Science.gov

Sample records for blood-brain tumor barrier

  1. Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticles across the blood-brain tumor barrier into malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant; Kanevsky, Ariel S; Wu, Haitao; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Fung, Steve H; Sousa, Alioscka A; Auh, Sungyoung; Wilson, Colin M; Sharma, Kamal; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D; Griffiths, Gary L; Hall, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics across the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant gliomas remains a challenge. This is due to our limited understanding of nanoparticle properties in relation to the physiologic size of pores within the blood-brain tumor barrier. Polyamidoamine dendrimers are particularly small multigenerational nanoparticles with uniform sizes within each generation. Dendrimer sizes increase by only 1 to 2 nm with each successive generation. Using functionalized polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 1 through 8, we investigated how nanoparticle size influences particle accumulation within malignant glioma cells. Methods Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging probes were conjugated to the dendrimer terminal amines. Functionalized dendrimers were administered intravenously to rodents with orthotopically grown malignant gliomas. Transvascular transport and accumulation of the nanoparticles in brain tumor tissue was measured in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Localization of the nanoparticles within glioma cells was confirmed ex vivo with fluorescence imaging. Results We found that the intravenously administered functionalized dendrimers less than approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter were able to traverse pores of the blood-brain tumor barrier of RG-2 malignant gliomas, while larger ones could not. Of the permeable functionalized dendrimer generations, those that possessed long blood half-lives could accumulate within glioma cells. Conclusion The therapeutically relevant upper limit of blood-brain tumor barrier pore size is approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm. Therefore, effective transvascular drug delivery into malignant glioma cells can be accomplished by using nanoparticles that are smaller than 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter and possess long blood half-lives. PMID:19094226

  2. Blood Brain Barrier: A Challenge for Effectual Therapy of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Arijit; Ghosh, Mrinal Kanti

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumors are one of the most formidable diseases of mankind. They have only a fair to poor prognosis and high relapse rate. One of the major causes of extreme difficulty in brain tumor treatment is the presence of blood brain barrier (BBB). BBB comprises different molecular components and transport systems, which in turn create efflux machinery or hindrance for the entry of several drugs in brain. Thus, along with the conventional techniques, successful modification of drug delivery and novel therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome this obstacle for treatment of brain tumors. In this review, we have elucidated some critical insights into the composition and function of BBB and along with it we have discussed the effective methods for delivery of drugs to the brain and therapeutic strategies overcoming the barrier. PMID:25866775

  3. Targeted delivery of antibody-based therapeutic and imaging agents to CNS tumors: Crossing the blood-brain-barrier divide

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Li, Chunsheng; Pryma, Daniel A.; Brem, Steven; Coukos, George; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain tumors are inherently difficult to treat in large part due to the cellular blood-brain barriers (BBB) that limit the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor tissue from the systemic circulation. Virtually no large-molecules, including antibody-based proteins, can penetrate the BBB. With antibodies fast becoming attractive ligands for highly specific molecular targeting to tumor antigens, a variety of methods are being investigated to enhance the access of these agents to intracranial tumors for imaging or therapeutic applications. Areas covered This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and the vasculature in brain tumors, described as the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB). Antibodies targeted to molecular markers of CNS tumors will be highlighted, and current strategies for enhancing the delivery of antibodies across these cellular barriers into the brain parenchyma to the tumor will be discussed. Non-invasive imaging approaches to assess BBB/BBTB permeability and/or antibody targeting will be presented as a means of guiding the optimal delivery of targeted agents to brain tumors. Expert Opinion Pre-clinical and clinical studies highlight the potential of several approaches in increasing brain tumor delivery across the blood-brain barrier divide. However, each carries its own risks and challenges. There is tremendous potential in using neuroimaging strategies to assist in understanding and defining the challenges to translating and optimizing molecularly-targeted antibody delivery to CNS tumors to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23751126

  4. Overcoming the blood-brain tumor barrier for effective glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    van Tellingen, O; Yetkin-Arik, B; de Gooijer, M C; Wesseling, P; Wurdinger, T; de Vries, H E

    2015-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Particularly in adult patients, the vast majority of gliomas belongs to the heterogeneous group of diffuse gliomas, i.e. glial tumors characterized by diffuse infiltrative growth in the preexistent brain tissue. Unfortunately, glioblastoma, the most aggressive (WHO grade IV) diffuse glioma is also by far the most frequent one. After standard treatment, the 2-year overall survival of glioblastoma patients is approximately only 25%. Advanced knowledge in the molecular pathology underlying malignant transformation has offered new handles and better treatments for several cancer types. Unfortunately, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients have not yet profited as although numerous experimental drugs have been tested in clinical trials, all failed miserably. This grim prognosis for GBM is at least partly due to the lack of successful drug delivery across the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB). The human brain comprises over 100 billion capillaries with a total length of 400 miles, a total surface area of 20 m(2) and a median inter-capillary distance of about 50 μm, making it the best perfused organ in the body. The BBTB encompasses existing and newly formed blood vessels that contribute to the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the tumor and facilitate glioma cell migration to other parts of the brain. The high metabolic demands of high-grade glioma create hypoxic areas that trigger increased expression of VEGF and angiogenesis, leading to the formation of abnormal vessels and a dysfunctional BBTB. Even though the BBTB is considered 'leaky' in the core part of glioblastomas, in large parts of glioblastomas and, even more so, in lower grade diffuse gliomas the BBTB more closely resembles the intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and prevents efficient passage of cancer therapeutics, including small molecules and antibodies. Thus, many drugs can still be blocked from reaching the many infiltrative glioblastoma cells that

  5. Blood-brain barrier delivery.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-01-01

    Neuropharmaceutics is the largest potential growth sector of the pharmaceutical industry. However, this growth is blocked by the problem of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Essentially 100% of large-molecule drugs and >98% of small-molecule drugs do not cross the BBB. The BBB can be traversed because there are multiple endogenous transporters within this barrier. Therefore, brain drug development programs of the future need to be re-configured so that drugs are formulated to enable transport into the brain via endogenous BBB transporters.

  6. A dynamic in vivo-like organotypic blood-brain barrier model to probe metastatic brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Li, Zhongyu; Yu, Yue; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Ho, Winson S.; Yin, Fangchao; Wang, Li; Zhu, Guoli; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Lei; Zhuang, Zhengping; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the uptake of many neuro-therapeutic molecules, presenting a formidable hurdle to drug development in brain diseases. We proposed a new and dynamic in vivo-like three-dimensional microfluidic system that replicates the key structural, functional and mechanical properties of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. Multiple factors in this system work synergistically to accentuate BBB-specific attributes–permitting the analysis of complex organ-level responses in both normal and pathological microenvironments in brain tumors. The complex BBB microenvironment is reproduced in this system via physical cell-cell interaction, vascular mechanical cues and cell migration. This model possesses the unique capability to examine brain metastasis of human lung, breast and melanoma cells and their therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. The results suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and astrocytes in BBB microenvironment might affect the ability of malignant brain tumors to traverse between brain and vascular compartments. Furthermore, quantification of spatially resolved barrier functions exists within a single assay, providing a versatile and valuable platform for pharmaceutical development, drug testing and neuroscientific research. PMID:27830712

  7. A dynamic in vivo-like organotypic blood-brain barrier model to probe metastatic brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Li, Zhongyu; Yu, Yue; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Ho, Winson S.; Yin, Fangchao; Wang, Li; Zhu, Guoli; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Lei; Zhuang, Zhengping; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the uptake of many neuro-therapeutic molecules, presenting a formidable hurdle to drug development in brain diseases. We proposed a new and dynamic in vivo-like three-dimensional microfluidic system that replicates the key structural, functional and mechanical properties of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. Multiple factors in this system work synergistically to accentuate BBB-specific attributes–permitting the analysis of complex organ-level responses in both normal and pathological microenvironments in brain tumors. The complex BBB microenvironment is reproduced in this system via physical cell-cell interaction, vascular mechanical cues and cell migration. This model possesses the unique capability to examine brain metastasis of human lung, breast and melanoma cells and their therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. The results suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and astrocytes in BBB microenvironment might affect the ability of malignant brain tumors to traverse between brain and vascular compartments. Furthermore, quantification of spatially resolved barrier functions exists within a single assay, providing a versatile and valuable platform for pharmaceutical development, drug testing and neuroscientific research.

  8. The blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers: a review of strategies for increasing drug delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Groothuis, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Drug delivery to brain tumors has been a controversial subject. Some believe the blood-brain barrier is not important, while others believe it is the major obstacle in treatment and have devised innovative approaches to circumvent it. These approaches can be divided into two categories: those that attempt to increase drug delivery of intravascularly administered drugs by manipulating either the drugs or capillary permeability, and those that attempt to increase drug delivery by local administration. Several strategies have been developed to increase the fraction of intravascular drug reaching the tumor, including intra-arterial administration, barrier disruption, new ways of packaging drugs, and, most recently, inhibiting drug efflux from tumor. When given intravascularly, all drugs have a common drawback: the body acts as a sink, and, even in the best situations, only a small fraction of administered drug actually reaches the tumor. A consequence is that systemic toxicity is usually the dose-limiting factor. When given locally, such as into the cerebrospinal fluid or directly into the tumor, 100% of an administered dose is delivered to the target site. However, local delivery is associated with variable and unpredictable spatial distribution and variation in drug concentration. The major dose-limiting factor of most local delivery methods will be neurotoxicity. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of circumventing the blood-brain barrier are presented in this review, and special attention is given to convection-enhanced delivery, which has particular promise for the local delivery of large therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, antisense oligonucleotides, or viral vectors. PMID:11302254

  9. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: A Limit to the Therapy of CNS Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Facchini, Ludovica; Stival, Alessia; Becciani, Sabrina; Guidi, Milena; Favre, Claudio; de Martino, Maurizio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, represents an ongoing challenge. In Central Nervous System (CNS) the achievement of therapeutic concentration of chemical agents is complicated by the presence of distinct set of efflux proteins, such as ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters localized on the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). The activity of ABC transporters seems to be a common mechanism that underlies the poor response of CNS diseases to therapies. The molecular characterization of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), as an ABC transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR), has stimulated many studies to investigate its activity on the BBB, its involvement in physiology and CNS diseases and its role in limiting the delivery of drugs in CNS. In this review, we highlight the activity and localization of BCRP on the BBB and the action that this efflux pump has on many conventional drugs or latest generation molecules used for the treatment of CNS tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26584727

  11. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  12. Neovascularization and tumor growth in the rabbit brain. A model for experimental studies of angiogenesis and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Zagzag, D.; Brem, S.; Robert, F.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the study of tumor angiogenesis within the rabbit brain is presented. Implantation of the VX2 carcinoma provides a reproducible tumor accompanied by angiogenesis. The authors report the sequential growth, histology, tumor neovascularization, and vascular permeability of this tumor following its intracerebral implantation. Tumor angiogenesis correlates with the rapid and logarithmic intracerebral tumor growth. The proliferation of blood vessels in the tumor and the organization of tumor cells around tumor vessels are described. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (detected by Evans blue leakage) starts in the early stages of tumor development and becomes prominent as the tumor vasculature and size increase. This model is useful for experimental studies of angiogenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 15 PMID:2451889

  13. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  14. The effects of ionizing radiation and dexamethasone on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-tumor-barrier (BTB): Implications for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Spickard, J.H.; Griebenow, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Currently envisioned techniques for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors rely on the increased permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) (more specifically, the blood-tumor-barrier (BTB)) which occurs around the malignant tumor. As a result of this increased permeability, higher boron concentrations (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) should be obtainable in the tumor than in the surrounding normal brain. The effects on the BBB and BTB by the ionizing component of this radiation and by the steroid dexamethasone (almost universally used in the clinical management of these patients) must be considered in the formulation of this treatment technique. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Blood-brain barrier and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2006-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in the transduction of signals between the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. It does so through several mechanisms, including the direct transport of peptides and regulatory proteins such as insulin and leptin. Another mechanism that may be important is the secretion by brain endothelial cells of substances that affect feeding, such as proinflammatory cytokines and NO. We have recently shown that the BBB is capable of receiving an input from one side and secreting a substance into the other. Additionally, BBB secretions can be modulated by substances that affect feeding, such as adiponectin and lipopolysaccharide.

  16. The blood-brain barrier in psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2009-05-01

    The term ''psychoneuroimmunology'' connotes separate compartments that interact. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is both the dividing line, physical and physiologic, between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) and the locale for interaction. The BBB restricts unregulated mixing of immune substances in the blood with those in the CNS, directly transports neuroimmune-active substances between the blood and CNS, and itself secretes neuroimmune substances. These normal functions of the BBB can be altered by neuroimmune events. As such, the BBB is an important conduit in the communication between the immune system and the CNS.

  17. Glial influence on the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Jorge Ivan; Katayama, Takahiro; Prat, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) is a specialized vascular structure tightly regulating central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis. Endothelial cells are the central component of the BBB and control of their barrier phenotype resides on astrocytes and pericytes. Interactions between these cells and the endothelium promote and maintain many of the physiological and metabolic characteristics that are unique to the BBB. In this review we describe recent findings related to the involvement of astroglial cells, including radial glial cells, in the induction of barrier properties during embryogenesis and adulthood. In addition, we describe changes that occur in astrocytes and endothelial cells during injury and inflammation with a particular emphasis on alterations of the BBB phenotype. GLIA 2013;61:1939–1958 PMID:24123158

  18. Guiding Brain-Tumor Surgery via Blood-Brain-Barrier-Permeable Gold Nanoprobes with Acid-Triggered MRI/SERRS Signals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xihui; Yue, Qi; Liu, Zining; Ke, Mengjing; Zhou, Xingyu; Li, Sihan; Zhang, Jianping; Zhang, Ren; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying; Li, Cong

    2017-03-15

    Surgical resection is a mainstay in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Surgeons, however, face great challenges in distinguishing tumor margins due to their infiltrated nature. Here, a pair of gold nanoprobes that enter a brain tumor by crossing the blood-brain barrier is developed. The acidic tumor environment triggers their assembly with the concomitant activation of both magnetic resonance (MR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) signals. While the bulky aggregates continuously trap into the tumor interstitium, the intact nanoprobes in normal brain tissue can be transported back into the blood stream in a timely manner. Experimental results show that physiological acidity triggers nanoparticle assembly by forming 3D spherical nanoclusters with remarkable MR and SERRS signal enhancements. The nanoprobes not only preoperatively define orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high sensitivity and durability in vivo, but also intraoperatively guide tumor excision with the assistance of a handheld Raman scanner. Microscopy studies verify the precisely demarcated tumor margin marked by the assembled nanoprobes. Taking advantage of the nanoprobes' rapid excretion rate and the extracellular acidification as a hallmark of solid tumors, these nanoprobes are promising in improving brain-tumor surgical outcome with high specificity, safety, and universality.

  19. AIDS and the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Nathan S.; MacLean, Andrew G.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in normal physiology of the central nervous system by regulating what reaches the brain from the periphery. The BBB also plays a major role in neurologic disease including neuropathologic sequelae associated with infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans and the closely related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in macaques. In this review, we provide an overview of the function, structure and components of the BBB, followed by a more detailed discussion of the subcellular structures and regulation of the tight junction. We then discuss the ways in which HIV/SIV affects the BBB, largely through infection of monocytes/macrophages, and how infected macrophages crossing the BBB ultimately results in breakdown of the barrier. PMID:19306229

  20. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with t1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in brain tumors: a comparative study with two different algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Saitta, Laura; Barletta, Laura; Bonzano, Laura; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Castellan, Lucio; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Roccatagliata, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of measuring different permeability parameters with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to investigate the blood brain-barrier permeability associated with different brain tumors. The Patlak algorithm and the extended Tofts-Kety model were used to this aim. Twenty-five adult patients with tumors of different histological grades were enrolled in this study. MRI examinations were performed at 1.5 T. Multiflip angle, fast low-angle shot, and axial 3D T1-weighted images were acquired to calculate T1 maps, followed by a DCE acquisition. A region of interest was placed within the tumor of each patient to calculate the mean value of different permeability parameters. Differences in permeability measurements were found between different tumor grades, with higher histological grades characterized by higher permeability values. A significant difference in transfer constant (K (trans)) values was found between the two methods on high-grade tumors; however, both techniques revealed a significant correlation between the histological grade of tumors and their K (trans) values. Our results suggest that DCE acquisition is feasible in patients with brain tumors and that K (trans) maps can be easily obtained by these two algorithms, even if the theoretical model adopted could affect the final results.

  1. Targeting Glioma with a Dual Mode Optical and Paramagnetic Nanoprobe across the Blood-brain Tumor Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Kishor; Ewing, James R; Ali, Meser M

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumors, delivering nanoparticles across the blood-tumor barrier presents major hurdles. A clinically relevant MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, DL680 were conjugated to a G5 PAMAM dendrimer, thus producing a dual-mode MRI and NIR imaging agent. Systemic delivery of the subsequent nano-sized agent demonstrated glioma-specific accumulation, probably due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. In vivo MRI detected the agent in glioma tissue, but not in normal contralateral tissue; this observation was validated with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. A biodistribution study showed the agent to have accumulated in the glioma tumor and the liver, the latter being the excretion path for a G5 dendrimer-based agent. PMID:27695645

  2. Multiple treatments with liposomal doxorubicin and ultrasound-induced disruption of blood-tumor and blood-brain barriers improves outcomes in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Park, Juyoung; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the central nervous system and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels, along with several other factors, creates additional barriers for drug treatment for brain tumors. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and the “blood-tumor barrier”. Here, we tested the impact of three weekly sessions of FUS and liposomal doxorubicin (DOX) in 9L rat glioma tumors. Animals that received FUS + DOX (N = 8) had a median survival time that was increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to animals who received DOX only (N = 6), FUS only (N = 8), or no treatment (N = 7). Median survival for animals that received FUS + DOX was increased by 100% relative to untreated controls, whereas animals who received DOX alone had only a 16% improvement. Animals who received only FUS showed no improvement. No tumor cells were found in histology in 4/8 animals in the FUS + DOX group, and in two animals, only a few tumor cells were detected. Adverse events in the treatment group included skin toxicity, impaired activity, damage to surrounding brain tissue, and tissue loss at the tumor site. In one animal, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed. These events are largely consistent with known side effects of doxorubicin and with an extensive tumor burden. Overall this work demonstrates that multiple sessions using this FUS technique to enhance the delivery of liposomal doxorubicin has a pronounced therapeutic effect in this rat glioma model. PMID:23603615

  3. Dissecting gene expression at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Melanie A.; Bien-Ly, Nga; Daneman, Richard; Watts, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of genome-wide expression data for the blood-brain barrier is an invaluable resource that has recently enabled the discovery of several genes and pathways involved in the development and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, particularly in rodent models. The broad distribution of published data sets represents a viable starting point for the molecular dissection of the blood-brain barrier and will further direct the discovery of novel mechanisms of blood-brain barrier formation and function. Technical advances in purifying brain endothelial cells, the key cell that forms the critical barrier, have allowed for greater specificity in gene expression comparisons with other central nervous system cell types, and more systematic characterizations of the molecular composition of the blood-brain barrier. Nevertheless, our understanding of how the blood-brain barrier changes during aging and disease is underrepresented. Blood-brain barrier data sets from a wider range of experimental paradigms and species, including invertebrates and primates, would be invaluable for investigating the function and evolution of the blood-brain barrier. Newer technologies in gene expression profiling, such as RNA-sequencing, now allow for finer resolution of transcriptomic changes, including isoform specificity and RNA-editing. As our field continues to utilize more advanced expression profiling in its ongoing efforts to elucidate the blood-brain barrier, including in disease and drug delivery, we will continue to see rapid advances in our understanding of the molecular mediators of barrier biology. We predict that the recently published data sets, combined with forthcoming genomic and proteomic blood-brain barrier data sets, will continue to fuel the molecular genetic revolution of blood-brain barrier biology. PMID:25414634

  4. Nanoparticle transport across the blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Andreas M; Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Pederzoli, Francesca; Forni, Flavio; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Tosi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While the role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized in the (development of treatments targeting neurodegenerative disorders, to date, few strategies exist that enable drug delivery of non-BBB crossing molecules directly to their site of action, the brain. However, the recent advent of Nanomedicines may provide a potent tool to implement CNS targeted delivery of active compounds. Approaches for BBB crossing are deeply investigated in relation to the pathology: among the main important diseases of the CNS, this review focuses on the application of nanomedicines to neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington's Disease) and to other brain pathologies as epilepsy, infectious diseases, multiple sclerosis, lysosomal storage disorders, strokes. PMID:27141426

  5. Effects of Adrenal Cortical Steroids and Osmotic Blood-Brain Barrier Opening on Methotrexate Delivery to Gliomas in the Rodent: The Factor of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuwelt, Edward A.; Barnett, Peggy A.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Frenkel, Eugene P.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of adrenal cortical steroids and osmotic blood-brain barrier modification on methotrexate delivery to normal and glioma-bearing rats was studied. In animals with the avian sarcoma virus-induced glioma, osmotic blood-brain barrier modification resulted in significantly increased delivery of methotrexate to the tumor-bearing hemisphere (including the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor), compared to the nonmodified hemisphere or to control animals. The administration of adrenal steroids, followed by intracarotid methotrexate, resulted in slightly decreased chemotherapeutic agent (methotrexate) delivery to the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor. When adrenal steroids were given prior to barrier modification and methotrexate therapy, the level of methotrexate was significantly less in the tumor. These studies provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier exists in tumors and is a factor in drug delivery to tumors. Steroid administration greatly interferes with the enhancement of drug delivery to tumors that can be achieved with osmotic blood-brain barrier modification.

  6. Drug-loaded bubbles with matched focused ultrasound excitation for concurrent blood-brain barrier opening and brain-tumor drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been used to achieve local blood-brain barrier opening (BBB opening) and increase the penetration of therapeutic drugs into brain tumors. However, inertial cavitation of microbubbles during FUS-induced BBB opening causes intracerebral hemorrhaging (ICH), leading to acute and chronic brain injury and limiting the efficiency of drug delivery. Here we investigated whether induction of drug (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, BCNU)-loaded bubbles (BCNU bubbles) to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB opening, thereby eliminating ICH and enhancing drug delivery in a rat brain model. FUS was tested at 1 and 10 MHz, over a wide range of pressure (mechanical index ranging from 0.16 to 1.42) in the presence of BCNU bubbles. Excitation of BCNU bubbles by resonance frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) resulted in predominantly stable cavitation and significantly reduced the occurrence of potential hazards of exposure to biological tissues during the BBB opening process. In addition, the drug release process could be monitored by acoustic emission obtained from ultrasound imaging. In tumor-bearing animals, BCNU bubbles with FUS showed significant control of tumor progression and improved maximum survival from 26 to 35 days. This study provides useful advancements toward the goal of successfully translating FUS theranostic bubble-enhanced brain drug delivery into clinical use.

  7. Peptides and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system.

  8. Prolactin and blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Hamilton, W Ryan; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel A; Ali, Syed F; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists in part of a highly specialized set of cells which separates the brain from the vascular system. The BBB controls the entry and exit of substances from the brain tissue through tight junctions (TJs) between endothelial cells. It is known that the hormone prolactin (PRL) is able to regulate endothelial-dependent processes, like the balance between proliferation and apoptosis and the mammary epithelial permeability. However, the effects of PRL and the role it plays in the BBB permeability are still not well understood. A primary culture of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells was used as in vitro model of BBB. Cells were treated with PRL (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nM) for 24 hours. PRL significantly increased cellular proliferation at 10 and 100 nM, but did not modify basal apoptosis. These effects were dependent on the production of the mitogenic factor nitric oxide (NO). PRL significantly decreased the permeability and promoted an increase in trans-endothelial electrical resistance in a NO-independent way. PRL also increased the expression of the TJs proteins claudin-5 and occludin. The short form of the PRL receptor was detected in these cells but its expression was not modified by PRL. Together, these results suggest that PRL has the ability to increase cellular proliferation associated with a decrease on BBB permeability by increasing the expression of TJs proteins.

  9. Hormones and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hampl, Richard; Bičíková, Marie; Sosvorová, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain, and brain cells are also hormonally active. To reach their targets in brain structures, hormones must overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a unique device selecting desired/undesired molecules to reach or leave the brain, and it is composed of endothelial cells forming the brain vasculature. These cells differ from other endothelial cells in their almost impermeable tight junctions and in possessing several membrane structures such as receptors, transporters, and metabolically active molecules, ensuring their selection function. The main ways how compounds pass through the BBB are briefly outlined in this review. The main part concerns the transport of major classes of hormones: steroids, including neurosteroids, thyroid hormones, insulin, and other peptide hormones regulating energy homeostasis, growth hormone, and also various cytokines. Peptide transporters mediating the saturable transport of individual classes of hormones are reviewed. The last paragraph provides examples of how hormones affect the permeability and function of the BBB either at the level of tight junctions or by various transporters.

  10. Effective treatment of glioblastoma requires crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting tumors including cancer stem cells: The promise of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Harford, Joe B; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-12-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal type of brain tumor. Both therapeutic resistance and restricted permeation of drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) play a major role in the poor prognosis of GBM patients. Accumulated evidence suggests that in many human cancers, including GBM, therapeutic resistance can be attributed to a small fraction of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been shown to have stem cell-like properties that enable them to evade traditional cytotoxic therapies, and so new CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies are needed. Nanoparticles have been designed to selectively deliver payloads to relevant target cells in the body, and there is considerable interest in the use of nanoparticles for CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for overcoming CSC-mediated therapeutic resistance and thus significantly improving management of GBM. In this review, we will examine the current nanomedicine approaches for targeting CSCs and their therapeutic implications. The inhibitory effect of various nanoparticle-based drug delivery system towards CSCs in GBM tumors is the primary focus of this review.

  11. Human blood-brain barrier insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, W M; Eisenberg, J; Yang, J

    1985-06-01

    A new model system for characterizing the human brain capillary, which makes up the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vivo, is described in these studies and is applied initially to the investigation of the human BBB insulin receptor. Autopsy brains were obtained from the pathologist between 22-36 h postmortem and were used to isolate human brain microvessels which appeared intact on both light and phase microscopy. The microvessels were positive for human factor 8 and for a BBB-specific enzyme marker, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. The microvessels avidly bound insulin with a high-affinity dissociation constant, KD = 1.2 +/- 0.5 nM. The human brain microvessels internalized insulin based on acid-wash assay, and 75% of insulin was internalized at 37 degrees C. The microvessels transported insulin to the medium at 37 degrees C with a t1/2 = approximately 70 min. Little of the 125I-insulin was metabolized by the microvessels under these conditions based on the elution profile of the medium extract over a Sephadex G-50 column. Plasma membranes were obtained from the human brain microvessels and these membranes were enriched in membrane markers such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase or alkaline phosphatase. The plasma membranes bound 125I-insulin with and ED50 = 10 ng/ml, which was identical to the 50% binding point in intact microvessels. The human BBB plasma membranes were solubilized in Triton X-100 and were adsorbed to a wheat germ agglutinin Sepharose affinity column, indicating the BBB insulin receptor is a glycoprotein. Affinity cross-linking of insulin to the plasma membranes revealed a 127K protein that specifically binds insulin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Netrin 1 regulates blood-brain barrier function and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Podjaski, Cornelia; Alvarez, Jorge I; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Larouche, Sandra; Terouz, Simone; Bin, Jenea M; Lécuyer, Marc-André; Saint-Laurent, Olivia; Larochelle, Catherine; Darlington, Peter J; Arbour, Nathalie; Antel, Jack P; Kennedy, Timothy E; Prat, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Blood-brain barrier function is driven by the influence of astrocyte-secreted factors. During neuroinflammatory responses the blood-brain barrier is compromised resulting in central nervous system damage and exacerbated pathology. Here, we identified endothelial netrin 1 induction as a vascular response to astrocyte-derived sonic hedgehog that promotes autocrine barrier properties during homeostasis and increases with inflammation. Netrin 1 supports blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating endothelial junctional protein expression, while netrin 1 knockout mice display disorganized tight junction protein expression and barrier breakdown. Upon inflammatory conditions, blood-brain barrier endothelial cells significantly upregulated netrin 1 levels in vitro and in situ, which prevented junctional breach and endothelial cell activation. Finally, netrin 1 treatment during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis significantly reduced blood-brain barrier disruption and decreased clinical and pathological indices of disease severity. Our results demonstrate that netrin 1 is an important regulator of blood-brain barrier maintenance that protects the central nervous system against inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  13. Targeting the brain--surmounting or bypassing the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Potschka, Heidrun

    2010-01-01

    The constituents of the blood-brain barrier, including its efflux transporter system, can efficiently limit brain penetration of potential CNS therapeutics. Effective extrusion from the brain by transporters is a frequent reason for the pharmaceutical industry to exclude novel compounds from further development for CNS therapeutics. Moreover, high transporter expression levels that are present in individual patients or may be generally associated with the pathophysiology seem to be a major cause of therapeutic failure in a variety of CNS diseases including brain tumors, epilepsy, brain HIV infection, and psychiatric disorders. Increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier creates a basis for the development of strategies which aim to enhance brain uptake of beneficial pharmaceutical compounds. The different strategies discussed in this review aim to modulate blood-brain barrier function or to bypass constituents of the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood-brain barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J.

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, an in vitro blood-brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood-brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood-brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood-brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood-brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood-brain barrier (e.g. CPB).

  15. The blood-brain barrier: an engineering perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrew D.; Ye, Mao; Levy, Amanda F.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Bergles, Dwight E.; Searson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been more than 100 years since Paul Ehrlich reported that various water-soluble dyes injected into the circulation did not enter the brain. Since Ehrlich's first experiments, only a small number of molecules, such as alcohol and caffeine have been found to cross the blood-brain barrier, and this selective permeability remains the major roadblock to treatment of many central nervous system diseases. At the same time, many central nervous system diseases are associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier that can lead to changes in permeability, modulation of immune cell transport, and trafficking of pathogens into the brain. Therefore, advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier are key to developing effective treatments for a wide range of central nervous system diseases. Over the past 10 years it has become recognized that the blood-brain barrier is a complex, dynamic system that involves biomechanical and biochemical signaling between the vascular system and the brain. Here we reconstruct the structure, function, and transport properties of the blood-brain barrier from an engineering perspective. New insight into the physics of the blood-brain barrier could ultimately lead to clinical advances in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. PMID:24009582

  16. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  17. Increasing of Blood-Brain Tumor Barrier Permeability through Transcellular and Paracellular Pathways by Microbubble-Enhanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in a C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinlong; Liu, Heng; Du, Xuesong; Guo, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Shunan; Fang, Jingqin; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Most of the anticancer agents cannot be efficiently delivered into the brain tumor because of the existence of blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). The objective of this study was to explore the effect of microbubble-enhanced diagnostic ultrasound (MEUS) on the BTB permeability and the possible mechanism. Glioma-bearing rats were randomized into three groups as follows: the microbubble-enhanced continued diagnostic ultrasound (MECUS) group; the microbubble-enhanced intermittent diagnostic ultrasound (MEIUS) group and the control group. The gliomas were insonicated through the skull with a diagnostic ultrasound and injected with microbubbles through the tail veins. Evans Blue (EB) and dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI were used to test changes in the BTB permeability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the deposition of the EB in the tumor tissues. The distribution and expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) and calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa channels) were detected by a Western blot, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining. In the MEUS groups, the EB extravasation (11.0 ± 2.2 μg/g in MECUS group and 17.9 ± 2.3 μg/g in MEIUS group) exhibited a significant increase compared with the control group (5.3 ± 0.9 μg/g). The MEIUS group had more EB extravasation than the MECUS group. The Ktrans value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI in the MEUS groups was higher than that of the control group and correlated strongly with the EB extravasation in the tumor (R2 = 0.97). This showed that the Ktrans value might be a non-invasive method to evaluate the BTB permeability in rat glioma after microbubble-enhanced ultrasound treatment.Western blot, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining revealed that MEUS increased the KCa channels expression and reduced JAM-A expression in glioma. This change was more obvious in the MEIUS group than in the MECUS group. The results demonstrated that MEUS effectively increased the BTB permeability in

  18. Sleep fragmentation and sepsis differentially impact blood-brain barrier integrity and transport of tumor necrosis factor-α in aging.

    PubMed

    Opp, Mark R; George, Amrita; Ringgold, Kristyn M; Hansen, Kim M; Bullock, Kristin M; Banks, William A

    2015-11-01

    The factors by which aging predisposes to critical illness are varied, complex, and not well understood. Sepsis is considered a quintessential disease of old age because the incidence and mortality of severe sepsis increases in old and the oldest old individuals. Aging is associated with dramatic changes in sleep quality and quantity and sleep increasingly becomes fragmented with age. In healthy adults, sleep disruption induces inflammation. Multiple aspects of aging and of sleep dysregulation interact via neuroimmune mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), a cytokine involved in sleep regulation and neuroimmune processes, exerts some of its effects on the CNS by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this study we examined the impact of sepsis, sleep fragmentation, and aging on BBB disruption and TNF transport into brain. We used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis in young and aged mice that were either undisturbed or had their sleep disrupted. There was a dichotomous effect of sepsis and sleep disruption with age: sepsis disrupted the BBB and increased TNF transport in young mice but not in aged mice, whereas sleep fragmentation disrupted the BBB and increased TNF transport in aged mice, but not in young mice. Combining sleep fragmentation and CLP did not produce a greater effect on either of these BBB parameters than did either of these manipulations alone. These results suggest that the mechanisms by which sleep fragmentation and sepsis alter BBB functions are fundamentally different from one another and that a major change in the organism's responses to those insults occurs with aging.

  19. The blood-brain barrier and methamphetamine: open sesame?

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Patric; Kenny, Bridget-Ann

    2015-01-01

    The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood–brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighboring pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood–brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signaling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the underlying neural tissue. PMID:25999807

  20. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Samantha J.; Bainton, Roland J.

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through G-protein coupled receptor signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate BBB has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many BBB mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the BBB can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of BBB gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of BBB secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate BBB anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study. PMID:25565944

  1. Epstein Barr Virus and Blood Brain Barrier in Multiple Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    of EBV in MS disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Blood-brain-barrier, Epstein-Barr virus; EBV ; BBB; MS, Multiple sclerosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...virus ( EBV ) infection is associated with MS pathogenesis. However, mechanism for the EBV -MS connection is unclear. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is...astrocytes. Interestingly EBV is able to infect both kinds of cells. Because EBV is able to transfer infection from one cell type to another cell type

  2. Blood-brain barrier: an impediment to neuropharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J T; Piquette-Miller, M

    2015-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) serves as a highly selective barrier separating the central nervous system from the systemic circulation. Although contributing to neurological health, the BBB restricts the ability of drugs to reach their site of action and thus presents a major challenge to the treatment of neurological disorders. Advances in our understanding of the complexity of the BBB have fostered development of novel pharmacometric models and drug delivery strategies to better predict and improve therapeutic access.

  3. Differential permeability of the blood-brain barrier in experimental brain metastases produced by human neoplasms implanted into nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R. D.; Price, J. E.; Fujimaki, T.; Bucana, C. D.; Fidler, I. J.

    1992-01-01

    This study clarified whether and when the blood-brain barrier in experimental brain metastases is impaired by using hydrosoluble sodium fluorescein (MW 376) as a blood-brain barrier function indicator. Cells from eight human tumor lines (four melanomas, two breast carcinomas, one colon carcinoma, and one renal carcinoma) were inoculated into the internal carotid artery of nude mice. Brain metastases at different stages of development were sampled and the permeability of the blood-brain barrier around the metastases determined. Histologic examination showed two patterns of tumor growth. In the first, tumor cells formed isolated, well-defined nodules in the parenchyma of the brain. In lesions smaller than 0.2 mm2, the blood-brain barrier was intact. In the second, small diffuse nests of tumor cells were distributed throughout the brain parenchyma. The blood-brain barrier was intact until the small tumor cell colonies coalesced to form large tumor masses. These results suggest that the permeability of the blood-brain barrier varies among different experimental brain metastases and that its function is related to the growth pattern and size of the lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1443046

  4. From blood-brain barrier to blood-brain interface: new opportunities for CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2016-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the development of therapeutics for central nervous system (CNS) disorders is achieving sufficient blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. Research in the past few decades has revealed that the BBB is not only a substantial barrier for drug delivery to the CNS but also a complex, dynamic interface that adapts to the needs of the CNS, responds to physiological changes, and is affected by and can even promote disease. This complexity confounds simple strategies for drug delivery to the CNS, but provides a wealth of opportunities and approaches for drug development. Here, I review some of the most important areas that have recently redefined the BBB and discuss how they can be applied to the development of CNS therapeutics.

  5. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  6. Folate nutrition and blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stover, Patrick J; Durga, Jane; Field, Martha S

    2017-04-01

    Mammals require essential nutrients from dietary sources to support normal metabolic, physiological and neuronal functions, to prevent diseases of nutritional deficiency as well as to prevent chronic disease. Disease and/or its treatment can modify fundamental biological processes including cellular nutrient accretion, stability and function in cells. These effects can be isolated to a specific diseased organ in the absence of whole-body alterations in nutrient status or biochemistry. Loss of blood-brain barrier function, which occurs in in-born errors of metabolism and in chronic disease, can cause brain-specific folate deficiency and contribute to disease co-morbidity. The role of brain folate deficiency in neuropsychiatric disorders is reviewed, as well as emerging diagnostic and nutritional strategies to identify and address brain folate deficiency in blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

  7. Maternal antibodies and developing blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Czeslawa; Athanassiou, Andrew; Chen, Huiyi; Diamond, Betty

    2015-12-01

    We briefly review the protective role of maternal antibodies during fetal development and at early postnatal stages. We describe antibody delivery to fetuses, particularly in the context of the developing blood-brain barrier (BBB), and present the essential concepts regarding the adult BBB, together with existing information on the prenatal developing BBB. We focus on maternal antibody transfer to the developing brain and the consequences of the presence of pathogenic antibodies at early stages of brain development on subsequent brain dysfunction.

  8. Regulation of ABC Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David S.

    2015-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters at the blood-brain barrier function as ATP-driven xenobiotic efflux pumps and limit delivery of small molecule drugs to the brain. Here I review recent progress in understanding the regulation of the expression and transport activity of these transporters and comment on how this new information might aid in improving drug delivery to the brain. PMID:25670036

  9. Establishment and Dysfunction of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Nelson, Amy R.; Betsholtz, Christer; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Structural and functional brain connectivity, synaptic activity and information processing require highly coordinated signal transduction between different cell types within the neurovascular unit and intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) functions. Here, we examine the mechanisms regulating the formation and maintenance of the BBB and functions of BBB-associated cell types. Furthermore, we discuss the growing evidence associating BBB breakdown with the pathogenesis of inherited monogenic neurological disorders and complex multifactorial diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26590417

  10. Neuron-Glial Interactions in Blood-Brain Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Swati; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2010-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) evolved to preserve the microenvironment of the highly excitable neuronal cells to allow for action potential generation and propagation. Intricate molecular interactions between two main cell types, the neurons and the glial cells, form the underlying basis of the critical functioning of the nervous system across species. In invertebrates, interactions between neurons and glial cells are central in establishing a functional BBB. However, in vertebrates, the BBB formation and function is coordinated by interactions between neurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells. Here we review the neuron-glial interaction–based blood barriers in invertebrates and vertebrates and provide an evolutionary perspective as to how a glial-barrier system in invertebrates evolved into an endothelial barrier system. We also summarize the clinical relevance of the BBB as this protective barrier becomes disadvantageous in the pharmacological treatment of various neurological disorders. PMID:17506642

  11. Matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and blood-brain barrier: Versatile breakers and makers.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Ralf G; Hartz, Anika Ms; Bauer, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are versatile endopeptidases with many different functions in the body in health and disease. In the brain, matrix metalloproteinases are critical for tissue formation, neuronal network remodeling, and blood-brain barrier integrity. Many reviews have been published on matrix metalloproteinases before, most of which focus on the two best studied matrix metalloproteinases, the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, and their role in one or two diseases. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the role various matrix metalloproteinases play in brain disorders. We summarize and review current knowledge and understanding of matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and at the blood-brain barrier in neuroinflammation, multiple sclerosis, cerebral aneurysms, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and brain cancer. We discuss the detrimental effects matrix metalloproteinases can have in these conditions, contributing to blood-brain barrier leakage, neuroinflammation, neurotoxicity, demyelination, tumor angiogenesis, and cancer metastasis. We also discuss the beneficial role matrix metalloproteinases can play in neuroprotection and anti-inflammation. Finally, we address matrix metalloproteinases as potential therapeutic targets. Together, in this comprehensive review, we summarize current understanding and knowledge of matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and at the blood-brain barrier in brain disorders.

  12. Peptides at the Blood Brain Barrier: Knowing Me Knowing You

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.; Abbruscato, Thomas J.; Egleton, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    When the Davis Lab was first asked to contribute to this special edition of Peptides to celebrate the career and influence of Abba Kastin on peptide research, it felt like a daunting task. It is difficult to really understand and appreciate the influence that Abba has had, not only on a generation of peptide researchers, but also on the field of blood brain barrier (BBB) research, unless you lived it as we did. When we look back at our careers and those of our former students, one can truly see that several of Abba’s papers played an influential role in the development of our personal research programs. PMID:25937599

  13. Striatal blood-brain barrier permeability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Madison T; Woulfe, John M

    2015-05-01

    In vivo studies have shown that blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is involved in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these have lacked either anatomic definition or the ability to recognize minute changes in BBB integrity. Here, using histologic markers of serum protein, iron, and erythrocyte extravasation, we have shown significantly increased permeability of the BBB in the postcommissural putamen of PD patients. The dense innervation of the striatum by PD-affected regions allows for exploitation of this permeability for therapeutic goals. These results are also discussed in the context of the retrograde trans-synaptic hypothesis of PD spread.

  14. Anatomy and physiology of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Shelef, Ilan; Knyazer, Boris; Friedman, Alon

    2015-02-01

    Essential requisite for the preservation of normal brain activity is to maintain a narrow and stable homeostatic control in the neuronal environment of the CNS. Blood flow alterations and altered vessel permeability are considered key determinants in the pathophysiology of brain injuries. We will review the present-day literature on the anatomy, development and physiological mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier, a distinctive and tightly regulated interface between the CNS and the peripheral circulation, playing a crucial role in the maintenance of the strict environment required for normal brain function.

  15. Anatomy and Physiology of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Serlin, Yonatan; Shelef, Ilan; Knyazer, Boris; Friedman, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Essential requisite for the preservation of normal brain activity is to maintain a narrow and stable homeostatic control in the neuronal environment of the CNS. Blood flow alterations and altered vessel permeability are considered key determinants in the pathophysiology of brain injuries. We will review the present-day literature on the anatomy, development and physiological mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier, a distinctive and tightly regulated interface between the CNS and the peripheral circulation, playing a crucial role in the maintenance of the strict environment required for normal brain function. PMID:25681530

  16. SyM-BBB: A Microfluidic Blood Brain Barrier Model

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Mills, Ivy R.; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Aschner, Michael; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    Current techniques for mimicking the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) largely use incubation chambers (Transwell) separated with a filter and matrix coating to represent and to study barrier permeability. These devices have several critical shortcomings; (a) they do not reproduce critical microenvironmental parameters, primarily anatomical size or hemodynamic shear stress, (b) they often do not provide real-time visualization capability, and (c) they require a large amount of consumables. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a microfluidics based Synthetic Microvasculature model of the Blood-Brain Barrier (SyM-BBB). The SyM-BBB platform is comprised of a plastic, disposable and optically clear microfluidic chip with a microcirculation sized two-compartment chamber. The chamber is designed in such a way as to permit the realization of side-by-side apical and basolateral compartments, thereby simplifying fabrication and facilitating integration with standard instrumentation. The individually addressable apical side is seeded with endothelial cells and the basolateral side can support neuronal cells or conditioned media. In the present study, an immortalized Rat Brain Endothelial cell line (RBE4) was cultured in SyM-BBB with a perfusate of Astrocyte Conditioned Media (ACM). Biochemical analysis showed upregulation of tight junction molecules while permeation studies showed an intact BBB. Finally, transporter assay was successfully demonstrated in SyM-BBB indicating a functional model. PMID:23344641

  17. Models for predicting blood-brain barrier permeation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter Aadal; Andersson, Olga; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Simonsen, Klaus Bæk; Andersson, Gunnar

    2011-06-01

    The endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) ensures an optimal environment for proper neural function in vertebrates; however, it also creates a major obstacle for the medical treatment of brain diseases. Despite significant progress in the development of various in vitro and in silico models for predicting BBB permeation, many challenges remain and, so far, no model is able to meet the early drug discovery demands of the industry for reliability and time and cost efficiency. Recently, it was found that the grasshopper (Locusta migratoria) brain barrier has similar functionality as the vertebrate BBB. The insect model can thus be used as a surrogate for the vertebrate BBB as it meets the demands required during the drug discovery phase.

  18. Development, maintenance and disruption of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Birgit; Daneman, Richard; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The interface between the blood circulation and the neural tissue features unique characteristics which are embraced by the term ‘blood-brain barrier’ (BBB). The main functions of this barrier, namely maintenance of brain homeostasis, regulation of influx and efflux transport, and protection from harm, are determined by its specialized multicellular structure. Every constituent cell type makes an indispensible contribution to the BBB’s integrity. But, if one member of the BBB fails and as a result, the barrier breaks down, there can be dramatic consequences, and neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration can occur. In this Review we highlight recently gained mechanistic insights into the development and maintenance of the BBB. We then discuss how BBB disruption can cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we examine how this knowledge can be used to explore new possibilities for BBB repair. PMID:24309662

  19. Exercise maintains blood-brain barrier integrity during early stages of brain metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Gretchen; Davidson, Sarah J; Wrobel, Jagoda K; Toborek, Michal

    2015-08-07

    Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier, which is a highly protected microvascular environment fortified with tight junction (TJ) proteins. TJ integrity can be regulated under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. There is evidence that exercise can modulate oxidation status within the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell extravasation and metastasis formation. In order to study these events, mature male mice were given access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel (exercise) or access to a locked wheel (sedentary) for five weeks. The average running distance was 9.0 ± 0.2 km/day. Highly metastatic tumor cells (murine Lewis lung carcinoma) were then infused into the brain microvasculature through the internal carotid artery. Analyses were performed at early stage (48 h) and late stage (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed fewer isolated tumor cells extravasating into the brain at both 48 h and 3 weeks post surgery in exercised mice. Occludin protein levels were reduced in the sedentary tumor group, but maintained in the exercised tumor group at 48 h post tumor cell infusion. These results indicate that voluntary exercise may participate in modulating blood-brain barrier integrity thereby protecting the brain during metastatic progression.

  20. Measurement of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide antisense transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (PODNs) can act as antisense molecules, knocking down proteins. Many PODNs have the unusual characteristic of being transported across the blood-brain barrier by a saturable system. This means that PODNs injected intravenously can accumulate in the central nervous system in quantities sufficient to knock down proteins in brain and the blood-brain barrier. A critical step in the development of PODNs that can be administered peripherally and knockdown proteins in the central nervous system is to determine the relation to the blood-brain barrier, specifically, does the PODN cross the blood-brain barrier and, if so, how fast and to what degree.

  1. Bypassing the blood-brain barrier: delivery of therapeutic agents by macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Kwon, Young Jik; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood brain tumor barrier (BBTB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) to cross the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer agents such as nanoparticles to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: The infiltration of Mo/Ma into brain tumor spheroids in vitro was determined using fluorescent stained Mo/Ma. Tumors were also established in the brains of inbred rats and ALA-PDT was given 18 days following tumor induction. The degredation of the BBTB and quantification of the number of infiltrating Mo/Ma was examined on histological sections from removed brains. Results & Conclusion: PDT was highly effective in locally opening the BBTB and inducing macrophage migration into the irradiated portions of brain tumors.

  2. Optical imaging to map blood-brain barrier leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, Hayder; Adjei, Isaac M.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    Vascular leakage in the brain is a major complication associated with brain injuries and certain pathological conditions due to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have developed an optical imaging method, based on excitation and emission spectra of Evans Blue dye, that is >1000-fold more sensitive than conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry. We used a rat thromboembolic stroke model to validate the usefulness of our method for vascular leakage. Optical imaging data show that vascular leakage varies in different areas of the post-stroke brain and that administering tissue plasminogen activator causes further leakage. The new method is quantitative, simple to use, requires no tissue processing, and can map the degree of vascular leakage in different brain locations. The high sensitivity of our method could potentially provide new opportunities to study BBB leakage in different pathological conditions and to test the efficacy of various therapeutic strategies to protect the BBB.

  3. Extracellular vesicles of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECV), like exosomes, gained recently a lot of attention as potentially playing a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly in Aβ pathology. While there are a lot of reports on ECV/exosomes derived from a variety of cell types, there is limited information on ECV/exosomes originated from brain microvascular endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this review, we summarize the literature data on brain endothelial ECV/exosomes and present our own data on BBB-derived ECV and their possible involvement in the brain's Aβ pathology. We propose that ECV/exosome release from brain endothelial cells associated with Aβ affects different cells of the neurovascular unit and may be an important contributor to the Aβ deposition in the central nervous system. PMID:27141419

  4. The molecular constituents of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian Wai; Gu, Chenghua

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) maintains the optimal microenvironment in the central nervous system (CNS) for proper brain function. The BBB is comprised of specialized CNS endothelial cells with fundamental molecular properties essential for the function and integrity of the BBB. The restrictive nature of the BBB hinders delivery of therapeutics for many neurological disorders. In addition, recent evidence shows that BBB dysfunction can precede or hasten the progression of several neurological diseases. Despite the physiological significance of the BBB in health and disease, major discoveries of the molecular regulators of BBB formation and function have only occurred recently. This review will highlight recent findings describing the molecular determinants and core cellular pathways that confer BBB properties upon CNS endothelial cells. PMID:26442694

  5. How Cryptococcus interacts with the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsiang-Kuang; Huang, Tseng-Yu; Wu, Alice Ying-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Hong; Liu, Chang-Pan; Jong, Ambrose

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus demonstrates predilection for invasion of the brain, but the mechanism by which Cryptococcus crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to cause brain invasion is largely unknown. In order for Cryptococcus to cross the BBB, there must be a way to either cross human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which are the main constitute of the BBB, or go in between tight junctions. Recent evidence of human brain microvascular endothelial cell responses to transcellular brain invasions includes membrane rearrangements, intracellular signaling pathways and cytoskeletal activations. Several Cryptococcal genes related to the traversal of BBB have been identified, including CPS1, ITR1a, ITR3c, PLB1, MPR1, FNX1 and RUB1. In addition, Cryptococcus neoformans-derived microvesicles may contribute to cryptococcal brain invasion. Paracellularly, Cryptococcus may traverse across BBB using either routes utilizing plasmin, ammonia or macrophages in a Trojan horse mechanism.

  6. Blood-brain barrier tight junction permeability and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Karin E; Witt, Ken A

    2008-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed by the endothelial cells of cerebral microvessels, providing a dynamic interface between the peripheral circulation and the central nervous system. The tight junctions (TJs) between the endothelial cells serve to restrict blood-borne substances from entering the brain. Under ischemic stroke conditions decreased BBB TJ integrity results in increased paracellular permeability, directly contributing to cerebral vasogenic edema, hemorrhagic transformation, and increased mortality. This loss of TJ integrity occurs in a phasic manner, which is contingent on several interdependent mechanisms (ionic dysregulation, inflammation, oxidative and nitrosative stress, enzymatic activity, and angiogenesis). Understanding the inter-relation of these mechanisms is critical for the development of new therapies. This review focuses on those aspects of ischemic stroke impacting BBB TJ integrity and the principle regulatory pathways, respective to the phases of paracellular permeability.

  7. Circumventing the Blood-Brain Barrier with Autonomic Ganglion Transplants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Jeffrey M.; Brightman, Milton W.

    1983-08-01

    Superior cervical ganglia, whose vessels are fenestrated and permeable to protein tracers such as horseradish peroxidase, were transplanted to undamaged surfaces in the fourth ventricle of rat pup brains. Horseradish peroxidase, infused systemically into the host, was exuded from the graft's vessels into the graft's extracellular stroma within 1 minute. At later times the glycoprotein reached the extracellular clefts of adjacent brain tissue, the vessels of which appeared to retain their impermeability. The blood-brain barrier to horseradish peroxide was thus bypassed where the extracellular compartments of graft and brain became confluent. The graft of autonomic ganglia can serve as a portal through which peptides, hormones, and immunoglobulins may likewise enter the brain.

  8. Impaired blood-brain/spinal cord barrier in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G; Rodrigues, Maria C O; Haller, Edward; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Mirtyl, Santhia; Sallot, Sebastian; Saporta, Samuel; Borlongan, Cesario V; Sanberg, Paul R

    2012-08-21

    Vascular pathology, including blood-brain/spinal cord barrier (BBB/BSCB) alterations, has recently been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage, identifying a neurovascular disease signature for ALS. However, BBB/BSCB competence in sporadic ALS (SALS) is still undetermined. In this study, BBB/BSCB integrity in postmortem gray and white matter of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients and controls was investigated. Major findings include (1) endothelial cell damage and pericyte degeneration, (2) severe intra- and extracellular edema, (3) reduced CD31 and CD105 expressions in endothelium, (4) significant accumulation of perivascular collagen IV, and fibrin deposits (5) significantly increased microvascular density in lumbar spinal cord, (6) IgG microvascular leakage, (7) reduced tight junction and adhesion protein expressions. Microvascular barrier abnormalities determined in gray and white matter of the medulla, cervical, and lumbar spinal cord of SALS patients are novel findings. Pervasive barrier damage discovered in ALS may have implications for disease pathogenesis and progression, as well as for uncovering novel therapeutic targets.

  9. Astrocytic modulation of blood brain barrier: perspectives on Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Ricardo; Avila, Marcos; Gonzalez, Janneth; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos; Báez, Eliana; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Jurado Coronel, Juan Camilo; Capani, Francisco; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia; Barreto, George E

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a tightly regulated interface in the Central Nervous System (CNS) that regulates the exchange of molecules in and out from the brain thus maintaining the CNS homeostasis. It is mainly composed of endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes and astrocytes that create a neurovascular unit (NVU) with the adjacent neurons. Astrocytes are essential for the formation and maintenance of the BBB by providing secreted factors that lead to the adequate association between the cells of the BBB and the formation of strong tight junctions. Under neurological disorders, such as chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, Epilepsy, Alzheimer and Parkinson's Diseases, a disruption of the BBB takes place, involving a lost in the permeability of the barrier and phenotypical changes in both the ECs and astrocytes. In this aspect, it has been established that the process of reactive gliosis is a common feature of astrocytes during BBB disruption, which has a detrimental effect on the barrier function and a subsequent damage in neuronal survival. In this review we discuss the implications of astrocyte functions in the protection of the BBB, and in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and related disorders. Additionally, we highlight the current and future strategies in astrocyte protection aimed at the development of restorative therapies for the BBB in pathological conditions.

  10. ABC transporters and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Begley, David J

    2004-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) form a very effective barrier to the free diffusion of many polar solutes into the brain. Many metabolites that are polar have their brain entry facilitated by specific inwardly-directed transport mechanisms. In general the more lipid soluble a molecule or drug is, the more readily it will tend to partition into brain tissue. However, a very significant number of lipid soluble molecules, among them many useful therapeutic drugs have lower brain permeability than would be predicted from a determination of their lipid solubility. These molecules are substrates for the ABC efflux transporters which are present in the BBB and BCSB and the activity of these transporters very efficiently removes the drug from the CNS, thus limiting brain uptake. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was the first of these ABC transporters to be described, followed by the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) and more recently breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). All are expressed in the BBB and BCSFB and combine to reduce the brain penetration of many drugs. This phenomenon of "multidrug resistance" is a major hurdle when it comes to the delivery of therapeutics to the brain, not to mention the problem of cancer chemotherapy in general. Therefore, the development of strategies for bypassing the influence of these ABC transporters and for the design of effective drugs that are not substrates and the development of inhibitors for the ABC transporters becomes a high imperative for the pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Blood-brain barrier-on-a-chip: Microphysiological systems that capture the complexity of the blood-central nervous system interface.

    PubMed

    Phan, Duc Tt; Bender, R Hugh F; Andrejecsk, Jillian W; Sobrino, Agua; Hachey, Stephanie J; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher Cw

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier is a dynamic and highly organized structure that strictly regulates the molecules allowed to cross the brain vasculature into the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier pathology has been associated with a number of central nervous system diseases, including vascular malformations, stroke/vascular dementia, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and various neurological tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. There is a compelling need for representative models of this critical interface. Current research relies heavily on animal models (mostly mice) or on two-dimensional (2D) in vitro models, neither of which fully capture the complexities of the human blood-brain barrier. Physiological differences between humans and mice make translation to the clinic problematic, while monolayer cultures cannot capture the inherently three-dimensional (3D) nature of the blood-brain barrier, which includes close association of the abluminal side of the endothelium with astrocyte foot-processes and pericytes. Here we discuss the central nervous system diseases associated with blood-brain barrier pathology, recent advances in the development of novel 3D blood-brain barrier -on-a-chip systems that better mimic the physiological complexity and structure of human blood-brain barrier, and provide an outlook on how these blood-brain barrier-on-a-chip systems can be used for central nervous system disease modeling.

  12. Efflux Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier Limit Delivery and Efficacy of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitor Palbociclib (PD-0332991) in an Orthotopic Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Karen E.; Pokorny, Jenny; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Bakken, Katrina; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2015-01-01

    6-Acetyl-8-cyclopentyl-5-methyl-2-([5-(piperazin-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl]amino)pyrido(2,3-d)pyrimidin-7(8H)-one [palbociclib (PD-0332991)] is a cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and is currently undergoing clinical trials for many solid tumors. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and has limited treatment options. The cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 pathway is commonly dysregulated in GBM and is a promising target in treating this devastating disease. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the delivery of drugs to invasive regions of GBM, where the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein can prevent treatments from reaching the tumor. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms limiting the effectiveness of palbociclib therapy in an orthotopic xenograft model. The in vitro intracellular accumulation results demonstrated that palbociclib is a substrate for both P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein. In vivo studies in transgenic mice confirmed that efflux transport is responsible for the limited brain distribution of palbociclib. There was an ∼115-fold increase in brain exposure at steady state in the transporter deficient mice when compared with wild-type mice, and the efflux inhibitor elacridar significantly increased palbociclib brain distribution. Efficacy studies demonstrated that palbociclib is an effective therapy when GBM22 tumor cells are implanted in the flank, but ineffective in an orthotopic (intracranial) model. Moreover, doses designed to mimic brain exposure were ineffective in treating flank tumors. These results demonstrate that efflux transport in the BBB is involved in limiting the brain distribution of palbociclib and this has critical implications in determining effective dosing regimens of palbociclib therapy in the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:26354993

  13. Studies on microwave and blood-brain barrier interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Lin, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at correlating changes of blood-brain-barrier permeability with the quantity and distribution of absorbed microwave energy inside the brain of adult Wistar rats anesthetized by sodium pentobarbital. Through use of thermographic methods and a direct-contact applicator at the animal's head, the pattern of absorbed microwave energy was determined. Indwelling catheters were placed in the femoral vein and in the left external carotid artery. Evans blue and sodium fluorescein in isotonic saline were used as visual indicators of barrier permeation. Exposure to pulsed 2,450-MHz radiation for 20 min at average power densities of 0.5, 1, 5, 20, 145 or 1,000 mW/cm2, which resulted in average specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.04, 0.08, 0.4, 1.6, 11.5 or 80.0 mW/g in the brain, did not produce staining, except in the pineal body, the pituitary gland, and the choroid plexus - regions that normally are highly permeable. Except for these regions, staining was also absent in the brains of sham-exposed animals. The rectal temperature, as monitored by a copper-constantan thermocouple, showed a maximum increase of less than 0.75 degrees C from a mean pre-exposure temperature of 36.6 degrees C. The highest brain temperature recorded in a similar group of animals using a thickfilm carbon thermistor was less than 41.0 degrees C.

  14. Alterations of blood brain barrier function in hyperammonemia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Ammonia is a neurotoxin involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions associated with hyperammonemia, including hepatic encephalopathy, a condition associated with acute--(ALF) or chronic liver failure. This article reviews evidence that apart from directly affecting the metabolism and function of the central nervous system cells, ammonia influences the passage of different molecules across the blood brain barrier (BBB). A brief description is provided of the tight junctions, which couple adjacent cerebral capillary endothelial cells to each other to form the barrier. Ammonia modulates the transcellular passage of low-to medium-size molecules, by affecting their carriers located at the BBB. Ammonia induces interrelated aberrations of the transport of the large neutral amino acids and aromatic amino acids (AAA), whose influx is augmented by exchange with glutamine produced in the course of ammonia detoxification, and maybe also modulated by the extracellularly acting gamma-glutamyl moiety transferring enzyme, gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase. Impaired AAA transport affects neurotransmission by altering intracerebral synthesis of catecholamines (serotonin and dopamine), and producing "false neurotransmitters" (octopamine and phenylethylamine). Ammonia also modulates BBB transport of the cationic amino acids: the nitric oxide precursor, arginine, and ornithine, which is an ammonia trap, and affects the transport of energy metabolites glucose and creatine. Moreover, ammonia acting either directly or in synergy with liver injury-derived inflammatory cytokines also evokes subtle increases of the transcellular passage of molecules of different size (BBB "leakage"), which appears to be responsible for the vasogenic component of cerebral edema associated with ALF.

  15. Evolving Drug Delivery Strategies to Overcome the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, David S.; Wadajkar, Aniket S.; Roberts, Nathan B.; Perez, Jimena G.; Connolly, Nina P.; Frenkel, Victor; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Kim, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) poses a unique challenge for drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). The BBB consists of a continuous layer of specialized endothelial cells linked together by tight junctions, pericytes, nonfenestrated basal lamina, and astrocytic foot processes. This complex barrier controls and limits the systemic delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Several innovative strategies have been explored to enhance the transport of therapeutics across the BBB, each with individual advantages and disadvantages. Ongoing advances in delivery approaches that overcome the BBB are enabling more effective therapies for CNS diseases. In this review, we discuss: (1) the physiological properties of the BBB, (2) conventional strategies to enhance paracellular and transcellular transport through the BBB, (3) emerging concepts to overcome the BBB, and (4) alternative CNS drug delivery strategies that bypass the BBB entirely. Based on these exciting advances, we anticipate that in the near future, drug delivery research efforts will lead to more effective therapeutic interventions for diseases of the CNS.

  16. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier as interface between neurons and hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Schirmeier, Stefanie; Klämbt, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier is an evolutionary ancient structure that provides direct support and protection of the nervous system. In all systems, it establishes a tight diffusion barrier that hinders uncontrolled paracellular diffusion into the nervous system. In invertebrates, the blood-brain barrier separates the nervous system from the hemolymph. Thus, the barrier-forming cells need to actively import ions and nutrients into the nervous system. In addition, metabolic or environmental signals from the external world have to be transmitted across the barrier into the nervous system. The first blood-brain barrier that formed during evolution was most likely based on glial cells. Invertebrates as well as primitive vertebrates still have a purely glial-based blood-brain barrier. Here we review the development and function of the barrier forming glial cells at the example of Drosophila.

  17. Pharmacodynamic analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-monitored focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for drug delivery to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    Microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound (FUS) can enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain for brain tumor treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of brain tumor conditions on the distribution and dynamics of small molecule leakage into targeted regions of the brain after FUS-BBB opening. A total of 34 animals were used, and the process was monitored by 7T-MRI. Evans blue (EB) dye as well as Gd-DTPA served as small molecule substitutes for evaluation of drug behavior. EB was quantified spectrophotometrically. Spin-spin (R1) relaxometry and area under curve (AUC) were measured by MRI to quantify Gd-DTPA. We found that FUS-BBB opening provided a more significant increase in permeability with small tumors. In contrast, accumulation was much higher in large tumors, independent of FUS. The AUC values of Gd-DTPA were well correlated with EB delivery, suggesting that Gd-DTPA was a good indicator of total small-molecule accumulation in the target region. The peripheral regions of large tumors exhibited similar dynamics of small-molecule leakage after FUS-BBB opening as small tumors, suggesting that FUS-BBB opening may have the most significant permeability-enhancing effect on tumor peripheral. This study provides useful information toward designing an optimized FUS-BBB opening strategy to deliver small-molecule therapeutic agents into brain tumors.

  18. Tau Proteins Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Kovac, Andrej; Majerova, Petra; Bullock, Kristin M; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Tauopathies are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injuries. It has been demonstrated that amyloid-beta peptides, alpha-synuclein, and prion proteins cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), contributing to their abilities to induce disease. Very little is known about whether tau proteins can cross the BBB. Here we systematically characterized several key forms of tau proteins to cross the BBB, including Tau-441 (2N4R), Tau-410 (2N3R), truncated tau 151-391 (0N4R), and truncated tau 121-227. All of these tau proteins crossed the BBB readily and bidirectonally; however, only Tau-410 had a saturable component to its influx. The tau proteins also entered the blood after their injection into the brain, with Tau 121-227 having the slowest exit from brain. The tau proteins varied in regards to their enzymatic stability in brain and blood and in their peripheral pharmacokinetics. These results show that blood-borne tau proteins could contribute to brain tauopathies. The result also suggest that the CNS can contribute to blood levels of tau, raising the possibility that, as suggested for other misfolded proteins, blood levels of tau proteins could be used as a biomarker of CNS disease.

  19. Characteristics of compounds that cross the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2009-06-12

    Substances cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by a variety of mechanisms. These include transmembrane diffusion, saturable transporters, adsorptive endocytosis, and the extracellular pathways. Here, we focus on the chief characteristics of two mechanisms especially important in drug delivery: transmembrane diffusion and transporters. Transmembrane diffusion is non-saturable and depends, on first analysis, on the physicochemical characteristics of the substance. However, brain-to-blood efflux systems, enzymatic activity, plasma protein binding, and cerebral blood flow can greatly alter the amount of the substance crossing the BBB. Transport systems increase uptake of ligands by roughly 10-fold and are modified by physiological events and disease states. Most drugs in clinical use to date are small, lipid soluble molecules that cross the BBB by transmembrane diffusion. However, many drug delivery strategies in development target peptides, regulatory proteins, oligonucleotides, glycoproteins, and enzymes for which transporters have been described in recent years. We discuss two examples of drug delivery for newly discovered transporters: that for phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and for enzymes.

  20. Middle cerebral artery thrombosis: acute blood-brain barrier consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.D.; Prado, R.; Watson, B.D.; Nakayama, H.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of middle cerebral artery (MCA) thrombosis on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was studied in rats using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Endothelial injury with subsequent platelet thrombosis was produced by means of a rose bengal-sensitized photochemical reaction, facilitated by irradiating the right proximal MCA segment with the focused beam of an argon laser. At 15 minutes following thrombosis formation, diffuse leakage of HRP was observed bilaterally within cortical and subcortical brain areas. Peroxidase extravasation was most dense within the territory of the occluded artery including neocortical areas and dorso-lateral striatum. Contralaterally, a similar distribution was observed but with less intense HRP leakage. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated an increase in permeability to HRP within arterioles, venules and capillaries. At these sites, the vascular endothelium contained HRP-filled pinocytotic vesicles and tubular profiles. Although less intense, bilateral HRP leakage was also observed following MCA stenosis or femoral artery occlusion. Endothelial-platelet interactions at the site of vascular injury may be responsible for releasing substances or neurohumoral factors which contribute to the acute opening of the BBB.

  1. Novel oximes as blood-brain barrier penetrating cholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gregory E; Campbell, Amy J; Olson, John; Moorad-Doctor, Deborah; Morthole, Venee I

    2010-09-06

    The US Army utilizes pralidoxime (2-PAM) for the reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE. While 2-PAM effectively reactivates acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the body, it does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at therapeutically relevant levels. To address this problem of central nervous system AChE reactivation, novel sugar-oxime conjugates were utilized. These 'sugar-oximes' would potentially be transported across the BBB because they contain a sugar moiety which would be recognized by the facilitative glucose transporters. Eight previously reported, but understudied sugar-oximes, as well as six novel sugar-oximes were synthesized, and their ability to reactivate both human red blood cell AChE and plasma butyrylcholinesterase poisoned with DFP, paraoxon, sarin and VX were tested. The results show that the novel sugar-oxime 13c was more active than the other compounds with a reactivation potential similar to 2-PAM. The sugar-oxime 8b had low toxicity with a LD(50) of 1,590 mg/kg from a single IM dose in the guinea pig and >2,000 mg/kg IP in the mouse. Histopathological analysis showed that there were no apparent differences in hippocampus, heart, liver, kidney sciatic nerve, or skeletal muscle between treated and untreated animals. These results show that sugar-oximes can be effective reactivators and suggest that high treatment doses may be possible.

  2. Assessing blood-brain barrier function using in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Bressler, Joseph; Clark, Katherine; O'Driscoll, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    The impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is due to a number of properties including tight junctions on adjoining endothelial cells, absence of pinocytic vesicles, and expression of multidrug transporters. Although the permeability of many chemicals can be predicted by their polarity, or oil/water partition coefficient, many lipophilic chemicals are not permeable because of multidrug transporters at the luminal and abluminal membranes. In contrast, many nutrients, which are usually polar, cross the BBB more readily than predicted by their oil/water partition coefficients due to the expression of specific nutrient transporters. In vitro models are being developed because rodent models are of low input and relatively expensive. Isolated brain microvessels and cell culture models each offers certain advantages and disadvantages. Isolated brain microvessels are useful in measuring multidrug drug transporters and tight junction integrity, whereas cell culture models allow the investigator to measure directional transport and can be genetically manipulated. In this chapter, we describe how to isolate large batches of brain microvessels from freshly slaughtered cows. The different steps in the isolation procedure include density gradient centrifugations and filtering. Purity is determined microscopically and by marker enzymes. Permeability is assessed by measuring the uptake of fluorescein-labeled dextran in an assay that has been optimized to have a large dynamic range and low inter-day variability. We also describe how to evaluate transendothelial cell electrical resistance and paracellular transport in cell culture models.

  3. Transport characteristics of tramadol in the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Atsushi; Higuchi, Kei; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2014-10-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic whose action is mediated by both agonistic activity at opioid receptors and inhibitory activity on neuronal reuptake of monoamines. The purpose of this study was to characterize the blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport of tramadol by means of microdialysis studies in rat brain and in vitro studies with human immortalized brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). The Kp,uu,brain value of tramadol determined by rat brain microdialysis was greater than unity, indicating that tramadol is actively taken up into the brain across the BBB. Tramadol was transported into hCMEC/D3 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The uptake was inhibited by type II cations (pyrilamine, verapamil, etc.), but not by substrates of organic cation transporter OCTs or OCTN2. It was also inhibited by a metabolic inhibitor but was independent of extracellular sodium or membrane potential. The uptake was altered by changes of extracellular pH, and by ammonium chloride-induced intracellular acidification, suggesting that transport of tramadol is driven by an oppositely directed proton gradient. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo results suggest that tramadol is actively transported, at least in part, from blood to the brain across the BBB by proton-coupled organic cation antiporter.

  4. Role of the blood-brain barrier in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Mireles-Ramírez, Mario A; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Hernández-Navarro, Vanessa Elizabeth; Sánchez-López, Angélica Lizeth; Alatorre-Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system associated with demyelination and axonal loss eventually leading to neurodegeneration. MS exhibits many of the hallmarks of an inflammatory autoimmune disorder including breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a complex organization of cerebral endothelial cells, pericytes and their basal lamina, which are surrounded and supported by astrocytes and perivascular macrophages. In pathological conditions, lymphocytes activated in the periphery infiltrate the central nervous system to trigger a local immune response that ultimately damages myelin and axons. Cytotoxic factors including pro-inflammatory cytokines, proteases, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulate and may contribute to myelin destruction. Dysregulation of the BBB and transendothelial migration of activated leukocytes are among the earliest cerebrovascular abnormalities seen in MS brains and parallel the release of inflammatory cytokines. In this review we establish the importance of the role of the BBB in MS. Improvements in our understanding of molecular mechanism of BBB functioning in physiological and pathological conditions could lead to improvement in the quality of life of MS patients.

  5. [The blood-brain barrier and neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases].

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko

    2013-02-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy has been a very effective treatment for several lysosomal storage diseases. However, correcting central nervous system (CNS) storage has been challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which hampers the entry of circulating lysosomal enzymes into the brain. In our previous studies, we discovered that luminally expressed cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor is a universal transporter for lysosomal enzymes that contain M6P moieties on the enzyme molecule. This receptor-mediated transport of lysosomal enzymes showed developmental down-regulation that resulted in a failure of delivery of lysosomal enzymes across the BBB in the adult brain. Conceptually, if one can re-induce M6P receptor-mediated transport of lysosomal enzymes in adult BBB, this could provide a novel brain targeting approach for treating abnormal storage in the CNS, regardless of the age of subjects. We found that systemic adrenergic stimuli restored functional transport of β-glucuronidase across the adult BBB. The concept of manipulating BBB transport activity by endogenous characteristics has also been demonstrated by another group who showed effective treatment in a Pompe disease model animal in vivo. It is intriguing that lysosomal enzymes utilize multiple mechanisms for their transport across the BBB. This review explores pharmacological manipulations for the delivery of lysosomal enzymes into the CNS, and the mechanisms of their transport across the BBB, based on existing evidence from studies of β-glucuronidase, sulfamidase, acid α-glucosidase, and arylsulfatase A.

  6. Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

    2014-10-29

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice.

  7. Neuroimmunological Blood Brain Barrier Opening in Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Kerstin; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Frevert, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is responsible for nearly one million annual deaths worldwide. Because of the difficulty in monitoring the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria in humans, we conducted a study in various mouse models to better understand disease progression in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). We compared the effect on the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the histopathology of the brain of P. berghei ANKA, a known ECM model, P. berghei NK65, generally thought not to induce ECM, P. yoelii 17XL, originally reported to induce human cerebral malaria-like histopathology, and P. yoelii YM. As expected, P. berghei ANKA infection caused neurological signs, cerebral hemorrhages, and BBB dysfunction in CBA/CaJ and Swiss Webster mice, while Balb/c and A/J mice were resistant. Surprisingly, PbNK induced ECM in CBA/CaJ mice, while all other mice were resistant. P. yoelii 17XL and P. yoelii YM caused lethal hyperparasitemia in all mouse strains; histopathological alterations, BBB dysfunction, or neurological signs were not observed. Intravital imaging revealed that infected erythrocytes containing mature parasites passed slowly through capillaries making intimate contact with the endothelium, but did not arrest. Except for relatively rare microhemorrhages, mice with ECM presented no obvious histopathological alterations that would explain the widespread disruption of the BBB. Intravital imaging did reveal, however, that postcapillary venules, but not capillaries or arterioles, from mice with ECM, but not hyperparasitemia, exhibit platelet marginalization, extravascular fibrin deposition, CD14 expression, and extensive vascular leakage. Blockage of LFA-1 mediated cellular interactions prevented leukocyte adhesion, vascular leakage, neurological signs, and death from ECM. The endothelial barrier-stabilizing mediators imatinib and FTY720 inhibited vascular leakage and neurological signs and prolonged survival to ECM. Thus, it appears that neurological

  8. The blood-brain barrier after stroke: Structural studies and the role of transcytotic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Haley, Michael J; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2017-02-01

    Blood-brain barrier breakdown worsens ischaemic damage, but it is unclear how molecules breach the blood-brain barrier in vivo. Using the obese ob/ob mouse as a model of enhanced blood-brain barrier breakdown, we investigated how stroke-induced structural changes to the microvasculature related to blood-brain barrier permeability. Ob/ob mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by 4 or 24 h reperfusion. Blood-brain barrier integrity was assessed using IgG and horseradish peroxidase staining, and blood-brain barrier structure by two-dimensional and three-dimensional electron microscopy. At 4 and 24 h post-stroke, ob/ob mice had increased ischaemic damage and blood-brain barrier breakdown compared to ob/- controls, and vessels from both genotypes showed astrocyte end-foot swelling and increased endothelial vesicles. Ob/ob mice had significantly more endothelial vesicles at 4 h in the striatum, where blood-brain barrier breakdown was most severe. Both stroke and genotype had no effect on tight junction structure visualised by electron microscopy, or protein expression in isolated microvessels. Astrocyte swelling severity did not correlate with tissue outcome, being unaffected by genotype or reperfusion times. However, the rare instances of vessel lumen collapse were always associated with severe astrocyte swelling in two-dimensional and three-dimensional electron microscopy. Endothelial vesicles were therefore the best spatial and temporal indicators of blood-brain barrier breakdown after cerebral ischaemia.

  9. Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James; Deffieux, Thomas; Baseri, Babak; Vlachos, Fotios

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million U.S. men and women suffer from Alzheimer's disease; 1 million from Parkinson's disease; 350,000 from multiple sclerosis (MS); and 20,000 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Worldwide, these four diseases account for more than 20 million patients. In addition, aging greatly increases the risk of neurodegenerative disease. Although great progress has been made in recent years toward understanding of these diseases, few effective treatments and no cures are currently available. This is mainly due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that allows only 5% of the 7000 small-molecule drugs available to treat only a tiny fraction of these diseases. On the other hand, safe and localized opening of the BBB has been proven to present a significant challenge. Of the methods used for BBB disruption shown to be effective, Focused Ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with microbubbles, is the only technique that can induce localized BBB opening noninvasively and regionally. FUS may thus have a huge impact in trans-BBB brain drug delivery. The primary objective in this paper is to elucidate the interactions between ultrasound, microbubbles and the local microenvironment during BBB opening with FUS, which are responsible for inducing the BBB disruption. The mechanism of the BBB opening in vivo is monitored through the MRI and passive cavitation detection (PCD), and the safety of BBB disruption is assessed using H&E histology at distinct pressures, pulse lengths and microbubble diameters. It is hereby shown that the BBB can be disrupted safely and transiently under specific acoustic pressures (under 0.45 MPa) and microbubble (diameter under 8 μm) conditions. PMID:22201586

  10. Blood-brain barrier as a regulatory interface.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2010-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important component of the communication network that connects the central nervous system and peripheral tissues in the control of feeding-related behaviors. Specifically, the BBB acts as an interface that restricts and regulates the exchange of substances between the CNS and blood. Many of the eating-related peptides and regulatory proteins produced by peripheral tissues and with receptors in the brain have been found to cross the BBB. The consequences of BBB permeability to these substances can be viewed from various perspectives. Here, we briefly consider five views relating the BBB and eating. A view of physiologic integration emphasizes the BBB as a conduit that controls a humoral-dependent signaling between the CNS and peripheral tissues. A view of regulation emphasizes that the transporters for many of the eating-related hormones are themselves regulated by physiologic events. This means that blood-to-brain signaling across the BBB is state-dependent and adaptable to the needs of the organism. A view of pathologic dysfunction shows how dysregulation of BBB transporters can result in disease. Resistance to leptin caused by its decreased transport across the BBB in obesity is an example. An evolutionary view emphasizes how the role of the BBB in eating may have evolved and how adaptations to one set of eating conditions can result in maladaptations under other conditions. Finally, the implications of these views for drug development targeted at obesity or anorexia is explored. Overall, these views show the BBB is an integral part of the physiology of eating.

  11. The blood-brain barrier as a cause of obesity.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2008-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the number of obese and overweight persons has spurred interest in control of appetite, body weight, and adiposity. Leptin is the humoral component of a negative feedback loop between adipose tissue and brain. Leptin is secreted from fat in proportion to the degree of adiposity, is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and acts in the brain to decrease appetite and increase thermogenesis, actions that ultimately decrease adiposity. However, leptin fails as an adipostat because leptin resistance arises in obesity. The BBB transporter is the first part of the feedback loop to fail, producing the so called "peripheral resistance" to leptin. In this sense, obesity is a disease of the BBB. Failure of leptin as an adipostat raises the question of what its primary role is as does its effects on reproduction, bone, immunity, breathing, cognition, and neurogenesis. Kinetics analysis shows that the BBB transporter performs most efficiently at low serum levels of leptin, suggesting that the feedback loop evolved to operate at lower leptin levels than those seen in ideal body weight. We suggest that low levels of serum leptin inform the brain that adipose reserves are adequate to expend calories on functions other than feeding, such as reproduction and the immune system. This feedback loop is short-circuited when an animal enters starvation. Hallmarks of starvation include decreased secretion of leptin by adipose tissue and hypertriglyceridemia. Triglycerides inhibit the transport of leptin across the BBB, thus attenuating the leptin signal across the BBB and providing a mechanism for peripheral leptin resistance. Triglycerides are elevated in both starvation and obesity. We postulate that hypertriglyceridemia evolved as a starvation signal to the brain that acts in part to inhibit the transport of the leptin across the BBB. The hypertriglyceridemia of obesity invokes this aspect of the starvation response, inducing leptin resistance at the

  12. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier to a rhenacarborane.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Patrick M; Jelliss, Paul A; Nonaka, Naoko; Shi, Xiaoming; Banks, William A

    2009-05-01

    The treatment of brain malignancies with boron neutron capture therapy depends on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). An especially promising class of boron-containing compounds is the rhenacarboranes that, if able to cross the BBB, could act as delivery vehicles as well as a source of boron. Here, we examined the ability of the 3-NO-3,3-kappa(2)-(2,2'-N(2)C(10)H(6)(Me)[(CH(2))(7)(131)I]-4,4')-closo-3,1,2-ReC(2)B(9)H(11) (rhenacarborane) labeled with iodine-131 to be taken up into the bloodstream after subcutaneous administration and to cross the BBB. The (131)I-rhenacarborane was quickly absorbed from the injection site and reached a steady state in arterial serum of 2.59%/ml of the administered dose. Between 73 and 95% of the radioactivity in serum 6 h after administration represented intact (131)I-rhenacarborane. Its octanol/buffer partition coefficient was 1.74, showing it to be lipophilic. Tissue/serum ratios for brain, lung, and liver showed classic patterns for a lipid-soluble substance with high levels immediately achieved and rapid redistribution. For brain, a steady state of approximately 0.107% of the administered dose/gram-brain was rapidly reached, and 71% of the radioactivity in brain 6 h after subcutaneous administration represented intact (131)I-rhenacarborane. Steady-state values were 1.53 and 0.89% of the injected dose per gram for lung and liver, respectively. (131)I-Rhenacarborane was quickly effluxed from brain by a nonsaturable system after its injection into the lateral ventricle of the brain. In conclusion, these results show that a rhenacarborane was enzymatically resistant and able to cross the BBB by transmembrane diffusion and accumulate in brain in substantial amounts. This supports their use as therapeutic agents for targeting the central nervous system.

  13. Blood-Brain Barrier Changes in High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, José V; Bermudez, Garazi; Camargo-Arce, Lorena; Bulnes, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral syndromes related to high-altitude exposure are becoming more frequent as the number of trips to high altitudes has increased in the last decade. The commonest symptom is headache, followed by acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), which can be fatal. The pathophysiology of these syndromes is not fully understood. The classical "tight-fit hypothesis" posits that there are some anatomical variations that would obstruct the sinovenous outflow and worsen vasogenic edema and intracranial hypertension reactive to hypoxia. This could explain microhemorrhages seen in autopsies. However, recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have demonstrated some components of cytotoxic edema in HACE absent in AMS, suggesting a dysfunction in water balance at the cellular level. Currently, the "red-ox theory" supports trigemino-vascular system activation by free radicals formed after hypoxia and the consequent oxidative stress cascades. Apart from trigemino-vascular system activation, free radicals can also provoke membrane destabilisation mediated by lipid peroxidation, inflammation, and local hypoxia inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor activation, resulting in gross blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Besides alterations in endothelial cells such as increased pinocytotic vesicles and disassembly of interendothelial tight junction proteins, capillary permeability may also increase with subsequent swelling of astrocyte end-feet. In conclusion, although the pathophysiology of AMS and HACE is not completely understood, recent evidence proposes a multifactorial entity, with brain swelling and compromise of the BBB considered to play an important role. A fuller comprehension of these processes is crucial to reduce and prevent BBB alterations during high-altitude exposure.

  14. Blood-brain barrier impairment in MPS III patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of a specific enzyme leading to heparan sulfate (HS) accumulation within cells and to eventual progressive cerebral and systemic organ abnormalities. Different enzyme deficiencies comprise the MPS III subcategories (A, B, C, D). Since neuropathological manifestations are common to all MPS III types, determining blood-brain barrier (BBB) condition may be critical to understand potential additional disease mechanisms. Methods We investigated BBB integrity in various brain structures of post-mortem tissues from an eleven year old Caucasian female with MPS III A and from a twenty four year old Caucasian female with MPS III D. Control tissues were obtained post-mortem from three Caucasians without neurological deficits: a twelve year old male, a twenty four year old female, and a twenty seven year old female. BBB capillary ultrastructure (electron microscopy) and capillary functional integrity (IgG leakage, tight junction proteins, and lysosomal accumulation within endothelium) were examined. Results Compromised BBB integrity was found in both MPS III cases. Major study findings were: (1) capillary endothelial and pericyte cell damage; (2) mucopolysaccharide bodies in a majority of endothelial cells and pericytes rupturing cell membranes; (3) severe extracellular edema; (4) IgG microvascular leakage and reductions of occludin and claudin-5 with variations between MPS III types; (5) extensive lysosomal accumulation in capillary endothelium. Conclusions These new findings of BBB structural and functional impairment, although from only two cases, MPS III A and III D, may have implications for disease pathogenesis and should be considered in treatment development for MPS III. PMID:24225396

  15. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  16. Ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James; Deffieux, Thomas; Baseri, Babak; Vlachos, Fotios

    2012-06-01

    Over 4 million U.S. men and women suffer from Alzheimer's disease; 1 million from Parkinson's disease; 350,000 from multiple sclerosis (MS); and 20,000 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Worldwide, these four diseases account for more than 20 million patients. In addition, aging greatly increases the risk of neurodegenerative disease. Although great progress has been made in recent years toward understanding of these diseases, few effective treatments and no cures are currently available. This is mainly due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that allows only 5% of the 7000 small-molecule drugs available to treat only a tiny fraction of these diseases. On the other hand, safe and localized opening of the BBB has been proven to present a significant challenge. Of the methods used for BBB disruption shown to be effective, Focused Ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with microbubbles, is the only technique that can induce localized BBB opening noninvasively and regionally. FUS may thus have a huge impact in trans-BBB brain drug delivery. The primary objective in this paper is to elucidate the interactions between ultrasound, microbubbles and the local microenvironment during BBB opening with FUS, which are responsible for inducing the BBB disruption. The mechanism of the BBB opening in vivo is monitored through the MRI and passive cavitation detection (PCD), and the safety of BBB disruption is assessed using H&E histology at distinct pressures, pulse lengths and microbubble diameters. It is hereby shown that the BBB can be disrupted safely and transiently under specific acoustic pressures (under 0.45 MPa) and microbubble (diameter under 8 μm) conditions.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus and Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Shikha; Sajja, Ravi K; Naik, Pooja; Cucullo, Luca

    2014-06-01

    A host of diabetes-related insults to the central nervous system (CNS) have been clearly documented in type-1 and -2 diabetic patients as well as experimental animal models. These host of neurological disorders encompass hemodynamic impairments (e.g., stroke), vascular dementia, cognitive deficits (mild to moderate), as well as a number of neurochemical, electrophysiological and behavioral alterations. The underlying causes of diabetes-induced CNS complications are multifactorial and are relatively little understood although it is now evident that blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage plays a significant role in diabetes-dependent CNS disorders. Changes in plasma glucose levels (hyper- or hypoglycemia) have been associated with altered BBB transport functions (e.g., glucose, insulin, choline, amino acids, etc.), integrity (tight junction disruption), and oxidative stress in the CNS microcapillaries. Last two implicating a potential causal role for upregulation and activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). This type I membrane-protein also transports amyloid-beta (Aβ) from the blood into the brain across the BBB thus, establishing a link between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, also referred to as "type 3 diabetes"). Hyperglycemia has been associated with progression of cerebral ischemia and the consequent enhancement of secondary brain injury. Difficulty in detecting vascular impairments in the large, heterogeneous brain microvascular bed and dissecting out the impact of hyper- and hypoglycemia in vivo has led to controversial results especially with regard to the effects of diabetes on BBB. In this article, we review the major findings and current knowledge with regard to the impact of diabetes on BBB integrity and function as well as specific brain microvascular effects of hyper- and hypoglycemia.

  18. Methamphetamine effects on blood-brain barrier structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, Nicole A.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a widely abuse psychostimulant. Traditionally, studies have focused on the neurotoxic effects of Meth on monoaminergic neurotransmitter terminals. Recently, both in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated the effects of Meth on the BBB and found that Meth produces a decrease in BBB structural proteins and an increase in BBB permeability to various molecules. Moreover, preclinical studies are validated by clinical studies in which human Meth users have increased concentrations of toxins in the brain. Therefore, this review will focus on the structural and functional disruption of the BBB caused by Meth and the mechanisms that contribute to Meth-induced BBB disruption. The review will reveal that the mechanisms by which Meth damages dopamine and serotonin terminals are similar to the mechanisms by which the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is damaged. Furthermore, this review will cover the factors that are known to potentiate the effects of Meth (McCann et al., 1998) on the BBB, such as stress and HIV, both of which are co-morbid conditions associated with Meth abuse. Overall, the goal of this review is to demonstrate that the scope of damage produced by Meth goes beyond damage to monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems to include BBB disruption as well as provide a rationale for investigating therapeutics to treat Meth-induced BBB disruption. Since a breach of the BBB can have a multitude of consequences, therapies directed toward the treatment of BBB disruption may help to ameliorate the long-term neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits produced by Meth and possibly even Meth addiction. PMID:25788874

  19. Noninvasive Blood-Brain Barrier Opening in Live Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Pernot, Mathieu; Small, Scott; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2006-05-01

    Most therapeutic agents cannot be delivered to the brain because of brain's natural defense: the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). It has recently been shown that Focused Ultrasound (FUS) can produce reversible and localized BBB opening in the brain when applied in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents post-craniotomy in rabbits [1]. However, a major limitation of ultrasound in the brain is the strong phase aberration and attenuation of the skull bone, and, as a result, no study of trans-cranial ultrasound-targeted drug treatment in the brain in vivo has been reported as of yet. In this study, the feasibility of BBB opening in the hippocampus of wildtype mice using FUS through the intact skull and skin was investigated. In order to investigate the effect of the skull, simulations of ultrasound wave propagation (1.5 MHz) through the skull using μCT data, and needle hydrophone measurements through an ex-vivo skull were made. The pressure field showed minimal attenuation (18% of the pressure amplitude) and a well-focused pattern through the left and right halves of the parietal bone. In experiments in vivo, the brains of four mice were sonicated through intact skull and skin. Ultrasound sonications (burst length: 20 ms; duty cycle: 20%; acoustic pressure range: 2.0 to 2.7 MPa) was applied 5 times for 30 s per shot with a 30 s delay between shots. Prior to sonication, ultrasound contrast agents (Optison; 10 μL) were injected intravenously. Contrast material enhanced high resolution MR Imaging (9.4 Tesla) was able to distinguish opening of large vessels in the region of the hippocampus. These results demonstrate the feasibility of locally opening the BBB in the mouse hippocampus using focused ultrasound through intact skull and skin. Future investigations will deal with optimization and reproducibility of the technique as well as application on Alzheimer's-model mice.

  20. Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle transport through in vitro blood-brain barrier models

    PubMed Central

    Åberg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanoparticle transport through the blood-brain barrier has received much attention of late, both from the point of view of nano-enabled drug delivery, as well as due to concerns about unintended exposure of nanomaterials to humans and other organisms. In vitro models play a lead role in efforts to understand the extent of transport through the blood-brain barrier, but unique features of the nanoscale challenge their direct adaptation. Here we highlight some of the differences compared to molecular species when utilizing in vitro blood-brain barrier models for nanoparticle studies. Issues that may arise with transwell systems are discussed, together with some potential alternative methodologies. We also briefly review the biomolecular corona concept and its importance for how nanoparticles interact with the blood-brain barrier. We end with considering future directions, including indirect effects and application of shear and fluidics-technologies. PMID:27141425

  1. Pharmacologic manipulation of lysosomal enzyme transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Sly, William S; Banks, William A

    2016-03-01

    The adult blood-brain barrier, unlike the neonatal blood-brain barrier, does not transport lysosomal enzymes into brain, making enzyme replacement therapy ineffective in treating the central nervous system symptoms of lysosomal storage diseases. However, enzyme transport can be re-induced with alpha-adrenergics. Here, we examined agents that are known to alter the blood-brain barrier transport of large molecules or to induce lysosomal enzyme transport across the blood-brain barrier ((±)epinephrine, insulin, retinoic acid, and lipopolysaccharide) in 2-week-old and adult mice. In 2-week-old adolescent mice, all these pharmacologic agents increased brain and heart uptake of phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase. In 8-week-old adult mice, manipulations with (±)epinephrine, insulin, and retinoic acid were significantly effective on uptake by brain and heart. The increased uptake of phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase was inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate for the agents (±)epinephrine and retinoic acid and by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester for the agent lipopolysaccharide in neonatal and adult mice. An in situ brain perfusion study revealed that retinoic acid directly modulated the transport of phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase across the blood-brain barrier. The present study indicates that there are multiple opportunities to at least transiently induce phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase transport at the adult blood-brain barrier.

  2. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Dan; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) samples (eight fluids and three powders) was determined using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl) alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood-brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood-brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood-brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability). Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood-brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications.

  3. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Astrocytic TYMP and VEGFA drive blood-brain barrier opening in inflammatory central nervous system lesions.

    PubMed

    Chapouly, Candice; Tadesse Argaw, Azeb; Horng, Sam; Castro, Kamilah; Zhang, Jingya; Asp, Linnea; Loo, Hannah; Laitman, Benjamin M; Mariani, John N; Straus Farber, Rebecca; Zaslavsky, Elena; Nudelman, German; Raine, Cedric S; John, Gareth R

    2015-06-01

    In inflammatory central nervous system conditions such as multiple sclerosis, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier is a key event in lesion pathogenesis, predisposing to oedema, excitotoxicity, and ingress of plasma proteins and inflammatory cells. Recently, we showed that reactive astrocytes drive blood-brain barrier opening, via production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Here, we now identify thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP; previously known as endothelial cell growth factor 1, ECGF1) as a second key astrocyte-derived permeability factor, which interacts with VEGFA to induce blood-brain barrier disruption. The two are co-induced NFκB1-dependently in human astrocytes by the cytokine interleukin 1 beta (IL1B), and inactivation of Vegfa in vivo potentiates TYMP induction. In human central nervous system microvascular endothelial cells, VEGFA and the TYMP product 2-deoxy-d-ribose cooperatively repress tight junction proteins, driving permeability. Notably, this response represents part of a wider pattern of endothelial plasticity: 2-deoxy-d-ribose and VEGFA produce transcriptional programs encompassing angiogenic and permeability genes, and together regulate a third unique cohort. Functionally, each promotes proliferation and viability, and they cooperatively drive motility and angiogenesis. Importantly, introduction of either into mouse cortex promotes blood-brain barrier breakdown, and together they induce severe barrier disruption. In the multiple sclerosis model experimental autoimmune encephalitis, TYMP and VEGFA co-localize to reactive astrocytes, and correlate with blood-brain barrier permeability. Critically, blockade of either reduces neurologic deficit, blood-brain barrier disruption and pathology, and inhibiting both in combination enhances tissue preservation. Suggesting importance in human disease, TYMP and VEGFA both localize to reactive astrocytes in multiple sclerosis lesion samples. Collectively, these data identify TYMP as an

  5. The Drosophila blood-brain barrier: development and function of a glial endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Stefanie; Weiler, Astrid; Volkenhoff, Anne; Babatz, Felix; Klämbt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of neuronal function requires a well-balanced extracellular ion homeostasis and a steady supply with nutrients and metabolites. Therefore, all organisms equipped with a complex nervous system developed a so-called blood-brain barrier, protecting it from an uncontrolled entry of solutes, metabolites or pathogens. In higher vertebrates, this diffusion barrier is established by polarized endothelial cells that form extensive tight junctions, whereas in lower vertebrates and invertebrates the blood-brain barrier is exclusively formed by glial cells. Here, we review the development and function of the glial blood-brain barrier of Drosophila melanogaster. In the Drosophila nervous system, at least seven morphologically distinct glial cell classes can be distinguished. Two of these glial classes form the blood-brain barrier. Perineurial glial cells participate in nutrient uptake and establish a first diffusion barrier. The subperineurial glial (SPG) cells form septate junctions, which block paracellular diffusion and thus seal the nervous system from the hemolymph. We summarize the molecular basis of septate junction formation and address the different transport systems expressed by the blood-brain barrier forming glial cells. PMID:25452710

  6. Therapeutic strategies to improve drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Tej D.; Pan, James; Connolly, Ian D.; Remington, Austin; Wilson, Christy M.; Grant, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Resection of brain tumors is followed by chemotherapy and radiation to ablate remaining malignant cell populations. Targeting these populations stands to reduce tumor recurrence and offer the promise of more complete therapy. Thus, improving access to the tumor, while leaving normal brain tissue unscathed, is a critical pursuit. A central challenge in this endeavor lies in the limited delivery of therapeutics to the tumor itself. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for much of this difficulty but also provides an essential separation from systemic circulation. Due to the BBB’s physical and chemical constraints, many current therapies, from cytotoxic drugs to antibody-based proteins, cannot gain access to the tumor. This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and associated changes wrought by the presence of a tumor. Current strategies for enhancing the delivery of therapies across the BBB to the tumor will be discussed, with a distinction made between strategies that seek to disrupt the BBB and those that aim to circumvent it. PMID:25727231

  7. Drug interactions at the blood-brain barrier: fact or fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Eyal, Sara; Hsiao, Peng; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the therapeutic and adverse outcomes of drug interactions at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). These include altered efficacy of drugs used in the treatment of CNS disorders, such as AIDS dementia and malignant tumors, and enhanced neurotoxicity of drugs that normally penetrate poorly into the brain. BBB- and BCSFB-mediated interactions are possible because these interfaces are not only passive anatomical barriers, but are also dynamic in that they express a variety of influx and efflux transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes. Based on studies in rodents, it has been widely postulated that efflux transporters play an important role at the human BBB in terms of drug delivery. Furthermore, it is assumed that chemical inhibition of transporters or their genetic ablation in rodents is predictive of the magnitude of interaction to be expected at the human BBB. However, studies in humans challenge this well-established paradigm and claim that such drug interactions will be lesser in magnitude but yet may be clinically significant. This review focuses on current known mechanisms of drug interactions at the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and the potential impact of such interactions in humans. We also explore whether such drug interactions can be predicted from preclinical studies. Defining the mechanisms and the impact of drug-drug interactions at the BBB is important for improving efficacy of drugs used in the treatment of CNS disorders while minimizing their toxicity as well as minimizing neurotoxicity of non-CNS drugs. PMID:19393264

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Busquets, Maria Antònia; Espargaró, Alba; Sabaté, Raimon; Estelrich, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  9. Real-time monitoring of human blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Korhonen, Vesa; Kortelainen, Jukka; Rytky, Seppo; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Isokangas, Matti; Sonkajärvi, Eila; Siniluoto, Topi; Nikkinen, Juha; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Myllylä, Teemu; Kuittinen, Outi; Voipio, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy aided by opening of the blood-brain barrier with intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol improves the outcome in primary central nervous system lymphoma. Proper opening of the blood-brain barrier is crucial for the treatment, yet there are no means available for its real-time monitoring. The intact blood-brain barrier maintains a mV-level electrical potential difference between blood and brain tissue, giving rise to a measurable electrical signal at the scalp. Therefore, we used direct-current electroencephalography (DC-EEG) to characterize the spatiotemporal behavior of scalp-recorded slow electrical signals during blood-brain barrier opening. Nine anesthetized patients receiving chemotherapy were monitored continuously during 47 blood-brain barrier openings induced by carotid or vertebral artery mannitol infusion. Left or right carotid artery mannitol infusion generated a strongly lateralized DC-EEG response that began with a 2 min negative shift of up to 2000 μV followed by a positive shift lasting up to 20 min above the infused carotid artery territory, whereas contralateral responses were of opposite polarity. Vertebral artery mannitol infusion gave rise to a minimally lateralized and more uniformly distributed slow negative response with a posterior-frontal gradient. Simultaneously performed near-infrared spectroscopy detected a multiphasic response beginning with mannitol-bolus induced dilution of blood and ending in a prolonged increase in the oxy/deoxyhemoglobin ratio. The pronounced DC-EEG shifts are readily accounted for by opening and sealing of the blood-brain barrier. These data show that DC-EEG is a promising real-time monitoring tool for blood-brain barrier disruption augmented drug delivery. PMID:28319185

  10. Real-time monitoring of human blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Korhonen, Vesa; Kortelainen, Jukka; Rytky, Seppo; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Isokangas, Matti; Sonkajärvi, Eila; Siniluoto, Topi; Nikkinen, Juha; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Myllylä, Teemu; Kuittinen, Outi; Voipio, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy aided by opening of the blood-brain barrier with intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol improves the outcome in primary central nervous system lymphoma. Proper opening of the blood-brain barrier is crucial for the treatment, yet there are no means available for its real-time monitoring. The intact blood-brain barrier maintains a mV-level electrical potential difference between blood and brain tissue, giving rise to a measurable electrical signal at the scalp. Therefore, we used direct-current electroencephalography (DC-EEG) to characterize the spatiotemporal behavior of scalp-recorded slow electrical signals during blood-brain barrier opening. Nine anesthetized patients receiving chemotherapy were monitored continuously during 47 blood-brain barrier openings induced by carotid or vertebral artery mannitol infusion. Left or right carotid artery mannitol infusion generated a strongly lateralized DC-EEG response that began with a 2 min negative shift of up to 2000 μV followed by a positive shift lasting up to 20 min above the infused carotid artery territory, whereas contralateral responses were of opposite polarity. Vertebral artery mannitol infusion gave rise to a minimally lateralized and more uniformly distributed slow negative response with a posterior-frontal gradient. Simultaneously performed near-infrared spectroscopy detected a multiphasic response beginning with mannitol-bolus induced dilution of blood and ending in a prolonged increase in the oxy/deoxyhemoglobin ratio. The pronounced DC-EEG shifts are readily accounted for by opening and sealing of the blood-brain barrier. These data show that DC-EEG is a promising real-time monitoring tool for blood-brain barrier disruption augmented drug delivery.

  11. Review: Role of developmental inflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Stolp, H B; Dziegielewska, K M

    2009-04-01

    The causes of most neurological disorders are not fully understood. Inflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction appear to play major roles in the pathology of these diseases. Inflammatory insults that occur during brain development may have widespread effects later in life for a spectrum of neurological disorders. In this review, a new hypothesis suggesting a mechanistic link between inflammation and blood-brain barrier function (integrity), which is universally important in both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, is proposed. The role of inflammation and the blood-brain barrier will be discussed in cerebral palsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, conditions where both inflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction occur either during initiation and/or progression of the disease. We suggest that breakdown of normal blood-brain barrier function resulting in a short-lasting influx of blood-born molecules, in particular plasma proteins, may cause local damage, such as reduction of brain white matter observed in some newborn babies, but may also be the mechanism behind some neurodegenerative diseases related to underlying brain damage and long-term changes in barrier properties.

  12. The protective influence of the locus ceruleus on the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Harik, S.I.; McGunigal, T. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The functions of the putative noradrenergic innervation of cerebral microvessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus remain ambiguous. Although most evidence indicates that such innervation does not have a major role in the control of cerebral blood flow, there are increasing indications that it modulates transport and permeability functions of the blood-brain barrier. In this study we investigated the effect of unilateral chemical lesioning of the locus ceruleus on the leakage of radioiodinated human serum albumin across the blood-brain barrier. Experiments were performed in awake and restrained rats under steady-state conditions and during drug-induced systemic arterial hypertension, and in anesthetized and paralyzed rats during bicuculline-induced seizures. Both hypertension and seizures are known to be associated with increased leakage of macromolecules across the blood-brain barrier. Albumin leakage into norepinephrine-depleted forebrain structures ipsilateral to the locus ceruleus lesion was compared with that of the contralateral side. There were no side-to-side differences in blood-brain barrier permeability to albumin under steady-state conditions, the stress of restraint, or angiotensin-induced hypertension, or after isoproterenol administration. Norepinephrine-induced hypertension and seizures, however, caused significant increases in albumin leakage into forebrain structures ipsilateral to the lesion. These results suggest that noradrenergic innervation of cerebral microvessels from the locus ceruleus helps preserve the integrity of the blood-brain barrier during pathophysiological states associated with hypertension and increased circulating catecholamines.

  13. Anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody modulates blood-brain barrier function in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiyong; Sadowska, Grazyna B; Chen, Xiaodi; Park, Seon Yeong; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Bodge, Courtney A; Cummings, Erin; Lim, Yow-Pin; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G; Gaitanis, John; Banks, William A; Stonestreet, Barbara S

    2015-05-01

    Impaired blood-brain barrier function represents an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the perinatal period. Proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to ischemia-related blood-brain barrier dysfunction. IL-6 increases vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability in vitro. However, contributions of IL-6 to blood-brain barrier abnormalities have not been examined in the immature brain in vivo. We generated pharmacologic quantities of ovine-specific neutralizing anti-IL-6 mAbs and systemically infused mAbs into fetal sheep at 126 days of gestation after exposure to brain ischemia. Anti-IL-6 mAbs were measured by ELISA in fetal plasma, cerebral cortex, and cerebrospinal fluid, blood-brain barrier permeability was quantified using the blood-to-brain transfer constant in brain regions, and IL-6, tight junction proteins, and plasmalemma vesicle protein (PLVAP) were detected by Western immunoblot. Anti-IL-6 mAb infusions resulted in increases in mAb (P < 0.05) in plasma, brain parenchyma, and cerebrospinal fluid and decreases in brain IL-6 protein. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, anti-IL-6 mAb infusions attenuated ischemia-related increases in blood-brain barrier permeability and modulated tight junction and PLVAP protein expression in fetal brain. We conclude that inhibiting the effects of IL-6 protein with systemic infusions of neutralizing antibodies attenuates ischemia-related increases in blood-brain barrier permeability by inhibiting IL-6 and modulates tight junction proteins after ischemia.

  14. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  15. Pharmacological modulation of blood-brain barrier increases permeability of doxorubicin into the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Iacopo; la Marca, Giancarlo; Cardellicchio, Stefania; Giunti, Laura; Malvagia, Sabrina; Genitori, Lorenzo; Massimino, Maura; de Martino, Maurizio; Giovannini, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    Our group recently demonstrated in a rat model that pretreatment with morphine facilitates doxorubicin delivery to the brain in the absence of signs of increased acute systemic toxicity. Morphine and other drugs such as dexamethasone or ondansetron seem to inhibit MDR proteins localized on blood-brain barrier, neurons and glial cells increasing the access of doxorubicin to the brain by efflux transporters competition. We explored the feasibility of active modification of the blood-brain barrier protection, by using morphine dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment, to allow doxorubicin accumulation into the brain in a rodent model. Rats were pretreated with morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) or ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.) before injection of doxorubicin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Quantitative analysis of doxorubicin was performed by mass spectrometry. Acute hearth and kidney damage was analyzed by measuring doxorubicin accumulation, LDH activity and malondialdehyde plasma levels. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in all brain areas of rats pretreated with morphine (P < 0.001) or ondansetron (P < 0.05) than in control tissues. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in cerebral hemispheres and brainstem (P < 0.05) but not in cerebellum of rats pretreated with dexamethasone than in control tissues. Pretreatment with any of these drugs did not increase LDH activity or lipid peroxidation compared to controls. Our data suggest that morphine, dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment is able to allow doxorubicin penetration inside the brain by modulating the BBB. This effect is not associated with acute cardiac or renal toxicity. This finding might provide the rationale for clinical applications in the treatment of refractory brain tumors and pave the way to novel applications of active but currently inapplicable chemotherapeutic drugs.

  16. Ischemia-reperfusion impairs blood-brain barrier function and alters tight junction protein expression in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Threlkeld, S W; Cummings, E E; Juan, I; Makeyev, O; Besio, W G; Gaitanis, J; Banks, W A; Sadowska, G B; Stonestreet, B S

    2012-12-13

    The blood-brain barrier is a restrictive interface between the brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions contribute to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Hypoxic-ischemic damage to the blood-brain barrier could be an important component of fetal brain injury. We hypothesized that increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia depend upon the duration of reperfusion and that decreases in tight junction proteins are associated with the ischemia-related impairment in blood-brain barrier function in the fetus. Blood-brain barrier function was quantified with the blood-to-brain transfer constant (K(i)) and tight junction proteins by Western immunoblot in fetal sheep at 127 days of gestation without ischemia, and 4, 24, or 48 h after ischemia. The largest increase in K(i) (P<0.05) was 4 h after ischemia. Occludin and claudin-5 expressions decreased at 4 h, but returned toward control levels 24 and 48 h after ischemia. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 decreased after ischemia. Inverse correlations between K(i) and tight junction proteins suggest that the decreases in tight junction proteins contribute to impaired blood-brain barrier function after ischemia. We conclude that impaired blood-brain barrier function is an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus, and that increases in quantitatively measured barrier permeability (K(i)) change as a function of the duration of reperfusion after ischemia. The largest increase in permeability occurs 4 h after ischemia and blood-brain barrier function improves early after injury because the blood-brain barrier is less permeable 24 and 48 than 4 h after ischemia. Changes in the tight junction molecular composition are associated with increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia.

  17. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier-stealth nanocomposites for in situ glioblastoma theranostics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Fong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy.The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00280c

  18. Glioma targeting and blood-brain barrier penetration by dual-targeting doxorubincin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Qing; Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Ming; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Li, Fan-Zhu; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min

    2013-07-01

    Effective chemotherapy for glioblastoma requires a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the glioma cells. Dual-targeting doxorubincin (Dox) liposomes were produced by conjugating liposomes with both folate (F) and transferrin (Tf), which were proven effective in penetrating the BBB and targeting tumors, respectively. The liposome was characterized by particle size, Dox entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release profile. Drug accumulation in cells, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, and drug transport across the BBB in the dual-targeting liposome group were examined by using bEnd3 BBB models. In vivo studies demonstrated that the dual-targeting Dox liposomes could transport across the BBB and mainly distribute in the brain glioma. The anti-tumor effect of the dual-targeting liposome was also demonstrated by the increased survival time, decreased tumor volume, and results of both hematoxylin-eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis. The dual-targeting Dox liposome could improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma and were less toxic than the Dox solution, showing a dual-targeting effect. These results indicate that this dual-targeting liposome can be used as a potential carrier for glioma chemotherapy.

  19. Atomistic modeling of the structural components of the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Grishina, O. A.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier, which is a barrage system between the brain and blood vessels, plays a key role in the "isolation" of the brain of unnecessary information, and reduce the "noise" in the interneuron communication. It is known that the barrier function of the BBB strictly depends on the initial state of the organism and changes significantly with age and, especially in developing the "vascular accidents". Disclosure mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function will develop new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in the newborn. The aim of this work is the construction of atomistic models of structural components of the blood-brain barrier to reveal the mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function.

  20. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called 'quorum sensing'. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis.

  1. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called ‘quorum sensing’. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis. PMID:26536593

  2. Penetrating the Blood-Brain Barrier: Promise of Novel Nanoplatforms and Delivery Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Iqbal Unnisa; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-27

    Multifunctional nanoplatforms combining versatile therapeutic modalities with a variety of imaging options have the potential to diagnose, monitor, and treat brain diseases. The promise of nanotechnology can only be realized by the simultaneous development of innovative brain-targeting delivery vehicles capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier without compromising its structural integrity.

  3. Inflammatory events at blood-brain barrier in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders: implications for clinical disease.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Helga E; Kooij, Gijs; Frenkel, Dan; Georgopoulos, Spiros; Monsonego, Alon; Janigro, Damir

    2012-11-01

    Proper function of the neurovasculature is required for optimal brain function and preventing neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Within this review, we discuss alterations of the function of the blood-brain barrier in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease and address potential underlying mechanisms.

  4. A method to determine the ability of drugs to diffuse through the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, A; Gottschlich, R; Devant, R M

    1994-01-01

    A method has been devised for predicting the ability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier. The criteria depend on the amphiphilic properties of a drug as reflected in its surface activity. The assessment was made with various drugs that either penetrate or do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The surface activity of these drugs was quantified by their Gibbs adsorption isotherms in terms of three parameters: (i) the onset of surface activity, (ii) the critical micelle concentration, and (iii) the surface area requirement of the drug at the air/water interface. A calibration diagram is proposed in which the critical micelle concentration is plotted against the concentration required for the onset of surface activity. Three different regions are easily distinguished in this diagram: a region of very hydrophobic drugs which fail to enter the central nervous system because they remain adsorbed to the membrane, a central area of less hydrophobic drugs which can cross the blood-brain barrier, and a region of relatively hydrophilic drugs which do not cross the blood-brain barrier unless applied at high concentrations. This diagram can be used to predict reliably the central nervous system permeability of an unknown compound from a simple measurement of its Gibbs adsorption isotherm. PMID:8278409

  5. Qualitative prediction of blood-brain barrier permeability on a large and refined dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlbacher, Markus; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    The prediction of blood-brain barrier permeation is vitally important for the optimization of drugs targeting the central nervous system as well as for avoiding side effects of peripheral drugs. Following a previously proposed model on blood-brain barrier penetration, we calculated the cross-sectional area perpendicular to the amphiphilic axis. We obtained a high correlation between calculated and experimental cross-sectional area (r = 0.898, n = 32). Based on these results, we examined a correlation of the calculated cross-sectional area with blood-brain barrier penetration given by logBB values. We combined various literature data sets to form a large-scale logBB dataset with 362 experimental logBB values. Quantitative models were calculated using bootstrap validated multiple linear regression. Qualitative models were built by a bootstrapped random forest algorithm. Both methods found similar descriptors such as polar surface area, pKa, log P, charges and number of positive ionisable groups to be predictive for logBB. In contrast to our initial assumption, we were not able to obtain models with the cross-sectional area chosen as relevant parameter for both approaches. Comparing those two different techniques, qualitative random forest models are better suited for blood-brain barrier permeability prediction, especially when reducing the number of descriptors and using a large dataset. A random forest prediction system (ntrees = 5) based on only four descriptors yields a validated accuracy of 88%.

  6. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and Monocyte Infiltration in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, S.; Blezer, E. L. A.; Schreibelt, G.; Dopp, E.; van der Pol, S. M. A.; Schadee-Eestermans, I. L.; Nicolay, K.; Dijkstra, C. D.; de Vries, H. E.

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced cerebrovascular permeability and cellular infiltration mark the onset of early multiple sclerosis lesions. So far, the precise sequence of these events and their role in lesion formation and disease progression remain unknown. Here we provide quantitative evidence that blood-brain barrier leakage is an early event and precedes massive…

  7. Epstein Barr Virus and Blood Brain Barrier in Multiple Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    brain-barrier, Epstein-Barr virus; EBV ; BBB; MS, Multiple sclerosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune neurodegenerative disease. Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ) infection is associated with MS...pathogenesis. However, mechanism for the EBV -MS connection is unclear. The blood– brain barrier (BBB) is a separation of circulating blood and the brain

  8. Acid extrusion via blood-brain barrier causes brain alkalosis and seizures after neonatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mohamed M; Ruusuvuori, Eva; Watkins, Paul V; Voipio, Juha; Kanold, Patrick O; Kaila, Kai

    2012-11-01

    Birth asphyxia is often associated with a high seizure burden that is predictive of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. The mechanisms underlying birth asphyxia seizures are unknown. Using an animal model of birth asphyxia based on 6-day-old rat pups, we have recently shown that the seizure burden is linked to an increase in brain extracellular pH that consists of the recovery from the asphyxia-induced acidosis, and of a subsequent plateau level well above normal extracellular pH. In the present study, two-photon imaging of intracellular pH in neocortical neurons in vivo showed that pH changes also underwent a biphasic acid-alkaline response, resulting in an alkaline plateau level. The mean alkaline overshoot was strongly suppressed by a graded restoration of normocapnia after asphyxia. The parallel post-asphyxia increase in extra- and intracellular pH levels indicated a net loss of acid equivalents from brain tissue that was not attributable to a disruption of the blood-brain barrier, as demonstrated by a lack of increased sodium fluorescein extravasation into the brain, and by the electrophysiological characteristics of the blood-brain barrier. Indeed, electrode recordings of pH in the brain and trunk demonstrated a net efflux of acid equivalents from the brain across the blood-brain barrier, which was abolished by the Na/H exchange inhibitor, N-methyl-isobutyl amiloride. Pharmacological inhibition of Na/H exchange also suppressed the seizure activity associated with the brain-specific alkalosis. Our findings show that the post-asphyxia seizures are attributable to an enhanced Na/H exchange-dependent net extrusion of acid equivalents across the blood-brain barrier and to consequent brain alkalosis. These results suggest targeting of blood-brain barrier-mediated pH regulation as a novel approach in the prevention and therapy of neonatal seizures.

  9. Retention of indocyanine green as a potential marker for optical detection of blood brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, A.; Joshi, S.; Wang, M.; Bigio, I. J.

    2011-03-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that there is great variability in the degree of disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBBD) after the intraarterial injection of mannitol in rabbit models. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) is affected by a number of factors, and the variations could have a profound impact on regional delivery of chemotherapeutics. Optically measured brain tissue concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG) and Evan's blue (EB) enable the quantification of BBBD after intraarterial administration of mannitol. Using the optical pharmacokinetics technique, a variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, we are able to track in vivo brain tissue concentrations of ICG and EB in rabbits, before and after barrier disruption. This study shows the feasibility of optical monitoring of BBBD, a method that can help improve intraarterial delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  10. Derivation of blood-brain barrier endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Ethan S; Azarin, Samira M; Kay, Jennifer E; Nessler, Randy A; Wilson, Hannah K; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2012-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is crucial to the health of the brain and is often compromised in neurological disease. Moreover, because of its barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts uptake of neurotherapeutics. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could spur brain research and pharmaceutical development. Here we show that endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) acquire BBB properties when co-differentiated with neural cells that provide relevant cues, including those involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The resulting endothelial cells have many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, appropriate expression of nutrient transporters and polarized efflux transporter activity. Notably, they respond to astrocytes, acquiring substantial barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1,450 ± 140 Ω cm2), and they possess molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo rodent blood-brain transfer coefficients.

  11. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle J; Frederiksen, Jette L; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2015-09-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood-brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood-brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2 years after optic neuritis onset. Logistic regression analysis showed that baseline permeability in normal-appearing white matter significantly improved prediction of multiple sclerosis conversion (according to the 2010 revised McDonald diagnostic criteria) within 2 years compared to T2 lesion count alone. There was no correlation between permeability and T2 lesion count. An increase in permeability in normal-appearing white matter of 0.1 ml/100 g/min increased the risk of multiple sclerosis 8.5 times whereas having more than nine T2 lesions increased the risk 52.6 times. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of permeability in normal-appearing white matter gave a cut-off of 0.13 ml/100 g/min, which predicted conversion to multiple sclerosis with a sensitivity of

  12. Brain Distribution of Cediranib Is Limited by Active Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianli; Agarwal, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Cediranib is an orally active tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor family. Because of its potent antiangiogenic and antitumor activities, cediranib has been evaluated for therapy in glioma, a primary brain tumor. This study investigated the influence of two important efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), on the delivery of cediranib to the central nervous system. In vitro studies indicated that cediranib is a dual substrate for both P-gp and Bcrp. It is noteworthy that in spite of the in vitro data the in vivo mouse disposition studies conclusively showed that P-gp was the dominant transporter restricting the brain distribution of cediranib. The brain-to-plasma partitioning (AUCbrain/AUCplasma, where AUC is area under the curve) and the steady-state brain-to-plasma concentration ratio of cediranib were approximately 20-fold higher in Mdr1a/b(−/−) and Mdr1a/b(−/−)Bcrp1(−/−) mice compared with wild-type and Bcrp1(−/−) mice. Moreover, there was no significant difference in brain distribution of cediranib between wild-type and Bcrp1(−/−) mice and between Mdr1a/b(−/−) and Mdr1a/b(−/−)Bcrp1(−/−) mice. These results show that, unlike other tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are dual substrates for P-gp and Bcrp, Bcrp does not restrict the distribution of cediranib across the blood-brain barrier. We also show that inhibition of P-gp using specific or nonspecific inhibitors resulted in significantly enhanced delivery of cediranib to the brain. Concurrent administration of cediranib with chemical modulators of efflux transporters can be used as a strategy to enhance delivery and thus efficacy of cediranib in the brain. These findings are clinically relevant to the efficacy of cediranib chemotherapy in glioma. PMID:22323823

  13. Nanowired Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier in Central Nervous System Injury and Repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Menon, Preeti; Muresanu, Dafin F; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tian, Z Ryan; Lafuente, José V; Sharma, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological regulator of transport of essential items from blood to brain for the maintenance of homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) within narrow limits. The BBB is also responsible for export of harmful or metabolic products from brain to blood to keep the CNS fluid microenvironment healthy. However, noxious insults to the brain caused by trauma, ischemia or environmental/chemical toxins alter the BBB function to small as well as large molecules e.g., proteins. When proteins enter the CNS fluid microenvironment, development of brain edema occurs due to altered osmotic balance between blood and brain. On the other hand, almost all neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic insults to the CNS and subsequent BBB dysfunction lead to edema formation and cell injury. To treat these brain disorders suitable drug therapy reaching their brain targets is needed. However, due to edema formation or only a focal disruption of the BBB e.g., around brain tumors, many drugs are unable to reach their CNS targets in sufficient quantity. This results in poor therapeutic outcome. Thus, new technology such as nanodelivery is needed for drugs to reach their CNS targets and be effective. In this review, use of nanowires as a possible novel tool to enhance drug delivery into the CNS in various disease models is discussed based on our investigations. These data show that nanowired delivery of drugs may have superior neuroprotective ability to treat several CNS diseases effectively indicating their role in future therapeutic strategies.

  14. Effects of fumaric acid esters on blood-brain barrier tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Bénardais, Karelle; Pul, Refik; Singh, Vikramjeet; Skripuletz, Thomas; Lee, De-Hyung; Linker, Ralf A; Gudi, Viktoria; Stangel, Martin

    2013-10-25

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of a network of tight junctions (TJ) which interconnect cerebral endothelial cells (EC). Alterations in the TJ proteins are common in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) like multiple sclerosis (MS). Modulation of the BBB could thus represent a therapeutic mechanism. One pathway to modulate BBB integrity could be the induction of nuclear-factor (erythroid derived 2) related factor-2 (Nrf2) mediated oxidative stress responses which are targeted by fumaric acid esters (FAE). Here we analyze effects of FAE on the expression of TJ proteins in the human cerebral endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that dimethylfumarate (DMF) and its primary metabolite monomethylfumarate (MMF) induce the expression of the Nrf2/NQO1 pathway in endothelial cells. Neither MMF nor DMF had a consistent modulatory effect on the expression of TJ molecules in hCMEC/D3 cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-induced downregulation of TJ proteins was at least partially reversed by treatment with FAE. However, DMF had no effect on claudin-5 expression in EAE, despite its effect on the clinical score and infiltration of immune cells. These data suggest that the modulation of the BBB is not a major mechanism of action of FAE in inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS.

  15. Systemic Delivery of Blood-Brain Barrier Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Enhances Delivery to Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J.; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer nanoparticle systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All nanoparticle preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One nanoparticle produced significantly higher brain uptake (~0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad nanoparticles provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing nanoparticle transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects. PMID:26453169

  16. Drug and gene delivery across the blood-brain barrier with focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Timbie, Kelsie F; Mead, Brian P; Price, Richard J

    2015-12-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains one of the most significant limitations to treatments of central nervous system (CNS) disorders including brain tumors, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. It is now well-established that focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with contrast agent microbubbles may be used to non-invasively and temporarily disrupt the BBB, allowing localized delivery of systemically administered therapeutic agents as large as 100nm in size to the CNS. Importantly, recent technological advances now permit FUS application through the intact human skull, obviating the need for invasive and risky surgical procedures. When used in combination with magnetic resonance imaging, FUS may be applied precisely to pre-selected CNS targets. Indeed, FUS devices capable of sub-millimeter precision are currently in several clinical trials. FUS mediated BBB disruption has the potential to fundamentally change how CNS diseases are treated, unlocking potential for combinatorial treatments with nanotechnology, markedly increasing the efficacy of existing therapeutics that otherwise do not cross the BBB effectively, and permitting safe repeated treatments. This article comprehensively reviews recent studies on the targeted delivery of therapeutics into the CNS with FUS and offers perspectives on the future of this technology.

  17. Efficient Enhancement of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT)

    PubMed Central

    Åslund, Andreas K.O.; Snipstad, Sofie; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Torp, Sverre H.; Sontum, Per C.; Davies, Catharina de Lange; van Wamel, Annemieke

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle in drug delivery for diseases of the brain, and today there is no standardized route to surpass it. One technique to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB, is focused ultrasound in combination with gas-filled microbubbles. However, the microbubbles used are typically developed for ultrasound imaging, not BBB disruption. Here we describe efficient opening of the BBB using the promising novel Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT), that recently has been used in combination with Abraxane® to successfully treat subcutaneous tumors of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. ACT is based on the conjugation of microbubbles to liquid oil microdroplets through electrostatic interactions. Upon activation in an ultrasound field, the microdroplet phase transfers to form a larger bubble that transiently lodges in the microvasculature. Further insonation induces volume oscillations of the activated bubble, which in turn induce biomechanical effects that increase the permeability of the BBB. ACT was able to safely and temporarily permeabilize the BBB, using an acoustic power 5-10 times lower than applied for conventional microbubbles, and successfully deliver small and large molecules into the brain. PMID:28042313

  18. Characterization and Optimization of Trans-Blood-Brain Barrier Diffusion In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Choi, James; Baseri, Babak; Lee, Ann

    2009-04-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the lack of a truly noninvasive, transient, and regionally selective brain drug delivery method. The brain is particularly difficult to deliver drugs to because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over the past few years, we have been developing methods that combine Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles in order to noninvasively, locally and transiently open the BBB so as to treat neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we will focus on the characterization of the type of molecular delivery that can be induced through the opened BBB. More specifically, we will characterize important properties of the BBB opening such as its reversibility and permeability using fluorescence and MR imaging techniques, respectively. Results on both wildtype and Alzheimer's model mice showed that the timeline of BBB opening is very similar between the presence and absence of amyloid plaques. The permeability change induced by BBB opening was found to increase by up to a 10-fold and to similar levels with those found in literature for glioma tumors.

  19. Targeting therapeutics across the blood brain barrier (BBB), prerequisite towards thrombolytic therapy for cerebrovascular disorders-an overview and advancements.

    PubMed

    Pulicherla, K K; Verma, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral tissues possess highly selective and dynamic protection known as blood brain barrier (BBB) that regulates brain homeostasis and provides protection against invading pathogens and various chemicals including drug molecules. Such natural protection strictly monitors entry of drug molecules often required for the management of several diseases and disorders including cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. However, in recent times, the ischemic cerebrovascular disease and clinical manifestation of acute arterial thrombosis are the most common causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The management of cerebral Ischemia requires immediate infusion of external thrombolytic into systemic circulation and must cross the blood brain barrier. The major challenge with available thrombolytic is their poor affinity towards the blood brain barrier and cerebral tissue subsequently. In the clinical practice, a high dose of thrombolytic often prescribed to deliver drugs across the blood brain barrier which results in drug dependent toxicity leading to damage of neuronal tissues. In recent times, more emphasis was given to utilize blood brain barrier transport mechanism to deliver drugs in neuronal tissue. The blood brain barrier expresses a series of receptor on membrane became an ideal target for selective drug delivery. In this review, the author has given more emphasis molecular biology of receptor on blood brain barrier and their potential as a carrier for drug molecules to cerebral tissues. Further, the use of nanoscale design and real-time monitoring for developed therapeutic to encounter drug dependent toxicity has been reviewed in this study.

  20. Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Helen M; Daniels, Brian P; Pinto, Amelia K; Huang, Albert C; Vick, Sarah C; Doyle, Sean E; Gale, Michael; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-04-22

    Although interferon-λ [also known as type III interferon or interleukin-28 (IL-28)/IL-29] restricts infection by several viruses, its inhibitory mechanism has remained uncertain. We used recombinant interferon-λ and mice lacking the interferon-λ receptor (IFNLR1) to evaluate the effect of interferon-λ on infection with West Nile virus, an encephalitic flavivirus. Cell culture studies in mouse keratinocytes and dendritic cells showed no direct antiviral effect of exogenous interferon-λ, even though expression of interferon-stimulated genes was induced. We observed no differences in West Nile virus burden between wild-type and Ifnlr1(-/-) mice in the draining lymph nodes, spleen, or blood. We detected increased West Nile virus infection in the brain and spinal cord of Ifnlr1(-/-) mice, yet this was not associated with a direct antiviral effect in mouse neurons. Instead, we observed an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in Ifnlr1(-/-) mice. Treatment of mice with pegylated interferon-λ2 resulted in decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, reduced West Nile virus infection in the brain without affecting viremia, and improved survival against lethal virus challenge. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier showed that interferon-λ signaling in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells increased transendothelial electrical resistance, decreased virus movement across the barrier, and modulated tight junction protein localization in a protein synthesis- and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-independent manner. Our data establish an indirect antiviral function of interferon-λ in which noncanonical signaling through IFNLR1 tightens the blood-brain barrier and restricts viral neuroinvasion and pathogenesis.

  1. Neocortical Transplants in the Mammalian Brain Lack a Blood-Brain Barrier to Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Jeffrey M.

    1987-02-01

    In order to determine whether the blood-brain barrier was present in transplants of central nervous tissue, fetal neocortex, which already possesses blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers to protein, was grafted into the undamaged fourth ventricle or directly into the neocortex of recipient rats. Horseradish peroxidase or a conjugated human immunoglobulin G-peroxidase molecule was systemically administered into the host. These proteins were detected within the cortical transplants within 2 minutes regardless of the age of the donor or postoperative time. At later times these compounds, which normally do not cross the blood-brain barrier, inundated the grafts and adjacent host brain and also entered the cerebrospinal fluid. Endogenous serum albumin detected immunocytochemically in untreated hosts had a comparable although less extensive distribution. Thus, transplants of fetal central nervous tissue have permanent barrier dysfunction, probably due to microvascular changes, and are not integrated physiologically within the host. Blood-borne compounds, either systemically administered or naturally occurring, which should never contact normal brain tissue, have direct access to these transplants and might affect neuronal function.

  2. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  3. Selective disruption of the blood-brain barrier by photochemical internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Zhang, Michelle J.; Gach, Michael H.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Madsen, Steen J.

    2009-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to selectively disrupt the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer drugs to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: PCI treatment, coupling a macromolecule therapy of Clostridium perfringens (Cl p) epsilon prototoxin with AlPcS2a-PDT, was performed on non-tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats. T1-weighted post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to evaluate the extent of BBB disruption which can be inferred from the volume contrast enhancement. Results: The synergistic effect of PCI to disrupt the BBB was observed at a fluence level of 1 J with an intraperitoneal injection of Cl p prototoxin. At the fluence level of 2.5J, the extent of BBB opening induced by PCI was similar to the result of PDT suggesting no synergistic effect evoked under these conditions. Conclusion: PCI was found to be highly effective and efficient for inducing selective and localized disruption of the BBB. The extent of BBB opening peaked on day 3 and the BBB was completed restored by day 18 post treatment.

  4. Disruption of the blood brain barrier following ALA mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Peng, Qian; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Zhang, Michelle J.; Madsen, Steen J.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Failure of treatment for high grade gliomas is usually due to local recurrence at the site of surgical resection indicating that a more aggressive form of local therapy, such as PDT, could be of benefit. PDT causes damage to tumor cells as well as degradation of the blood brain barrier (BBB). We have evaluated the ability of ALA mediated PDT to open the BBB in rats. This will permit access of chemotherapeutic agents to brain tumor cells remaining in the resection cavity wall, but limit their penetration into normal brain remote from the site of illumination. Materials and Methods: ALA-PDT was performed on non tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats at increasing fluence levels. T2 weighted MRI scans were used to evaluate edema formation and post-contrast T I MRI scans were used to monitor the degree BBB disruption which could be inferred from the intensity and volume of the contrast agent visualized. Results. PDT at increasing fluence levels between 9J and 26J demonstrated an increasing contrast flow rate. No effect on the BBB was observed if 26J of light were given in the absence of ALA. A similar increased contrast volume was observed with increasing fluence rates. The BBB was found to be disrupted 2hrs. following PDT and 80-100% restored 72hrs later. Conclusion: PDT was highly effective in opening the BBB in a limited region of the brain. The degradation of the BBB was temporary in nature, opening rapidly following treatment and significantly restored during the next 72 hrs.

  5. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Antiretroviral Treatment with Efavirenz Disrupts the Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Increases Stroke Severity

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Luc; Dygert, Levi; Toborek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral drugs (ARVd) changed the prognosis of HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic disease. However, even with undetectable viral loads, patients still develop a wide range of pathologies, including cerebrovascular complications and stroke. It is hypothesized that toxic side effects of ARVd may contribute to these effects. To address this notion, we evaluated the impact of several non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI; Efavirenz, Etravirine, Rilpivirine and Nevirapine) on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and their impact on severity of stroke. Among studied drugs, Efavirenz, but not other NNRTIs, altered claudin-5 expression, increased endothelial permeability, and disrupted the blood-brain barrier integrity. Importantly, Efavirenz exposure increased the severity of stroke in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. Taken together, these results indicate that selected ARVd can exacerbate HIV-associated cerebrovascular pathology. Therefore, careful consideration should be taken when choosing an anti-retroviral therapy regimen. PMID:28008980

  7. Morphologic Effect of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadwell, Richard D.; Salcman, Michael; Kaplan, Richard S.

    1982-07-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) opens the blood-brain barrier of mice to the enzymatic tracer horseradish peroxidase. A single injection of horseradish peroxidase in 10 to 15 percent DMSO into the tail vein along with 10 to 15 percent DMSO delivered intraperitoneally allowed horseradish peroxidase to fill the extracellular clefts throughout the brain within 2 hours. In the absence of DMSO, peroxidase failed to enter brain parenchyma except through the circumventricular organs. Opening of the blood-brain barrier by DMSO is reversible. Dimethyl sulfoxide stimulated the pinocytosis of horseradish peroxidase by the cerebral endothelium; the peroxidase was then directed to lysosomal dense bodies for degradation. Vesicular transport of horseradish peroxidase from the luminal to the abluminal wall of the endothelial cell was not observed. Dimethyl sulfoxide did not alter the morphology of endothelial cells or brain parenchyma.

  8. Influence of antioxidants on blood-brain barrier permeability during adrenaline-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, B; Erkin, E; Dural, E; Isbir, T

    2000-11-01

    We have examined the effect of antioxidants (vitamin E, and selenium) on the blood-brain barrier permeability during adreneline-induced acute hypertension in the female rats. The rats supplemented with nontoxic doses of sodium selenite in drinking water for three months or vitamin E was given intraperitoneally before adrenaline-induced acute hypertension. Evans-blue was used as a blood-brain barrier tracer. Mean values for Evans-blue dye were found to be 0.28 +/- 0.04 microg/g tissue in control animals and 1.0 +/- 0.2 microg tissue after adrenaline-induced acute hypertension (p < .01). Rats pretreated with selenium or vitamin E also showed macroscopic leakage of Evans-blue albumin after adrenaline injection i.e., there was no significant difference in protein extravasation between untreated and treated animals (p > .5). The mean value for Evans-blue dye was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.2 microg/g tissue in acute hypertension group, 0.9 +/- 0.2 microg/g tissue in selenium pretreated animals and 1.0 +/- 0.2 micrg/g tissue vitamin E injected animals after acute hypertension. The results show that antioxidants did not influence the blood-brain barrier breakdown during adrenaline-induced acute hypertension.

  9. Hypomyelination, memory impairment, and blood-brain barrier permeability in a model of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lenise Jihe; Martinez, Denis; Fiori, Cintia Zappe; Baronio, Diego; Kretzmann, Nélson Alexandre; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser

    2015-02-09

    We investigated the effect of intermittent hypoxia, mimicking sleep apnea, on axonal integrity, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cognitive function of mice. Forty-seven C57BL mice were exposed to intermittent or sham hypoxia, alternating 30s of progressive hypoxia and 30s of reoxigenation, during 8h/day. The axonal integrity in cerebellum was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Short- and long-term memories were assessed by novel object recognition test. The levels of endothelin-1 were measured by ELISA. Blood-brain barrier permeability was quantified by Evans Blue dye. After 14 days, animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia showed hypomyelination in cerebellum white matter and higher serum levels of endothelin-1. The short and long-term memories in novel object recognition test was impaired in the group exposed to intermittent hypoxia as compared to controls. Blood-brain barrier permeability was similar between the groups. These results indicated that hypomyelination and impairment of short- and long-term working memories occurred in C57BL mice after 14 days of intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea.

  10. Vitamin C crosses the blood-brain barrier in the oxidized form through the glucose transporters.

    PubMed Central

    Agus, D B; Gambhir, S S; Pardridge, W M; Spielholz, C; Baselga, J; Vera, J C; Golde, D W

    1997-01-01

    Vitamin C concentrations in the brain exceed those in blood by 10-fold. In both tissues, the vitamin is present primarily in the reduced form, ascorbic acid. We identified the chemical form of vitamin C that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and the mechanism of this process. Ascorbic acid was not able to cross the blood-brain barrier in our studies. In contrast, the oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbic acid (oxidized ascorbic acid), readily entered the brain and was retained in the brain tissue in the form of ascorbic acid. Transport of dehydroascorbic acid into the brain was inhibited by d-glucose, but not by l-glucose. The facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT1, is expressed on endothelial cells at the blood-brain barrier, and is responsible for glucose entry into the brain. This study provides evidence showing that GLUT1 also transports dehydroascorbic acid into the brain. The findings define the transport of dehydroascorbic acid by GLUT1 as a mechanism by which the brain acquires vitamin C, and point to the oxidation of ascorbic acid as a potentially important regulatory step in accumulation of the vitamin by the brain. These results have implications for increasing antioxidant potential in the central nervous system. PMID:9389750

  11. Blood--brain barrier sodium/potassium pump: modulation by central noradrenergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Harik, S I

    1986-06-01

    The active transport of Na+ and K+ across the blood--brain barrier by the membrane-bound enzyme Na+/K+-activated ATPase of brain microvessel endothelial cells has a major role in the maintenance of brain water and electrolyte homeostasis. To test whether the putative noradrenergic innervation of cerebral microvessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus contributes to the regulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity of the blood--brain barrier, specific [3H]ouabain-binding studies were performed on cerebral microvessels and crude cortical membranes obtained from Wistar rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus. Such lesion depleted norepinephrine by about 90% in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex without affecting the contralateral cortex. [3H]Ouabain binding to membranes of cerebral cortex and the cerebral microvessels was specific and saturable. The maximal ouabain-binding capacity in microvessels of the ipsilateral, norepinephrine-depleted, cerebral cortex was reduced by about 40%, without change in the affinity of binding. [3H]Ouabain binding to crude membrane fractions of the cerebral cortex was not significantly affected by locus ceruleus lesion. The results suggest that Na+/K+-ATPase activity of cerebral microvessels, and the consequent transport of Na+ and K+ across the blood--brain barrier, is modulated by noradrenergic innervation from the locus ceruleus.

  12. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  13. Preparation of Trojan horse liposomes (THLs) for gene transfer across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2010-04-01

    Nonviral plasmid DNA is delivered to the brain via a transvascular route across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intravenous administration of DNA encapsulated within Trojan horse liposomes (THLs), also called PEGylated immunoliposomes (PILs). The liposome surface is covered with several thousand strands of polymer (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), and the tips of 1%-2% of the polymer strands are conjugated with a targeting monoclonal antibody that acts as a molecular Trojan horse (MTH). The MTH binds to a receptor (e.g., for transferrin or insulin) on the BBB and brain cell membrane, triggering receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL across the BBB in vivo, and receptor-mediated endocytosis into brain cells beyond the BBB. The persistence of transgene expression in the brain is inversely related to the rate of degradation of the episomal plasmid DNA. THL technology enables an exogenous gene to be widely expressed in the majority of cells in adult brain (or other organs) within 1 d of a single intravenous administration. Applications of the THLs include tissue-specific gene expression with tissue-specific promoters, complete normalization of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase in experimental Parkinson's disease following intravenous tyrosine hydroxylase gene therapy, a 100% increase in survival time of mice with brain tumors following weekly intravenous antisense gene therapy using THLs, and a 90% increase in survival time with weekly intravenous RNA interference (RNAi) gene therapy in mice with intracranial brain tumors. This protocol describes the preparation of THLs for use in gene transfer in vitro or in vivo.

  14. Blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Blood-borne substances can invade into the extracellular spaces of the brain via endothelial cells in sites without the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and can travel through the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain parenchyma adjacent to non-BBB sites. It has been shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains directly into the blood via the arachnoid villi and also into lymph nodes via the subarachnoid spaces of the brain, while ISF drains into the cervical lymph nodes through perivascular drainage pathways. In addition, the glymphatic pathway of fluids, characterized by para-arterial pathways, aquaporin4-dependent passage through astroglial cytoplasm, interstitial spaces, and paravenous routes, has been established. Meningeal lymphatic vessels along the superior sagittal sinus were very recently discovered. It is known that, in mice, blood-borne substances can be transferred to areas with intact BBB function, such as the medial regions of the hippocampus, presumably through leaky vessels in non-BBB sites. In the present paper, we review the clearance mechanisms of interstitial substances, such as amyloid-β peptides, as well as summarize models of BBB deterioration in response to different types of insults, including acute ischemia followed by reperfusion, hypertension, and chronic hypoperfusion. Lastly, we discuss the relationship between perivascular clearance and brain disorders.

  15. Permeability of ergot alkaloids across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and influence on the barrier integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mulac, Dennis; Hüwel, Sabine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Scope Ergot alkaloids are secondary metabolites of Claviceps spp. and they have been in the focus of research for many years. Experiments focusing on ergotamine as a former migraine drug referring to the ability to reach the brain revealed controversial results. The question to which extent ergot alkaloids are able to cross the blood-brain barrier is still not answered. Methods and results In order to answer this question we have studied the ability of ergot alkaloids to penetrate the blood-brain barrier in a well established in vitro model system using primary porcine brain endothelial cells. It could clearly be demonstrated that ergot alkaloids are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in high quantities in only a few hours. We could further identify an active transport for ergometrine as a substrate for the BCRP/ABCG2 transporter. Investigations concerning barrier integrity properties have identified ergocristinine as a potent substance to accumulate in these cells ultimately leading to a weakened barrier function. Conclusion For the first time we could show that the so far as biologically inactive described 8-(S) isomers of ergot alkaloids seem to have an influence on barrier integrity underlining the necessity for a risk assessment of ergot alkaloids in food and feed. PMID:22147614

  16. Effect of some drugs on ethanol-induced changes in blood brain barrier permeability for /sup 14/C-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Borisenko, S.A.; Burov, Yu.V.

    1987-06-01

    This investigation seeks to compare the effects of membrane stabilizers chlorpromazine and alpha-tocopherol, and also the dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol, in changes in permeability of the blood-brain barrier for carbon 14-labelled tyrosine.

  17. Influence of 50 Hz frequency sinusoidal magnetic field on the blood-brain barrier permeability of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, Baria; Kalkan, Tunaya; Tuncel, Handan

    2004-07-01

    The combined effects of diabetes and a 50 Hz, 5 mT RMS flux density sinusoidal magnetic field for 8 h a day, for 21 consecutive days on the permeation of Evans-blue dye through the blood-brain barrier were studied in male Wistar albino rats. Our results suggest that magnetic field has no effect on the blood-brain barrier permeability in normoglycemic animals, but that diabetic rats are vulnerable to magnetic fields.

  18. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  19. Blood-brain barrier transport of non-viral gene and RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J

    2007-09-01

    The development of gene- and RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics represents a challenge for the drug delivery field. The global brain distribution of DNA genes, as well as the targeting of specific regions of the brain, is even more complicated because conventional delivery systems, i.e. viruses, have poor diffusion in brain when injected in situ and do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is only permeable to lipophilic molecules of less than 400 Da. Recent advances in the "Trojan Horse Liposome" (THL) technology applied to the transvascular non-viral gene therapy of brain disorders presents a promising solution to the DNA/RNAi delivery obstacle. The THL is comprised of immunoliposomes carrying either a gene for protein replacement or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmids for RNAi effect, respectively. The THL is engineered with known lipids containing polyethyleneglycol (PEG), which stabilizes its structure in vivo in circulation. The tissue target specificity of THL is given by conjugation of approximately 1% of the PEG residues to peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) that bind to specific endogenous receptors (i.e. insulin and transferrin receptors) located on both the BBB and the brain cellular membranes, respectively. These MAbs mediate (a) receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL complex through the BBB, (b) endocytosis into brain cells and (c) transport to the brain cell nuclear compartment. The present review presents an overview of the THL technology and its current application to gene therapy and RNAi, including experimental models of Parkinson's disease and brain tumors.

  20. Potential use of polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Tosi, G; Bortot, B; Ruozi, B; Dolcetta, D; Vandelli, M A; Forni, F; Severini, G M

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine is certainly one of the scientific and technological challenges of the coming years. In particular, biodegradable nanoparticles formulated from poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been extensively investigated for sustained and targeted delivery of different agents, including recombinant proteins, plasmid DNA, and low molecular weight compounds. PLGA NPs present some very attractive properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, protection of drug from degradation, possibility of sustained release, and the possibility to modify surface properties to target nanoparticles to specific organs or cells. Moreover, PLGA NPs have received the FDA and European Medicine Agency approval in drug delivery systems for parenteral administration, thus reducing the time for human clinical applications. This review in particular deals on surface modification of PLGA NPs and their possibility of clinical applications, including treatment for brain pathologies such as brain tumors and Lysosomal Storage Disorders with neurological involvement. Since a great number of pharmacologically active molecules are not able to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) and reach the Central Nervous System (CNS), new brain targeted polymeric PLGA NPs modified with glycopeptides (g7- NPs) have been recently produced. In this review several in vivo biodistribution studies and pharmacological proof-of evidence of brain delivery of model drugs are reported, demonstrating the ability of g7-NPs to create BBB interaction and trigger an efficacious BBB crossing. Moreover, another relevant development of NPs surface engineering was achieved by conjugating to the surface of g7-NPs, some specific and selective antibodies to drive NPs directly to a specific cell type once inside the CNS parenchyma.

  1. Tesmilifene modifies brain endothelial functions and opens the blood-brain/blood-glioma barrier.

    PubMed

    Walter, Fruzsina R; Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Péterfi, Zoltán A; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Cervenak, László; Ábrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2015-09-01

    Tesmilifene, a tamoxifen analog with antihistamine action, has chemopotentiating properties in experimental and clinical cancer studies. In our previous works, tesmilifene increased the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in animal and culture models. Our aim was to investigate the effects of tesmilifene on brain microvessel permeability in the rat RG2 glioma model and to reveal its mode of action in brain endothelial cells. Tesmilifene significantly increased fluorescein extravasation in the glioma. Short-term treatment with tesmilifene reduced the resistance and increased the permeability for marker molecules in a rat triple co-culture BBB model. Tesmilifene also affected the barrier integrity in brain endothelial cells co-cultured with RG2 glioblastoma cells. Tesmilifene inhibited the activity of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 efflux pumps and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, efflux pumps, solute carriers, and metabolic enzymes important for BBB functions. Among the possible signaling pathways that regulate BBB permeability, tesmilifene activated the early nuclear translocation of NFκB. The MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt kinase pathways were also involved. We demonstrate for the first time that tesmilifene increases permeability marker molecule extravasation in glioma and inhibits efflux pump activity in brain endothelial cells, which may have therapeutic relevance. Tesmilifene, a chemopotentiator in experimental and clinical cancer studies increases vascular permeability in RG2 glioma in rats and permeability for marker molecules in a culture model of the blood-brain barrier. Tesmilifene inhibits the activity of efflux pumps and down-regulates the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, transporters, and metabolic enzymes important for the blood-brain barrier functions, which may have therapeutic relevance.

  2. Photodynamic-therapy-induced alterations of the blood-brain barrier transfer constant of a tracer molecule in normal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Ivan; Lilge, Lothar D.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Stevens, Laura; Cenic, Aleksa

    1997-05-01

    Photofrin uptake studies in brain tissues using bulk sampling techniques have demonstrated up to a 10-fold higher concentration in intracranial tumors compared to normal brain structures. This selective uptake is in part attributed to the leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) in brain tumors while intact BBB in normal brain excludes Photofrin from the extravascular space. However, in vivo preclinical studies have shown a very high sensitivity in normal brain to photodynamic therapy (PDT) despite this selective uptake. In vivo computed tomography (CT) measurement of the blood- brain transfer constant (K) and cerebral plasma volume using an x-ray dye as a tracer was used to monitor the degradation process of the BBB in normal brain during and post PDT. In these experiments, it was observed that K increased as early as 15 minutes after the onset of PDT, peaking at approximately 3 hr post PDT treatment followed by a drop close to baseline values for 3 out of 4 animals. On the other hand, the cerebral plasma volume showed a decrease also as early as 15 min post PDT onset, but its decrease continued up to 6 hrs with no apparent vascular stasis at the end of the time period. The results suggested a continuous process of BBB breakdown and vascular shutdown shortly after start of PDT.

  3. Junctional proteins of the blood-brain barrier: New insights into function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stamatovic, Svetlana M; Johnson, Allison M; Keep, Richard F; Andjelkovic, Anuska V

    2016-01-01

    abstract The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a highly complex and dynamic barrier. It is formed by an interdependent network of brain capillary endothelial cells, endowed with barrier properties, and perivascular cells (astrocytes and pericytes) responsible for inducing and maintaining those properties. One of the primary properties of the BBB is a strict regulation of paracellular permeability due to the presence of junctional complexes (tight, adherens and gap junctions) between the endothelial cells. Alterations in junction assembly and function significantly affect BBB properties, particularly barrier permeability. However, such alterations are also involved in remodeling the brain endothelial cell surface and regulating brain endothelial cell phenotype. This review summarizes the characteristics of brain endothelial tight, adherens and gap junctions and highlights structural and functional alterations in junctional proteins that may contribute to BBB dysfunction. PMID:27141427

  4. Neutralizing anti-interleukin-1β antibodies modulate fetal blood-brain barrier function after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodi; Sadowska, Grazyna B; Zhang, Jiyong; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Cummings, Erin E; Bodge, Courtney A; Lim, Yow-Pin; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G; Gaitanis, John; Threlkeld, Steven W; Banks, William A; Stonestreet, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that increases in blood-brain barrier permeability represent an important component of ischemia-reperfusion related brain injury in the fetus. Pro-inflammatory cytokines could contribute to these abnormalities in blood-brain barrier function. We have generated pharmacological quantities of mouse anti-ovine interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody and shown that this antibody has very high sensitivity and specificity for interleukin-1β protein. This antibody also neutralizes the effects of interleukin-1β protein in vitro. In the current study, we hypothesized that the neutralizing anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody attenuates ischemia-reperfusion related fetal blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Instrumented ovine fetuses at 127 days of gestation were studied after 30 min of carotid occlusion and 24h of reperfusion. Groups were sham operated placebo-control- (n=5), ischemia-placebo- (n=6), ischemia-anti-IL-1β antibody- (n=7), and sham-control antibody- (n=2) treated animals. Systemic infusions of placebo (0.154M NaCl) or anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody (5.1±0.6 mg/kg) were given intravenously to the same sham or ischemic group of fetuses at 15 min and 4h after ischemia. Concentrations of interleukin-1β protein and anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody were measured by ELISA in fetal plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and parietal cerebral cortex. Blood-brain barrier permeability was quantified using the blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) with α-aminoisobutyric acid in multiple brain regions. Interleukin-1β protein was also measured in parietal cerebral cortices and tight junction proteins in multiple brain regions by Western immunoblot. Cerebral cortical interleukin-1β protein increased (P<0.001) after ischemia-reperfusion. After anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody infusions, plasma anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody was elevated (P<0.001), brain anti-interleukin-1β monoclonal antibody levels were higher (P<0

  5. Transfer of opiorphin through a blood-brain barrier culture model.

    PubMed

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Géza; Deli, Mária A; Wollemann, Mária

    2015-08-01

    Opioid peptides are potent analgesics with therapeutic potential in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. Their efficacy is limited by peptidases (enkephalinases). Opiorphin pentapeptide (QRFSR) is the first characterized human endogenous inhibitor of enkephalinases. The peptide is able to increase the binding and affinity of endogenous opiates to mu opioid receptors; thus, the mechanism of opiorphin may provide a new therapeutic approach in pain management. The analgesic effect of opiorphin was proven in several earlier published in vitro and in vivo studies. Our aim was to test the transfer of opiorphin through a blood-brain barrier model for the first time. The flux of opiorphin was tested on a blood-brain barrier culture model consisting of rat brain endothelial, glial and pericyte cells. Brain endothelial cells in this triple co-culture model form tight monolayers characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance measurement. Relative quantity of the peptide was estimated by mass spectrometry. The transfer of opiorphin through the blood-brain barrier model was estimated to be ∼3%, whereas the permeability coefficient was 0.53 ± 1.36 × 10(-6) cm/s (n = 4). We also observed rapid conversion of N-terminal glutamine into pyroglutamic acid during the transfer experiments. Our results indicate that opiorphin crosses cultured brain endothelial cells in the absence of serum factors in a significant amount. This is in agreement with previous in vivo data showing potentiation of enkephalin-mediated antinociception. We suggest that opiorphin may have a potential as a centrally acting novel drug to treat pain.

  6. Memantine ameliorates autistic behavior, biochemistry & blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, commonly characterized by altered social behavior, communication, biochemistry and pathological conditions. One percent of the worldwide population suffers from autism and males suffer more than females. NMDA receptors have the important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This study has been designed to investigate the role of memantine, a NMDA receptor modulator, in prenatal valproic acid-induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have shown the reduction in social interaction (three-chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alternation (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid-treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood-brain barrier permeability. Treatment with memantine has significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid-induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, memantine has also attenuated the prenatal valproic acid-induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood-brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behavior, biochemistry and blood-brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by memantine. NMDA receptor modulators like memantine should be explored further for the therapeutic

  7. Restraint Stress-Induced Morphological Changes at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sántha, Petra; Veszelka, Szilvia; Hoyk, Zsófia; Mészáros, Mária; Walter, Fruzsina R.; Tóth, Andrea E.; Kiss, Lóránd; Kincses, András; Oláh, Zita; Seprényi, György; Rákhely, Gábor; Dér, András; Pákáski, Magdolna; Kálmán, János; Kittel, Ágnes; Deli, Mária A.

    2016-01-01

    Stress is well-known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognized in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3, and 21 days) were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occluding, and glucose transporter-1) and astroglia (GFAP). Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, 1-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes, cognitive and

  8. Chronic systemic IL-1β exacerbates central neuroinflammation independently of the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Murta, Verónica; Farías, María Isabel; Pitossi, Fernando Juan; Ferrari, Carina Cintia

    2015-01-15

    Peripheral circulating cytokines are involved in immune to brain communication and systemic inflammation is considered a risk factor for flaring up the symptoms in most neurodegenerative diseases. We induced both central inflammatory demyelinating lesion, and systemic inflammation with an interleukin-1β expressing adenovector. The peripheral pro-inflammatory stimulus aggravated the ongoing central lesion independently of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This model allows studying the role of specific molecules and cells (neutrophils) from the innate immune system, in the relationship between central and peripheral communication, and on relapsing episodes of demyelinating lesions, along with the role of BBB integrity.

  9. Mechanisms of restriction of viral neuroinvasion at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists of highly specialized cells including brain microvascular endothelial cells, astrocytes, microglia, pericytes, and neurons, which act in concert to restrict the entry of pathogens, immune cells, and soluble molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). If pathogens manage to cross the BBB and establish infection within the CNS, the BBB can open in a regulated manner to allow leukocyte transmigration into the CNS so that microbes, infected cells, and debris can be cleared. This review highlights how different inflammatory cytokines or signaling pathways disrupt or enhance BBB integrity in a way that regulates entry of neurotropic viruses into the CNS.

  10. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Physiology and Metabolic Plasticity in Brain Angiogenesis and Blood-Brain Barrier Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Malinovskaya, Natalia A.; Komleva, Yulia K.; Salmin, Vladimir V.; Morgun, Andrey V.; Shuvaev, Anton N.; Panina, Yulia A.; Boitsova, Elizaveta B.; Salmina, Alla B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB) development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons). Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies. PMID:27990124

  11. Measuring blood-brain barrier penetration using the NeuroCart, a CNS test battery.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Geert Jan; Hay, Justin Luke; Van Gerven, Johannes Marinus

    2016-06-01

    To systematically study the pharmacodynamics of a CNS drug early in the development process, we developed and validated a battery of drug-sensitive CNS tests, which we call NeuroCart. Using this test battery, data-intensive phase 1 studies in healthy subjects can be performed to demonstrate the specific, time- and dose-dependent, neurophysiological and/or neuropsychological effects of a compound, thereby confirming whether the test compound reaches its intended target in the CNS - or does not reach its intended target. We use this test battery to demonstrate that a compound passes the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    van Assema, Daniëlle M E; Lubberink, Mark; Bauer, Martin; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Schuit, Robert C; Windhorst, Albert D; Comans, Emile F I; Hoetjes, Nikie J; Tolboom, Nelleke; Langer, Oliver; Müller, Markus; Scheltens, Philip; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2012-01-01

    A major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of amyloid-β in senile plaques in the brain. Evidence is accumulating that decreased clearance of amyloid-β from the brain may lead to these elevated amyloid-β levels. One of the clearance pathways of amyloid-β is transport across the blood-brain barrier via efflux transporters. P-glycoprotein, an efflux pump highly expressed at the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, has been shown to transport amyloid-β. P-glycoprotein function can be assessed in vivo using (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and positron emission tomography. The aim of this study was to assess blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with age-matched healthy controls using (R)-[(11)C]verapamil and positron emission tomography. In 13 patients with Alzheimer's disease (age 65 ± 7 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 23 ± 3), global (R)-[(11)C]verapamil binding potential values were increased significantly (P = 0.001) compared with 14 healthy controls (aged 62 ± 4 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 30 ± 1). Global (R)-[(11)C]verapamil binding potential values were 2.18 ± 0.25 for patients with Alzheimer's disease and 1.77 ± 0.41 for healthy controls. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, higher (R)-[(11)C]verapamil binding potential values were found for frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices, and posterior and anterior cingulate. No significant differences between groups were found for medial temporal lobe and cerebellum. These data show altered kinetics of (R)-[(11)C]verapamil in Alzheimer's disease, similar to alterations seen in studies where P-glycoprotein is blocked by a pharmacological agent. As such, these data indicate that P-glycoprotein function is decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease. This is the first direct evidence that the P-glycoprotein transporter at the blood-brain barrier is compromised in sporadic

  13. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction-induced inflammatory signaling in brain pathology and epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Buckwalter, Marion; Soreq, Hermona; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaufer, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    The protection of the brain from blood-borne toxins, proteins, and cells is critical to the brain's normal function. Accordingly, a compromise in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function accompanies many neurologic disorders, and is tightly associated with brain inflammatory processes initiated by both infiltrating leukocytes from the blood, and activation of glial cells. Those inflammatory processes contribute to determining the severity and prognosis of numerous neurologic disorders, and can both cause, and result from BBB dysfunction. In this review we examine the role of BBB and inflammatory responses, in particular activation of transforming grown factor β (TGFβ) signaling, in epilepsy, stroke, and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented.

  15. Polyploidization of glia in neural development links tissue growth to blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Proper development requires coordination in growth of the cell types composing an organ. Many plant and animal cells are polyploid, but how these polyploid tissues contribute to organ growth is not well understood. We found the Drosophila melanogaster subperineurial glia (SPG) to be polyploid, and ploidy is coordinated with brain mass. Inhibition of SPG polyploidy caused rupture of the septate junctions necessary for the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the increased SPG cell size resulting from polyploidization is required to maintain the SPG envelope surrounding the growing brain. Polyploidization likely is a conserved strategy to coordinate tissue growth during organogenesis, with potential vertebrate examples.

  16. Pericytes from Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a model for the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohe; Brookes, Oliver; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain-barrier (BBB) in vitro models have been widely reported in studies of the BBB phenotype. However, established co-culture systems involve brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, neurons and pericytes, and therefore are often consuming and technically challenging. Here we use mesenchymal system cells (MSC) as a potential substitute for pericytes in a BBB model. Both MSC and pericyte markers in 2D culture environment were evaluated on different extracellular matrix compositions. Further experiments indicated that MSC contributed in a similar manner to pericytes in a co-cultured 3D model on increasing trans-endothelial electric resistance (TEER) and decreasing permeability against macromolecules. PMID:28098158

  17. Age-associated physiological and pathological changes at the blood-brain barrier: A review.

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Denes, László; de Lange, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The age-associated decline of the neurological and cognitive functions becomes more and more serious challenge for the developed countries with the increasing number of aged populations. The morphological and biochemical changes in the aging brain are the subjects of many extended research projects worldwide for a long time. However, the crucial role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment and disruption in the pathological processes in age-associated neurodegenerative disorders received special attention just for a few years. This article gives an overview on the major elements of the blood-brain barrier and its supporting mechanisms and also on their alterations during development, physiological aging process and age-associated neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, pharmacoresistant epilepsy). Besides the morphological alterations of the cellular elements (endothelial cells, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, neuronal elements) of the BBB and neurovascular unit, the changes of the barrier at molecular level (tight junction proteins, adheres junction proteins, membrane transporters, basal lamina, extracellular matrix) are also summarized. The recognition of new players and initiators of the process of neurodegeneration at the level of the BBB may offer new avenues for novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of numerous chronic neurodegenerative disorders currently without effective medication.

  18. Viral interactions with the blood-brain barrier: old dog, new tricks

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianghui; Baker, Lane A; Zhou, Lushan; Klein, Robyn S

    2016-01-01

    Brain endothelial cells form a unique cellular structure known as the tight junction to regulate the exchanges between the blood and the parenchyma by limiting the paracellular diffusion of blood-borne substance. Together with the restricted pathway of transcytosis, the tight junction in the brain endothelial cells provides the central nervous system (CNS) with effective protection against both the foreign pathogens and the host immune cells, which is also termed the “blood-brain barrier.” The blood-brain barrier is particularly important for defending against neurotropic viral infections that have become a major source of diseases worldwide. Many neurotropic viruses are able to cross the BBB and infect the CNS through very poorly understood processes. This review focuses upon the structural and functional changes of the brain endothelial tight junction in response to viral infections in the CNS and how the tight junction changes may be studied with advanced imaging and recording approaches to reveal novel processes used by the viruses to cross the barrier system. Additional emphasis is placed upon new countermeasures that can act directly upon the tight junction to improve the pathogen clearance and minimize the inflammatory damage. PMID:27141421

  19. Experimental Methods and Transport Models for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier essential for maintaining the micro-environment of the brain. Although the special anatomical features of the BBB determine its protective role for the central nervous system (CNS) from blood-born neurotoxins, however, the BBB extremely limits the therapeutic efficacy of drugs into the CNS, which greatly hinders the treatment of major brain diseases. This review summarized the unique structures of the BBB, described a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental methods for determining the transport properties of the BBB, e.g., the permeability of the BBB to water, ions, and solutes including nutrients, therapeutic agents and drug carriers, and presented newly developed mathematical models which quantitatively correlate the anatomical structures of the BBB with its barrier functions. Finally, on the basis of the experimental observations and the quantitative models, several strategies for drug delivery through the BBB were proposed. PMID:22201587

  20. Differential effect of aluminum on the blood-brain barrier transport of peptides, technetium and albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, W.A.; Kastin, A.J.; Fasold, M.B.

    1988-02-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxin capable of altering membrane structure and function. We investigated whether aluminum also can affect saturable transport across membranes using the blood-brain barrier as our model. Mice were given i.p. or i.v. aluminum (up to 100 mg/kg) as the chloride salt and the disappearance from the brain of several centrally administered substances was measured. We found that aluminum rapidly and profoundly inhibited the saturable system that transports the small, N-tyrosinated peptides Tyr-MIF-1 and the enkephalins from the brain to the blood by acting as a noncompetitive inhibitor. In contrast, the disappearance from the brain of technetium pertechnetate (a substance also transported out of the brain by a different saturable system), albumin or D-Tyr-MIF-1 (a stereoisomer of Tyr-MIF-1 that was confirmed not to be transported by the carrier system) was not affected by aluminum. Aluminum also did not alter either the saturable or nonsaturable component of the uptake of Tyr-MIF-1 by erythrocytes. These findings suggest that one mechanism by which aluminum may induce neurotoxicity is by selective alteration of the transport systems of the blood-brain barrier.

  1. Effect of 2450-MHz microwave energy on the blood-brain barrier to hydrophilic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave energy at 2450 MHz 120 Hz AM was found ineffective in increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to the hydrophilic tracers HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose. Furthermore, a diminished permeability to HRP and sodium fluorescein was apparent after 180 minutes of exposure to microwaves at an incident power density of 20 mW/cm/sup 2/. Colonic temperature, as well as temperature within the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum and medulla, were elevated by less than 1/sup 0/C over those of sham-exposed rats. A significant decrease in the permeability to HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose occurred after exposure to an incident power density of 65 mW/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. The reduction in permeability to HRP correlated with a suppressed incorporation of the tracer by pinocytosis in cerebral microvessels. Suppression of blood-brain barrier permeability to hydrophilic tracers was most pronounced at brain temperatures exceeding approx. 40/sup 0/C and is demonstrated to be temperature dependent.

  2. Nanoparticles and blood-brain barrier: the key to central nervous system diseases.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alazne; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Major central nervous system disorders represent a significant and worldwide public health problem. In fact, the therapeutic success of many pharmaceuticals developed to treat central nervous system diseases is still moderate, since the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the access of systemically administered compounds to the brain. Therefore, they require the application of a large total dose of a drug, and cause numerous toxic effects. The development of nanotechnological systems are useful tools to deliver therapeutics and/or diagnostic probes to the brain due to nanocarriers having the potential to improve the therapeutic effect of drugs and to reduce their side effects. This review provides a brief overview of the variety of carriers employed for central nervous system drug and diagnostic probes delivery. Further, this paper focuses on the novel nanocarriers developed to enhance brain delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Special attention is paid to liposomes, micelles, polymeric and lipid-based nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes. The recent developments in nanocarrier implementation through size/charge optimization and surface modifications (PEGylation, targeting delivery, and coating with surfactants) have been discussed. And a detailed description of the nanoscaled pharmaceutical delivery devices employed for the treatment of central nervous system disorders have also been defined. The aim of the review is to evaluate the nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategies to treat different central nervous system disorders.

  3. Interaction of ethanol and microwaves on the blood-brain barrier of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Neilly, J.P.; Lin, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The combined effects of ethanol and microwaves on the permeation of Evans blue dye through the mammalian blood-brain barrier was studied in male Wistar rats. Anesthetized rats were infused through a cannula in the left femoral vein with 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 or 0.7 grams of absolute ethanol per kilogram of body mass. A control group was given 0.7 g/kg of isotonic saline. The left hemisphere of the brain was irradiated by 3.15-GHz microwave energy at 3.0 W/cm2 rms for 15 min. The rat's rectal temperature was maintained at 37.0 degrees C. Immediately after irradiation, 2% Evans blue dye in saline (2.0 ml/kg body mass) was injected through the cannula. The results show that as the quantity of alcohol was increased, the degree of staining was decreased or eliminated. The temperature of the irradiated area of the brain increased for the first 4 to 5 minutes of irradiation and then stabilized for the remainder of the irradiation period. The steady-state temperature was highest in animals receiving saline or the smallest dose of alcohol. As the quantity of alcohol was increased, the steady-state temperature was reduced. These results indicate that ethanol inhibits microwave-induced permeation of the blood-brain barrier through reduced heating of the brain.

  4. Methodologies to assess drug permeation through the blood-brain barrier for pharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Passeleu-Le Bourdonnec, Céline; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Scherrmann, Jean Michel; Martel, Sophie

    2013-11-01

    The drug discovery process for drugs that target the central nervous system suffers from a very high rate of failure due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which limits the entry of xenobiotics into the brain. To minimise drug failure at different stages of the drug development process, new methodologies have been developed to understand the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) profile of drug candidates at early stages of drug development. Additionally, understanding the permeation of drug candidates is also important, particularly for drugs that target the central nervous system. During the first stages of the drug discovery process, in vitro methods that allow for the determination of permeability using high-throughput screening methods are advantageous. For example, performing the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay followed by cell-based models with interesting hits is a useful technique for identifying potential drugs. In silico models also provide interesting information but must be confirmed by in vitro models. Finally, in vivo models, such as in situ brain perfusion, should be studied to reduce a large number of drug candidates to a few lead compounds. This article reviews the different methodologies used in the drug discovery and drug development processes to determine the permeation of drug candidates through the blood-brain barrier.

  5. Agent based modeling of the effects of potential treatments over the blood-brain barrier in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Marzio; Russo, Giulia; Motta, Santo; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system that involves the destruction of the insulating sheath of axons, causing severe disabilities. Since the etiology of the disease is not yet fully understood, the use of novel techniques that may help to understand the disease, to suggest potential therapies and to test the effects of candidate treatments is highly advisable. To this end we developed an agent based model that demonstrated its ability to reproduce the typical oscillatory behavior observed in the most common form of multiple sclerosis, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The model has then been used to test the potential beneficial effects of vitamin D over the disease. Many scientific studies underlined the importance of the blood-brain barrier and of the mechanisms that influence its permeability on the development of the disease. In the present paper we further extend our previously developed model with a mechanism that mimics the blood-brain barrier behavior. The goal of our work is to suggest the best strategies to follow for developing new potential treatments that intervene in the blood-brain barrier. Results suggest that the best treatments should potentially prevent the opening of the blood-brain barrier, as treatments that help in recovering the blood-brain barrier functionality could be less effective.

  6. An Unexpected Transient Breakdown of the Blood Brain Barrier Triggers Passage of Large Intravenously Administered Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicole M.; Gachulincova, Ivana; Ho, Diwei; Bailey, Charlotte; Bartlett, Carole A.; Norret, Marck; Murphy, John; Buckley, Alysia; Rigby, Paul J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Dunlop, Sarah A.

    2016-03-01

    The highly restrictive blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critically important role in maintaining brain homeostasis and is pivotal for proper neuronal function. The BBB is currently considered the main limiting factor restricting the passage of large (up to 200 nm) intravenously administered nanoparticles to the brain. Breakdown of the barrier occurs as a consequence of cerebrovascular diseases and traumatic brain injury. In this article, we report that remote injuries in the CNS are also associated with BBB dysfunction. In particular, we show that a focal partial transection of the optic nerve triggers a previously unknown transient opening of the mammalian BBB that occurs in the visual centres. Importantly, we demonstrate that this transient BBB breakdown results in a dramatic change in the biodistribution of intravenously administered large polymeric nanoparticles which were previously deemed as BBB-impermeable.

  7. Phenolic acid metabolites derived from coffee consumption are unlikely to cross the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lardeau, A; Poquet, L

    2013-03-25

    Coffee drinking is well known for its stimulating effects on the brain and on cognition. In addition to the most active component, caffeine, coffee contains phenolic acids, which may also have some activity. Dihydrocaffeoyl-3-O-sulfate, caffeoyl-3-O-sulfate, dihydroferuloyl-4-O-sulfate, as well as dihydroferulic, dihydrocaffeic, 5-O-feruloylquinic and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids, the major phenolic acid metabolites circulating in human plasma after coffee ingestion, were tested for their potential to enter the brain using a validated in vitro model of the blood brain barrier made of endothelial cells from bovine brain capillaries. As expected, caffeine showed a high rate of permeation across this barrier, but the phenolic acid metabolites exhibited a very low rate of permeation. The data suggest that none of these phenolic acid metabolites can be considered as potential candidate to enter the brain in vivo and so are unlikely to affect cognitive processes directly as proposed for caffeine.

  8. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextran Extravasation as a Measure of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole; Yamamoto, Bryan

    2017-04-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed in part by vascular endothelial cells that constitute the capillaries and microvessels of the brain. The function of this barrier is to maintain homeostasis within the brain microenvironment and buffer the brain from changes in the periphery. A dysfunction of the BBB would permit circulating molecules and pathogens typically restricted to the periphery to enter the brain and interfere with normal brain function. As increased permeability of the BBB is associated with several neuropathologies, it is important to have a reliable and sensitive method that determines BBB permeability and the degree of BBB disruption. A detailed protocol is presented for assessing the integrity of the BBB by transcardial perfusion of a 10,000 Da FITC-labeled dextran molecule and its visualization to determine the degree of extravasation from brain microvessels. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. The gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Braniste, Viorica; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Kowal, Czeslawa; Anuar, Farhana; Abbaspour, Afrouz; Tóth, Miklós; Korecka, Agata; Bakocevic, Nadja; Ng, Lai Guan; Guan, Ng Lai; Kundu, Parag; Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Hultenby, Kjell; Nilsson, Harriet; Hebert, Hans; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty; Pettersson, Sven

    2014-11-19

    Pivotal to brain development and function is an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB), which acts as a gatekeeper to control the passage and exchange of molecules and nutrients between the circulatory system and the brain parenchyma. The BBB also ensures homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). We report that germ-free mice, beginning with intrauterine life, displayed increased BBB permeability compared to pathogen-free mice with a normal gut flora. The increased BBB permeability was maintained in germ-free mice after birth and during adulthood and was associated with reduced expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-5, which are known to regulate barrier function in endothelial tissues. Exposure of germ-free adult mice to a pathogen-free gut microbiota decreased BBB permeability and up-regulated the expression of tight junction proteins. Our results suggest that gut microbiota-BBB communication is initiated during gestation and propagated throughout life.

  10. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  11. Chromatographic behaviour predicts the ability of potential nootropics to permeate the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Farsa, Oldřich

    2013-01-01

    The log BB parameter is the logarithm of the ratio of a compound's equilibrium concentrations in the brain tissue versus the blood plasma. This parameter is a useful descriptor in assessing the ability of a compound to permeate the blood-brain barrier. The aim of this study was to develop a Hansch-type linear regression QSAR model that correlates the parameter log BB and the retention time of drugs and other organic compounds on a reversed-phase HPLC containing an embedded amide moiety. The retention time was expressed by the capacity factor log k'. The second aim was to estimate the brain's absorption of 2-(azacycloalkyl)acetamidophenoxyacetic acids, which are analogues of piracetam, nefiracetam, and meclofenoxate. Notably, these acids may be novel nootropics. Two simple regression models that relate log BB and log k' were developed from an assay performed using a reversed-phase HPLC that contained an embedded amide moiety. Both the quadratic and linear models yielded statistical parameters comparable to previously published models of log BB dependence on various structural characteristics. The models predict that four members of the substituted phenoxyacetic acid series have a strong chance of permeating the barrier and being absorbed in the brain. The results of this study show that a reversed-phase HPLC system containing an embedded amide moiety is a functional in vitro surrogate of the blood-brain barrier. These results suggest that racetam-type nootropic drugs containing a carboxylic moiety could be more poorly absorbed than analogues devoid of the carboxyl group, especially if the compounds penetrate the barrier by a simple diffusion mechanism.

  12. Chromatographic Behaviour Predicts the Ability of Potential Nootropics to Permeate the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Farsa, Oldřich

    2013-01-01

    The log BB parameter is the logarithm of the ratio of a compound’s equilibrium concentrations in the brain tissue versus the blood plasma. This parameter is a useful descriptor in assessing the ability of a compound to permeate the blood-brain barrier. The aim of this study was to develop a Hansch-type linear regression QSAR model that correlates the parameter log BB and the retention time of drugs and other organic compounds on a reversed-phase HPLC containing an embedded amide moiety. The retention time was expressed by the capacity factor log k′. The second aim was to estimate the brain’s absorption of 2-(azacycloalkyl)acetamidophenoxyacetic acids, which are analogues of piracetam, nefiracetam, and meclofenoxate. Notably, these acids may be novel nootropics. Two simple regression models that relate log BB and log k′ were developed from an assay performed using a reversed-phase HPLC that contained an embedded amide moiety. Both the quadratic and linear models yielded statistical parameters comparable to previously published models of log BB dependence on various structural characteristics. The models predict that four members of the substituted phenoxyacetic acid series have a strong chance of permeating the barrier and being absorbed in the brain. The results of this study show that a reversed-phase HPLC system containing an embedded amide moiety is a functional in vitro surrogate of the blood-brain barrier. These results suggest that racetam-type nootropic drugs containing a carboxylic moiety could be more poorly absorbed than analogues devoid of the carboxyl group, especially if the compounds penetrate the barrier by a simple diffusion mechanism. PMID:23641330

  13. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening to enhance temozolomide delivery for glioblastoma treatment: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chu, Po-Chun; Wang, Hay-Yan Jack; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Lee, Pei-Yun; Tseng, I-Chou; Feng, Li-Ying; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-monitored focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption to enhance Temozolomide (TMZ) delivery for improving Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) treatment. MRI-monitored FUS with microbubbles was used to transcranially disrupt the BBB in brains of Fisher rats implanted with 9L glioma cells. FUS-BBB opening was spectrophotometrically determined by leakage of dyes into the brain, and TMZ was quantitated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma by LC-MS\\MS. The effects of treatment on tumor progression (by MRI), animal survival and brain tissue histology were investigated. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening increased the local accumulation of dyes in brain parenchyma by 3.8-/2.1-fold in normal/tumor tissues. Compared to TMZ alone, combined FUS treatment increased the TMZ CSF/plasma ratio from 22.7% to 38.6%, reduced the 7-day tumor progression ratio from 24.03 to 5.06, and extended the median survival from 20 to 23 days. In conclusion, this study provided preclinical evidence that FUS BBB-opening increased the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting its clinical potential for improving current brain tumor treatment.

  14. Focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption to enhance chemotherapeutic drugs (BCNU) delivery for glioblastoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound has been recently found to capable of temporally and reversibly disrupt local blood-brain barrier (BBB) and opens new frontier in delivering varies type of drugs into brain for central nerve system (CNS) disorder treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of delivering 1, 3-bits (2-chloroethyl) -1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to treat glioblastoma in animal models and evaluate whether this approach would gain treatment efficacy. Under the presence of microbubbles administration, a 400-kHz focused ultrasound was employed to deliver burst-tone ultrasonic energy stimulation to disrupt BBB in animal brains transcranially, and in-vivo monitored by magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). C6-glioma cells were cultured and implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats as the brain-tumor model. BCNU deposited in brain was quantified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and brain tissues were examined histologically. MRI was employed to longitudinal evaluate the brain tumor treatment including the analysis of tumor progression and animal survival. We confirmed that the focused ultrasound, under the secure ultrasonic energy level, can significantly enhance the BCNU penetration through BBB over 300% than control without cause hemorrhage. Apparent improvement of treatment efficacy achieved by combining focused ultrasound with BCNU delivery, including significant suppression of tumor growth and a prolonged animal survival. This study highly support that this treatment strategy could be clinically-relevant and may help to provide another potential strategy in increasing local chemotherapeutic drugs for brain-tumor treatment.

  15. Noninvasive localized delivery of Herceptin to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-08-01

    Antibody-based anticancer agents are promising chemotherapeutic agents. Among these agents, Herceptin (trastuzumab), a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/c-erbB2) monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully in patients with breast cancer. However, in patients with brain metastasis, the blood-brain barrier limits its use, and a different delivery method is needed to treat these patients. Here, we report that Herceptin can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the mouse central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier under image guidance by using an MRI-guided focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption technique. The amount of Herceptin delivered to the target tissue was correlated with the extent of the MRI-monitored barrier opening, making it possible to estimate indirectly the amount of Herceptin delivered. Histological changes attributable to this procedure were minimal. This method may represent a powerful technique for the delivery of macromolecular agents such as antibodies to treat patients with diseases of the central nervous system. brain tumor | microbubble

  16. Gap Junction Proteins in the Blood-Brain Barrier Control Nutrient-Dependent Reactivation of Drosophila Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spéder, Pauline; Brand, Andrea H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells in the adult brain exist primarily in a quiescent state but are reactivated in response to changing physiological conditions. How do stem cells sense and respond to metabolic changes? In the Drosophila CNS, quiescent neural stem cells are reactivated synchronously in response to a nutritional stimulus. Feeding triggers insulin production by blood-brain barrier glial cells, activating the insulin/insulin-like growth factor pathway in underlying neural stem cells and stimulating their growth and proliferation. Here we show that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier glia mediate the influence of metabolic changes on stem cell behavior, enabling glia to respond to nutritional signals and reactivate quiescent stem cells. We propose that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier are required to translate metabolic signals into synchronized calcium pulses and insulin secretion. PMID:25065772

  17. Blood-brain barrier permeability mechanisms in view of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR).

    PubMed

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Kaliszan, Michał; Kaliszan, Roman; Markuszewski, Michał J

    2015-04-10

    The goal of the present paper was to develop a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method using a simple statistical approach, such as multiple linear regression (MLR) for predicting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemical compounds. The "best" MLR models, comprised logP and either molecular mass (M) or isolated atomic energy (E(isol)), tested on a structurally diverse set of 66 compounds, is characterized the by correlation coefficients (R) around 0.8. The obtained models were validated using leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation technique and the correlation coefficient of leave-one-out- R(LOO)(2) (Q(2)) was at least 0.6. Analysis of a case from legal medicine demonstrated informative value of our QSAR model. To best authors' knowledge the present study is a first application of the developed QSAR models of BBB permeability to case from the legal medicine. Our data indicate that molecular energy-related descriptors, in combination with the well-known descriptors of lipophilicity may have a supportive value in predicting blood-brain distribution, which is of utmost importance in drug development and toxicological studies.

  18. Drug transport at the blood-brain barrier and the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Graff, Candace L; Pollack, Gary M

    2004-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB) represent the main interfaces between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral circulation. Drug exposure to the CNS is dependent on a variety of factors, including the physical barrier presented by the BBB and the BCSFB and the affinity of the substrate for specific transport systems located at both of these interfaces. It is the aggregate effect of these factors that ultimately determines the total CNS exposure, and thus pharmacological efficacy, of a drug or drug candidate. This review discusses the anatomical and biochemical barriers presented to solute access to the CNS. In particular, the important role played by various efflux transporters in the overall barrier function is considered in detail, as current literature suggests that efflux transport likely represents a key determinant of overall CNS exposure for many substrates. Finally, it is important to consider not only the net delivery of the agent to the CNS, but also the ability of the agent to access the relevant target site within the CNS. Potential approaches to increasing both net CNS and target-site exposure, when such exposure is dictated by efflux transport, are considered.

  19. Ex vivo Evans blue assessment of the blood brain barrier in three breast cancer brain metastasis models.

    PubMed

    Do, John; Foster, Deshka; Renier, Corinne; Vogel, Hannes; Rosenblum, Sahar; Doyle, Timothy C; Tse, Victor; Wapnir, Irene

    2014-02-01

    The limited entry of anticancer drugs into the central nervous system represents a special therapeutic challenge for patients with brain metastases and is primarily due to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Albumin-bound Evans blue (EB) dye is too large to cross the BBB but can grossly stain tissue blue when the BBB is disrupted. The course of tumor development and the integrity of the BBB were studied in three preclinical breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) models. A luciferase-transduced braintropic clone of MDA-231 cell line was used. Nude mice were subjected to stereotactic intracerebral inoculation, mammary fat pad-derived tumor fragment implantation, or carotid artery injections. EB was injected 30 min prior to euthanasia at various timepoints for each of the BCBM model animals. Serial bioluminescent imaging demonstrated exponential tumor growth in all models. Carotid BCBM appeared as diffuse multifocal cell clusters. EB aided the localization of metastases ex vivo. Tumor implants stained blue at 7 days whereas gross staining was not evident until day 14 in the stereotactic model and day 28 for the carotid model. EB assessment of the integrity of the BBB provides useful information relevant to drug testing in preclinical BCBM models.

  20. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-03

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  1. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Prachi; O’Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB. PMID:26234920

  2. Mini review on blood-brain barrier penetration of pyridinium aldoximes.

    PubMed

    Kalász, H; Nurulain, S M; Veress, G; Antus, S; Darvas, F; Adeghate, E; Adem, A; Hashemi, F; Tekes, K

    2015-02-01

    This paper reviews the blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration of newly developed pyridinium aldoximes. Pyridinium aldoximes are highly charged hydrophilic compounds used in the treatment of subjects exposed to organophosphonates because they are effective as acetylcholinesterase reactivators. Pyridinium aldoximes have antidotal effects against poisoning with cholinesterase inhibitors, a frequent problem affecting people working with organophosphate-based insecticides and pesticides. Toxic organophosphonate products such as sarin and tabun can be used by terrorists as chemical warfare agents. This poses a severe challenge to all innocent and peace-loving people worldwide. This review gives a brief summary of BBB transporters and description of the current in vitro and in vivo methods for the characterization of BBB penetration of established and novel pyridinium aldoximes. The authors provide a putative mechanism of penetration, outline some future ways of formulation and discuss the possible advantages and disadvantages of increasing BBB penetration.

  3. Drug transport into the central nervous system: using newer findings about the blood-brain barriers.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2012-06-01

    The blood-brain barriers (BBBs) represent one of the biggest challenges for the effective delivery of drugs today. Discoveries made in the last 30 years offer new strategies for central nervous system (CNS) drug development, but have yet to be fully incorporated into the field. Here, we examine seven recently discovered aspects of the BBB and how they have been or could be developed for drug delivery. These areas are brain-to-blood (efflux) transporters, immune cell trafficking into the brain under physiologic conditions, mechanisms by which antibodies can access the CNS, Trojan horse delivery systems, blood-to-brain transport systems for biologicals, lectin interactions and ligand modifications that enhance BBB penetration, and secretory capacities of cells comprising the BBBs.

  4. The blood-brain barrier: connecting the gut and the brain.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2008-08-07

    The BBB prevents the unrestricted exchange of substances between the central nervous system (CNS) and the blood. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) also conveys information between the CNS and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract through several mechanisms. Here, we review three of those mechanisms. First, the BBB selectively transports some peptides and regulatory proteins in the blood-to-brain or the brain-to-blood direction. The ability of GI hormones to affect functions of the BBB, as illustrated by the ability of insulin to alter the BBB transport of amino acids and drugs, represents a second mechanism. A third mechanism is the ability of GI hormones to affect the secretion by the BBB of substances that themselves affect feeding and appetite, such as nitric oxide and cytokines. By these and other mechanisms, the BBB regulates communications between the CNS and GI tract.

  5. Developing drugs that can cross the blood-brain barrier: applications to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2008-12-10

    Development of therapeutics for the central nervous system is one of the most challenging areas in drug development. This is primarily because, in addition to all of the other complications one faces in developing new drugs targeting peripheral sites, one must also negotiate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). There are dozens of strategies to overcome the obstacle of the BBB, but many of these are bound to fail, barring extreme serendipity, because they are based on an inaccurate or incomplete picture of the BBB. This article therefore starts with a brief review of the BBB as it pertains to drug development. It then examines some examples of the delivery of drugs to the central nervous system that are relevant to Alzheimer's disease, placing emphasis on peptides, antibodies, and antisense oligonucleotides.

  6. Alzheimer's disease drug development and the problem of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Pardridge, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). More than 98% of all small molecule drugs, and ∼100% of all large molecule drugs, do not cross the BBB. Despite the fact that the vast majority of AD drug candidates do not cross the BBB, the present-day AD drug development effort is characterized by an imbalance, whereby >99% of the drug development effort is devoted to CNS drug discovery, and <1% of drug development is devoted to CNS drug delivery. Future AD drug development needs a concerted effort to incorporate the BBB sciences early in the CNS drug discovery process. This can be accomplished by a reallocation of resources, and an expansion of the effort in the pure science of BBB biology and the applied science of brain drug targeting technology. PMID:19751922

  7. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  8. Astrocytic laminin regulates pericyte differentiation and maintains blood brain barrier integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Chen, Zu-Lin; Norris, Erin H.; Strickland, Sidney

    2014-03-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown is not only a consequence of but also contributes to many neurological disorders, including stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. How the basement membrane (BM) contributes to the normal functioning of the BBB remains elusive. Here we use conditional knockout mice and an acute adenovirus-mediated knockdown model to show that lack of astrocytic laminin, a brain-specific BM component, induces BBB breakdown. Using functional blocking antibody and RNAi, we further demonstrate that astrocytic laminin, by binding to integrin α2 receptor, prevents pericyte differentiation from the BBB-stabilizing resting stage to the BBB-disrupting contractile stage, and thus maintains the integrity of BBB. Additionally, loss of astrocytic laminin decreases aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction protein expression. Altogether, we report a critical role for astrocytic laminin in BBB regulation and pericyte differentiation. These results indicate that astrocytic laminin maintains the integrity of BBB through, at least in part, regulation of pericyte differentiation.

  9. Focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alison; Shah, Kairavi; Hough, Olivia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in blood-brain barrier (BBB) research, it remains a significant hurdle for the pharmaceutical treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is one method to transiently increase permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to specific brain regions. An introduction to the BBB and a brief overview of the methods which can be used to circumvent the BBB to promote drug delivery is provided. In particular, we discuss the advantages and limitations of FUS technology and the efficacy of FUS-mediated drug delivery in models of disease. MRI for targeting and evaluating FUS treatments, combined with administration of microbubbles, allows for transient, reproducible BBB opening. The integration of a real-time acoustic feedback controller has improved treatment safety. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to transform the treatment of brain disease worldwide without requiring the development of new pharmaceutical agents. PMID:25936845

  10. Cerebral mast cells contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction by promoting blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Susu; Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Nana; Sun, Jie; Qian, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Trauma induced neuroinflammation plays a key role in the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a highly specialized endothelial layer, is exquisitely sensitive to inflammatory insults, which can result in numerous neurocognitive syndromes. While brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury, the functional interactions between mast cells and the BBB remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrate that tibial fracture surgery can induce cognitive impairment relating to an inflammatory response and destabilization of the BBB. Disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn)--which acts as a mast cell stabilizer--inhibited this effect. Specifically, cromolyn resulted in ameliorated cognitive ability, decrease of inflammatory cytokines and increase of BBB stability. Taken together, these results suggest that activated mast cells contributed to central nervous system inflammation and cognitive dysfunction by promoting BBB disruption, and interactions between mast cells and the BBB could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for POCD.

  11. Metabolically dependent blood-brain barrier breakdown in chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C P; Munro, P M; Landon, D N; McDonald, W I

    1992-01-01

    We have studied chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE), a model of immune-mediated demyelination, using gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in vivo and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) markers, lanthanum nitrate and Gd nitrate, histologically. In regions of the spinal cord showing Gd enhancement, there was evidence for vesicular transport as a mechanism of BBB breakdown in CREAE, shown by an increased number of endothelial vesicles containing lanthanide (lanthanum or Gd, whichever had been perfused) and deposition of tracer in the perivascular space; tight interendothelial junctions remained intact. Prior perfusion with 2,4-dinitrophenol, a metabolic inhibitor, suppressed the appearance of endothelial vesicles containing lanthanide and tracer in the perivascular space. We conclude that an important contribution to BBB breakdown in CREAE is mediated by a metabolic change in the endothelial cells associated with increased vesicular transport.

  12. Analytical and Biological Methods for Probing the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnline, Sloan; Courtney, D.; Nandi, Pradyot; Linz, Thomas H.; Aldrich, Jane V.; Audus, Kenneth L.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2012-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important interface between the peripheral and central nervous systems. It protects the brain against the infiltration of harmful substances and regulates the permeation of beneficial endogenous substances from the blood into the extracellular fluid of the brain. It can also present a major obstacle in the development of drugs that are targeted for the central nervous system. Several methods have been developed to investigate the transport and metabolism of drugs, peptides, and endogenous compounds at the BBB. In vivo methods include intravenous injection, brain perfusion, positron emission tomography, and microdialysis sampling. Researchers have also developed in vitro cell-culture models that can be employed to investigate transport and metabolism at the BBB without the complication of systemic involvement. All these methods require sensitive and selective analytical methods to monitor the transport and metabolism of the compounds of interest at the BBB.

  13. Automated Protein Localization of Blood Brain Barrier Vasculature in Brightfield IHC Images

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Brendan T.; Pack, Allan I.; Shackleford, James A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an objective method for localization of proteins in blood brain barrier (BBB) vasculature using standard immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques and bright-field microscopy. Images from the hippocampal region at the BBB are acquired using bright-field microscopy and subjected to our segmentation pipeline which is designed to automatically identify and segment microvessels containing the protein glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Gabor filtering and k-means clustering are employed to isolate potential vascular structures within cryosectioned slabs of the hippocampus, which are subsequently subjected to feature extraction followed by classification via decision forest. The false positive rate (FPR) of microvessel classification is characterized using synthetic and non-synthetic IHC image data for image entropies ranging between 3 and 8 bits. The average FPR for synthetic and non-synthetic IHC image data was found to be 5.48% and 5.04%, respectively. PMID:26828723

  14. Blood-brain barrier after resuscitation from 10-min clinical death in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapuściński, A; Kapuściński, P

    1995-01-01

    In rats 10-min clinical death was induced by intrathoracic compression of the cardiac vessel bundle. The animals were sacrificed from 15 min to 7 days after resuscitation. They were decapitated 15 sec after intracarotid injection of mixture of L-[U-14C]glutamic acid and tritiated water. Using by the dual label method the brain uptake index (BUI) and percent of injected dose of amino acid in the cerebral hemisphere were calculated. In 45% of animals an increase of amino acid transfer and rise of BUI revealed the blood-brain barrier (BBB) alterations. The most pronounced changes developed after 120 min and 1 day after resuscitation. The impaired vs. normal BBB state depends probably on uneven recovery of cerebral circulation in individual animals after resuscitation.

  15. Focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Shah, Kairavi; Hough, Olivia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances in blood-brain barrier (BBB) research, it remains a significant hurdle for the pharmaceutical treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is one method to transiently increase permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to specific brain regions. An introduction to the BBB and a brief overview of the methods, which can be used to circumvent the BBB to promote drug delivery, is provided. In particular, we discuss the advantages and limitations of FUS technology and the efficacy of FUS-mediated drug delivery in models of disease. MRI for targeting and evaluating FUS treatments, combined with administration of microbubbles, allows for transient, reproducible BBB opening. The integration of a real-time acoustic feedback controller has improved treatment safety. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to transform the treatment of brain disease worldwide without requiring the development of new pharmaceutical agents.

  16. The impact of microglial activation on blood-brain barrier in brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Anna Carolina Carvalho; Matias, Diana; Garcia, Celina; Amaral, Rackele; Geraldo, Luiz Henrique; Freitas, Catarina; Lima, Flavia Regina Souza

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), constituted by an extensive network of endothelial cells (ECs) together with neurons and glial cells, including microglia, forms the neurovascular unit (NVU). The crosstalk between these cells guarantees a proper environment for brain function. In this context, changes in the endothelium-microglia interactions are associated with a variety of inflammation-related diseases in brain, where BBB permeability is compromised. Increasing evidences indicate that activated microglia modulate expression of tight junctions, which are essential for BBB integrity and function. On the other hand, the endothelium can regulate the state of microglial activation. Here, we review recent advances that provide insights into interactions between the microglia and the vascular system in brain diseases such as infectious/inflammatory diseases, epilepsy, ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25404894

  17. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  18. Targeting nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Joana A; Gomes, Bárbara; Coelho, Manuel A N; do Carmo Pereira, Maria; Rocha, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    Development of therapeutics for brain disorders is one of the more difficult challenges to be overcome by the scientific community due to the inability of most molecules to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Antibody-conjugated nanoparticles are drug carriers that can be used to target encapsulated drugs to the brain endothelial cells and have proven to be very promising. They significantly improve the accumulation of the drug in pathological sites and decrease the undesirable side effect of drugs in healthy tissues. We review the systems that have demonstrated promising results in crossing the BBB through receptor-mediated endocytic mechanisms for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

  19. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier in Parkinson's disease: curse or route to a cure?

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyne; Pienaar, Ilse S

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for ensuring the maintenance of brain homeostasis, whilst protecting the brain against toxic insults. Various pathological events disrupt BBB integrity, holding several important clinical implications. In instances where the normal mechanisms controlling passage of substances into the brain are compromised, these could sensitize or even worsen endogenous pathological conditions. Recognition has grown recently that patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) present with concurrent medical problems, including cerebrovascular lesions. However, cerebrovascular disturbances may also result from PD-related disease processes; the pathological mechanisms which could entail interaction between environment-derived and genetic factors. The current review addresses the accumulation of studies aimed at better understanding the series of processes affecting the neurovascular unit in human Parkinsonism, due in part to the BBB presenting as a formidable opponent in the effective delivery of therapeutics that have shown promise as therapeutic strategies for treating aspects of PD when tested in vitro.

  20. Blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Bartels, A L

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the brain is strengthened by active transport and ABC transporters. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) functions as an active efflux pump by extruding a substrate from the brain, which is important for maintaining loco-regional homeostasis in the brain and protection against toxic compounds. Importantly, dysfunctional BBB P-gp transport is postulated as an important factor contributing to accumulation of aggregated protein in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, P-gp is a major factor in mediating resistance to brain entry of numerous exogenous compounds, including toxins that can be involved in PD pathogenesis. This review highlights the role of altered P-gp function in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disease. Also the implications of alterations in P-gp function for the treatment of these diseases are discussed.

  1. Carbenoxolone does not cross the blood brain barrier: an HPLC study

    PubMed Central

    Leshchenko, Yevgen; Likhodii, Sergei; Yue, Wendy; Burnham, William M; Perez Velazquez, Jose L

    2006-01-01

    Background Carbenoxolone (CBX) is a widely used gap junctional blocker. Considering several reports indicating that transient gap junctional blockade could be a favourable intervention following injuries to central nervous tissue, and some current enthusiasm in studies using systemic injections of CBX, it is imperative to consider the penetration of CBX into central nervous tissue after systemic administrations. So far, only very indirect evidence suggests that CBX penetrates into the central nervous system after systemic administrations. We thus determined the amounts of CBX present in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid of rats after intraperitoneal administration, using high performance liquid chromatography Results CBX was found in the blood of the animals, up to 90 minutes post-injection. However, the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of CBX was negligible. Conclusion Thus, we conclude that, most likely, CBX does not penetrate the blood brain barrier and therefore recommend careful consideration in the manner of administration, when a central effect is desired. PMID:16405728

  2. Automatic QSAR modeling of ADME properties: blood-brain barrier penetration and aqueous solubility.

    PubMed

    Obrezanova, Olga; Gola, Joelle M R; Champness, Edmund J; Segall, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we present an automatic model generation process for building QSAR models using Gaussian Processes, a powerful machine learning modeling method. We describe the stages of the process that ensure models are built and validated within a rigorous framework: descriptor calculation, splitting data into training, validation and test sets, descriptor filtering, application of modeling techniques and selection of the best model. We apply this automatic process to data sets of blood-brain barrier penetration and aqueous solubility and compare the resulting automatically generated models with 'manually' built models using external test sets. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the automatic model generation process for two types of data sets commonly encountered in building ADME QSAR models, a small set of in vivo data and a large set of physico-chemical data.

  3. Automatic QSAR modeling of ADME properties: blood brain barrier penetration and aqueous solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrezanova, Olga; Gola, Joelle M. R.; Champness, Edmund J.; Segall, Matthew D.

    2008-06-01

    In this article, we present an automatic model generation process for building QSAR models using Gaussian Processes, a powerful machine learning modeling method. We describe the stages of the process that ensure models are built and validated within a rigorous framework: descriptor calculation, splitting data into training, validation and test sets, descriptor filtering, application of modeling techniques and selection of the best model. We apply this automatic process to data sets of blood-brain barrier penetration and aqueous solubility and compare the resulting automatically generated models with `manually' built models using external test sets. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the automatic model generation process for two types of data sets commonly encountered in building ADME QSAR models, a small set of in vivo data and a large set of physico-chemical data.

  4. Viral nanoparticles associate with regions of inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption during CNS infection

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, Leah P.; Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Manchester, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Targeted treatment of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) remains problematic due to the complex pathogenesis of these disorders and difficulty in drug delivery. The plant virus, cow pea mosaic virus (CPMV), has recently been explored as a nanoparticle delivery system for therapeutics targeting a number of diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration. To understand the biodistribution of CPMV in the CNS, we examined CPMV uptake during infection of mice with neurotropic mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). CPMV localized mainly to the CNS endothelium in areas that contained an intact blood brain barrier. However, in inflammatory lesions containing macrophage/microglial cell infiltration and IgG, CPMV could be detected in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, CPMV showed rapid internalization in an in vitro model of the BBB. These results suggest that CPMV particles could be used to a vehicle to deliver therapeutics to the damaged CNS during neurodegenerative and infectious diseases of the CNS. PMID:19394707

  5. Bioavailability of endomorphins and the blood-brain barrier--a review.

    PubMed

    Perlikowska, Renata; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Opioid peptides have the potential to be pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of pain because they modulate nociceptive pathways at supraspinal, spinal and peripheral levels. Unfortunately, peptides are generally hydrophilic compounds and therefore unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by passive diffusion to reach the central nervous system (CNS) in an amount sufficient to activate appropriate receptors. Endomorphins (EMs) belong to the class of endogenous opioids eliciting the strongest analgesic effect, but only after direct administration to the CNS. Extensive research is in progress to better understand the relationships between EM structure and bioavailability. This article deals with the recent investigations that allow the design of stable and neuroactive EM analogs with enhanced brain passage and uptake.

  6. Changes in blood-brain barrier function modify the neuroendocrine response to circulating substances.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Johansson, B B; Oprsalová, Z; Vigas, M

    1989-04-01

    It is known that various experimental, pathological and even physiological situations may be accompanied by transient increases in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The hypothesis that under such conditions the blood-borne substances can reach the active sites in the brain in concentrations high enough to influence central control of hormone release was verified in these studies. A suitable experimental model of BBB opening by protamine sulfate administration in conscious rats was introduced. Using this model it was shown that the dopaminergic blocker domperidone inhibited apomorphine-induced ACTH release if permeability of the BBB was increased, but not under normal conditions. It is suggested that the changes in BBB function can modify the neuroendocrine response also to other circulating substances and this may be an important, until now unconsidered phenomenon in neuroendocrine research.

  7. Blood-brain barrier drug targeting: the future of brain drug development.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2003-03-01

    As human longevity increases, the likelihood of the onset of diseases of the brain (and other organs) also increases. Clinical therapeutics offer useful long-term treatments, if not cures, if drugs can be delivered appropriately and effectively. Unfortunately, research in drug transport to the brain has not advanced very far. Through better characterization of the transport systems utilized within the blood-brain barrier, a greater understanding of how to exploit these systems will lead to effective treatments for brain disorders. Pardridge reviews the functions of the various known transport systems in the brain and discusses how the development of BBB drug-targeting programs in pharmaceutical and academic settings may lead to more efficacious treatments.

  8. Mast Cell - Glia Dialogue in Chronic Pain and Neuropathic Pain: Blood-Brain Barrier Implications.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells and microglia, working singly and in partnership, produce proinflammatory agents which play key roles in a wide array of nervous system disorders. Such neuroinflammatory settings may compromise integrity of both the blood-nerve barrier and blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier. While both belong to the innate immune system mast cells are far more ubiquitous, are resident in peripheral nerves and the central nervous system, and can influence blood-nerve barrier characteristics. Mast cells, being near the perivasculature especially within the dura, on the brain side of the BBB, are strategically located to play havoc with the BBB. Mast cells and glia are endowed with homeostatic mechanisms/molecules which come into play following tissue damage. These include the N-acylethanolamine family, especially N-palmitoylethanolamine, which is posited to be a key player in maintaining cellular homeostasis against external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. This review is intended as an overview covering the pathobiology of neuroinflammation in the context of mast cells and microglia, their role in BBB integrity, and therapeutic perspectives in targeting these cells to preserve BBB function.

  9. Methamphetamine-induced nitric oxide promotes vesicular transport in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tânia; Burgoyne, Thomas; Kenny, Bridget-Ann; Hudson, Natalie; Futter, Clare E; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P; Greenwood, John; Turowski, Patric

    2013-02-01

    Methamphetamine's (METH) neurotoxicity is thought to be in part due to its ability to induce blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Here, we investigated the effect of METH on barrier properties of cultured rat primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs). Transendothelial flux doubled in response to METH, irrespective of the size of tracer used. At the same time, transendothelial electrical resistance was unchanged as was the ultrastructural appearance of inter-endothelial junctions and the distribution of key junction proteins, suggesting that METH promoted vesicular but not junctional transport. Indeed, METH significantly increased uptake of horseradish peroxidase into vesicular structures. METH also enhanced transendothelial migration of lymphocytes indicating that the endothelial barrier against both molecules and cells was compromised. Barrier breakdown was only observed in response to METH at low micromolar concentrations, with enhanced vesicular uptake peaking at 1 μM METH. The BMVEC response to METH also involved rapid activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and its inhibition abrogated METH-induced permeability and lymphocyte migration, indicating that nitric oxide was a key mediator of BBB disruption in response to METH. This study underlines the key role of nitric oxide in BBB function and describes a novel mechanism of drug-induced fluid-phase transcytosis at the BBB.

  10. Immunogold labeling reveals subcellular localisation of silica nanoparticles in a human blood-brain barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Anguissola, Sergio; O'Neill, Tiina; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-01

    Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles.Subcellular location of nanoparticles has been widely investigated with fluorescence microscopy, via fluorescently labeled antibodies to visualise target antigens in cells. However, fluorescence microscopy, such as confocal or live cell imaging, has generally limited 3D spatial resolution. Conventional electron microscopy can be useful in bridging resolution gap, but still not ideal in resolving subcellular organelle identities. Using the pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopic imaging, we performed accurate examination of the intracellular trafficking and gathered further evidence of transport mechanisms of silica nanoparticles across a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Our approach can effectively immunolocalise a variety of intracellular compartments and provide new insights into the uptake and subcellular transport of nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation data, preservation of cellular structures, staining controls, optimisation of size amplification via the silver enhancement, and more imaging results from anti-clathrin and anti-caveolin 1

  11. Image-Guided Synthesis Reveals Potent Blood-Brain Barrier Permeable Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that several histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which are used to study/treat brain diseases, show low blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. In addition to low HDAC potency and selectivity observed, poor brain penetrance may account for the high doses needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Here we report the development and evaluation of highly potent and blood-brain barrier permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications based on an image-guided approach involving the parallel synthesis and radiolabeling of a series of compounds based on the benzamide HDAC inhibitor, MS-275 as a template. BBB penetration was optimized by rapid carbon-11 labeling and PET imaging in the baboon model and using the imaging derived data on BBB penetration from each compound to feed back into the design process. A total of 17 compounds were evaluated, revealing molecules with both high binding affinity and BBB permeability. A key element conferring BBB penetration in this benzamide series was a basic benzylic amine. These derivatives exhibited 1–100 nM inhibitory activity against recombinant human HDAC1 and HDAC2. Three of the carbon-11 labeled aminomethyl benzamide derivatives showed high BBB penetration (∼0.015%ID/cc) and regional binding heterogeneity in the brain (high in thalamus and cerebellum). Taken together this approach has afforded a strategy and a predictive model for developing highly potent and BBB permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications and for the discovery of novel candidate molecules for small molecule probes and drugs. PMID:24780082

  12. Blood-brain barrier transport kinetics of the cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins beauvericin and enniatins.

    PubMed

    Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; Veryser, Lieselotte; Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Peremans, Kathelijne; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-09-06

    The cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins beauvericin and enniatins are capable of reaching the systemic circulation through various routes of exposure and are hence capable of exerting central nervous system (CNS) effects, if they are able to pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which was the main objective of this study. Quantification of the mycotoxins was performed using an in-house developed and validated bio-analytical UHPLC-MS/MS method. Prior to the BBB experiments, the metabolic stability of the mycotoxins was evaluated in vitro in mouse serum and brain homogenate. The BBB permeation kinetics of beauvericin and enniatins were studied using an in vivo mice model, applying multiple time regression for studying the blood-to-brain influx. Additionally, capillary depletion was applied to obtain the fraction of the peptides really entering the brain parenchyma and the fraction loosely adhered to the brain capillary wall. Finally, also the brain-to-blood efflux transport kinetics was studied. Metabolic stability data indicated that the investigated mycotoxins were stable during the duration of the in vivo study. The brain influx study showed that beauvericin and enniatins are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in mice: using the Gjedde-Patlak biphasic model, it was shown that all investigated mycotoxins exert a high initial influx rate into the brain (K1 ranging from 11 to 53μL/(g×min)), rapidly reaching a plateau. After penetration, the mycotoxins reached the brain parenchyma (95%) with only a limited amount residing in the capillaries (5%). Negligible efflux (<0.005min(-1)) from the brain was observed in the 15min post-intracerebroventricular injection.

  13. Blood-brain barrier transport of short proline-rich antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Peremans, Kathelijne; Polis, Ingeborgh; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are becoming a great risk for human health, leading to an urgent need for new efficient antibacterial therapies. The short, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides from insects gained a lot of interest as a potential antibacterial treatment, having a low toxicity profile and being mainly active against Gram-negative bacteria. To know whether these antimicrobial peptides can be used for the treatment of cerebral infections, the blood-brain barrier transport characteristics of these peptides were investigated. This study describes the results of the in vivo blood-brain barrier experiments in mice, as well as the in vitro metabolic stability in mouse plasma and brain of apidaecin Api137, oncocin, drosocin and drosocin Pro5Hyp. The four investigated peptides showed a significant influx into the brain with a K(in) ranging between 0.37 and 0.86 µL/g x min and brain distribution volumes of 19.6 to 25.8 µL/g. Only for drosocin, a significant efflux was determined, with a k(out) of 0.22 min(-1). After entering the brain, oncocin was for approximately 80% trapped in the endothelial cells, while the other peptides reached the brain parenchyma for about 70%. All peptides were stable in plasma and brain during the experiments, with estimated metabolic half-lives ranging between 47 min and 637 min. We conclude that the investigated short, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides show an influx into the brain, which make them a promising antibacterial treatment of cerebral infections.

  14. Cyclosporine-inhibitable Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Transport Influences Clinical Morphine Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Konrad; Avram, Michael J.; Yermolenka, Viktar; Francis, Amber M.; Blood, Jane; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier is richly populated by active influx and efflux transporters influencing brain drug concentrations. Morphine, a drug with delayed clinical onset, is a substrate for the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein in vitro and in animals. This investigation tested whether morphine is a transporter substrate in humans. Methods Fourteen healthy volunteers received morphine (0.1 mg/kg, 1 h intravenous infusion) in a crossover study after nothing (control) or the validated P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine (5 mg/kg, 2 h infusion). Plasma and urine morphine and morphine glucuronide metabolite concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. Morphine effects were measured by miosis and analgesia. Results Cyclosporine minimally altered morphine disposition, increasing the area under the plasma morphine concentration versus time curve to 100 ± 21 versus 85 ± 24 ng/ml•hr (p < 0.05) without changing maximum plasma concentration. Cyclosporine enhanced (3.2 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.0 mm peak) and prolonged miosis, and increased the area under the miosis-time curve (18 ± 9 vs. 11 ± 5 mm-hr), plasma-effect site transfer rate constant (ke0, median 0.27 vs. 0.17 hr−1), and maximum calculated effect site morphine concentration (11.5 ± 3.7 vs. 7.6 ± 2.9 ng/ml) (all p < 0.05). Analgesia testing was confounded by cyclosporine-related pain. Conclusions Morphine is a transporter substrate at the human blood-brain barrier. Results suggest a role for P-glycoprotein or other efflux transporters in brain morphine access, although the magnitude of the effect is small, and unlikely to be a major determinant of morphine clinical effects. Efflux may explain some variability in clinical morphine effects. PMID:23851346

  15. Diesel exhaust particles induce oxidative stress, proinflammatory signaling, and P-glycoprotein up-regulation at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Anika M S; Bauer, Björn; Block, Michelle L; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Miller, David S

    2008-08-01

    Here, we report that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a major constituent of urban air pollution, affect blood-brain barrier function at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Isolated rat brain capillaries exposed to DEPs showed increased expression and transport activity of the key drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (6 h EC(50) was approximately 5 microg/ml). Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein was abolished by blocking transcription or protein synthesis. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase or pretreatment of capillaries with radical scavengers ameliorated DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation, indicating a role for reactive oxygen species in signaling. DEP exposure also increased brain capillary tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation was abolished when TNF-receptor 1 (TNF-R1) was blocked and was not evident in experiments with capillaries from TNF-R1 knockout mice. Inhibition of JNK, but not NF-kappaB, blocked DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation, indicating a role for AP-1 in the signaling pathway. Consistent with this, DEPs increased phosphorylation of c-jun. Together, our results show for the first time that a component of air pollution, DEPs, alters blood-brain barrier function through oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production. These experiments disclose a novel blood-brain barrier signaling pathway, with clear implications for environmental toxicology, CNS pathology, and the pharmacotherapy of CNS disorders.

  16. Radiation induces progenitor cell death, microglia activation, and blood-brain barrier damage in the juvenile rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Boström, Martina; Ek, C. Joakim; Li, Tao; Xie, Cuicui; Xu, Yiran; Sun, Yanyan; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa tumors are the most common childhood intracranial tumors, and radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments. However, irradiation induces long-term adverse effects that can have significant negative impacts on the patient’s quality of life. The purpose of this study was to characterize irradiation-induced cellular and molecular changes in the cerebellum. We found that irradiation-induced cell death occurred mainly in the external germinal layer (EGL) of the juvenile rat cerebellum. The number of proliferating cells in the EGL decreased, and 82.9% of them died within 24 h after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiation induced oxidative stress, microglia accumulation, and inflammation in the cerebellum. Interestingly, blood-brain barrier damage and blood flow reduction was considerably more pronounced in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions. The cerebellar volume decreased by 39% and the migration of proliferating cells to the internal granule layer decreased by 87.5% at 16 weeks after irradiation. In the light of recent studies demonstrating that the cerebellum is important not only for motor functions, but also for cognition, and since treatment of posterior fossa tumors in children typically results in debilitating cognitive deficits, this differential susceptibility of the cerebellum to irradiation should be taken into consideration for future protective strategies. PMID:28382975

  17. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier exacerbates spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rochon-Terry, Geneviève; Money, Tomas G A; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2014-07-01

    In response to cellular stress in the nervous system of the locust (Locusta migratoria) neural function is interrupted in association with ionic disturbances propagating throughout nervous tissue (Spreading depression; SD). The insect blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in the regulation of ion levels within the CNS. We investigated how a disruption in barrier function by transient exposure to 3M urea affects locusts' vulnerability to disturbances in ion levels. Repetitive SD was induced by bath application of ouabain and the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o) within the metathoracic ganglion (MTG) was monitored. Urea treatment increased the susceptibility to ouabain and caused a progressive impairment in the ability to maintain baseline [K(+)]o levels during episodes of repetitive SD. Additionally, using a within animal protocol we demonstrate that waves of SD, induced by high K(+), propagate throughout the MTG faster following disruption of the BBB. Lastly, we show that targeting the BBB of intact animals reduces their ability to sustain neural function during anoxic conditions. Our findings indicate that locust's ability to withstand stress is diminished following a reduction in barrier function likely due to an impairment of the ability of neural tissue to maintain ionic gradients.

  18. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier: development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: (1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and (2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Blood-brain barrier disruption in the striatum of rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; del Valle, Jaume; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè; Pelegrí, Carme; Vilaplana, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a natural toxin that is used to induce models of Huntington's disease (HD) in experimental animals. Here we injected 3-NPA into Sprague-Dawley rats in order to evaluate its effects on the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Evans blue (EB) extravasation was used to identify injured areas in the brains of the treated animals and immunostainings of endothelial brain barrier antigen (EBA), zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and laminin were used as markers to characterize the effects of the neurotoxin on the BBB. Treated rats had a significant loss of body weight compared to controls, and a correlation between motor affectation and body weight loss was observed in the former. The lateral part of the striatum was specifically injured in treated animals and the BBB almost disappeared in the core of the injured areas, as evidenced by a high EB extravasation and severe alterations of the immunostainings of the three BBB integrity markers compared to those of control animals. We conclude that the BBB is severely affected in the 3-NPA rat model of HD and that disruption of this barrier is a crucial event during the development of this disease.

  20. Electroporation of Brain Endothelial Cells on Chip toward Permeabilizing the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bonakdar, Mohammad; Wasson, Elisa M.; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier, mainly composed of brain microvascular endothelial cells, poses an obstacle to drug delivery to the brain. Controlled permeabilization of the constituent brain endothelial cells can result in overcoming this barrier and increasing transcellular transport across it. Electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon that has shown potential in permeabilizing and overcoming this barrier. In this study we developed a microengineered in vitro model to characterize the permeabilization of adhered brain endothelial cells to large molecules in response to applied pulsed electric fields. We found the distribution of affected cells by reversible and irreversible electroporation, and quantified the uptaken amount of naturally impermeable molecules into the cells as a result of applied pulse magnitude and number of pulses. We achieved 81 ± 1.7% (N = 6) electroporated cells with 17 ± 8% (N = 5) cell death using an electric-field magnitude of ∼580 V/cm and 10 pulses. Our results provide the proper range for applied electric-field intensity and number of pulses for safe permeabilization without significantly compromising cell viability. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to permeabilize the endothelial cells of the BBB in a controlled manner, therefore lending to the feasibility of using pulsed electric fields to increase drug transport across the BBB through the transcellular pathway. PMID:26789772

  1. Trojan Horse Transit Contributes to Blood-Brain Barrier Crossing of a Eukaryotic Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Tirado, Felipe H; Onken, Michael D; Cooper, John A; Klein, Robyn S; Doering, Tamara L

    2017-01-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the central nervous system (CNS) by restricting the passage of molecules and microorganisms. Despite this barrier, however, the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans invades the brain, causing a meningoencephalitis that is estimated to kill over 600,000 people annually. Cryptococcal infection begins in the lung, and experimental evidence suggests that host phagocytes play a role in subsequent dissemination, although this role remains ill defined. Additionally, the disparate experimental approaches that have been used to probe various potential routes of BBB transit make it impossible to assess their relative contributions, confounding any integrated understanding of cryptococcal brain entry. Here we used an in vitro model BBB to show that a "Trojan horse" mechanism contributes significantly to fungal barrier crossing and that host factors regulate this process independently of free fungal transit. We also, for the first time, directly imaged C. neoformans-containing phagocytes crossing the BBB, showing that they do so via transendothelial pores. Finally, we found that Trojan horse crossing enables CNS entry of fungal mutants that cannot otherwise traverse the BBB, and we demonstrate additional intercellular interactions that may contribute to brain entry. Our work elucidates the mechanism of cryptococcal brain invasion and offers approaches to study other neuropathogens.

  2. Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Azarin, Samira M.; Kay, Jennifer E.; Nessler, Randy A.; Wilson, Hannah K.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain health and is often compromised in disease. Moreover, as a result of its significant barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts neurotherapeutic uptake. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could prove enabling for brain research and pharmaceutical development. Herein, we demonstrate that endothelial cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be specified to possess many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, expression of nutrient transporters, and polarized efflux transporter activity. Importantly, hPSC-derived BBB endothelial cells respond to astrocytic cues yielding impressive barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1450±140 Ωxcm2) and molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo brain uptake. In addition, specification of hPSC-derived BBB endothelial cells occurs in concert with neural cell co-differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling, consistent with previous transgenic studies. This study represents the first example of organ-specific endothelial differentiation from hPSCs. PMID:22729031

  3. Electroporation of Brain Endothelial Cells on Chip toward Permeabilizing the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Mohammad; Wasson, Elisa M; Lee, Yong W; Davalos, Rafael V

    2016-01-19

    The blood-brain barrier, mainly composed of brain microvascular endothelial cells, poses an obstacle to drug delivery to the brain. Controlled permeabilization of the constituent brain endothelial cells can result in overcoming this barrier and increasing transcellular transport across it. Electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon that has shown potential in permeabilizing and overcoming this barrier. In this study we developed a microengineered in vitro model to characterize the permeabilization of adhered brain endothelial cells to large molecules in response to applied pulsed electric fields. We found the distribution of affected cells by reversible and irreversible electroporation, and quantified the uptaken amount of naturally impermeable molecules into the cells as a result of applied pulse magnitude and number of pulses. We achieved 81 ± 1.7% (N = 6) electroporated cells with 17 ± 8% (N = 5) cell death using an electric-field magnitude of ∼580 V/cm and 10 pulses. Our results provide the proper range for applied electric-field intensity and number of pulses for safe permeabilization without significantly compromising cell viability. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to permeabilize the endothelial cells of the BBB in a controlled manner, therefore lending to the feasibility of using pulsed electric fields to increase drug transport across the BBB through the transcellular pathway.

  4. Polymeric nanoparticles assembled with microfluidics for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, M. R.; de Menezes, L. R.; do Nascimento, D. F.; Souza, D. H. S.; Reynaud, F.; Marques, M. F. V.; Tavares, M. I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a challenge in the treatment of some diseases, since it prevents many drugs from reaching therapeutic concentrations in the brain. In this context, there is a growing interest in nanoparticles for drug delivery, since they are able to cross this barrier and target the brain. The use of polymeric materials in the development of these nanoparticles has been extensively studied. It has already been demonstrated that these nanosystems have the ability to cross the BBB, which allows effective drug release into the brain. Biodegradable polymers provide a great advantage in the development of nanosystems, but modifications of the nanoparticles' surface is essential. The traditional batch methods lack precise control over the processes of nucleation and growth, resulting in poor control over final properties of the nanoparticles. Therefore, microfluidics could be used to achieve a better production environment for the fabrication of nano- structured drug delivery systems. This study provides a brief review of: the BBB, the polymeric nanoparticles with the ability to overcome the barrier, the properties of the most used polymeric matrices, and the nanostructured drug delivery systems assembled with microfluidics.

  5. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier; Development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: 1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and 2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25355056

  6. Trojan Horse Transit Contributes to Blood-Brain Barrier Crossing of a Eukaryotic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Tirado, Felipe H.; Onken, Michael D.; Cooper, John A.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the central nervous system (CNS) by restricting the passage of molecules and microorganisms. Despite this barrier, however, the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans invades the brain, causing a meningoencephalitis that is estimated to kill over 600,000 people annually. Cryptococcal infection begins in the lung, and experimental evidence suggests that host phagocytes play a role in subsequent dissemination, although this role remains ill defined. Additionally, the disparate experimental approaches that have been used to probe various potential routes of BBB transit make it impossible to assess their relative contributions, confounding any integrated understanding of cryptococcal brain entry. Here we used an in vitro model BBB to show that a “Trojan horse” mechanism contributes significantly to fungal barrier crossing and that host factors regulate this process independently of free fungal transit. We also, for the first time, directly imaged C. neoformans-containing phagocytes crossing the BBB, showing that they do so via transendothelial pores. Finally, we found that Trojan horse crossing enables CNS entry of fungal mutants that cannot otherwise traverse the BBB, and we demonstrate additional intercellular interactions that may contribute to brain entry. Our work elucidates the mechanism of cryptococcal brain invasion and offers approaches to study other neuropathogens. PMID:28143979

  7. Computing the blood brain barrier (BBB) diffusion coefficient: A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Pedram, Maysam Z.; Heidari, Hossein; Alasty, Aria

    2016-07-01

    Various physical and biological aspects of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) structure still remain unfolded. Therefore, among the several mechanisms of drug delivery, only a few have succeeded in breaching this barrier, one of which is the use of Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs). However, a quantitative characterization of the BBB permeability is desirable to find an optimal magnetic force-field. In the present study, a molecular model of the BBB is introduced that precisely represents the interactions between MNPs and the membranes of Endothelial Cells (ECs) that form the BBB. Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) simulations of the BBB crossing phenomenon have been carried out. Mathematical modeling of the BBB as an input-output system has been considered from a system dynamics modeling viewpoint, enabling us to analyze the BBB behavior based on a robust model. From this model, the force profile required to overcome the barrier has been extracted for a single NP from the SMD simulations at a range of velocities. Using this data a transfer function model has been obtained and the diffusion coefficient is evaluated. This study is a novel approach to bridge the gap between nanoscale models and microscale models of the BBB. The characteristic diffusion coefficient has the nano-scale molecular effects inherent, furthermore reducing the computational costs of a nano-scale simulation model and enabling much more complex studies to be conducted.

  8. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Deosarkar, Sudhir P; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Wang, Bin; Sheffield, Joel B; Krynska, Barbara; Kiani, Mohammad F

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB). To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C) that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0 ± 0.9 x 10-6 cm/s to 2.9 ± 1.0 x 10-6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10-6 cm/s, respectively). Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we developed a

  9. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Deosarkar, Sudhir P.; Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Wang, Bin; Sheffield, Joel B.; Krynska, Barbara; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB). To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C) that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC) isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0±0.9 x 10−6 cm/s to 2.9±1.0 x 10−6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10−6 cm/s, respectively). Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we developed a

  10. Intestinal and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Ginkgolides and Bilobalide: In Vitro and In Vivo Approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study intestinal and blood brain barrier (BBB) transport of ginkgolides A, B, C, J and bilobalide, isolated from Ginkgo biloba (Family-Ginkgoaceae), was evaluated in Caco-2 and MDR1-MDCK cell monolayer models. Transepithelial transport was examined for 2 hours in both absorptive and secretor...

  11. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Moctezuma, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a vital phenomenon related to immunomodulation at the central and peripheral level. Sleep deficient in duration and/or quality is a common problem in the modern society and is considered a risk factor to develop neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep loss in rodents induces blood-brain barrier disruption and the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Several reports indicate that sleep loss induces a systemic low-grade inflammation characterized by the release of several molecules, such as cytokines, chemokines, and acute-phase proteins; all of them may promote changes in cellular components of the blood-brain barrier, particularly on brain endothelial cells. In the present review we discuss the role of inflammatory mediators that increase during sleep loss and their association with general disturbances in peripheral endothelium and epithelium and how those inflammatory mediators may alter the blood-brain barrier. Finally, this manuscript proposes a hypothetical mechanism by which sleep loss may induce blood-brain barrier disruption, emphasizing the regulatory effect of inflammatory molecules on tight junction proteins. PMID:27738642

  12. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic, crosses the blood-brain barrier and impairs iron-dependent hippocampal neuron dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Bastian, T W; Duck, K A; Michalopoulos, G C; Chen, M J; Liu, Z-J; Connor, J R; Lanier, L M; Sola-Visner, M C; Georgieff, M K

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Potential neurodevelopmental side effects of thrombopoietin mimetics need to be considered. The effects of eltrombopag (ELT) on neuronal iron status and dendrite development were assessed. ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier and causes iron deficiency in developing neurons. ELT blunts dendrite maturation, indicating a need for more safety studies before neonatal use.

  13. Blood-brain barrier models and their relevance for a successful development of CNS drug delivery systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-01

    During the research and development of new drugs directed at the central nervous system, there is a considerable attrition rate caused by their hampered access to the brain by the blood-brain barrier. Throughout the years, several in vitro models have been developed in an attempt to mimic critical functionalities of the blood-brain barrier and reliably predict the permeability of drug candidates. However, the current challenge lies in developing a model that retains fundamental blood-brain barrier characteristics and simultaneously remains compatible with the high throughput demands of pharmaceutical industries. This review firstly describes the roles of all elements of the neurovascular unit and their influence on drug brain penetration. In vitro models, including non-cell based and cell-based models, and in vivo models are herein presented, with a particular emphasis on their methodological aspects. Lastly, their contribution to the improvement of brain drug delivery strategies and drug transport across the blood-brain barrier is also discussed.

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Alvarado, G; Domínguez-Salazar, E; Pavon, L; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J; Gómez-González, B

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a vital phenomenon related to immunomodulation at the central and peripheral level. Sleep deficient in duration and/or quality is a common problem in the modern society and is considered a risk factor to develop neurodegenerative diseases. Sleep loss in rodents induces blood-brain barrier disruption and the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Several reports indicate that sleep loss induces a systemic low-grade inflammation characterized by the release of several molecules, such as cytokines, chemokines, and acute-phase proteins; all of them may promote changes in cellular components of the blood-brain barrier, particularly on brain endothelial cells. In the present review we discuss the role of inflammatory mediators that increase during sleep loss and their association with general disturbances in peripheral endothelium and epithelium and how those inflammatory mediators may alter the blood-brain barrier. Finally, this manuscript proposes a hypothetical mechanism by which sleep loss may induce blood-brain barrier disruption, emphasizing the regulatory effect of inflammatory molecules on tight junction proteins.

  15. Blood brain barrier impairment is associated with cerebrospinal fluid markers of neuronal damage in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, A; Atzori, C; Romito, A; Vai, D; Audagnotto, S; Stella, M L; Montrucchio, C; Imperiale, D; Di Perri, G; Bonora, S

    2016-02-01

    Blood brain barrier impairment occurs early in the course of infection by HIV and it may persist in a subset of patients despite effective antiretroviral treatment. We tested the hypothesis that HIV-positive patients with dysfunctional blood brain barrier may have altered biomarkers of neuronal damage. In adult HIV-positive highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART)-treated patients (without central nervous system infections and undergoing lumbar punctures for clinical reasons) cerebrospinal fluid albumin to serum ratios (CSAR), total tau, phosphorylated tau, 1-42 beta amyloid, and neopterin were measured. In 101 adult patients, cerebrospinal fluid-to-serum albumin ratios were 4.8 (3.7-6.1) with 12 patients (11.9%) presenting age-defined impaired blood brain barrier. A significant correlation was observed between CSAR and total tau (p = 0.005), phosphorylated tau (p = 0.008), and 1-42 beta amyloid (p = 0.040). Patients with impaired blood brain barrier showed significantly higher total tau (201.6 vs. 87.3 pg/mL, p = 0.010), phosphorylated tau (35.3 vs. 32.1 ng/mL, p = 0.035), and 1-42 beta amyloid (1134 vs. 830 pg/mL, p = 0.045). Despite effective antiretroviral treatment, blood brain barrier impairment persists in some HIV-positive patients: it is associated with markers of neuronal damage and it was not associated with CSF neopterin concentrations.

  16. Methamphetamine disrupts blood-brain barrier function by induction of oxidative stress in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava; Fan, Shongshan; Eidem, Tess; Papugani, Anil; Reichenbach, Nancy; Dykstra, Holly; Weksler, Babette B; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre O; Persidsky, Yuri

    2009-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a potent stimulant with strong euphoric properties, has a high abuse liability and long-lasting neurotoxic effects. Recent studies in animal models have indicated that METH can induce impairment of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus suggesting that some of the neurotoxic effects resulting from METH abuse could be the outcome of barrier disruption. In this study, we provide evidence that METH alters BBB function through direct effects on endothelial cells and explore possible underlying mechanisms leading to endothelial injury. We report that METH increases BBB permeability in vivo, and exposure of primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) to METH diminishes the tightness of BMVEC monolayers in a dose- and time-dependent manner by decreasing the expression of cell membrane-associated tight junction (TJ) proteins. These changes were accompanied by the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, increased monocyte migration across METH-treated endothelial monolayers, and activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in BMVEC. Antioxidant treatment attenuated or completely reversed all tested aspects of METH-induced BBB dysfunction. Our data suggest that BBB injury is caused by METH-mediated oxidative stress, which activates MLCK and negatively affects the TJ complex. These observations provide a basis for antioxidant protection against brain endothelial injury caused by METH exposure.

  17. Drug delivery to the brain in Alzheimer's disease: consideration of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2012-05-15

    The successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) will require drugs that can negotiate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the BBB is not simply a physical barrier, but a complex interface that is in intimate communication with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) and influenced by peripheral tissues. This review examines three aspects of the BBB in AD. First, it considers how the BBB may be contributing to the onset and progression of AD. In this regard, the BBB itself is a therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. Second, it examines how the BBB restricts drugs that might otherwise be useful in the treatment of AD and examines strategies being developed to deliver drugs to the CNS for the treatment of AD. Third, it considers how drug penetration across the AD BBB may differ from the BBB of normal aging. In this case, those differences can complicate the treatment of CNS diseases such as depression, delirium, psychoses, and pain control in the AD population.

  18. Paving the way towards complex blood-brain barrier models using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lauschke, Karin; Frederiksen, Lise; Hall, Vanessa J

    2017-04-11

    A tissue with great need to be modelled in vitro is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a tight barrier that covers all blood vessels in the brain and separates the brain microenvironment from the blood system. It consists of three cell types (neurovascular unit (NVU)) that contribute to the unique tightness and selective permeability of the BBB and has been shown to be disrupted in many diseases and brain disorders, such as, vascular dementia, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Given the progress that pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have made in the last two decades, it is now possible to produce many cell types from the BBB and even partially recapitulate this complex tissue in vitro. In this review, we summarize the most recent developments in PSC differentiation and modelling of the BBB. We also suggest how patient-specific human induced PSCs could be used to model BBB dysfunction in the future. Lastly, we provide perspectives on how to improve production of the BBB in vitro, for example by improving pericyte differentiation protocols and by better modelling the NVU in the dish.

  19. The molecular, cellular, and morphological components of blood-brain barrier development during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nellwyn; Ben-Zvi, Ayal

    2015-02-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of blood vessels in the brain and functions to protect the brain from unwanted blood born materials, support the unique metabolic needs of the brain, and define a stable environment crucial for brain homeostasis. The temporal profile of BBB development was long debated until recent studies produced convincing evidence demonstrating that the BBB is established and functional during embryogenesis. Here we review research focused on the molecular, cellular and morphological characteristics of BBB development. Our review discusses the precise temporal profile of BBB formation, the development of endothelial cell ultrastructure and the molecular components that provide sealing and transporting properties, the molecular pathways involved in the induction of BBB specific endothelial cell differentiation, the signaling pathways driving developmental angiogenesis versus barrier-genesis, and finally the contribution of other cell types to BBB formation. We examine aspects of BBB development that are still unresolved while highlighting research tools that could provide new insight to answer these open questions.

  20. A2A adenosine receptor regulates the human blood brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) symbolically represents the gateway to the central nervous system. It is a single layer of specialized endothelial cells that coats the central nervous system (CNS) vasculature and physically separates the brain environment from the blood constituents, to maintain the homeostasis of the CNS. However, this protective measure is a hindrance to the delivery of therapeutics to treat neurological diseases. Here, we show that activation of A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved agonist potently permeabilizes an in vitro primary human brain endothelial barrier (hBBB) to the passage of chemotherapeutic drugs and T cells. T cell migration under AR signaling occurs primarily by paracellular transendothelial route. Permeabilization of the hBBB is rapid, time-dependent and reversible and is mediated by morphological changes in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization induced by RhoA signaling and a potent down-regulation of Claudin-5 and VE-Cadherin. Moreover, the kinetics of BBB permeability in mice closely overlaps with the permeability kinetics of the hBBB. These data suggest that activation of A2A AR is an endogenous mechanism that may be used for CNS drug delivery in human. PMID:25262373

  1. Targeting Transporters: Promoting Blood-Brain Barrier Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical and biochemical barrier that precisely regulates the ability of endogenous and exogenous substances to accumulate within brain tissue. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight junction and adherens junction protein complexes, influx and efflux transporters) that work in concert to control solute permeation. Oxidative stress, a critical component of several diseases including cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and peripheral inflammatory pain, can cause considerable injury to the BBB and lead to significant CNS pathology. This suggests a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can protect the BBB in diseases with an oxidative stress component. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters, intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of endothelial drug delivery or for control of transport of endogenous substrates such as the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In particular, targeting transporters offers a unique approach to protect BBB integrity by promoting repair of cell-cell interactions at the level of the brain microvascular endothelium. This review summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present considerable opportunity for providing BBB protection and/or promoting BBB repair in the setting of oxidative stress. PMID:25796436

  2. A Stable and Reproducible Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model Derived from Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sevin, Emmanuel; Almeida, Catarina; Culot, Maxime; Dehouck, Lucie; Coisne, Caroline; Engelhardt, Britta; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Ferreira, Lino

    2014-01-01

    The human blood brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs), which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS) from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs) express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes. PMID:24936790

  3. Neuroinflammation: a common pathway in CNS diseases as mediated at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Michelle A; Dohi, Kenji; Banks, William A

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not simply a physical barrier but a regulatory interface between the central nervous system (CNS) and immune system. The BBB both affects and is affected by the immune system and connects at many levels with the CNS, including the following: (1) the BBB transports cytokines and secretes various substances with neuroinflammatory properties; (2) transporters are altered in disease states including traumatic injury, Alzheimer's disease and inflammatory processes; (3) cytokines and other immune secretions from the cells comprising the BBB are both constitutive and inducible; (4) immune cells are transported across the BBB by the highly regulated process termed diapedesis, which involves communication and interactions between the brain endothelial cells and the immune cells; (5) the neuroimmune system has various effects on the BBB, including modulation of important transport systems and in extreme pathological conditions even disruption of the BBB, and (6) the brain-to-blood efflux transporter P-glycoprotein is altered in inflammatory conditions, thus affecting drug delivery to the brain. In summary, the BBB is an interactive interface that regulates and defines many of the ways that the CNS and the immune system communicate with one another.

  4. Microfluidic organ-on-chip technology for blood-brain barrier research.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, Marinke W; van der Meer, Andries D; Eijkel, Jan C T; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes I

    2016-01-01

    Organs-on-chips are a new class of microengineered laboratory models that combine several of the advantages of current in vivo and in vitro models. In this review, we summarize the advances that have been made in the development of organ-on-chip models of the blood-brain barrier (BBBs-on-chips) and the challenges that are still ahead. The BBB is formed by specialized endothelial cells and separates blood from brain tissue. It protects the brain from harmful compounds from the blood and provides homeostasis for optimal neuronal function [corrected]. Studying BBB function and dysfunction is important for drug development and biomedical research. Microfluidic BBBs-on-chips enable real-time study of (human) cells in an engineered physiological microenvironment, for example incorporating small geometries and fluid flow as well as sensors. Examples of BBBs-on-chips in literature already show the potential of more realistic microenvironments and the study of organ-level functions. A key challenge in the field of BBB-on-chip development is the current lack of standardized quantification of parameters such as barrier permeability and shear stress. This limits the potential for direct comparison of the performance of different BBB-on-chip models to each other and existing models. We give recommendations for further standardization in model characterization and conclude that the rapidly emerging field of BBB-on-chip models holds great promise for further studies in BBB biology and drug development.

  5. Blood-brain barrier pathology in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease: implications for drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Brinda S; Monahan, Angela J; Carvey, Paul M; Hendey, Bill

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a tightly regulated barrier in the central nervous system. Though the BBB is thought to be intact during neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), recent evidence argues otherwise. Dysfunction of the BBB may be involved in disease progression, eliciting of peripheral immune response, and, most importantly, altered drug efficacy. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the BBB, its components, and their functions. We will critically evaluate the current literature in AD and PD BBB pathology resulting from insult, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Specifically, we will discuss alterations in tight junction, transport and endothelial cell surface proteins, and vascular density changes, all of which result in altered permeability. Finally, we will discuss the implications of BBB dysfunction in current and future therapeutics. Developing a better appreciation of BBB dysfunction in AD and PD may not only provide novel strategies in treatment, but will prove an interesting milestone in understanding neurodegenerative disease etiology and progression.

  6. Computational prediction of blood-brain barrier permeability using decision tree induction.

    PubMed

    Suenderhauf, Claudia; Hammann, Felix; Huwyler, Jörg

    2012-08-31

    Predicting blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is essential to drug development, as a molecule cannot exhibit pharmacological activity within the brain parenchyma without first transiting this barrier. Understanding the process of permeation, however, is complicated by a combination of both limited passive diffusion and active transport. Our aim here was to establish predictive models for BBB drug permeation that include both active and passive transport. A database of 153 compounds was compiled using in vivo surface permeability product (logPS) values in rats as a quantitative parameter for BBB permeability. The open source Chemical Development Kit (CDK) was used to calculate physico-chemical properties and descriptors. Predictive computational models were implemented by machine learning paradigms (decision tree induction) on both descriptor sets. Models with a corrected classification rate (CCR) of 90% were established. Mechanistic insight into BBB transport was provided by an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO)-based binary classifier analysis to identify the most predictive chemical substructures. Decision trees revealed descriptors of lipophilicity (aLogP) and charge (polar surface area), which were also previously described in models of passive diffusion. However, measures of molecular geometry and connectivity were found to be related to an active drug transport component.

  7. Blood-ocular and blood-brain barrier function in streptozocin-induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maeepea, O.; Karlsson, C.; Alm, A.

    1984-09-01

    Edetic acid labeled with chromium 51 was injected intravenously in normal rats and in rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes. One hour after the injection the animals were killed and the concentrations of edetic acid 51Cr in vitreous body, retina, and brain were determined. No significant difference was observed between the two groups for either tissue. In a second series, a mixture of tritiated 1-glucose and aminohippuric acid tagged with carbon 14 was injected instead of edetic acid. A substantial accumulation of aminohippuric acid 14C compared with tritiated 1-glucose was observed in the vitreous body and the brain of diabetic rats in comparison with the control group. It is concluded that untreated streptozocin-induced diabetes in rats for one to two weeks will not cause a generalized increase in the permeability of the blood-ocular or the blood-brain barriers, but organic acids may accumulate in the vitreous body as well as in the brain as a consequence of reduced outward transport through these barriers.

  8. Regulation of ABC transporters blood-brain barrier: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Miller, David S

    2015-01-01

    The brain capillary endothelial cells that constitute the blood-brain barrier express multiple ABC transport proteins on the luminal, blood-facing, plasma membrane. These transporters function as ATP-driven efflux pumps for xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. High expression of these ABC transporters at the barrier is a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutics, including chemotherapeutics, to the CNS. Here, I review the signals that alter ABC transporter expression and transport function with an emphasis on P-glycoprotein, Mrp2, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), the efflux transporters for which we have the most detailed picture of regulation. Recent work shows that transporter protein expression can be upregulated in response to inflammatory and oxidative stress, therapeutic drugs, diet, and persistent environmental pollutants; as a consequence, drug delivery to the brain is reduced (potentially bad and ugly). In contrast, basal transport activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP can be reduced through complex signaling pathways that involve events in and on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Targeting these signaling events provides opportunities to rapidly and reversibly increase brain accumulation of drugs that are substrates for the transporters (potentially good). The clinical usefulness of targeting signaling to reduce efflux transporter activity and improve drug delivery to the CNS remains to be established.

  9. Microfluidic organ-on-chip technology for blood-brain barrier research

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Marinke W; van der Meer, Andries D; Eijkel, Jan C T; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes I

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Organs-on-chips are a new class of microengineered laboratory models that combine several of the advantages of current in vivo and in vitro models. In this review, we summarize the advances that have been made in the development of organ-on-chip models of the blood-brain barrier (BBBs-on-chips) and the challenges that are still ahead. The BBB is formed by specialized e3ndothelial cells and separates blood from brain tissue. It protects the brain from harmful compounds from the blood and provides homeostasis for optimal neuronal function. Studying BBB function and dysfunction is important for drug development and biomedical research. Microfluidic BBBs-on-chips enable real-time study of (human) cells in an engineered physiological microenvironment, for example incorporating small geometries and fluid flow as well as sensors. Examples of BBBs-on-chips in literature already show the potential of more realistic microenvironments and the study of organ-level functions. A key challenge in the field of BBB-on-chip development is the current lack of standardized quantification of parameters such as barrier permeability and shear stress. This limits the potential for direct comparison of the performance of different BBB-on-chip models to each other and existing models. We give recommendations for further standardization in model characterization and conclude that the rapidly emerging field of BBB-on-chip models holds great promise for further studies in BBB biology and drug development. PMID:27141422

  10. The blood-brain barrier as a target in traumatic brain injury treatment.

    PubMed

    Thal, Serge C; Neuhaus, Winfried

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most frequent causes of death in the young population. Several clinical trials have unsuccessfully focused on direct neuroprotective therapies. Recently immunotherapeutic strategies shifted into focus of translational research in acute CNS diseases. Cross-talk between activated microglia and blood-brain barrier (BBB) could initiate opening of the BBB and subsequent recruitment of systemic immune cells and mediators into the brain. Stabilization of the BBB after TBI could be a promising strategy to limit neuronal inflammation, secondary brain damage and acute neurodegeneration. This review provides an overview on the pathophysiology of TBI and brain edema formation including definitions and classification of TBI, current clinical treatment strategies, as well as current understanding on the underlying cellular processes. A summary of in vivo and in vitro models to study different aspects of TBI is presented. Three mechanisms proposed for stabilization of the BBB, myosin light chain kinases, glucocorticoid receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are reviewed for their influence on barrier-integrity and outcome after TBI. In conclusion, the BBB is recommended as a promising target for the treatment of traumatic brain injury, and it is suggested that a combination of BBB stabilization and neuroprotectants may improve therapeutic success.

  11. Autoregulated paracellular clearance of amyloid-β across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Keaney, James; Walsh, Dominic M.; O’Malley, Tiernan; Hudson, Natalie; Crosbie, Darragh E.; Loftus, Teresa; Sheehan, Florike; McDaid, Jacqueline; Humphries, Marian M.; Callanan, John J.; Brett, Francesca M.; Farrell, Michael A.; Humphries, Peter; Campbell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is essential for maintaining brain homeostasis and protecting neural tissue from damaging blood-borne agents. The barrier is characterized by endothelial tight junctions that limit passive paracellular diffusion of polar solutes and macromolecules from blood to brain. Decreased brain clearance of the neurotoxic amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Whereas transport of Aβ across the BBB can occur via transcellular endothelial receptors, the paracellular movement of Aβ has not been described. We show that soluble human Aβ(1–40) monomers can diffuse across the paracellular pathway of the BBB in tandem with a decrease in the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin in the cerebral vascular endothelium. In a murine model of AD (Tg2576), plasma Aβ(1–40) levels were significantly increased, brain Aβ(1–40) levels were decreased, and cognitive function was enhanced when both claudin-5 and occludin were suppressed. Furthermore, Aβ can cause a transient down-regulation of claudin-5 and occludin, allowing for its own paracellular clearance across the BBB. Our results show, for the first time, the involvement of the paracellular pathway in autoregulated Aβ movement across the BBB and identify both claudin-5 and occludin as potential therapeutic targets for AD. These findings also indicate that controlled modulation of tight junction components at the BBB can enhance the clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:26491725

  12. The Effect of Ovariectomy and Estrogen on Penetrating Brain Arterioles and Blood-brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Marilyn J.; Godfrey, Julie A.; Wiegman, Marchien J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of estrogen replacement on the structure and function of penetrating brain arterioles (PA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Methods Female ovariectomized Sprague Dawley rats were replaced with estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) (OVX+E; N=13) and compared to ovariectomized animals without replacement (OVX; N=14) and intact controls (CTL, proestrous; N=13). Passive and active diameters, percent tone and passive distensibility of pressurized PA were compared. In addition, BBB permeability to Lucifer Yellow, a marker of transcellular transport, was compared in cerebral arteries. Results Ovariectomy increased myogenic tone in PA compared to CTL that was not ameliorated by estrogen treatment. Percent tone at 75 mmHg for CTL vs. OVX and OVX+E was 44 ± 3% vs. 51 ± 1% and 54 ± 3% (p<0.01 vs. CTL for both). No differences were found in passive diameters or distensibility between the groups. BBB permeability increased 500% in OVX vs. CTL animals, however, estrogen replacement restored barrier properties: flux of Lucifer Yellow for CTL, OVX and OVX+E was (ng/mL): 3.4 ± 1.2, 20.2 ± 5.3 (p<0.01 vs. CTL) and 6.15 ± 1.2 (n.s.). Conclusions These results suggest that estrogen replacement may not be beneficial for small vessel disease in the brain, but may limit BBB disruption and edema under conditions that cause it. PMID:19905968

  13. A Genetic Algorithm Based Support Vector Machine Model for Blood-Brain Barrier Penetration Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daqing; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhou, Nannan; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a highly complex physical barrier determining what substances are allowed to enter the brain. Support vector machine (SVM) is a kernel-based machine learning method that is widely used in QSAR study. For a successful SVM model, the kernel parameters for SVM and feature subset selection are the most important factors affecting prediction accuracy. In most studies, they are treated as two independent problems, but it has been proven that they could affect each other. We designed and implemented genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize kernel parameters and feature subset selection for SVM regression and applied it to the BBB penetration prediction. The results show that our GA/SVM model is more accurate than other currently available log BB models. Therefore, to optimize both SVM parameters and feature subset simultaneously with genetic algorithm is a better approach than other methods that treat the two problems separately. Analysis of our log BB model suggests that carboxylic acid group, polar surface area (PSA)/hydrogen-bonding ability, lipophilicity, and molecular charge play important role in BBB penetration. Among those properties relevant to BBB penetration, lipophilicity could enhance the BBB penetration while all the others are negatively correlated with BBB penetration. PMID:26504797

  14. Enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration and glioma therapy mediated by a new peptide modified gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hui; Wang, Kaiyuan; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Jianfeng; Lou, Jinning; Ye, Liya; Yan, Xueying; Lu, Weiyue; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Successful glioma gene therapy lays on two important factors, the therapeutic genes and efficient delivery vehicles to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reach gliomas. In this work, a new gene vector was constructed based on dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGL) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG), conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, the nucleolar translocation signal (NoLS) sequence of the LIM Kinase 2 (LIMK2) protein (LIMK2 NoLS peptide, LNP), yielding DGL-PEG-LNP. Plasmid DNA encoding inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) was applied as the therapeutic gene. DGL-PEG-LNP/DNA nanoparticles (NPs) were monodispersed, with a mean diameter of 90.6 ± 8.9 nm. The conjugation of LNP significantly enhanced the BBB-crossing efficiency, cellular uptake and gene expression within tumor cells. Mechanism studies suggested the involvement of energy, caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis in cellular uptake of LNP-modified NPs. MTT results showed that no apparent cytotoxicity was observed when cells were treated with synthesized vectors. Furthermore, LNP-modified NPs mediated strongest and most intensive apoptosis on the tumor site, and the longest median survival time of glioma-bearing mice. All the results demonstrated that LNP is a kind of efficient CPPs especially for BBB-crossing application, and DGL-PEG-LNP/DNA is a potential non-viral platform for glioma gene therapy via intravenous administration.

  15. Potentiation of neurotoxicity of Lathyrus sativus by manganese: alterations in blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Geeta; Shukla, Rakesh; Hasan, Mahdi; Khanna, Subhash K; Das, Mukul

    2009-05-01

    Environmental factors have been speculated to play an important role in potentiating the neurotoxicity of Lathyrus sativus (LS). Hence, blood-brain barrier permeability and neurotoxicity studies were carried out in manganese- and LS-exposed animals. Dietary feeding of LS (80%) plus Mn (0.4 mg/100 g diet) for 90 days to guinea pigs showed significant (p < 0.05) decrease in brain nucleotidase and ATPase activities when compared to control or LS alone treated groups. Combined treatment of LS and Mn showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in neuronal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (36-40%), ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (40-45%), glutathione-S-transferase (27-31%), and quinone reductase (24-25%) activities when compared to control and LS alone treated animals. Lipid peroxidation, a marker for membrane damage, was found to be relatively more enhanced (58-141%) along with significant (p < 0.05) depletion of GSH levels in LS+Mn-treated animals when compared to control, Mn alone, and LS alone treated groups. The neuronal catalase activity of lathyrus plus Mn-treated animals showed a pronounced decrease (37-49%) when compared to control, Mn, and lathyrus alone treated groups. On the contrary, glutathione peroxidase in brain of Mn and lathyrus alone treated animals indicated a respective increase (p < 0.05) of 18% and 20%, while the combined effect of lathyrus plus Mn exhibited an increase of almost 50% when compared to control guinea pigs. Single parenteral administration of Mn (15 mg/kg b.wt) to guinea pigs followed by single oral intubation of beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha, beta-diamino propionic acid (ODAP, 75 mg/guinea pig) resulted in a significant increase (143%) in neuronal ODAP content. ODAP (50 mg/kg,iv) treatment to mice pretreated with MnCl2 (10 mg/kg b.wt for 3 days or 40 mg/kg b.wt for 1 day), caused an enhancement in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability (129-196%), while ODAP and Mn alone showed relatively less enhancement (66-87%). The lumbar region of LS+Mn showed a

  16. Recreating blood-brain barrier physiology and structure on chip: A novel neurovascular microfluidic bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Pensabene, Virginia; Markov, Dmitry A.; Allwardt, Vanessa; Neely, M. Diana; Shi, Mingjian; Britt, Clayton M.; Hoilett, Orlando S.; Yang, Qing; Brewer, Bryson M.; Samson, Philip C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; May, James M.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu; Bowman, Aaron B.; Reiserer, Ronald S.; Wikswo, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical structure that serves as the gatekeeper between the central nervous system and the rest of the body. It is the responsibility of the BBB to facilitate the entry of required nutrients into the brain and to exclude potentially harmful compounds; however, this complex structure has remained difficult to model faithfully in vitro. Accurate in vitro models are necessary for understanding how the BBB forms and functions, as well as for evaluating drug and toxin penetration across the barrier. Many previous models have failed to support all the cell types involved in the BBB formation and/or lacked the flow-created shear forces needed for mature tight junction formation. To address these issues and to help establish a more faithful in vitro model of the BBB, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that is comprised of both a vascular chamber and a brain chamber separated by a porous membrane. This design allows for cell-to-cell communication between endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes and independent perfusion of both compartments separated by the membrane. This NeuroVascular Unit (NVU) represents approximately one-millionth of the human brain, and hence, has sufficient cell mass to support a breadth of analytical measurements. The NVU has been validated with both fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran diffusion and transendothelial electrical resistance. The NVU has enabled in vitro modeling of the BBB using all human cell types and sampling effluent from both sides of the barrier. PMID:26576206

  17. Effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol on ischemia-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Ennis, S R; Keep, R F

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effect of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a mitochondrial uncoupling agent, during focal brain ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption was assessed after 2 hours of occlusion with 2 hours of reperfusion or 4 hours of permanent occlusion by measurement of the influx rate constant (K(i)) for 3H-inulin in the MCA territory ipsi- and contralateral to the occlusion. Three experimental groups were examined: vehicle and 1 and 5 mg/kg DNP treated animals (given 30 minutes prior to occlusion). Four hours of permanent MCA occlusion only induced a modest increase in the K(i) for inulin in vehicle-treated animals (0.09 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.07 +/- 0.01 microL/g/min in contralateral tissue). Although 5 mg/kg DNP significantly increased this disruption (p < 0.01), this effect was relatively minor (0.14 +/- 0.02 microL/g/min). In contrast, DNP treatment in transient ischemia markedly increased barrier disruption. The ipsilateral K(i) for 3H-inulin were 0.15 +/- 0.04, 0.37 +/- 0.06, and 0.79 +/- 0.17 microL/g/min in vehicle, 1 mg/kg DNP and 5 mg/kg DNP groups, respectively. DNP did not induce barrier disruption in the contralateral hemisphere. Thus, while there is evidence that DNP can be neuroprotective, it has adverse effects on the BBB during ischemia, particularly with reperfusion. Considering the importance of naturally- or therapeutically-induced reperfusion in limiting brain damage, this may limit the utility of DNP and mitochondrial uncouplers as therapeutic agents.

  18. Current advances in delivery of biotherapeutics across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Boyden, Tracey; Liras, Jennifer; El-Kattan, Ayman; Brodfuehrer, Joanne

    2011-06-01

    Significant efforts through genomic approaches have been dedicated toward the identification of novel protein-protein interactions as promising therapeutic targets for indications such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and neuropsychiatric disorders. Additionally, the number of biotherapeutic agents entering the Pharmaceutical sector continues to increase and according to EvaluatePharma's "World Preview 2014" report, "the compounded annual growth rate of biologics is expected to be 8.5 percent from 2008-2014, eight to 10 times greater than the growth rate of small molecules". However, there are limited examples of success in developing biotherapeutic modalities for central nervous system (CNS) diseases in the drug development pipeline. A primary reason for the lack of application of biotherapeutics to neuroscience targets, is that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) isolates and protects CNS structures creating a unique biochemically and immunologically privileged environment, therefore passage of macromolecules across this barrier has additional challenges. An understanding of the anatomical and physiological properties of this barrier with respect to penetration of biotherapeutics is presented in this review document. In this summary, recent advances in biotherapeutic delivery mechanisms across the BBB including transcranial brain drug delivery, focused ultrasound technology, nasal delivery, absorptive endocytosis, and receptor mediated endocytosis are evaluated using an industrial perspective. With acknowledgement that each approach has advantages and disadvantages, this review discusses the opportunities and challenges that are encountered during application of these methods across a variety of therapeutic areas such as, pain, obesity, neuroscience, and oncology. Utilizing an industrial perspective, including consideration of cost of goods and commercial feasibility for these approaches, this review highlights technology features which would enable industry

  19. Breakdown of Blood-Brain and Blood-Spinal Cord Barriers During Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication: Role of Brain Temperature.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful and often-abused stimulant with potent addictive and neurotoxic properties. While it is generally believed that structural brain damage induced by METH results from oxidative stress, in this work we present data suggesting robust disruption of blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers during acute METH intoxication in rats. We demonstrate the relationships between METH-induced brain hyperthermia and widespread but structure-specific barrier leakage, acute glial cell activation, changes in brain water and ionic homeostasis, and structural damage of different types of cells in the brain and spinal cord. Therefore, METH-induced leakage of the blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers is a significant contributor to different types of functional and structural brain abnormalities that determine acute toxicity of this drug and possibly neurotoxicity during its chronic use.

  20. The pivotal role of astrocytes in an in vitro stroke model of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Gaiser, Fabian; Mahringer, Anne; Franz, Jonas; Riethmüller, Christoph; Förster, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Stabilization of the blood-brain barrier during and after stroke can lead to less adverse outcome. For elucidation of underlying mechanisms and development of novel therapeutic strategies validated in vitro disease models of the blood-brain barrier could be very helpful. To mimic in vitro stroke conditions we have established a blood-brain barrier in vitro model based on mouse cell line cerebEND and applied oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). The role of astrocytes in this disease model was investigated by using cell line C6. Transwell studies pointed out that addition of astrocytes during OGD increased the barrier damage significantly in comparison to the endothelial monoculture shown by changes of transendothelial electrical resistance as well as fluorescein permeability data. Analysis on mRNA and protein levels by qPCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy of tight junction molecules claudin-3,-5,-12, occludin and ZO-1 revealed that their regulation and localisation is associated with the functional barrier breakdown. Furthermore, soluble factors of astrocytes, OGD and their combination were able to induce changes of functionality and expression of ABC-transporters Abcb1a (P-gp), Abcg2 (bcrp), and Abcc4 (mrp4). Moreover, the expression of proteases (matrixmetalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and t-PA) as well as of their endogenous inhibitors (TIMP-1, TIMP-3, PAI-1) was altered by astrocyte factors and OGD which resulted in significant changes of total MMP and t-PA activity. Morphological rearrangements induced by OGD and treatment with astrocyte factors were confirmed at a nanometer scale using atomic force microscopy. In conclusion, astrocytes play a major role in blood-brain barrier breakdown during OGD in vitro. PMID:25389390

  1. Unilateral Opening of Rat Blood-Brain Barrier Assisted by Diagnostic Ultrasound Targeted Microbubbles Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hai; Zhu, Qiong; Hua, Xing; Xia, Hongmei; Tan, Kaibin; Gao, Yunhua; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key obstacle that prevents the medication from blood to the brain. Microbubble-enhanced cavitation by focused ultrasound can open the BBB and proves to be valuable in the brain drug delivery. The study aimed to explore the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of unilateral opening of BBB using diagnostic ultrasound targeted microbubbles destruction in rats. Methods. A transtemporal bone irradiation of diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous injection of lipid-coated microbubbles were performed at unilateral hemisphere. Pathological changes were monitored. Evans Blue extravasation grades, extraction from brain tissue, and fluorescence optical density were quantified. Lanthanum nitrate was traced by transmission electron microscopy. Results. After diagnostic ultrasound mediated microbubbles destruction, Evans Blue extravasation and fluorescence integrated optical density were significantly higher in the irradiated hemisphere than the contralateral side (all p < 0.01). Erythrocytes extravasations were demonstrated in the ultrasound-exposed hemisphere (4 ± 1, grade 2) while being invisible in the control side. Lanthanum nitrate tracers leaked through interendothelial cleft and spread to the nerve fiber existed in the irradiation side. Conclusions. Transtemporal bone irradiation under DUS mediated microbubble destruction provides us with a more accessible, safer, and higher selective BBB opening approach in rats, which is advantageous in brain targeted drugs delivery. PMID:27579317

  2. Drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alison; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a significant impediment to the delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain for treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been developed as a non-invasive method for transiently increasing the permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to targeted regions of the brain. Areas Covered The present review briefly compares the methods used to promote drug delivery to the brain and describes the benefits and limitations of FUS technology. We summarize the experimental data which shows that FUS, combined with intravascular microbubbles, increases therapeutic agent delivery into the brain leading to significant reductions in pathology in preclinical models of disease. The potential for translation of this technology to the clinic is also discussed. Expert Opinion The introduction of MRI guidance and intravascular administration of microbubbles to FUS treatments permits the consistent, transient, and targeted opening of the BBB. The development of feedback systems and real-time monitoring techniques improve the safety of BBB opening. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of brain disease resulting in effective, less-invasive treatments without the need for expensive drug development. PMID:24650132

  3. The blood-brain barrier as a regulatory interface in the gut-brain axes.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2006-11-30

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the unrestricted movement of peptides and proteins between the brain and blood. However, some peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the BBB by saturable and non-saturable mechanisms. Leptin and insulin each cross the BBB by their own transporters. Impaired transport of leptin occurs in obesity and accounts for peripheral resistance; that is, the condition wherein an obese animal loses weight when given leptin directly into the brain but not when given leptin peripherally. Leptin transport is also inhibited in starvation and by hypertriglyceridemia. Since hypertriglyceridemia occurs in both starvation and obesity, we have postulated that the peripheral resistance induced by hypertriglyceridemia may have evolved as an adaptive mechanism in response to starvation. Insulin transport is also regulated. For example, treatment of mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases insulin transport across the BBB by about threefold. Since many of the actions of CNS insulin oppose those of peripheral insulin and since LPS releases proinflammatory cytokines, enhanced transport of insulin across the BBB could be a mechanism which promotes insulin resistance in sepsis. The brain endothelial cells which comprise the BBB secrete many substances including cytokines. Such secretion can be stimulated from one side of the BBB with release into the other side. For example, it appears that adiponectin can inhibit release of interleukin-6 from brain endothelial cells. Overall, the BBB represents an important interface in mediating gut-brain axes.

  4. Role of the blood-brain barrier in the evolution of feeding and cognition.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2012-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the blood-to-brain passage of gastrointestinal hormones, thus informing the brain about feeding and nutritional status. Disruption of this communication results in dysregulation of feeding and body weight control. Leptin, which crosses the BBB to inform the CNS about adiposity, provides an example. Impaired leptin transport, especially coupled with central resistance, results in obesity. Various substances/conditions regulate leptin BBB transport. For example, triglycerides inhibit leptin transport. This may represent an evolutionary adaptation in that hypertriglyceridemia occurs during starvation. Inhibition of leptin, an anorectic, during starvation could have survival advantages. The large number of other substances that influence feeding is explained by the complexity of feeding. This complexity includes cognitive aspects; animals in the wild are faced with cost/benefit analyses to feed in the safest, most economical way. This cognitive aspect partially explains why so many feeding substances affect neurogenesis, neuroprotection, and cognition. The relation between triglycerides and cognition may be partially mediated through triglyceride's ability to regulate the BBB transport of cognitively active gastrointestinal hormones such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin.

  5. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Dohgu, Shinya; Robinson, Sandra M; Sly, William S; Grubb, Jeffery H; Banks, William A

    2015-01-01

    The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB) to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse) of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  6. Brain meets body: the blood-brain barrier as an endocrine interface.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2012-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) separates the central nervous system (CNS) from the peripheral tissues. However, this does not prevent hormones from entering the brain, but shifts the main control of entry to the BBB. In general, steroid hormones cross the BBB by transmembrane diffusion, a nonsaturable process resulting in brain levels that reflect blood levels, whereas thyroid hormones and many peptides and regulatory proteins cross using transporters, a saturable process resulting in brain levels that reflect blood levels and transporter characteristics. Protein binding, brain-to-blood transport, and pharmacokinetics modulate BBB penetration. Some hormones have the opposite effect within the CNS than they do in the periphery, suggesting that these hormones cross the BBB to act as their own counterregulators. The cells making up the BBB are also endocrine like, both responding to circulating substances and secreting substances into the circulation and CNS. By dividing a hormone's receptors into central and peripheral pools, the former of which may not be part of the hormone's negative feed back loop, the BBB fosters the development of variable hormone resistance syndromes, as exemplified by evidence that altered insulin action in the CNS can contribute to Alzheimer's disease. In summary, the BBB acts as a regulatory interface in an endocrine-like, humoral-based communication between the CNS and peripheral tissues.

  7. Mouse models of neurological disorders: a view from the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2010-10-01

    The number of disease models that involve an aspect of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysregulation have increased tremendously. The main factors contributing to this expansion have been an increased number of diseases in which the BBB is known to be involved, an increase in the known functions of the BBB, and an increase in the number of models and tools with which those diverse functions can be studied. In many cases, the BBB may be a target of disease; current thinking would include hypertensive encephalopathy and perhaps stroke in this category. Another category are those diseases in which special attributes of the BBB may predispose to disease; for example, the ability of a pathogen to cross the BBB often depends on the pathogen's ability to invoke transcytotic pathways in the brain endothelial or choroid plexus cell. Of special interest are those diseases in which the BBB may be the primary seat of disease or play a major role in the onset or progression of the disease. An increasing number of diseases are so categorized in which BBB dysfunction or dysregulation plays a major role; this review highlights such roles for the BBB including those proposed for Alzheimer's disease and obesity.

  8. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction as a cause and consequence of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Michelle A; Banks, William A

    2013-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays critical roles in the maintenance of central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis. Dysfunction of the BBB occurs in a number of CNS diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A prevailing hypothesis in the AD field is the amyloid cascade hypothesis that states that amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the CNS initiates a cascade of molecular events that cause neurodegeneration, leading to AD onset and progression. In this review, the participation of the BBB in the amyloid cascade and in other mechanisms of AD neurodegeneration will be discussed. We will specifically focus on three aspects of BBB dysfunction: disruption, perturbation of transporters, and secretion of neurotoxic substances by the BBB. We will also discuss the interaction of the BBB with components of the neurovascular unit in relation to AD and the potential contribution of AD risk factors to aspects of BBB dysfunction. From the results discussed herein, we conclude that BBB dysfunction contributes to AD through a number of mechanisms that could be initiated in the presence or absence of Aβ pathology.

  9. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wei; Gu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage. PMID:28249040

  10. Microbubbles and Blood Brain Barrier Opening: A Numerical Study on Acoustic Emissions and Wall Stress Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Goertz, David E.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles is an emerging technique for blood brain barrier (BBB) opening. Here, a comprehensive theoretical model of a bubble-fluid-vessel system has been developed which accounts for the bubble’s non-spherical oscillations inside a microvessel, and its resulting acoustic emissions. Numerical simulations of unbound and confined encapsulated bubbles were performed to evaluate the effect of the vessel wall on acoustic emissions and vessel wall stresses. Using a Marmottant shell model, the normalized second harmonic to fundamental emissions first decreased as a function of pressure (>50 kPa) until reaching a minima ("transition point") at which point they increased. The transition point of unbound compared to confined bubble populations occurred at different pressures and was associated with an accompanying increase in shear and circumferential wall stresses. As the wall stresses depend on the bubble to vessel wall distance, the stresses were evaluated for bubbles with their wall at a constant distance to a flat wall. As a result, the wall stresses were bubble size and frequency dependent and the peak stress values induced by bubbles larger than resonance remained constant versus frequency at a constant mechanical index. PMID:25546853

  11. Plasma from patients with HELLP syndrome increases blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kedra; Tremble, Sarah M; Owens, Michelle Y; Morris, Rachael; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2015-03-01

    Circulating inflammatory factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to contribute to the pathophysiology of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. To date, the occurrence of neurological complications in these women has been reported, but few studies have examined whether impairment in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or cerebrovascular reactivity is present in women having HELLP syndrome. We hypothesized that plasma from women with HELLP syndrome causes increased BBB permeability and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Posterior cerebral arteries from female nonpregnant rats were perfused with 20% serum from women with normal pregnancies (n = 5) or women with HELLP syndrome (n = 5), and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. Plasma from women with HELLP syndrome increased BBB permeability while not changing myogenic tone and reactivity to pressure. Addition of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester caused constriction of arteries that was not different with the different plasmas nor was dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside different between the 2 groups. However, dilation to the small- and intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel activator NS309 was decreased in vessels exposed to HELLP plasma. Thus, increased BBB permeability in response to HELLP plasma was associated with selective endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Transport Rankings of Non-Steroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs across Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro Models

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Iveta; Subileau, Eva-Anne; Toegel, Stefan; Gruber, Daniela; Lachmann, Bodo; Urban, Ernst; Chesne, Christophe; Noe, Christian R.; Neuhaus, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line) for proper data comparison. PMID:24466249

  13. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI. PMID:27180729

  14. Gpr124 is essential for blood-brain barrier integrity in central nervous system disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Junlei; Mancuso, Michael R; Maier, Carolina; Liang, Xibin; Yuki, Kanako; Yang, Lu; Kwong, Jeffrey W; Wang, Jing; Rao, Varsha; Vallon, Mario; Kosinski, Cynthia; Zhang, J J Haijing; Mah, Amanda T; Xu, Lijun; Li, Le; Gholamin, Sharareh; Reyes, Teresa F; Li, Rui; Kuhnert, Frank; Han, Xiaoyuan; Yuan, Jenny; Chiou, Shin-Heng; Brettman, Ari D; Daly, Lauren; Corney, David C; Cheshier, Samuel H; Shortliffe, Linda D; Wu, Xiwei; Snyder, Michael; Chan, Pak; Giffard, Rona G; Chang, Howard Y; Andreasson, Katrin; Kuo, Calvin J

    2017-04-01

    Although blood-brain barrier (BBB) compromise is central to the etiology of diverse central nervous system (CNS) disorders, endothelial receptor proteins that control BBB function are poorly defined. The endothelial G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Gpr124 has been reported to be required for normal forebrain angiogenesis and BBB function in mouse embryos, but the role of this receptor in adult animals is unknown. Here Gpr124 conditional knockout (CKO) in the endothelia of adult mice did not affect homeostatic BBB integrity, but resulted in BBB disruption and microvascular hemorrhage in mouse models of both ischemic stroke and glioblastoma, accompanied by reduced cerebrovascular canonical Wnt-β-catenin signaling. Constitutive activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling fully corrected the BBB disruption and hemorrhage defects of Gpr124-CKO mice, with rescue of the endothelial gene tight junction, pericyte coverage and extracellular-matrix deficits. We thus identify Gpr124 as an endothelial GPCR specifically required for endothelial Wnt signaling and BBB integrity under pathological conditions in adult mice. This finding implicates Gpr124 as a potential therapeutic target for human CNS disorders characterized by BBB disruption.

  15. Unilateral Opening of Rat Blood-Brain Barrier Assisted by Diagnostic Ultrasound Targeted Microbubbles Destruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yali; Cui, Hai; Zhu, Qiong; Hua, Xing; Xia, Hongmei; Tan, Kaibin; Gao, Yunhua; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key obstacle that prevents the medication from blood to the brain. Microbubble-enhanced cavitation by focused ultrasound can open the BBB and proves to be valuable in the brain drug delivery. The study aimed to explore the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of unilateral opening of BBB using diagnostic ultrasound targeted microbubbles destruction in rats. Methods. A transtemporal bone irradiation of diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous injection of lipid-coated microbubbles were performed at unilateral hemisphere. Pathological changes were monitored. Evans Blue extravasation grades, extraction from brain tissue, and fluorescence optical density were quantified. Lanthanum nitrate was traced by transmission electron microscopy. Results. After diagnostic ultrasound mediated microbubbles destruction, Evans Blue extravasation and fluorescence integrated optical density were significantly higher in the irradiated hemisphere than the contralateral side (all p < 0.01). Erythrocytes extravasations were demonstrated in the ultrasound-exposed hemisphere (4 ± 1, grade 2) while being invisible in the control side. Lanthanum nitrate tracers leaked through interendothelial cleft and spread to the nerve fiber existed in the irradiation side. Conclusions. Transtemporal bone irradiation under DUS mediated microbubble destruction provides us with a more accessible, safer, and higher selective BBB opening approach in rats, which is advantageous in brain targeted drugs delivery.

  16. Numerical study of nonlinear, transcranial focused ultrasound wave propagation for blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Roig, Bernardino; Redondo, Javier; Picó, Rubén; Marquet, Fabrice; Konofagou, Elisa E.; Camarena, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) techniques for Blood-Brain Barrier opening are emerging for localized and safe brain drug delivery. In this work, a transcranial FUS field is computed by a numerical approach entailing nonlinear wave propagation in the time domain in order to determine the position of the true focus and the existence of reflections and resonances. A transducer with a curvature radius of 90 mm, and an aperture of 80 mm was simulated at a central frequency of 500 kHz. The computational method was a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) implemented on nonlinear fluid model over a 2D Axis-symmetric domain. The boundary conditions were derived from the apparent density measurements based on a 3D CT scan acquisition performed on a Macaca mulatta primate. The study shows that nonlinear propagation shifts the peak pressure 3 mm away from the transducer when the pressure in the transducer increases from 2 kPa to 70 kPa. The focal shift is mainly due to the presence of the skull and dependent on the incidence angle of the ultrasonic beam. This study proposes a FDTD nonlinear numerical approach to study the propagation of ultrasonic waves through the skull, showing that nonlinear propagation can affect the position of the focal peak.

  17. Protective associations of HDL with blood-brain barrier injury in multiple sclerosis patients[S

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Kelly; Uher, Tomas; Browne, Richard W.; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Horakova, Dana; Posova, Helena; Vaneckova, Manuela; Seidl, Zdenek; Krasensky, Jan; Tyblova, Michaela; Havrdova, Eva; Zivadinov, Robert; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the associations of serum cholesterol and apolipoproteins with measures of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and CNS inflammation following the first clinical demyelinating event. This study included 154 patients [67% female; age, 29.5 ± 8.2 years (mean ± SD)] enrolled in a multi-center study of interferon β1-a treatment following the first demyelinating event. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained at screening prior to treatment. A comprehensive serum lipid profile and multiple surrogate markers of BBB breakdown and CNS immune activity were obtained. Higher levels of serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and ApoA-I were associated with lower CSF total protein level, CSF albumin level, albumin quotient, and CSF IgG level (all P ≤ 0.001 for HDL-C and all P < 0.01 for ApoA-I). HDL-C was also associated with CSF CD80+ (P < 0.001) and with CSF CD80+CD19+ (P = 0.007) cell frequencies. Higher serum HDL is associated with lower levels of BBB injury and decreased CD80+ and CD80+CD19+ cell extravasation into the CSF. HDL may potentially inhibit the initiation and/or maintenance of pathogenic BBB injury following the first demyelinating event. PMID:26243484

  18. Discovery of Novel Blood-Brain Barrier Targets to Enhance Brain Uptake of Therapeutic Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, Y Joy Yu; Chen, Xiaocheng; Bien-Ly, Nga; Bumbaca, Daniela; Tong, Raymond K; Gao, Xiaoying; Zhang, Shuo; Hoyte, Kwame; Luk, Wilman; Huntley, Melanie A; Phu, Lilian; Tan, Christine; Kallop, Dara; Weimer, Robby M; Lu, Yanmei; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Ernst, James A; Chih, Ben; Dennis, Mark S; Watts, Ryan J

    2016-01-06

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) poses a major challenge for developing effective antibody therapies for neurological diseases. Using transcriptomic and proteomic profiling, we searched for proteins in mouse brain endothelial cells (BECs) that could potentially be exploited to transport antibodies across the BBB. Due to their limited protein abundance, neither antibodies against literature-identified targets nor BBB-enriched proteins identified by microarray facilitated significant antibody brain uptake. Using proteomic analysis of isolated mouse BECs, we identified multiple highly expressed proteins, including basigin, Glut1, and CD98hc. Antibodies to each of these targets were significantly enriched in the brain after administration in vivo. In particular, antibodies against CD98hc showed robust accumulation in brain after systemic dosing, and a significant pharmacodynamic response as measured by brain Aβ reduction. The discovery of CD98hc as a robust receptor-mediated transcytosis pathway for antibody delivery to the brain expands the current approaches available for enhancing brain uptake of therapeutic antibodies.

  19. Influence of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on in vitro blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Chieh; Hsiao, I-Lun; Lin, Ho-Chen; Wu, Chien-Hou; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Huang, Yuh-Jeen

    2016-10-01

    An in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model being composed of co-culture with endothelial (bEnd.3) and astrocyte-like (ALT) cells was established to evaluate the toxicity and permeability of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs; 8nm) and TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2NPs; 6nm and 35nm) in normal and inflammatory central nervous system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was pre-treated to simulate the inflammatory responses. Both AgNPs and Ag ions can decrease transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value, and cause discontinuous tight junction proteins (claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1) of BBB. However, only the Ag ions induced inflammatory cytokines to release, and had less cell-to-cell permeability than AgNPs, which indicated that the toxicity of AgNPs was distinct from Ag ions. LPS itself disrupted BBB, while co-treatment with AgNPs and LPS dramatically enhanced the disruption and permeability coefficient. On the other hand, TiO2NPs exposure increased BBB penetration by size, and disrupted tight junction proteins without size dependence, and many of TiO2NPs accumulated in the endothelial cells were observed. This study provided the new insight of toxic potency of AgNPs and TiO2NPs in BBB.

  20. Collagen Micro-Flow Channels as an for In vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Katsuya; Terazono, Hideyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    An in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model is useful for drug discovery and efficacy measurements because it is a simple and convenient model of the in vivo BBB. However, the conventional in vitro BBB model does not account for shear stress to endotherial cell (EC) layers although in vivo ECs are exposed by shear stress. To improve this deficiency, we applied a microfluidics technique to a conventional in vitro BBB model and constructed a new in vitro BBB model. First, we confirmed that ECs can survive and proliferate on a cross-linked collagen gel and on an agarose including microbeads decorated with collagen type IV (CIV). In addition, we found that the cross-linker 1-ethyl-3carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) is less effective for EC proliferation than glutaraldehyde (GA), ethyleneglycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE), and agarose with microbeads. Applying a focused infrared laser, we fabricated microtunnels within the collagen gel, and we successfully cultured ECs on the inner tunnel wall. The results indicate the potential of gel microstructures for a microfluidic in vitro BBB model.

  1. Radiation-induced blood-brain barrier changes: pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    d'Avella, D; Cicciarello, R; Angileri, F F; Lucerna, S; La Torre, D; Tomasello, F

    1998-01-01

    The pathophysiology of whole-brain radiation (WBR) toxicity remains incompletely understood. The possibility of a primary change in blood-brain barrier (BBB) associated with microvascular damage was investigated. Rats were exposed to conventional fractionation in radiation (200 +/- cGy/d, 5d/wk; total dose, 4,000 cGy). BBB changes were assessed by means of the quantitative 14C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) technique coupled with standard electron microscopy (EM) and morphometric techniques as well as studies of the transcapillary passage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). At 15 days after WBR, AIB transport across BBB increased significantly in cerebral cortex. EM disclosed vesicular transport of HRP across the intact endothelium without opening of the tight junctions. Ninety days after WBR, well-defined alterations of the microvasculature were observed. The main feature of cortical microvessels was their collapsed aspect, associated with perivascular edema containing cell debris. Data suggest a possible association between damage of the microvascular/glial unit of tissue injury and development of radiation-induced brain cerebral dysfunction. We hypothesize the following sequence of pathophysiological events: WBR causes an early increase in BBB permeability, which produces perivascular edema and microvascular collapse. The interference with microcirculation affects blood flow and energy supply to the tissue, resulting in structural damage on an ischemic/dysmetabolic basis.

  2. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Akihiko; Dohgu, Shinya; Robinson, Sandra M.; Sly, William S.; Grubb, Jeffery H.; Banks, William A

    2015-01-01

    The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB) to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse) of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:26545208

  3. Permeating the Blood Brain Barrier and Abrogating the Inflammation in Stroke: Implications for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Borlongan, C.V.; Glover, Loren E.; Sanberg, P.R.; Hess, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapy has been shown as a potential treatment for stroke and other neurological disorders. Human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) may be a promising source of stem cells for cell therapy. The most desired outcomes occur when stem cells cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) and eventually reach the injured brain site. We propose, from our previous studies, that mannitol is capable of disrupting the BBB, allowing the transplanted cells to enter the brain from the periphery. However, when the BBB is compromised, the inflammatory response from circulation may also be able to penetrate the brain and thus may actually exacerbate the stroke rather than afford therapeutic effects. We discuss how an NF-kB decoy can inhibit the inflammatory responses in the stroke brain thereby reducing the negative effects associated with BBB disruption. In this review, we propose the combination of mannitol-induced BBB permeation and NF-kB decoy for enhancing the therapeutic benefits of cell therapy in stroke. PMID:22574981

  4. Blood Occludin Level as a Potential Biomarker for Early Blood Brain Barrier Damage Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rong; Yu, Kewei; Weatherwax, Theodore; Zheng, Handong; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Ke Jian

    2017-01-01

    Concern about intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the primary reason for withholding tPA therapy from patients with ischemic stroke. Early blood brain barrier (BBB) damage is the major risk factor for fatal post-thrombolysis ICH, but rapidly assessing BBB damage before tPA administration is highly challenging. We recently reported that ischemia induced rapid degradation of tight junction protein occludin in cerebromicrovessels. The present study investigates whether the cleaved occludin is released into the blood stream and how blood occludin levels correlate to the extent of BBB damage using a rat model of ischemic stroke. Cerebral ischemia induced a time-dependent increase of blood occludin with a sharp increase at 4.5-hour post-ischemia onset, which concurrently occurred with the loss of occludin from ischemic cerebral microvessels and a massive BBB leakage at 4.5-hour post-ischemia. Two major occludin fragments were identified in the blood during cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, blood occludin levels remained significantly higher than its basal level within the first 24 hours after ischemia onset. Our findings demonstrate that blood occludin levels correlate well with the extent of BBB damage and thus may serve as a clinically relevant biomarker for evaluating the risk of ICH before tPA administration. PMID:28079139

  5. Brain injury associated with widely abused amphetamines: neuroinflammation, neurogenesis and blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2010-12-01

    Over the course of the 20(th) century, it became increasingly clear that amphetamine-like psychostimulants carried serious abuse liability that has resulted in sociological use patterns that have been described as epidemics. In fact, drug addiction is a brain disease with a high worldwide prevalence, and is considered the most expensive of the neuropsychiatric disorders. This review goes beyond the previously well-documented evidence demonstrating that amphetamines cause neuronal injury. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of psychostimulants drugs have been extensively described giving particular attention to the role of oxidative stress and metabolic compromise. Recently, it was shown that the amphetamine class of drugs of abuse triggers an inflammatory process, emerging as a critical concept to understand the toxic effects of these drugs. Moreover, it has been suggested that psychostimulants compromise the capacity of the brain to generate new neurons (neurogenesis), and can also lead to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Together, these effects may contribute to brain damage, allowing the entry of pathogens into the brain parenchyma and thus decreasing the endogenous brain repair resources. The overall objective of this review is to highlight experimental evidence in an attempt to clarify the role of neuroinflammation in amphetamines-induced brain dysfunction and the effect of these drugs on both neurogenesis and BBB integrity.

  6. The TAM receptor Mertk protects against neuroinvasive viral infection by maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Daniels, Brian P; Shrestha, Bimmi; Proenca-Modena, Jose L; Lew, Erin D; Lazear, Helen M; Gorman, Matthew J; Lemke, Greg; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    The TAM receptors Tyro3, Axl and Mertk are receptor tyrosine kinases that dampen host innate immune responses following engagement with their ligands Gas6 and Protein S, which recognize phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells. In a form of apoptotic mimicry, many enveloped viruses display phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of their membranes, enabling TAM receptor activation and downregulation of antiviral responses. Accordingly, we hypothesized that a deficiency of TAM receptors would enhance antiviral responses and protect against viral infection. Unexpectedly, mice lacking Mertk and/or Axl, but not Tyro3, exhibited greater vulnerability to infection with neuroinvasive West Nile and La Crosse encephalitis viruses. This phenotype was associated with increased blood-brain barrier permeability, which enhanced virus entry into and infection of the brain. Activation of Mertk synergized with interferon-β to tighten cell junctions and prevent virus transit across brain microvascular endothelial cells. Because TAM receptors restrict pathogenesis of neuroinvasive viruses, these findings have implications for TAM antagonists that are currently in clinical development.

  7. Delivery of dopamine transporter tracer (PE2I) through blood brain barrier with ultrasound and microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrière, Sophie; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Bodard, Sylvie; Novell, Anthony; Vergote, Jackie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Thiéry, Jean-Claude; Chalon, Sylvie; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2012-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier plays a major role in controlling the delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of ultrasound and microbubbles to increase its delivery through the BBB and by determining the optimal experimental conditions that achieve a transient and safe BBB disruption. First, we established the ultrasound conditions that achieved a transient BBB disruption in rats using a non-permeant marker, Evans blue. Hence SonoVue® (450 μL/kg) and Evans blue (100 mg/kg) were intravenously administered. BBB leakage was obtained using ultrasound insonation through the rat skull at 1.6 MPa, PRF 1 Hz, duty cycle 12%, burst 10 ms during 120 sec. BBB disruption was observed in all treated animals (N=4) by histological analysis. The same experimental conditions were applied to enhance brain uptake of PE2I. Biological samples were analyzed using a scintillation counter apparatus. The results showed 50% and 20% increase of 125I-PE2I uptake in the striatum and cerebral cortex, respectively, in the treated rats (N=5) versus control (N=4). Similar enhancements were observed using SonoVue® at half concentration. This innovative method provides a great potential for intracerebral delivery of molecular ligands that could be used for the therapy of brain diseases.

  8. Gyroxin increases blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue dye in mice.

    PubMed

    Alves da Silva, J A; Oliveira, K C; Camillo, M A P

    2011-01-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease enzyme component of the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom. This toxin displays several activities, including the induction of blood coagulation (fibrinogenolytic activity), vasodilation and neurotoxicity, resulting in an effect called barrel rotation. The mechanisms involved in this neurotoxic activity are not well known. Because gyroxin is a member of a potentially therapeutic family of enzymes, including thrombin, ancrod, batroxobin, trypsin and kallicrein, the identification of the mechanism of gyroxin's action is extremely important. In this study, gyroxin was isolated from crude venom by affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. Analysis of the isolated gyroxin via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed a single protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 28 kDa, confirming the identity of the molecule. Furthermore, intravenous administration of purified gyroxin (0.25 μg/g of body weight) to mice resulted in symptoms compatible with barrel rotation syndrome, confirming the neurotoxic activity of the toxin. Mice treated with gyroxin showed an increase in the concentration of albumin-Evans blue in brain extracts, indicating an increase in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. This gyroxin-induced increase in BBB permeability was time-dependent, reaching a peak within 15 min after exposure, similar to the time span in which the neurotoxic syndrome (barrel rotation) occurs. This work provides the first evidence of gyroxin's capacity to temporarily alter the permeability of the BBB.

  9. Microfluidic modeling of the effects of nanoparticles on the blood-brain barrier in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwait, Craig; Hartman, Ryan; Bao, Yuping; Xu, Yaolin

    2011-11-01

    The difficulty of diffusing drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has caused an impasse for many brain treatments. Nanoparticles (NPs), to which drugs can adsorb, attach, or be entrapped, have the potential to deliver drugs past the BBB. Before nanoparticles can be used, their effects on the BBB and brain must be ascertained. Previous steady-state studies fall short for closely modeling in vivo conditions . Convection of nanoparticles is ignored, and endothelial cells' (ECs) morphology differs based on loading conditions; in vitro loading with continuous flow exhibit ECs indicating a more similar in vivo phenotype. NPs interact with monocytes prior to the BBB, and their toxicity effects were measured in flow conditions using both Trypan Blue cell counting and cell proliferation assays. The microfluidic device designed to model the BBB contained a concentric PES hollow fiber porous membrane in PFA tubing. Full use of the device will include ECs adhered on the inner surface and astrocytes adhered to the outer surface of the PES membrane to model cerebrovascular capillaries. Funded by NSF REU Site 1062611.

  10. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH.

  11. The Role of Circulating Tight Junction Proteins in Evaluating Blood Brain Barrier Disruption following Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiaoyang; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Fan, Zhicheng; Si, Mengya; Xie, Qingdong; Chang, Xiaolan; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Brain injury after intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a hallmark of ICH-induced brain injury; however, data mirroring BBB disruption in human ICH are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of circulating biomarkers in evaluating BBB disruption after ICH. Twenty-two patients with ICH were recruited in this study. Concentrations of the tight junction proteins (TJs) Claudin-5 (CLDN5), Occludin (OCLN), and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from patients with ICH. The white blood cell (WBC) count in blood and CSF, albumin (ALB) levels in the CSF (ALBCSF), and the BBB ratio were significantly higher in the ICH than in controls (p < 0.05). Significantly higher levels of CLDN5, OCLN, ZO-1, MMP-9, and VEGF in CSF were observed in the ICH group; these biomarkers were also positively associated with BBB ratio (p < 0.05). Our data revealed that circulating TJs could be considered the potential biomarkers reflecting the integrity of the BBB in ICH. PMID:26586924

  12. Angiogenesis in refractory depression: A possible phenotypic target to avoid the blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Maki K

    Major depressive syndrome (so-called depression) is a common but serious mental disease that causes low mood. Most patients are treatable, mainly because of high response rates for medicines such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, there are still a considerable number of patients with refractory or drug-resistant depression. On the other hand, recent findings suggest that angiogenesis, i.e., making new blood vessels, could have an important role in the recovery from depressive disorders, at least in part. It has been reported that the brain capillaries are physiologically capable of undergoing angiogenesis upon stimuli such as exercise and SSRIs seem to accelerate brain angiogenesis. Drugs targeting angiogenesis may possibly be another good concept. In addition, the blood brain barrier (BBB), which is a major obstacle for drug development for the central nervous system, would be circumvented. Here I summarize the reports that relate angiogenesis to a cure for major depression and discuss some of the potential molecular targets.

  13. Astrocyte-derived VEGF-A drives blood-brain barrier disruption in CNS inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Asp, Linnea; Zhang, Jingya; Navrazhina, Kristina; Pham, Trinh; Mariani, John N; Mahase, Sean; Dutta, Dipankar J; Seto, Jeremy; Kramer, Elisabeth G; Ferrara, Napoleone; Sofroniew, Michael V; John, Gareth R

    2012-07-01

    In inflammatory CNS conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), current options to treat clinical relapse are limited, and more selective agents are needed. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an early feature of lesion formation that correlates with clinical exacerbation, leading to edema, excitotoxicity, and entry of serum proteins and inflammatory cells. Here, we identify astrocytic expression of VEGF-A as a key driver of BBB permeability in mice. Inactivation of astrocytic Vegfa expression reduced BBB breakdown, decreased lymphocyte infiltration and neuropathology in inflammatory and demyelinating lesions, and reduced paralysis in a mouse model of MS. Knockdown studies in CNS endothelium indicated activation of the downstream effector eNOS as the principal mechanism underlying the effects of VEGF-A on the BBB. Systemic administration of the selective eNOS inhibitor cavtratin in mice abrogated VEGF-A-induced BBB disruption and pathology and protected against neurologic deficit in the MS model system. Collectively, these data identify blockade of VEGF-A signaling as a protective strategy to treat inflammatory CNS disease.

  14. Crossing the Blood-Brain Barrier: Recent Advances in Drug Delivery to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur M; Patel, Bhoomika M

    2017-02-01

    CNS disorders are on the rise despite advancements in our understanding of their pathophysiological mechanisms. A major hurdle to the treatment of these disorders is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which serves as an arduous janitor to protect the brain. Many drugs are being discovered for CNS disorders, which, however fail to enter the market because of their inability to cross the BBB. This is a pronounced challenge for the pharmaceutical fraternity. Hence, in addition to the discovery of novel entities and drug candidates, scientists are also developing new formulations of existing drugs for brain targeting. Several approaches have been investigated to allow therapeutics to cross the BBB. As the molecular structure of the BBB is better elucidated, several key approaches for brain targeting include physiological transport mechanisms such as adsorptive-mediated transcytosis, inhibition of active efflux pumps, receptor-mediated transport, cell-mediated endocytosis, and the use of peptide vectors. Drug-delivery approaches comprise delivery from microspheres, biodegradable wafers, and colloidal drug-carrier systems (e.g., liposomes, nanoparticles, nanogels, dendrimers, micelles, nanoemulsions, polymersomes, exosomes, and quantum dots). The current review discusses the latest advancements in these approaches, with a major focus on articles published in 2015 and 2016. In addition, we also cover the alternative delivery routes, such as intranasal and convection-enhanced diffusion methods, and disruption of the BBB for brain targeting.

  15. Bacterial induction of Snail1 contributes to blood-brain barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brandon J.; Hancock, Bryan M.; Bermudez, Andres; Cid, Natasha Del; Reyes, Efren; van Sorge, Nina M.; Lauth, Xavier; Smurthwaite, Cameron A.; Hilton, Brett J.; Stotland, Aleksandr; Banerjee, Anirban; Buchanan, John; Wolkowicz, Roland; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infection of the CNS that results when blood-borne bacteria are able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate bacterial BBB disruption and penetration are not well understood. Here, we found that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) with GBS and other meningeal pathogens results in the induction of host transcriptional repressor Snail1, which impedes expression of tight junction genes. Moreover, GBS infection also induced Snail1 expression in murine and zebrafish models. Tight junction components ZO-1, claudin 5, and occludin were decreased at both the transcript and protein levels in hBMECs following GBS infection, and this repression was dependent on Snail1 induction. Bacteria-independent Snail1 expression was sufficient to facilitate tight junction disruption, promoting BBB permeability to allow bacterial passage. GBS induction of Snail1 expression was dependent on the ERK1/2/MAPK signaling cascade and bacterial cell wall components. Finally, overexpression of a dominant-negative Snail1 homolog in zebrafish elevated transcription of tight junction protein–encoding genes and increased zebrafish survival in response to GBS challenge. Taken together, our data support a Snail1-dependent mechanism of BBB disruption and penetration by meningeal pathogens. PMID:25961453

  16. Regulation of ABC Efflux Transporters at Blood-Brain Barrier in Health and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qosa, Hisham; Miller, David S.; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The strength of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in providing protection to the central nervous system from exposure to circulating chemicals is maintained by tight junctions between endothelial cells and by a broad range of transporter proteins that regulate exchange between CNS and blood. The most important transporters that restrict the permeability of large number of toxins as well as therapeutic agents are the ABC transporters. Among them, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 are the utmost studied. These efflux transporters are neuroprotective, limiting the brain entry of neurotoxins; however, they could also restrict the entry of many therapeutics and contribute to CNS pharmacoresistance. Characterization of several regulatory pathways that govern expression and activity of ABC efflux transporters in the endothelium of brain capillaries have led to an emerging consensus that these processes are complex and contain several cellular and molecular elements. Alterations in ABC efflux transporters expression and/or activity occur in several neurological diseases. Here, we review the signaling pathways that regulate expression and transport activity of P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 as well as how their expression/activity changes in neurological diseases. PMID:26187753

  17. The role of pericytic laminin in blood brain barrier integrity maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Jyoti; Zhang, Xuanming; Yao, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Laminin, a major component of the basement membrane, plays an important role in blood brain barrier regulation. At the neurovascular unit, brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes synthesize and deposit different laminin isoforms into the basement membrane. It has been shown that laminin α4 (endothelial laminin) regulates vascular integrity at embryonic/neonatal stage, while astrocytic laminin maintains vascular integrity in adulthood. Here, we investigate the function of pericyte-derived laminin in vascular integrity. Using a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that loss of pericytic laminin leads to hydrocephalus and BBB breakdown in a small percentage (10.7%) of the mutants. Interestingly, BBB disruption always goes hand-in-hand with hydrocephalus in these mutants, and neither symptom is observed in the rest 89.3% of the mutants. Further mechanistic studies show that reduced tight junction proteins, diminished AQP4 expression, and decreased pericyte coverage are responsible for the BBB disruption. Together, these data suggest that pericyte-derived laminin is involved in the maintenance of BBB integrity and regulation of ventricular size/development. PMID:27808256

  18. Trafficking of Endogenous Immunoglobulins by Endothelial Cells at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Villaseñor, Roberto; Ozmen, Laurence; Messaddeq, Nadia; Grüninger, Fiona; Loetscher, Hansruedi; Keller, Annika; Betsholtz, Christer; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Collin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) restricts access of large molecules to the brain. The low endocytic activity of brain endothelial cells (BECs) is believed to limit delivery of immunoglobulins (IgG) to the brain parenchyma. Here, we report that endogenous mouse IgG are localized within intracellular vesicles at steady state in BECs in vivo. Using high-resolution quantitative microscopy, we found a fraction of endocytosed IgG in lysosomes. We observed that loss of pericytes (key components of the BBB) in pdgf-bret/ret mice affects the intracellular distribution of endogenous mouse IgG in BECs. In these mice, endogenous IgG was not detected within lysosomes but instead accumulate at the basement membrane and brain parenchyma. Such IgG accumulation could be due to reduced lysosomal clearance and increased sorting to the abluminal membrane of BECs. Our results suggest that, in addition to low uptake from circulation, IgG lysosomal degradation may be a downstream mechanism by which BECs further restrict IgG access to the brain. PMID:27149947

  19. Studies of the penetration of the blood brain barrier by atrial natriuretic factor.

    PubMed

    Levin, E R; Frank, H J; Weber, M A; Ismail, M; Mills, S

    1987-09-30

    The atrial natriuretic factors (ANF) have been detected in various areas of the brain. To determine whether circulating blood borne ANF could contribute to the ANF content in the central nervous systems we examined the ability of ANF-99-126 or ANF-102-126 to penetrate the blood brain barrier. Carotid artery injections of [3H] inulin with [125I] ANF in anesthetized rabbits resulted in a comparably minimal brain uptake index (BUI) for each labeled substance as measured in cerebral cortex extracts. Injection of [3H] HOH and [125I] ANF resulted in a mean BUI in cortex of 4.9 +/- .6 (SEM)% for ANF relative to triated water; this low uptake was not significantly saturable. The BUI ratio for ANF/HOH in olfactory bulb was somewhat higher though still low, at 7.0 +/- 9%, possibly reflecting the high density of ANF receptors in this structure. Infusion of [125I] ANF into the carotid artery of anesthetized rabbits resulted in little radioactivity being detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. Infusion of unlabeled ANF, which raised plasma levels as high as 26.3 ng/ml, resulted in little change in CSF levels. Our results demonstrate that the uptake of ANF into the brain is minimal and supports the idea that local synthesis of ANF predominantly accounts for the brain pool of this peptide.

  20. Brain Meets Body: The Blood-Brain Barrier as an Endocrine Interface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) separates the central nervous system (CNS) from the peripheral tissues. However, this does not prevent hormones from entering the brain, but shifts the main control of entry to the BBB. In general, steroid hormones cross the BBB by transmembrane diffusion, a nonsaturable process resulting in brain levels that reflect blood levels, whereas thyroid hormones and many peptides and regulatory proteins cross using transporters, a saturable process resulting in brain levels that reflect blood levels and transporter characteristics. Protein binding, brain-to-blood transport, and pharmacokinetics modulate BBB penetration. Some hormones have the opposite effect within the CNS than they do in the periphery, suggesting that these hormones cross the BBB to act as their own counterregulators. The cells making up the BBB are also endocrine like, both responding to circulating substances and secreting substances into the circulation and CNS. By dividing a hormone's receptors into central and peripheral pools, the former of which may not be part of the hormone's negative feed back loop, the BBB fosters the development of variable hormone resistance syndromes, as exemplified by evidence that altered insulin action in the CNS can contribute to Alzheimer's disease. In summary, the BBB acts as a regulatory interface in an endocrine-like, humoral-based communication between the CNS and peripheral tissues. PMID:22778219

  1. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-05-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI.

  2. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (Arteriolosclerosis) in Brains of Older People

    PubMed Central

    Khoong, Cheryl H.L.; Poon, Wayne; Esiri, Margaret M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Hainsworth, Atticus H.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects brain tissue from potentially harmful plasma components. Small vessel disease ([SVD], arteriolosclerosis) is common in the brains of older people and is associated with lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and vascular dementia. To determine whether plasma extravasation is associated with SVD, we immunolabeled the plasma proteins fibrinogen and IgG, which are assumed to reflect BBB dysfunction, in deep grey matter (anterior caudate-putamen, [DGM]) and deep subcortical white matter (DWM) in the brains of a well-characterized patient cohort with minimal Alzheimer disease pathology (Braak stage 0-II) (n = 84; age ≥65 years). Morphometric measures of fibrinogen labeling were compared between people with neuropathologically defined SVD and aged control subjects. Parenchymal cellular labeling with fibrinogen and IgG was detectable in DGM and DWM in many subjects (>70%). Quantitative measures of fibrinogen were not associated with SVD in DGM or DWM; SVD severity was correlated between DGM and DWM (p < 0.0001). Fibrinogen in DGM showed a modest association with a history of hypertension; DWM fibrinogen was associated with dementia and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (all p < 0.05). In DWM, SVD was associated with leukoaraiosis identified in life (p < 0.05), but fibrinogen was not. Our data suggest that in aged brains plasma extravasation and hence local BBB dysfunction is common but do not support an association with SVD. PMID:25289893

  3. Role of the blood-brain barrier in the nutrition of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Campos-Bedolla, Patricia; Walter, Fruzsina R; Veszelka, Szilvia; Deli, Mária A

    2014-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and complex interface between the blood and the central nervous system regulating brain homeostasis. Major functions of the BBB include the transport of nutrients and protection of the brain from toxic compounds. This review summarizes the most important transport pathways contributing to the nutrition of the brain. Carrier-mediated transport selectively delivers small molecules like sugars, amino acids, vitamins, and trace elements. Large biomolecules, lipoproteins, peptide and protein hormones cross the BBB by receptor-mediated transport. Active efflux transporters participate in the brain efflux of endogenous metabolites as well as toxins, xenobiotics and drugs. Dysfunction in the transport of nutrients at the BBB is described in several neurological disorders and diseases. The BBB penetration of neuroprotective nutrients, especially plant polyphenols and alkaloids, their potential protective effect on brain endothelium and the interaction of nutraceuticals with active efflux transporters at the BBB are discussed. In vitro BBB models to examine nutrient transport are also presented.

  4. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in disorders of the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Raffaella; Pansiot, Julien; Bettati, Donatella; Strazielle, Nathalie; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François; Damante, Giuseppe; Fleiss, Bobbi; Titomanlio, Luigi; Gressens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of the developing brain represent a major health problem. The neurological manifestations of brain lesions can range from severe clinical deficits to more subtle neurological signs or behavioral problems and learning disabilities, which often become evident many years after the initial damage. These long-term sequelae are due at least in part to central nervous system immaturity at the time of the insult. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain and maintains homeostasis. BBB alterations are observed during both acute and chronic brain insults. After an insult, excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters are released, causing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent changes in BBB permeability that allow immune cells to enter and stimulate an inflammatory response. The cytokines, chemokines and other molecules released as well as peripheral and local immune cells can activate an inflammatory cascade in the brain, leading to secondary neurodegeneration that can continue for months or even years and finally contribute to post-insult neuronal deficits. The role of the BBB in perinatal disorders is poorly understood. The inflammatory response, which can be either acute (e.g., perinatal stroke, traumatic brain injury) or chronic (e.g., perinatal infectious diseases) actively modulates the pathophysiological processes underlying brain injury. We present an overview of current knowledge about BBB dysfunction in the developing brain during acute and chronic insults, along with clinical and experimental data. PMID:25741233

  5. Delivery of antihuman African trypanosomiasis drugs across the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Gayathri N; Watson, Christopher P; Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Sanderson, Lisa; Thomas, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness) is a potentially fatal disease caused by the parasite, Trypanosoma brucei sp. The parasites are transmitted by the bite of insect vectors belonging to the genus Glossina (tsetse flies) and display a life cycle strategy that is equally spread between human and insect hosts. T.b. gambiense is found in western and central Africa whereas, T.b. rhodesiense is found in eastern and southern Africa. The disease has two clinical stages: a blood stage after the bite of an infected tsetse fly, followed by a central nervous system (CNS) stage where the parasite penetrates the brain; causing death if left untreated. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes the CNS stage difficult to treat because it prevents 98% of all known compounds from entering the brain, including some anti-HAT drugs. Those that do enter the brain are toxic compounds in their own right and have serious side effects. There are only a few drugs available to treat HAT and those that do are stage specific. This review summarizes the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of HAT and provides a close examination of the BBB transport of anti-HAT drugs and an overview of the latest drugs in development.

  6. Targeted delivery of GDNF through the blood-brain barrier by MRI-guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Shi, Yu; Lu, Lin; Liu, Li; Cai, Youli; Zheng, Hairong; Liu, Xin; Yan, Fei; Zou, Chao; Sun, Chengyu; Shi, Jie; Lu, Shukun; Chen, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), are promising therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the application of GDNF to treat these diseases effectively is limited because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the local delivery of macromolecular therapeutic agents from entering the central nervous system (CNS). Focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles (MBs) using appropriate parameters has been previously demonstrated to be able to open the BBB locally and noninvasively. This study investigated the targeted delivery of GDNF MBs through the BBB by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound. Evans Blue extravasation and histological examination were used to determine the optimum focused ultrasound parameters. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to verify the effects of GDNF bound on MBs using a biotin-avidin bridging chemistry method to promote GDNF delivery into the brain. The results showed that GDNF can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the CNS through the BBB using MRI-guided focused ultrasound combined with MBs under optimum parameters. MBs that bind GDNF combined with MRI-guided focused ultrasound may be an effective way of delivering neurotrophic factors directly into the CNS. The method described herein provides a potential means of treating patients with CNS diseases.

  7. Dynamic study of blood-brain barrier closure after its disruption using ultrasound: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Benjamin; Larrat, Benoit; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Robic, Caroline; Robert, Philippe; Port, Marc; Le Bihan, Denis; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Lethimonnier, Franck; Mériaux, Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents to the brain is majorly hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recently, many studies have demonstrated local and transient disruption of the BBB using low power ultrasound sonication combined with intravascular microbubbles. However, BBB opening and closure mechanisms are poorly understood, especially the maximum gap that may be safely generated between endothelial cells and the duration of opening of the BBB. Here, we studied BBB opening and closure under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance in a rat model. First, MR contrast agents (CA) of different hydrodynamic diameters (1 to 65 nm) were employed to estimate the largest molecular size permissible across the cerebral tissues. Second, to estimate the duration of the BBB opening, the CA were injected at various times post-BBB disruption (12 minutes to 24 hours). A T(1) mapping strategy was developed to assess CA concentration at the ultrasound (US) focal point. Based on our experimental data and BBB closure modeling, a calibration curve was obtained to compute the half closure time as a function of CA hydrodynamic diameter. These findings and the model provide an invaluable basis for optimal design and delivery of nanoparticles to the brain.

  8. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-10-22

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60 minutes and didn't affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications.

  9. Brain inositol is a novel stimulator for promoting Cryptococcus penetration of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Kim, Jong-Chul; Wang, Yina; Toffaletti, Dena L; Eugenin, Eliseo; Perfect, John R; Kim, Kee Jun; Xue, Chaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common cause of fungal meningitis, with high mortality and morbidity. The reason for the frequent occurrence of Cryptococcus infection in the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. The facts that human and animal brains contain abundant inositol and that Cryptococcus has a sophisticated system for the acquisition of inositol from the environment suggests that host inositol utilization may contribute to the development of cryptococcal meningitis. In this study, we found that inositol plays an important role in Cryptococcus traversal across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) both in an in vitro human BBB model and in in vivo animal models. The capacity of inositol to stimulate BBB crossing was dependent upon fungal inositol transporters, indicated by a 70% reduction in transmigration efficiency in mutant strains lacking two major inositol transporters, Itr1a and Itr3c. Upregulation of genes involved in the inositol catabolic pathway was evident in a microarray analysis following inositol treatment. In addition, inositol increased the production of hyaluronic acid in Cryptococcus cells, which is a ligand known to binding host CD44 receptor for their invasion. These studies suggest an inositol-dependent Cryptococcus traversal of the BBB, and support our hypothesis that utilization of host-derived inositol by Cryptococcus contributes to CNS infection.

  10. SEMA4D compromises blood-brain barrier, activates microglia, and inhibits remyelination in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ernest S; Jonason, Alan; Reilly, Christine; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Fisher, Terrence; Doherty, Michael; Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Mallow, Crystal; Cornelius, Chad; Leonard, John E; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Pham, Trinh; Seils, Jennifer; Bussler, Holm; Torno, Sebold; Kirk, Renee; Howell, Alan; Evans, Elizabeth E; Paris, Mark; Bowers, William J; John, Gareth; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neuroinflammatory disease characterized by immune cell infiltration of CNS, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, localized myelin destruction, and progressive neuronal degeneration. There exists a significant need to identify novel therapeutic targets and strategies that effectively and safely disrupt and even reverse disease pathophysiology. Signaling cascades initiated by semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) induce glial activation, neuronal process collapse, inhibit migration and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and disrupt endothelial tight junctions forming the BBB. To target SEMA4D, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognizes mouse, rat, monkey and human SEMA4D with high affinity and blocks interaction between SEMA4D and its cognate receptors. In vitro, anti-SEMA4D reverses the inhibitory effects of recombinant SEMA4D on OPC survival and differentiation. In vivo, anti-SEMA4D significantly attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in multiple rodent models by preserving BBB integrity and axonal myelination and can be shown to promote migration of OPC to the site of lesions and improve myelin status following chemically-induced demyelination. Our study underscores SEMA4D as a key factor in CNS disease and supports the further development of antibody-based inhibition of SEMA4D as a novel therapeutic strategy for MS and other neurologic diseases with evidence of demyelination and/or compromise to the neurovascular unit.

  11. Reversible Opening of the Blood-Brain Barrier by Anti-Bacterial Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Prasad, Sudha M.; George, Jonathan S.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Ibsen, Per; Heron, Iver; Starzyk, Ruth M.

    1993-08-01

    The leukocyte adhesion molecule CR3 (CD11b/CD18, Mac-1) promotes leukocyte transmigration into tissues by engaging an unknown cognate ligand on the surface of vascular endothelial cells. Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), an adhesin of the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, binds to CR3. We hypothesized that FHA mimics the native ligand for the CR3 integrin on endothelial cells and predicted that anti-FHA antibodies should bind to endothelial cells, interfere with leukocyte recruitment, and induce endothelial permeability. Anti-FHA monoclonal antibodies bound to cerebral microvessels in sections from human brain and upon intravenous injection into rabbits. Antibody binding correlated with the ability to recognize two polypeptides in extracts of human cerebral vessels that were also bound by CD18. In vivo, antibody binding not only interfered with transmigration of leukocytes into cerebrospinal fluid but also induced a dose-dependent reversible increase in blood-brain barrier permeability sufficient to improve delivery of intravenously administered therapeutic agents to brain parenchyma.

  12. von-Willebrand factor influences blood brain barrier permeability and brain inflammation in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Noubade, Rajkumar; del Rio, Roxana; McElvany, Benjamin; Zachary, James F; Millward, Jason M; Wagner, Denisa D; Offner, Halina; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2008-09-01

    Weibel-Palade bodies within endothelial cells are secretory granules known to release von Willebrand Factor (VWF), P-selectin, chemokines, and other stored molecules following histamine exposure. Mice with a disrupted VWF gene (VWFKO) have endothelial cells that are deficient in Weibel-Palade bodies. These mice were used to evaluate the role of VWF and/or Weibel-Palade bodies in Bordetella pertussis toxin-induced hypersensitivity to histamine, a subphenotype of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, the principal autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis. No significant differences in susceptibility to histamine between wild-type and VWFKO mice were detected after 3 days; however, histamine sensitivity persisted significantly longer in VWFKO mice. Correspondingly, encephalomyelitis onset was earlier, disease was more severe, and blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability was significantly increased in VWFKO mice, as compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, inflammation was selectively increased in the brains, but not spinal cords, of VWFKO mice as compared with wild-type mice. Early increases in BBB permeability in VWFKO mice were not due to increased encephalitogenic T-cell activity since BBB permeability did not differ in adjuvant-treated VWFKO mice as compared with littermates immunized with encephalitogenic peptide plus adjuvant. Taken together, these data indicate that VWF and/or Weibel-Palade bodies negatively regulate BBB permeability changes and autoimmune inflammatory lesion formation within the brain elicited by peripheral inflammatory stimuli.

  13. Safety Validation of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Pilatou, Magdalini; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the brain of multiple sessions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption using focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with micro-bubbles over a range of acoustic exposure levels. Six weekly sessions of FUS, using acoustical pressures between 0.66 and 0.80 MPa, were performed under magnetic resonance guidance. The success and degree of BBB disruption was estimated by signal enhancement of post-contrast T1-weighted imaging of the treated area. Histopathological analysis was performed after the last treatment. The consequences of repeated BBB disruption varied from no indications of vascular damage to signs of micro-hemorrhages, macrophage infiltration, micro-scar formations and cystic cavities. The signal enhancement on the contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging had limited value for predicting small-vessel damage. T2-weighted imaging corresponded well with the effects on histopathology and could be used to study treatment effects over time. This study demonstrates that repeated BBB disruption by FUS can be performed with no or limited damage to the brain tissue.

  14. Numerical study of a simple transcranial focused ultrasound system applied to blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Deffieux, Thomas; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the focalization properties of single-element transducers at low frequencies (300 to 1000 kHz) through primate and human skulls. The study addresses the transcranial targeting involved in ultrasound- induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening with clinically relevant targets such as the hippocampus and the basal ganglia, which are typically affected by early Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, respectively. A finite-difference, timedomain simulation platform is used to solve the 3-D linear acoustic wave equation with CT-based acoustic maps of the skulls. The targeted brain structures were extracted from 3-D brain atlases registered with the skulls and used to virtually position and orient the transducers. The effect of frequency is first investigated and the targeting of the different structures is then tested. The frequency of 500 kHz provided the best tradeoff between phase aberrations and standing wave effects in the human case, whereas the frequency of 800 kHz was most suitable in the case of the primate skull. A fast periodic linear chirp method was developed and found capable of reducing the standing wave effects. Such a simple, affordable, and convenient system is concluded to be feasible for BBB opening in primates and humans and could thus allow for its broader impact and applications.

  15. Advances in PET imaging of P-glycoprotein function at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Syvänen, Stina; Eriksson, Jonas

    2013-02-20

    Efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts substrate compounds from entering the brain and may thus contribute to pharmacoresistance observed in patient groups with refractory epilepsy and HIV. Altered P-gp function has also been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET), a molecular imaging modality, has become a promising method to study the role of P-gp at the BBB. The first PET study of P-gp function was conducted in 1998, and during the past 15 years two main categories of P-gp PET tracers have been investigated: tracers that are substrates of P-gp efflux and tracers that are inhibitors of P-gp function. PET, as a noninvasive imaging technique, allows translational research. Examples of this are preclinical investigations of P-gp function before and after administering P-gp modulating drugs, investigations in various animal and disease models, and clinical investigations regarding disease and aging. The objective of the present review is to give an overview of available PET radiotracers for studies of P-gp and to discuss how such studies can be designed. Further, the review summarizes results from PET studies of P-gp function in different central nervous system disorders.

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery: Overcoming blood-brain barrier to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Cláudia; Praça, Catarina; Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Ferreira, Lino; Bernardino, Liliana

    2016-08-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vital boundary between neural tissue and circulating blood. The BBB's unique and protective features control brain homeostasis as well as ion and molecule movement. Failure in maintaining any of these components results in the breakdown of this specialized multicellular structure and consequently promotes neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In several high incidence pathologies such as stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) the BBB is impaired. However, even a damaged and more permeable BBB can pose serious challenges to drug delivery into the brain. The use of nanoparticle (NP) formulations able to encapsulate molecules with therapeutic value, while targeting specific transport processes in the brain vasculature, may enhance drug transport through the BBB in neurodegenerative/ischemic disorders and target relevant regions in the brain for regenerative processes. In this review, we will discuss BBB composition and characteristics and how these features are altered in pathology, namely in stroke, AD and PD. Additionally, factors influencing an efficient intravenous delivery of polymeric and inorganic NPs into the brain as well as NP-related delivery systems with the most promising functional outcomes will also be discussed.

  17. Alpha synuclein is transported into and out of the brain by the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yu-Ting; Bullock, Kristin M; Erickson, Michelle A; Zhang, Jing; Banks, W A

    2014-12-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn), a small protein with multiple physiological and pathological functions, is one of the dominant proteins found in Lewy Bodies, a pathological hallmark of Lewy body disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). More recently, α-Syn has been found in body fluids, including blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and is likely produced by both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system. Exchange of α-Syn between the brain and peripheral tissues could have important pathophysiologic and therapeutic implications. However, little is known about the ability of α-Syn to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we found that radioactively labeled α-Syn crossed the BBB in both the brain-to-blood and the blood-to-brain directions at rates consistent with saturable mechanisms. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1), but not p-glycoprotein, may be involved in α-Syn efflux and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation could increase α-Syn uptake by the brain by disrupting the BBB.

  18. Interleukin-1β induces blood-brain barrier disruption by downregulating Sonic hedgehog in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Cheng, Yi; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular astrocytes, which regulate central nervous system homeostasis. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) released from astrocytes plays an important role in the maintenance of BBB integrity. BBB disruption and microglial activation are common pathological features of various neurologic diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a major pro-inflammatory cytokine released from activated microglia, increases BBB permeability. Here we show that IL-1β abolishes the protective effect of astrocytes on BBB integrity by suppressing astrocytic SHH production. Astrocyte conditioned media, SHH, or SHH signal agonist strengthened BBB integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins, whereas SHH signal inhibitor abrogated these effects. Moreover, IL-1β increased astrocytic production of pro-inflammatory chemokines such as CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL2, which induce immune cell migration and exacerbate BBB disruption and neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest that astrocytic SHH is a potential therapeutic target that could be used to restore disrupted BBB in patients with neurologic diseases.

  19. Blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function is not impaired in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bartels, A L; van Berckel, B N M; Lubberink, M; Luurtsema, G; Lammertsma, A A; Leenders, K L

    2008-08-01

    The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. Genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental toxins contribute to specific neuronal loss in PD. Decreased blood-brain barrier (BBB) P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux function has been proposed as a possible causative link between toxin exposure and PD neurodegeneration. In the present study BBB P-gp function was investigated in vivo in 10 early stage PD patients and 8 healthy control subjects using (R)-[(11)C]-verapamil and PET. Cerebral volume of distribution (V(d)) of verapamil was used as measure of P-gp function. Both region of interest (ROI) analysis and voxel analysis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) were performed to assess regional brain P-gp function. In addition, MDR1 genetic polymorphism was assessed. In the present study, a larger variation in V(d) of (R)-[(11)C]-verapamil was seen in the PD group as compared to the control group. However, decreased BBB P-gp function in early stage PD patients could not be confirmed.

  20. Transport of nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier for imaging and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Malka; Motiei, Menachem; Hana, Panet; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2014-02-21

    A critical problem in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, is the incapability to overcome the restrictive mechanism of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to deliver important therapeutic agents to the brain. During the last decade, nanoparticles have gained attention as promising drug delivery agents that can transport across the BBB and increase the uptake of appropriate drugs in the brain. In this study we have developed insulin-targeted gold nanoparticles (INS-GNPs) and investigated quantitatively the amount of INS-GNPs that cross the BBB by the receptor-mediated endocytosis process. For this purpose, INS-GNPs and control GNPs were injected into the tail vein of male BALB/c mice. Major organs were then extracted and a blood sample was taken from the mice, and thereafter analyzed for gold content by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results show that two hours post-intravenous injection, the amount of INS-GNPs found in mouse brains is over 5 times greater than that of the control, untargeted GNPs. Results of further experimentation on a rat model show that INS-GNPs can also serve as CT contrast agents to highlight specific brain regions in which they accumulate. Due to the fact that they can overcome the restrictive mechanism of the BBB, this approach could be a potentially valuable tool, helping to confront the great challenge of delivering important imaging and therapeutic agents to the brain for detection and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases.

  1. Flavonoid transport across RBE4 cells: A blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Faria, Ana; Pestana, Diogo; Teixeira, Diana; Azevedo, Joana; De Freitas, Victor; Mateus, Nuno; Calhau, Conceição

    2010-06-01

    There is a growing interest in dietary therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative stress-induced damage to the Central Nervous System (CNS), which is associated with a number of pathophysiological processes, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. Identifying the mechanisms associated with phenolic neuroprotection has been delayed by the lack of information concerning the ability of these compounds to enter the CNS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transmembrane transport of flavonoids across RBE-4 cells (an immortalized cell line of rat cerebral capillary endothelial cells) and the effect of ethanol on this transport. The detection and quantification of all of the phenolic compounds in the studied samples (basolateral media) was performed using a HPLC-DAD (Diode Array Detector). All of the tested flavonoids (catechin, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside) passed across the RBE-4 cells in a time-dependent manner. This transport was not influenced by the presence of 0.1% ethanol. In conclusion, the tested flavonoids were capable of crossing this blood-brain barrier model.

  2. Excitotoxicity triggered by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment and blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    Gudiño-Cabrera, Graciela; Ureña-Guerrero, Monica E; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha C; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo I; Beas-Zárate, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    It is likely that monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the excitotoxin that has been most commonly employed to characterize the process of excitotoxicity and to improve understanding of the ways that this process is related to several pathological conditions of the central nervous system. Excitotoxicity triggered by neonatal MSG treatment produces a significant pathophysiological impact on adulthood, which could be due to modifications in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and vice versa. This mini-review analyzes this topic through brief descriptions about excitotoxicity, BBB structure and function, role of the BBB in the regulation of Glu extracellular levels, conditions that promote breakdown of the BBB, and modifications induced by neonatal MSG treatment that could alter the behavior of the BBB. In conclusion, additional studies to better characterize the effects of neonatal MSG treatment on excitatory amino acids transporters, ionic exchangers, and efflux transporters, as well as the role of the signaling pathways mediated by erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor in the cellular elements of the BBB, should be performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the increase in neurovascular permeability associated with excitotoxicity observed in several diseases and studied using neonatal MSG treatment.

  3. Analytical characterization and comparison of the blood-brain barrier permeability of eight opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Adriaens, Antita; Polis, Ingeborgh; Peremans, Kathelijne; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2010-07-01

    Opioid drugs, including the newly developed peptides, should penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for pain management activity. Although BBB transport is fragmentarily described for some mu-opioid peptides, a complete and comparative overview is currently lacking. In this study, the BBB transport of eight opioid peptides (EM-1, EM-2, CTAP, CTOP, DAMGO, dermorphin, TAPP and TAPS) is described and compared. In addition, the metabolic stability in plasma and brain was evaluated. The highest influx rate was obtained for dermorphin (K(in)=2.18 microl/(g x min)), followed by smaller rates for EM-1, EM-2 and TAPP (K(in)=1.06-1.14 microl/(g x min)). Negligible influx was observed for DAMGO, CTOP and TAPS (K(in)=0.18-0.40 microl/(g x min)) and no influx for CTAP. Capillary depletion revealed that all peptides reached brain parenchyma for over 75%. Efflux was shown for TAPP (t(1/2)=2.82 min) and to a lesser extent for EM-1, EM-2 and DAMGO (t(1/2)=10.66-21.98 min), while no significant efflux was observed for the other peptides. All peptides were stable in mouse plasma and brain, with generally higher stability in brain, except for EM-1 and EM-2 which showed plasma half-life stabilities of a few minutes only.

  4. Nanoparticulate Transport of Oximes over an In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Sylvia; Kufleitner, Jürgen; Zensi, Anja; Dadparvar, Miriam; Wien, Sascha; Bungert, Judith; Vogel, Tikva; Worek, Franz; Kreuter, Jörg; von Briesen, Hagen

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to the use of organophosphates (OP) as pesticides and the availability of OP-type nerve agents, an effective medical treatment for OP poisonings is still a challenging problem. The acute toxicity of an OP poisoning is mainly due to the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the peripheral and central nervous systems (CNS). This results in an increase in the synaptic concentration of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, overstimulation of cholinergic receptors and disorder of numerous body functions up to death. The standard treatment of OP poisoning includes a combination of a muscarinic antagonist and an AChE reactivator (oxime). However, these oximes can not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) sufficiently. Therefore, new strategies are needed to transport oximes over the BBB. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we combined different oximes (obidoxime dichloride and two different HI 6 salts, HI 6 dichloride monohydrate and HI 6 dimethanesulfonate) with human serum albumin nanoparticles and could show an oxime transport over an in vitro BBB model. In general, the nanoparticulate transported oximes achieved a better reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE than free oximes. Conclusions/Significance With these nanoparticles, for the first time, a tool exists that could enable a transport of oximes over the BBB. This is very important for survival after severe OP intoxication. Therefore, these nanoparticulate formulations are promising formulations for the treatment of the peripheral and the CNS after OP poisoning. PMID:21151975

  5. Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, the Blood-Brain Barrier, and Central Nervous System Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Mohammad S.; Chishty, Mansoor; Qaiser, M. Zeeshan; Palmer, Alan M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The worldwide market for therapies for CNS disorders is worth more than $50 billion and is set to grow substantially in the years ahead. This is because: 1) the incidence of many CNS disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease) increase exponentially after age 65 and 2) the number of people in the world over 65 is about to increase sharply because of a marked rise in fertility after World War II. However, CNS research and development are associated with significant challenges: it takes longer to get a CNS drug to market (12–16 years) compared with a non-CNS drug (10–12 years) and there is a higher attrition rate for CNS drug candidates than for non-CNS drug candidates. This is attributable to a variety of factors, including the complexity of the brain, the liability of CNS drugs to cause CNS side effects, and the requirement of CNS drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This review focuses on BBB penetration, along with pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism, in the process of the discovery and development of safe and effective medicines for CNS disorders. PMID:16489365

  6. Transport of nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier for imaging and therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilo, Malka; Motiei, Menachem; Hana, Panet; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2014-01-01

    A critical problem in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, is the incapability to overcome the restrictive mechanism of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to deliver important therapeutic agents to the brain. During the last decade, nanoparticles have gained attention as promising drug delivery agents that can transport across the BBB and increase the uptake of appropriate drugs in the brain. In this study we have developed insulin-targeted gold nanoparticles (INS-GNPs) and investigated quantitatively the amount of INS-GNPs that cross the BBB by the receptor-mediated endocytosis process. For this purpose, INS-GNPs and control GNPs were injected into the tail vein of male BALB/c mice. Major organs were then extracted and a blood sample was taken from the mice, and thereafter analyzed for gold content by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results show that two hours post-intravenous injection, the amount of INS-GNPs found in mouse brains is over 5 times greater than that of the control, untargeted GNPs. Results of further experimentation on a rat model show that INS-GNPs can also serve as CT contrast agents to highlight specific brain regions in which they accumulate. Due to the fact that they can overcome the restrictive mechanism of the BBB, this approach could be a potentially valuable tool, helping to confront the great challenge of delivering important imaging and therapeutic agents to the brain for detection and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases.

  7. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H. K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases.

  8. Minocycline and riluzole brain disposition: interactions with p-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Milane, Aline; Fernandez, Christine; Vautier, Sarah; Bensimon, Gilbert; Meininger, Vincent; Farinotti, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative fatal disease. The only drug recognized to increase the survival time is riluzole(RLZ). In animal models, minocycline (MNC) delayed the onset of the disease and increased the survival time (in combination with RLZ). The objective of our work was to study the interactions between RLZ, MNC and the efflux pump p-glycoprotein (p-gp) at the blood-brain barrier. We investigated these two drugs as: (i) p-gp substrates by comparing their brain uptake in CF1 mdr1a (-/-) and mdr1a (+/+) mice, (ii) p-gp modulators by studying their effect on the cerebral uptake of digoxin. mdr1a (-/-) mice showed higher brain uptake of MNC and RLZ than mdr1a (+/+) (in a 1.6- and 1.4-fold, respectively); and in mdr1a (+/+) mice pre-treated with repeated doses of MNC, brain uptake of digoxin was increased. When both drugs were administrated to mdr1a (+/+) mice, MNC increased the brain uptake of RLZ in a 2.1-fold. In conclusion, MNC and RLZ are both p-gp substrates. MNC is also a p-gp inhibitor and increases the brain diffusion of RLZ. In vitro experiments with the GPNT cell line confirmed these results. These interactions should be taken into account in the design of future clinical trials.

  9. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiang; Yang, Heng; Ni, Wei; Gu, Yuxiang

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage.

  10. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Iveta; Subileau, Eva-Anne; Toegel, Stefan; Gruber, Daniela; Lachmann, Bodo; Urban, Ernst; Chesne, Christophe; Noe, Christian R; Neuhaus, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line) for proper data comparison.

  11. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates cerebral edema formation by protecting the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Reiner; Urrutia, Andrés; Hoffmann, Angelika; Liu, Hui; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Reischl, Stefan; Korff, Thomas; Marti, Hugo H

    2015-04-01

    Brain edema is a hallmark of various neuropathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to characterize how tissue hypoxia, together with oxidative stress and inflammation, leads to capillary dysfunction and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In a mouse stroke model we show that systemic treatment with dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an antioxidant drug clinically used for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, significantly prevented edema formation in vivo. Indeed, DMF stabilized the BBB by preventing disruption of interendothelial tight junctions and gap formation, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain tissue. In vitro, DMF directly sustained endothelial tight junctions, inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, and attenuated leukocyte transmigration. We also demonstrate that these effects are mediated via activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). DMF activated the Nrf2 pathway as shown by up-regulation of several Nrf2 target genes in the brain in vivo, as well as in cerebral endothelial cells and astrocytes in vitro, where DMF also increased protein abundance of nuclear Nrf2. Finally, Nrf2 knockdown in endothelial cells aggravated subcellular delocalization of tight junction proteins during ischemic conditions, and attenuated the protective effect exerted by DMF. Overall, our data suggest that DMF protects from cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke by targeting interendothelial junctions in an Nrf2-dependent manner, and provide the basis for a completely new approach to treat brain edema.

  12. Theranostic USPIO-Loaded Microbubbles for Mediating and Monitoring Blood-Brain Barrier Permeation

    PubMed Central

    Fokong, Stanley; Gremse, Felix; Ehling, Josef; Vogt, Michael; Pich, Andrij; Storm, Gert; van Zandvoort, Marc; Kiessling, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and safe drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains to be one of the major challenges of biomedical and (nano-) pharmaceutical research. Here, we show that poly(butyl cyanoacrylate)-based microbubbles (MB), carrying ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles within their shell, can be used to mediate and monitor BBB permeation. Upon exposure to transcranial ultrasound pulses, USPIO-MB are destroyed, resulting in acoustic forces inducing vessel permeability. At the same time, USPIO are released from the MB shell, they extravasate across the permeabilized BBB and they accumulate in extravascular brain tissue, thereby providing non-invasive R2*-based magnetic resonance imaging information on the extent of BBB opening. Quantitative changes in R2* relaxometry were in good agreement with 2D and 3D microscopy results on the extravascular deposition of the macromolecular model drug FITC-dextran into the brain. Such theranostic materials and methods are considered to be useful for mediating and monitoring drug delivery across the BBB, and for enabling safe and efficient treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:25729344

  13. Analysing molecular polar surface descriptors to predict blood-brain barrier permeation.

    PubMed

    Shityakov, Sergey; Neuhaus, Winfried; Dandekar, Thomas; Förster, Carola

    2013-01-01

    Molecular polar surface (PS) descriptors are very useful parameters in prediction of drug transport properties. They could be also used to investigate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation rate for various chemical compounds. In this study, a dataset of drugs (n = 19) from various pharmacological groups was studied to estimate their potential properties to permeate across the BBB. Experimental logBB data were available as steady-state distribution values of the in vivo rat model for these molecules. Including accurate calculation of the electrostatic potential maps, polar surface descriptors, such as a two-dimensional polar surface area (2D-PSA), topological polar surface area (TPSA) and three-dimensional polar surface area or polar area (3D-PSA; PA) were measured and analysed. We report the strong correlation of these descriptors with logBB values for the prediction of BBB permeation using the linear partial least squares (PLS) fitting technique. The 3D-PSA descriptor showed the best fit to logBB values with R² = 0.92 and RMSD = 0.29 (p-value < 0.0001). The obtained results demonstrate that all descriptors bear high predictive powers and could provide an efficient strategy to envisage the pharmacokinetic properties of chemical compounds to permeate across the BBB at an early stage of the drug development process.

  14. Nanotechnology approaches to crossing the blood-brain barrier and drug delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel A

    2008-12-10

    Nanotechnologies are materials and devices that have a functional organization in at least one dimension on the nanometer (one billionth of a meter) scale, ranging from a few to about 100 nanometers. Nanoengineered materials and devices aimed at biologic applications and medicine in general, and neuroscience in particular, are designed fundamentally to interface and interact with cells and their tissues at the molecular level. One particularly important area of nanotechnology application to the central nervous system (CNS) is the development of technologies and approaches for delivering drugs and other small molecules such as genes, oligonucleotides, and contrast agents across the blood brain barrier (BBB). The BBB protects and isolates CNS structures (i.e. the brain and spinal cord) from the rest of the body, and creates a unique biochemical and immunological environment. Clinically, there are a number of scenarios where drugs or other small molecules need to gain access to the CNS following systemic administration, which necessitates being able to cross the BBB. Nanotechnologies can potentially be designed to carry out multiple specific functions at once or in a predefined sequence, an important requirement for the clinically successful delivery and use of drugs and other molecules to the CNS, and as such have a unique advantage over other complimentary technologies and methods. This brief review introduces emerging work in this area and summarizes a number of example applications to CNS cancers, gene therapy, and analgesia.

  15. Potassium fluxes across the blood brain barrier of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Kocmarek, Andrea L; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Potassium fluxes across the blood-brain barrier of the cockroach Periplaneta americana were measured using the scanning ion-selective microelectrode technique. In salines containing 15 mM or 25 mMK(+), an efflux of K(+) from the ganglia of isolated nerve cords was counterbalanced by an influx across the connectives. Metabolic inhibition with CN(-) resulted in an increase in K(+) efflux across both the ganglia and the connectives. Depletion of K(+) by chilling the nerve cords in K(+)-free saline was associated with subsequent K(+) influx across the connectives in K(+)-replete saline at room temperature. There were dramatic increases in K(+) efflux across both ganglia and connectives when the nerve cords were exposed to the pore-forming antibiotic amphotericin B. K(+) fluxes across the ventral nerve cord were also altered when paracellular leakage was augmented by transient exposure to 3M urea. K(+) efflux was reduced by the K(+) channel blockers Ba(2+) and tetraethylammonium or by exposure to Ca(2+)-free saline and K(+) efflux from the ganglia was increased by addition of ouabain to the bathing saline. The results provide direct support for a model proposing that K(+) is cycled through a current loop between the ganglia and the connectives and that both the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and K(+) channels are implicated in extracellular K(+) homeostasis within the central nervous system.

  16. Edaravone-Encapsulated Agonistic Micelles Rescue Ischemic Brain Tissue by Tuning Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qu; Cai, Yu; Li, Sihan; Liu, Haoran; Zhou, Xingyu; Lu, Chunqiang; Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Shenghong; Li, Cong

    2017-01-01

    Thrombolysis has been a standard treatment for ischemic stroke. However, only 2-7% patients benefit from it because the thrombolytic agent has to be injected within 4.5 h after the onset of symptoms to avoid the increasing risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. As the only clinically approved neuroprotective drug, edaravone (EDV) rescues ischemic brain tissues by eradicating over-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the limitation of therapeutic time-window. However, EDV's short circulation half-life and inadequate cerebral uptake attenuate its therapeutic efficacy. Here we developed an EDV-encapsulated agonistic micelle (EDV-AM) to specifically deliver EDV into brain ischemia by actively tuning blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The EDV-AM actively up-regulated endothelial monolayer permeability in vitro. HPLC studies showed that EDV-AM delivered more EDV into brain ischemia than free EDV after intravenous injection. Magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that EDV-AM more rapidly salvaged ischemic tissue than free EDV. Diffusion tensor imaging indicated the highest efficiency of EDV-AM in accelerating axonal remodeling in the ipsilesional white matter and improving functional behaviors of ischemic stroke models. The agonistic micelle holds promise to improve the therapeutic efficiency of ischemic stroke patients who miss the thrombolytic treatment. PMID:28382161

  17. The Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs on Blood Brain Barrier Function and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kousik, Sharanya M.; Napier, T. Celeste; Carvey, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a highly dynamic interface between the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery. The BBB is comprised of a number of components and is part of the larger neuro(glio)vascular unit. Current literature suggests that psychostimulant drugs of abuse alter the function of the BBB which likely contributes to the neurotoxicities associated with these drugs. In both preclinical and clinical studies, psychostimulants including methamphetamine, MDMA, cocaine, and nicotine, produce BBB dysfunction through alterations in tight junction protein expression and conformation, increased glial activation, increased enzyme activation related to BBB cytoskeleton remodeling, and induction of neuroinflammatory pathways. These detrimental changes lead to increased permeability of the BBB and subsequent vulnerability of the brain to peripheral toxins. In fact, abuse of these psychostimulants, notably methamphetamine and cocaine, has been shown to increase the invasion of peripheral bacteria and viruses into the brain. Much work in this field has focused on the co-morbidity of psychostimulant abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As psychostimulants alter BBB permeability, it is likely that this BBB dysfunction results in increased penetration of the HIV virus into the brain thus increasing the risk of and severity of neuro AIDS. This review will provide an overview of the specific changes in components within the BBB associated with psychostimulant abuse as well as the implications of these changes in exacerbating the neuropathology associated with psychostimulant drugs and HIV co-morbidity. PMID:22754527

  18. Purification and characterization of metabolically active capillaries of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, L; Tremblay, L; Béliveau, R

    1991-01-01

    Microvessels were isolated from bovine and rat cerebral cortex by simple procedures involving mechanical homogenization, differential and density-gradient centrifugation, and chromatography on a column of glass beads. The preparations were composed of short capillaries with a diameter of 1-10 microns. Both purifications were monitored by assaying the activity of the marker enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTase). The final bovine and rat preparations were enriched 20- and 14-fold over the homogenate respectively. gamma-GTase activity was measured in different fractions after bovine and rat membranes were solubilized with 0.5% and 0.3% Triton X-100 respectively. Measurement of 5'-nucleotidase and acetylcholinesterase activities indicated very low levels of contamination of the microvessel preparations by glial cells and neurons. The integrity of the capillary membranes was confirmed by the assay of a cytosolic marker enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. Viability of the microvessels was demonstrated by the presence of detectable levels of adenylates and by tissue respiration induced by glucose and succinate. Comparison of the proteins of homogenized bovine and rat brain cortex with those of purified capillaries separated by SDS/PAGE revealed enrichment of at least three predominant proteins of 14, 16 and 18 kDa in the capillary preparations. It is concluded that these methods allow rapid isolation of small blood vessels of the blood-brain barrier which are suitable for metabolic and structural studies in vitro. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:1712199

  19. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  20. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60 minutes and didn’t affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications. PMID:26490653

  1. Mechanism and Safety at the Threshold of the Blood-Brain Barrier Opening In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Choi, James; Baseri, Babak; Selert, Kirsten; Tung, Yao-Sheng

    2010-03-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this paper, the threshold of BBB opening and its dependence on the microbubble diameter as well as the associated mechanism and safety are identified in vivo. In vivo BBB opening in mice (n = 13) was achieved by systemically injecting microbubbles (Definity and 1-2 and 4-5-μm lipid-shelled, gas-filled) and applying pulsed FUS (frequency: 1.525 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 150-600 kPa) to the left hippocampus through the intact skin and skull. Systemically administered, BBB-impermeable, fluorescent-tagged dextrans at 3 kDa were injected to confirm BBB opening. H&E histology was also performed to determine any associated vascular or neuronal damage. Detection of stable and inertial cavitation was performed using a passive cavitation device (PCD) in a blood vessel phantom at the same pressure amplitudes as those used in vivo. Larger microbubbles (4-5 μm) resulted in a lower threshold of BBB opening. Cavitation studies confirmed that stable cavitation occurs at the threshold of BBB opening. The mechanism of BBB opening at the threshold was identified to be mainly related to stable cavitation. Histological studies indicated that, at the BBB opening threshold, no red-blood cell extravasation or neuronal damage was noted.

  2. Lipocalin 2 and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in White Matter after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Iwama, Toru; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    We reported previously that subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes acute white matter injury in mice. In this study, we investigated lipocalin 2 (LCN2) mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in white matter, which may lead to subsequent injury. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in wild-type (WT) and LCN2-knockout (LCN2(-/-)) mice. Sham mice underwent the same procedure without perforation. Mice underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 24 h after SAH to confirm the development of T2-hyperintensity in white matter. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of LCN2-mediated white matter injury and BBB disruption. It was confirmed that LCN2 expression was significantly increased in white matter of WT mice after SAH by Western blotting (versus sham; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry showed that LCN2 receptor 24p3R was expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and pericytes in the white matter. In WT mice with SAH, albumin leakage along the white matter was prominently observed and was consistent with T2-hyperintensity on MRI. As with our previous report, LCN2(-/-) mice scarcely developed T2-hyperintensity on MRI or albumin leakage in white matter. Our results suggest that BBB leakage occurs in white matter after SAH and that LCN2 contributes to SAH-induced BBB disruption.

  3. Tight junction regulation by morphine and HIV-1 tat modulates blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Sykes, Donald E; Reynolds, Jessica L; Bindukumar, B; Fernandez, Stanley F; Chawda, Ramnik; Shanahan, Thomas C; Schwartz, Stanley A

    2008-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 patients who abuse opiates are at a greater risk of developing neurological complications of AIDS. Alterations in blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity are associated with cytoskeletal disorganization and disruption of tight junction (TJ) integrity. We hypothesize that opiates in combination with HIV-1 viral proteins can modulate TJ expression in primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC), thereby compromising BBB integrity and exacerbating HIV-1 neuropathogenesis. We investigated the effect of morphine and/or tat on the expression of TJ proteins ZO-1, JAM-2, Occludin and P-glycoprotein and the functional effects of TJ modulation in BMVEC. Morphine and/or tat, via the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, intracellular Ca(2+) release, and activation of myosin light chain kinase, modulated TJ expression resulting in decreased transendothelial electric resistance and enhanced transendothelial migration across the BBB. These studies may lead to the development of novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics that target specific TJ proteins, thus preventing TJ disruption in opiate using HIV-1 patients.

  4. Endothelial cell heterogeneity of blood-brain barrier gene expression along the cerebral microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Jennifer A; Murugesan, Nivetha; Pachter, Joel S

    2010-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) refers to the network of microvessels that selectively restricts the passage of substances between the circulation and the central nervous system (CNS). This microvascular network is comprised of arterioles, capillaries and venules, yet the respective contribution of each of these to the BBB awaits clarification. In this regard, it has been postulated that brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) from these different tributaries might exhibit considerable heterogeneity in form and function, with such diversity underlying unique roles in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Means to begin exploring such endothelial differences in situ, free from caveats associated with cell isolation and culturing procedures, are crucial to comprehending the nature and treatment of CNS diseases with vascular involvement. Here, the recently validated approach of immuno-laser capture microdissection (immuno-LCM) coupled to quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze gene expression patterns of BMEC retrieved in situ from either capillaries or venules. From profiling 87 genes known to play a role in BBB function and/or be enriched in isolated brain microvessels, results imply that most BBB properties reside in both segments, but that capillaries preferentially express some genes related to solute transport, while venules tend toward higher expression of an assortment of genes involved in inflammatory-related tasks. Fuller appreciation of such heterogeneity will be critical for efficient therapeutic targeting of the endothelium and the management of CNS disease.

  5. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction as a Hallmark Pathology in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Colin P; O'Keefe, Eoin; Wallace, Eugene; Loftus, Teresa; Keaney, James; Kealy, John; Humphries, Marian M; Molloy, Michael G; Meaney, James F; Farrell, Michael; Campbell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. In recent years, attention has focused on emerging evidence linking the development of CTE to concussive injuries in athletes and military personnel; however, the underlying molecular pathobiology of CTE remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is disrupted in regions of dense perivascular p-Tau accumulation in a case of CTE. Immunoreactivity patterns of the BBB-associated tight junction components claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 were markedly discontinuous or absent in regions of perivascular p-Tau deposition; there was also immunohistochemical evidence of a BBB in these foci. Because the patient was diagnosed premortem clinically as having progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we also compromised that the CTE alterations appear to be distinct from those in the brain of a patient with PSP. This report represents the first description of BBB dysfunction in a pathologically proven CTE case and suggests a vascular component in the postconcussion cascade of events that may ultimately lead to development of a progressive degenerative disorder. BBB dysfunction may represent a correlate of neural dysfunction in live subjects suspected of being at risk for development of CTE.

  6. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    PubMed

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (p<0.01). 1800MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure was found more effective on the male animals (p<0.01). For female groups; dye contents in the whole brains were 0.14±0.01mg% in the control, 0.24±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.14±0.02mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. No statistical variance found between the control and 1800MHz exposed animals (p>0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed

  7. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions.

  8. Mustard-inspired delivery shuttle for enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration and effective drug delivery in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Pei; Lv, Mingming; Tong, Gangsheng; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-04-05

    Effective penetration through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a challenge for the treatment of many brain diseases. In this study, a small molecule, sinapic acid (SA), extracted from mustard, was selected as a novel bioinspired BBB-permeable ligand for efficient drug delivery in glioma treatment. SA was conjugated on the surface of zwitterionic polymer poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC)-encapsulated bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles, yielding nBSA-SA. The PMPC shell serves as a protective layer to prolong the in vivo blood circulation time with a better chance to cross the BBB. Furthermore, temozolomide (TMZ), which can be loaded onto the nanoparticles via electrostatic interactions with acrylic acid (AA) to generate AA-nBSA-SA-TMZ, was applied as an excellent chemotherapeutic drug for glioma therapy. The obtained nanoparticles with a distinct size show great BBB permeability. Through the mechanism study, it was found that the cell internalization of the SA-conjugated nanoparticles is an energy-dependent process with only transient disruption of the BBB. The biological evaluation results unambiguously suggest that drug-loaded nanoparticles can lead to strong apoptosis on the tumor site and increase the median survival time of glioma-bearing mice. Overall, this novel BBB-permeable ligand SA paves the way for the delivery of cargo into the brain and provides a powerful nanoplatform for glioma therapy via intravenous administration.

  9. Noninvasive delivery of stealth, brain-penetrating nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier using MRI-guided focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G. Wilson; Song, Ji; Louttit, Cameron; Klibanov, Alexander L; Shih, Ting-Yu; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including invasive brain tumors, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and stroke. Therapeutics must be capable of bypassing the BBB and also penetrate the brain parenchyma to achieve a desired effect within the brain. In this study, we test the unique combination of a noninvasive approach to BBB permeabilization with a therapeutically relevant polymeric nanoparticle platform capable of rapidly penetrating within the brain microenvironment. MR-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) with intravascular microbubbles (MBs) is able to locally and reversibly disrupt the BBB with submillimeter spatial accuracy. Densely poly(ethylene-co-glycol) (PEG) coated, brain-penetrating nanoparticles (BPNs) are long-circulating and diffuse 10-fold slower in normal rat brain tissue compared to diffusion in water. Following intravenous administration of model and biodegradable BPN in normal healthy rats, we demonstrate safe, pressure-dependent delivery of 60 nm BPNs to the brain parenchyma in regions where the BBB is disrupted by FUS and MBs. Delivery of BPNs with MR-guided FUS has the potential to improve efficacy of treatments for many CNS diseases, while reducing systemic side effects by providing sustained, well-dispersed drug delivery into select regions of the brain. PMID:24979210

  10. Delivery of a peptide-drug conjugate targeting the blood brain barrier improved the efficacy of paclitaxel against glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Zheng, Xuemin; Gong, Min; Zhang, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to the brain has created an entire field of active research devoted to overcoming the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently delivering drugs to the brain. Angiopep-2 can trigger transcytosis and traverse the BBB by recognizing low-density lipoprotein related protein-1 (LRP-1) expressed on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Here, we designed a novel strategy for the delivery of drugs to the brain. The novel drug delivery system was a combination of a receptor-targeting ligand, such as low-density lipoprotein related protein 1, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was hypothesized that this conjugate will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB and increase the permeability of a solid tumor. Our findings indicate that the combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle significantly improved translocation of small molecules (paclitaxel) into the brain compared to the vehicle treatment, which contained only receptor-targeting ligand. The application of this strategy could potentially expand the horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27765902

  11. Delivery of doxorubicin across the blood-brain barrier by ondansetron pretreatment: a study in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Iacopo; Fantappiè, Ornella; la Marca, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Maria Grazia; Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Malvagia, Sabrina; Cardellicchio, Stefania; Giunti, Laura; de Martino, Maurizio; Mazzanti, Roberto

    2014-10-28

    Doxorubicin (Dox) has got a limited efficacy in the treatment of central nervous system tumors because of its poor penetration through blood-brain barrier mediated by MDR efflux transporters. We investigated the possibility that ondansetron (Ond) enhances Dox cytotoxicity in cell lines interfering with P-glycoprotein and increases Dox concentration in rat brain tissues. The MDR phenotype was studied using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line PLC/PRF/5 (P5 and P1(0.5) clones), two subclones of NIH 3T3 cells (PSI-2 and PN1A) and two glioblastoma cell lines (A172, U87MG). Rats were pretreated with Ond before injection of Dox. Quantitative analysis of Dox was performed by mass spectrometry. Our in vitro experiments demonstrated that Ond at 10 µg/ml is not toxic to all cell lines. However, Ond reverses the MDR phenotype in P1(0.5) and PN1A cell lines. In addition, we showed that pretreatment with Ond increases Dox concentration in rat brain tissues, without increasing acute heart and renal toxicity.

  12. A2A adenosine receptor modulates drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from toxic substances within the peripheral circulation. It maintains brain homeostasis and is a hurdle for drug delivery to the CNS to treat neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and brain tumors. The drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is highly expressed on brain endothelial cells and blocks the entry of most drugs delivered to the brain. Here, we show that activation of the A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved A2A AR agonist (Lexiscan) rapidly and potently decreased P-gp expression and function in a time-dependent and reversible manner. We demonstrate that downmodulation of P-gp expression and function coincided with chemotherapeutic drug accumulation in brains of WT mice and in primary mouse and human brain endothelial cells, which serve as in vitro BBB models. Lexiscan also potently downregulated the expression of BCRP1, an efflux transporter that is highly expressed in the CNS vasculature and other tissues. Finally, we determined that multiple pathways, including MMP9 cleavage and ubiquitinylation, mediated P-gp downmodulation. Based on these data, we propose that A2A AR activation on BBB endothelial cells offers a therapeutic window that can be fine-tuned for drug delivery to the brain and has potential as a CNS drug-delivery technology. PMID:27043281

  13. The blood-brain barrier in neuroimmunology: Tales of separation and assimilation.

    PubMed

    Banks, W A

    2015-02-01

    Neuroimmunology is concerned with the relations between the central nervous and immune systems and with the mechanisms that drive those relations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) employs mechanisms that both separate and connect these two systems. In fact, the relative immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) is largely attributable to the BBB's ability to prevent the unregulated exchange of immune cells and their secretions between the CNS and blood. Having separated the two systems, the BBB then participates in mechanisms that allow them to influence, communicate, and interact with one another. Likewise, the BBB itself is influenced by immune events that are occurring in the periphery and in the CNS so that these three components (the BBB, the immune system, and the CNS) form neuroimmune axes that adapt to physiological and pathological conditions. To date, four major themes have emerged by which the BBB participates in these neuroimmune axes. The first of these four, the formation of the barrier, acts to separate the immune and central nervous systems. The other three themes provide mechanisms for re-establishing communication: response of the BBB to immunomodulatory molecules (e.g., prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide) secreted by immune and CNS cells; the controlled, regulated exchange of chemokines, cytokines, and immune cells between the CNS and the blood (i.e., transport across the BBB); the secretion of immunomodulatory molecules by the BBB, often in a polarized fashion. Taken together, these mechanisms reveal the BBB to be a dynamic, interactive, and adaptable interface between the immune system and the CNS, separating them on the one hand and fostering their interactions on the other hand, adjusting to physiological changes, while being a target for disease processes. This review examines specific examples by which the BBB plays an interactive, defining role in neuroimmunology.

  14. Control of the blood-brain barrier function in cancer cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Blecharz, Kinga G; Colla, Ruben; Rohde, Veit; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral metastases are the most common brain neoplasms seen clinically in the adults and comprise more than half of all brain tumours. Actual treatment options for brain metastases that include surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are rarely curative, although palliative treatment improves survival and life quality of patients carrying brain-metastatic tumours. Chemotherapy in particular has also shown limited or no activity in brain metastasis of most tumour types. Many chemotherapeutic agents used systemically do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), whereas others may transiently weaken the BBB and allow extravasation of tumour cells from the circulation into the brain parenchyma. Increasing evidence points out that the interaction between the BBB and tumour cells plays a key role for implantation and growth of brain metastases in the central nervous system. The BBB, as the tightest endothelial barrier, prevents both early detection and treatment by creating a privileged microenvironment. Therefore, as observed in several in vivo studies, precise targetting the BBB by a specific transient opening of the structure making it permeable for therapeutic compounds, might potentially help to overcome this difficult clinical problem. Moreover, a better understanding of the molecular features of the BBB, its interrelation with metastatic tumour cells and the elucidation of cellular mechanisms responsible for establishing cerebral metastasis must be clearly outlined in order to promote treatment modalities that particularly involve chemotherapy. This in turn would substantially expand the survival and quality of life of patients with brain metastasis, and potentially increase the remission rate. Therefore, the focus of this review is to summarise the current knowledge on the role and function of the BBB in cancer metastasis.

  15. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Subba Rao Atluri, Venkata; Raymond, Andrea; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2014-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ˜10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ˜130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on the blood brain barrier permeability to pharmacologically active substances

    SciTech Connect

    Trnovec, T.; Kallay, Z.; Bezek, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can impair the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Data on early and late damage after brain irradiation are usually reported separately, yet a gradual transition between these two types has become evident. Signs appearing within 3 weeks after irradiation are considered to be early manifestations. The mechanism of radiation-effected integrity impairment of the BBB is discussed in relation to changes in morphological structures forming the BBB, the endothelium of intracerebral vessels, and in the surrounding astrocytes. Alterations in the function of the BBB are manifested in the endothelium by changes in the ultrastructural location of the activity of phosphatases and by the activation of pinocytotic vesicular transport, and in astrocyte cytoplasm by glycogen deposition. The changes in ultrastructure were critically surveyed with regard to increasing doses of radiation to the brain in the range of 5 Gy to 960 Gy. The qualitative as well as the semiquantitative and quantitative observations on the passage of substances across the damaged BBB were treated separately. Qualitative changes are based mainly on findings of extravasation of vital stains and of labelled proteins. The quantitative studies established differences in radiation-induced changes in the permeability of the BBB depending on the structure and physico-chemical properties of the barrier penetrating tracers. Indirect evaluation of radiation-induced BBB changes is based on studies of pharmacological effects of substances acting on the CNS. In conclusion, radiation impairs significantly the integrity of the BBB following single irradiation of the brain with a dose exceeding 10-15 Gy. The response of the BBB to ionizing radiation is dependent both on the dose to which the brain is exposed and on specific properties of the tracer. 68 references.

  17. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Raymond, Andrea; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P

    2014-02-07

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ∼10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ∼130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.

  18. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2) = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  19. The Blood-brain Barrier in Neuroimmunology: Tales of Separation and Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Banks, W. A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimmunology is concerned with the relations between the central nervous and immune systems and with the mechanisms that drive those relations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) employs mechanisms that both separate and connect these two systems. In fact, the relative immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) is largely attributable to the BBB's ability to prevent the unregulated exchange of immune cells and their secretions between the CNS and blood. Having separated the two systems, the BBB then participates in mechanisms that allow them to influence, communicate, and interact with one another. Likewise, the BBB itself is influenced by immune events that are occurring in the periphery and in the CNS so that these three components (the BBB, the immune system, and the CNS) form neuroimmune axes that adapt to physiological and pathological conditions. To date, four major themes have emerged by which the BBB participates in these neuroimmune axes. The first of these four, the formation of the barrier, acts to separate the immune and central nervous systems. The other three themes provide mechanisms for re-establishing communication: response of the BBB to immunomodulatory molecules (e.g., prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide) secreted by immune and CNS cells; the controlled, regulated exchange of chemokines, cytokines, and immune cells between the CNS and the blood (i.e., transport across the BBB); the secretion of immunomodulatory molecules by the BBB, often in a polarized fashion. Taken together, these mechanisms reveal the BBB to be a dynamic, interactive, and adaptable interface between the immune system and the CNS, separating them on the one hand and fostering their interaction on the other hand, adjusting to physiological changes, while being a target for disease processes. This review examines specific examples by which the BBB plays an interactive, defining role in neuroimmunology. PMID:25172555

  20. Controlled Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Passive Acoustic Emissions Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R2 = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology. PMID:23029240

  1. Cellular mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier opening induced by ultrasound in presence of microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Sheikov, Nickolai; McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Jolesz, Ferenc; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2004-07-01

    Local blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening is an advantageous approach for targeted drug delivery to the brain. Recently, it has been shown that focused ultrasound (US) exposures (sonications), when applied in the presence of preformed gas bubbles, caused magnetic-resonance (MR) proven reversible opening of the BBB in targeted locations. The cellular mechanisms of such transient barrier disruption are largely unknown. We investigated US-induced changes in endothelial cell fine morphology that resulted in the BBB opening in rabbits. To obtain evidence for the passage of blood-borne macromolecules through the opened transvascular routes, an immunocytochemical procedure for endogenous immunoglobulinG (IgG) was performed, in addition to the routine electron microscopy. An increased number of vesicles and vacuoles, fenestration and channel formation, as well as opening of some tight junctions, were seen in capillaries after low-power (0.55 W) sonication. Immunosignals presented in some of the vesicles and vacuoles, in the cytoplasmic channels and, so rarely, in intercellular clefts; immunosignals could also be seen in neuropil around the blood vessels. Damage to the cellular ultrastructure was not seen in these areas. However, cell destruction and leakage of IgG through defects of the endothelial lining took place at 3 W sonications. The data reveals that several mechanisms of transcapillary passage are possible after such sonications: 1. transcytosis; 2. endothelial cell cytoplasmic openings--fenestration and channel formation; 3. opening of a part of tight junctions; and 4. free passage through the injured endothelium (with the higher power sonications). These findings could be considered in further development of the strategy for drug delivery to brain parenchyma.

  2. Glycodermorphins: opioid peptides with potent and prolonged analgesic activity and enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Tabacco, Fabio; Scolaro, Barbara; Rocchi, Raniero

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve the in vivo stability of the opioid peptide dermorphin we synthesized O-βglucosylated analogs ([Ser7-O-βGlc]dermorphin and [Ser7-O-βGlc(Ac)4]-dermorphin) and C-αgalactosylated analogs ([Ala7-C-αGal]dermorphin and [Ala7-C-αGal(Ac)4]-dermorphin).O- and C-glycosylation of dermorphin halved the peptide affinity for brain μ-opioid receptors and the biological potency in guinea-pig ileum assay (GPI). Despite their lower opioid receptor affinity, when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v., 8–40 pmol) and subcutaneously (s.c., 0.5–3 μmol kg−1) in rats, glycosylated analogs were two times more potent than dermorphin in reducing the nociceptive response to radiant heat. Acetylation of sugar hydroxyl groups reduces 5–10 times both biological activity on GPI and μ-receptor affinity, whereas the antinociceptive potency was equal to (i.c.v.) or only two-three times lower (s.c.) than dermorphin potency.Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Index (BBB-PI) of the glycodermorphins was significantly higher than that of dermorphin, indicating a facilitated entry into the brain: O-β-linked glucoconiugates are expected to enter CNS by the glucose transporter GLUT-1 of the endothelial barrier. However the calculated BBB-PI for the C-αgalactoside was about two times higher than that of the O-βglucoside, excluding the implication of GLUT-1 that is known to be selective for O-β-links and preferring for the exose glucose.The enhanced brain permeability with the subsequent decrease in peripheral dosage of these opioid peptides did not result in lowering constipation. PMID:9723966

  3. Surfactants, not size or zeta-potential influence blood-brain barrier passage of polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Nadine; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Kockentiedt, Sarah; Hintz, Werner; Tomas, Jürgen; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) can deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but little is known which of the factors surfactant, size and zeta-potential are essential for allowing BBB passage. To this end we designed purpose-built fluorescent polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) NP and imaged the NP's passage over the blood-retina barrier - which is a model of the BBB - in live animals. Rats received intravenous injections of fluorescent PBCA-NP fabricated by mini-emulsion polymerisation to obtain various NP's compositions that varied in surfactants (non-ionic, anionic, cationic), size (67-464nm) and zeta-potential. Real-time imaging of retinal blood vessels and retinal tissue was carried out with in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) before, during and after NP's injection. Successful BBB passage with subsequent cellular labelling was achieved if NP were fabricated with non-ionic surfactants or cationic stabilizers but not when anionic compounds were added. NP's size and charge had no influence on BBB passage and cell labelling. This transport was not caused by an unspecific opening of the BBB because control experiments with injections of unlabelled NP and fluorescent dye (to test a "door-opener" effect) did not lead to parenchymal labelling. Thus, neither NP's size nor chemo-electric charge, but particle surface is the key factor determining BBB passage. This result has important implications for NP engineering in medicine: depending on the surfactant, NP can serve one of two opposite functions: while non-ionic tensides enhance brain up-take, addition of anionic tensides prevents it. NP can now be designed to specifically enhance drug delivery to the brain or, alternatively, to prevent brain penetration so to reduce unwanted psychoactive effects of drugs or prevent environmental nanoparticles from entering tissue of the central nervous system.

  4. The effects of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Nihal Gunes; Orhan, Nurcan; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Arican, Nadir; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Kaya, Mehmet; Toklu, Akin Savas

    2013-09-19

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment yields conflicting results on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity under various pathological conditions and the effects of HBO on healthy brain is poorly understood. In this experimental study, the effects of HBO on BBB integrity were investigated in comparison with hyperbaric air (HBA) in intact rats. Four sessions of HBA or HBO were applied to intact rats in 24h. BBB integrity was functionally and structurally evaluated by determining extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracers. In immunohistochemical evaluation, relative staining intensity for occludin, a tight junction (TJ) protein, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water-channel protein, was detected in the barrier type of microvessels of brain by image analysis. BBB permeability to EB dye significantly increased in animals in HBO treatment group compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.05). The immunoreactivity of occludin, a tight junction protein, remained essentially unaltered in capillaries of hippocampus in all groups. In animals exposed to HBO, AQP4 immunoreactivity significantly increased in parietal cortex compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.01). Ultrastructurally, frequent vesicles containing HRP reaction products were observed in capillary endothelial cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to both HBA and HBO. Our results indicate that the HBO administration to intact rats increased BBB permeability to both EB and HRP while HBA increased only HRP extravasation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that HBA also impairs the BBB integrity in intact rats as well as HBO.

  5. Influence of glioma cells on a new co-culture in vitro blood-brain barrier model for characterization and validation of permeability.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Bárbara; Marques, Cláudia; Carvalho, Isabel; Costa, Paulo; Martins, Susana; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-07-25

    The blood-brain barrier plays an important role in protecting the brain from injury and diseases, but also restrains the delivery of potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of brain illnesses, such as tumors. Glioma is most common cancer type of central nervous system in adults and the most lethal in children. The treatment is normally poor and ineffective. To better understand the ability of drug delivery systems to permeate this barrier, a blood-brain barrier model using human brain endothelial cells and a glioma cell line is herein proposed. The consistent trans-endothelial electrical values, immunofluorescence and scanning electronic microscopy showed a confluent endothelial cell monolayer with high restrictiveness. Upon inclusion of glioma cell line, the trans-endothelial electrical resistance decreased, with consequent increase of apparent permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran used as model drug, revealing a reduction of the barrier robustness. In addition, it was demonstrated a cell shape modification in the co-culture, with loss of tight junctions. The microenvironment of co-cultured model presented significant increase of of CCL2/MCP-1 and IL-6 production, correlating with the modulation of permeation. The results encourage the use of the proposed in vitro model as a screening tool when performing drugs permeability for the treatment of disorders among the central nervous system.

  6. A novel strategy to monitor microfluidic in-vitro blood-brain barrier models using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeste, J.; Illa, X.; Guimerà, A.; Villa, R.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present the use of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) for performing electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements to monitor a microfluidic blood brain barrier model. In particular, an electrode configuration which would not impair the optical visualization of the cell culture is proposed. Numerical studies have been performed to evaluate the electrical impedance sensitivity of the proposed tetrapolar configuration along the cell barrier in a given microfluidic chamber geometry. The system has been validated using a home-made cyclo olefin polymer (COP) bioreactor and perforated poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sheets with different pore densities in order to simulate different cell barrier impedances.

  7. ST6GALNAC5 Expression Decreases the Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and the Human Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Delannoy, Clément Philippe; Dewald, Justine Hélène; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Julien, Sylvain; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Delannoy, Philippe; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-08-11

    The ST6GALNAC5 gene that encodes an α2,6-sialyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of α-series gangliosides, was previously identified as one of the genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain. We have shown that the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the expression of GD1α ganglioside at the cell surface. By using a human blood-brain barrier in vitro model recently developed, consisting in CD34⁺ derived endothelial cells co-cultivated with pericytes, we show that ST6GALNAC5 expression decreased the interactions between the breast cancer cells and the human blood-brain barrier.

  8. Alzheimer's disease and blood-brain barrier function - Why have anti-β-amyloid therapies failed to prevent dementia progression?

    PubMed Central

    Pahnke, Jens; Walker, Lary C.; Scheffler, Katja; Krohn, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Proteopathies of the brain are defined by abnormal, disease-inducing protein deposition that leads to functional abrogation and death of neurons. Immunization trials targeting the removal of amyloid-β plaques in Alzheimer's disease have so far failed to stop the progression of dementia, despite autopsy findings of reduced plaque load. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the relationship between AD pathology and blood-brain barrier function, and propose that the activation of the excretion function of the blood-brain barrier might help to achieve better results in trials targeting the dissolution of cerebral amyloid-β aggregates. We further discuss a possible role of oligomers in limiting the efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:19481107

  9. ST6GALNAC5 Expression Decreases the Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and the Human Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Delannoy, Clément Philippe; Dewald, Justine Hélène; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Julien, Sylvain; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Delannoy, Philippe; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The ST6GALNAC5 gene that encodes an α2,6-sialyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of α-series gangliosides, was previously identified as one of the genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain. We have shown that the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the expression of GD1α ganglioside at the cell surface. By using a human blood-brain barrier in vitro model recently developed, consisting in CD34+ derived endothelial cells co-cultivated with pericytes, we show that ST6GALNAC5 expression decreased the interactions between the breast cancer cells and the human blood-brain barrier. PMID:27529215

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans phospholipase B1 activates host cell Rac1 for traversal across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Ravi; Zhu, Longkun; Pearce, Donna; Zheng, Yi; Perfect, John; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans penetration into the central nervous system (CNS) requires traversal of the blood-brain barrier that is composed of a single layer of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), but the underlying mechanisms of C. neoformans traversal remain incompletely understood. C. neoformans transcytosis of HBMEC monolayer involves rearrangements of the host cell actin cytoskeleton and small GTP-binding Rho family proteins such as Rac1 are shown to regulate host cell actin cytoskeleton. We, therefore, examined whether C. neoformans traversal of the blood-brain barrier involves host Rac1. While the levels of activated Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) in HBMEC increased significantly upon incubation with C. neoformans strains, pharmacological inhibition and down-modulation of Rac1 significantly decreased C. neoformans transcytosis of HBMEC monolayer. Also, Rac1 inhibition was efficient in preventing C. neoformans penetration into the brain. In addition, C. neoformans phospholipase B1 (Plb1) was shown to contribute to activating host cell Rac1, andSTAT3 was observed to associate with GTP-Rac1 in HBMEC that were incubated with C. neoformans strain but not with its Δplb1 mutant. These findings demonstrate for the first time that C. neoformans Plb1 aids fungal traversal across the blood-brain barrier by activating host cell Rac1 and its association with STAT3, and suggest that pharmacological intervention of host-microbial interaction contributing to traversal of the blood-brain barrier may prevent C. neoformans penetration into the brain.

  11. Preparation of Silica Nanoparticles Loaded with Nootropics and Their In Vivo Permeation through Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zaruba, Kamil; Kunes, Martin; Ulbrich, Pavel; Brezaniova, Ingrid; Triska, Jan; Suchy, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics), which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials) by means of an in vivo model of rat brain perfusion. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The content of the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers was analysed by elemental analysis and UV spectrometry. Microscopic analysis of visualized silica nanocarriers in the perfused brain tissue was performed. The concentration of the drug substances in the tissue was determined by means of UHPLC-DAD/HRMS LTQ Orbitrap XL. It was found that the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers permeated through the blood brain barrier to the brain tissue, whereas bulk materials were not detected in the brain. PMID:26075264

  12. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of neurogenesis - the role of the blood brain barrier in an experimental model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Inga B; Schelhaas, Sonja; Zinnhardt, Bastian; Viel, Thomas; Hermann, Sven; Couillard-Després, Sébastien; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2017-02-13

    Bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase in Doublecortin(+) (Dcx) neuroblasts might serve as a powerful tool to study the role of neurogenesis in models of brain injury and neurodegeneration using non-invasive, longitudinal in vivo imaging. Therefore, we aimed to use BLI in B6(Cg)-Tyrc-2J/J Dcx-Luc (Doublecortin-Luciferase, Dcx-Luc) mice to investigate its suitability to assess neurogenesis in a unilateral injection model of Parkinson's disease. We further aimed to assess the blood brain barrier leakage associated with the intranigral 6-OHDA injection to evaluate its impact on substrate delivery and bioluminescence signal intensity. Two weeks after lesion, we observed an increase in bioluminescence signal in the ipsilateral hippocampal region in both, 6-OHDA and vehicle injected Dcx-Luc mice. At the same time, no corresponding increase in Dcx(+) neuroblast numbers could be observed in the dentate gyrus of C57Bl6 mice. Blood brain barrier leakage was observed in the hippocampal region and in the degenerating substantia nigra of C57Bl6 mice in vivo using T1 weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Gadovist(®) and ex vivo using Evans Blue Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging and mouse Immunoglobulin G staining. Our data suggests a BLI signal dependency on blood brain barrier permeability, underlining a major pitfall of substrate/tracer dependent imaging in invasive disease models.

  13. Preparation of silica nanoparticles loaded with nootropics and their in vivo permeation through blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef; Zaruba, Kamil; Oravec, Michal; Kunes, Martin; Babula, Petr; Ulbrich, Pavel; Brezaniova, Ingrid; Opatrilova, Radka; Triska, Jan; Suchy, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics), which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials) by means of an in vivo model of rat brain perfusion. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The content of the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers was analysed by elemental analysis and UV spectrometry. Microscopic analysis of visualized silica nanocarriers in the perfused brain tissue was performed. The concentration of the drug substances in the tissue was determined by means of UHPLC-DAD/HRMS LTQ Orbitrap XL. It was found that the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers permeated through the blood brain barrier to the brain tissue, whereas bulk materials were not detected in the brain.

  14. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder.

  15. Optimization of the Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the lack of a truly non-invasive, transient, and regionally selective brain drug delivery method. The brain is particularly difficult to deliver drugs to because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The impermeability of the BBB is due to the tight junctions connecting adjacent endothelial cells and highly regulatory transport systems of the endothelial cell membranes. The main function of the BBB is ion and volume regulation to ensure conditions necessary for proper synaptic and axonal signaling. However, the same permeability properties that keep the brain healthy also constitute the cause of the tremendous obstacles posed in its pharmacological treatment. The BBB prevents most neurologically active drugs from entering the brain and, as a result, has been isolated as the rate-limiting factor in brain drug delivery. Until a solution to the trans-BBB delivery problem is found, treatments of neurological diseases will remain impeded. Over the past decade, methods that combine Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles have been shown to offer the unique capability of noninvasively, locally and transiently open the BBB so as to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Four of the main challenges that have been taken on by our group and discussed in this paper are: 1) assess its safety profile, 2) unveil the mechanism by which the BBB opens and closes, 3) control and predict the opened BBB properties and duration of the opening and 4) assess its premise in brain drug delivery. All these challenges will be discussed, findings in both small (mice) and large (non-human primates) animals are shown and finally the clinical potential for this technique is shown. PMID:23382778

  16. Consequences of repeated blood-brain barrier disruption in football players.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Nicola; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes.

  17. Effects of electromagnetic pulse exposure on gelatinase of blood-brain barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Qiu, Lian-Bo; An, Guang-Zhou; Zhou, Jia-Xing; Du, Le; Ma, Ya-Hong; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Ding, Gui-Rong

    2017-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the brain have been focused on for years. It was reported that gelatinase played an important role in maintaining brain function through regulating permeability in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To investigate the effects of EMP on gelatinase of BBB, an in vitro BBB model was established using primary cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC), astrocytes and half-contact culture of these cells in a transwell chamber. Cultured supernatant and cells were collected at different time points after exposure to EMP (peak intensity 400 kV/m, rise time 10 ns, pulse width 350 ns, 0.5 pps and 200 pulses). Protein levels of cellular gelatinase MMP-2 and MMP-9, and endogenous inhibitor TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were detected by Western blot. The activity of gelatinase in culture supernatant was detected by gelatin zymography. It was found that compared with the sham-exposed group, the protein level of MMP-2 was significantly increased at 6 h (p < 0.05), and the protein level of its endogenous inhibitor TIMP-2 did not change after EMP exposure. In addition, the protein levels of MMP-9 and its endogenous inhibitor TIMP-1 did not change after EMP exposure. Gelatin zymography results showed that the activity of MMP-2 in the inner pool and the outer pool of the transwell chamber was significantly increased at 6 h after EMP exposure compared with that of the sham group. These results suggested that EMP exposure could affect the expression and activity of MMP-2 in the BBB model.

  18. Iron supplement prevents lead-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier during rat development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiang; Luo Wenjing; Zheng Wei; Liu Yiping; Xu Hui; Zheng Gang; Dai Zhongming; Zhang Wenbin; Chen Yaoming; Chen Jingyuan . E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-02-15

    Children are known to be venerable to lead (Pb) toxicity. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) in immature brain is particularly vulnerable to Pb insults. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Pb exposure damaged the integrity of the BBB in young animals and iron (Fe) supplement may prevent against Pb-induced BBB disruption. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Three groups of rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water containing 342 {mu}g Pb/mL as Pb acetate, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day with 7 mg Fe/kg and 14 mg Fe/kg as FeSO{sub 4} solution as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. The control group received sodium acetate in drinking water. Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in blood by 6.6-folds (p < 0.05) and brain tissues by 1.5-2.0-folds (p < 0.05) as compared to controls. Under the electron microscope, Pb exposure in young animals caused an extensive extravascular staining of lanthanum nitrate in brain parenchyma, suggesting a leakage of cerebral vasculature. Western blot showed that Pb treatment led to 29-68% reduction (p < 0.05) in the expression of occludin as compared to the controls. Fe supplement among Pb-exposed rats maintained the normal ultra-structure of the BBB and restored the expression of occludin to normal levels. Moreover, the low dose Fe supplement significantly reduced Pb levels in blood and brain tissues. These data suggest that Pb exposure disrupts the structure of the BBB in young animals. The increased BBB permeability may facilitate the accumulation of Pb. Fe supplement appears to protect the integrity of the BBB against Pb insults, a beneficial effect that may have significant clinical implications.

  19. Synthesis and alkylation activity of a nitrogen mustard agent to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard agents are widely used for the clinical treatment of cancers. A nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agent was synthesized utilizing nicotinic acid as the carrier of the alkylating substituent (-OCH2CH2N(CH2CH2Cl)2) that forms an ester group (R-C(O)-OR) on a heterocyclic ring. The N-mustard agent is a solid at room temperature and is stable for more than 6 weeks when stored at -10 degrees C. To determine the kinetics of alkylation activity a nucleophilic primary amine compound (4-chloroaniline) was placed in aqueous solution with the mustard agent at physiological pH 7.4 (pH of blood) and 37 degrees C. The alkylation reaction was found to be second-order with rate equation: rate = k2[N-mustard][Nu], where Nu = nucleophile and k2 = 0.0415 L/(mol x min). Pharmacological descriptors calculated showed values indicating a strong potential of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. The partition coefficient (Log P) of the mustard agent is 1.95 compared with 0.58 for nicotinic acid. Values of descriptors such as dipole, polar surface area, Log BB, molar refractivity, parachor, and violations of Rule of 5 were found to be 5.057 Debye, 42.44 A2, 0.662, 72.7 cm3, 607.7 cm3, and 0.0 for the N-mustard agent. Value of polar surface area for the mustard agent (42.44 A2) predicts that >90% of any amount present in the intestinal tract will be absorbed.

  20. The physiological characteristics and transcytosis mechanisms of the blood-brain barrier (BBB).

    PubMed

    de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2012-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the vessel wall made up of specialized capillary endothelial cells, surrounded by astroglial endfeet and neurons, that govern the exchange of compounds between blood and brain. It protects the brain from harmful compounds potentially present in blood, while it is specifically designed to supply the brain with the required nutrients and to get rid of waste products. The BBB is structurally different from blood capillaries in other tissues. The BBB strictly limits the paracellular exchange of compounds by the so-called tight junctions. Moreover, the capillary endothelial cells contain metabolic enzymes that may convert a compound before entering the brain while transcellular passage across the BBB may be limited or increased by active transport systems. Thus the BBB has an important role in the relationship of the concentration-time profile of compounds in blood and those in the brain. The functionality of the BBB is dynamically regulated, depending on the given conditions. Important examples are changes in BBB functionality that may result in or are brought about by (CNS) disease conditions. All together this indicates the importance of investigations on BBB functionality and resulting transport of compounds for the design and optimization of therapeutic regimens. Thus, BBB investigation is an ever growing and dynamic field studied by pharmacologists, neuroscientists, pathologists, physiologists, and clinical practitioners. This review deals with a general introduction on the physiological characteristics of the BBB, its different transport systems, with particular emphasis on supposed transcytosis mechanisms at the BBB. Specific and detailed information on drug delivery approaches aiming at transcytosis into the brain will be dealt with in other parts of this special issue.

  1. Omapatrilat: penetration across the blood-brain barrier and effects on ischaemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Schmedt Auf der Günne, Wenke; Zhao, Yi; Hedderich, Jürgen; Gohlke, Peter; Culman, Juraj

    2015-09-01

    Omapatrilat (OMA), which simultaneously inhibits the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the neutral endopeptidase (neprilysin (NEP)), is widely used in experimental protocols related to hypertension and heart failure. The penetration of OMA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the effects of ACE/NEP inhibition on the recovery from ischaemic stroke have not yet been investigated. Angiotensin (Ang) I injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) or intravenously (IV) is converted to Ang II by ACE and induces an immediate increase in blood pressure. The pressor responses to OMA administered ICV, orally or IV were studied in male Wistar rats instrumented with an ICV and arterial and venous catheters. OMA infused ICV rapidly appeared in the systemic circulation and more effectively attenuated the systemic than the central pressor responses to Ang I. OMA administered orally (5, 25, 100 μmol/kg body weight) or IV (0.5, 1, 5, 25 μmol/kg body weight) completely abolished increases in blood pressure to IV Ang I up to 2 h after treatment. The pressor responses to ICV Ang I were not altered, indicating that systemically administered OMA does not cross the BBB. To study the effects of ACE and NEP inhibition in the brain on the recovery from ischaemic stroke, OMA was infused ICV over a 5-day period before and 24 h after the occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 90 min. ICV application of OMA had no effect on infarction volume and marginally improved neurological outcome. We demonstrate for the first time that simultaneous inhibition of ACE and NEP in the brain tissue does not alter the recovery from ischaemic stroke.

  2. Methamphetamine is not Toxic but Disrupts the Cell Cycle of Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D; Gamieldien, K; Mafunda, P S

    2015-07-01

    The cytotoxic effects of methamphetamine (MA) are well established to be caused via induced oxidative stress which in turn compromises the core function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by reducing its ability to regulate the homeostatic environment of the brain. While most studies were conducted over a period of 24-48 h, this study investigated the mechanisms by which chronic exposure of MA adversely affect the endothelial cells of BBB over an extended period of 96 h. MA induced significant depression of cell numbers at 96 h. This result was supported by flow cytometric data on the cell cycle which showed that brain endothelial cells (bEnd5) at 96 h were significantly suppressed in the S-phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, at 24-72 h control cell numbers for G1, S and G2-M phases were similar to MA-exposed cells. MA (0-1,000 µM) did not, however, statistically affect the viability and cytotoxicity of the bEnd5 cells, and the profile of ATP production and DNA synthesis (BrdU) across 96 h did not provide a rationale for the suppression of cell division. Our study reports for the first time that chronic exposure to MA results in long-term disruption of the cell cycle phases which eventuates in the attenuation of brain capillary endothelial cell growth after 96 h, compounding and contributing to the already well-known adverse short-term permeability effects of MA exposure on the BBB.

  3. Blood-brain barrier transport machineries and targeted therapy of brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Rafi, Mohammad A.; Pourseif, Mohammad M.; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Desired clinical outcome of pharmacotherapy of brain diseases largely depends upon the safe drug delivery into the brain parenchyma. However, due to the robust blockade function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), drug transport into the brain is selectively controlled by the BBB formed by brain capillary endothelial cells and supported by astrocytes and pericytes. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed the most recent literature on the subject to provide an insight upon the role and impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results: All drugs, either small molecules or macromolecules, designated to treat brain diseases must adequately cross the BBB to provide their therapeutic properties on biological targets within the central nervous system (CNS). However, most of these pharmaceuticals do not sufficiently penetrate into CNS, failing to meet the intended therapeutic outcomes. Most lipophilic drugs capable of penetrating BBB are prone to the efflux functionality of BBB. In contrast, all hydrophilic drugs are facing severe infiltration blockage imposed by the tight cellular junctions of the BBB. Hence, a number of strategies have been devised to improve the efficiency of brain drug delivery and targeted therapy of CNS disorders using multimodal nanosystems (NSs). Conclusions: In order to improve the therapeutic outcomes of CNS drug transfer and targeted delivery, the discriminatory permeability of BBB needs to be taken under control. The carrier-mediated transport machineries of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) can be exploited for the discovery, development and delivery of small molecules into the brain. Further, the receptor-mediated transport systems can be recruited for the delivery of macromolecular biologics and multimodal NSs into the brain. PMID:28265539

  4. Interleukin-1β transfer across the blood-brain barrier in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Grazyna B; Chen, Xiaodi; Zhang, Jiyong; Lim, Yow-Pin; Cummings, Erin E; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G; Gaitanis, John; Padbury, James F; Banks, William A; Stonestreet, Barbara S

    2015-09-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction represents an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus. Hypoxic-ischemic injury could accentuate systemic cytokine transfer across the fetal BBB. There has been considerable conjecture suggesting that systemic cytokines could cross the BBB during the perinatal period. Nonetheless, evidence to support this contention is sparse. We hypothesized that ischemia-reperfusion increases the transfer of systemic interleukin-1β (IL-1β) across the BBB in the fetus. Ovine fetuses at 127 days of gestation were studied 4 hours after 30 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion and compared with a nonischemic group. Recombinant ovine IL-1β protein was expressed from an IL-1β pGEX-2 T vector in E. coli BL-21 cells and purified. The BBB function was quantified in 12 brain regions using a blood-to-brain transfer constant with intravenous (125)I-radiolabeled IL-1β ((125)I-IL-1β). Interleukin-1β crossed the intact BBB in nonischemic fetuses. Blood-to-brain transport of (125)I-IL-1β was higher (P<0.05) across brain regions in fetuses exposed to ischemia-reperfusion than nonischemic fetuses. We conclude that systemic IL-1β crosses the intact fetal BBB, and that ischemia-reperfusion increases transfer of this cytokine across the fetal BBB. Therefore, altered BBB function after hypoxia-ischemia facilitates entry of systemic cytokines into the brain of the fetus.

  5. Vaccinia virus-induced smallpox postvaccinal encephalitis in case of blood-brain barrier damage.

    PubMed

    Garcel, Aude; Fauquette, William; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Crance, Jean-Marc; Favier, Anne-Laure

    2012-02-08

    Smallpox vaccination is the only currently effective mean to combat the threat of variola virus used as a bioterrorism agent, although it is responsible for a rare but serious complication, the postvaccinal encephalitis (PVE). Development of safer vaccines therefore is a high priority as the PVE physiopathology is not well understood to date. If vaccinia virus (VACV) is responsible for PVE by central nervous system (CNS) dissemination, trans-migration of the VACV across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) would be supposed to be essential. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of vaccinia neurovirulence, an in vitro BBB model was used to explore the mechanism of VACV to induce BBB permeability. Two VACV strains were studied, the neurovirulent Western Reserve strain (VACV-WR) and the vaccine reference Lister strain (VACV-List). A mouse model was also developed to study the ability of these two viral strains to propagate in the brain from the blood compartment, their neurovirulence and their neuropathogenesis. In vitro, the loss of permeability resulted from the tight-junctions disruption was induced by virus replication. The ability of VACV to release infectious particles at the abluminal side suggests the capacity of both VACV strains to migrate across the BBB from the blood to the CNS. In vivo, the virus replication in mice CNS was strain-dependent. The VACV-WR laboratory strain proved to be neuroinvasive and neurovirulent, whereas the VACV-List strain is safe in physiological conditions. Mice PVE was observed only with VACV-WR in the co-infection model, when BBB opening was obtained by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. This study suggests that VACV is able to cross the BBB but encephalitis occurs only in the presence of a co-infection by bacteria. So, a model of co-infection, mimicked by LPS treatment, could have important implication towards the assessment of neurovirulence of new vaccines.

  6. Microbubble gas volume: A unifying dose parameter in blood-brain barrier opening by focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kang-Ho; Fan, Alexander C.; Hinkle, Joshua J.; Newman, Joshua; Borden, Mark A.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2017-01-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles is being developed to transiently, locally and noninvasively open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for improved pharmaceutical delivery. Prior work has demonstrated that, for a given concentration dose, microbubble size affects both the intravascular circulation persistence and extent of BBB opening. When matched to gas volume dose, however, the circulation half-life was found to be independent of microbubble size. In order to determine whether this holds true for BBB opening as well, we independently measured the effects of microbubble size (2 vs. 6 µm diameter) and concentration, covering a range of overlapping gas volume doses (1-40 µL/kg). We first demonstrated precise targeting and a linear dose-response of Evans Blue dye extravasation to the rat striatum for a set of constant microbubble and ultrasound parameters. We found that dye extravasation increased linearly with gas volume dose, with data points from both microbubble sizes collapsing to a single line. A linear trend was observed for both the initial sonication (R2=0.90) and a second sonication on the contralateral side (R2=0.68). Based on these results, we conclude that microbubble gas volume dose, not size, determines the extent of BBB opening by focused ultrasound (1 MHz, ~0.5 MPa at the focus). This result may simplify planning for focused ultrasound treatments by constraining the protocol to a single microbubble parameter - gas volume dose - which gives equivalent results for varying size distributions. Finally, using optimal parameters determined for Evan Blue, we demonstrated gene delivery and expression using a viral vector, dsAAV1-CMV-EGFP, one week after BBB disruption, which allowed us to qualitatively evaluate neuronal health. PMID:28042323

  7. Bryostatin-1 Restores Blood Brain Barrier Integrity following Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Smith, Kelly E.; Turner, Ryan C.; Alkon, Daniel L.; Tan, Zhenjun; Naser, Zachary J.; Knotts, Chelsea M.; Huber, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have accounted for an estimated 270,000 blast exposures among military personnel. Blast traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the ‘signature injury’ of modern warfare. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption following blast TBI can lead to long-term and diffuse neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigate for the first time the role of bryostatin-1, a specific protein kinase C (PKC) modulator, in ameliorating BBB breakdown. Thirty seven Sprague–Dawley rats were used for this study. We utilized a clinically relevant and validated blast model to expose animals to moderate blast exposure. Groups included: control, single blast exposure, and single blast exposure + bryostatin-1. Bryostatin-1 was administered i.p. 2.5 mg/kg after blast exposure. Evan’s blue, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis were performed to assess injury. Evan’s blue binds to albumin and is a marker for BBB disruption. The single blast exposure caused an increase in permeability compared to control (t=4.808, p<0.05), and a reduction back toward control levels when bryostatin-1 was administered (t=5.113, p<0.01). Three important PKC isozymes, PKCα, PKCδ, and PKCε, were co-localized primarily with endothelial cells but not astrocytes. Bryostatin-1 administration reduced toxic PKCα levels back toward control levels (t=4.559, p<0.01) and increased the neuroprotective isozyme PKCε (t=6.102, p<0.01). Bryostatin-1 caused a significant increase in the tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, and occludin through modulation of PKC activity. Bryostatin-1 ultimately decreased BBB breakdown potentially due to modulation of PKC isozymes. Future work will examine the role of bryostatin-1 in preventing chronic neurodegeneration following repetitive neurotrauma. PMID:25301233

  8. Bryostatin-1 Restores Blood Brain Barrier Integrity following Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Smith, Kelly E; Turner, Ryan C; Alkon, Daniel L; Tan, Zhenjun; Naser, Zachary J; Knotts, Chelsea M; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-12-01

    Recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have accounted for an estimated 270,000 blast exposures among military personnel. Blast traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the 'signature injury' of modern warfare. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption following blast TBI can lead to long-term and diffuse neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigate for the first time the role of bryostatin-1, a specific protein kinase C (PKC) modulator, in ameliorating BBB breakdown. Thirty seven Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. We utilized a clinically relevant and validated blast model to expose animals to moderate blast exposure. Groups included: control, single blast exposure, and single blast exposure + bryostatin-1. Bryostatin-1 was administered i.p. 2.5 mg/kg after blast exposure. Evan's blue, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis were performed to assess injury. Evan's blue binds to albumin and is a marker for BBB disruption. The single blast exposure caused an increase in permeability compared to control (t = 4.808, p < 0.05), and a reduction back toward control levels when bryostatin-1 was administered (t = 5.113, p < 0.01). Three important PKC isozymes, PKCα, PKCδ, and PKCε, were co-localized primarily with endothelial cells but not astrocytes. Bryostatin-1 administration reduced toxic PKCα levels back toward control levels (t = 4.559, p < 0.01) and increased the neuroprotective isozyme PKCε (t = 6.102, p < 0.01). Bryostatin-1 caused a significant increase in the tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, and occludin through modulation of PKC activity. Bryostatin-1 ultimately decreased BBB breakdown potentially due to modulation of PKC isozymes. Future work will examine the role of bryostatin-1 in preventing chronic neurodegeneration following repetitive neurotrauma.

  9. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

    SciTech Connect

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.B.; Yang, J.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Cationized Immunoglobulin G: Enhanced Delivery Compared to Native Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triguero, Domingo; Buciak, Jody B.; Yang, Jing; Pardridge, William M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to >10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 ± 0.37 μ M; Bmax, 1.4 ± 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  11. Nanoparticle-based evaluation of blood brain-barrier leakage during the foreign body response

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Andrew J.; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The brain foreign body response (FBR) is an important process that limits the functionality of electrodes that comprise the brain-machine interface. Associated events in this process include leakage of the blood brain barrier (BBB), reactive astrogliosis, recruitment and activation of microglia, and neuronal degeneration. Proper BBB function is also integral to maintaining neuronal health and function. Previous attempts to characterize BBB integrity have shown homogeneous leakage of macromolecules up to 10 nm in size. In the present study, we describe a new method of measuring BBB permeability during the foreign body response in a mouse model. Approach Fluorescent nanoparticles were delivered via the tail vein into implant-bearing mice. Tissue sections were then analyzed using fluorescence microscopy to observe nanoparticles in the tissue. Gold nanoparticles were also used in conjunction with TEM to confirm the presence of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma. Main results By using polymer nanoparticle tracers, which are significantly larger than conventional macromolecular tracers, we show near-implant BBB gaps of up to 500 nm in size that persist for at least 4 weeks after implantation. Further characterization of the BBB illustrates that leakage during the brain FBR is heterogeneous with gaps between at least 10 and 500 nm. Moreover, electron microscopy was used to confirm that the nanoparticle tracers enter into the brain parenchyma near chronic brain implants. Significance Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the FBR-induced BBB leakage is characterized by larger gaps and is of longer duration than previously thought. This technique can be applied to examine the BBB in other disease states as well as during induced, transient, BBB opening. PMID:23337399

  12. Glycolysis-mediated control of blood-brain barrier development and function.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Alla B; Kuvacheva, Natalia V; Morgun, Andrey V; Komleva, Yulia K; Pozhilenkova, Elena A; Lopatina, Olga L; Gorina, Yana V; Taranushenko, Tatyana E; Petrova, Lyudmila L

    2015-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists of differentiated cells integrating in one ensemble to control transport processes between the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral blood. Molecular organization of BBB affects the extracellular content and cell metabolism in the CNS. Developmental aspects of BBB attract much attention in recent years, and barriergenesis is currently recognized as a very important and complex mechanism of CNS development and maturation. Metabolic control of angiogenesis/barriergenesis may be provided by glucose utilization within the neurovascular unit (NVU). The role of glycolysis in the brain has been reconsidered recently, and it is recognized now not only as a process active in hypoxic conditions, but also as a mechanism affecting signal transduction, synaptic activity, and brain development. There is growing evidence that glycolysis-derived metabolites, particularly, lactate, affect barriergenesis and functioning of BBB. In the brain, lactate produced in astrocytes or endothelial cells can be transported to the extracellular space via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), and may act on the adjoining cells via specific lactate receptors. Astrocytes are one of the major sources of lactate production in the brain and significantly contribute to the regulation of BBB development and functioning. Active glycolysis in astrocytes is required for effective support of neuronal activity and angiogenesis, while endothelial cells regulate bioavailability of lactate for brain cells adjusting its bidirectional transport through the BBB. In this article, we review the current knowledge with regard to energy production in endothelial and astroglial cells within the NVU. In addition, we describe lactate-driven mechanisms and action of alternative products of glucose metabolism affecting BBB structural and functional integrity in developing and mature brain.

  13. Instruction of Circulating Endothelial Progenitors In Vitro towards Specialized Blood-Brain Barrier and Arterial Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ponio, Julie Boyer-Di; El-Ayoubi, Fida; Glacial, Fabienne; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Driancourt, Catherine; Godet, Maeva; Perrière, Nicolas; Guillevic, Oriane; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Uzan, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Objective The vascular system is adapted to specific functions in different tissues and organs. Vascular endothelial cells are important elements of this adaptation, leading to the concept of ‘specialized endothelial cells’. The phenotype of these cells is highly dependent on their specific microenvironment and when isolated and cultured, they lose their specific features after few passages, making models using such cells poorly predictive and irreproducible. We propose a new source of specialized endothelial cells based on cord blood circulating endothelial progenitors (EPCs). As prototype examples, we evaluated the capacity of EPCs to acquire properties characteristic of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (blood-brain barrier (BBB)) or of arterial endothelial cells, in specific inducing culture conditions. Approach and Results First, we demonstrated that EPC-derived endothelial cells (EPDCs) co-cultured with astrocytes acquired several BBB phenotypic characteristics, such as restricted paracellular diffusion of hydrophilic solutes and the expression of tight junction proteins. Second, we observed that culture of the same EPDCs in a high concentration of VEGF resulted, through activation of Notch signaling, in an increase of expression of most arterial endothelial markers. Conclusions We have thus demonstrated that in vitro culture of early passage human cord blood EPDCs under specific conditions can induce phenotypic changes towards BBB or arterial phenotypes, indicating that these EPDCs maintain enough plasticity to acquire characteristics of a variety of specialized phenotypes. We propose that this property of EPDCs might be exploited for producing specialized endothelial cells in culture to be used for drug testing and predictive in vitro assays. PMID:24392113

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation transiently increases the blood-brain barrier solute permeability in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Da Wi; Khadka, Niranjan; Fan, Jie; Bikson, Marom; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive electrical stimulation technique investigated for a broad range of medical and performance indications. Whereas prior studies have focused exclusively on direct neuron polarization, our hypothesis is that tDCS directly modulates endothelial cells leading to transient changes in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability (P) that are highly meaningful for neuronal activity. For this, we developed state-of-the-art imaging and animal models to quantify P to various sized solutes after tDCS treatment. tDCS was administered using a constant current stimulator to deliver a 1mA current to the right frontal cortex of rat (approximately 2 mm posterior to bregma and 2 mm right to sagittal suture) to obtain similar physiological outcome as that in the human tDCS application studies. Sodium fluorescein (MW=376), or FITC-dextrans (20K and 70K), in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer was injected into the rat (SD, 250-300g) cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump at a constant rate of ~3 ml/min. To determine P, multiphoton microscopy with 800-850 nm wavelength laser was applied to take the images from the region of interest (ROI) with proper microvessels, which are 100-200 micron below the pia mater. It shows that the relative increase in P is about 8-fold for small solute, sodium fluorescein, ~35-fold for both intermediate sized (Dex-20k) and large (Dex-70k) solutes, 10 min after 20 min tDCS pretreatment. All of the increased permeability returns to the control after 20 min post treatment. The results confirmed our hypothesis.

  15. Effects of a disrupted blood-brain barrier on cholesterol homeostasis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Ahmed A; Genové, Guillem; Li, Tian; Lütjohann, Dieter; Olin, Maria; Mast, Natalia; Pikuleva, Irina A; Crick, Peter; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William; Betsholtz, Christer; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2014-08-22

    The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for cholesterol metabolism in the brain, preventing uptake of lipoprotein-bound cholesterol from the circulation. The metabolic consequences of a leaking BBB for cholesterol metabolism have not been studied previously. Here we used a pericyte-deficient mouse model, Pdgfb(ret/ret), shown to have increased permeability of the BBB to a range of low-molecular mass and high-molecular mass tracers. There was a significant accumulation of plant sterols in the brains of the Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. By dietary treatment with 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol, we could demonstrate a significant flux of cholesterol from the circulation into the brains of the mutant mice roughly corresponding to about half of the measured turnover of cholesterol in the brain. We expected the cholesterol flux into the brain to cause a down-regulation of cholesterol synthesis. Instead, cholesterol synthesis was increased by about 60%. The levels of 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC) were significantly reduced in the brains of the pericyte-deficient mice but increased in the circulation. After treatment with 1% cholesterol in diet, the difference in cholesterol synthesis between mutants and controls disappeared. The findings are consistent with increased leakage of 24S-OHC from the brain into the circulation in the pericyte-deficient mice. This oxysterol is an efficient suppressor of cholesterol synthesis, and the results are consistent with a regulatory role of 24S-OHC in the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a defective BBB may lead to increased flux of a lipophilic compound out from the brain. The relevance of the findings for the human situation is discussed.

  16. Monochloroacetic acid toxicity in the mouse associated with blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Berardi, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) damages the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of mice when administered orally at lethal doses. Damage was characterized by the finding of RBC's in the brain parenchyma of mice exhibiting neurologic dysfunction after MCA treatment, and by the entry of (/sup 14/C)inulin and (/sup 3/H)dopamine into the brain following a lethal dose of MCA. Results of acute toxicity studies, pharmacological antidote studies, and toxicokinetics studies in mice and rats are also presented. Acute toxicity of MCA in rats and mice by several routes of administration was determined. Toxicity of molten MCA by the dermal route was characterized by a small amount of surface area exposure and short application time necessary to produce death in both species. Some mice surviving an acute lethal oral dose of MCA exhibited a rigid clasping of the front paws (myotonia) with impairment of walking. Oral administration of (/sup 14/C)MCA to both mice and rats was followed by a rapid elimination of radioactivity from non-cerebral tissues and rapid appearance in the urine. As the dose was increased from a trace dose to a toxic dose, the percent of the administrated dose which was found in the tissues, including brain regions, was greatly increased. Two hours after oral administration of an LD80 of MCA to mice, and coinciding with the onset of toxic signs, entry of (/sup 14/C)inulin into brain regions was significantly increased compared to controls. Both MCA lethality and front paw dysfunction in mice appear to be associated with damage to the BBB.

  17. Long-Term Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in Binswanger’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huisa, Branko N; Caprihan, Arvind; Thompson, Jeffrey; Prestopnik, Jillian; Qualls, Clifford R; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The blood brain-barrier (BBB) is disrupted in small vessel disease (SVD) patients with lacunes and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs). The relationship of WMHs and regional BBB permeability changes has not been studied. We hypothesized that BBB disruption occurs in normal appearing WM (NAWM) and regions near the WMHs. To test the hypothesis, we repeated BBB permeability measurements in patients with extensive WMHs related to Binswanger’s disease (BD). Methods We selected a subset of 22 BD subjects from a well-characterized larger prospective vascular cognitive impairment cohort. We used 16 age-matched controls for comparison. The abnormal WM permeability (WMP) was measured twice over several years using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI). WMP maps were constructed from voxels above a predetermined threshold. Scans from first and second visits were co-registered. WM was divided into 3 regions: NAWM, WMH ring and WMH core. The ring was defined as 2mm on each side of the WMH border. WMP was calculated in each of the three specific regions. We used paired t-test, ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test to compare individual changes. Results WMP was significantly higher in subjects than controls (p<0.001). There was no correlation between WMH load and WMP. High permeability regions had minimal overlap between first and second scans. Nine percent of WMP was within the WMHs, 49% within the NAWM, and 52% within the WMH ring (p<0.001; ANOVA). Conclusions Increased BBB permeability in NAWM and close to the WMH borders supports a relationship between BBB disruption and development of WMHs. PMID:26205374

  18. Nano carriers for drug transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinming; Tsibouklis, John; Weng, Tingting; Zhang, Buning; Yin, Guoqiang; Feng, Guangzhu; Cui, Yingde; Savina, Irina N; Mikhalovska, Lyuba I; Sandeman, Susan R; Howel, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    Effective therapy lies in achieving a therapeutic amount of drug to the proper site in the body and then maintaining the desired drug concentration for a sufficient time interval to be clinically effective for treatment. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) hinders most drugs from entering the central nervous system (CNS) from the blood stream, leading to the difficulty of delivering drugs to the brain via the circulatory system for the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of brain diseases. Several brain drug delivery approaches have been developed, such as intracerebral and intracerebroventricular administration, intranasal delivery and blood-to-brain delivery, as a result of transient BBB disruption induced by biological, chemical or physical stimuli such as zonula occludens toxin, mannitol, magnetic heating and ultrasound, but these approaches showed disadvantages of being dangerous, high cost and unsuitability for most brain diseases and drugs. The strategy of vector-mediated blood-to-brain delivery, which involves improving BBB permeability of the drug-carrier conjugate, can minimize side effects, such as being submicrometre objects that behave as a whole unit in terms of their transport and properties, nanomaterials, are promising carrier vehicles for direct drug transport across the intact BBB as a result of their potential to enter the brain capillary endothelial cells by means of normal endocytosis and transcytosis due to their small size, as well as their possibility of being functionalized with multiple copies of the drug molecule of interest. This review provids a concise discussion of nano carriers for drug transport across the intact BBB, various forms of nanomaterials including inorganic/solid lipid/polymeric nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, quantum dots, nanogels, liposomes, micelles, dendrimers, polymersomes and exosomes are critically evaluated, their mechanisms for drug transport across the BBB are reviewed, and the future directions of this area are fully

  19. Adenosine receptor signaling modulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Carman, Aaron J; Mills, Jeffrey H; Krenz, Antje; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S

    2011-09-14

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is comprised of specialized endothelial cells that form the capillary microvasculature of the CNS and is essential for brain function. It also poses the greatest impediment in the treatment of many CNS diseases because it commonly blocks entry of therapeutic compounds. Here we report that adenosine receptor (AR) signaling modulates BBB permeability in vivo. A(1) and A(2A) AR activation facilitated the entry of intravenously administered macromolecules, including large dextrans and antibodies to β-amyloid, into murine brains. Additionally, treatment with an FDA-approved selective A(2A) agonist, Lexiscan, also increased BBB permeability in murine models. These changes in BBB permeability are dose-dependent and temporally discrete. Transgenic mice lacking A(1) or A(2A) ARs showed diminished dextran entry into the brain after AR agonism. Following treatment with a broad-spectrum AR agonist, intravenously administered anti-β-amyloid antibody was observed to enter the CNS and bind β-amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective AR activation resulted in cellular changes in vitro including decreased transendothelial electrical resistance, increased actinomyosin stress fiber formation, and alterations in tight junction molecules. These results suggest that AR signaling can be used to modulate BBB permeability in vivo to facilitate the entry of potentially therapeutic compounds into the CNS. AR signaling at brain endothelial cells represents a novel endogenous mechanism of modulating BBB permeability. We anticipate these results will aid in drug design, drug delivery and treatment options for neurological diseases such as AD, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and cancers of the CNS.

  20. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. The effects of nicotinamide on apoptosis and blood-brain barrier breakdown following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Michael R; Kaplan, Shelby A; Ellis, Amy L

    2006-12-13

    Nicotinamide has been shown to protect against many of the pathophysiological factors associated with both ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. The present study evaluated the neuroprotective effect of nicotinamide on the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and apoptosis expression following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Animals were prepared with a unilateral cortical contusion injury (CCI). Fifteen minutes following injury the animals received either nicotinamide (500 mg/kg, ip) or 0.9% saline. The animals were perfused at 5, 24, and 72 h post-injury. BBB integrity was assessed by endogenous rat IgG immunoreactivity. Recent studies have shown that IgG immunoreactivity is a reliable measure of BBB integrity. The results indicated that IgG immunoreactivity was greatest at 5 h and declined at 24 h after injury. Nicotinamide significantly reduced IgG expression at every time point following injury. Apoptosis was examined using the TUNEL method. The results indicated that TUNEL immunoreactivity peaked at 24 h. TUNEL(+) cells were classified morphologically as nonapoptotic (Type I) or apoptotic (Type II) to verify that the neuroprotective effects of nicotinamide occur by inhibiting apoptosis or necrosis. Administration of nicotinamide significantly reduced the expression of all TUNEL(+) cells in the tissue surrounding the lesion cavity. Specifically there was a significant reduction in the number of Type I, Type II, and Total TUNEL(+) cells in the nicotinamide-treated animals. In addition, nicotinamide reduced lesion cavity expansion 72 h following CCI. These findings suggest that nicotinamide reduces BBB breach and neuronal cell loss acutely following injury and that these reductions may account for the beneficial behavioral effects seen in previous studies.

  2. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Ivanidze, Jana; Kallas, Omar N.; Gupta, Ajay; Weidman, Elizabeth; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Mir, Danial; Giambrone, Ashley; Segal, Alan Z.; Claassen, Jan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Blood brain barrier permeability (BBBP) is not presently routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema (GCE) occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of GCE is challenging using current imaging techniques. Our purpose was to apply BBBP imaging in patients with GCE using extended pass CT Perfusion (CTP). Methods SAH patients underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as GCE or non-GCE using established non-contrast CT criteria. CTP were post-processed into BBBP quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface area product), K-trans (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space, EES), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from EES to intravascular space), VE (EES volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume) and F (plasma flow) using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t-tests. Results 22 patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, p < 0.0001), K-trans (0.15 versus 0.19, p < 0.0001), VP (0.51 versus 0.57, p = 0.0007) and F (1176 versus 1329, p = 0.0001) were decreased in GCE compared to non-GCE while VE (0.81 versus 0.39, p < 0.0001) was increased. Conclusion Extended CTP was utilized to evaluate BBBP in SAH patients with and without GCE. Kep is an important indicator of altered BBBP in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of BBBP is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of GCE. PMID:27127002

  3. Consequences of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Janigro, Mattia; Ghosh, Chaitali; Zhong, Jianhui; Zhu, Tong; Blackman, Eric; Stewart, Desiree; Ellis, Jasmina; Butler, Robert; Janigro, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT) scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers). None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57); the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games). A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10). Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes. PMID:23483891

  4. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, H A S; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, M E; Acosta, C; Carneiro, A A O; Konofagou, E E

    2015-10-07

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5–1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were mm3, mm3and mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were V.s, V.s and V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue.

  5. Persistent neuroinflammatory effects of serial exposure to stress and methamphetamine on the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2012-12-01

    Studies of methamphetamine (Meth)-induced neurotoxicity have traditionally focused on monoaminergic terminal damage while more recent studies have found that stress exacerbates these damaging effects of Meth. Similarities that exist between the mechanisms that cause monoaminergic terminal damage in response to stress and Meth and those capable of producing a disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) suggest that the well-known high co-morbidity of stress and Meth could produce long-lasting structural and functional BBB disruption. The current studies examined the role of neuroinflammation in mediating the effects of exposure to chronic stress and/or Meth on BBB structure and function. Rats were pre-exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) and/or challenged with Meth. Twenty-four hours after the treatment of Meth in rats pre-exposed to CUS, occludin and claudin-5 immunoreactivity were decreased while truncation of β-dystroglycan, as well as FITC-dextran and water extravasation was increased. All changes other than β-dystroglycan and edema persisted 7 days later, occurred with increases in GFAP and COX-2, and were blocked by ketoprofen after Meth treatment. In addition, persistent increases in FITC-dextran extravasation were prevented by treatment with an EP1 receptor antagonist after Meth exposure. The results indicate that CUS and Meth synergize to produce long-lasting structural and functional BBB disruptions that are mediated by cyclooxygenase and protracted increases in inflammation. These results suggest that stress and Meth can synergize to produce a long-lasting vulnerability of the brain to subsequent environmental insults resulting from the persistent breach of the BBB.

  6. Idazoxan reduces blood-brain barrier damage during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Fang, Hui-Lin; Chen, Yu; Liang, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Zhen-Guo; Zeng, Qing-Yi; Li, Jia; Xu, Hui-Qin; Shao, Bei; He, Jin-Cai; Hou, Sheng-Tao; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2014-08-05

    We have previously shown that Idazoxan (IDA), an imidazoline 2 receptor ligand, is neuroprotective against spinal cord injury caused by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mouse, an animal modal of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the protective mechanism remains unclear. Here, we provided evidence to show that IDA confers neuroprotection through reduction in blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. EAE was induced by immunizing C57 BL/6 mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein35-55 amino acid peptide (MOG35-55). IDA was administrated for 14 days after MOG immunization at 2 mg/kg (i.p., bid). Significant reduction in BBB damage occurred in the IDA-treated group of mice compared with the saline-treated group, as evidenced by the reduction in Evan׳s blue content in the brain tissue and the reduced BBB tight junction damage viewed under a transmission electron microscope. Moreover, EAE-induced reductions in tight junction proteins (JAM-1, Occludin, Claudin-5 and ZO-1) were also significantly ameliorated in IDA-treated mice, all of which supported the notion that IDA reduced BBB damage. Interestingly, the expression levels of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the ratio of MMP-9 against tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), which is known to be associated with MS-induced BBB damage, were significantly reduced in IDA-treated group, lending further support to the hypothesis that IDA confers brain protection through reducing BBB damage. This study raised a possibility that IDA is a promising pro-drug for development against MS.

  7. MRI-guided targeted blood-brain barrier disruption with focused ultrasound: histological findings in rabbits.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Raymond, Scott; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-11-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a method to disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) noninvasively and reversibly at targeted locations. The purpose of this study was to test the safety of this method by searching for ischemia and apoptosis in areas with BBB disruption induced by pulsed ultrasound in the presence of preformed gas bubbles and by looking for delayed effects up to one month after sonication. Pulsed ultrasound exposures (sonications) were performed in the brains of 24 rabbits under monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (ultrasound: frequency = 1.63 MHz, burst length = 100 ms, PRF = 1 Hz, duration = 20 s, pressure amplitude 0.7 to 1.0 MPa). Before sonication, an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) was injected IV. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced MR images. Whole brain histologic examination was performed using haematoxylin and eosin staining for general histology, vanadium acid fuchsin-toluidine blue staining for ischemic neurons and TUNEL staining for apoptosis. The main effects observed were tiny regions of extravasated red blood cells scattered around the sonicated locations, indicating affected capillaries. Despite these vasculature effects, only a few cells in some of the sonicated areas showed evidence for apoptosis or ischemia. No ischemic or apoptotic regions were detected that would indicate a compromised blood supply was induced by the sonications. No delayed effects were observed either by MRI or histology up to 4 wk after sonication. Ultrasound-induced BBB disruption is possible without inducing substantial vascular damage that would result in ischemic or apoptotic death to neurons. These findings indicate that this method is safe for targeted drug delivery, at least when compared with the currently available invasive methods.

  8. Use of Ultrasound Pulses Combined with Definity for Targeted Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a method to combine an ultrasound contrast agent (USCA) with low-intensity focused ultrasound pulses combined to produce temporary blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), a potential non-invasive means for targeted drug delivery in the brain. All of our previous work used the USCA Optison. The purpose of this work was to test the feasibility of using the USCA Definity for BBBD. Thirty-six non-overlapping locations were sonicated through a craniotomy in experiments in the brains of nine rabbits (4 locations per rabbit; US frequency: 0.69MHz, burst: 10ms, PRF: 1Hz, duration: 20s; pressure amplitude: 0.2-1.5 MPa). Eleven locations were sonicated using Optison at 0.5 MPa. For both agents, the probability for BBBD was estimated to be 50% at 0.4 MPa using probit regression. In histology, small isolated areas of extravasated erythrocytes were observed in some locations. At 0.8 MPa and above, this extravasation was sometimes accompanied by tiny (dimensions of 100 μm or less) regions of damaged brain parenchyma. The magnitude of the BBBD was larger with Optison than with Definity at 0.5 MPa (P=0.04), and more areas with extravasated erythrocytes were observed (P=0.03). We conclude that BBBD is possible using Definity for the dosage of USCA and the acoustic parameters tested in this study. While the probability for BBBD as a function of pressure amplitude and the type of acute tissue effects was similar to findings with Optison, under these experimental conditions, Optison produced a larger effect.

  9. The rights and wrongs of blood-brain barrier permeability studies: a walk through 100 years of history

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Norman R.; Dreifuss, Jean-Jacques; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Johansson, Pia A.; Habgood, Mark D.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Bauer, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Careful examination of relevant literature shows that many of the most cherished concepts of the blood-brain barrier are incorrect. These include an almost mythological belief in its immaturity that is unfortunately often equated with absence or at least leakiness in the embryo and fetus. The original concept of a blood-brain barrier is often attributed to Ehrlich; however, he did not accept that permeability of cerebral vessels was different from other organs. Goldmann is often credited with the first experiments showing dye (trypan blue) exclusion from the brain when injected systemically, but not when injected directly into it. Rarely cited are earlier experiments of Bouffard and of Franke who showed methylene blue and trypan red stained all tissues except the brain. The term “blood-brain barrier” “Blut-Hirnschranke” is often attributed to Lewandowsky, but it does not appear in his papers. The first person to use this term seems to be Stern in the early 1920s. Studies in embryos by Stern and colleagues, Weed and Wislocki showed results similar to those in adult animals. These were well-conducted experiments made a century ago, thus the persistence of a belief in barrier immaturity is puzzling. As discussed in this review, evidence for this belief, is of poor experimental quality, often misinterpreted and often not properly cited. The functional state of blood-brain barrier mechanisms in the fetus is an important biological phenomenon with implications for normal brain development. It is also important for clinicians to have proper evidence on which to advise pregnant women who may need to take medications for serious medical conditions. Beliefs in immaturity of the blood-brain barrier have held the field back for decades. Their history illustrates the importance of taking account of all the evidence and assessing its quality, rather than selecting papers that supports a preconceived notion or intuitive belief. This review attempts to right the wrongs

  10. Growth inhibition in a brain metastasis model by antibody delivery using focused ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan J

    2016-09-28

    HER2-targeting antibodies (i.e. trastuzumab and pertuzumab) prolong survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with extracranial metastases. However, the response of brain metastases to these drugs is poor, and it is hypothesized that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits drug delivery to the brain. We investigated whether we could improve the response by temporary disruption of the BBB using focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles. To study this, we inoculated 30 nude rats with HER2-positive cells derived from a brain metastasis of a breast cancer patient (MDA-MB-361). The animals were divided into three groups: a control-group that received no treatment; an antibody-only group that received six weekly treatments of trastuzumab and pertuzumab; and an ultrasound+antibody group that received trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination with six weekly sessions of BBB disruption using focused ultrasound. In two animals, the leakiness of the tumors before disruption was evaluated using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and found that the tumors were not leaky. The same technique was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BBB disruption, which was successful in all sessions. The tumor in the control animals grew exponentially with a growth constant of 0.042±0.011mm(3)/day. None of the antibody-only animals responded to the treatment and the growth constant was 0.033±0.009mm(3)/day during the treatment period. Four of the ten animals in the ultrasound+antibody-group showed a response to the treatment with an average growth constant of 0.010±0.007mm(3)/day, compared to a growth constant 0.043±0.013mm(3)/day for the six non-responders. After the treatment period, the tumors in all groups grew at similar rates. As the tumors were not leaky before BBB disruption and there were no responders in the antibody-only group, these results show that at least in some cases disruption of the BBB is necessary for a response to the antibodies in

  11. Radiation-Induced Astrogliosis and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage Can Be Abrogated Using Anti-TNF Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christy M.; Gaber, M. Waleed Sabek, Omaima M.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: In this article, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in the initiation of acute damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain tissue following radiotherapy (RT) for CNS tumors. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a closed cranial window technique were used to measure quantitatively BBB permeability to FITC-dextran 4.4-kDa molecules, leukocyte adhesion (Rhodamine-6G) and vessel diameters before and after 20-Gy cranial radiation with and without treatment with anti-TNF. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify astrogliosis post-RT and immunofluorescence was used to visualize protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 post-RT. Recombinant TNF (rTNF) was used to elucidate the role of TNF in leukocyte adhesion and vessel diameter. Results: Mice treated with anti-TNF showed significantly lower permeability and leukocyte adhesion at 24 and 48 h post-RT vs. RT-only animals. We observed a significant decrease in arteriole diameters at 48 h post-RT that was inhibited in TNF-treated animals. We also saw a significant increase in activated astrocytes following RT that was significantly lower in the anti-TNF-treated group. In addition, immunofluorescence showed protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 in the cerebral cortex that was inhibited with anti-TNF treatment. Finally, administration of rTNF induced a decrease in arteriole diameter and a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion in venules and arterioles. Conclusions: TNF plays a significant role in acute changes in BBB permeability, leukocyte adhesion, arteriole diameter, and astrocyte activation following cranial radiation. Treatment with anti-TNF protects the brain's microvascular network from the acute damage following RT.

  12. The Trendelenburg Position after Cerebral Air Embolism in Dogs: Effects on the Somatosensory Evoked Potential, Intracranial Pressure, and Blood-Brain Barrier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    ertension, the duration of the hypertensive phase, and the maximum level of the blood pressure are related to recovery. We record the group averages of...IN DOGS: EFFECTS ON THE SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIAL, INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE , AND BLOOD -BRAIN BARRIER A. J. Dutka J. E. Polychronidis R. B. Mink- V...TRENDELENBURG POSITION I- CEREBRAL AR EMBOLISM TN DOGS: EFFECTS ON THE SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIAL, INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE , AND BLOOD - BRAIN BARRIER 12

  13. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide on blood-brain barrier and dopaminergic neurons of rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-li; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yun-hui; Xue, Yi-xue

    2014-05-01

    Neuro-inflammation and dysfunction of blood-brain barrier play an important role in the occurrence, development, and neuronal degeneration of Parkinson's disease (PD). Studies have demonstrated that a variety of cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β destroy the structure and function of blood-brain barrier. The damage to blood-brain barrier results in death of dopaminergic neurons, while protection of blood-brain barrier slows down the progression of PD. Also, it has been shown that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) plays an important role in causing damage to blood-brain barrier. In addition, the PARP inhibitor 3-AB has been shown to protect blood-brain barrier from damage and has neuroprotective effects. In this study, using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD rat model, we investigated whether 3-AB protects blood-brain barrier and dopaminergic neurons from functional damage. LPS significantly increased Evans blue content in the substantia nigra which peaked at 12 h, while administration of 3-AB significantly inhibited the LPS-induced increase in Evans blue content and also significantly increased the expression of the tight junction-associated proteins claudin-5, occludin and ZO-1. 3-AB also increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells and reduced the IL-1β and TNF-α content significantly. According to western blot analysis, 3-AB significantly reduced the p-ERK1/2 expression, while the expression of p-p38MAPK increased. These results suggest that 3-AB protects the blood-brain barrier from functional damage in an LPS-induced PD rat model and dopaminergic neurons are protected from degeneration by upregulation of tight junction-associated proteins. These protective effects of 3-AB may be related to modulation of the ERK1/2 pathway.

  14. Interactions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) with the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kastin, Abba J; Akerstrom, Victoria; Pan, Weihong

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) reduces insulin requirement in diabetes mellitus and promotes satiety. GLP-1 in the periphery (outside the CNS) has been shown to act on the brain to reduce food ingestion. As GLP-1 is readily degraded in blood, we focused on the interactions of [Ser8]GLP-1, an analog with similar biological effects and greater stability, with the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The influx of radiolabeled [Ser8]GLP-1 into brain has several distinctive characteristics: 1. A rapid influx rate of 8.867 +/- 0.798 x 10(4) mL/g-min as measured by multiple-time regression analysis after iv injection in mice. 2. Lack of self-inhibition by excess doses of the unlabeled [Ser8]GLP-1 either iv or by in situ brain perfusion, indicating the absence of a saturable transport system at the BBB. 3. Lack of modulation by short-term fasting and some other ingestive peptides that may interact with GLP-1, including leptin, glucagon, insulin, neuropeptide Y, and melanin-concentrating hormone. 4. No inhibition of influx by the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39), suggesting that the GLP-1 receptor is not involved in the rapid entry into brain. Similarly, there was no efflux system for [Ser8]GLP-1 to exit the brain other than following the reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The fast influx was not associated with high lipid solubility. Upon reaching the brain compartment, substantial amounts of [Ser8]GLP-1 entered the brain parenchyma, but a large proportion was loosely associated with the vasculature at the BBB. Finally, the influx rate of [Ser8]GLP-1 was compared with that of GLP-1 in a blood-free brain perfusion system; radiolabeled GLP-1 had a more rapid influx than its analog and neither peptide showed the self-inhibition indicative of a saturable transport system. Therefore, we conclude that [Ser8]GLP-1 and the endogenous peptide GLP-1 can gain access to the brain from the periphery by simple diffusion and thus contribute to the regulation of feeding.

  15. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low

  16. Melatonin Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Permeability via Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Alluri, Himakarnika; Wilson, Rickesha L.; Anasooya Shaji, Chinchusha; Wiggins-Dohlvik, Katie; Patel, Savan; Liu, Yang; Peng, Xu; Beeram, Madhava R.; Davis, Matthew L.; Huang, Jason H.; Tharakan, Binu

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular hyperpermeability that occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) often leads to vasogenic brain edema and elevated intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury (TBI). At a cellular level, tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells maintain the integrity of the BBB via TJ associated proteins particularly, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) that binds to the transmembrane TJPs and actin cytoskeleton intracellularly. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) as well as the proteolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) are key mediators of trauma-associated brain edema. Recent studies indicate that melatonin a pineal hormone directly binds to MMP-9 and also might act as its endogenous inhibitor. We hypothesized that melatonin treatment will provide protection against TBI-induced BBB hyperpermeability via MMP-9 inhibition. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells grown as monolayers were used as an in vitro model of the BBB and a mouse model of TBI using a controlled cortical impactor was used for all in vivo studies. IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 2 hours)-induced endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability was significantly attenuated by melatonin (10 μg/mL; 1 hour), GM6001 (broad spectrum MMP inhibitor; 10 μM; 1 hour), MMP-9 inhibitor-1 (MMP-9 specific inhibitor; 5 nM; 1 hour) or MMP-9 siRNA transfection (48 hours) in vitro. Melatonin and MMP-9 inhibitor-1 pretreatment attenuated IL-1β-induced MMP-9 activity, loss of ZO-1 junctional integrity and f-actin stress fiber formation. IL-1β treatment neither affected ZO-1 protein or mRNA expression or cell viability. Acute melatonin treatment attenuated BBB hyperpermeability in a mouse controlled cortical impact model of TBI in vivo. In conclusion, one of the protective effects of melatonin against BBB hyperpermeability occurs due to enhanced BBB integrity via MMP-9 inhibition. In addition, acute melatonin treatment provides protection against BBB

  17. C5a alters blood-brain barrier integrity in experimental lupus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Alexander; Hack, Bradley; Chiang, Eddie; Garcia, Joe G N; Quigg, Richard J; Alexander, Jessy J

    2010-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a crucial anatomic location in the brain. Its dysfunction complicates many neurodegenerative diseases, from acute conditions, such as sepsis, to chronic diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Several studies suggest an altered BBB in lupus, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In the current study, we observed a definite loss of BBB integrity in MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/lpr) lupus mice by IgG infiltration into brain parenchyma. In line with this result, we examined the role of complement activation, a key event in this setting, in maintenance of BBB integrity. Complement activation generates C5a, a molecule with multiple functions. Because the expression of the C5a receptor (C5aR) is significantly increased in brain endothelial cells treated with lupus serum, the study focused on the role of C5a signaling through its G-protein-coupled receptor C5aR in brain endothelial cells, in a lupus setting. Reactive oxygen species production increased significantly in endothelial cells, in both primary cells and the bEnd3 cell line treated with lupus serum from MRL/lpr mice, compared with those treated with control serum from MRL(+/+) mice. In addition, increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance, cytoskeletal remodeling caused by actin fiber rearrangement, and increased iNOS mRNA expression were observed in bEnd3 cells. These disruptive effects were alleviated by pretreating cells with a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRant) or a C5a antibody. Furthermore, the structural integrity of the vasculature in MRL/lpr brain was maintained by C5aR inhibition. These results demonstrate the regulation of BBB integrity by the complement system in a neuroinflammatory setting. For the first time, a novel role of C5a in the maintenance of BBB integrity is identified and the potential of C5a/C5aR blockade highlighted as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Microbubble type and distribution dependence of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound, in the presence of microbubbles, has been used non-invasively to induce reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study was aimed at identifying the dependence of BBB opening properties on polydisperse microbubble (all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using a clinically approved ultrasound contrast agent (Definity microbubbles) and in-house prepared polydisperse (IHP) microbubbles in mice. A total of 18 C57 BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse was injected with either Definity or IHP microbubbles via the tail vein. The concentration and size distribution of activated Definity and IHP microbubbles were measured, and the microbubbles were diluted to 6 × 10(8)/mL before injection. Immediately after microbubble administration, mice were subjected to focused ultrasound with the following parameters: frequency = 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency = 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures = 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. Permeability of the treated region and volume of BBB opening did not significantly differ between the two types of microbubbles (p > 0.05) at peak rarefractional acoustic pressures of 0.45 and 0.6 MPa, whereas IHP microbubbles had significantly higher permeability and opening volume (p < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on focused ultrasound-induced BBB opening at lower pressures, but less important effects at higher pressures, possibly because of the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher pressures, where inertial cavitation typically occurs.

  19. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Wang, S.; Wu, S.-Y.; Karakatsani, M. E.; Acosta, C.; Carneiro, A. A. O.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38+/- 5.71 mm3, 8.91+/- 3.91 mm3and 35.47+/- 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40+/- 28.43 V.s, 63.87+/- 29.97 V.s and 356.52+/- 257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue.

  20. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-07

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  1. MR-Guided Unfocused Ultrasound Disruption of the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Kelly A.; King, Randy L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound with microbubbles can temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for drug delivery. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) can visualize gadolinium passage into the brain, indicating BBB opening. Previous studies used focused ultrasound, which is appropriate for the targeted delivery of drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate unfocused ultrasound for BBB opening across the whole brain. In 10 rats, gadolinium-based MR contrast agent (Gd; 0.25 ml) was administered concurrent with ultrasound microbubbles (Optison, 0.25 ml) and circulated for 20 sec before sonication. A 753 kHz planar PZT transducer, diameter 1.8 cm, sonicated each rat brain with supplied voltage of 300, 400, or 500 mVpp for 10 sec in continuous wave mode, or at 500 mVpp at 20% duty cycle at 10 Hz for 30-300 sec. After sonication, coronal T1-weighted FSE CE-MRI images were acquired with a 3in surface coil. The imaging protocol was repeated 3-5 times after treatment. One control animal was given Gd and microbubbles, but not sonicated, and the other was given Gd and sonicated without microbubbles. Signal change in ROIs over the muscle, mesencephalon/ventricles, and the cortex/striatum were measured at 3-5 time points up to 36 min after sonication. Signal intensity was converted to % signal change compared to the initial image. In the controls, CE-MRI showed brightening of surrounding structures, but not the brain. In the continuous wave subjects, cortex/striatum signal did not increase, but ventricle/mesenchephalon signal did. Those that received pulsed sonications showed signal increases in both the cortex/striatum and ventricles/mesenchephalon. In conclusion, after pulsed unfocused ultrasound sonication, the BBB is disrupted across the whole brain, including cortex and deep grey matter, while continuous wave sonication affects only the ventricles and possibly deeper structures, without opening the cortex BBB. As time passes, the timeline of Gd passage into the brain

  2. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, HAS; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, ME; Acosta, C; Carneiro, AAO; Konofagou, EE

    2015-01-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n=15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38±5.71 mm3, 8.91±3.91 mm3 and 35.47 ± 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40±28.43 V.s, 63.87±29.97 V.s and 356.52±257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:26394091

  3. Extended-access methamphetamine self-administration elicits neuroinflammatory response along with blood-brain barrier breakdown.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana; Leitão, Ricardo A; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Assis, María Amparo; Coria, Santiago M; Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos; Ambrosio, Emilio; Silva, Ana Paula

    2017-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug that can lead to neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. Several studies have explored the central impact of METH use, but the mechanism(s) underlying blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and associated neuroinflammatory processes after chronic METH consumption are still unclear. Important findings in the field are mainly based on in vitro approaches and animal studies using an acute METH paradigm, and not much is known about the neurovascular alterations under a chronic drug use. Thus, the present study aimed to fill this crucial gap by exploring the effect of METH-self administration on BBB function and neuroinflammatory responses. Herein, we observed an increase of BBB permeability characterized by Evans blue and albumin extravasation in the rat hippocampus and striatum triggered by extended-access METH self-administration followed by forced abstinence. Also, there was a clear structural alteration of blood vessels showed by the down-regulation of collagen IV staining, which is an important protein of the endothelial basement membrane, together with a decrease of intercellular junction protein levels, namely claudin-5, occludin and vascular endothelial-cadherin. Additionally, we observed an up-regulation of vascular cell and intercellular adhesion molecule, concomitant with the presence of T cell antigen CD4 and tissue macrophage marker CD169 in the brain parenchyma. Rats trained to self-administer METH also presented a neuroinflammatory profile characterized by microglial activation, astrogliosis and increased pro-inflammatory mediators, namely tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukine-1 beta, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Overall, our data provide new insights into METH abuse consequences, with a special focus on neurovascular dysfunction and neuroinflammatory response, which may help to find novel approaches to prevent or diminish brain dysfunction triggered by this overwhelming illicit

  4. 7.0-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characterization of Acute Blood-Brain-Barrier Disruption Achieved with Intracranial Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Robertson, John L.; Olson, John D.; Johnson, Annette J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd) uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21) with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter) separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm) at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (−5, +5, +15, and +30 min) was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16) and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5) and Gd administration. PMID:23226293

  5. The effect of regadenoson on the integrity of the human blood-brain barrier, a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sadhana; George, Richard T; Lodge, Martin A; Piotrowski, Anna; Wahl, Richard L; Gujar, Sachin K; Grossman, Stuart A

    2017-03-17

    Regadenoson is an FDA approved adenosine receptor agonist which increases blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in rodents. Regadenoson is used clinically for pharmacologic cardiac stress testing using SPECT or CT imaging agents that do not cross an intact BBB. This study was conducted to determine if standard doses of regadenoson transiently disrupt the human BBB allowing higher concentrations of systemically administered imaging agents to enter the brain. Patients without known intracranial disease undergoing clinically indicated pharmacologic cardiac stress tests were eligible for this study. They received regadenoson (0.4 mg) followed by brain imaging with either (99m)Tc-sestamibi for SPECT or visipaque for CT imaging. Pre- and post-regadenoson penetration of imaging agents into brain were quantified [SPECT: radioactive counts, CT: Hounsfield units (HU)] and compared using a matched-pairs t-test. Twelve patients (33% male, median 60 yo) were accrued: 7 SPECT and 5 CT. No significant differences were noted in pre- and post-regadenoson values using mean radionuclide counts (726 vs. 757) or HU (29 vs. 30). While animal studies have demonstrated that regadenoson transiently increases the permeability of the BBB to dextran and temozolomide, we were unable to document changes in the penetration of contrast agents in humans with intact BBB using the FDA approved doses of regadenoson for cardiac evaluation. Further studies are needed exploring alternate regadenoson dosing, schedules, and studies in patients with brain tumors; as transiently disrupting the BBB to improve drug entry into the brain is critical to improving the care of patients with CNS malignancies.

  6. Pericytes support neutrophil transmigration via interleukin-8 across a porcine co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Christian; Pieloch, Paulina; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-02

    Transmigration of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to an inflamed brain tissue is an important process during neuronal inflammation. The process of neutrophil activation as well as their way of rolling along the endothelium and their transmigration is quite well understood. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the fate of neutrophils after they have transmigrated through the endothelium. The role of the other cells of the neurovascular unit in this process is also poorly understood. Here we studied the potential of pericytes to chemo-attract neutrophils under inflammatory conditions. Quantitative real time PCR, western blot analysis, and a chemotaxis assay showed that pericytes are able to chemo-attract neutrophils by interleukin-8 (IL-8) after stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), or interleukin-1beta (IL-1β). Then, a co-culture model consisting of primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCECs) and primary porcine brain capillary pericytes (PBCPs) was used to analyze neutrophil transmigration across the BBB. As a model for inflammation, LPS was used and the effects of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were analyzed. In general, all stimulants apart from IFN-γ were able to increase transendothelial neutrophil migration. This effect was significantly reduced by a specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9. MMP-2/-9 secretion is expected to decrease adhesion to pericytes and thus support the transmigration of neutrophils. Additionally, in an adhesion experiment, we showed that MMP-2/-9 inhibition significantly enhances the adhesion of neutrophils to pericytes.

  7. Impact of Manganese on and Transfer across Blood-Brain and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Bornhorst, Julia; Wehe, Christoph A.; Hüwel, Sabine; Karst, Uwe; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Manganese occupational and dietary overexposure has been shown to result in specific clinical central nervous system syndromes, which are similar to those observed in Parkinson disease. To date, modes of neurotoxic action of Mn are still to be elucidated but are thought to be strongly related to Mn accumulation in brain and oxidative stress. However, the pathway and the exact process of Mn uptake in the brain are yet not fully understood. Here, two well characterized primary porcine in vitro models of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier were applied to assess the transfer of Mn in the brain while monitoring its effect on the barrier properties. Thus, for the first time effects of MnCl2 on the integrity of these two barriers as well as Mn transfer across the respective barriers are compared in one study. The data reveal a stronger Mn sensitivity of the in vitro blood-CSF barrier compared with the blood-brain barrier. Very interestingly, the negative effects of Mn on the structural and functional properties of the highly Mn-sensitive blood-CSF barrier were partly reversible after incubation with calcium. In summary, both the observed stronger Mn sensitivity of the in vitro blood-CSF barrier and the observed site-directed, most probably active, Mn transport toward the brain facing compartment, reveal that, in contrast to the general assumption in literature, after oral Mn intake the blood-CSF barrier might be the major route for Mn into the brain. PMID:22457347

  8. Neuropsychiatric disease relevance of circulating anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies depends on blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Schneider, A; Papiol, S; Tantra, M; Begemann, M; Sirén, A-L; Pardo, L A; Sperling, S; Mohd Jofrry, S; Gurvich, A; Jensen, N; Ostmeier, K; Lühder, F; Probst, C; Martens, H; Gillis, M; Saher, G; Assogna, F; Spalletta, G; Stöcker, W; Schulz, T F; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2014-10-01

    In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE(-/-)) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE(-/-) mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function.

  9. Vector-Mediated Delivery of a Polyamide ("Peptide") Nucleic Acid Analogue through the Blood-Brain Barrier in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardridge, William M.; Boado, Ruben J.; Kang, Young-Sook

    1995-06-01

    Polyamide ("peptide") nucleic acids (PNAs) are molecules with antigene and antisense effects that may prove to be effective neuropharmaceuticals if these molecules are enabled to undergo transport through the brain capillary endothelial wall, which makes up the blood-brain barrier in vivo. The model PNA used in the present studies is an 18-mer that is antisense to the rev gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and is biotinylated at the amino terminus and iodinated at a tyrosine residue near the carboxyl terminus. The biotinylated PNA was linked to a conjugate of streptavidin (SA) and the OX26 murine monoclonal antibody to the rat transferrin receptor. The blood-brain barrier is endowed with high transferrin receptor concentrations, enabling the OX26-SA conjugate to deliver the biotinylated PNA to the brain. Although the brain uptake of the free PNA was negligible following intravenous administration, the brain uptake of the PNA was increased at least 28-fold when the PNA was bound to the OX26-SA vector. The brain uptake of the PNA bound to the OX26-SA vector was 0.1% of the injected dose per gram of brain at 60 min after an intravenous injection, approximating the brain uptake of intravenously injected morphine. The PNA bound to the OX26-SA vector retained the ability to bind to synthetic rev mRNA as shown by RNase protection assays. In summary, the present studies show that while the transport of PNAs across the blood-brain barrier is negligible, delivery of these potential neuropharmaceutical drugs to the brain may be achieved by coupling them to vector-mediated peptide-drug delivery systems.

  10. Characterization of the blood brain barrier in pediatric central nervous system neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S.; Ho, Winson; Piazza, Martin G.; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping; Heiss, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The normal blood–brain barrier (BBB) is composed of tight junctions between endothelial cells and surrounding astrocyte foot processes. Breakdown of the physiological astrocyte-endothelial cell relationship occurs in adult metastatic and primary brain tumors. However, the astrocyte-endothelial cell relationship has not been studied in pediatric tumors. Materials and Methods Utilizing specimens from cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 5), medulloblastoma (n = 5), and low-grade diffuse astrocytoma (n = 1), immunofluorescence were performed using primary antibodies against CD31, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and aquaporin 4 (AQ4). Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, operative, and histopathological findings were analyzed. Results Strongly-enhancing areas of medulloblastoma exhibited complete BBB breakdown with sparse GFAP and AQ4 staining around CD31-positive vessels. Moderately enhancing regions of pilocytic astrocytomas exhibited regions of intact BBB and vasculature surrounded by dense GFAP staining but reduced and disorganized AQ4 staining, suggesting tumor cells could not fulfill physiological BBB support. Non-enhancing low-grade diffuse astrocytoma demonstrated intact BBB with intense peri-microvasculature GFAP and AQ4 staining. AQ4 stained so strongly that AQ4 visualization alone delineated CD31-positive vessels. Conclusion Taken together, BBB breakdown in pediatric tumors corresponds to a loss of normal endothelial cell-astrocyte foot process relationships. Further development of pharmaceutical agents capitalizing on this disrupted BBB is warranted in medulloblastoma and pilocytic astrocytoma. However, BBB integrity remains a challenge in treating low-grade diffuse astrocytoma before progression toward secondary glioblastoma. PMID:27917302

  11. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  12. Development of a solvent-free analytical method for paracetamol quantitative determination in Blood Brain Barrier in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Marie-Hélène; Vekris, Antonios; Bousses, Christine; Mordelet, Elodie; Buhannic, Nathalie; Séguard, Céline; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Weksler, Babette B; Petry, Klaus G; Gaudin, Karen

    2015-04-15

    A Reversed Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Diode Array Detection method was developed and validated for paracetamol quantification in cell culture fluid from an in vitro Blood Brain Barrier model. The chromatographic method and sample preparation were developed using only aqueous solvents. The column was a XTerra RP18 150 × 4.6mm, 3.5 μm with a guard column XTerra RP18 20 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 μm at 35 °C and the mobile phase was composed by 100% formate buffer 20 mM at pH 4 and flow rate was set at 1 mL/min. The detection was at 242 nm. The sample was injected at 10 μL. Validation was performed using the accuracy profile approach. The analytical procedure was validated with the acceptance limits at ± 10% over a range of concentration from 1 to 58 mg L(-1). The procedure was then used in routine to determine paracetamol concentration in a brain blood barrier in vitro model. Application of the Unither paracetamol formulation in Blood Brain Barrier model allowed the determination and comparison of the transcellular passage of paracetamol at 37 °C and 4 °C, that excludes paracellular or non specific leakage.

  13. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  14. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis inhibits apoptosis and preserves the blood-brain barrier after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cheng; Yu, Hongwei; Yan, Cong; Zhao, Wenyang; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Nan

    2017-03-22

    Early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) strongly determines the prognosis of patients suffering from an aneurysm rupture, and apoptosis is associated with early brain injury after SAH. This study was designed to explore the role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) in early brain injury following SAH. The expression of XIAP was detected using western blotting and real-time RT-PCR in an autologous blood injection model of SAH. We also studied the role of XIAP in early brain injury and detected apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that XIAP was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus and that XIAP was mainly expressed in neuronal cells following SAH. The inhibition of endogenous XIAP aggravated blood-brain barrier disruption, neurological deficits and brain edema. Recombinant XIAP preserved the blood-brain barrier, improved the neurological scores and ameliorated brain edema. Recombinant XIAP treatment also decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, whereas there was no effect on the expression of p53, apoptosis-inducing factor or cytochrome c. These results show that XIAP acts as an endogenous neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic agent following SAH. The effects of XIAP on early brain injury was associated with the inhibition of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  15. Multimodality MRI assessment of grey and white matter injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after intracerebral haemorrhage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Li, Qian; Wang, Zhongyu; Qi, Cunfang; Han, Xiaoning; Lan, Xi; Wan, Jieru; Wang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Xiaochun; Hou, Zhipeng; Gao, Cong; Carhuapoma, J. Ricardo; Mori, Susumu; Zhang, Jiangyang; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined injury progression after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) induced by collagenase in mice using a preclinical 11.7 Tesla MRI system. On T2-weighted MRI, lesion and striatal volumes were increased on day 3 and then decreased from days 7 to 28. On day 3, with an increase in striatal water content, vasogenic oedema in the perihaematomal region presented as increased T2 and increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) signal. With a synchronous change in T2 and ADC signals, microglial activation peaked on day 3 in the same region and decreased over time. Iron deposition appeared on day 3 around the haematoma border but did not change synchronously with ADC signals. Vascular permeability measured by Evans blue extravasation on days 1, 3, and 7 correlated with the T1-gadolinium results, both of which peaked on day 3. On diffusion tensor imaging, white matter injury was prominent in the corpus callosum and internal capsule on day 3 and then partially recovered over time. Our results indicate that the evolution of grey/white matter injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after ICH can be assessed with multimodal MRI, and that perihaematomal vasogenic oedema might be attributable to microglial activation, iron deposition, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:28084426

  16. Getting into the brain: liposome-based strategies for effective drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Débora B; Gamarra, Lionel F

    This review summarizes articles that have been reported in literature on liposome-based strategies for effective drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Due to their unique physicochemical characteristics, liposomes have been widely investigated for their application in drug delivery and in vivo bioimaging for the treatment and/or diagnosis of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, stroke, and glioma. Several strategies have been used to deliver drug and/or imaging agents to the brain. Covalent ligation of such macromolecules as peptides, antibodies, and RNA aptamers is an effective method for receptor-targeting liposomes, which allows their blood-brain barrier penetration and/or the delivery of their therapeutic molecule specifically to the disease site. Additionally, methods have been employed for the development of liposomes that can respond to external stimuli. It can be concluded that the development of liposomes for brain delivery is still in its infancy, although these systems have the potential to revolutionize the ways in which medicine is administered.

  17. X-linked inhibitor of