not have an adverse effect on the cognitive function, provided that the cerebral autoregulation is largely unimpaired. PMID:27155746

  12. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart ... it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the ...

  13. The CentriMag centrifugal blood pump as a benchmark for in vitro testing of hemocompatibility in implantable ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chris H H; Pieper, Ina Laura; Hambly, Rebecca; Radley, Gemma; Jones, Alyssa; Friedmann, Yasmin; Hawkins, Karl M; Westaby, Stephen; Foster, Graham; Thornton, Catherine A

    2015-02-01

    Implantable ventricular assist devices (VADs) have proven efficient in advanced heart failure patients as a bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy. However, VAD usage often leads to infection, bleeding, and thrombosis, side effects attributable to the damage to blood cells and plasma proteins. Measuring hemolysis alone does not provide sufficient information to understand total blood damage, and research exploring the impact of currently available pumps on a wider range of blood cell types and plasma proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required to further our understanding of safer pump design. The extracorporeal CentriMag (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) has a hemolysis profile within published standards of normalized index of hemolysis levels of less than 0.01 g/100 L at 100 mm Hg but the effect on leukocytes, vWF multimers, and platelets is unknown. Here, the CentriMag was tested using bovine blood (n = 15) under constant hemodynamic conditions in comparison with a static control for total blood cell counts, hemolysis, leukocyte death, vWF multimers, microparticles, platelet activation, and apoptosis. The CentriMag decreased the levels of healthy leukocytes (P < 0.006), induced leukocyte microparticles (P < 10(-5) ), and the level of high molecular weight of vWF multimers was significantly reduced in the CentriMag (P < 10(-5) ) all compared with the static treatment after 6 h in vitro testing. Despite the leukocyte damage, microparticle formation, and cleavage of vWF multimers, these results show that the CentriMag is a hemocompatible pump which could be used as a standard in blood damage assays to inform the design of new implantable blood pumps.

  14. Development of bushings and bearings for use in hot brine pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Hosang, George W.; Stetson, Alvin, R.

    1982-10-08

    The exploitation of geothermal resources often requires that naturally heated subterranean brines be pumped to the surface from depths of up to 6000 feet underground while minimizing heat losses and maintaining sufficient fluid pressure to prevent boiling. To accomplish this requires the use of downhole brine pumps capable of months of uninterrupted operation. Significant problems have occurred with pump lineshaft bearings in the geothermal wells. The objective of this research program was to determine the nature of the problems associated with commonly reported premature failures of downhole lineshaft pump bearings. Using the information gathered, a series of bearing endurance tests was performed on a variety of candidate bearing materials. These tests were accomplished using test rigs specially developed to simulate actual geothermal field conditions and to isolate specific bearing wear problems.

  15. Phase 1-A development kinematic Sterling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat pump research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, L.; Agno, J. G.; Houtman, W. H.

    1984-07-01

    Heat pumps driven by electric motors are successfully sold as energy saving systems in the space conditioning marketplace. By utilizing an on-site natural gas fueled Stirling cycle engine to drive a refrigerating compressor, energy consumption of such a heat pump can be reduced in both heating and cooling modes of operation. The achievements reached in Phase 1-A indicate that the goal of developing a technically and economically feasible commercial heat pump, using the V-160 Stirling engine, is practical and can be accomplished within a reasonable period of time. This initial investigation also indicates that the potential heat pump system can be responsive to a large market segment as well as providing a technological base for expanding into other gas market segments.

  16. Development of a High Performance Air Source Heat Pump for the US Market

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shen, Bo; Gao, Zhiming; Baxter, Van D; Iu, Ipseng

    2011-01-01

    Heat pumps present a significant advantage over conventional residential heating technologies due to higher energy efficiencies and less dependence on imported oil. The US development of heat pumps dates back to the 1930 s with pilot units being commercially available in the 1950 s. Reliable and cost competitive units were available in the US market by the 1960 s. The 1973 oil embargo led to increased interest in heat pumps prompting significant research to improve performance, particularly for cold climate locations. Recent increasing concerns on building energy efficiency and environmental emissions have prompted a new wave of research in heat pump technology with special emphasis on reducing performance degradation at colder outdoor air temperatures. A summary of the advantages and limitations of several performance improvement options sought for the development of high performance air source heat pump systems for cold climate applications is the primary focus of this paper. Some recommendations for a high performance cold climate heat pump system design most suitable for the US market are presented.

  17. Effect of Impeller Geometry on Lift-Off Characteristics and Rotational Attitude in a Monopivot Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kento; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamane, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the flow path geometry of the impeller on the lift-off and tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller against the hydrodynamic force was investigated in a centrifugal blood pump with an impeller supported by a single-contact pivot bearing. Four types of impeller were compared: the FR model with the flow path having both front and rear cutouts on the tip, the F model with the flow path having only a front cutout, the R model with only a rear cutout, and the N model with a straight flow path. First, the axial thrust and the movement about the pivot point, which was loaded on the surface of the impeller, were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Next, the lift-off point and the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller were measured experimentally. The CFD analysis showed that the axial thrust increased gently in the FR and R models as the flow rate increased, whereas it increased drastically in the F and N models. This difference in axial thrust was likely from the higher pressure caused by the smaller circumferential velocity in the gap between the top surface of the impeller and the casing in the FR and R models than in the F and N models, which was caused by the rear cutout. These results corresponded with the experimental results showing that the impellers lifted off in the F and N models as the flow rate increased, whereas it did not in the FR and R models. Conversely, the movement about the pivot point increased in the direction opposite the side with the pump outlet as the flow rate increased. However, the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller, which oriented away from the pump outlet, was less than 0.8° in any model under any conditions, and was considered to negligibly affect the rotational attitude of the impeller. These results confirm that a rear cutout prevents lift-off of the impeller caused by a decrease in the axial thrust.

  18. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to

  19. Development and optimization of micro/nanoporous osmotic pump tablets.

    PubMed

    Tuntikulwattana, Siracha; Mitrevej, Ampol; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat; Williams, Desmond B; Sinchaipanid, Nuttanan

    2010-06-01

    Micro/nanoporous osmotic pump tablets coated with cellulose acetate containing polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) as pore formers were fabricated. Propranolol hydrochloride was used as a model drug in this study. Formulation optimization based on USP 31 requirements was conducted following a central composite design using a two-level factorial plan involving two membrane variables (pore former and coating levels). Effect of molecular weight of pore former (PVP K30 and PVP K90) was also evaluated. Responses of drug release to the variables were analyzed using statistical software (MINITAB 14). Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy showed that the pores formed by PVP. The drug release was dependent on the molecular weight and concentration of PVP and the level of coating. The results showed that acceptable 12-h profile could be achieved with only specific range of PVP K30-containing membrane at the defined membrane thickness. However, satisfactory 24-h profile could be accomplished by both PVP K30 and PVP K90-containing membrane at the range and membrane thickness tested. Preparation and testing of the optimized formulation showed a good correlation between predicted and observed values.

  20. Heat-activated heat-pump development and potential application of Stirling-engine technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, P. D.; West, C. D.

    1982-06-01

    Presented is a brief overview of the heat-activated heat pump technology development program being carried out with emphasis on the Stirling engine technology projects. The major projects are reviewed as they were formulated and carried out under the previous product development guidelines. The revised technology development focus and current status of those major hardware projects are discussed. The key issues involved in applying Stirling engine technology to heat pump equipment are assessed. The approach and planned future activities to address those issues are described. Also included are brief descriptions of two projects in this area supported by the Gas Research Institute.

  1. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  2. NEURONAL ACTION ON THE DEVELOPING BLOOD VESSEL PATTERN

    PubMed Central

    James, Jennifer M.; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke

    2011-01-01

    The nervous system relies on a highly specialized network of blood vessels for development and neuronal survival. Recent evidence suggests that both the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS) employ multiple mechanisms to shape the vascular tree to meet its specific metabolic demands, such as promoting nerve-artery alignment in the PNS or the development the blood brain barrier in the CNS. In this article we discuss how the nervous system directly influences blood vessel patterning resulting in neuro-vascular congruence that is maintained throughout development and in the adult. PMID:21978864

  3. High power diode pumped solid state laser development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Solarz, R.; Albrecht, G.; Hackel, L.

    1994-03-01

    The authors recent developments in high powered diode pumped solid state lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Over the past year the authors have made continued improvements to semiconductor pump array technology which includes the development of higher average power and lower cost pump modules. They report the performance of high power AlGaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaInP arrays. They also report on improvement to the integrated micro-optics designs in conjunction with lensing duct technology which gives rise to very high performance end pumping designs for solid state lasers which have major advantages which they detail. Substantial progress on beam quality improvements to near the diffraction limit at very high power have also been made and will be reported. They also will discuss recent experiments on high power non-linear materials for q-switches, harmonic converters, and parametric oscillators. Advances in diode pumped devices at LLNL which include tunable Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6}, mid-IR Er:YAG, holmium based lasers and other developments will also be outlined. Concepts for delivering up to 30 kilowatts of average power from a DPSSL oscillator will be described.

  4. Development of a capillary plasma pump with vapour bubble for water purification: experimental and theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, S.; Ishihata, K.; Nishiyama, H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-sized reactive plasma pump driven by capillary bubble discharge for the purification of treated water. The apparatus we developed decomposes the pollutants in the water by using chemical species generated by the plasma discharge. The resulting stream of bubbles obviates the need for an external gas supply or pump to transport the water. A high-speed camera was used to investigate the bubble dynamics responsible for the pumping effect, which is achieved by selecting the shape of the capillary such that the bubble ejections within enhance the ‘self-repetition’ action required for the pumping motion. Our experiments showed that optimal bubble generation requires a consumed power of 17.8 W. A theoretical model was developed to investigate the pumping mechanism. We solve the problems associated with liquid oscillations in the U-shaped water reservoir by employing a non-uniform cross-sectional area in our model. The chemical reactivity of the device was confirmed by using emission spectroscopy of OH radical and by measuring the decomposition of methylene blue.

  5. The effects on blood flows of coronary artery by-pass grafts during intra-aortic balloon pumping.

    PubMed

    Tedoriya, T; Akemoto, K; Imai, T; Ueyama, T; Kawasuji, M; Watanabe, Y

    1994-12-01

    The internal thoracic artery (ITA), as well as aorto-coronary by-pass grafts, has been used for widely coronary artery by-pass grafting. Intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) is the first choice for left ventricular support when low output syndrome occurs during coronary artery by-pass surgery. However, the effect of diastolic augmentation by IABP may vary to the type of grafts. Graft flow with and without IABP support were measured in six patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery requiring IABP at Kanazawa National Hospital. The patients ranged in age from 59 to 67 years, with a mean age of 63 years, and included one woman and five men. In all cases, the left ITA was dissected from the thoracic wall as pedicle, and anastomosed in situ to the left anterior descending artery. Saphenous vein grafts (SVGs) were used for aortocoronary by-pass to the obtuse marginal branches, the first diagonal branches, the left circumflex branches, and/or the right coronary artery. Blood flow in 6 ITAs, 11 SVGs to the left coronary artery systems, and three SVGs to the right coronary artery was measured by ultrasound transit-time flowmeter simultaneously with the electrocardiogram. Blood flows in ITA grafts and SVGs were measured during IABP assist and unassisting under hemodynamically stable conditions after discontinuing cardiopulmonary by-pass. The systolic and diastolic flows of each graft were measured using the peak of the R wave and the end of T wave on the electrocardiogram as the references for systole. Systolic flow during IABP were similar to unassisted flow in both ITA and SVGs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effect of lobe pumping on human albumin: development of a lobe pump simulator using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Prakash, Mahesh; Hunt, Ben; Stokes, Nick; Cleary, Paul; Tatford, Owen C; Bertolini, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Using SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), the motion of a lobe pump under load was simulated in order to predict the level of shear stress experienced by a protein solution. By varying the gap size between the lobes and pump housing, variations in pump efficiency and shear stress were determined. The simulations indicated that pump shear was dependent on gap size, with shear stress levels (0-40 Pa) correlating with those estimated in previous albumin-pumping studies. As gap size increased, the number of fluid particles experiencing low shear (<10 Pa) increased, whereas those experiencing high shear (>20 Pa) showed a decreasing trend. The pump efficiency, however, decreased with gap size, requiring more lobe revolutions to pass a unit volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that lobe pumps operated with increased gaps between the rotors and the housing result in larger number of particles within the fluid experiencing shear stresses. Moreover, the simulations indicate that it is best to use larger lobe pumps operated at high efficiency to transfer protein-containing solutions. PMID:16246177

  7. Rethinking blood components and patients: Patient blood management. Possible ways for development in France.

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. A better awareness of the risks of blood transfusion, the availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all have led to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. In this context, patient blood management (PBM) appears as an evidence-based, patient centred, multidisciplinary approach, aiming to optimise the care of patients who might need transfusion and consequently the use of blood products. This paper presents updated scientific bases of PBM and the three pillars founding it. As PBM is developing fast in other European countries, this review proposes ways to explore for its development in France. It finally proposes to integrate PBM in a wider and coordinated approach of the blood supply management, with tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, starting with the needs of the patients and ending with an optimum treatment of the patient, including the appropriate number of blood components of the required quality. A better understanding, implementation and assessment of this coordinated global approach, allowing to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, in a coordinated way, will certainly be a major challenge for transfusion medicine in the near future, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain.

  8. A Computational Model Predicting Disruption of Blood Vessel Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vascular development is a complex process regulated by dynamic biological networks that vary in topology and state across different tissues and developmental stages. Signals regulating de novo blood vessel formation (vasculogenesis) and remodeling (angiogenesis) come from a varie...

  9. Development of a blood vessel searching device for HMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Tatsuro; Uenoya, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    In this study, an automatic blood vessel searching system (BVSS) is newly developed, which is built in the health monitoring system (HMS) and the drug delivery system (DDS) to extract the blood, evaluates the blood sugar level and injects the insulin for the diabetic patients. Main subjects of our BVSS development are 1) a transmittance photo imaging of the finger by using the LED light as a near-infrared light source with peak wave length of 870 nm, and 2) an image processing to detect the location of the center of the blood vessel cross section. The sharp edge focus method was applied in our BVSS to detect the depth of blood vessel. We carried out experiments by using blood vessel phantoms, which consist of an artificial cylindrical blood vessel and skin tissue, which are made of the teflon tube and the silicone rubber. The teflon tube has the size of 0.6 mm in diameter and is filled with the human blood. The experimental results demonstrated that the estimated depth, which is obtained by image analysis corresponding to given depths, shows a good agreement with the real values, and consequently the availability of our BVSS is confirmed.

  10. High-pressure magnetostrictive pump development: a comparison of prototype and modeled performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, Keith; Sewell, John M.; Cooke, Arthur V.; Lutian, Joseph L.; Kohlhafer, Dennis; Small, George E.; Kuhn, Philip M.

    2004-07-01

    Current efforts to extend the mission profile of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have highlighted the need for scalable linear actuators. Typically, electrical power and control are specified for their high specific performance and ease of maintenance and replacement. Electro-Hydraulic Actuators (EHAs) provide the advantages of electrical power and control along with the proven reliability, robustness and graceful failure modes of hydraulic actuation. Current EHA technology, however, is not scalable to the degree required for projected UAVs and extension to other markets and applications. This paper will describe the measured and theoretical performance of a magnetostrictive hydraulic pump developed for one such EHA as part of the DARPA Compact Hybrid Actuator Program (CHAP). This work will focus on prototype pump designs utilizing a resonant magnetostrictive piston driver. The numerous design and operational parameters that have been tested and studied in an effort to produce an optimized pump design will be discussed. In particular, the measured and predicted performance of the resonant structure and fluidics will be compared and contrasted for several pump designs. The paper will also examine the interdependence of pump parameters and the balance required to produce a viable design with the required performance characteristics.

  11. Blood flow mechanics in cardiovascular development.

    PubMed

    Boselli, Francesco; Freund, Jonathan B; Vermot, Julien

    2015-07-01

    Hemodynamic forces are fundamental to development. Indeed, much of cardiovascular morphogenesis reflects a two-way interaction between mechanical forces and the gene network activated in endothelial cells via mechanotransduction feedback loops. As these interactions are becoming better understood in different model organisms, it is possible to identify common mechanogenetic rules, which are strikingly conserved and shared in many tissues and species. Here, we discuss recent findings showing how hemodynamic forces potentially modulate cardiovascular development as well as the underlying fluid and tissue mechanics, with special attention given to the flow characteristics that are unique to the small scales of embryos.

  12. Engineering: Economic analysis of improved heat pump performance for minimum standards development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, S. R.; Barnes, K. A.; Kelly, G. E.

    1981-07-01

    A methodology and seasonal performance data are given that could be used in the development of a reference basis for minimum efficiency standards for heat pumps that are economically justified on a life cycle basis. Criteria for economic optimization are outlined. The methodology used to computer seasonal heating and cooling performance ratings and the annual energy savings resulting from efficiency improvements, by climate region, is detailed. The interdependence between efficiency ratings in the heating and cooling modes is explored using statistical analysis. An example of the procedure for determining maximum cost effective efficiency levels is demonstrated for a 36,000 Btu/h heat pump.

  13. Measuring Problematic Mobile Phone Use: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Properties of the PUMP Scale

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Stone, Amanda M.; Bibbey, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the psychometric properties of an English language measure of problematic mobile phone use. Participants were recruited from a university campus, health science center, and other public locations. The sample included 244 individuals (68.4% female) aged 18–75. Results supported a unidimensional factor structure for the 20-item self-report Problematic Use of Mobile Phones (PUMP) Scale. Internal consistency was excellent (α = 0.94). Strong correlations (r = .76, P < .001) were found between the PUMP Scale and an existing scale of cellular phone dependency that was validated in Asia, as well as items assessing frequency and intensity of mobile phone use. Results provide preliminary support for the use of the PUMP Scale to measure problematic use of mobile phones. PMID:24826371

  14. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. ...

  15. Oscillometric measurement of arterial pulse pressure for patients supported by a rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yih-Choung; Peterson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to evaluate the accuracy of an oscillometric method to measure the arterial pulse pressure from a patient with a rotary ventricular assist device (VAD). This computer model consists of three major components: the cardiovascular system, the HeartMate II VAD, and the operation of an automated cuff. Simulation was performed to mimic failure, recovery, and normal cardiac functions of a patient, supported by the HeartMate II VAD at different levels from minimum to maximum. The oscillating cuff pressure, simulating the air pressure of a deflecting cuff, was obtained from simulation under different conditions to test the accuracy of an oscillometric algorithm in determining the arterial pulse pressure. The algorithm was able to detect the systolic and diastolic arterial pressure with the error within ±2 mmHg in most cases, except the cases when ventricular suction, induced by the VAD, occurred. The results from this study suggested that the oscillometric algorithm is capable to accurately detect the arterial pulse pressure for a rotary VAD patient if the algorithm is properly tuned.

  16. Development of blood vessel searching system for HMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandani, Hirofumi; Uenoya, Toshiyuki; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we develop a new 3D miniature blood vessel searching system by using near-infrared LED light, a CMOS camera module with an image processing unit for a health monitoring system (HMS), a drug delivery system (DDS) which requires very high performance for automatic micro blood volume extraction and automatic blood examination. Our objective is to fabricate a highly reliable micro detection system by utilizing image capturing, image processing, and micro blood extraction devices. For the searching system to determine 3D blood vessel location, we employ the stereo method. The stereo method is a common photogrammetric method. It employs the optical path principle to detect 3D location of the disparity between two cameras. The principle for blood vessel visualization is derived from the ratio of hemoglobin's absorption of the near-infrared LED light. To get a high quality blood vessel image, we adopted an LED, with peak a wavelength of 940nm. The LED is set on the dorsal side of the finger and it irradiates the human finger. A blood vessel image is captured by a CMOS camera module, which is set below the palmer side of the finger. 2D blood vessel location can be detected by the luminance distribution of a one pixel line. To examine the accuracy of our detecting system, we carried out experiments using finger phantoms with blood vessel diameters of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0mm, at the depths of 0.5 ~ 2.0 mm from the phantom's surface. The experimental results of the estimated depth obtained by our detecting system shows good agreements with the given depths, and the viability of this system is confirmed.

  17. Development of a portable blood irradiator for potential clinical uses

    SciTech Connect

    Hungate, F.P.

    1988-12-01

    This document provides an account of the development of a fully portable blood irradiator and the evaluation of its safety and efficacy when implanted in goats, sheep, a baboon and dogs. The program was initiated because the control of lymphocyte populations by irradiation is a potential method for improving success in organ or tissue transplantation and for treating a variety of blood diseases. 15 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Calmodulin activation of the Ca2+ pump revealed by fluorescent chelator dyes in human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Ca2+ transport in red blood cell ghosts was monitored with fura2 or quin2 incorporated as the free acid during resealing. This is the first report of active transport monitored by the fluorescent intensity of the chelator dyes fura2 (5-50 microM) or quin2 (250 microM) in hemoglobin-depleted ghosts. Since there are no intracellular compartments in ghosts and the intracellular concentrations of all assay chelator substances including calmodulin (CaM), the dyes, and ATP could be set, the intracellular concentrations of free and total Ca [( Cafree]i and [Catotal]i) could be calculated during the transport. Ghosts prepared with or without CaM rapidly extruded Ca2+ to a steady- state concentration of 60-100 nM. A 10(4)-fold gradient for Ca2+ was routinely produced in medium containing 1 mM Ca2+. During active Ca2+ extrusion, d[Cafree]i/dt was a second order function of [Cafree]i and was independent of the dye concentration, whereas d[Catotal]i/dt increased as a first order function of both the [Cafree]i and the concentration of the Ca:dye complex. CaM (5 microM) increased d[Catotal]i/dt by 400% at 1 microM [Cafree]i, while d[Cafree]i/dt increased by only 25%. From a series of experiments we conclude that chelated forms of Ca2+ serve as substrates for the pump under permissive control of the [Cafree]i, and this dual effect may explain cooperativity. Free Ca2+ is extruded, and probably also Ca2+ bound to CaM or other chelators, while CaM and the chelators are retained in the cell. PMID:1371307

  19. Development of solar driven absorption air conditioners and heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, K.; Wahlig, M.; Wali, E.; Rasson, J.; Molishever, E.

    1980-03-01

    The development of absorption refrigeration systems for solar active heating and cooling applications is discussed. The approaches investigated are those using air-cooled condenser-absorber and those leading to coefficient of performances (COP) that increase continuously with heat source temperature. This is primarily an experimental project, with the emphasis on designing, fabricating and testing absorption chillers in operating regimes that are particularly suited for solar energy applications. Its demonstrated that the conventional single-effect ammonia-water absorption cycle can be used (with minor modifications) for solar cooling.

  20. Maternal antibodies and developing blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Czeslawa; Athanassiou, Andrew; Chen, Huiyi; Diamond, Betty

    2015-12-01

    We briefly review the protective role of maternal antibodies during fetal development and at early postnatal stages. We describe antibody delivery to fetuses, particularly in the context of the developing blood-brain barrier (BBB), and present the essential concepts regarding the adult BBB, together with existing information on the prenatal developing BBB. We focus on maternal antibody transfer to the developing brain and the consequences of the presence of pathogenic antibodies at early stages of brain development on subsequent brain dysfunction.

  1. Cancer as a channelopathy: ion channels and pumps in tumor development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Litan, Alisa; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels and pumps not only regulate membrane potential, ion homeostasis, and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and differentiation. Consistent with a role in cell signaling, channel proteins and ion pumps can form macromolecular complexes with growth factors, and cell adhesion and other signaling molecules. And while cancer is still not being cataloged as a channelopathy, as the non-traditional roles of ion pumps and channels are being recognized, it is increasingly being suggested that ion channels and ion pumps contribute to cancer progression. Cancer cell migration requires the regulation of adhesion complexes between migrating cells and surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Cell movement along solid surfaces requires a sequence of cell protrusions and retractions that mainly depend on regulation of the actin cytoskeleton along with contribution of microtubules and molecular motor proteins such as mysoin. This process is triggered and modulated by a combination of environmental signals, which are sensed and integrated by membrane receptors, including integrins and cadherins. Membrane receptors transduce these signals into downstream signaling pathways, often involving the Rho GTPase protein family. These pathways regulate the cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for proper timing of adhesion, contraction and detachment of cells in order to find their way through extracellular spaces. Migration and adhesion involve continuous modulation of cell motility, shape and volume, in which ion channels and pumps play major roles. Research on cancer cells suggests that certain ion channels may be involved in aberrant tumor growth and channel inhibitors often lead to growth arrest. This review will describe recent research into the role of ion pumps and ion channels in cell migration and adhesion, and how they may contribute to tumor development

  2. Rethinking blood components and patients: Patient blood management. Possible ways for development in France.

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. A better awareness of the risks of blood transfusion, the availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all have led to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. In this context, patient blood management (PBM) appears as an evidence-based, patient centred, multidisciplinary approach, aiming to optimise the care of patients who might need transfusion and consequently the use of blood products. This paper presents updated scientific bases of PBM and the three pillars founding it. As PBM is developing fast in other European countries, this review proposes ways to explore for its development in France. It finally proposes to integrate PBM in a wider and coordinated approach of the blood supply management, with tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, starting with the needs of the patients and ending with an optimum treatment of the patient, including the appropriate number of blood components of the required quality. A better understanding, implementation and assessment of this coordinated global approach, allowing to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, in a coordinated way, will certainly be a major challenge for transfusion medicine in the near future, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. PMID:27476011

  3. Development of High Efficiency Carbon Dioxide Commercial Heat Pump Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Michael PETERSEN; Chad D. BOWERS; Stefan ELBEL; Pega HRNJAK

    2012-07-01

    Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in both Japan and Europe, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such products in the US has been limited. While this trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but acceptance remains low in the commercial sector. The objective of the presented work is the development of a high efficiency R744 heat pump water heater for commercial applications with effective utilization of the cooling capability for air conditioning and/or refrigeration. The ultimate goal is to achieve total system COP of up to 8. This unit will be targeted at commercial use where some cooling load is typically needed year round, such as restaurants, hotels, nursing homes, and hospitals. This paper presents the performance results from the development of four R744 commercial heat pump water heater packages of approximately 35 kW and comparison to a commercially available baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, the influences of an internal heat exchanger and an enhanced evaporator on the system performance are described and recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system.

  4. Review article: the continuing development of proton pump inhibitors with particular reference to pantoprazole.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Kohl, B; Sachs, G; Senn-Bilfinger, J; Simon, W A; Sturm, E

    1995-08-01

    Inhibition of the gastric proton pump is gaining acceptance as the treatment of choice for severe gastrooesophageal reflux disease, and for treatment of duodenal and gastric ulceration. Three of these drugs are now available (omeprazole, lansoprazole and pantoprazole) and more are being developed. Proton pump inhibitors share the same core structure, but differ in terms of substituents on this core. The substitutions are able to modify some important chemical properties of the compounds. For example, pantoprazole is significantly more acid-stable than omeprazole or lansoprazole. E3810 is significantly less stable than the other compounds. We present an explantation for this finding that depends on the relative pK values for the pyridine and benzimidazole nitrogens, especially the former. Pantoprazole formulated in an enteric-coated tablet displays high bioavailability and linear pharmacokinetics whether on single or multiple dose regimens. Although all three proton pump inhibitors provide a similar chemical conversion to sulphenamides, which are highly reactive cysteine reagents, these reagents derivatize different cysteines in the extracytoplasmic or membrane domain of the pump and inhibit the pump at different rates. Whereas the differences in chemical reactivity can be explained by the solution chemistry of the compounds, selective derivatization of different cysteines on the protein argues for an involvement of pump structure in response to the presence of the proton pump inhibitor on its luminal surface. This suggests that the proton pump inhibitors, which were originally designed to take advantage of only the highly acidic space generated in the parietal cell by the production of the sulphenamide, are made even more selective by the protein they target. Pantoprazole is metabolized by a combination of phase I and phase II metabolism, and has also been shown to have a very low potential for drug interaction. Studies of acid secretion in man have shown this

  5. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  6. Physics-driven impeller designs for a novel intravascular blood pump for patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; McKenna, Kelli L; Riddle, Michelle L; Kafagy, Dhyaa H; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support offers an alternative therapeutic treatment for patients with dysfunctional single ventricle physiology. An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a cavopulmonary assist device for these patients. This study details the development of a new rotating impeller geometry. We examined the performance of 8 impeller geometries with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100° to 800° using computational methods. A refined range of blade twist angles between 300° and 400° was then identified, and 4 additional geometries were evaluated. Generally, the impeller designs produced 4-26mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min for 6000-8000 RPM. A data regression analysis was completed and found the impeller with 400° of blade twist to be the superior performer. A hydraulic test was conducted on a prototype of the 400° impeller, which generated measurable pressure rises of 7-28mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min at 6000-8000 RPM. The findings of the numerical model and experiment were in reasonable agreement within approximately 20%. These results support the continued development of an axial-flow, mechanical cavopulmonary assist device as a new clinical therapeutic option for Fontan patients. PMID:27129783

  7. Physics-driven impeller designs for a novel intravascular blood pump for patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; McKenna, Kelli L; Riddle, Michelle L; Kafagy, Dhyaa H; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support offers an alternative therapeutic treatment for patients with dysfunctional single ventricle physiology. An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a cavopulmonary assist device for these patients. This study details the development of a new rotating impeller geometry. We examined the performance of 8 impeller geometries with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100° to 800° using computational methods. A refined range of blade twist angles between 300° and 400° was then identified, and 4 additional geometries were evaluated. Generally, the impeller designs produced 4-26mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min for 6000-8000 RPM. A data regression analysis was completed and found the impeller with 400° of blade twist to be the superior performer. A hydraulic test was conducted on a prototype of the 400° impeller, which generated measurable pressure rises of 7-28mmHg for flow rates of 1-4L/min at 6000-8000 RPM. The findings of the numerical model and experiment were in reasonable agreement within approximately 20%. These results support the continued development of an axial-flow, mechanical cavopulmonary assist device as a new clinical therapeutic option for Fontan patients.

  8. Development of venous-venous extracorporeal blood purification circuits in rodents for sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhi-Yong; Rimmelé, Thomas; Zhou, Feihu; Chuasuwan, Anan; Kellum, John A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unlike pharmacological interventions in sepsis, extracorporeal blood purification which is widely used in septic patients is not typically studied in experimental rodents. Most of the previous studies have performed extracorporeal blood purification in larger animals and typically use artery-venous (AV) vascular access. We developed a venous-venous (VV) purification model in the rat as a treatment for sepsis. METHODS Using adult male Sprague Dawley rats we cannulated the femoral artery or vein and the jugular vein with P50 tubing and created a VV or AV circuit. Blood flow was determined by arterial pressure in the AV circuit while in the VV circuit the blood flow was regulated using a rotary pump. The safety of this circuit was evaluated using the changes of blood interleukin-6 (IL-6), rectal temperature and seven-day survival with sham extracorporeal circulation (circuit connection without treatment) to the control (without circuit). The main side effects of this V-V circuit with A–V circuit were compared. RESULTS The difference of IL-6, body temperature and cumulative survival were no statistically significant after extracorporeal circulation. The main side effects of extracorporeal circulation occurred less often with VV compared to AV therapy: massive bleeding (2.5% vs. 15%, p=0.04), clot formation (2.5% vs. 15%, p=0.04). This VV circuit has been successfully used in different septic rodent models with different techniques (hemoadsorption and hemofiltration). CONCLUSIONS VV blood purification in a rodent model appears to be effective and is safer than AV circuit. PMID:23953896

  9. Development of an implantable infusion pump for sustained anti-HIV drug administration.

    PubMed

    Baert, Lieven; Schueller, Laurent; Tardy, Yanik; Macbride, Doug; Klooster, Gerben van't; Borghys, Herman; Clessens, Ellen; Van Den Mooter, Guy; Van Gyseghem, Elke; Van Remoortere, Pieter; Wigerinck, Piet; Rosier, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Factors such as insufficient drug potency, non-compliance and restricted tissue penetration contribute to incomplete suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the difficulty to control this infection. Infusion via standard catheters can be a source of infection, which is potentially life threatening in these patients. We developed an implantable infusion pump, allowing to accommodate large volumes (16-50mL) of high viscous solutions (up to 23.96mPas at 39 degrees C) of anti-HIV agents and providing sustained release of medication: a standard Codman 3000 pump, which was initially developed to release aqueous solutions ( approximately 0.7mPas) into the spinal cord such as for pain medication, was transformed for release of viscous solutions up to 40mPas by adapting the diameter of the capillary flow restrictor, the capillary length and way of catheterisation--by placing the indwelling catheter in the vena cava. A pilot study of the pump implanted in 2 dogs showed continuous steady-state release of the protease inhibitor darunavir (25mg/dog/day administered for 25 days), thereby achieving plasma concentration levels of approximately 40ng/mL. Steady-state plasma levels were reproducible after monthly refill of the pumps. In conclusion, the implantable adapted Codman 3000 constant-flow infusion pump customized to anti-HIV therapy allows sustained release of anti-HIV medication and may represent an opportunity to reduce the pill burden and complexity of dosing schemes associated with common anti-HIV therapy.

  10. Basic study to develop an electromagnetic drive method for the rotary undulation pump.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yusuke; Chinzei, Tsuneo; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Mochizuki, Shuichi; Kouno, Akimasa; Imachi, Kou

    2003-10-01

    The rotary undulation pump, which is composed of a disk with a convex shape on both sides and a pump housing with one narrow side and one wide side, is a unique continuous flow pump with a new principle. The concept of the levitation drive method for this pump was proposed. The electromagnetic driver model and drive circuit were developed to examine the possibility and the difference among the delta wired, Y wired, and repulsion methods. In the repulsion method, the disk was driven by magnetic repulsion. The model could be driven with either method, and the repulsion method was demonstrated to also be possible. With either method, owing to the wide gap between the permanent magnets and coils, the output was not enough when the load was high. The efficiency was almost the same in the delta wired and Y wired methods. In the repulsion method, however, it was less than 50% of that in the other two methods. From the results, the delta wired and Y wired methods with an active control of the gap distance were considered to be better than the repulsion method, which required no active gap control. PMID:14616528

  11. Design and development of a split-evaporator heat-pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, M.H.; Penoncello, S.G.

    1981-12-01

    The designs and experimental results of three types of multiple source heat pumps are presented. The three designs are the parallel evaporator, the series evaporator, and the parallel evaporator with active subcooling, with the parallel evaporator with the active subcooling showing the most promise for solving the problem of defrosting of air evaporators. Three design procedures for multiple source heat pumps were developed. One of these is a hand calculational procedure, the others are computer based. The models are based upon the refrigerant flow rate, rather than the refrigeration effect of the evaporator. The technical results of a detailed analytical and experimental model of the heat transfer rates on a flat plate ice maker are presented. It is shown, both analytically and experimentally, that the temperature of the air surrounding the flat plate ice maker can play a dominant role in the rate of ice formation. A detailed weather analysis for forty cities located throughout the nation was completed. These data were processed to allow easy computation of thermal storage requirements for full, partial, or minimum ACES systems, or upon other design requirements, such as off-peak air conditioning. The results of an innovative ice storage system that is thermally coupled to the earth are described. This system has the potential for meeting both the off-peak air conditioning needs and the thermal storage requirements for the heating cycle. An economic and energy comparison of multiple source heat pumps with ACES, and air-to-air heat pump systems is presented.

  12. Innovative Design to Prevent Reversal of Roller Blood Pump Rotation in the Event of Electromechanical Failure: An Easy Solution to a Devastating Problem

    PubMed Central

    Skoletsky, Jennifer S.; White, Brian T.; Austin, Jon W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Despite the advanced technologies of battery back-up for heart-lung consoles and the availability of system-wide generators, electromechanical failure is still occurring. Several heartlung machine manufacturers still provide unsafe handcranking devices to use in the case of an emergency while using a roller blood pump. A new design has been engineered to eliminate safety and quality issues for the perfusionist and the patient when the need for handcranking presents itself. A ratchet-style handcranking device was fabricated by means of a steel plate with adjustable pins. The adjustable pins allow for use with different models of the Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra heart-lung consoles, which contain roller pumps with 180° roller heads. Additional modifications such as a 1:2 transmission and fluorescent markers are also used in the design. This innovative design is an improvement in safety compared with the current handcrank provided by Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra. With this modified handcranking device, accidental reverse rotation of the roller pump head cannot occur. Fluorescent markers will improve visualization of the pump head in low-light situations. The ergonomic design improves efficiency by reducing fatigue. Most importantly, a “safe” safety device will replace the current design provided by these manufacturers, thus improving the quality of care by health care providers. PMID:17672191

  13. Innovative design to prevent reversal of roller blood pump rotation in the event of electromechanical failure: an easy solution to a devastating problem.

    PubMed

    Skoletsky, Jennifer S; White, Brian T; Austin, Jon W

    2007-06-01

    Despite the advanced technologies of battery back-up for heart-lung consoles and the availability of system-wide generators, electromechanical failure is still occurring. Several heart-lung machine manufacturers still provide unsafe handcranking devices to use in the case of an emergency while using a roller blood pump. A new design has been engineered to eliminate safety and quality issues for the perfusionist and the patient when the need for handcranking presents itself. A ratchet-style handcranking device was fabricated by means of a steel plate with adjustable pins. The adjustable pins allow for use with different models of the Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra heart-lung consoles, which contain roller pumps with 1800 roller heads. Additional modifications such as a 1:2 transmission and fluorescent markers are also used in the design. This innovative design is an improvement in safety compared with the current handcrank provided by Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra. With this modified handcranking device, accidental reverse rotation of the roller pump head cannot occur. Fluorescent markers will improve visualization of the pump head in low-light situations. The ergonomic design improves efficiency by reducing fatigue. Most importantly, a "safe" safety device will replace the current design provided by these manufacturers, thus improving the quality of care by health care providers.

  14. Development of a single-mode dye laser pumped by a copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasushi; Niki, Hideaki; Adachi, Satoru; Takeda, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1986-10-01

    An efficient high power single mode dye laser was developed for a study of uranium enrichment. The oscillation and amplification properties were studied experimentally and theoretically. The obtained band width was narrower than 100 MHz. When rhodamine 6 G chloride was used, the average output power and efficiency of the oscillator-amplifier system were 300 mW and 5%, respectively, at 575 nm for the total copper vapor laser pumping power of 4 W.

  15. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: image and computational analyses of behaviors of magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Yano, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids (several days). We have developed an MF seal that has a shield mechanism. The seal was perfect for 275 days in water. To investigate the effect of a shield, behaviors of MFs in a seal in water were studied both experimentally and computationally. (a) Two kinds of MF seals, one with a shield and one without a shield, were installed in a centrifugal pump. Behaviors of MFs in the seals in water were observed with a video camera and high-speed microscope. In the seal without a shield, the surface of the water in the seal waved and the turbulent flow affected behaviors of the MFs. In contrast, MFs rotated stably in the seal with a shield in water even at high rotational speeds. (b) Computational fluid dynamics analysis revealed that a stationary secondary flow pattern in the seal and small velocity difference between magnetic fluid and water at the interface. These MF behaviors prolonged the life of an MF seal in water. PMID:24109774

  16. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: Behaviors of magnetic fluids in a magnetic fluid seal.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Yano, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Wataru; Okamoto, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids (several days). We have developed an MF seal that has a shield mechanism. The seal was perfect for 275 days in water. To investigate the effect of a shield, behaviors of MFs in a seal in water were studied both experimentally and computationally. (a) Two kinds of MF seals, one with a shield and one without a shield, were installed in a centrifugal pump. Behaviors of MFs in the seals in water were observed with a video camera and high-speed microscope. In the seal without a shield, the surface of the water in the seal waved and the turbulent flow affected behaviors of the MFs. In contrast, MFs rotated stably in the seal with a shield in water even at high rotational speeds. (b) Computational fluid dynamics analysis revealed that a stationary secondary flow pattern in the seal and small velocity difference between magnetic fluid and water at the interface. These MF behaviors prolonged the life of an MF seal in water. PMID:23442238

  17. Final Technical Report: Electromagnetic Pump Insulation Materials Development and Testing (PLM-DOC-0005-2465) Report # DOEGEHB00613

    SciTech Connect

    Krahn, John; Reed, Claude; Loewen, Eric

    2015-10-29

    Final Technical Report: Electromagnetic Pump Insulation Materials Development and Testing (Report # DOEGEHB00613) summarizes the information gathered from the analysis of the 160 m3/min EM Pump insulation that was tested in 2000-2002 and additional evaluations of new resilient, engineered insulation system evaluated and tested at both GRC and ANL. This report provides information on Tasks 1 and 2 of the entire project. This report also provides information in three broad areas: Historical and current data; Conclusions based on test data; and Insulation specifications for use in EM Pumps. The research for Task 2 builds upon Task 1: Update EM Pump Databank, which is summarized within this report. Where research for Task 3 and 4 Next-Generation EM Pump Analysis Tools identified parameters or analysis model that benefits Task 2 research, those items are noted within this report. The important design variables for the manufacture and operation of an EM Pump that the insulation research can evaluate are: space constraints; voltage capability of insulation system; maximum flux density through iron; flow rate and outlet pressure; efficiency and manufacturability. The development summary of the Electromagnetic Pump Insulation Materials Development and Testing was completed to include: Historical and current data; Conclusions based on test data; and Insulation specifications for use in EM Pumps.

  18. Maternal antibodies and developing blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Czeslawa; Athanassiou, Andrew; Chen, Huiyi; Diamond, Betty

    2015-12-01

    We briefly review the protective role of maternal antibodies during fetal development and at early postnatal stages. We describe antibody delivery to fetuses, particularly in the context of the developing blood-brain barrier (BBB), and present the essential concepts regarding the adult BBB, together with existing information on the prenatal developing BBB. We focus on maternal antibody transfer to the developing brain and the consequences of the presence of pathogenic antibodies at early stages of brain development on subsequent brain dysfunction. PMID:26507553

  19. Design, development and test of a capillary pump loop heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroliczek, E. J.; Ku, J.; Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a capillary pump loop (CPL) heat pipe, including computer modeling and breadboard testing, is presented. The computer model is a SINDA-type thermal analyzer, combined with a pressure analyzer, which predicts the transients of the CPL heat pipe during operation. The breadboard is an aluminum/ammonia transport system which contains multiple parallel evaporator and condenser zones within a single loop. Test results have demonstrated the practicality and reliability of such a design, including heat load sharing among evaporators, liquid inventory/temperature control feature, and priming under load. Transport capability for this system is 65 KW-M with individual evaporator pumps managing up to 1.7 KW at a heat flux of 15 W/sq cm. The prediction of the computer model for heat transport capabilities is in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Development of solar concentrators for high-power solar-pumped lasers.

    PubMed

    Dinh, T H; Ohkubo, T; Yabe, T

    2014-04-20

    We have developed unique solar concentrators for solar-pumped solid-state lasers to improve both efficiency and laser output power. Natural sunlight is collected by a primary concentrator which is a 2  m×2  m Fresnel lens, and confined by a cone-shaped hybrid concentrator. Such solar power is coupled to a laser rod by a cylinder with coolant surrounding it that is called a liquid light-guide lens (LLGL). Performance of the cylindrical LLGL has been characterized analytically and experimentally. Since a 14 mm diameter LLGL generates efficient and uniform pumping along a Nd:YAG rod that is 6 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length, 120 W cw laser output is achieved with beam quality factor M2 of 137 and overall slope efficiency of 4.3%. The collection efficiency is 30.0  W/m2, which is 1.5 times larger than the previous record. The overall conversion efficiency is more than 3.2%, which can be comparable to a commercial lamp-pumped solid-state laser. The concept of the light-guide lens can be applied for concentrator photovoltaics or other solar energy optics.

  1. Development of Environmentally Benign Heat Pump Water Heaters for the US Market

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan; Roetker, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Improving energy efficiency in water heating applications is important to the nation's energy strategies. Water heating in residential and commercial buildings accounts for about 10% of U.S. buildings energy consumption. Heat pump water heating (HPWH) technology is a significant breakthrough in energy efficiency, as an alternative to electric resistance water heating. Heat pump technology has shown acceptable payback period with proper incentives and successful market penetration is emerging. However, current HPWH require the use of refrigerants with high Global Warming Potential (GWP). Furthermore, current system designs depend greatly on the backup resistance heaters when the ambient temperature is below freezing or when hot water demand increases. Finally, the performance of current HPWH technology degrades greatly as the water set point temperature exceeds 330 K. This paper presents the potential for carbon dioxide, CO2, as a natural, environmentally benign alternative refrigerant for HPWH technology. In this paper, we first describe the system design, implications and opportunities of operating a transcritical cycle. Next, a prototype CO2 HPWH design featuring flexible component evaluation capability is described. The experimental setup and results are then illustrated followed by a brief discussion on the measured system performance. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for the development of CO2 heat pump water heating technology suitable for the U.S. market.

  2. Development of an Air-Source Heat Pump Integrated with a Water Heating / Dehumidification Module

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C Keith; Uselton, Robert B.; Shen, Bo; Baxter, Van D; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    A residential-sized dual air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) concept is under development in partnership between ORNL and a manufacturer. The concept design consists of a two-stage air-source heat pump (ASHP) coupled on the air distribution side with a separate novel water heating/dehumidification (WH/DH) module. The motivation for this unusual equipment combination is the forecast trend for home sensible loads to be reduced more than latent loads. Integration of water heating with a space dehumidification cycle addresses humidity control while performing double-duty. This approach can be applied to retrofit/upgrade applications as well as new construction. A WH/DH module capable of ~1.47 L/h water removal and ~2 kW water heating capacity was assembled by the manufacturer. A heat pump system model was used to guide the controls design; lab testing was conducted and used to calibrate the models. Performance maps were generated and used in a TRNSYS sub-hourly simulation to predict annual performance in a well-insulated house. Annual HVAC/WH energy savings of ~35% are predicted in cold and hot-humid U.S. climates compared to a minimum efficiency baseline.

  3. Optical power supply unit utilizing high power laser diode module developed for fiber laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Akira; Kiyoyama, Wataru; Yamauchi, Ryozo

    2014-05-01

    High power laser diode developed for fiber laser pumping is evaluated as a light source for an optical power supply unit. The output power of the newly developed laser diode module exceeds 15 W with 105 μm core fiber. It is estimated that more than 1600 mW power supply can be achieved with the single emitter laser diode module and a polycrystalline silicon cell over 1 km away from the light source. This unit can be used for sensor nodes in the fiber sensor network.

  4. Setbacks in blood substitutes research and development: a biochemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Alayash, Abdu I

    2010-06-01

    Recent setbacks in using Hb-based technology to develop oxygen carriers or blood substitutes may spur new and fundamentally different approaches for the development of a new generation of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs). This article briefly details some underlying mechanisms that may have been responsible for the adverse-event profile associated with HBOCs, with a focus on the contribution of the author's laboratory toward identifying some of these biochemical pathways and some ways and means to control them. It is hoped that this will aid in the development of a safe and effective second generation of HBOCs.

  5. Development of trivalent ytterbium doped fluorapatites for diode-pumped laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2000-11-01

    A major motivator of this work is the Mercury Project, a one kilowatt diode-pumped solid-state laser system under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), which incorporates ytterbium doped strontium fluorapatite, Sr5(PO4)3F (S-FAP), as the amplifier gain medium. The primary focus of this thesis is a full understanding of the properties of this material, which is necessary for proper design and modeling of the system. Ytterbium-doped fluorapatites were investigated at LLNL prior to this work and found to be ideal candidate materials for high-power amplifier systems providing high absorption and emission cross sections, long radiative lifetimes, and high efficiency. A family of barium substituted S-FAP crystals was grown in an effort to modify the pump and emission bandwidths for application to broadband diode pumping and short pulse generation. Crystals of Yb 3+:Srs5-xBax(PO4) 3F where x < 1 showed homogeneous lines offering 8.4 nm (1.8X enhancement) of absorption bandwidth and 6.9 nm (1.4X enhancement) of emission bandwidth. The gain saturation fluence of Yb:S-FAP was measured to be 3.2 J/cm 2 with homogeneous extraction using a pump-probe experiment where the probe laser was a high intensity Q-switched master oscillator power amplifier system. The crystal quality of Czochralski grown Yb:S-FAP boules, which is effected by defects such as cracking, cloudiness, bubble core, slip dislocations, and anomalous absorption, was investigated interferometrically and quantified by means of Power Spectral Density (PSD) plots. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) losses were evaluated by first measuring the SRS gain coefficient to be 1.3 cm/GW, then modeling the losses in the Mercury amplifier system. Countermeasures including the addition of bandwidth to the extraction beam and wedging of amplifier surfaces are shown to reduce the SRS losses allowing efficient laser gain extraction at higher intensities. Finally, an efficient Q-switched Yb:S-FAP oscillator

  6. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argabright, T. A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 1100 C (160 to 2300 F) for the source heat and 140 to 1900 C (280 to 3750 F) for the product heat.

  7. Development of blood vessel searching system using near-infrared light stereo method for clinical blood sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kai; Morita, Yusuke; Nakamachi, Eiji; Honda, Norihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-10-01

    We developed an accurate three-dimensional blood vessel search (3D BVS) system using NIR light for the clinical blood sampling. In the previous study, the 3D BVS system, which used near-infrared (NIR) light imaging and the stereo method to locate blood vessel accurately in three dimensions has been developed(1). However, as NIR lights could not transmit the human arm, this system could not be used for the subcutaneous blood vessel detection. In this study, we developed a BVS by using the reflecting NIR light for blood sampling assist. The light scattering in human tissue will cause blur of blood vessel edge in image, that makes the diameter of blood vessel became uncertain. In this study, a light propagation simulation and a multilayer phantom were adopted to estimate the measurement error of blood vessel diameter in our BSV system. In the simulation, the optical properties of scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, and refractive index were set similar with human skin. Next, we fabricated a multilayer phantom, which has the similar structure and optical properties with the human skin to confirm availability of the simulation. Also, the optical properties of our phantom are adjustable in our phantom to imitate the different color of skin. We established the estimation algorithm to detect the blood vessel accurately. Finally, we confirm the availability of our BVS for the blood sampling assist system.

  8. Mother-plant-mediated pumping of zinc into the developing seed.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lene Irene; Hansen, Thomas H; Larue, Camille; Østerberg, Jeppe Thulin; Hoffmann, Robert D; Liesche, Johannes; Krämer, Ute; Surblé, Suzy; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Samson, Vallerie Ann; Grolimund, Daniel; Husted, Søren; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient intake of zinc and iron from a cereal-based diet is one of the causes of 'hidden hunger' (micronutrient deficiency), which affects some two billion people(1,2). Identifying a limiting factor in the molecular mechanism of zinc loading into seeds is an important step towards determining the genetic basis for variation of grain micronutrient content and developing breeding strategies to improve this trait(3). Nutrients are translocated to developing seeds at a rate that is regulated by transport processes in source leaves, in the phloem vascular pathway, and at seed sinks. Nutrients are released from a symplasmic maternal seed domain into the seed apoplasm surrounding the endosperm and embryo by poorly understood membrane transport processes(4-6). Plants are unique among eukaryotes in having specific P1B-ATPase pumps for the cellular export of zinc(7). In Arabidopsis, we show that two zinc transporting P1B-ATPases actively export zinc from the mother plant to the filial tissues. Mutant plants that lack both zinc pumps accumulate zinc in the seed coat and consequently have vastly reduced amounts of zinc inside the seed. Blockage of zinc transport was observed at both high and low external zinc supplies. The phenotype was determined by the mother plant and is thus due to a lack of zinc pump activity in the seed coat and not in the filial tissues. The finding that P1B-ATPases are one of the limiting factors controlling the amount of zinc inside a seed is an important step towards combating nutritional zinc deficiency worldwide.

  9. Mother-plant-mediated pumping of zinc into the developing seed.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lene Irene; Hansen, Thomas H; Larue, Camille; Østerberg, Jeppe Thulin; Hoffmann, Robert D; Liesche, Johannes; Krämer, Ute; Surblé, Suzy; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Samson, Vallerie Ann; Grolimund, Daniel; Husted, Søren; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient intake of zinc and iron from a cereal-based diet is one of the causes of 'hidden hunger' (micronutrient deficiency), which affects some two billion people(1,2). Identifying a limiting factor in the molecular mechanism of zinc loading into seeds is an important step towards determining the genetic basis for variation of grain micronutrient content and developing breeding strategies to improve this trait(3). Nutrients are translocated to developing seeds at a rate that is regulated by transport processes in source leaves, in the phloem vascular pathway, and at seed sinks. Nutrients are released from a symplasmic maternal seed domain into the seed apoplasm surrounding the endosperm and embryo by poorly understood membrane transport processes(4-6). Plants are unique among eukaryotes in having specific P1B-ATPase pumps for the cellular export of zinc(7). In Arabidopsis, we show that two zinc transporting P1B-ATPases actively export zinc from the mother plant to the filial tissues. Mutant plants that lack both zinc pumps accumulate zinc in the seed coat and consequently have vastly reduced amounts of zinc inside the seed. Blockage of zinc transport was observed at both high and low external zinc supplies. The phenotype was determined by the mother plant and is thus due to a lack of zinc pump activity in the seed coat and not in the filial tissues. The finding that P1B-ATPases are one of the limiting factors controlling the amount of zinc inside a seed is an important step towards combating nutritional zinc deficiency worldwide. PMID:27243644

  10. Arterial α2-Na+ pump expression influences blood pressure: lessons from novel, genetically engineered smooth muscle-specific α2 mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Song, Hong; Wang, Youhua; Lee, Jane C.; Kotlikoff, Michael I.; Pritchard, Tracy J.; Paul, Richard J.; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Arterial myocytes express α1-catalytic subunit isoform Na+ pumps (75–80% of total), which are ouabain resistant in rodents, and high ouabain affinity α2-Na+ pumps. Mice with globally reduced α2-pumps (but not α1-pumps), mice with mutant ouabain-resistant α2-pumps, and mice with a smooth muscle (SM)-specific α2-transgene (α2SM-Tg) that induces overexpression all have altered blood pressure (BP) phenotypes. We generated α2SM-DN mice with SM-specific α2 (not α1) reduction (>50%) using nonfunctional dominant negative (DN) α2. We compared α2SM-DN and α2SM-Tg mice to controls to determine how arterial SM α2-pumps affect vasoconstriction and BP. α2SM-DN mice had elevated basal mean BP (mean BP by telemetry: 117 ± 4 vs. 106 ± 1 mmHg, n = 7/7, P < 0.01) and enhanced BP responses to chronic ANG II infusion (240 ng·kg−1·min−1) and high (6%) NaCl. Several arterial Ca2+ transporters, including Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) and sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps [sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 1 (PMCA1)], were also reduced (>50%). α2SM-DN mouse isolated small arteries had reduced myogenic reactivity, perhaps because of reduced Ca2+ transporter expression. In contrast, α2SM-Tg mouse aortas overexpressed α2 (>2-fold), NCX1, SERCA2, and PMCA1 (43). α2SM-Tg mice had reduced basal mean BP (104 ± 1 vs. 109 ± 2 mmHg, n = 15/9, P < 0.02) and attenuated BP responses to chronic ANG II (300–400 ng·kg−1·min−1) with or without 2% NaCl but normal myogenic reactivity. NCX1 expression was inversely related to basal BP in SM-α2 engineered mice but was directly related in SM-NCX1 engineered mice. NCX1, which usually mediates arterial Ca2+ entry, and α2-Na+ pumps colocalize at plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions and functionally couple via the local Na+ gradient to help regulate cell Ca2+. Altered Ca2+ transporter expression in SM-α2 engineered mice apparently compensates to

  11. Arterial α2-Na+ pump expression influences blood pressure: lessons from novel, genetically engineered smooth muscle-specific α2 mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Song, Hong; Wang, Youhua; Lee, Jane C; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Pritchard, Tracy J; Paul, Richard J; Zhang, Jin; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2015-09-01

    Arterial myocytes express α1-catalytic subunit isoform Na(+) pumps (75-80% of total), which are ouabain resistant in rodents, and high ouabain affinity α2-Na(+) pumps. Mice with globally reduced α2-pumps (but not α1-pumps), mice with mutant ouabain-resistant α2-pumps, and mice with a smooth muscle (SM)-specific α2-transgene (α2 (SM-Tg)) that induces overexpression all have altered blood pressure (BP) phenotypes. We generated α2 (SM-DN) mice with SM-specific α2 (not α1) reduction (>50%) using nonfunctional dominant negative (DN) α2. We compared α2 (SM-DN) and α2 (SM-Tg) mice to controls to determine how arterial SM α2-pumps affect vasoconstriction and BP. α2 (SM-DN) mice had elevated basal mean BP (mean BP by telemetry: 117 ± 4 vs. 106 ± 1 mmHg, n = 7/7, P < 0.01) and enhanced BP responses to chronic ANG II infusion (240 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and high (6%) NaCl. Several arterial Ca(2+) transporters, including Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) and sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps [sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (PMCA1)], were also reduced (>50%). α2 (SM-DN) mouse isolated small arteries had reduced myogenic reactivity, perhaps because of reduced Ca(2+) transporter expression. In contrast, α2 (SM-Tg) mouse aortas overexpressed α2 (>2-fold), NCX1, SERCA2, and PMCA1 (43). α2 (SM-Tg) mice had reduced basal mean BP (104 ± 1 vs. 109 ± 2 mmHg, n = 15/9, P < 0.02) and attenuated BP responses to chronic ANG II (300-400 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) with or without 2% NaCl but normal myogenic reactivity. NCX1 expression was inversely related to basal BP in SM-α2 engineered mice but was directly related in SM-NCX1 engineered mice. NCX1, which usually mediates arterial Ca(2+) entry, and α2-Na(+) pumps colocalize at plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions and functionally couple via the local Na(+) gradient to help regulate cell Ca(2+). Altered Ca(2+) transporter expression in

  12. Eosinophilic esophagitis that develops during therapy with proton pump inhibitors : case series and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Orel, R; Murch, S; Amil Dias, J; Vandenplas, Y; Homan, M

    2016-01-01

    Therapy with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) results in remission in at least one third of patients with esophageal eosinophilia, presumably because of both their acid-related and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action. However, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) may also develop during therapy with PPIs. We present a case series of four children who were initially diagnosed with infectious esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease or gastric ulcer, who had no eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus, but subsequently developed symptoms, endoscopic features and histological picture of typical EoE. We discuss mechanisms of action of PPIs of likely relevance to an increased risk of development of EoE in some patients, such as their influence on mucosal barrier function, interference with pH-related protein digestion by pepsin, and antigen processing by immune cells. PMID:27382946

  13. Clinical results and pump analysis of the Gyro pump for long-term extracorporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Takamitsu; Takano, Tamaki; Michinaga, Yuuki; Yokokawa, Michihiro; Wada, Yuko; Seto, Tatsuichirou; Fukui, Daisuke; Amano, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Rescuing patients in severe cardiac failure with extracorporeal support remains challenging. The Gyro pump is a centrifugal blood pump and was now used for cardiopulmonary bypass, although it was originally developed for long-term cardiac assist. Little is known about clinical experiences using this pump. Here, we report on the clinical results of long-term extracorporeal life support for over 4 days using the Gyro pump with Excelung, a hollow fiber oxygenator coated with silicone and heparin. Seven patients underwent extracorporeal life support with 15 pump and oxygenator combinations. Gyro and Excelung were used for venoarterial extracorporeal support in six patients and for right ventricular support in one patient. Patient characteristics, pump driving conditions, and blood chemistry were obtained retrospectively. All pumps were subsequently disassembled and examined macroscopically, with 6 of 15 pumps also examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The patient mortality rate was 57.1%. Mean duration of support was 10.5 ± 7.2 days per pump and oxygenator combination. Lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase were generally maintained below 1000 and 100 IU/L, respectively, after the first 4 days of pump driving. Thrombi were found in two pumps, one used without anticoagulation and the other driven at a very slow rotational speed. SEM revealed no wear in the male bearings and very low wear and deformation (0.02 ± 0.03 mm) in the female bearings. The combination of Gyro and Excelung may be applicable for long-term biventricular and right ventricular support, although proper anticoagulation should be administrated to avoid thrombus formation inside the pump.

  14. Design and development of a high-power LED-pumped Ce:Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Villars, Brenden; Steven Hill, E; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-07-01

    By studying quasi-continuous wave (QCW) operation of a Ce:Nd:YAG solid-state laser directly pumped by LED arrays, we demonstrate the feasibility of direct-LED pumping as an alternative to direct-diode or flashlamp pumping. LEDs emitting either at 460 or 810 nm were used to pump an uncooled Ce:Nd:YAG laser rod (at 30-Hz repetition rate for tens of seconds). Pumping at 460 nm was made possible by the Ce(3+) co-dopant that enables transfer of excitations near to Nd(3+) ions in the YAG lattice. Comparison of these two pumping schemes has allowed for a thorough analysis of the performance and efficiency of this laser system. QCW output energies as high as 18 mJ/pulse are reported, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest output pulse energy achieved by an LED-pumped solid-state laser to date. PMID:26125364

  15. Quantification of blood flow and topology in developing vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Astrid; Hierck, Beerend; Westerweel, Jerry; Poelma, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Since fluid dynamics plays a critical role in vascular remodeling, quantification of the hemodynamics is crucial to gain more insight into this complex process. Better understanding of vascular development can improve prediction of the process, and may eventually even be used to influence the vascular structure. In this study, a methodology to quantify hemodynamics and network structure of developing vascular networks is described. The hemodynamic parameters and topology are derived from detailed local blood flow velocities, obtained by in vivo micro-PIV measurements. The use of such detailed flow measurements is shown to be essential, as blood vessels with a similar diameter can have a large variation in flow rate. Measurements are performed in the yolk sacs of seven chicken embryos at two developmental stages between HH 13+ and 17+. A large range of flow velocities (1 µm/s to 1 mm/s) is measured in blood vessels with diameters in the range of 25-500 µm. The quality of the data sets is investigated by verifying the flow balances in the branching points. This shows that the quality of the data sets of the seven embryos is comparable for all stages observed, and the data is suitable for further analysis with known accuracy. When comparing two subsequently characterized networks of the same embryo, vascular remodeling is observed in all seven networks. However, the character of remodeling in the seven embryos differs and can be non-intuitive, which confirms the necessity of quantification. To illustrate the potential of the data, we present a preliminary quantitative study of key network topology parameters and we compare these with theoretical design rules.

  16. Development of a solenoid pumped in situ zinc analyzer for environmental monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Wanty, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A battery powered submersible chemical analyzer, the Zn-DigiScan (Zn Digital Submersible Chemical Analyzer), has been developed for near real-time, in situ monitoring of zinc in aquatic systems. Microprocessor controlled solenoid pumps propel sample and carrier through an anion exchange column to separate zinc from interferences, add colorimetric reagents, and propel the reaction complex through a simple photometric detector. The Zn-DigiScan is capable of self-calibration with periodic injections of standards and blanks. The detection limit with this approach was 30 ??g L-1. Precision was 5-10% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) below 100 ??g L-1, improving to 1% R.S.D. at 1000 ??g L-1. The linear range extended from 30 to 3000 ??g L-1. In situ field results were in agreement with samples analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). This pump technology is quite versatile and colorimetric methods with complex online manipulations such as column reduction, preconcentration, and dilution can be performed with the DigiScan. However, long-term field deployments in shallow high altitude streams were hampered by air bubble formation in the photometric detector. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Heat-pump-centered integrated community energy systems: system development summary

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An introduction to district heating systems employing heat pumps to enable use of low-temperature energy sources is presented. These systems operate as thermal utilities to provide space heating and may also supply space cooling, service-water heating, and other thermal services. Otherwise-wasted heat from industrial and commercial processes, natural sources including solar and geothermal heat, and heat stored on an annual cycle from summer cooling may be effectively utilized by the systems described. These sources are abundant, and their use would conserve scarce resources and reduce adverse environmental impacts. More than one-quarter of the energy consumed in the United States is used to heat and cool buildings and to heat service water. Natural gas and oil provide approximately 83% of this energy. The systems described show potential to reduce net energy consumption for these services by 20 to 50% and to allow fuel substitution with less-scarce resources not practical in smaller, individual-building systems. Seven studies performed for the system development phase of the Department of Energy's Heat-Pump-Centered Integrated Community Energy Systems Project and to related studies are summarized. A concluding chapter tabulates data from these separately published studies.

  18. Development of a Dual-Pump CARS System for Measurements in a Supersonic Combusting Free Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the development of a dual-pump CARS system for simultaneous measurements of temperature and absolute mole fraction of N2, O2 and H2 in a laboratory scale supersonic combusting free jet. Changes to the experimental set-up and the data analysis to improve the quality of the measurements in this turbulent, high-temperature reacting flow are described. The accuracy and precision of the instrument have been determined using data collected in a Hencken burner flame. For temperature above 800 K, errors in absolute mole fraction are within 1.5, 0.5, and 1% of the total composition for N2, O2 and H2, respectively. Estimated standard deviations based on 500 single shots are between 10 and 65 K for the temperature, between 0.5 and 1.7% of the total composition for O2, and between 1.5 and 3.4% for N2. The standard deviation of H2 is 10% of the average measured mole fraction. Results obtained in the jet with and without combustion are illustrated, and the capabilities and limitations of the dual-pump CARS instrument discussed.

  19. Development of Absorption Heat Pump Driven by Low Temperature Hot Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshida, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Naoto; Asai, Hiroshi; Hasatani, Masanobu; Watanabe, Fujio; Fujisawa, Ryou

    We developed an Adsorption Heat Pump (AHP) system, which applies silica-gel as adsorbent and H2O as refrigerant, and is possibly intended to use low temperature hot water (333K) as a driving force. The growing importance to save energy, leads us to develop energy saving systems such as Co-generation systems, including fuel cell system. It is important to use low temperature hot water in order to achieve high efficiency in total. It is, however, noticed that the lower water temperature is, the more difficult its' heat recovery becomes. We reported experimental results of the AHP system, and estimated the possibility to apply low temperature hot water from fuel cell system to the AHP system. We showed quantitatively that the AHP system is able to be driven by low temperature hot water(333K).

  20. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  1. Development of Trivalent Ytterbium Doped Fluorapatites for Diode-Pumped Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A.J.

    2000-06-21

    One of the major motivators of this work is the Mercury Project, which is a 1 kW scalable diode-pumped solid-state laser system under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Major goals include 100 J pulses, 10% wallplug efficiency, 10 Hz repetition rate, and a 5 times diffraction limited beam. To achieve these goals the Mercury laser incorporates ytterbium doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (S-FAP) as the amplifier gain medium. The primary focus of this thesis is a full understanding of the properties of this material which are necessary for proper design and modeling of the system. Ytterbium doped fluorapatites, which were previously investigated at LLNL, were found to be ideal candidate materials for a high power amplifier systems providing high absorption and emission cross sections, long radiative lifetimes, and high efficiency. A family of barium substituted S-FAP crystals were grown in an effort to modify the pump and emission bandwidths for application to broadband diode pumping and short pulse generation. Crystals of Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 5-x}Ba{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F where x < 1 showed homogeneous lines offering 8.4 nm (1.8 times enhancement) of absorption bandwidth and 6.9 nm (1.4 times enhancement) of emission bandwidth. The gain saturation fluence of Yb:S-FAP was measured to be 3.2 J/cm{sup 2} using a pump-probe experiment where the probe laser was a high intensity Q-switched master oscillator power amplifier system. The extraction data was successfully fit to a homogeneous extraction model. The crystal quality of Czochralski grown Yb:S-FAP crystals, which have been plagued by many defects such as cracking, cloudiness, bubble core, slip dislocations, and anomalous absorption, was investigated interferometrically and quantified by means of Power Spectral Density (PSD) plots. The very best crystals grown to date were found to have adequate crystal quality for use in the Mercury laser system. In addition to phase distortions which are

  2. Advanced variable speed air source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) development - CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Rice, C. Keith; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Ally, Moonis Raza; Shen, Bo

    2015-09-30

    Between August 2011 and September 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nordyne, LLC (now Nortek Global HVAC LLC, NGHVAC) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop an air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) system for the US residential market. Two generations of laboratory prototype systems were designed, fabricated, and lab-tested during 2011-2013. Performance maps for the system were developed using the latest research version of the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, or HPDM, (Rice 1991; Rice and Jackson 2005; Shen et al 2012) as calibrated against the lab test data. These maps were the input to the TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) system to predict annual performance relative to a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of 13 SEER air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater with Energy Factor (EF) of 0.9). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a tight, well insulated 2600 ft2 (242 m2) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 46 to 61%, averaging 52%, relative to the baseline system (lowest savings at the cold-climate Chicago location). Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 62 to 76% relative to resistance WH. Based on these lab prototype test and analyses results a field test prototype was designed and fabricated by NGHVAC. The unit was installed in a 2400 ft2 (223 m2) research house in Knoxville, TN and field tested from May 2014 to April 2015. Based on the demonstrated field performance of the AS-IHP prototype and estimated performance of a baseline system operating under the same loads and weather conditions, it was estimated that the prototype would achieve ~40% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite. The estimated WH savings were >60% and SC mode savings were >50%. But estimated SH savings were only about 20%. It is believed that had the test

  3. Enhanced ventricular pump function and decreased reservoir backflow sustain rise in pulmonary blood flow after reduction of lung liquid volume in fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J

    2014-02-15

    Although a reduction in lung liquid volume increases fetal pulmonary blood flow, the changes in central flow patterns that sustain this increased pulmonary perfusion are unknown. To address this issue, eight anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), ductus arteriosus (DA), and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes, with blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses performed at baseline and after withdrawal of lung liquid via an endotracheal tube. Reducing lung liquid volume by 19 ± 6 ml/kg (mean ± SD) augmented right ventricular power by 34% (P < 0.001), with distribution of an accompanying increase in mean PT blood flow (245 ± 63 ml/min, P < 0.001) to the lungs (169 ± 91 ml/min, P = 0.001) and across the DA (77 ± 92 ml/min, P = 0.04). However, although PT and DA flow increments were confined to systole and were related to an increased magnitude of flow-increasing, forward-running compression waves, the rise in PA flow spanned both systole (108 ± 66 ml/min) and diastole (61 ± 32 ml/min). Flow profile analysis showed that the step-up in PA diastolic flow was associated with diminished PA diastolic backflow and accompanied by a lesser degree of diastolic right-to-left DA shunting. These data suggest that an increased pulmonary blood flow after reduction of lung liquid volume is associated with substantial changes in PT-DA-PA interactions and underpinned by two main factors: 1) enhanced right ventricular pump function that increases PA systolic inflow and 2) decreased PA diastolic backflow that arises from a fundamental change in PA reservoir function, thereby resulting in greater passage of systolic inflow through the lungs.

  4. In Vitro Mean Red Blood Cell Volume Change Induced by Diode Pump Solid State Low-Level Laser of 405 nm

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Mohamad Suhaimi; Al-Gailani, Bassam T.; Ahmed, Naser Mahmoud; Suhaimi, Fatanah Mohamad; Suardi, Nursakinah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of low-level laser (LLL) doses on human red blood cell volume. The effects of exposure to a diode pump solid state (DPSS) (λ = 405 nm) laser were observed. Background data: The response of human blood to LLL irradiation gives important information about the mechanism of interaction of laser light with living organisms. Materials and methods Blood samples were collected into ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-containing tubes, and each sample was divided into two equal aliquots, one to serve as control and the other for irradiation. The aliquot was subjected to laser irradiation for 20, 30, 40, or 50 min at a fixed power density of 0.03 W/cm2. Mean cell volume (MCV) and red blood cell (RBC) counts were measured immediately after irradiation using a computerized hemtoanalyzer. Results: Significant decrease in RBC volume (p < 0.05, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.05, respectively) was induced with variation in laser doses.The highest response was observed with an exposure time of 40 min. This result was reproduced in RBCs suspended in a buffered NaCl solution. In contrast to this finding, laser-induced RBC volume change was completely abolished by suspending RBCs in a solution containing a higher concentration of EDTA. Conclusions: It was suggested that LLL can reduce RBC volume possibly because of the increased free intracellular Ca+2 concentrations, which activate Ca+2-dependent K+ channels with consequent K+ ion efflux and cell shrinkage. PMID:26966989

  5. Development and Remodeling of the Vertebrate Blood-Gas Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Makanya, Andrew; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Djonov, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    During vertebrate development, the lung inaugurates as an endodermal bud from the primitive foregut. Dichotomous subdivision of the bud results in arborizing airways that form the prospective gas exchanging chambers, where a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) is established. In the mammalian lung, this proceeds through conversion of type II cells to type I cells, thinning, and elongation of the cells as well as extrusion of the lamellar bodies. Subsequent diminution of interstitial tissue and apposition of capillaries to the alveolar epithelium establish a thin BGB. In the noncompliant avian lung, attenuation proceeds through cell-cutting processes that result in remarkable thinning of the epithelial layer. A host of morphoregulatory molecules, including transcription factors such as Nkx2.1, GATA, HNF-3, and WNT5a; signaling molecules including FGF, BMP-4, Shh, and TFG-β and extracellular proteins and their receptors have been implicated. During normal physiological function, the BGB may be remodeled in response to alterations in transmural pressures in both blood capillaries and airspaces. Such changes are mitigated through rapid expression of the relevant genes for extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors. While an appreciable amount of information regarding molecular control has been documented in the mammalian lung, very little is available on the avian lung. PMID:23484070

  6. Development of a Gravity-Insensitive Heat Pump for Lunar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gregory S.; Scaringe, Robert P.; Grzyll, Lawrence R.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2006-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation is developing a gravity-insensitive system that will allow a vapor-compression-cycle heat pump to be used in both microgravity (10(exp -6)g) and lunar (10(exp -6)g) environments. System capacity is 5 kW to 15 kW at design refrigerant operating conditions of 4.44 C and 60 C evaporating and condensing temperatures, respectively. The current program, performed for NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and presented in this paper, includes compressor performance analysis, detailed system design, and thermal analysis. Future efforts, including prototype fabrication, integration of a solar power source and controls, ground-testing, and flight-testing support, are also discussed.

  7. DOE/GRI development and testing of a downhole pump for jet-assist drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to accelerate development and commercialization of a high pressure downhole pump (DHP{trademark}) to be used for ultra-high pressure, jet-assisted drilling. The purpose of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in the drilling of deeper gas and oil wells where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. As a means to accomplishing this objective, a second generation commercial prototype of a DHP is to be designed, fabricated, tested in the laboratory, and eventually tested in the field. The design of the DOE commercial prototype DHP is current in progress. The layout of the complete DHP is expected to be completed by mid-April. Fabrication and laboratory experimentation is expected to be completed in September. Pending successful completion of the laboratory testing phase, the DOE commercial DHP should be ready for testing in the field by the end of the calendar year.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF COLD CLIMATE HEAT PUMP USING TWO-STAGE COMPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith; Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a well-regarded, hardware based heat pump system model to investigate a two-stage economizing cycle for cold climate heat pump applications. The two-stage compression cycle has two variable-speed compressors. The high stage compressor was modelled using a compressor map, and the low stage compressor was experimentally studied using calorimeter testing. A single-stage heat pump system was modelled as the baseline. The system performance predictions are compared between the two-stage and single-stage systems. Special considerations for designing a cold climate heat pump are addressed at both the system and component levels.

  9. Deposition of novel nanocomposite films by a newly developed differential pumping co-sputtering system

    SciTech Connect

    Nose, Masateru; Kurimoto, Takeshi; Saiki, Atsushi; Matsuda, Kenji; Terayama, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-15

    A differential pumping co-sputtering system was developed to facilitate a controlled, but flexible fabrication of multifunctional nanocomposite films with compositions not limited by thermodynamic restrictions. This system features a multichamber design with a differential pumping system. Dividing atmospheres with this set up greatly reduced the cross-contamination between chambers, and each material could be co-deposited by rapid rotation of the substrate. The clearance between the substrate holder and the chamber was set at 1-2 mm, and the conductance of the clearance was examined roughly using conductance equations for typical types of orifices. It was found that the potential difference (PD) value of the clearance between the two chambers was less than 0.01; the gas flow between the two chambers through the clearance thus appears to be a practical molecular flow. The PD value, where P is a pressure (Pa) and D is a diameter of an orifice or a pipe (m), is a gas flow indicator or parameter obtained from an equation of Knudsen number. The changes in the oxygen partial pressure and glow discharge plasma in the left chamber were investigated using a process gas monitor (PGM) and optical emission spectroscope (OES) by introducing different gases to each chamber. The PGM results revealed that the cross-contamination of oxygen from the other chamber was suppressed to 10 {+-} 3% of the original. In addition, the OES measurement for glow discharge plasma did not detect substantial oxygen contamination from the other chamber. Using the newly developed system, an AlN/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite film consisting of B4-type AlN and amorphous SiO{sub x} was obtained successfully.

  10. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  14. The Development of a Wireless Implantable Blood Flow Monitor.

    PubMed

    Unadkat, Jignesh V; Rothfuss, Michael; Mickle, Marlin H; Sejdic, Ervin; Gimbel, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    Microvascular anastomotic failure remains an uncommon but devastating problem. Although the implantable Doppler probe is helpful in flap monitoring, the devices are cumbersome, easily dislodged, and plagued by false-positive results. The authors have developed an implantable wireless Doppler monitor prototype from off-the-shelf components and tested it in a swine model. The wireless probe successfully distinguished between femoral vein flow, occlusion, and reflow, and wirelessly reported the different signals reliably. This is the first description of a wireless implantable blood flow sensor for flap monitoring. Future iterations will incorporate an integrated microchip-based Doppler system that will decrease the size to 1 mm, small enough to fit onto an anastomotic coupler.

  15. Development of automatic blood extraction device with a micro-needle for blood-sugar level measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanaka, Kaichiro; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2008-12-01

    In this study, a portable type HMS (Health Monitoring System) device is newly developed. It has features 1) puncturing a blood vessel by using a minimally invasive micro-needle, 2) extracting and transferring human blood and 3) measuring blood glucose level. This miniature SMBG (Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose) device employs a syringe reciprocal blood extraction system equipped with an electro-mechanical control unit for accurate and steady operations. The device consists of a) a disposable syringe unit, b) a non-disposable body unit, and c) a glucose enzyme sensor. The syringe unit consists of a syringe itself, its cover, a piston and a titanium alloy micro-needle, whose inner diameter is about 100µm. The body unit consists of a linear driven-type stepping motor, a piston jig, which connects directly to the shaft of the stepping motor, and a syringe jig, which is driven by combining with the piston jig and slider, which fixes the syringe jig. The required thrust to drive the slider is designed to be greater than the value of the blood extraction force. Because of this driving mechanism, the automatic blood extraction and discharging processes are completed by only one linear driven-type stepping motor. The experimental results using our miniature SMBG device was confirmed to output more than 90% volumetric efficiency under the driving speed of the piston, 1.0mm/s. Further, the blood sugar level was measured successfully by using the glucose enzyme sensor.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the TandemHeart pediatric centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Svitek, Robert G; Smith, Douglas E; Magovern, James A

    2007-01-01

    The pediatric TandemHeart pump is being developed for short-term circulatory support of patients varying in size from 2 to 40 kg. The pump withdraws blood from the left atrium via cannula inserted percutaneously, either through the right internal jugular vein or transhepatically, and pumps the blood back into the arterial system via the carotid or femoral artery. High resolution stereolithography (SLA) was used to create an upper housing and impeller design, which were assembled into a functional pump prototype. Pressure-flow characteristics of the pump were determined in a blood analogue solution and compared with the pressure-flow requirements of the intended cannulation. At 5,500 rpm, the pump was able to generate 0.4 L/min of flow with a pressure rise of 325 mm Hg and 2.0 L/min with a pressure rise of 250 mm Hg. The hydraulic performance of the pump will enable at least 50% of cardiac output when the arterial cannula is placed in the carotid artery. The hemolysis of the TandemHeart pediatric pump at 5,500 rpm was compared with the BP-50 pediatric centrifugal pump in vitro using bovine blood flowing at 0.4 L/min against 250 mm Hg. The TandemHeart pump produced a similar increase in plasma free hemoglobin levels during the duration of the 6 hour test.

  17. Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - Second Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V. C.; Craddick, William G

    2007-09-01

    Since the 1980s various attempts have been made to apply the efficiency of heat pumps to water heating. The products generated in the 80s and 90s were not successful, due in part to a lack of reliability and difficulties with installation and servicing. At the turn of the century, EnvironMaster International (EMI) produced a heat pump water heater (HPWH) based on a design developed by Arthur D. Little (ADL), with subsequent developmental assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ADL. This design was a drop-in replacement for conventional electric water heaters. In field and durability testing conducted by ORNL, it proved to be reliable and saved on average more than 50% of the energy used by the best conventional electric water heater. However, the retail price set by EMI was very high, and it failed in the market. ORNL was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. Several cost saving opportunities were found. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. After some experimentation, a prototype unit was built with a double-wall coil inserted into the tank. When tested it achieved an energy factor (EF) of 2.12 to 2.2 using DOE-specified test procedures. A.O. Smith contacted ORNL in May 2006 expressing their interest in the ORNL design. The prototype unit was shipped to A.O. Smith to be tested in their laboratory. After they completed their test, ORNL analyzed the raw test data provided by A.O. Smith and calculated the EF to be approximately 1.92. The electric resistance heating elements of a conventional electric water heater are typically retained in a heat pump water heater to provide auxiliary heating capacity in periods of high

  18. Apparatus for Pumping a Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeyen, Robert Van; Reeh, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A fluid pump has been developed for mechanically pumped fluid loops for spacecraft thermal control. Lynntech's technology utilizes a proprietary electrochemically driven pumping mechanism. Conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps typically do not meet the stringent power and operational reliability requirements of space applications. Lynntech's developmental pump is a highly efficient solid-state pump with essentially no rotating or moving components (apart from metal bellows).

  19. Towards the development of hemerythrin-based blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Mot, Augustin C; Roman, Alina; Lupan, Iulia; Kurtz, Donald M; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2010-08-01

    Hemerythrin is proposed as an alternative to hemoglobin-based blood substitutes. In contrast to hemoglobin, hemerythrin exhibits negligible reactivity towards oxidative and nitrosative stress agents (peroxide, nitric oxide, nitrite). Protocols for attachment of polyethylene glycol and glutaraldehyde cross-linking of Hr are described. These derivatizations appear to have favorable effects on O(2) affinity and autoxidation rates for use in blood substitutes. Based on lessons learned from hemoglobin-based blood substitutes, these derivatizations should also help limit extravasation and antigenicity of a hemerythrin-based blood substitute.

  20. Photovoltaic pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klockgether, J.; Kiessling, K. P.

    1983-09-01

    Solar pump systems for the irrigation of fields and for water supply in regions with much sunshine are discussed. For surface water and sources with a hoisting depth of 12 m, a system with immersion pumps is used. For deep sources with larger hoisting depths, an underwater motor pump was developed. Both types of pump system meet the requirements of simple installation and manipulation, safe operation, maintenance free, and high efficiency reducing the number of solar cells needed.

  1. New design for a pumping artificial lung.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, A J; Mockros, L F; Mavroudis, C

    1996-01-01

    A new prototype of a pumping artificial lung (PAL) has been designed and tested. The device performs the functions of both the pump and oxygenator components of an extracorporeal perfusion circuit. Previous prototypes that the authors developed (Type A) had gas exchanging microporous fibers formed into propeller-like vanes that, upon rotation, pump the blood. The design of the new PAL prototypes (Type B) uses the rotation of an annular bank of fibers to drive flow. The fiber bank, including sealed gas manifolds, lies within the housing of a modified Bio-Medicus BMP-50 pump head (Bio-Medicus, Eden Prairie, MN). Rotation of the fiber bank is driven through a magnetic coupling. Inlet and outlet gas lines enter the pump head through a sealed bearing. The Type A PAL suffered from insufficient pumping rates and gas exchange, necessitating redesign. The authors have constructed two PAL-B prototypes with a priming volume of only 140 ml and gas exchange surface areas of 0.16 and 0.60 m2. During in vitro saline testing, these prototypes showed significant pump performance, pumping 7.0 L/min against zero head at 3,500 rpm. The larger prototype had exchange rates in saline of up to 71 ml O2/min and 75 ml CO2/min. Gas exchange fluxes (O2 = 119 ml/[min.m2] and CO2 = 125 ml/[min.m2]) for the PAL-B are significantly higher than that of commercially available oxygenators in saline. Future prototypes will have increased surface area and fibers smaller than the 0.038 cm outside diameter fibers used in the present prototypes. A primary concern in using microporous fibers to push the blood was the durability of the fibers at high pump speeds. High speeds exhibited no negative effects on gas exchange abilities or fiber durability. PMID:8944954

  2. A seal-less centrifugal pump (Baylor Gyro Pump) for application to long-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Minato, N; Sakuma, I; Sasaki, T; Shiono, M; Ohara, Y; Takatani, S; Noon, G P; Nosé, Y

    1993-01-01

    We are developing a new centrifugal pump, the Baylor Gyro Centrifugal Pump (Gyro Pump), which can function for more than 2 weeks. The concept of the Gyro Pump is that a one-piece rotor-impeller with embedded permanent magnets, driven directly by a brushless direct current motor stator placed outside, rotates like a "gyroscope," and the rotor-impeller is supported by one pivot bearing at the bottom in accordance with the gyroscopic principle. This concept enables us to eliminate a driving shaft and a seal between the driving shaft and the blood chamber, which results in extending the life of the centrifugal pump. The blood passes through the space between the motor stator and the rotor to the impeller portion. In this preliminary phase, two pivot bearings were applied to support the rotor-impeller at the top and the bottom inside the blood chamber. Both pivot bearings showed less blood trauma and less thrombogenicity in in vitro and in vivo studies. The Gyro Pump is a promising second-generation centrifugal pump for long-term circulatory support in the near future. PMID:8422233

  3. Allogeneic Blood Product Usage in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) with minimalized Extracorporeal Circulation System (MECC) Versus Standard On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lisy, M.; Schmid, E.; Kozok, J.; Rosenberger, P.; Stock, U.A.; Kalender, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intraoperative allogeneic blood product transfusion (ABPT) in cardiac surgery is associated with worse overall outcome, including mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ABPTs in minimalized extracorporeal cardiopulmonary (MECCTM) compared with standard open system on-pump coronary revascularization. Methods: Data of 156 patients undergoing myocardial revascularization between September 2008 and September 2010 were reviewed. 83 patients were operated by the MECC technique and 73 were treated by standard extracorporeal circulation (sECC). ABPT and overall early postoperative complications were analyzed. Results: Operative mortality and morbidity were similar in both groups. ABPT in the MECC group was significantly lower than in the sECC group both intraoperatively (7.2 vs. 60.3% of patients p<0.001) and during the first five postoperative days (19.3 vs. 57.5%; p<0.001). “Skin to skin”- (214 ± 45 vs. 232 ± 45 min; p=0.012), cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) - (82 ± 25 vs. 95 ± 26 min; p=0.014), and X-clamp- times (50 ± 16 vs. 56 ± 17 min; p=0.024) were significantly lower in the MECC group than in the sECC group. Length of ICU (intensive care unit) - and hospital stay were also significantly lower in the MECC group vs. the sECC group (26.7 ± 20.2 vs. 54.5 ± 68.9 h; p<0.001, and 12.0 ± 4.1 vs. 14.5 ± 4.6 days; p<0.001). Conclusion: Application of MECC as on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) results in significantly lower ABPT as well as shorter ICU and in-hospital stay. In order to achieve these benefits of MECC autologous retrograde priming, Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring, intraoperative cell salvage, meticulous hemostasis and strict peri- and postoperative volume management are crucial. PMID:27499818

  4. Optimal design of the hydrodynamic multi-arc bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kazuya; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish an optimal design of the multi-arc hydrodynamic bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level. The multi-arc bearing was designed to fulfill the required specifications: (i) ensuring the uniform bearing stiffness for various bearing angles; (ii) ensuring a higher bearing stiffness than the centrifugal force to prevent impeller whirl; and (iii) adjusting the bearing clearance as much as possible to reduce hemolysis. First, a numerical analysis was performed to optimize three design parameters of the multi-arc bearing: number of arcs N, bearing clearance C, and groove depth H. To validate the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the impeller trajectories for six pump models were measured. Finally, an in vitro hemolysis test was conducted to evaluate the hemolytic property of the multi-arc bearing. As a result of the numerical analysis, the optimal parameter combination was determined as follows: N=4, C=100 μm, and H ≥ 100 μm. In the measurements of the impeller trajectory, the optimal parameter combination was found to be as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. This result demonstrated the high reliability of the numerical analysis. In the hemolysis test, the parameter combination that achieved the smallest hemolysis was obtained as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. In conclusion, the multi-arc bearing could be optimized for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

  5. Effects of altering the ATP/ADP ratio on pump-mediated Na/K and Na/Na exchanges in resealed human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Resealed human red blood cell ghosts were prepared to contain a range of ADP concentrations at fixed ATP concentrations and vice versa. ATP/ADP ratios ranging from approximately 0.2 to 50 were set and maintained (for up to 45 min) in this system. ATP and ADP concentrations were controlled by the addition of either a phosphoarginine- or phosphocreatine-based regenerating system. Ouabain- sensitive unidirectional Na efflux was determined in the presence and absence of 15 mM external K as a function of the nucleotide composition. Na/K exchange was found to increase to saturation with ATP (K 1/2 approximately equal to 250 microM), whereas Na/Na exchange (measured in K-free solutions) was a saturating function of ADP (K 1/2 approximately equal to 350 microM). The elevation of ATP from approximately 100 to 1,800 microM did not appreciably affect Na/Na exchange. In the presence of external Na and a saturating concentration of external K, increasing the ADP concentration at constant ATP was found to decrease ouabain-sensitive Na/K exchange. The decreased Na/K exchange that still remained when the ADP/ATP ratio was high was stimulated by removal of external Na. Assuming that under normal substrate conditions the reaction cycle of the Na/K pump is rate- limited by the conformational change associated with the release of occluded K [E2 X (K) X ATP----E1 X ATP + K], increasing ADP inhibits the rate of these transformations by competition with ATP for the E2(K) form. A less likely alternative is that inhibition is due to competition with ATP at the high-affinity site (E1). The acceleration of the Na/K pump that occurs upon removing external Na at high levels of ADP evidently results from a shift in the forward direction of the transformation of the intermediates involved with the release of occluded Na from E1P X (Na). Thus, the nucleotide composition and the Na gradient can modulate the rate at which the Na/K pump operates. PMID:3950576

  6. Development of an operational, full-scale fish protection system at a major pumped-storage hydropower dam

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, J.M.; Ploskey, G.R.; Weeks, G.

    1995-12-31

    A large scale, fully operational, integrated fish protection system was developed for Richard B. Russell Dam, a Corps of Engineers pumped-storage hydropower facility with 640 MW conventional generation capacity and 340 MW pumping capacity, on the Savannah River between Georgia and South Carolina. The fish protection system, designed to operate during pumping operation only, combines: (1) knowledge of seasonal and diel movement patterns of fishes to develop guidelines to restrict pumping to periods of minimal fish entrainment potential; (2) detailed 2-dimensional physical and numerical hydraulic modeling to identify high velocity entraining flow zones, low velocity zones, and slack water zones; (3) an acoustic repulsion system employing high-frequency sound to divert blueback herring out of the entraining zone and into low velocity or slack water zones; (4) banks of high pressure sodium incandescent lights located in the low velocity-slack water zones to attract and hold fishes during pumping operation; and (5) a veneer made of 0.32-cm wedge wire on 5.08-cm centers that is placed directly over the trash racks to divert fishes larger than about 35-cm in length from the trash racks. Strobe lights were initially included in the system, but later abandoned after evaluation for effectiveness. Yearlong full recovery net monitoring supplemented by fixed aspect hydroacoustics sampling using two of the four pumped-storage units demonstrates the effectiveness of the fish protection. The total cost of the system was less than one million dollars. Integrating separate fish protection technologies into a comprehensive fish protection system can be used to increase fish protection at hydropower dams.

  7. Prenatal exposure to H2 blockers and to proton pump inhibitors and asthma development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Gorodischer, Rafael; Aviram, Micha; Novack, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Fetal exposure to H2 blockers (H2 Bs) or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been reported to be associated with asthma in children. We evaluated the risk of asthma in offspring following prenatal H2 Bs. We enrolled 91 428 children and their mothers who resided in southern Israel during 1998-2011. The computerized medications database was linked with records from the district hospital. Of the eligible children, 11 227 developed asthma, and overall 5.5% had been exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs prenatally. The risk of developing asthma was slightly higher in the group exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs (RR, 1.09; P = .023). At greater risk were children whose mothers purchased these medications more than 3 times (RR, 1.22; P = .038) or exposed to >20 defined daily doses or prenatally exposed to lansoprazole. The statistical association was significant and depended on magnitude of exposure and specific medication, but the absolute risk was low. The association between maternal consumption of H2 Bs or PPIs and asthma and childhood remained statistically significant 2 years after delivery, raising the possibility of confounding by the indication phenomenon. In view of the findings, a causal relationship could not be ascertained, and an unidentified etiological factor could be operative.

  8. Development of a wireless sensor for the measurement of chicken blood flow using the laser Doppler blood flow meter technique.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Kei; Iwasaki, Wataru; Nakamura, Masaki; Higurashi, Eiji; Soh, Tomoki; Itoh, Toshihiro; Okada, Hironao; Maeda, Ryutaro; Sawada, Renshi

    2013-06-01

    Here, we report the development of an integrated laser Doppler blood flow micrometer for chickens. This sensor weighs only 18 g and is one of the smallest-sized blood flow meters, with no wired line, these are features necessary for attaching the sensor to the chicken. The structure of the sensor chip consists of two silicon cavities with a photo diode and a laser diode, which was achieved using the microelectromechanical systems technique, resulting in its small size and significantly low power consumption. In addition, we introduced an intermittent measuring arrangement in the measuring system to reduce power consumption and to enable the sensor to work longer. We were successfully able to measure chicken blood flow for five consecutive days, and discovered that chicken blood flow shows daily fluctuations.

  9. Performance of mosquito's pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    The flow of human blood in Mosquito's proboscis on Hagen-Poiseuille flow is investigated by using micro PIV system to apply mosquito's sucking system for micro-TAS devises. We want to know how high the power of Mosquito's pump is and how small the resistance in a proboscis is, a structure of Mosquito's sucking pump, and its characteristics as mechanical pump. We made the mosquito suck blood of our arm to obtain the average value, made many slices of a mosquito with 2μm thickness after fixed by wax. We anatomized the mosquito's head and picked up the sucking pump under the microscope to know its volume. Mosquito's pump shows high performance compared with the artificial pumps. The surfaces of proboscis were taken by using SEM, AFM because it is important factor for interaction between flow and its wall. Visualization of the blood flows near the tip of and inside proboscis are taken by micro PIV system to know the flow rate. We estimate the power of pump and the friction drag of proboscis by using these data.

  10. Heart Pump Design for Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Through a Lewis CommTech Program project with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the NASA Lewis Research Center is playing a key role in the design and development of a permanently implantable, artificial heart pump assist device. Known as the Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS), this device will take on the pumping role of the damaged left ventricle of the heart. The key part of the IVAS is a nonpulsatile (continuous flow) artificial heart pump with centrifugal impeller blades, driven by an electric motor. Lewis is part of an industry and academia team, led by the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI), that is working with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation to make IVAS a reality. This device has the potential to save tens of thousands of lives each year, since 80 percent of heart attack victims suffer irreversible damage to the left ventricle, the part of the heart that does most of the pumping. Impeller blade design codes and flow-modeling analytical codes will be used in the project. These codes were developed at Lewis for the aerospace industry but will be applicable to the IVAS design project. The analytical codes, which currently simulate the flow through the compressor and pump systems, will be used to simulate the flow within the blood pump in the artificial heart assist device. The Interdisciplinary Technology Office heads up Lewis' efforts in the IVAS project. With the aid of numerical modeling, the blood pump will address many design issues, including some fluid-dynamic design considerations that are unique to the properties of blood. Some of the issues that will be addressed in the design process include hemolysis, deposition, recirculation, pump efficiency, rotor thrust balance, and bearing lubrication. Optimum pumping system performance will be achieved by modeling all the interactions between the pump components. The interactions can be multidisciplinary and, therefore, are influenced not only by the fluid dynamics of adjacent components but also by

  11. The use of blood in obstetrics and gynecology in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Schantz-Dunn, Julianna; M, Nawal

    2011-01-01

    Access to safe blood is critical in comprehensive emergency obstetric care and for reducing maternal mortality. Many countries have inadequate blood supplies, and this disproportionately affects women and children in need of life-saving blood transfusions. Although preventative measures aimed at reducing postpartum hemorrhage by treating underlying anemia and infectious diseases are critical, they are insufficient for obstetric hemorrhage. In the developing world, efforts should focus on alternative means of providing safe blood in cases of hemorrhage, with particular focus on rapid testing, donation of warm whole blood, and autologous blood transfusion. PMID:22102932

  12. Design and Development of Microcontroller-Based Clinical Chemistry Analyser for Measurement of Various Blood Biochemistry Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, S. R.; Kumar, Jagdish; Thariyan, K. K.; Verma, Sanjeev

    2005-01-01

    Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase), amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase), and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments. PMID:18924737

  13. Design and development of microcontroller-based clinical chemistry analyser for measurement of various blood biochemistry parameters.

    PubMed

    Taneja, S R; Gupta, R C; Kumar, Jagdish; Thariyan, K K; Verma, Sanjeev

    2005-01-01

    Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase), amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase), and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments.

  14. Performance monitoring of an adsorption heat pump; Model development and simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, F.; Zanife, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Performance monitoring of an adsorption heat pump has been studied in a case of hot water delivery to a slaughterhouse when heat demand is a very irregular function of time. As the heat delivered by an adsorption heat pump is discontinuous, a heat storage tank has been used. The influence of the heat transfer fluid mass flow rate in the heat pump is very important because: a low mass flow rate yields a high temperature lift but a low efficiency; a high mass flow rate produces instabilities on the condensater and yields a low efficiency, and; an intermediate mass flow rate yields a reasonable efficiency and a correct temperature lift. Nevertheless, after a very large peak demand, the temperature requirement is not satisfied and a 7% dissatisfaction of the needs if obtained. To get 100% satisfaction of the needs, it would probably be necessary to overdesign the heat pump and the boiler.

  15. Progress report on pump limiter developments for the TEXTOR tokamak: ALT-I

    SciTech Connect

    Pontau, A.E.; Campbell, G.A.; Doyle, B.L.; Finken, F.H.; Gauster, W.B.; Guthrie, S.E.; Malinowski, M.E.; Ver Berkmoes, A.A.; Watson, R.D.; Whitley, J.B.

    1984-09-01

    A collaborative program is underway to field a comprehensive pump limiter experimental program on TEXTOR: Advanced Limiter Test-I (ALT-I). Either of two interchangeable limiter modules may be attached to an insertion/rotation mechanism to direct particles to the about1 m/sup 3/ pumping chamber. Pumping is provided primarily by a solid getter assembly at about20,000 1/sec. Variation of geometric dimensions and gas puffing in the modules will allow the study of plasma and neutral interaction in differing recycle regimes. Multiple diagnostic systems are incorporated into the pump limiter design for use in conjunction with TEXTOR plasma diagnostics. Initial experiments are scheduled for December 1983.

  16. Development of an oral push–pull osmotic pump of fenofibrate-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zongzhe; Wu, Chao; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were used to prepare an oral push–pull osmotic pump. Fenofibrate, the selected model drug, was firstly loaded into the MSNs, followed by a suspending agent consisting of a drug layer of push–pull osmotic pump. Fenofibrate-loaded MSNs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) analysis, and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Polyethylene oxide of molecular weight (MW) 100,000 and polyethylene oxide of MW 6,000,000 were selected as the suspending agent and the expanding agent, respectively. Cellulose acetate was used as the semipermeable membrane, along with polyethylene glycol 6,000 to increase the flexibility and control the membrane permeability. The in vitro dissolution studies indicated that the osmotic pump tablet combined with MSNs was able to deliver fenofibrate in an approximately zero-order manner in 24 hours. A pharmacokinetic study showed that, although the maximum plasma concentration of the osmotic pump was lower than that of the reference formulation, the relative bioavailability was increased, indicating that the osmotic pump was more efficient than the reference tablets. Therefore, using MSNs as a carrier for poorly water-soluble drugs is an effective method for preparing osmotic pump tablets. PMID:25784799

  17. Development of a Variable-Speed Residential Air-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C Keith; Shen, Bo; Munk, Jeffrey D; Ally, Moonis Raza; Baxter, Van D

    2014-01-01

    A residential air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) is under development in partnership with a U.S. manufacturer. A nominal 10.6 kW (3-ton) cooling capacity variable-speed unit, the system provides both space conditioning and water heating. This multi-functional unit can provide domestic water heating (DWH) in either full condensing (FC) (dedicated water heating or simultaneous space cooling and water heating) or desuperheating (DS) operation modes. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model for each mode of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options for efficiency while maintaining acceptable comfort conditions and refrigerant-side pressures and temperatures within allowable operating envelopes. Annual simulations were performed with the AS-IHP installed in a well-insulated house in five U.S. climate zones. The AS-IHP is predicted to use 45 to 60% less energy than a DOE minimum efficiency baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads. Water heating energy use is lowered by 60 to 75% in cold to warmer climates, respectively. Plans are to field test the unit in Knoxville, TN.

  18. Development of optically pumped XeF laser technology in NINT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Yi, Aiping; Liu, Jingru; Ma, Lianying; Huang, Chao; Shen, Yanlong; Zhu, Feng; Zeng, Jiangtao; An, Xiaoxia; Tang, Ying; Qian, Hang; Huang, Ke; Ye, Xisheng; Zhao, Liu; Luan, Kunpeng

    2015-05-01

    The investigations of the XeF laser bumped by ultraviolet radiation have been studied for more than 20 years in Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology (NINT Xi'an China). Up to now, several XeF laser devices were developed and an integrative experimental system has been set up which is comprised of a laser device, an electrical power supply, a high voltage trigger generator and a mixture gas supply device. Many key technologies were studied in detail and have been applied now. These technologies include section surface discharge, XeF2 photodissociation, synchronal trigger generating, double-sides optical pumping from opposite directions, active mixture gases supplying in real time, gases circulation, and so on. The XeF laser system operating on pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is up to 10 Hz. Two kinds of operating modes were applied. For the open gas flowing mode, the pulse energy of 3.2 J and the average power of 32 W at 10Hz is obtained. For the gases circumrotate mode, the average energy of 20 laser pulses is more than 0.5J.

  19. Development of a residential free-piston Stirling engine heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Robert A.

    After several years of development, the free-piston Stirling engine heat pump (FPSE/HP) has successfully met proof-of-concept targets. The performance targets were achieved during an off-site test and evaluation program conducted at the Lennox Industries Engineering Center. The performance achieved for the module was a cooling thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.91 and a heating thermal COP of 1.62. In addition to its performance achievement, the FPSE/HP module demonstrated good reliability in over 60 days of operation and ran stably and repeatably over a range of ambient conditions from 0 to 105 F. This paper will provide a description of the FPSE/HP module tested at Lennox, describe the developmental history of the FPSE/HP at Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI), and present the results of the Lennox tests. This work has been a collaborative effort of MTI, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI). The financial and technical support provided by ORNL, DOE, and GRI was responsible for the success achieved.

  20. Phosphate from the phosphointermediate (EP) of the human red blood cell Na/K pump is coeffluxed with Na, in the absence of external K

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    This study is concerned with Na/K pump-mediated phosphate efflux that occurs during uncoupled Na efflux in human red blood cells. Uncoupled Na efflux is known to be a ouabain-sensitive mode of the Na/K pump that occurs in the absence of external Nao and Ko. Because this efflux (measured with 22Na) is also inhibited by 5 mM Nao, the efflux can be separated into a Nao-sensitive and a Nao-insensitive component. Previous work established that the Nao-sensitive efflux is actually comprised of an electroneutral coefflux of Na with cellular anions, such as SO4 (as 35SO4). The present work focuses on the Nao-insensitive component in which the principal finding is that orthophosphate (P(i)) is coeffluxed with Na in a ouabain-sensitive manner. This P(i) efflux can be seen to occur, in the absence of Ko, in both DIDS-treated intact cells and resealed red cell ghosts. This efflux of P(i) was shown to be derived directly from the pump's substrate, ATP, by the use of resealed ghosts made to contain both ATP and P(i) in which either the ATP or the P(i) were labeled with, respectively, [gamma-32P]ATP or [32P]H3PO4. (These resealed ghosts also contained Na, Mg, P(i), SO4, Ap5A, as well as an arginine kinase/creatine kinase nucleotide regenerating system for the control of ATP and ADP concentrations, and were suspended usually in (NMG)2SO4 at pH 7.4.) It was found that 32P was only coeffluxed with Na when the 32P was contained in [gamma-32P]ATP and not in [32P]H3PO4. This result implies that the 32P that is released comes from ATP via the pump's phosphointermediate (EP) without commingling with the cellular pool of P(i). Ko (as K2SO4) inhibits this 32P efflux as well as the Nao-sensitive 35SO4 efflux, with a K0.5 of 0.3-0.4 mM. The K0.5 for inhibition of P(i) efflux by Ko is not influenced by Nao, nor can Nao act as a congenor for Ko in any of the flux reactions involving Ko. The stoichiometry of Na to SO4 and Na to P(i) efflux is approximately 2:1 under circumstances where the

  1. The alpha 1 Na(+)-K+ pump of the Dahl salt-sensitive rat exhibits altered Na+ modulation of K+ transport in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Canessa, M; Romero, J R; Ruiz-Opazo, N; Herrera, V L

    1993-06-01

    The properties of the alpha 1 Na(+)-K+ pump were compared in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) and salt-resistant (DR) strains by measuring ouabain-sensitive fluxes (mmol/liter cell x hr = FU, Mean +/- SE) in red blood cells (RBCs) and varying internal (i) and external (o) Na+ and K+ concentrations. Kinetic parameters of several modes of operation, i.e., Na+/K+, K+/K+, Na+/Na+ exchanges, were characterized and analyzed for curve-fitting using the Enzfitter computer program. In unidirectional flux studies (n = 12 rats of each strain) into fresh cells incubated in 140 mM Na(+) + 5 mM K+, ouabain-sensitive K+ influx was substantially lower in the DS than in DR RBCs, while ouabain-sensitive Na+ efflux and Nai were similar in both strains. Thus, the coupling ratio between unidirectional Na+:K+ fluxes was significantly higher in DS than in DR cells at similar RBC Na+ content. In the presence of 140 mM Nao, activation of ouabain-sensitive K+ influx by Ko had a lower Km and Vmax in DS as estimated by the Garay equation (N = 2.70 +/- 0.33, Km 0.74 +/- 0.09 mM; Vmax 2.87 +/- 0.09 FU) than in DR rats (N = 1.23 +/- 0.36, Km 2.31 +/- 0.16 mM; Vmax 5.70 +/- 0.52 FU). However, the two kinetic parameters were similar following Nao removal. The activation of ouabain-sensitive K+ influx by Nai had significantly lower Vmax in DS (9.3 +/- 0.4 FU) than in DR (14.5 +/- 0.6 FU) RBCs but similar Km. These data suggest that the low K+ influx in DS cells is caused by a defect in modulation by Nao and Nai. Na+ efflux showed no differences in Nai activation or trans effects by Nao and Ko, thus accounting for the different Na+:K+ coupling ratio in the Dahl strains. Further evidence for the differences in the coupling of ouabain-sensitive fluxes was found in studies of net Na+ and K+ fluxes, where the net ouabain-sensitive Na+ losses showed similar magnitudes in the two Dahl strains while the net ouabain-sensitive K+ gains were significantly greater in the DR than the DS RBCs. Ouabain-sensitive Na

  2. A Hemodynamic Predict of an Intra-Aorta Pump Application in Vitro Using Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Chen, Ningning; Chang, Yu

    The Intra-Aorta Pump is a novel LVAD assisting the native heart without percutaneous drive-lines. The Intra-Aorta Pump is emplaced between the radix aortae and the aortic arch to draw-off the blood from the left ventricle to the aorta. To predict the change of pressure drop and blood flow along with the change of pump speed, a nonlinear model has been made based on the structure and speed of the Intra-Aorta Pump. To do this, a nonlinear electric circuit for the Intra-Aorta Pump has been developed. The model includes two speed dependent current sources and flow dependent resistant to simulate the relationship between the pressure drop of the Intra-Aorta Pump and the flow through the pump along with the change of pump speed. The pressure drop and blood flow is derived by solving differential equations with variable coefficients. The parameters of the model are determined by experiment, and the results of the experiment show that these parameters change along with the change of the pump speed distinctness. The accuracy of the model is tested experimentally on a test loop. The comparison of the prediction data derived from the model with the experimental data shows that the error is lest than 15%. The experimental results showed that the model can predict the change of pressure drop and blood flow accurately.

  3. What`s new in artificial lift. Part 2: Advances in electrical submersible pumping equipment and instrumentation/control, plus other new artificial lift developments

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1996-04-01

    The Part 1 article presented last month discussed recent industry artificial lift innovations for sucker rod pumping, progressing cavity pumping and gas lift. Described in this presentation are 22 advances recently introduced by 15 different companies for electrical submersible pumping (ESP), and other new developments related to artificial lift field operations. ESP innovations include contributions ranging from new downhole pump equipment, gas separators and cables to various surface controllers/monitors. Other R and D contributions cover desangers, separators, fluid level measurements, chemical injection and well-heads.

  4. The helical flow pump with a hydrodynamic levitation impeller.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yusuke; Ishii, Kohei; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Nakano, Emiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Ono, Minoru; Imachi, Kou

    2012-12-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) is a novel rotary blood pump invented for developing a total artificial heart (TAH). The HFP with a hydrodynamic levitation impeller, which consists of a multi-vane impeller involving rotor magnets, stator coils at the core position, and double helical-volute pump housing, was developed. Between the stator and impeller, a hydrodynamic bearing is formed. Since the helical volutes are formed at both sides of the impeller, blood flows with a helical flow pattern inside the pump. The developed HFP showed maximum output of 19 l/min against 100 mmHg of pressure head and 11 % maximum efficiency. The profile of the H-Q (pressure head vs. flow) curve was similar to that of the undulation pump. Hydrodynamic levitation of the impeller was possible with higher than 1,000 rpm rotation speed. The normalized index of the hemolysis ratio of the HFP to centrifugal pump (BPX-80) was from 2.61 to 8.07 depending on the design of the bearing. The HFP was implanted in two goats with a left ventricular bypass method. After surgery, hemolysis occurred in both goats. The hemolysis ceased on postoperative days 14 and 9, respectively. In the first experiment, no thrombus was found in the pump after 203 days of pumping. In the second experiment, a white thrombus was found in the pump after 23 days of pumping. While further research and development are necessary, we are expecting to develop an excellent TAH with the HFP. PMID:22926404

  5. Development of a cuffless blood pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Liang-Yu; Kao, Yao-Lin; Tsai, Wen-Ya; Hu, Weichih

    2012-01-01

    This study constructs a novel blood pressure measurement device without the air cuff to overcome the problem of discomfort and portability. The proposed device measures the blood pressure through a mechanism that is made of silicon rubber and pressure transducer. The system uses a microcontroller to control the measurement procedure and to perform the necessary computation. To verify the feasibility of the constructed device, ten young volunteers were recruited. Ten blood pressure readings were obtained using the new system and were compared with ten blood pressure readings from bedside monitor (Spacelabs Medical, model 90367). The results indicated that, when all the readings were included, the mean pressure, systolic pressure and diastolic pressure from the new system were all higher than those from bedside monitor. The correlation coefficients between these two were 0.15, 0.18 and 0.29, for mean, systolic and diastolic pressures, respectively. After excluding irregular apparatus utilization, the correlation coefficient increased to 0.71, 0.60 and 0.41 for diastolic pressure, mean pressure and systolic pressure, respectively. We can conclude from these results that the accuracy can be improved effectively by defining the user regulation more precisely. The above mentioned irregular apparatus utilization factors can be identified and eliminated by the microprocessor to provide a reliable blood pressure measurement in practical applications in the future. PMID:23366320

  6. [Development of ultrasound-based monitor of relative blood volume].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shunzhong; Hu, Xiao; Liang, Zhongwei; Fan, Jianghong; Xia, Wubing; Zhou, Hongbo; Yi, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Assessing dry weight accurately is crucial in providing effective and safe haemodialysis. Biases towards dry weight assessment may bring a series of dialysis complications. This study introduces an online detection technique of relative blood volume (RBV) based on ultrasound, which analyzes the correlation between changes in blood density and sound speed. By measuring the attenuation in sound velocity, this method was employed to calculate RBV, and then to evaluate the dry weight of patients on dialysis. TDC-GP2 time measurement chip and MSP430 Single-chip Microcontroller (SCM) were used in the system to measure the ultrasonic travel time. In the clinical trials, RBV values range between 71.3% and 108.1%, showing consistent result with Fresenius 4008S blood volume monitor (BVM). This detection method possesses several advantages, such as real time, convenient, reproducible, non-invasive, and etc. PMID:24645597

  7. Development of a blood extraction device for a miniature SMBG system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshimitsu; Uenoya, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    In this study, a vacuum driven blood extraction device for the self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) was newly developed. The health monitoring system (HMS) for SMBG consists of a blood extracting system and a drug delivery system (DDS). Our HMS extracts the blood through a micro-needle and measures the blood sugar level accurately. The main purpose of this work in HMS development are, 1) minimally invasive blood extraction, 2) a handy type automatic blood extraction, and 3) a continuous measurement of the blood sugar level. We adopted a vacuum driven type blood extraction mechanism. The vacuum driven blood extraction unit consists of a) a puncture part to open the vacuum part, b) an extraction part, and c) a measurement part. The puncture and extraction parts consist of a minimally invasive micro-needle, whose inner diameter is less than 100μm and made of titanium alloy, and a vacuum chamber, which is covered by a very thin membrane. A SMA spring and two bias springs are employed to penetrate the blood vessel through the skin with the micro-needle, and to execute the punctuation to slash the membrane in order to open the vacuum chamber. The blood is extracted into the vacuum chamber, seeps into the unwoven cloth according to the capillary principle, and is finally deposited on the blood sugar level sensor. Results show, our vacuum driven blood extraction device succeeded in extracting 12.7μl of human blood within 2 seconds. The blood sugar level was measured successfully by using a glucose enzyme sensor. Finally, the availability of our HMS device was confirmed.

  8. Numerical modeling of hemodynamics with pulsatile impeller pump support.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2010-08-01

    There is significant interest in the development and application of variable speed impeller-pump type ventricular assist devices designed to generate pulsatile blood flow. However, no study has so far been carried out to investigate the systemic cardiovascular response to various aspects of pump motion. In this article, a numerical model is constructed for the simulation of the cardiovascular response in the heart failure condition under representative cases of pulsatile impeller pump support. The native cardiovascular model is based on a previously validated model, and the impeller pump is modeled by directly fitting the pressure-flow curves that describe the pump characteristics. The model developed is applied to study circulatory dynamics under different degrees of phase shift and pulsation ratio in the pump motion profile. The characteristic variables are discussed as criteria for the evaluation of system response for comparison of the pulsatile flows. Simulation results show that a constant pump speed is the most efficient work mode for the rotary pump, and with the application of either a phase shift of 75% and a pulsation ratio of 0.5, or a phase shift of 42% and a pulsation ratio of 0.55, it is possible to generate arterial pulse pressure with the maximal magnitude of about 28 mmHg. However, this is achieved at the cost of reduced cardiac output and pump efficiency.

  9. Development and validation of a UPLC method for rapid and simultaneous analysis of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Addo, Richard T; Davis, Kenneth; Ubale, Ruhi; Owen, Joel S; Watkins, E Blake

    2015-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the relief of gastroesophageal reflux, peptic ulcers, and other hypersecretory conditions. Some of the commonly used PPIs-omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, and rabeprazole-were used in this study with the aim of developing a rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for detecting each and allowing separation and quantification of a mixture of PPIs. An analysis of samples was performed on a UPLC system equipped with a quaternary solvent delivery system, a refrigerated sample manager, a column heater, a photo diode array detector scanning from 210 to 400 nm, and a C18 analytical column (50 mm × 3.0 mm, 1.7-μm particle size). The chromatographic analysis of the PPI samples and standards was performed using gradient elution with acetonitrile and water. The calibration curve range varied for each of the PPIs ranging from a lower limit of 0.75-1.78 μg/mL to a maximum concentration of 200 μg/mL with a regression coefficient (r (2)) of ≥0.98. The accuracy and precision were calculated, and the %RSD was determined to be ≤0.21% (intraday) and ≤5% (interday). The LOD was 0.23-0.59 μg/mL and the LOQ was 0.71-1.78 μg/mL for each of the drugs analyzed. The method was capable of detecting and quantifying each drug in a mixture with good resolution and a total run time of less than 5 min. Herein, we report an efficient and rapid analytical method for the simultaneous detection of multiple PPIs in a mixture. PMID:25160675

  10. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  11. Development of an optically-pumped cesium standard at the Aerospace Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Yat C.

    1992-01-01

    We have initiated a research program to study the performance of compact optically-pumped cesium (Cs) frequency standards, which have potential for future timekeeping applications in space. A Cs beam clock apparatus has been assembled. Basic functions of the frequency standard have been demonstrated. Clock signals are observed with optical pumping schemes using one or two lasers. With two laser pumping, we are able to selectively place up to 80 percent of the atomic population into one of the clock transition states. The observed pattern of clock signal indicates that the velocity distribution of the Cs atoms contributing to the microwave signal is beam-Maxwellian. Thus, in the optically-pumped Cs frequency standards, the entire Cs population in the atomic beam could be utilized to generate the clock signals. This is in contrast to the conventional Cs beam standards where only approx. 1 percent of the atoms in the beam are used. More efficient Cs consumption can lead to improved reliability and increased useful lifetime of the clock.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A LINEAR COMPRESSOR FOR AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the design, building, testing, and delivering to the Environmental Protection Agency of a linear compressor for operation in a 3.0- ton (10.5 kW) residential air-conditioning and heat pumping system. The compressor design evolved from a linear resonant piston...

  13. Hydraulic development of high specific-speed pump-turbines by means of an inverse design method, numerical flow-simulation (CFD) and model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschberger, P.; Gehrer, A.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years an increased interest in pump-turbines has been recognized in the market. The rapid availability of pumped storage schemes and the benefits to the power system by peak lopping, providing reserve and rapid response for frequency control are becoming of growing advantage. In that context it is requested to develop pump-turbines that reliably stand dynamic operation modes, fast changes of the discharge rate by adjusting the variable diffuser vanes as well as fast changes from pump to turbine operation. Within the present study various flow patterns linked to the operation of a pump-turbine system are discussed. In that context pump and turbine mode are presented separately and different load cases at both operation modes are shown. In order to achieve modern, competitive pump-turbine designs it is further explained which design challenges should be considered during the geometry definition of a pump-turbine impeller. Within the present study a runner-blade profile for a low head pump-turbine has been developed. For the initial hydraulic runner-blade design, an inverse design method has been applied. Within this design procedure, a first blade geometry is generated by imposing the pressure loading-distribution and by means of an inverse 3D potential-flow-solution. The hydraulic behavior of both, pump-mode and turbine-mode is then evaluated by solving the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations in combination with a robust turbulence model. Based on this initial design the blade profile has been further optimized and redesigned considering various hydraulic pump-turbine requirements. Finally, the progress in hydraulic design is demonstrated by model test results which show a significant improvement in hydraulic performance compared to an existing reference design.

  14. Development of marketable solar assisted heat pumps. Phase II. Summary report, technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Hundt, R.; Heard, S.

    1981-02-20

    A water source heat pump has been designed that is capable of operating over the range from 40 to 110/sup 0/F entering water temperature and has a heating coefficient of performance greater than six in the upper portion of this range. A computerized heat pump balance program was written to allow the performance of either a water-to-water or a water-to-air heat pump to be predicted in either the heating or cooling mode. A detailed program description, flow charts, and sample outputs are appended. The balance program was used to specify components for a high efficiency water-to-water and a high efficiency water-to-air heat pump. Performance predictions for both units in heating and in cooling are included. The water-to-water and water-to-air performance predictions were compared. The water-to-air approach was clearly superior. A detailed design and layout was done for the three solar-assisted water-to-air heat pump. A horizontal configuration was chosen for marketability reasons. The design was made consistent with high quantity production equipment available in our factories and should result in the lowest possible manufacturing cost. A key question to be answered in this project is whether a reciprocating compressor can operate without damage at the high suction pressures characteristic to the inline SAHP. Reciprocating compressors are normally applied in applications with maximum suction pressures equal to a 55/sup 0/F saturated suction temperature. An accelerated life test was performed on low speed at 85/sup 0/F saturated suction temperature and 100/sup 0/F saturated condensing temperature. After 465 hours at these severe conditions no performance degradation or physical damage was noted. Tests on high speed at 70/sup 0/F saturated suction temperature are in progress and should define the limits where the compressor may be safely operated.

  15. Transporters of the blood-brain and blood-CSF interfaces in development and in the adult.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Norman R; Daneman, Richard; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Liddelow, Shane A

    2013-01-01

    The protective barriers of the brain provide a complex series of physical and chemical obstacles to movement of macromolecules from the periphery into the central nervous system. Studies on these barriers have been focused on two main research areas: (i) anatomical and physiological descriptions of their properties, including during development where functioning barriers are likely to be important for normal neuronal growth; and (ii), investigations of these barriers during disease and attempts at overcoming their defenses in order to deliver drugs to the central nervous system. Both fields are now advanced by the application of molecular gene expression studies of cerebral endothelia (blood vasculature, site of the blood-brain barrier) and choroid plexus epithelia (site of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier) from developing and adult brains, particularly with respect to solute-linked carriers and other transporters. These new techniques provide a wealth of information on the changing nature of transporters at barrier interfaces during normal development and following disease. This review outlines published findings from transcriptome and qPCR studies of expression of genes coding for transporters in these barriers, with a focus on developing brain. The findings clearly support earlier published physiological data describing specific transport mechanisms across barrier interfaces both in the adult and in particular in the developing brain. PMID:23506907

  16. Development of Noninvasive Blood Glucose Sensor Using the Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Keiichi; Tamura, Kazuto; Kaneko, Wataru; Ishizawa, Hiroaki; Toba, Eiji

    Recently, diabetics have been steadily increasing, because change of diet, lack of exercise, increase an alcoholic intake, and increase a stress. It is a very serious problem for us. About 23.6 millions of people in Japan approach the danger of diabetes. Therefore, it is necessary to get insulin injection. And they have to measure blood glucose again and again a day. So, they are burden too heavy. This paper describes a new noninvasive measurement of blood glucose based on optical sensing. This uses Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection. Non-invasive measurement was carried out by using 3 methods. And standard error of prediction is about ±20mg/dl by 3 method. This paper also describes practical application of this method.

  17. Developing Efficient Coordination Schemes to Control Over-Pumping in the Heihe River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzini, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many wicked water resources problems are approached in a social planner perspective. This not always matches the real institutional and policy-making context, where, rather, multiple decision-makers (DMs) can act independently, or weakly cooperate, ultimately producing system-wide inefficient trade-offs. The idea in this work is to adopt a more realistic approach, where the multi-DMs nature of the problem is preserved and the uncoordinated DMs are driven, thorough coordination mechanisms, towards a more system-wide efficient solution. An agent-based modelling framework linked to a surface and groundwater model is used to design these coordination mechanisms as constraints to the independent agents (i.e., DMs) behaviour. In the Heihe Basin the ongoing introduction of smart meter IC-card systems on farmers' pumping wells will soon allow monitoring and control of abstractions with the goal of preventing further depletion of the resource. The major interest of policy makers in the region concerns the development of new and the improvement of existing legislation on pricing schemes and/or groundwater quotas. The model outcome where agents act rationally but selfishly is compared to the optimal solution at system-level assuming perfect coordination and cooperation. The optimal solutions with respect to the given utility functions are computed using nonlinear optimization with a rolling out time horizon. The Pareto-Frontier is synthesized through an exhaustive sampling of the weight coefficient space and related to the current and to the historical management of the last 4 decades. The best parameter values for the proposed coordination mechanisms are determined and the alternatives are compared with respect to their efficiency and acceptability. Preliminary results suggest that a regulatory tax on groundwater of about a factor 10 of the current resource fee is required to increase the elasticity of the groundwater demand curve such that reducing consumption becomes

  18. Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Topical report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The goal of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, lower drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{reg_sign}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, {open_quotes}Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,{close_quotes} is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase II. In the downhole pump approach shown in the following figure, conventional drill pipe and drill collars are used, with the DHP as the last component of the bottom hole assembly next to the bit. The DHP is a reciprocating double ended, intensifier style positive displacement, high-pressure pump. The drive fluid and the high-pressure output fluid are both derived from the same source, the abrasive drilling mud pumped downhole through the drill string. Approximately seven percent of the stream is pressurized to 30,000 psi and directed through a high-pressure nozzle on the drill bit to produce the high speed jet and assist the mechanical action of the bit to make it drill faster.

  19. Heat-pump-centered integrated community energy systems: Systems development, Consolidated Natural Gas Service Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. R.; Donakowski, T. D.; Foster, R. B.; Sala, D. L.; Tison, R. R.; Whaley, T. P.; Yudow, B. D.; Swenson, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The heat actuated heat pump centered integrated community energy system (HAHP-ICES) is described. The system utilizes a gas fired, engine-driven, heat pump and commercial buildings, and offers several advantages over the more conventional equipment it is intended to supplant. The general nonsite specific application assumes a hypothetical community of one 59,000 cu ft office building and five 24 unit, low rise apartment buildings located in a region with a climate similar to Chicago. Various sensitivity analyses are performed and through which the performance characteristics of the HAHP are explored. The results provided the selection criteria for the site specific application of the HAHP-ICES concept to a real world community. The site-specific community consists of: 42 town houses; five 120 unit, low rise apartment buildings; five 104 unit high rise apartment buildings; one 124,000 cu ft office building; and a single 135,000 cu ft retail building.

  20. Development of a tritium monitor combined with an electrochemical tritium pump using a proton conducting oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    The detection of low level tritium is one of the key issues for tritium management in tritium handling facilities. Such a detection can be performed by tritium monitors based on proton conducting oxide technique. We tested a tritium monitoring system composed of a commercial proportional counter combined with an electrochemical hydrogen pump equipped with CaZr{sub 0.9}In{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-α} as proton conducting oxide. The hydrogen pump operated at 973 K under electrolysis conditions using tritiated water vapor (HTO). The proton conducting oxide extracts tritium molecules (HT) from HTO and tritium concentration is measured by the proportional counter. The advantage of the proposed tritium monitoring system is that it is able to convert HTO into molecular hydrogen.

  1. Study and Development of an Air Conditioning System Operating on a Magnetic Heat Pump Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the design of a laboratory scale demonstration prototype of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle. Design parameters were selected through studies performed by a Kennedy Space Center (KSC) System Simulation Computer Model. The heat pump consists of a rotor turning through four magnetic fields that are created by permanent magnets. Gadolinium was selected as the working material for this demonstration prototype. The rotor was designed to be constructed of flat parallel disks of gadolinium with very little space in between. The rotor rotates in an aluminum housing. The laboratory scale demonstration prototype is designed to provide a theoretical Carnot Cycle efficiency of 62 percent and a Coefficient of Performance of 16.55.

  2. Development of lasers optimized for pumping Ti:Al2O3 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A.; Schwarz, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory demonstrations that were completed included: (1) an all-solid-state, broadly tunable, single-frequency, Ti:Al2O3 master oscillator, and (2) a technique for obtaining 'long' (nominally 100- to 200-ns FWHM) laser pulses from a Q-switched, Nd oscillator at energy levels commensurate with straightforward amplification to the joule level. A diode-laser-pumped, Nd:YLF laser with intracavity SHG was designed, constructed, and evaluated. With this laser greater than 0.9 W of CW, output power at 523.5 nm with 10 W of diode-laser pump power delivered to the Nd:YLF crystal was obtained. With this laser as a pump source, for the first time, to our knowledge, an all solid-state, single frequency, Ti:Al203 laser with sufficient output power to injection seed a high-energy oscillator over a 20-nm bandwidth was demonstrated. The pulsed laser work succeeded in demonstrating pulse-stretching in a Q-switched Nd:YAG oscillator. Pulse energies greater than 50-mJ were obtained in pulses with 100- to 200-ns pulsewidths (FWHM).

  3. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  4. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches.

  5. Description of a flow optimized oxygenator with integrated pulsatile pump.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Ralf; Schlanstein, Peter; Arens, Jutta; Graefe, Roland; Schreiber, Fabian; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a well-established therapy for several lung and heart diseases in the field of neonatal and pediatric medicine (e.g., acute respiratory distress syndrome, congenital heart failure, cardiomyopathy). Current ECMO systems are typically composed of an oxygenator and a separate nonpulsatile blood pump. An oxygenator with an integrated pulsatile blood pump for small infant ECMO was developed, and this novel concept was tested regarding functionality and gas exchange rate. Pulsating silicone tubes (STs) were driven by air pressure and placed inside the cylindrical fiber bundle of an oxygenator to be used as a pump module. The findings of this study confirm that pumping blood with STs is a viable option for the future. The maximum gas exchange rate for oxygen is 48mL/min/L(blood) at a medium blood flow rate of about 300mL/min. Future design steps were identified to optimize the flow field through the fiber bundle to achieve a higher gas exchange rate. First, the packing density of the hollow-fiber bundle was lower than commercial oxygenators due to the manual manufacturing. By increasing this packing density, the gas exchange rate would increase accordingly. Second, distribution plates for a more uniform blood flow can be placed at the inlet and outlet of the oxygenator. Third, the hollow-fiber membranes can be individually placed to ensure equal distances between the surrounding hollow fibers.

  6. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates.

  7. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates. PMID:26696248

  8. Characterizations of pumping-induced land subsidence in coastal aquifers - model development and field-scale implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.; Huang, Y.; Lu, C.

    2012-12-01

    The pumping-induced land subsidence events are typically founded in coastal aquifers in Taiwan especially in the areas of lower alluvial fans. Previous investigations have recognized the irreversible situation for an aquifer deformation even if the pumped water is significantly reduced or stopped. Long-term monitoring projects on land subsidence in Choshui alluvial fan in central Taiwan have improved the understanding of the deformations in the aquifer system. To characterization the detailed land subsidence mechanism, this study develops an inverse numerical model to estimate the deformation parameters such as the specific storage (Ss) and vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) for interbeds. Similar to the concept of Hydraulic tomography survey (HTS), the developed model employs the iterative cokriging estimator to improve the accuracy of estimating deformation parameters. A one-dimensional numerical example is employed to assess the accuracy of the developed inverse model. The developed model is then applied to field-scale data from compaction monitoring wells (CMW) installed in the lower Choshui River fan. Results of the synthetic example show that the developed inverse model can reproduce well the predefined geologic features of the synthetic aquifer. The model provides better estimations of Kv patterns and magnitudes. Slightly less detail of the Ss was obtained due to the insensitivity of transient stresses for specified sampling times. Without prior information from field measurements, the developed model associated with deformation measurements form CMW can estimate Kv and Ss fields with great spatial resolution.

  9. 12. Sewage Ejector Pumps, view to the southwest. These pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Sewage Ejector Pumps, view to the southwest. These pumps are connected to sewage treatment tanks. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  10. [Development and challenge of modified hemoglobins as red blood cell substitutes].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiu-Ling

    2006-01-01

    The problems of blood shortage and the virus infection risk of blood transfusion have promoted the study of blood substitutes. Modified hemoglobin has become the focus of the challenges research because of its excellent oxygen carrying ability. To overcome the toxicity effect on direct use of purified native hemoglobin, various modification technologies have been developed, including diaspirin cross-linking, glutaraldehyde polymerization, O-raffinose polymerization, polyethylene glycol conjugation, liposome encapsulation and biodegradable polymer encapsulation. Some of the products have been in clinical trials, and one of the products has been approved in a country for clinical use. Research on red blood cell substitutes in China has also developed fast. This paper provides an overview of the history and current status in development of different hemoglobin-based red blood cell substitutes, especially the problems encountered, the challenges faced, and the prospects in future.

  11. Longitudinal relationships between diet-dependent renal acid load and blood pressure development in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Danika; Shi, Lijie; Remer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Diets high in sulfur-rich protein and low in fruits and vegetables affect human acid-base balance adversely. Corresponding subclinical forms of metabolic acidosis have been linked to hypertension in adults. We longitudinally examined relations of dietary acid load with blood pressure in 257 healthy prepuberty children with 3 or more parallel 3-day weighed dietary records, 24-h urine, and blood pressure measurements. Urinary net acid excretion and the potential renal acid load (PRAL), determined as the difference of major urinary nonbicarbonate anions and mineral cations, were used to predict dietary acid load. PRAL was also calculated from dietary data. In repeated-measures regression analyses, adjusted for body size and dietary fiber, an intraindividual increase of 10 mEq above the 'usual' net acid excretion or urine PRAL were each significantly related to a 0.6-0.7 mm Hg increased systolic blood pressure. Differences in urine PRAL among the children also significantly predicted between-person differences in systolic blood pressure. A higher individual net acid excretion or urine PRAL and intraindividual increase in urine PRAL were significantly related to higher diastolic blood pressure. Blood pressure associations were nonsignificant for dietary PRAL and urinary sodium. Thus, in healthy children, renal biomarker analyses reveal an association of proton load with higher blood pressure. Especially for systolic blood pressure, a more alkalizing nutrition may be beneficial for blood pressure development within a given individual. Experimental confirmation of a causal acid load-blood pressure link is required.

  12. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  13. Casing pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.E.; Bass, R.E.

    1987-09-29

    A natural gas operated pump is described for use in the casing of an oil well, comprising: a tubular pump body having an open lower end for admitting well fluids to the interior of the pump body and an open upper end, wherein a downwardly facing seating surface is formed on the inner periphery of the pump body adjacent the upper end thereof; means for forming a seal between the pump body and the casing of the well; a rod extending longitudinally through the seating surface formed in the pump body and protruding from the upper end of the pump body; a valve member mounted on the rod below the seating surface and shaped to mate with the seating surface; and means for vertically positioning the rod in proportion to fluid pressure within the pump body.

  14. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  15. RSES heat pump technician certification

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiner, J.

    1996-06-01

    In 1987 the National Heat Pump certification test was developed by the Refrigeration Service Engineers Society (RSES), and in 1994, the program was more specifically named Heat Pump Service Technician Certification. This report describes the benefits of certification.

  16. 20. Station Unwatering Pumps and Sump Pump, view to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Station Unwatering Pumps and Sump Pump, view to the north. The station unwatering pumps are the two large units in the center and right foreground of photograph and are marked with the numbers 1 and 2. The sump pump is the smaller unit in left foreground of photograph. These pumps are used for unwatering the draft chests for maintenance. Note the draft tube unwatering valve visible in background between the two unwatering pumps. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  17. MedTech Mag-Lev, single-use, extracorporeal magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump for mid-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-01-01

    Short- to mid-term extracorporeal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are recommended for critical cardiogenic shock patients. We have designed a preclinical, single-use MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for one-month extracorporeal use. The impeller-rotor of the pump was suspended by a two degree-of-freedom active magnetic bearing in a 300 μm fluid gap, where the computational fluid dynamics analysis predicted a secondary flow of about 400-500 ml/min at a pump speed of 1800-2200 rpm. Three eddy current sensors were employed to implement noise- and drift-free magnetic levitation. The pump components were injection molded using polycarbonate for smooth surfaces as well as improved reproducibility, followed by coating with a biocompatible 2-methacryloyl-oxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Chronic animal experiments were performed in nine calves. Three of the nine calves were excluded from analysis for problems with the circuit. Five of the six (83.3%) completed the 60 day duration of the study, while one prematurely died of massive bleeding due to inflow port detachment. The pump did not stop due to magnetic-levitation malfunction. Neither pump thrombosis nor major organ infarction was observed at autopsy. In comparison to machined surfaces, the injection-molded pump surfaces were thrombus-free after 60 day implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for 60 day circulatory support. PMID:23644611

  18. MedTech Mag-Lev, single-use, extracorporeal magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump for mid-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-01-01

    Short- to mid-term extracorporeal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are recommended for critical cardiogenic shock patients. We have designed a preclinical, single-use MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for one-month extracorporeal use. The impeller-rotor of the pump was suspended by a two degree-of-freedom active magnetic bearing in a 300 μm fluid gap, where the computational fluid dynamics analysis predicted a secondary flow of about 400-500 ml/min at a pump speed of 1800-2200 rpm. Three eddy current sensors were employed to implement noise- and drift-free magnetic levitation. The pump components were injection molded using polycarbonate for smooth surfaces as well as improved reproducibility, followed by coating with a biocompatible 2-methacryloyl-oxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Chronic animal experiments were performed in nine calves. Three of the nine calves were excluded from analysis for problems with the circuit. Five of the six (83.3%) completed the 60 day duration of the study, while one prematurely died of massive bleeding due to inflow port detachment. The pump did not stop due to magnetic-levitation malfunction. Neither pump thrombosis nor major organ infarction was observed at autopsy. In comparison to machined surfaces, the injection-molded pump surfaces were thrombus-free after 60 day implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for 60 day circulatory support.

  19. Pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a gas-oil well production system for pumping formation fluid wherein a down hole pump is provided having a barrel including a barrel fluid inlet, a barrel fluid outlet, a barrel chamber, and a plunger mounted in the barrel chamber having a plunger chamber. The plunger is reciprocally driven between an upper terminal position at the end of the plunger upstroke and a lower terminal position at the end of the plunger downstroke. The method for removing developed gaseous fluids in the formation fluid from the barrel chamber comprises: drawing formation fluid into the barrel chamber during the plunger upstroke; providing gas port means in the barrel; expelling the developed gaseous fluids from the barrel chamber through the gas port means during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from the upper terminal position of the gas port means; and substantially blocking the gas port means and moving formation fluid into the plunger chamber during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from below the gas port means to the lower terminal position.

  20. Requirements Analysis Study for Master Pump Shutdown System Project Development Specification [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    BEVINS, R.R.

    2000-03-24

    This document has been updated during the definitive design portion of the first phase of the W-314 Project to capture additional software requirements and is planned to be updated during the second phase of the W-314 Project to cover the second phase of the Project's scope. The objective is to provide requirement traceability by recording the analysis/basis for the functional descriptions of the master pump shutdown system. This document identifies the sources of the requirements and/or how these were derived. Each requirement is validated either by quoting the source or an analysis process involving the required functionality, performance characteristics, operations input or engineering judgment.

  1. Performance evaluation of ground-source heat pump system and development of suitability map for its installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, G.; Uchida, Y.; Yoshioka, M.; Kuronuma, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system is an energy efficient and environment friendly technology that uses natural subsurface heat energy stored in the shallow depth for space-heating, space-cooling, snow-melting, hot water supply etc. In Japan, development of this system is gradually increasing, however the rate is still limited due to higher initial cost caused by oversized design of ground heat exchangers. An efficient system that can lower the installation cost should be developed and evaluated for its performance in order to expand the growth of GSHP system in Japan. In addition, development of suitability map to assess appropriate locations for the system installation is essential for optimum design and sustainability. In this study, GSHP system was constructed utilizing an artesian well as ground heat exchanger (GHE) and evaluated its performance. The objective of this study is to develop low cost and high efficiency system. In areas with abundant groundwater and its flow, higher heat exchange rate can be expected leading to cost reduction and energy saving. Further, suitability map was prepared in regional scale to assess the suitable locations where this type of system can be installed. The suitability map was prepared considering local hydrogeological and thermal data. Average coefficient of performance (COP) was found to be 7 during space-cooling operation and 5 during space-heating operation. These values of COP are higher than that of normal air conditioner (air-source heat pump system).

  2. From Blood Islands to Blood Vessels: Morphologic Observations and Expression of Key Molecules during Hyaloid Vascular System Development

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, D. Scott; Hasegawa, Takuya; Baba, Takayuki; Grebe, Rhonda; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Merges, Carol; Edwards, Malia; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The mode of development of the human hyaloid vascular system (HVS) remains unclear. Early studies suggested that these blood vessels formed by vasculogenesis, while the current concept seems to favor angiogenesis as the mode of development. We examined embryonic and fetal human HVS using a variety of techniques to gain new insights into formation of this vasculature. Methods. Embryonic and fetal human eyes from 5.5 to 12 weeks gestation (WG) were prepared for immunohistochemical analysis or for light and electron microscopy. Immunolabeling of sections with a panel of antibodies directed at growth factors, transcription factors, and hematopoietic stem cell markers was employed. Results. Light microscopic examination revealed free blood islands (BI) in the embryonic vitreous cavity (5.5–7 WG). Giemsa stain revealed that BI were aggregates of mesenchymal cells and primitive nucleated erythroblasts. Free cells were also observed. Immunolabeling demonstrated that BI were composed of mesenchymal cells that expressed hemangioblast markers (CD31, CD34, C-kit, CXCR4, Runx1, and VEGFR2), erythroblasts that expressed embryonic hemoglobin (Hb-ε), and cells that expressed both. Few cells were proliferating as determined by lack of Ki67 antigen. As development progressed (12 WG), blood vessels became more mature structurally with pericyte investment and basement membrane formation. Concomitantly, Hb-ε and CXCR4 expression was down-regulated and von Willebrand factor expression was increased with the formation of Weibel-Palade bodies. Conclusions. Our results support the view that the human HVS, like the choriocapillaris, develops by hemo-vasculogenesis, the process by which vasculogenesis, erythropoiesis, and hematopoiesis occur simultaneously from common precursors, hemangioblasts. PMID:23092923

  3. Heat pump concepts for nZEB Technology developments, design tools and testing of heat pump systems for nZEB in the USA: Country report IEA HPT Annex 40 Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4 of the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Payne, W. Vance; Ling, Jiazhen; Radermacher, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The IEA HPT Annex 40 "Heat pump concepts for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings" deals with the application of heat pumps as a core component of the HVAC system for Nearly or Net Zero energy buildings (nZEB). This report covers Task 2 on the system comparison and optimisation and Task 3 dedicated to the development of adapted technologies for nZEB and field monitoring results of heat pump systems in nZEB. In the US team three institutions are involved and have worked on the following projects: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will summarize development activities through the field demonstration stage for several integrated heat pump (IHP) systems electric ground-source (GS-IHP) and air-source (AS-IHP) versions and an engine driven AS-IHP version. The first commercial GS-IHP product was just introduced to the market in December 2012. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex. The University of Maryland will contribute a software development project to Task 2 of the Annex. The software ThermCom evaluates occupied space thermal comfort conditions accounting for all radiative and convective heat transfer effects as well as local air properties. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF). This residential building was constructed on the NIST campus and officially opened in summer 2013. During the first year, between July 2013 and June 2014, baseline performance of the NZERTF was monitored under a simulated occupancy protocol. The house was equipped with an air-to-air heat pump which included a dedicated dehumidification operating mode. Outdoor conditions, internal loads and modes of heat pump operation were monitored. Field study results with respect to heat pump operation will be reported and recommendations on heat pump optimization for a net zero energy building will be provided. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex.

  4. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  5. Insulin Pumps: What Every School Nurse Needs to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschbach, Judy Laver; Cooper, Leslie; Liedl, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The results of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial revolutionized the care of people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). The era of "tight control" of blood sugars to decrease microvascular complications dawned. The subsequent technological development of insulin pumps has made it possible for individuals with Type 1 DM, as well as those…

  6. Use of expert judgment in the development and evaluation of risk-based inservice testing strategies for pumps and valves

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, W.J.; Perdue, R.K.; Balkey, K.R.; Closky, N.B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a rigorous approach for quantitatively evaluating inservice testing effectiveness that evolved from two pilot plant studies. These studies prototyped methodologies for designing and selecting inservice testing (IST) strategies in a manner structured to insure that the targeted components will perform their required safety functions while minimizing life cycle inservice testing costs. The paper concentrates on the use of expert judgment in developing test effectiveness measures that move risk-based methods beyond ranking to optimization of plant IST programs. Selected results for check valves and pumps are shown to illustrate the practical significance of the approach.

  7. Diamond Blackfan anemia: a disorder of red blood cell development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R; Lipton, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited hypoplastic anemia that typically presents in the first year of life. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA encode ribosomal proteins, and in these cases ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. The developmental timing of DBA presentation suggests that the changes in red blood cell production that occur around the time of birth trigger a pathophysiological mechanism, likely linked to defective ribosome synthesis, which precipitates the hematopoietic phenotype. Variable presentation of other clinical phenotypes in DBA patients indicates that other developmental pathways may also be affected by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and that the involvement of these pathways is influenced by modifier genes. Understanding the molecular basis for the developmental timing of DBA presentation promises to shed light on a number of baffling features of this disease. This chapter also attempts to demonstrate how the marriage of laboratory and clinical science may enhance each and permit insights into human disease that neither alone can accomplish.

  8. Development of three dimensional blood vessel search system by using on stereo and autofocus hybrid method.

    PubMed

    Nakamachi, E

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed an accurate three dimensional blood vessel search (3D BVS) system and an automatic operated blood sampling system. These systems were implemented into the point-of-care system for the ubiquitous medical care, which was featured as the portable type self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) devise. It resolved the human error problem, which causes by the complicated manual operation of blood sampling and blood glucose measurement in conventional SMBG devices. In this study, we mainly discuss the performance examination of accurate position detection of blood vessel. Our 3D BVS system employed the near-infrared (NIR) light imaging process and the stereo and autofocus hybrid method to determine the 3D blood vessel location accurately. We evaluated the accuracy of our 3D BVS system by using the phantom of human skin, blood vessel and blood. As a result, we validated a very good performance ability of our 3D BVS system for a portable type SMBG device. PMID:22255741

  9. Development of portable health monitoring system for automatic self-blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Huijun; Mizuno, Yoshihumi; Nakamachi, Eiji; Morita, Yusuke

    2010-02-01

    In this study, a new HMS (Health Monitoring System) device is developed for diabetic patient. This device mainly consists of I) 3D blood vessel searching unit and II) automatic blood glucose measurement (ABGM) unit. This device has features such as 1)3D blood vessel location search 2) laptop type, 3) puncturing a blood vessel by using a minimally invasive micro-needle, 4) very little blood sampling (10μl), and 5) automatic blood extraction and blood glucose measurement. In this study, ABGM unit is described in detail. It employs a syringe type's blood extraction mechanism because of its high accuracy. And it consists of the syringe component and the driving component. The syringe component consists of a syringe itself, a piston, a magnet, a ratchet and a micro-needle whose inner diameter is about 80μm. And the syringe component is disposable. The driving component consists of body parts, a linear stepping motor, a glucose enzyme sensor and a slider for accurate positioning control. The driving component has the all-in-one mechanism with a glucose enzyme sensor for compact size and stable blood transfer. On designing, required thrust force to drive the slider is designed to be greater than the value of the blood extraction force. Further, only one linear stepping motor is employed for blood extraction and transportation processes. The experimental result showed more than 80% of volume ratio under the piston speed 2.4mm/s. Further, the blood glucose was measured successfully by using the prototype unit. Finally, the availability of our ABGM unit was confirmed.

  10. Development of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) coatings for multipurpose mechanical pump seals.

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalchenko, A. M.; Elam, J. W.; Erdemir, A.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Libera, J. A.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Hryn, J. N.

    2011-01-01

    The reliability and performance of silicon carbide (SiC) shaft seals on multipurpose mechanical pumps are improved by applying a protective coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). UNCD exhibits extreme hardness (97 GPa), low friction (0.1 in air) and outstanding chemical resistance. Consequently, the application of UNCD coatings to multipurpose mechanical pump seals can reduce frictional energy losses and eliminate the downtime and hazardous emissions from seal failure and leakage. In this study, UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition utilizing an argon/methane gas mixture. Prior to coating, the SiC seals were subjected to mechanical polishing using different grades of micron-sized diamond powder to produce different starting surfaces with well-controlled surface roughnesses. Following this roughening process, the seals were seeded by mechanical abrasion with diamond nanopowder, and subsequently coated with UNCD. The coated seals were subjected to dynamic wear testing performed at 3600 RPM and 100 psi for up to 10 days during which the seals were periodically removed and inspected. The UNCD-coated seals were examined using Raman microanalysis, scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and adhesion testing before and after the wear testing. These analyses revealed that delamination of the UNCD films was prevented when the initial SiC seal surface had an initial roughness >0.1 {micro}m. In addition, the UNCD surfaces showed no measurable wear as compared to approximately 0.2 {micro}m of wear for the untreated SiC surfaces.

  11. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W.

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  12. Air-Operated Sump Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolt, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Pump removes liquid seepage from small, restricted area and against large pressure head. Developed for moving small amounts of water and oil from sump pit 85 ft (25.91 m) deep. Fits in space only 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm) in diameter and 18 in. (45.7 cm) long. In discharge part of pumping cycle, air forces liquid out of pump chamber through pipe. During filling part of pumping cycle, water enters pump chamber from sump pit. Float in chamber next to pump chamber controls pressurization through timer and solenoid valve.

  13. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  14. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  15. Development of a high-efficiency, gas-fired, absorption heat pump for residential and small-commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. A.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the total project is to develop a gas fired absorption heat pump for residential and small commercial applications that will produce at least 1.6 Btu of heating and 0.7 Btu of cooling per Btu of heat content in the gas being burned. The primary technology advances that can be used to attain the new goals are higher efficiency cycles, increased flue efficiency, and better fluids. Flue efficiency technology is well developed, and fan assisted combustion systems with condensing heat exchangers can limit flue and insulation losses to the 10 pct range. If this 10 pct loss assumption is made, the resulting target cycle COPs are 1.78 in heating mode and 0.78 in cooling mode at the ARI rating conditions. The objective of Phase 1 was to analyze working fluids and absorption-cycle concepts that are capable of performing at the target COPs and are potentially competitive with existing space-conditioning products in cost, operating life, and reliability. Six advanced cycles were evaluated with ammonia/water as the fluid pair. Then additional analysis was performed with other fluid pairs to determine whether cycle ranking would change depending on which fluid was used. It was concluded that the preferred cycle/fluid was the generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle using ammonia/water as the fluid pair. A cost estimate made by an independent manufacturing engineering firm for a residential heat pump based on the cycle/fluid combination determined that the GAX heat pump could be cost competitive with existing products.

  16. Centrifugal pump inlet pressure site affects measurement.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Simon; Horton, Alison; Butt, Warwick; Bennett, Martin; Horton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    During extracorporeal life support (ECLS), blood is exposed to a myriad of unphysiological factors that can affect outcome. One aspect of this is the sub-atmospheric pressure generated by the ECLS pump and imparted to blood elements along the pump inlet line. This pressure can be measured on the inlet line close to the pump head by adding a connector, or at the venous cannula connection site. We compared the two measurement sites located at both points; between the venous cannula-inlet tubing and inlet tubing-pump, with a range of cannulae and flows. We also investigated the effects on inlet pressure from pump afterload and increasing inlet tubing length.

  17. Insulin pump therapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2016-09-01

    Control of blood glucose during pregnancy is difficult because of wide variations, ongoing hormonal changes and mood swings. The need for multiple injections, pain at the injection site, regular monitoring and skillful handling of the syringes/pen further makes insulin therapy inconvenient. Insulin pump is gaining popularity in pregnancy because it mimics the insulin delivery of a healthy human pancreas. Multiple guidelines have also recommended the use of insulin pump in pregnancy to maintain the glycaemic control. The pump can release small doses of insulin continuously (basal), or a bolus dose close to mealtime to control the spike in blood glucose after a meal and the newer devices can shut down insulin delivery before the occurrence of hypoglycaemia. Pump insulin of choice is rapid acting analogue insulin. This review underscores the role of insulin pump in pregnancy, their usage, advantages and disadvantages in the light of existing literature and clinic experience. PMID:27582150

  18. Pressure pulsation in roller pumps: a validated lumped parameter model.

    PubMed

    Moscato, Francesco; Colacino, Francesco M; Arabia, Maurizio; Danieli, Guido A

    2008-11-01

    During open-heart surgery roller pumps are often used to keep the circulation of blood through the patient body. They present numerous key features, but they suffer from several limitations: (a) they normally deliver uncontrolled pulsatile inlet and outlet pressure; (b) blood damage appears to be more than that encountered with centrifugal pumps. A lumped parameter mathematical model of a roller pump (Sarns 7000, Terumo CVS, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) was developed to dynamically simulate pressures at the pump inlet and outlet in order to clarify the uncontrolled pulsation mechanism. Inlet and outlet pressures obtained by the mathematical model have been compared with those measured in various operating conditions: different rollers' rotating speed, different tube occlusion rates, and different clamping degree at the pump inlet and outlet. Model results agree with measured pressure waveforms, whose oscillations are generated by the tube compression/release mechanism during the rollers' engaging and disengaging phases. Average Euclidean Error (AEE) was 20mmHg and 33mmHg for inlet and outlet pressure estimates, respectively. The normalized AEE never exceeded 0.16. The developed model can be exploited for designing roller pumps with improved performances aimed at reducing the undesired pressure pulsation.

  19. Developing Educational Resources to Advance Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Research: A Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pereira Beak, Carla; Chargé, Sophie B; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-05-01

    In 2013 Canadian Blood Services (CBS) launched the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB), a program to collect, process, test, and store cord blood units donated for use in transplantation. A key component of the creation of the NPCBB is the establishment of a program that enables cord blood not suitable for banking or transplantation to be used for biomedical research purposes. Along with the development of processes and policies to manage the NPCBB and the cord blood research program, CBS-in collaboration with researchers from the Stem Cell Network-have also developed educational tools to provide relevant information for target audiences to aid implementation and operation. We describe here one of these tools, the REB Primer on Research and Cord Blood Donation (the Primer), which highlights key ethical and legal considerations and identifies Canadian documents that are relevant to the use of cord blood in biomedical research. The Primer also introduces the NPCBB and describes the systems CBS is implementing to address ethical issues. The Primer is intended to assist research ethics boards in evaluating the ethical acceptability of research protocols, to facilitate harmonized decision-making by providing a common reference, and to highlight the role of research ethics boards in governance frameworks. With the Primer we hope to illustrate how the development of such educational tools can facilitate the ethical implementation and governance of programs related to stem cell research in Canada and abroad.

  20. Developing Educational Resources to Advance Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Research: A Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pereira Beak, Carla; Chargé, Sophie B; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-05-01

    In 2013 Canadian Blood Services (CBS) launched the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB), a program to collect, process, test, and store cord blood units donated for use in transplantation. A key component of the creation of the NPCBB is the establishment of a program that enables cord blood not suitable for banking or transplantation to be used for biomedical research purposes. Along with the development of processes and policies to manage the NPCBB and the cord blood research program, CBS-in collaboration with researchers from the Stem Cell Network-have also developed educational tools to provide relevant information for target audiences to aid implementation and operation. We describe here one of these tools, the REB Primer on Research and Cord Blood Donation (the Primer), which highlights key ethical and legal considerations and identifies Canadian documents that are relevant to the use of cord blood in biomedical research. The Primer also introduces the NPCBB and describes the systems CBS is implementing to address ethical issues. The Primer is intended to assist research ethics boards in evaluating the ethical acceptability of research protocols, to facilitate harmonized decision-making by providing a common reference, and to highlight the role of research ethics boards in governance frameworks. With the Primer we hope to illustrate how the development of such educational tools can facilitate the ethical implementation and governance of programs related to stem cell research in Canada and abroad. PMID:26168106

  1. Requirements Analysis Study for Master Pump Shutdown System Project Development Specification [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    BEVINS, R.R.

    2000-09-20

    This study is a requirements document that presents analysis for the functional description for the master pump shutdown system. This document identifies the sources of the requirements and/or how these were derived. Each requirement is validated either by quoting the source or an analysis process involving the required functionality, performance characteristics, operations input or engineering judgment. The requirements in this study apply to the first phase of the W314 Project. This document has been updated during the definitive design portion of the first phase of the W314 Project to capture additional software requirements and is planned to be updated during the second phase of the W314 Project to cover the second phase of the project's scope.

  2. Ten years optically pumped semiconductor lasers: review, state-of-the-art, and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannengiesser, Christian; Ostroumov, Vasiliy; Pfeufer, Volker; Seelert, Wolf; Simon, Christoph; von Elm, Rüdiger; Zuck, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Optically Pumped Semiconductor Lasers - OPSLs - have been introduced in 2001. Their unique features such as power scalability and wavelength flexibility, their excellent beam parameters, power stability and reliability opened this pioneering technology access to a wide range of applications such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, sequencing, medical diagnosis and therapy, semiconductor inspection, graphic arts, forensic, metrology. This talk will introduce the OPSL principles and compare them with ion, diode and standard solid state lasers. It will revue the first 10 years of this exciting technology, its current state and trends. In particular currently accessible wavelengths and power ranges, frequency doubling, ultra-narrow linewidth possibilities will be discussed. A survey of key applications will be given.

  3. Regulation of pumping function of the heart in developing body under changing regimens of motor activity.

    PubMed

    Vafina, E Z; Abzalov, R A; Abzalov, N I; Nikitin, A S; Gulyakov, A A

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed parameters of the pumping function of the heart in rats subjected to enhanced motor activity after a preliminary 70-day hypokinesia under conditions of α- and β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with norepinephrine followed by blockade of β-adrenergic receptor with propranolol (obsidian) and α1-adrenergic receptors with doxazosin. After norepinephrine administration, the HR and cardiac output were higher in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary hypokinesia than in rats with low physical activity. After propranolol administration, stroke volume and cardiac output in 100-day-old rats with limited activity were lower, and HR higher was than in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia. After administration of doxazosin, rats with limited motor activity demonstrated more pronounced changes in HR than rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia. PMID:24970234

  4. Regulation of pumping function of the heart in developing body under changing regimens of motor activity.

    PubMed

    Vafina, E Z; Abzalov, R A; Abzalov, N I; Nikitin, A S; Gulyakov, A A

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed parameters of the pumping function of the heart in rats subjected to enhanced motor activity after a preliminary 70-day hypokinesia under conditions of α- and β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with norepinephrine followed by blockade of β-adrenergic receptor with propranolol (obsidian) and α1-adrenergic receptors with doxazosin. After norepinephrine administration, the HR and cardiac output were higher in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary hypokinesia than in rats with low physical activity. After propranolol administration, stroke volume and cardiac output in 100-day-old rats with limited activity were lower, and HR higher was than in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia. After administration of doxazosin, rats with limited motor activity demonstrated more pronounced changes in HR than rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia.

  5. Multidrug efflux pumps and cancer stem cells: insights into multidrug resistance and therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Moitra, K; Lou, H; Dean, M

    2011-04-01

    Stem cells possess the dual properties of self-renewal and pluripotency. Self-renewal affords these populations the luxury of self-propagation, whereas pluripotency allows them to produce the multitude of cell types found in the body. Protection of the stem cell population from damage or death is critical because these cells need to remain intact throughout the life of an organism. The principal mechanism of protection is through expression of multifunctional efflux transporters--the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are the "guardians" of the stem cell population. Ironically, it has been shown that these ABC efflux pumps also afford protection to cancer stem cells (CSCs), shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapeutic insult. It is therefore imperative to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the resistance of stem cells to chemotherapy, which could lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets and improvement of current anticancer strategies. PMID:21368752

  6. Injection seeded, diode pumped regenerative ring Nd:YAG amplifier for spaceborne laser ranging technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Kay, Richard B.; Degnan, John J.; Krebs, Danny J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1992-01-01

    A small, all solid state, regenerative ring amplifier designed as a prototype for space application is discussed. Novel features include dual side pumping of the Nd:YAG crystal and a triangular ring cavity design which minimizes the number of optical components and losses. The amplifier is relatively small (3 ns round trip time) even though standard optical elements are employed. The ring regeneratively amplifies a 100 ps single pulse by approximately 10(exp 5) at a repetition rate of 10 to 100 Hz. The amplifier is designed to be injection seeded with a pulsed, 100 ps laser diode at 1.06 microns, but another Nd:YAG laser system supplying higher pulse energies was employed for laboratory experiment. This system is a prototype laser oscillator for the Geoscience Laser Ranging System (GLRS) platform. Results on measurements of beam quality, astigmatism, and gain are given.

  7. Development of a 100 mJ, 5 Hz, flashlamp-pumped, Cr,Tm:YAG coherent lidar transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.; Johnson, S.

    1993-01-01

    A contract to develop a 100 mJ, 5 Hz, flashlamp-pumped Cr,Tm:YAG coherent lidar transmitter has been awarded to Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI). The lidar transmitter will operate at an eyesafe wavelength of 2.01 microns. The development complements work being performed under an SBIR Phase II with Electro-Optics Technology (EOT). EOT is developing continuous wave, low and medium power Tm:YAG oscillators of a unique design. One of the low power oscillators will be used as the injection seeder/local oscillator in the CIT lidar transmitter. The lidar transmitter will require the addition of a receiver section. Once completed, the lidar will be used in atmospheric performance studies, allowing comparison with that of the more mature CO2 lidar technology. The focus of current research and plans for next year are presented.

  8. Development of a fluorescent method for simultaneous measurement of glucose concentrations in interstitial fluid and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Chen, Limin; Lin, Yuan; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2013-12-01

    Continuous blood glucose monitoring is of great clinical significance to patients with diabetes. One of the effective methods to monitor blood glucose is to measure glucose concentrations of interstitial fluid (ISF). However, a time-delay problem exists between ISF and blood glucose concentrations, which results in difficulty in indicating real-time blood glucose concentrations. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent method to verify the accuracy and reliability of simultaneous ISF and blood glucose measurement, especially incorporating it into research on the delay relationship between blood and ISF glucose changes. This method is based on a competitive reaction among borate polymer, alizarin and glucose. When glucose molecules combine with borate polymers in alizarin-borate polymer competitively, changes in fluorescence intensity demonstrate changes in glucose concentrations. By applying the measured results to the blood and ISF glucose delay relationship, we were able to calculate the time delay as an average of 2.16 ± 2.05 min for ISF glucose changes with reference to blood glucose concentrations.

  9. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2010-02-01

    Insulin pump therapy is now more than 30 years old, and is an established part of the routine care of selected people with type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, there are still significant areas of concern, particularly how pumps compare with modern injection therapy, whether the increasingly sophisticated pump technologies like onboard calculators and facility for computer download offer any real benefit, and whether we have a consensus on the clinical indications. The following papers offer some insight into these and other current questions.

  10. Development of a Whole Blood Staining Device for use During Space Shuttle Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Crucian, Brian E.; Clift, Vaughan L.; Meinelt, Ellen M.

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity during space flight results in profound physiologic changes. Numerous studies have shown changes in circulating populations of peripheral blood immune cells immediately after space flight. It is currently unknown if these changes result from exposure to microgravity or are caused by the stress of reentry and readaptation to gravity. We have developed the whole blood staining device as a system for the staining of whole blood collected during space flight for subsequent flow cytometric analysis, This device contains all liquids to address safety issues concerned with space flight and also moves the cells through the staining, lyse/fixation and dilution steps.

  11. Blood flow

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    As the heart pumps, the arteries carry oxygen-rich blood (shown in red) away from the heart and toward the body's tissues and vital organs. ... brain, liver, kidneys, stomach, and muscles, including the heart muscle itself. At the same time, the veins ...

  12. Pump system characterization and reliability enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    1997-09-01

    Pump characterization studies were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review and analyze six years (1990 to 1995) of data from pump systems at domestic nuclear plants. The studies considered not only pumps and pump motors but also pump related circuit breakers and turbine drives (i.e., the pump system). One significant finding was that the number of significant failures of the pump circuit breaker exceeds the number of significant failures of the pump itself. The study also shows how regulatory code testing was designed for the pump only and therefore did not lead to the discovery of other significant pump system failures. Potential diagnostic technologies both experimental and mature, suitable for on-line and off-line pump testing were identified. The study does not select or recommend technologies but proposes diagnostic technologies and monitoring techniques that should be further evaluated/developed for making meaningful and critically needed improvements in the reliability of the pump system.

  13. Development of a laser optically pumped polarized target for use in heavy-ion physics. [/sup 151/ /sup 153/Eu

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, B.; Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.; Erb, K.A.; Ford, J.L.C. Jr.; Shapira, D.

    1982-01-01

    Important micro- and macroscopic details of heavy-ion reactions may be explicitly determined when nuclear spin aligned (polarized) targets are used. For deformed nuclei, the orientation of the symmetry axis of the nuclear density distribution is determined by the nuclear spin orientation. Polarized targets would thus allow experiments to be performed as a function of the orientation of the symmetry axis of the nuclear density distribution. A polarized target of /sup 151/ /sup 153/Eu is being developed at Oak Ridge and is based on laser depopulation optical pumping. A spatially defined target is provided by a supersonic gas jet and consists of Eu atoms seeded into an inert carrier gas. Detailed time-dependent optical-pumping calculations predict approx. = 90% nuclear spin polarization in a Eu target with an expected thickness in excess of 10/sup 15/ atoms/cm/sup 2/. We present some of the effects that will be observable in heavy-ion reactions when deformed polarized targets are used.

  14. Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - First Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V. C.; Tomlinson, J. J.

    2007-09-01

    Until now the heat pump water heater (HPWH) has been a technical success but a market failure because of its high initial cost. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. ORNL was also tasked to verify the technical feasibility of the cost saving opportunities where necessary and appropriate. The objective was to retain most of the HPWH s energy saving performance while reducing cost and simple payback period to approximately three years in a residential application. Several cost saving opportunities were found. Immersing the HPWH condenser directly into the tank allowed the water-circulating pump to be eliminated and a standard electric resistance storage water heater to be used. In addition, designs could be based on refrigerator compressors. Standard water heaters and refrigerator compressors are both reliable, mass produced, and low cost. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water heater tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. The sleeve contour causes the bayonet-style condenser to helix while being pushed into the tank, enabling a condenser of sufficient heat transfer surface area to be inserted. Based on this design, ORNL fabricated the first laboratory prototype and completed preliminary laboratory tests in accordance with the DOE Simulated Use Test Procedure. Hardening during double-wall condenser fabrication was not overcome, so the prototype is single-walled with a liner. The prototype unit was found to have an energy factor of 2.02, verifying that the low-cost design retains most of the HPWH s energy saving performance. Industry involvement is being sought to resolve the fabrication issue and quantify progress on reducing cost and

  15. Magnetic heat pump design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirol, L. D.; Dacus, M. W.

    1988-03-01

    Heat pumps utilizing the magnetocaloric effect offer a potentially attractive alternative to conventional heat pumps and refrigerators. Many physical configurations of magnetic heat pumps are possible. Major classes include those requiring electrical energy input and those with mechanical energy input. Mechanical energy is used to move magnets, working material, or magnetic shielding. Each type of mechanical magnetic heat pump can be built in a rotary (recuperative) or reciprocal (regenerative) configuration. Machines with electrical energy input utilize modulation of the magnetic field to cause working material to execute the desired thermodynamic cycle, and can also be recuperative or regenerative. Recuperative rotary heat pumps in which working material is moved past stationary magnets is the preferred configuration. Regenerative devices suffer performance degradation from temperature change of regenerator material and mixing and conduction in the regenerator. Field modulated cycles are not practical due to ac losses in superconducting magnets. Development of methods for recuperator fluid pumping is the major challenge in design of rotary recuperative devices. Several pumping options are presented, and the design of a bench scale heat pump described.

  16. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1994-12-31

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  17. Recovery act. Development of design and simulation tool for hybrid geothermal heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaojie; Ellis, Dan

    2014-05-29

    The ground source heat pump (GSHP) system is one of the most energy efficient HVAC technologies in the current market. However, the heat imbalance may degrade the ability of the ground loop heat exchanger (GLHX) to absorb or reject heat. The hybrid GSHP system, which combines a geothermal well field with a supplemental boiler or cooling tower, can balance the loads imposed on the ground loop heat exchangers to minimize its size while retaining superior energy efficiency. This paper presents a recent simulation-based study with an intention to compare multiple common control strategies used in hybrid GSHP systems, including fixed setpoint, outside air reset, load reset, and wetbulb reset. A small office in Oklahoma City conditioned by a hybrid GSHP system was simulated with the latest version of eQUEST 3.7[1]. The simulation results reveal that the hybrid GSHP system has the excellent capability to meet the cooling and heating setpoints during the occupied hours, balance thermal loads on the ground loop, as well as improve the thermal comfort of the occupants with the undersized well field.

  18. Development and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of etodolac controlled porosity osmotic pump tablets.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elbary, Ahmed; Tadros, Mina Ibrahim; Alaa-Eldin, Ahmed Adel

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the current work was the design and evaluation of etodolac controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) tablets exhibiting zero-order release kinetics. Variables influencing the design of (1) core tablets viz., (a) osmogent type (sodium chloride, potassium chloride, mannitol, and fructose) and (b) drug/osmogent ratio (1:0.25, 1:0.50, and 1:0.75), and (2) CPOP tablets viz., (a) coating solution composition, (b) weight gain percentage (1-5%, w/w), and (c) pore former concentration (5%, 10%, and 20%, v/v), were investigated. Statistical analysis and kinetic modeling of drug release data were estimated. Fructose-containing core tablets showed significantly (P < 0.05) more retarded drug release rates. An inverse correlation was observed between drug/fructose ratio and drug release rate. Coating of the optimum core tablets (F4) with a mixture of cellulose acetate solution (3%, w/v), diethyl phthalate, and polyethylene glycol 400 (85:10:5, v/v, respectively) till a 4% w/w weight gain enabled zero-order sustained drug delivery over 24 h. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs of coating membrane confirmed pore formation upon contact with dissolution medium. When compared to the commercial immediate-release Napilac® capsules, the optimum CPOP tablets (F4-34) provided enhanced bioavailability and extended duration of effective etodolac plasma concentration with minimum expected potential for side effects in healthy volunteers.

  19. [Development of microchips for the analysis of biomarkers in blood].

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Masatoshi; Abe, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Shohei; Yatsushiro, Shouki

    2012-11-01

    Several types of microchips have been developed for application in clinical diagnosis. A microchip made of cyclic olefin copolymer with straight microchannels (300 microm width and 100 microm depth) was employed for sandwich ELISA for the determination of serum type I C-peptide (PICP), a biomarker of osteoporosis. This assay enabled us to determine PICP with accuracy and high sensitivity, reducing the time for the immunoassay to 1/6, and the consumption of samples and reagents to 1/50 compared with the conventional method. Furthermore, cell microarray chips with 20,944 microchambers (105 microm width and 50 microm depth), made of polystyrene, were employed for malaria diagnosis and the detection of carcinoma cells among the leukocytes. Around 100 erythrocytes or leukocytes were accommodated in each microchamber with the formation of a monolayer. For malaria diagnosis, it offered 10-100 times higher sensitivity in the detection of malaria infected erythrocytes than conventional light microscopy, and easy operation within 15 min. By double staining for epithelial cells on the cell microarray chip, one carcinoma cell could be detected among 1,800,000 leukocytes. These results indicate the potential of microchips for clinic diagnosis.

  20. The role of blood groups in the development of diabetes mellitus after gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karagoz, Hatice; Erden, Abdulsamet; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Bulut, Kadir; Mutlu, Hasan; Simsek, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common condition that is defined as glucose intolerance of varying degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects approximately 5% of all pregnancies all over the world. GDM is not only associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as macrosomia, dystocia, birth trauma, and metabolic complications in newborns, but it is also a strong predictor of transitioning to overt DM postpartum. The association of ABO blood groups with DM has been observed before in several epidemiological and genetic studies and resulted with inconsistent findings, but still there are not enough studies in the literature about the association of ABO blood groups with GDM. In this study, we aimed at investigating any possible relationship between the ABO blood group system and GDM and also the transitioning of GDM to overt DM postpartum, in Turkey. Patients and methods A total of 233 patients with GDM from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. The cases that have serologically determined blood groups and Rh factor in the hospital records were included in the study, and the patients with unknown blood groups were excluded. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). GDM was diagnosed based on the glucose cut-points of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Society Groups. The distributions of blood groups of the patients with GDM were compared with the distribution of blood groups of 17,314 healthy donors who were admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in 2012. Results There was a significant difference between the patients with GDM and control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups. Blood group AB was found to be higher in the patients with GDM compared to the control group (P=0.029). When the patients were compared according to the development of DM, the ratio

  1. Relationship among maternal blood lead, ALAD gene polymorphism and neonatal neurobehavioral development.

    PubMed

    Yun, Li; Zhang, Weixing; Qin, Kejun

    2015-01-01

    Lead is a widely used heavy metal that can affect children's nervous system development. ALAD gene polymorphism is associated with lead neurotoxicity. This study aimed to clarify the relationship among maternal blood lead, ALAD gene polymorphism, and neonatal neurobehavioral development through detecting maternal blood lead and ALAD gene polymorphism. 198 maternal and neonatal were selected as the research object. Graphite furnace atomic absorption method was applied to detect the maternal blood lead concentration. PCR-RFLP was used to detect ALAD genotype distribution. Neonatal NANB score was treated as effect indicator. SPSS was used for statistical analysis. The ALAD genotype was 181 cases (91.4%) for ALAD11 and 17 cases (8.6%) for ALAD12. ALAD allele frequency distribution accords with genetics Hardy-Weinberg balance (P > 0.05). Blood lead level in maternal with ALAD12 genotype was significantly higher than with ALAD11 genotype (P < 0.01). NANB score in high blood lead neonatal group was obviously lower than the low blood lead group (P < 0.05). Newborn's NANB score from the maternal with ALAD11 genotype was lower than from the maternal with ALAD12 genotype (P < 0.01). After ruling out the confounding factors influence by multiple linear regressions, ALAD gene polymorphisms had no significant correlation with neonatal NANB score (P > 0.05). ALAD gene polymorphism is associated with the blood lead level. Low level lead exposure in utero may cause newborn early neurobehavioral maldevelopment. Maternal ALAD gene polymorphism can affect early neonatal neurobehavioral development by influencing the blood lead level.

  2. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Sadia; Baig, Mohammad Amjad; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Hasan, Syeda Faiza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.   Methods We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrolled. Professionally trained donor attendants drew blood and all donors were observed during and following donation for possible adverse events for 20 minutes. Blood donors were asked to report if they suffered from any delayed adverse consequences.   Results Out of 41,759 blood donors, 537 (1.3%) experienced adverse reactions. The incidence was one in every 78 donations. The mean age of donors who experienced adverse events was 26.0±6.8 years, and all were male. Out of 537 donors, 429 (80%) developed vasovagal reaction (VVR), 133 (25%) had nausea, 63 (12%) fainted, 35 (6%) developed hyperventilation, 9 (2%) had delayed syncope, and 9 (2%) developed hematoma. Arterial prick, nerve injury, cardiac arrest, and seizures were not observed. Donors aged less than < 30 years and weighing < 70 kg were significantly associated with VVR, hyperventilation, and nausea (p < 0.005). Undergraduates and Urdu speaking donors also had a significant association with fainting and nausea, respectively (p < 0.05).   Conclusion The prevalence of adverse events was low at our tertiary center. A VVR was the predominant adverse reaction and was associated with age and weight. Our study highlights the importance of these parameters in the donation process. A well-trained and experienced phlebotomist and pre-evaluation counseling of blood donors could further minimize the adverse reactions. PMID:27168923

  3. Normetex Pump Alternatives Study

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2013-04-25

    A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying

  4. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  5. Development and validation of a dried blood spot-LC-APCI-MS assay for estimation of canrenone in paediatric samples.

    PubMed

    Suyagh, Maysa Faisal; Kole, Prashant Laxman; Millership, Jeff; Collier, Paul; Halliday, Henry; McElnay, James C

    2010-03-15

    A selective and sensitive liquid chromatography (LC)-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-mass spectroscopic (MS) assay of canrenone has been developed and validated employing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) as the sample collection medium. DBS samples were prepared by applying 30 microl of spiked whole blood onto Guthrie cards. A 6mm disc was punched from the each DBS and extracted with 2 ml of methanolic solution of 17alpha-methyltestosterone (Internal Standard). The methanolic extract was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in acetonitrile:water (1:9, v/v). The reconstituted solution was further subjected to solid phase extraction using HLB cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved using Waters Sunfire C18 reversed-phase column using isocratic elution, followed by a high organic wash to clear late eluting/highly retained components. The mobile phase consisted of methanol:water (60:40, v/v) pumped at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min. LC-APCI-MS detection was performed in the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode using target ions at m/z 341.1 and 303.3 for canrenone and internal standard respectively. The selectivity of the method was established by analysing DBS samples from 6 different sources (individuals). The calibration curve for canrenone was found to be linear over 25-1000 ng/ml (r>0.994). Accuracy (% RE) and precision (% CV) values for within and between day were <20% at the lower limit of quantification (LLQC) and <15% at all other concentrations tested. The LLOQ of the method was validated at 25 ng/ml. Clinical validation of the method was achieved by employing the validated method for analysis of 160 DBS samples from 37 neonatal and paediatric patients. PMID:20153705

  6. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  7. 5. Station Unwatering Pumps and Sump Pump for Units 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Station Unwatering Pumps and Sump Pump for Units 1 and 2, view to the west. The unwatering pumps are the two larger items toward the right side of the photograph (one in foreground and one in background. The smaller item toward the left of the photograph is the sump pump. These pumps are used for draining water from the draft chest for maintenance. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  8. Development of a Two-Phase Capillary Pumped Heat Transport for Spacecraft Central Thermal Bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Triem; Brown, Michael; Baldauff, Robert; Cummings, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    Thermal requirements of future spacecraft and satellites will certainly outgrow the capability of conventional heat pipes in terms of heat transport, heat density, and temperature control. Emerging passive heat transport technologies such as Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) and Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) have demonstrated in both ground testing and micro-gravity flight experiments that they have the potential to replace heat pipes as primary heat transport devices in next generation thermal control technology. Like heat pipes, CPLs and LHPs are completely passive systems which have no mechanical moving part to wear out or to introduce unwanted vibration to the spacecraft. However, the heat transport capabilities of CPLs and LHPs are at least one order of magnitude higher than those of heat pipes. Despite sharing many operational characteristics. CPLs and LHPs do have differences. CPLs require a lengthy and tedious start-up procedure to prime the wicks before heat is applied to the evaporator plate. Even with the start-up procedure, start-ups are not always successful. LHPs, on the other hand, do not require a wick pre-conditioning process. But the LHP effective thermal conductance is not as high as that of a CPL. Temperature control of a LHP is not easily achieved. A novel concept, which combined a CPL and a LHP into one loop, was proposed to take advantage of selective features of each system without inheriting their shortcomings. The resultant loop was called Advanced Loop Heat Pipe (A-LHP). A proof-of-concept testbed was put together and tested at the Naval Research Laboratory. Test results showed that the A-LHP performed like a CPL without start-up problems associated with CPLs.

  9. Measurement of rotary pump flow and pressure by computation of driving motor power and speed.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zeng, P; Ru, W M; Yuan, H Y; Feng, Z G; Li, L

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of pump flow and pressure by ventricular assist is an important process, but difficult to achieve. On one hand, the pump flow and pressure are indicators of pump performance and the physiologic status of the receptor, meanwhile providing a control basis of the blood pump itself. On the other hand, the direct measurement forces the receptor to connect with a flow meter and a manometer, and the sensors of these meters may cause haematological problems and increase the danger of infection. A novel method for measuring flow rate and pressure of rotary pump has been developed recently. First the pump performs at several rotating speeds, and at each speed the flow rate, pump head and the motor power (voltage x current) are recorded and shown in diagrams, thus obtaining P (motor power)-Q (pump volume) curves as well as P-H (pump head) curves. Secondly, the P, n (rotating speed) values are loaded into the input layer of a 3-layer BP (back propagation) neural network and the Q and H values into the output layer, to convert P-Q and P-H relations into Q = f (P,n) and H = g (P, n) functions. Thirdly, these functions are stored by computer to establish a database as an archive of this pump. Finally, the pump flow and pressure can be computed from motor power and speed during animal experiments or clinical trials. This new method was used in the authors' impeller pump. The results demonstrated that the error for pump head was less than 2% and that for pump flow was under 5%, so its accuracy is better than that of non-invasive measuring methods.

  10. Development of stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Bo; Tong, Xin; Jiang, Chenyang; Brown, Daniel R.; Robertson, Lee

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we developed a stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping. An optimized external cavity equipped with an off-the-shelf volume holographic grating narrowed the spectral line-width of a 100 W high-power diode laser and stabilized the laser spectrum. The laser spectrum showed a high side mode suppression ratio of >30 dB and good long-term stability (center wavelength drifting within ±0.002 nm during 220 h of operation). Finally, our laser is delivered by a multimode fiber with power ~70 W, center wavelength of 794.77 nm, and spectral bandwidth of ~0.12 nm.

  11. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  12. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  13. Historical achievements of self-monitoring of blood glucose technology development in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeki

    2011-09-01

    Japanese companies were the first in the world to achieve a colorimetric glucose measurement meter back in 1973. Over the following 40 or so years, they succeeded in achieving a much greater level of user-friendliness and performance and in so doing, have contributed to the spread of self-monitoring of blood glucose. This article aims to unravel the history of blood glucose measurement's technological developments; to look at the direction and features of the development path Japan is taking; as well as to introduce some Japanese products that are on the market.

  14. Development of flashlamp-pumped Q-switched Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG lasers for mid-infrared LIDAR application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Young S.; Kim, Kyong H.; Whitney, Donald A.; Hess, Robert V.; Barnes, Norman P.; Bair, Clayton H.; Brockman, Philip

    1989-01-01

    A flashlamp-pumped 2.1 micron Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG laser was studied for both normal mode and Q-switched operations under a wide variety of experimental conditions in order to optimize performance. Laser output energy, slope efficiency, threshold and pulselength were determined as a function of operating temperature, output mirror reflectivity, input electrical energy and Q-switch opening time. The measured normal-mode laser thresholds of a Ho(3+) (0.45 atomic percent):Tm(3+) (2.5 atomic percent):Cr(3+) (0.8 atomic percent):YAG crystal ranged form 26 to 50 J between 120 and 200 K with slope efficiencies up to 0.36 percent with a 60 percent reflective output mirror. Under Q-switched operation the slope efficiency was 90 percent of the normal-mode result. Development of solid state lasers with Ho(3+), Tm(3+) and/or Er(3+) doped crystals has been pursued by NASA for eye-dafe mid-infrared LIDAR (light detection and ranging) application. As a part of the project, the authors have been working on evaluating Ho(3+):Tm(3+):Cr(3+):YAG crystals for normal-mode and Q-switched 2.1 micron laser operations in order to determine an optimum Tm(3+) concentration under flashlamp pumping conditions. Lasing properties of the Ho(3+) in the mid-infrared region have been studied by many research groups since the early 1960's. However, the technology of those lasers is still premature for lidar application. In order to overcome the inefficiency related to narrow absorption bands of the Ho(3+), Tm(3+) and Er(3+), the erbium has been replaced by chromium. The improvement in flashlamp-pumped Ho(3+) laser efficiency has been demonstrated recently by several research groups by utilizing the broad absorption spectrum of Cr(3+) which covers the flashlamp's emission spectrum. Efficient energy transfer to the Tm(3+) and then the Ho(3+) occurs subsequently. It is known that high Tm(3+) concentration and low Ho(3+) concentration are preferred to achieve a quantum efficiency approaching two and to avoid

  15. Blood lead level and neurobehavioral development among children living in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, H; Romiew, I; Palazuelos, E; Mancilla-Sanchez, T; Meneses-Gonzalez, F; Hernandez-Avila, M

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the association between blood lead levels and neuropsychological and behavioral development of 139 children (7-9 y of age) who attended school in the southwestern part of Mexico City. A trained psychologist administered an IQ test to 84% of the children, and teachers graded them for agility, socialization, expression, and knowledge. Parents also answered a questionnaire on demographic and socioeconomic variables. Anodic stripping voltametry was used to determine blood lead levels. Regression models were used to determine the best predictors of IQ and teachers' rating scores. The mean blood lead level was 19.4 micrograms/dl (standard deviation [SD] = 7.6), with a geometric mean of 17.8 micrograms/dl (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 16.5-19.1). Blood lead was the strongest predictor of full-scale IQ, and there was a significant negative trend between blood lead, full-scale IQ, and teachers' rating scores. In this study, children with higher levels of blood lead performed more poorly on psychometric tests and had poorer educational attainment than their counterparts. These results suggest an association between neuropsychological and behavioral impairment and lead exposure.

  16. Program optimizes sucker-rod pumping mode

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Direct energy costs for sucker-rod pumping can be optimized by selecting the right pump size, stroke length, and pumping speed for the required liquid production rate. Calculation procedures for a computer program are developed for optimizing the design of conventional pumping units.

  17. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  18. The development and testing of a fieldworthy system of improved fluid pumping device and liquid sensor for oil wells

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, W.G.

    1992-10-05

    An economical gas lift system has been designed that uses the airlift principles of the APOP system to enable one to pump deep wells which have been initially pumped using jack pumps. It can be constructed and installed in oil and/or gas wells where jack pumps have been operating. The 2 in. tubing in the bore hole is left in place and the rods are pulled from the normally 2 in. tubing. A 1 in. or greater diameter tubing containing a one way valve near its bottom and several small holes near the bottom of the 1 in. tube and just above the one way valve is installed into the 2 in. tubing. The one inch tube extends the total length of the 2 in. tubing and is seated on the seating nipple at the bottom of the 2 in. tubing. The space between the concentric tubes can serve as the gas(air) line and the center 1 in. tube serves as the liquid discharge line. This enables this pump to be used in many marginal wells which ordinarily would be uneconomical to pump. This is especially true for deep wells because the cost of jack pumps and the tubing as well as the maintenance to pump liquids from bore holes that are several thousand feet deep is substantial.

  19. Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The goal of jet-assist drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, less drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{trademark}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The US Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, `Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,` is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase I. The project was originally proposed to extend the DHP and jet-assist drilling technology to drilling slimholes. Results of the market analysis for DHP jet-assisted slimhole drilling indicated that the slimhole market would be small (about 1/20th) compared to 7-7/8 inch hole size. The best U.S. land market locations for use of the DHP were identified as East Texas RR District 3, Oklahoma, and East Texas RR District 6. For gas drilling alone, areas with the largest market potential were East Texas RR District 6, Oklahoma and Wyoming. As a consequence of the market size for 7-7/8 inch holes, associated savings to the industry, and a desire to promote earlier commercialization of the DHP jet-assisted drilling technology, this project was re-directed from slimhole applications to development of a second prototype DHP for 7-7/8 inch hole size.

  20. The development of a recruiting-drawing-inventory model for a community blood bank system.

    PubMed

    Smackey, B M

    1975-01-01

    A community blood bank system is a multiorganizational program that is designed to supply the blood needs of a community. Participating in such a program are hospitals, a central blood bank, industrial donor groups, the American Red Cross, advisory committees, and the community at large. The underlying determinant of the community's success or failure with its blood program is the degree of cooperation among the various organizations. Intertwined with organizational considerations are the management problems associated with the operation of a responsive and efficient inventory control system. This paper reports on the development of a system for a community blood bank that is in its third year of operation. The system that has been developed can be operated manually by a part-time clerk. Details of the model include an integration of the donor scheduling function and the inventory control function. Simulated testing of the model has been conducted and full-scale implementation is awaiting the expansion of the known donor base.

  1. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  2. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  3. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  4. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  5. The development of novel Blood and Cara cara like citrus varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2012 the Citrus Research Board took a unique approach to developing novel citrus cultivars – a biotech approach. Blood and the Cara cara orange are special cultivars that are distinguished by their color and distinctive flavor. These cultivars offer variety in flavor, taste, health-benefits and...

  6. Development of blood transfusion product pathogen reduction treatments: a review of methods, current applications and demands.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal; van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) have been greatly reduced in numbers due to the strict donor selection and screening procedures, i.e. the availability of technologies to test donors for endemic infections, and routine vigilance of regulatory authorities in every step of the blood supply chain (collection, processing and storage). However, safety improvement is still a matter of concern because infection zero-risk in transfusion medicine is non-existent. Alternatives are required to assure the safety of the transfusion product and to provide a substitution to systematic blood screening tests, especially in less-developed countries or at the war-field. Furthermore, the increasing mobility of the population due to traveling poses a new challenge in the endemic screening tests routinely used, because non-endemic pathogens might emerge in a specific population. Pathogen reduction treatments sum a plethora of active approaches to eliminate or reduce potential threatening pathogen load from blood transfusion products. Despite the success of pathogen reduction treatments applied to plasma products, there is still a long way to develop and deploy pathogen reduction treatments to cellular transfusion products (such as platelets, RBCs or even to whole blood) and there is divergence on its acceptance worldwide. While the use of pathogen reduction treatments in platelets is performed routinely in a fair number of European blood banks, most of these treatments are not (or just) licensed in the USA or elsewhere in the world. The development of pathogen reduction treatments for RBC and whole blood is still in its infancy and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the available and emerging pathogen reduction treatments and their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of characterizing standard transfusion products with current and emerging approaches (OMICS) and clinical outcome, and integrating this information on a database

  7. Development of blood transfusion product pathogen reduction treatments: a review of methods, current applications and demands.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal; van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) have been greatly reduced in numbers due to the strict donor selection and screening procedures, i.e. the availability of technologies to test donors for endemic infections, and routine vigilance of regulatory authorities in every step of the blood supply chain (collection, processing and storage). However, safety improvement is still a matter of concern because infection zero-risk in transfusion medicine is non-existent. Alternatives are required to assure the safety of the transfusion product and to provide a substitution to systematic blood screening tests, especially in less-developed countries or at the war-field. Furthermore, the increasing mobility of the population due to traveling poses a new challenge in the endemic screening tests routinely used, because non-endemic pathogens might emerge in a specific population. Pathogen reduction treatments sum a plethora of active approaches to eliminate or reduce potential threatening pathogen load from blood transfusion products. Despite the success of pathogen reduction treatments applied to plasma products, there is still a long way to develop and deploy pathogen reduction treatments to cellular transfusion products (such as platelets, RBCs or even to whole blood) and there is divergence on its acceptance worldwide. While the use of pathogen reduction treatments in platelets is performed routinely in a fair number of European blood banks, most of these treatments are not (or just) licensed in the USA or elsewhere in the world. The development of pathogen reduction treatments for RBC and whole blood is still in its infancy and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the available and emerging pathogen reduction treatments and their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of characterizing standard transfusion products with current and emerging approaches (OMICS) and clinical outcome, and integrating this information on a database

  8. Development of a xenon/computed tomography cerebral blood flow quality assurance phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Good, W.F.; Gur, D.; Herron, J.M.; Kennedy, W.H.

    1987-09-01

    A simple, easy to use, quality assurance and performance test phantom was developed for the xenon/computed tomography (CT) cerebral blood flow method. The phantom combines an inhalation system which allows for the simulation of xenon buildup or washout in the arterial blood as well as a multisection translatable cylinder in which several sections can be scanned during a preselected protocol to simulate the CT enhancement in brain tissue during a study. The phantom and scanning protocol are described and their use is demonstrated. The results compare favorably to the theoretically expected fast, intermediate, and slow flow values designed into the phantom.

  9. Development of a district Cord Blood Bank: a model for cord blood banking in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Buchanan, R; Webster, J; Laundy, V; Horsley, H; Barron, C; Anderson, N; Bradley, B; Hows, J

    2000-04-01

    The Bristol Cord Blood Bank was established as a pilot project within existing health services to establish cost-effective recruitment, collection and processing suitable for use in the NHS should cord blood become a routine source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in the UK. An important aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a midwifery-based collection network, thus utilising expertise already in place. Collection was performed on the delivery suite immediately after the placenta was delivered. The clinical experience of the midwife collector/counsellors allowed rapid pre-collection assessment of the condition of the cord and placenta. This prevented collection attempts from diseased or otherwise damaged placentas, leading to conservation of resources by preventing collection of most small volume donations. The bank was established within the National Blood Service, Bristol Centre to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice standards and ensure that processing was subject to the same stringency required for other sources of haemopoietic stem cells. Cord blood is an expensive resource. By utilising existing expertise in district Obstetric and National Blood Services, the Bristol Cord Blood Bank may serve as a model for health economic evaluation of cord blood banking of volunteer donations within the NHS. PMID:10808213

  10. Development of a district Cord Blood Bank: a model for cord blood banking in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Buchanan, R; Webster, J; Laundy, V; Horsley, H; Barron, C; Anderson, N; Bradley, B; Hows, J

    2000-04-01

    The Bristol Cord Blood Bank was established as a pilot project within existing health services to establish cost-effective recruitment, collection and processing suitable for use in the NHS should cord blood become a routine source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in the UK. An important aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a midwifery-based collection network, thus utilising expertise already in place. Collection was performed on the delivery suite immediately after the placenta was delivered. The clinical experience of the midwife collector/counsellors allowed rapid pre-collection assessment of the condition of the cord and placenta. This prevented collection attempts from diseased or otherwise damaged placentas, leading to conservation of resources by preventing collection of most small volume donations. The bank was established within the National Blood Service, Bristol Centre to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice standards and ensure that processing was subject to the same stringency required for other sources of haemopoietic stem cells. Cord blood is an expensive resource. By utilising existing expertise in district Obstetric and National Blood Services, the Bristol Cord Blood Bank may serve as a model for health economic evaluation of cord blood banking of volunteer donations within the NHS.

  11. Methods of failure and reliability assessment for mechanical heart pumps.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonna M; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Throckmorton, Amy L; Tribble, Curt G; Olsen, Don B

    2005-01-01

    Artificial blood pumps are today's most promising bridge-to-recovery (BTR), bridge-to-transplant (BTT), and destination therapy solutions for patients suffering from intractable congestive heart failure (CHF). Due to an increased need for effective, reliable, and safe long-term artificial blood pumps, each new design must undergo failure and reliability testing, an important step prior to approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for clinical testing and commercial use. The FDA has established no specific standards or protocols for these testing procedures and there are only limited recommendations provided by the scientific community when testing an overall blood pump system and individual system components. Product development of any medical device must follow a systematic and logical approach. As the most critical aspects of the design phase, failure and reliability assessments aid in the successful evaluation and preparation of medical devices prior to clinical application. The extent of testing, associated costs, and lengthy time durations to execute these experiments justify the need for an early evaluation of failure and reliability. During the design stages of blood pump development, a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) should be completed to provide a concise evaluation of the occurrence and frequency of failures and their effects on the overall support system. Following this analysis, testing of any pump typically involves four sequential processes: performance and reliability testing in simple hydraulic or mock circulatory loops, acute and chronic animal experiments, human error analysis, and ultimately, clinical testing. This article presents recommendations for failure and reliability testing based on the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Society for Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and American Society for Artificial Internal Organs (ASAIO), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Association for Advancement of

  12. Development of a Flexible Implantable Sensor for Postoperative Monitoring of Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Cannata, Jonathan M.; Chilipka, Thomas; Yang, Hao-Chung; Han, Sukgu; Ham, Sung W.; Rowe, Vincent L.; Weaver, Fred A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Vilkomerson, David

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a blood flow measurement system using Doppler ultrasound flow sensors fabricated of thin and flexible piezoelectric-polymer films. These flow sensors can be wrapped around a blood vessel and accurately measure flow. The innovation that makes this flow sensor possible is the diffraction-grating transducer. A conventional transducer produces a sound beam perpendicular to its face; therefore, when placed on the wall of a blood vessel, the Doppler shift in the backscattered ultrasound from blood theoretically would be 0. The diffraction-grating transducer produces a beam at a known angle to its face; therefore, backscattered ultrasound from the vessel will contain a Doppler signal. Flow sensors were fabricated by spin coating a poly(vinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene) copolymer film onto a flexible substrate with patterned gold electrodes. Custom-designed battery-operated continuous wave Doppler electronics along with a laptop computer completed the system. A prototype flow sensor was evaluated experimentally by measuring blood flow in a flow phantom and the infrarenal aorta of an adult New Zealand White rabbit. The flow phantom experiment demonstrated that the error in average velocity and volume blood flow was less than 6% for 30 measurements taken over a 2.5-hour period. The peak blood velocity through the rabbit infrarenal aorta measured by the flow sensor was 118 cm/s, within 1.7% of the measurement obtained using a duplex ultrasound system. The flow sensor and electronics operated continuously during the course of the 5-hour experiment after the incision on the animal was closed. PMID:23091251

  13. Study and development of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle (design and testing of flow directors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the fabrication, design of flow director, fluid flow direction analysis and testing of flow director of a magnetic heat pump. The objectives of the project are: (1) to fabricate a demonstration magnetic heat pump prototype with flow directors installed; and (2) analysis and testing of flow director and to make sure working fluid loops flow through correct directions with minor mixing. The prototype was fabricated and tested at the Development Testing Laboratory of Kennedy Space Center. The magnetic heat pump uses rear earth metal plates rotate in and out of a magnetic field in a clear plastic housing with water flowing through the rotor plates to provide temperature lift. Obtaining the proper water flow direction has been a problem. Flow directors were installed as flow barriers between separating point of two parallel loops. Function of flow directors were proven to be excellent both analytically and experimentally.

  14. What's new in artificial lift; Part 1: Industry developments in electrical submersible pumps and accessories; gas lift innovations; and new tools for control and measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F. ); Winkler, H.W. , Lubbock, TX )

    1994-03-01

    In this first article of a two-part series, several new developments by manufacturers of downhole electrical submersible pumps (ESPs) are discussed, including a progressive cavity pump and motor system, advances in cables and penetrators, and new lines of sensors and drives. Several gas-lift innovations are covered, such as: an electric surface controlled gas-lift valve, a retrievable valve latch, spoolable retrievable gas-lift valves and sidepocket mandrels, and an improved plunger-lift seal. Also described in the category of miscellaneous new equipment are: a high-rate waterflood mandrel and valve, net oil meter, less expensive downhole memory gauge, downhole oil/water separation system and a new laser coating process. Part 2, to follow next month, will introduce advances in beam and progressive cavity pumping.

  15. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  16. Development and Certification of Pratt and Whitney's Fuel and LOX Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, William S.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The development testing of the Pratt & Whitney's SSME Fuel and Lox Turbopumps has proven to be extremely valuable in preparation for Certification and Flight Readiness. Design 'lessons learned' from this program highlights the importance of overall systems engineering, including aerodynamic, thermal, mechanical, and materials systems.

  17. The Role of Human Factors in the Design and Development of an Insulin Pump

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Noel E.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses human factors (HF) processes and how they are applied during the development of a medical device to minimize the risk that the user interface design could lead to patient errors, adverse events, and product recalls. This process is best defined as “prevention through design.” The HF design process is exemplified by three distinct phases: (1) preliminary analysis, (2) formative design evaluation and modification, and (3) design validation. Additional benefits of employing HF principles during medical device development are briefly reviewed, including reduced patient risk by eliminating design flaws, increased patient adherence through the reduction in the complexity of therapeutic regimes, and reduced likelihood for product recalls. PMID:22538134

  18. The development and testing of a fieldworthy system of improved fluid pumping device and liquid sensor for oil wells

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, W.G.

    1991-12-31

    A major expenditure to maintain oil and gas leases is the support of pumpers, those individuals who maintain the pumping systems on wells to achieve optimum production. Many leases are marginal and are in remote areas and this requires considerable driving time for the pumper. The Air Pulse Oil Pump System is designed to be an economical system for the shallow stripper wells. To improve on the economics of this system, we have designed a Remote Oil Field Monitor and Controller to enable us to acquire data from the lease to our central office at anytime and to control the pumping activities from the central office by using a personal computer. The advent and economics of low-power microcontrollers have made it feasible to use this type of system for numerous remote control systems. We can also adapt this economical system to monitor and control the production of gas wells and/or pump jacks.

  19. Satellite Propellant Pump Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Veres, Joseph P.; Hah, Chunill; Nerone, Anthony L.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Fraser, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn initiated a satellite propellant pump technology demonstration program. The goal was to demonstrate the technologies for a 60 percent efficient pump at 1 gpm flow rate and 500 psia pressure rise. The pump design and analysis used the in-house developed computer codes named PUMPA and HPUMP3D. The requirements lead to a 4-stage impeller type pump design with a tip diameter of 0.54 inches and a rotational speed of 57,000 rpm. Analyses indicated that flow cavitation was not a problem in the design. Since the flow was incompressible, the stages were identical. Only the 2-stage pump was designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested for demonstration. Water was selected as the surrogate fluid for hydrazine in this program. Complete mechanical design including stress and dynamic analyses were conducted. The pump was driven by an electric motor directly coupled to the impellers. Runs up to 57,000 rpm were conducted, where a pressure rise of 200 psia at a flow rate of 0.8 gpm was measured to validate the design effort.

  20. Development of an Aptamer-Based Concentration Method for the Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Rana; Bist, Vaibhav; Sun, Sirena; Fortes de Araujo, Fernanda; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Debrabant, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a blood-borne parasite, is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. T. cruzi trypomastigotes, the infectious life cycle stage, can be detected in blood of infected individuals using PCR-based methods. However, soon after a natural infection, or during the chronic phase of Chagas disease, the number of parasites in blood may be very low and thus difficult to detect by PCR. To facilitate PCR-based detection methods, a parasite concentration approach was explored. A whole cell SELEX strategy was utilized to develop serum stable RNA aptamers that bind to live T. cruzi trypomastigotes. These aptamers bound to the parasite with high affinities (8–25 nM range). The highest affinity aptamer, Apt68, also demonstrated high specificity as it did not interact with the insect stage epimastigotes of T. cruzi nor with other related trypanosomatid parasites, L. donovani and T. brucei, suggesting that the target of Apt68 was expressed only on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Biotinylated Apt68, immobilized on a solid phase, was able to capture live parasites. These captured parasites were visible microscopically, as large motile aggregates, formed when the aptamer coated paramagnetic beads bound to the surface of the trypomastigotes. Additionally, Apt68 was also able to capture and aggregate trypomastigotes from several isolates of the two major genotypes of the parasite. Using a magnet, these parasite-bead aggregates could be purified from parasite-spiked whole blood samples, even at concentrations as low as 5 parasites in 15 ml of whole blood, as detected by a real-time PCR assay. Our results show that aptamers can be used as pathogen specific ligands to capture and facilitate PCR-based detection of T. cruzi in blood. PMID:22927983

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Methods Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. Results An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1–6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. Conclusions The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a

  2. Pumping mechanism for different gases in ion pumps with different configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audi, M.

    1988-09-01

    Ion pumps have the capability of pumping all gases of gas. Different phenomena are involved whens differnet gases are pumped. According to the pumping mechanisms in ion pump, gases can be divided in three rough groups: getterable gases, hydrogen and moble gases. Several different configurations of ion pumps have been developed through the years, to optimize their performance. Unfortunately, optimizing performance for one type of gas, often dimnishees performance for other gas. Diode ion pumps are the best choice for pumping getterable gases and hydrogen, but shown dramatic instability in pumping noble gases. Differential cathode ion pumps have a better behavior with noble gases, but slightly lower speeds for other gases. Triode ion pumps are stable when pumping noble gases, but have a reduced hydrogen capacity. The last generation of ion pumps has solved this problem: with a triode configuration and a unique cathode design, they have a high pumping speed for getterable gases, a pumping speed and pumping stability for noble gases even better than standard triode, and a pumping speed and capacity for hydrogen comparable to diode pumps.

  3. Development and characterization of an ice-selecting pumped counterflow virtual impactor (IS-PCVI) to study ice crystal residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Schnaiter, Martin; Vogt, Steffen; Vochezer, Paul; Järvinen, Emma; Wagner, Robert; Bell, David M.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    Separation of particles that play a role in cloud activation and ice nucleation from interstitial aerosols has become necessary to further understand aerosol-cloud interactions. The pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), which uses a vacuum pump to accelerate the particles and increase their momentum, provides an accessible option for dynamic and inertial separation of cloud elements. However, the use of a traditional PCVI to extract large cloud hydrometeors is difficult mainly due to its small cut-size diameters (< 5 µm). Here, for the first time we describe a development of an ice-selecting PCVI (IS-PCVI) to separate ice in controlled mixed-phase cloud system based on the particle inertia with the cut-off diameter ≥ 10 µm. We also present its laboratory application demonstrating the use of the impactor under a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions. The computational fluid dynamics simulations were initially carried out to guide the design of the IS-PCVI. After fabrication, a series of validation laboratory experiments were performed coupled with the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion cloud simulation chamber. In the AIDA chamber, test aerosol particles were exposed to the ice supersaturation conditions (i.e., RHice > 100 %), where a mixture of droplets and ice crystals was formed during the expansion experiment. In parallel, the flow conditions of the IS-PCVI were actively controlled, such that it separated ice crystals from a mixture of ice crystals and cloud droplets, which were of diameter ≥ 10 µm. These large ice crystals were passed through the heated evaporation section to remove the water content. Afterwards, the residuals were characterized with a suite of online and offline instruments downstream of the IS-PCVI. These results were used to assess the optimized operating parameters of the device in terms of (1) the critical cut-size diameter, (2) the transmission efficiency and (3) the counterflow

  4. Studies of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons down to 4.5 K for the development of cryosorption pumps for fusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.; Vivek, G. A.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Gangradey, R.; Udgata, S. S.; Tripati, V. S.

    2014-01-29

    Cryosorption pump is the only possible device to pump helium, hydrogen and its isotopes in fusion environment, such as high magnetic field and high plasma temperatures. Activated carbons are known to be the most suitable adsorbent in the development of cryosorption pumps. For this purpose, the data of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons in the temperature range 4.5 K to 77 K are needed, but are not available in the literature. For obtaining the above data, a commercial micro pore analyzer operating at 77 K has been integrated with a two stage GM cryocooler, which enables the cooling of the sample temperature down to 4.5 K. A heat switch mounted between the second stage cold head and the sample chamber helps to raise the sample chamber temperature to 77 K without affecting the performance of the cryocooler. The detailed description of this system is presented elsewhere. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adsorption isotherms measured on different types of activated carbons in the form of granules, globules, flake knitted and non-woven types in the temperature range 4.5 K to 10 K using Helium gas as the adsorbate. The above results are analyzed to obtain the pore size distributions and surface areas of the activated carbons. The effect of adhesive used for bonding the activated carbons to the panels is also studied. These results will be useful to arrive at the right choice of activated carbon to be used for the development of cryosorption pumps.

  5. Studies of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons down to 4.5 K for the development of cryosorption pumps for fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.; Vivek, G. A.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Gangradey, R.; Udgata, S. S.; Tripati, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Cryosorption pump is the only possible device to pump helium, hydrogen and its isotopes in fusion environment, such as high magnetic field and high plasma temperatures. Activated carbons are known to be the most suitable adsorbent in the development of cryosorption pumps. For this purpose, the data of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons in the temperature range 4.5 K to 77 K are needed, but are not available in the literature. For obtaining the above data, a commercial micro pore analyzer operating at 77 K has been integrated with a two stage GM cryocooler, which enables the cooling of the sample temperature down to 4.5 K. A heat switch mounted between the second stage cold head and the sample chamber helps to raise the sample chamber temperature to 77 K without affecting the performance of the cryocooler. The detailed description of this system is presented elsewhere. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adsorption isotherms measured on different types of activated carbons in the form of granules, globules, flake knitted and non-woven types in the temperature range 4.5 K to 10 K using Helium gas as the adsorbate. The above results are analyzed to obtain the pore size distributions and surface areas of the activated carbons. The effect of adhesive used for bonding the activated carbons to the panels is also studied. These results will be useful to arrive at the right choice of activated carbon to be used for the development of cryosorption pumps.

  6. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  7. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  8. Supercritical waste oxidation pump investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.; Garcia, K.

    1993-02-01

    This report investigates the pumping techniques and pumping equipment that would be appropriate for a 5,000 gallon per day supercritical water oxidation waste disposal facility. The pumps must boost water, waste, and additives from atmospheric pressure to approximately 27.6 MPa (4,000 psia). The required flow ranges from 10 gpm to less than 0.1 gpm. For the higher flows, many commercial piston pumps are available. These pumps have packing and check-valves that will require periodic maintenance; probably at 2 to 6 month intervals. Several commercial diaphragm pumps were also discovered that could pump the higher flow rates. Diaphragm pumps have the advantage of not requiring dynamic seals. For the lower flows associated with the waste and additive materials, commercial diaphragm pumps. are available. Difficult to pump materials that are sticky, radioactive, or contain solids, could be injected with an accumulator using an inert gas as the driving mechanism. The information presented in this report serves as a spring board for trade studies and the development of equipment specifications.

  9. [The development of biochip to detect anti-cholera antibodies in human blood serum].

    PubMed

    Utkin, D V; Osina, N A; Spitsin, A N; Kireev, M N; Gromova, O V; Zakharova, T L; Naidenova, E V; Kuklev, V E

    2015-02-01

    The full-scaled agglutinating immunoassay is commonly applied to detect content of antibodies to cholera agent Vibrio cholerae human in blood serum under application of serological diagnostic. The time of analysis implementation amounts to 18 hours. To shorten time of detection of antibodies a biological microchip (biochip) was developed. The biochip represents an activated slide with immobilized corpuscle and soluble antigen cholera agent (O-antigens, cholera toxin). The experimental work resulted in development of scheme of biochip and selection of optimal conditions of sorption and implementation of immunologic analysis using biochip. The application of biochip facilitated to detect specific antibodies to antigens of cholera agent in commercial experimental animal serums and blood serums of ill patients. The time of analysis implementation amounted to 2-3 hours. The results are substantiated by bacteriological and serological methods. PMID:26027261

  10. [The development of biochip to detect anti-cholera antibodies in human blood serum].

    PubMed

    Utkin, D V; Osina, N A; Spitsin, A N; Kireev, M N; Gromova, O V; Zakharova, T L; Naidenova, E V; Kuklev, V E

    2015-02-01

    The full-scaled agglutinating immunoassay is commonly applied to detect content of antibodies to cholera agent Vibrio cholerae human in blood serum under application of serological diagnostic. The time of analysis implementation amounts to 18 hours. To shorten time of detection of antibodies a biological microchip (biochip) was developed. The biochip represents an activated slide with immobilized corpuscle and soluble antigen cholera agent (O-antigens, cholera toxin). The experimental work resulted in development of scheme of biochip and selection of optimal conditions of sorption and implementation of immunologic analysis using biochip. The application of biochip facilitated to detect specific antibodies to antigens of cholera agent in commercial experimental animal serums and blood serums of ill patients. The time of analysis implementation amounted to 2-3 hours. The results are substantiated by bacteriological and serological methods.

  11. Methodological Guidelines for Reducing the Complexity of Data Warehouse Development for Transactional Blood Bank Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takecian, Pedro L.; Oikawa, Marcio K.; Braghetto, Kelly R.; Rocha, Paulo; Lucena, Fred; Kavounis, Katherine; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Acker, Susan; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B. F.; Sabino, Ester C.; Custer, Brian; Busch, Michael P.; Ferreira, João E.

    2013-01-01

    Over time, data warehouse (DW) systems have become more difficult to develop because of the growing heterogeneity of data sources. Despite advances in research and technology, DW projects are still too slow for pragmatic results to be generated. Here, we address the following question: how can the complexity of DW development for integration of heterogeneous transactional information systems be reduced? To answer this, we proposed methodological guidelines based on cycles of conceptual modeling and data analysis, to drive construction of a modular DW system. These guidelines were applied to the blood donation domain, successfully reducing the complexity of DW development. PMID:23729945

  12. Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential-size prototype turbocompressor heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    An experimental program was conducted to further define, improve and demonstrate the performance characteristics and operational features of an existing 18-ton solar-powered prototype heat pump. The prototype heat pump is nominally sized for multi-family residential applications and provides both space heating and cooling. It incorporates a turbocompressor specially designed to operate at peak temperatures consistent with medium concentration collectors. The major efforts in this program phase included modification and improvement of the instrumentation sensors, the laboratory simulation equipment and selected heat pump components. After implementing these modifications, performance testing was conducted for a total operating time of approximately 250 hours. Experimental test results compared favorably with performance data calculated using the UTRC computer prediction program for the same boundary conditions. A series of tests was conducted continuously over a 12-h period to simulate operation (in the cooling mode) of the prototype heat pump under conditions typical of an actual installation. The test demonstrated that the heat pump could match the cooling load profile of a multi-family residential building. During the system performance testing, sufficient data were taken to identify the performance of each of the major components (e.g. turbine, compressor, heat exchangers, R11 pump). Component performance is compared with that calculated using the UTRC computer predict program and with data supplied by their manufacturers. The performance capabilities of the prototype heat pump system have been documented and recommendations are made for further design improvements which could be included in a MOD-2 configuration. The MOD-2 configuration would incorporate features that would improve system performance, reduce capital cost and most importantly improve system reliability.

  13. Sports-induced blood sugar utilization prevents development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinkui; Yin, Xiaojian; Jiang, Jiazhen

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a malignant tumor of extremely high lethality in humans. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is the predominant precancerous lesion for PDAC and is frequently detected in the normal and inflamed pancreas. However, only a few of PanIN eventually progress into PDAC. Thus, understanding of the regulation of PanIN-to-PDAC conversion appears to be critical for prevention of the occurrence of PDAC. Here, we evaluated the effect of sports on the progression of PanIN into PDAC in an established mouse PDAC model (Ptf1a-Cre; K-ras fx/fx). We found that swimming (3 min twice per day) since 12 weeks of age significantly decreased the incidence of the development of PDAC in these PanIN-baring mice at 24 weeks of age. Moreover, swimming significantly decreased fasting blood sugar and improved glucose response in these mice, compared to the control. Furthermore, implantation of insulin pellets into the mice not only reduced fasting blood sugar and improved glucose response, but also significantly reduced the incidence of development of PDAC, which mimicked the effect of swimming. Taken together, our study suggests that sports-induced blood sugar utilization may prevent development of PDAC.

  14. Development of a wireless blood pressure measuring device with smart mobile device.

    PubMed

    İlhan, İlhan; Yıldız, İbrahim; Kayrak, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Today, smart mobile devices (telephones and tablets) are very commonly used due to their powerful hardware and useful features. According to an eMarketer report, in 2014 there were 1.76 billion sm