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Sample records for blue stellar objects

  1. DSS1/DSS2 astrometry for 1101 First Byurakan Survey blue stellar objects: Accurate positions and other results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2004-10-01

    Accurate measurements of the positions of 1101 First Byurakan Survey (FBS) blue stellar objects (the Second part of the FBS) have been carried out on the DSS1 and DSS2 (red and blue images). To establish the accuracy of the DSS1 and DSS2, measurements have been made for 153 AGN for which absolute VLBI coordinates have been published. The rms errors are: 0.45 arcsec for DSS1, 0.33 arcsec for DSS2 red, and 0.59 arcsec for DSS2 blue in each coordinate, the corresponding total positional errors being 0.64 arcsec, 0.46 arcsec, and 0.83 arcsec, respectively. The highest accuracy (0.42 arcsec) is obtained by weighted averaging of the DSS1 and DSS2 red positions. It is shown that by using all three DSS images accidental errors can be significantly reduced. The comparison of DSS2 and DSS1 images made it possible to reveal positional differences and proper motions for 78 objects (for 62 of these for the first time), including new high-probability candidate white dwarfs, and to find objects showing strong variability, i.e. high-probability candidate cataclysmic variables. Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/426/367

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: FBS blue stellar objects (Mickaelian+, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Goncalves, A. C.; Veron-Cetty, M. P.; Veron, P.

    2000-02-01

    The second part of the First Byurakan Survey is aimed at detecting all bright (B<16.5) UV-excess starlike objects in a large area of the sky. By comparison with other major surveys such as the ROSAT All Sky Survey (Cat. , the ROSAT WGACAT (Cat. ) catalogue of point sources, the IRAS (Cat. ) survey, the 6cm Green Bank (Cat. , the 1.4GHz NRAO VLA (Cat. , and the 92cm Westerbork Northern sky surveys (Cat. ) and with the catalogue of mean UBV data on stars, we estimate the number of AGNs present in the FBS survey and its completeness. We have made spectroscopic observations of nine of the most promising FBS candidates. We have found six new QSOs, bringing the total number of known QSOs in this survey to 42. By comparison with the Bright Quasar Survey, we found that the completeness of this last survey is of the order of 70% rather than 30-50% as suggested by several authors. (1 data file).

  3. On the nature of the FBS blue stellar objects and the completeness of the bright quasar survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M. P.; Véron, P.

    1999-02-01

    The second part of the First Byurakan Survey is aimed at detecting all bright (B < 16.5) UV-excess starlike objects in a large area of the sky. By comparison with other major surveys such as the ROSAT All Sky Survey, the ROSAT WGACAT catalogue of point sources, the IRAS survey, the 6 cm Green Bank, the 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA and the 92 cm Westerbork Northern sky surveys and with the catalogue of mean UBV data on stars, the authors estimate the number of AGNs present in the FBS survey and its completeness. The authors have made spectroscopic observations on nine of the most promising FBS candidates. They have found six new QSOs bringing the total number of known QSOs in this survey to 42. By comparison with the Bright Quasar Survey, they found that the completeness of this last survey is of the order of 70% rather than 30 - 50% as suggested by several authors.

  4. On the nature of the FBS blue stellar objects and the completeness of the Bright Quasar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Gonçales, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M. P.; Véron, P.

    1999-01-01

    The second part of the First Byurakan Survey is aimed at detecting all bright (B < 16.5) UV-excess starlike objects in a large area of the sky. By comparison with other major surveys such as the ROSA T All Sky Survey, the ROSAT WGACAT catalogue of point sources, the IRAS survey, the 6cm Green Bank, the 1.4GHz NRAO VLA, and the 92cm Westerbork Northern sky surveys and with the catalogue of mean UBV data on stars, we estimate the number of AGNs present in the FBS survey and its completeness. We have made spectroscopic observations of nine of the most promising FBS candidates. We have found six new QSOs, bringing the total number of known QSOs in this survey to 42. By comparison with the Bright Quasar Survey, we found that the completeness of this last survey is of the order of 70% rather than 30 50% as suggested by several authors.

  5. Stellar Populations in BL Lac type Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serote Roos, Margarida

    The relationship between an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) and its host galaxy is a crucial question in the study of galaxy evolution. We present an estimate of the stellar contribution in a sample of low luminosity BL Lac type objects. We have performed stellar population synthesis for a sample of 19 objects selected from Marchã et al. (1996, MNRAS 281, 425). The stellar content is quantified using the equivalent widths of all absorption features available throughout the spectrum. The synthesis is done by a variant of the GPG method (Pelat: 1997, MNRAS 284, 365).

  6. Young stellar objects close to Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, B.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Eckart, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Sabha, N.; Borkar, A.; Moultaka, J.; Mužić, K.; Moser, L.

    2014-05-01

    We aim at modeling small groups of young stars such as IRS 13N, 0.1 pc away from Sgr A*, which is suggested to contain a few embedded massive young stellar objects. We perform hydrodynamical simulations to follow the evolution of molecular clumps orbiting around a 4 × 106 M⊙ black hole, to constrain the formation and the physical conditions of such groups.

  7. Blue Stragglers in Clusters and Integrated Spectral Properties of Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Deng, Licai

    Blue straggler stars are the most prominent bright objects in the colour-magnitude diagram of a star cluster that challenges the theory of stellar evolution. Star clusters are the closest counterparts of the theoretical concept of simple stellar populations (SSPs) in the Universe. SSPs are widely used as the basic building blocks to interpret stellar contents in galaxies. The concept of an SSP is a group of coeval stars which follows a given distribution in mass, and has the same chemical property and age. In practice, SSPs are more conveniently made by the latest stellar evolutionary models of single stars. In reality, however, stars can be more complicated than just single either at birth time or during the course of evolution in a typical environment. Observations of star clusters show that there are always exotic objects which do not follow the predictions of standard theory of stellar evolution. Blue straggler stars (BSSs), as discussed intensively in this book both observationally and theoretically, are very important in our context when considering the integrated spectral properties of a cluster, or a simple stellar population. In this chapter, we are going to describe how important the contribution of BSSs is to the total light of a cluster.

  8. Stellar Clusters Forming in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    ; it is located at a distance of about 11 million light-years in the direction of the southern constellation Centaurus. Some time ago a group of European astronomers [1] decided to take a closer look at this object and to study star-forming processes in the primordial-like environment of this galaxy. True, NGC 5253 does contains some dust and heavier elements, but significantly less than our own Milky Way galaxy. However, it is quite extreme as a site of intense star formation, a profuse "starburst galaxy" in astronomical terminology, and a prime object for detailed studies of large-scale star formation. ESO PR Photo 31a/04 provides an impressive view of NGC 5253. This composite image is based on a near-infrared exposure obtained with the multi-mode ISAAC instrument mounted on the 8.2-m VLT Antu telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile), as well as two images in the optical waveband obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope data archive (located at ESO Garching). The VLT image (in the K-band at wavelength 2.16 μm) is coded red, the HST images are blue (V-band at 0.55 μm) and green (I-band at 0.79 μm), respectively. The enormous light-gathering capability and the fine optical quality of the VLT made it possible to obtain the very detailed near-infrared image (cf. PR Photo 31b/04) during an exposure lasting only 5 min. The excellent atmospheric conditions of Paranal at the time of the observation (seeing 0.4 arcsec) allow the combination of space- and ground-based data into a colour photo of this interesting object. A major dust lane is visible at the western (right) side of the galaxy, but patches of dust are visible all over, together with a large number of colourful stars and stellar clusters. The different colour shades are indicative of the ages of the objects and the degree of obscuration by interstellar dust. The near-infrared VLT image penetrates the dust clouds much better than the optical HST images, and some deeply embedded objects that are not

  9. Radio Jets in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada, Guillem

    Radio continuum emission in the centimeter range has already been detected in association with a large number of the youngest stellar objects. This emission, dominated by a thermal free-free component, is in general weak, but sensitive interferometric observations at these wavelengths have become one of the most important tools to detect and study the objects (particularly those most deeply embedded) that are powering the outflows frequently found in the star forming regions. Observations carried out with high (subarcsecond) angular resolution reveal that these centimeter sources are tracing collimated ionized outflows, i.e. "thermal radio jets". These radio jets constitute, at present, the best evidence for collimated outflow at the smallest scale (~100 AU). For objects of low bolometric luminosity (for which no significant photoionization is expected), there is a correlation between the momentum rate in the large scale outflow and the centimeter continuum luminosity, as expected if the emission is originated in shock-ionized gas, produced when a stellar wind shocks against surrounding high density material. This result provides important evidence favoring a connection between small scale jets and molecular outflows.

  10. Study of transneptunian objects through stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Sicardy, B.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2014-07-01

    The physical parameters of the transneptunian objects (TNO's) such as size, shape, density, presence of atmosphere, provide important information on their formation and evolution. At more than 30 astronomical units (au) from the Sun, those objects receive low solar radiation and have low mutual collisions so they can be considered as remnants of the primordial outer Solar System. Besides that, information on TNO's is of great relevance when trying to establish a general formation scenario for the recently discovered planetary systems. The problem is that such bodies have a diameter smaller than 2300 km (Eris, one of the largest TNO, has 2326 km) and, when viewed from Earth, they subtend angles smaller than 50 milli-arcseconds, a fact that makes their resolution very poor with current imaging systems. One method to obtain very accurate information on the TNO's is the stellar-occultation technique. Sizes at kilometer accuracies and pressure at nanobar levels can be achieved with this method. Shape, mass, density and other physical parameters can also be derived using this technique. Since 2010, we observed stellar occultations of several TNO's (Varuna in 2010 and 2013; Eris in 2010; 2003 AZ_{84} in 2010 and 2011; Makemake in 2011; Quaoar in 2011 and two in 2012; 2002 KX_{14} in 2013; and finally Sedna in 2013) besides some other occultations of the Pluto system and of the largest Centaurs. We also predicted future events in 2014 and 2015 for the largest 40 TNO's and Centaurs. In this work, we will present new results obtained from recent stellar occultations of TNO's.

  11. Spectral evolution of young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Lada, Charles J.; Shu, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    An evolutionary sequence, from protostars to pre-main sequence stars, for the classification of young stellar objects is derived by comparing the predictions of the theoretical protostar models of Adams and Shu (AS, 1986) with the morphological classification scheme of Lada and Wilking (1984). It is shown that the AS models adequately explain the emergent spectral energy distributions of unidentified objects with negative spectral indices in the mid-IR and near-IR in both Taurus and Ophiuchus. If the infalling dust envelope is then completely removed, the spectra of the underlying stars and nebular disks used by AS provide a natural explanation for the near-IR and mid-IR excesses and the positive spectral indices of embedded T Tauri stars. It is found that the addition of a simple physical model for residual dust envelopes can reproduce the far-IR excesses found in some of these T Tauri stars.

  12. Spectral evolution of young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    An evolutionary sequence, from protostars to pre-main-sequence stars, is suggested for the classification of young stellar objects. This sequence is derived by comparing the predictions of the theoretical models of Adams and Shu with the morphological classification scheme of Lada and Wilking. We first define the spectral index in the near- and mid-infrared, n is identical to d log(nu F sub nu)/d log nu, and then interpret the class of sources with negative spectral indices as protostars. The inferred mass infall rates for these objects are generally consistent with the measured gas temperatures of approx. 35 K in Ophiuchus, and of approx. 10 K in Taurus. Fitting the data requires us to adopt cloud rotation rates in Ophiuchus which are typically an order of magnitude greater than in Taurus, and we speculate on the mechanistic origin for this difference. Next, we consider a subclass of T Tauri stars with near- and mid-infrared excesses and positive or zero spectral indices. We find that the objects with the steeper indices can be understood as the post-infall products from the collapse of rotating cloud cores, where the infrared excesses arise from the simple reprocessing of visible stellar photons in optically thick but spatially thin disks. The sources with flatter spectra may require massive accretion disks. Given the existence of protostars and naked star/disk systems, there is a natural interpretation of another subclass of T Tauri stars, those with two peaks in their emergent spectral energy distributions. These are readily explained as intermediate cases in which dust envelopes still surround the stars and disks. Finally, we find that the theory can be extended to explain the spectral energy distribution of FU Orionis, a famous outburst source. Our model suggests that FU Orionis has a disk, but it offers no discrimination between the competing ideas that the outburst took place on the star or in the disk.

  13. Stellar Collisions and the Interior Structure of Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, James C., Jr.; Warren, Jessica S.; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Warren, Aaron R.

    2002-04-01

    Collisions of main-sequence stars occur frequently in dense star clusters. In open and globular clusters, these collisions produce merger remnants that may be observed as blue stragglers. Detailed theoretical models of this process require lengthy hydrodynamic computations in three dimensions. However, a less computationally expensive approach, which we present here, is to approximate the merger process (including shock heating, hydrodynamic mixing, mass ejection, and angular momentum transfer) with simple algorithms based on conservation laws and a basic qualitative understanding of the hydrodynamics. These algorithms have been fine-tuned through comparisons with the results of our previous hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the thermodynamic and chemical composition profiles of our simple models agree very well with those from recent SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) calculations of stellar collisions, and the subsequent stellar evolution of our simple models also matches closely that of the more accurate hydrodynamic models. Our algorithms have been implemented in an easy-to-use software package, which we are making publicly available.4 This software could be used in combination with realistic dynamical simulations of star clusters that must take into account stellar collisions.

  14. The Gaseous Disks of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    Disks represent a crucial stage in the formation of stars and planets. They are novel astrophysical systems with attributes intermediate between the interstellar medium and stars. Their physical properties are inhomogeneous and are affected by hard stellar radiation and by dynamical evolution. Observing disk structure is difficult because of the small sizes, ranging from as little as 0.05 AU at the inner edge to 100-1000 AU at large radial distances. Nonetheless, substantial progress has been made by observing the radiation emitted by the dust from near infrared to mm wavelengths, i.e., the spectral energy distribution of an unresolved disk. Many fewer results are available for the gas, which is the main mass component of disks over much of their lifetime. The inner disk gas of young stellar objects (henceforth YSOs) have been studied using the near infrared rovibrational transitions of CO and a few other molecules, while the outer regions have been explored with the mm and sub-mm lines of CO and other species. Further progress can be expected in understanding the physical properties of disks from observations with sub-mm arrays like SMA, CARMA and ALMA, with mid infrared measurements using Spitzer, and near infrared spectroscopy with large ground-based telescopes. Intense efforts are also being made to model the observations using complex thermal-chemical models. After a brief review of the existing observations and modeling results, some of the weaknesses of the models will be discussed, including the absence of good laboratory and theoretical calculations for essential microscopic processes.

  15. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GOULD BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Allen, Lori E.; Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Cieza, Lucas A.; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda C.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Hatchell, Jennifer; Heiderman, Amanda; Huard, Tracy L.; Kirk, Jason M.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Peterson, Dawn E.; Young, Kaisa E.

    2015-09-15

    We present the full catalog of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) identified in the 18 molecular clouds surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope “cores to disks” (c2d) and “Gould Belt” (GB) Legacy surveys. Using standard techniques developed by the c2d project, we identify 3239 candidate YSOs in the 18 clouds, 2966 of which survive visual inspection and form our final catalog of YSOs in the GB. We compile extinction corrected spectral energy distributions for all 2966 YSOs and calculate and tabulate the infrared spectral index, bolometric luminosity, and bolometric temperature for each object. We find that 326 (11%), 210 (7%), 1248 (42%), and 1182 (40%) are classified as Class 0 + I, Flat-spectrum, Class II, and Class III, respectively, and show that the Class III sample suffers from an overall contamination rate by background Asymptotic Giant Branch stars between 25% and 90%. Adopting standard assumptions, we derive durations of 0.40–0.78 Myr for Class 0 + I YSOs and 0.26–0.50 Myr for Flat-spectrum YSOs, where the ranges encompass uncertainties in the adopted assumptions. Including information from (sub)millimeter wavelengths, one-third of the Class 0 + I sample is classified as Class 0, leading to durations of 0.13–0.26 Myr (Class 0) and 0.27–0.52 Myr (Class I). We revisit infrared color–color diagrams used in the literature to classify YSOs and propose minor revisions to classification boundaries in these diagrams. Finally, we show that the bolometric temperature is a poor discriminator between Class II and Class III YSOs.

  16. Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgevits, George

    2006-09-01

    We present here the results for the first attempt to survey the sub-kilometre radius KBO population by stellar occultation. Using the unique capabilities of the 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope (Anglo Australian Observatory, Australia), in conjunction with the 6df Spectrograph, by simultaneously monitoring 100 suitably selected stars, we were able to embark upon an occultation observation program which yielded 7,000 hours of stellar light curves, with 10 millisecond resolution. Initial data reduction indicates that we have captured many events which resemble occultation events, in so far as the light curves of recorded events typically match that which may be expected when a small KBO occults a distant star. Logged events are spread over many pixels, with 10 pixels (corresponding to 100 milliseconds) being the typical event duration. By simultaneously monitoring many stars in the same field, false events are eliminated. Most runs monitored blue stars located at 2kpcs. As a sanity check, one night's observing monitored close F and G class stars in the same field. The event statistics for the distant and the close star cases are consistent with occultations caused by KBO's. As an additional confirmation, it was found that the observation results at 30o and 60o past opposition give the expected 50% fall in event rate due to the change in observing geometry. It is estimated that many of the events logged correspond to occultations which would be caused by objects down to 300m radius. As the next step, it is hoped to construct a purpose-built 2,000 fibre instrument and to conduct a complete survey of the Kuiper Belt. We wish to express our thanks to the Anglo Australian Observatory for their technical assistance and telescope time.

  17. Outflow Collimation in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Frank, A.

    1993-05-01

    Recent results of long-slit spectroscopy of the forbidden lines of the outflow in the young star DG Tau [7] suggest that its wind is well collimated very close to it, leading to the formation of its jet. The analysis of the width of stellar jets, on the other hand, seems to indicate that the collimation of the jets takes place at larger scales [5]. In other to understand this discrepancy, we are studying by means of a two dimensional hydrodynamical code [1][3], the collimation driven by the interaction of the stellar wind with the surrounding density structure left by the star formation process [8][9]. We have found in our adiabatic outflow simulations (using physical parameters similar to those for the HH 34 bipolar stellar jet [2]) that a spherical wind is well collimated near the source resembling a de Laval Nozzle [4][6]. ANC research is supported by NSF grant AST-91-14888. \\ References [1] Frank, A. 1992, PhD Thesis, University of Washington. [2] Heathcote, S. & Reipurth, B. 1992, AJ 104, 2193. [3] Icke, V., 1988 A&A 202, 177. [4] Konigl, A. 1982, ApJ 261, 115. [5] Mundt, R., Ray, T.P., & Raga, A.C. 1991, A&A 252, 740. [6] Raga A.C., & Canto, J. 1989, ApJ 344, 404. [7] Solf, J., & Bohm, K.H. 1993, ApJL (in press). [8] Terebey, S., Shu, F.H., & Cassen, P. 1984, ApJ 286, 529. [9] Yorke, H.W., Bodenheimer, P., & Laughlin, G. 1993, ApJ (in press).

  18. Young Stellar Objects from Soft to Hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel

    2009-05-01

    Magnetically active stars are the sites of efficient particle acceleration and plasma heating, processes that have been studied in detail in the solar corona. Investigation of such processes in young stellar objects is much more challenging due to various absorption processes. There is, however, evidence for violent magnetic energy release in very young stellar objects. The impact on young stellar environments (e.g., circumstellar disk heating and ionization, operation of chemical networks, photoevaporation) may be substantial. Hard X-ray devices like those carried on Simbol-X will establish a basis for detailed studies of these processes.

  19. STELLAR COLLISIONS AND BLUE STRAGGLER STARS IN DENSE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert

    2013-11-10

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are abundantly observed in all Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) where data exist. However, observations alone cannot reveal the relative importance of various formation channels or the typical formation times for this well-studied population of anomalous stars. Using a state-of-the-art Hénon-type Monte Carlo code that includes all relevant physical processes, we create 128 models with properties typical of the observed GGCs. These models include realistic numbers of single and binary stars, use observationally motivated initial conditions, and span large ranges in central density, concentration, binary fraction, and mass. Their properties can be directly compared with those of observed GGCs. We can easily identify the BSSs in our models and determine their formation channels and birth times. We find that for central densities above ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉} pc{sup –3}, the dominant formation channel is stellar collisions, while for lower density clusters, mass transfer in binaries provides a significant contribution (up to 60% in our models). The majority of these collisions are binary-mediated, occurring during three-body and four-body interactions. As a result, a strong correlation between the specific frequency of BSSs and the binary fraction in a cluster can be seen in our models. We find that the number of BSSs in the core shows only a weak correlation with the collision rate estimator Γ traditionally used by observers, in agreement with the latest Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data. Using an idealized 'full mixing' prescription for collision products, our models indicate that the BSSs observed today may have formed several Gyr ago. However, denser clusters tend to have younger (∼1 Gyr) BSSs.

  20. Stellar Collisions and Blue Straggler Stars in Dense Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert

    2013-11-01

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are abundantly observed in all Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) where data exist. However, observations alone cannot reveal the relative importance of various formation channels or the typical formation times for this well-studied population of anomalous stars. Using a state-of-the-art Hénon-type Monte Carlo code that includes all relevant physical processes, we create 128 models with properties typical of the observed GGCs. These models include realistic numbers of single and binary stars, use observationally motivated initial conditions, and span large ranges in central density, concentration, binary fraction, and mass. Their properties can be directly compared with those of observed GGCs. We can easily identify the BSSs in our models and determine their formation channels and birth times. We find that for central densities above ~103 M ⊙ pc-3, the dominant formation channel is stellar collisions, while for lower density clusters, mass transfer in binaries provides a significant contribution (up to 60% in our models). The majority of these collisions are binary-mediated, occurring during three-body and four-body interactions. As a result, a strong correlation between the specific frequency of BSSs and the binary fraction in a cluster can be seen in our models. We find that the number of BSSs in the core shows only a weak correlation with the collision rate estimator Γ traditionally used by observers, in agreement with the latest Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data. Using an idealized "full mixing" prescription for collision products, our models indicate that the BSSs observed today may have formed several Gyr ago. However, denser clusters tend to have younger (~1 Gyr) BSSs.

  1. Stellar science from a blue wavelength range. A possible design for the blue arm of 4MOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Seifert, W.; Koch, A.; Xu, W.; Caffau, E.; Christlieb, N.; Korn, A. J.; Lind, K.; Sbordone, L.; Ruchti, G.; Feltzing, S.; de Jong, R. S.; Barden, S.

    2015-09-01

    From stellar spectra, a variety of physical properties of stars can be derived. In particular, the chemical composition of stellar atmospheres can be inferred from absorption line analyses. These provide key information on large scales, such as the formation of our Galaxy, down to the small-scale nucleosynthesis processes that take place in stars and supernovae. By extending the observed wavelength range toward bluer wavelengths, we optimize such studies to also include critical absorption lines in metal-poor stars, and allow for studies of heavy elements (Z\\ensuremath{g}e 38) whose formation processes remain poorly constrained. In this context, spectrographs optimized for observing blue wavelength ranges are essential, since many absorption lines at redder wavelengths are too weak to be detected in metal-poor stars. This means that some elements cannot be studied in the visual-redder regions, and important scientific tracers and science cases are lost. The present era of large public surveys will target millions of stars. It is therefore important that the next generation of spectrographs are designed such that they cover a wide wavelength range and can observe a large number of stars simultaneously. Only then, we can gain the full information from stellar spectra, from both metal-poor to metal-rich ones, that will allow us to understand the aforementioned formation scenarios in greater detail. Here we describe the requirements driving the design of the forthcoming survey instrument 4MOST, a multi-object spectrograph commissioned for the ESO VISTA 4 m-telescope. While 4MOST is also intended for studies of active galactic nuclei, baryonic acoustic oscillations, weak lensing, cosmological constants, supernovae and other transients, we focus here on high-density, wide-area survey of stars and the science that can be achieved with high-resolution stellar spectroscopy. Scientific and technical requirements that governed the design are described along with a thorough

  2. Young Stellar Objects in NGC 6334

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, Jill; Burton, Michael

    NGC 6334 is a young star forming complex with at least seven distinct sites of ongoing star formation located along a central molecular ridge. These sites range in evolutionary stage and have associated with them many tracers of active star formation including 1-mm peaks far- and near-IR sources CO hot spots molecular outflows H20 OH and methanol maser emission. We obtained L-band observations across the central molecular ridge using the SPIREX/Abu system at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. These data combined with near-IR data from 2MASS reveal the existance of many sources displaying an L-band excess in (J-H) v (K-L) colour-colour diagrams. An excess of emission in the L-band is indicative of the presence of a circumstellar disk the detection of which is greatly facilitated by inclusion of the L-band data. Approximately 18 sources are selected as Class I objects with many more objects likely to also be candidates once optical extinction is accurately determined and removed. The majority of these objects correspond to high-mass stars (A--O type) and represent an ideal list of sources in which to study further (e.g. interferometric mm observations) to gain a better understanding of the nature and role of disks in high-mass star formation.

  3. Young Stellar Objects in the Orion B Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Alcalá, J. M.; Spezzi, L.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Stanke, Th.; Lombardi, M.; Alves, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Wide-field near-infrared imaging surveys offer an excellent opportunity to obtain spatially complete samples of young stars in nearby star-forming regions. By studying their spatial distribution and individual properties, the global star formation characteristics of a region can be established. Near-infrared wide-field imaging observations of a significantly large area in the Orion Molecular Cloud B, obtained with the VISTA telescope on Cerro Paranal are presented. On the basis of photometric selection criteria, we have identified 186 candidate young stellar objects that are associated with the stellar clusters NGC 2068 and NGC 2071, and with the stellar group around HH24-26. Overall, Orion B shows a lot of similarities in its star formation characteristics with other Galactic star-forming regions: a star formation efficiency of a few percent, a stellar mass distribution very similar to that of the Orion Trapezium cluster, and a high observed fraction of circumstellar discs.

  4. Quasi-stellar objects: possible local origin.

    PubMed

    Terrell, J

    1966-12-09

    Many difficulties face the conventional interpretation of the red shift of quasars as a Hubble shift, with associated immense distances. These objects are not of galactic size or nature, and are not associated with galaxies or clusters of galaxies. The continuing energy source for such enormous powers for a period of 10(6) to 10(7) years has not been clearly revealed. The absence of the expected absorption for the Lyman-alpha spectral line of hydrogen is a new difficulty. Because of the relativistic limit on the diameter which can produce rapid fluctuations of light output, there may not be enough surface to radiate the required light.A similar and perhaps more serious difficulty exists for the fluctuating radio output. Calculations given here for synchrotron radiation self-absorption lead to a reasonably accurate formula for the angular diameter of a radio source. For the quasar 3C 273B these relations indicate a conflict with the usually assumed distance. However, the discrepancy may be explained in terms of strong variation of radio diameter with frequency. For CTA 102 the conflict is more serious, and could be explained -for cosmological distance-only by rejecting the data of Sholomitskii. These difficulties are removed by the hypothesis that the observed quasars were ejected from a gravitational collapse at the center of our own galaxy, which may have occurred roughly 5 million years ago. The resultant distances, of the order of a million lightyears, reduce the energy problem by a factor of 10(6) or 10(7). On this basis the optical diameter would be less than a light-hour, about the size of the earth's orbit. A rotating mass of a few thousand solar masses with this diameter would account for the unusual line width, could easily produce the required radiated energy, and could readily account for observed short fluctuation periods and variations in spectrum. It is suggested that the radio output may be produced by high-speed passage of the quasar through

  5. Chemical evolution of circumstellar matter around young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    van Dishoeck, E F; Blake, G A

    1995-01-01

    Recent observational studies of the chemical composition of circumstellar matter around both high- and low-mass young stellar objects are reviewed. The molecular abundances are found to be a strong function of evolutionary state, but not of system mass or luminosity. The data are discussed with reference to recent theoretical models.

  6. Gravitational effects of condensate dark matter on compact stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: fayinwang@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We study the gravitational effect of non-self-annihilating dark matter on compact stellar objects. The self-interaction of condensate dark matter can give high accretion rate of dark matter onto stars. Phase transition to condensation state takes place when the dark matter density exceeds the critical value. A compact degenerate dark matter core is developed and alter the structure and stability of the stellar objects. Condensate dark matter admixed neutron stars is studied through the two-fluid TOV equation. The existence of condensate dark matter deforms the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and lower their maximum baryonic masses and radii. The possible effects on the Gamma-ray Burst rate in high redshift are discussed.

  7. INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN CLASSICAL QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Canalizo, Gabriela; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Although mergers and starbursts are often invoked in the discussion of quasi-stellar object (QSO) activity in the context of galaxy evolution, several studies have questioned their importance or even their presence in QSO host galaxies. Accordingly, we are conducting a study of z {approx} 0.2 QSO host galaxies previously classified as passively evolving elliptical galaxies. We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a sample of 15 hosts and model their stellar absorption spectra using stellar synthesis models. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra allows us to break various degeneracies that arise from different combinations of models, varying metallicities, and contamination from QSO light. We find that none of the host spectra can be modeled by purely old stellar populations and that the majority of the hosts (14/15) have a substantial contribution from intermediate-age populations with ages ranging from 0.7 to 2.4 Gyr. An average host spectrum is strikingly well fit by a combination of an old population and a 2.1 (+0.5, -0.7) Gyr population. The morphologies of the host galaxies suggest that these aging starbursts were induced during the early stages of the mergers that resulted in the elliptical-shaped galaxies that we observe. The current active galactic nucleus activity likely corresponds to the late episodes of accretion predicted by numerical simulations, which occur near the end of the mergers, whereas earlier episodes may be more difficult to observe due to obscuration. Our off-axis observations prevent us from detecting any current star formation or young stellar populations that may be present in the central few kiloparsecs.

  8. Stellar Occultations by Trans-Neptunian Objects and Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Juergen

    2015-10-01

    Our solar system beyond Neptune's orbit is populated with numerous small objects, referred to as Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). About 1400 TNOs are known today ranging in size from the most prominent one, Pluto (2370 km diameter), down to a few tens of kilometers. Most diameters have been determined by radiometric methods in the IR/FIR (SPITZER, HERSCHEL) with uncertainties in the 20% range. Only for Pluto and about 12 other objects have the projected diameters been measured more accurately by stellar occultations. A group of objects lingering between the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune, the Centaurs, are believed to have originated from TNOs. Two of them, Chariklo and Chiron, have recently drawn attention, as stellar occultations have revealed rings around them. Our proposed occultation observations with SOFIA shall add to the sparse knowledge on TNOs and Centaurs by determining more projected diameters and albedos. They have the potential of detecting moons, rings and atmospheres. We will use SOFIA's demonstrated capability of measuring occultations (Pluto 2011 & 2015) with its Focal Plane Imager (FPI) to observe up to five events on flight legs of approximately 30 min each. As most of these events cannot be predicted accurately enough more than a few months or weeks ahead of time, we propose these as targets of opportunity.

  9. Ultracompact Blue Dwarf Galaxies: Hubble Space Telescope Imaging and Stellar Population Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Vacca, William D.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Hibbard, John E.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2006-11-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel U-, narrow-V-, and I-band images of nine ``ultracompact'' blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We define UCBDs as local (z<0.01) star-forming galaxies having angular diameters less than 6" and physical diameters <1 kpc. They are also among the most metal-poor galaxies known, including objects having 12+log(O/H)<7.65, and are found to reside within voids. Both the HST images and the objects' SDSS optical spectra reveal that they are composites of young (~1-10 Myr) populations that dominate their light and older (~10 Gyr) populations that dominate their stellar masses, which we estimate to be ~107-108 Msolar. An intermediate-age (~107-109 yr) population is also indicated in most objects. The objects do not appear to be as dynamically disturbed as the prototype UCBD, POX 186, but the structure of several of them suggests that their current star formation has been triggered by the collisions/mergers of smaller clumps of stars. In one case, HS 0822+3542, the images resolve what may be two small (~100 pc) components that have recently collided, supporting this interpretation. In six of the objects much of the star formation is concentrated in young massive clusters, contributing to their compactness in ground-based images. The evidence that the galaxies consist mainly of ~10 Gyr old stars establishes that they are not protogalaxies, forming their first generation of stars. Their low metallicities are more likely to be the result of the escape of supernova ejecta, rather than youth.

  10. Exploring the association of Fermi sources with Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Romero, G. E.

    2011-02-01

    Massive protostars have associated bipolar outflows which can produce strong shocks when interact with the surrounding medium. Some theoretical models predict that particle acceleration at relativistic velocities can occur leading to gamma ray emission. In order to identify young stellar objects (YSO) that might emit gamma rays, we have crossed the Fermi First Year Catalog with catalogs of known YSOs, obtaining a set of candidates by spatial correlation. We have conducted Montecarlo simulations to find the probability of chance coincidence. Our results indicate that ~70% of the candidates should be gamma-ray sources with a confidence of ~5σ.

  11. Search for Exoplanets around Young Stellar Objects by Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyama, Taichi; Tamura, Motohide; Hashimoto, Jun; Kuzuhara, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    SEEDS project, exploring exoplanets and protoplanetary disks with Subaru/HiCIAO, has observed about 500 stars by Direct Imaging from 2009 Dec to 2015 Apr. Among these targets we explore around Young Stellar Objects (YSOs; age ≦ 10Myr) which often have the protoplanetary disks where planets are being formed in order to detect young exoplanets and to understand the formation process. We analyzed 66 YSOs (about 100 data in total) with LOCI data reduction. We will report the results (companion candidates and detection limit) of our exploration.

  12. Constraining the Stellar Populations and Star Formation Histories of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies with SED Fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J.; van Zee, Liese; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Skillman, Evan

    2017-02-01

    We discuss and test possible evolutionary connections between blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) and other types of dwarf galaxies. BCDs provide ideal laboratories to study intense star formation episodes in low-mass dwarf galaxies, and have sometimes been considered a short-lived evolutionary stage between types of dwarf galaxies. To test these connections, we consider a sample of BCDs as well as a comparison sample of nearby galaxies from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey for context. We fit the multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions (SED, far-ultra-violet to far-infrared) of each galaxy with a grid of theoretical models to determine their stellar masses and star formation properties. We compare our results for BCDs with the LVL galaxies to put BCDs in the context of normal galaxy evolution. The SED fits demonstrate that the star formation events currently underway in BCDs are at the extreme of the continuum of normal dwarf galaxies, both in terms of the relative mass involved and in the relative increase over previous star formation rates. Today’s BCDs are distinctive objects in a state of extreme star formation that is rapidly transforming them. This study also suggests ways to identify former BCDs whose star formation episodes have since faded.

  13. ClassLess: A Comprehensive Database of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; baliber, nairn

    2015-08-01

    We have designed and constructed a database intended to house catalog and literature-published measurements of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) within ~1 kpc of the Sun. ClassLess, so called because it includes YSOs in all stages of evolution, is a relational database in which user interaction is conducted via HTML web browsers, queries are performed in scientific language, and all data are linked to the sources of publication. Each star is associated with a cluster (or clusters), and both spatially resolved and unresolved measurements are stored, allowing proper use of data from multiple star systems. With this fully searchable tool, myriad ground- and space-based instruments and surveys across wavelength regimes can be exploited. In addition to primary measurements, the database self consistently calculates and serves higher level data products such as extinction, luminosity, and mass. As a result, searches for young stars with specific physical characteristics can be completed with just a few mouse clicks. We are in the database population phase now, and are eager to engage with interested experts worldwide on local galactic star formation and young stellar populations.

  14. Explaining Multi-wavelength Photometric Variability in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Aurora; Whitney, B.; Wood, K.; Plavchan, P.; Terebey, S.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderon, M.; YSOVAR

    2013-01-01

    We explore a variety of radiation transfer models to explain multi-wavelength photometric variability of young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster (Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Our models include hotspots, warps in the accretion disk, and spiral arms. Variability comes in different types, which have been categorized as periodic or quasi-periodic, narrow or broad dips in the light curves, and rapid flux variations or “wild type” stars. Our models can successfully reproduce these. The optical and near-infrared light curves are sensitive to the stellar variations and obscurations from the circumstellar material. The mid-infrared provides an additional diagnostic because it is sensitive to emission from the inner disk and the inner wall height. Our models make specific predictions as to the shapes and phasing of optical through mid-infrared photometry that can be tested with multi-wavelength time-series data. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech and was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  15. Young Stellar Objects in Lynds 1641: Disks and Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; van Boekel, Roy; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Flaherty, Kevin

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Lynds 1641 (L1641) cloud using multi-wavelength data including Spitzer, WISE, 2MASS, and XMM covering 1390 YSOs across a range of evolutionary stages. In addition, we targeted a sub-sample of YSOs for optical spectroscopy with the MMT/Hectospec and the MMT/Hectochelle. We use this data, along with archival photometric data, to derive spectral types, masses, ages and extinction values. We also use the H_alpha and H_beta lines to derive accretion rates. We calculate the disk fraction as N(II)/N(II+III), where N(II) and N(III) are numbers of Class\\ II and Class\\ III sources, respectively, and obtain a disk fraction of 50% in L1641. We find that the disk frequency is almost constant as a function of stellar mass with a slight peak at log(M_*/M_sun) -0.25. The analysis of multi-epoch data indicates that the accretion variability of YSOs cannot explain the two orders of magnitude of scatter for YSOs with similar masses in the M_acc vs. M_* plot. Forty-six new transition disk objects are confirmed in our spectroscopic survey and we find that the fraction of transition disks that are actively accreting is lower than for optically thick disks (40-45% vs. 77-79% respectively). We confirm our previous result that the accreting YSOs with transition disks have a similar median accretion rate to normal optically thick disks. Analyzing the age distributions of various populations, we find that the diskless YSOs are statistically older than the YSOs with optically-thick disks and the transition disk objects have a median age which is intermediate between the two populations.

  16. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL VARIABILITY ATLAS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kospal, A.; Abraham, P.; Kun, M.; Moor, A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Henning, Th.; Leinert, Ch.; Turner, N. J.

    2012-08-01

    Optical and near-infrared variability is a well-known property of young stellar objects. However, a growing number of recent studies claim that a considerable fraction of them also exhibit mid-infrared flux changes. With the aim of studying and interpreting variability on a decadal timescale, here we present a mid-infrared spectral atlas containing observations of 68 low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects. The atlas consists of 2.5-11.6 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the ISOPHOT-S instrument on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 1996 and 1998, as well as 5.2-14.5 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph instrument on board the Spitzer Space Telescope between 2004 and 2007. The observations were retrieved from the ISO and Spitzer archives and were post-processed interactively by our own routines. For those 47 objects where multi-epoch spectra were available, we analyze mid-infrared spectral variability on annual and/or decadal timescales. We identify 37 variable candidate sources. Many stars show wavelength-independent flux changes, possibly due to variable accretion rates. In several systems, all exhibiting 10 {mu}m silicate emission, the variability of the 6-8 {mu}m continuum, and the silicate feature exhibit different amplitudes. A possible explanation is variable shadowing of the silicate-emitting region by an inner disk structure of changing height or extra silicate emission from dust clouds in the disk atmosphere. Our results suggest that mid-infrared variability, in particular, the wavelength-dependent changes, is more ubiquitous than was known before. Interpreting this variability is a new possibility for exploring the structure of the disk and its dynamical processes.

  17. The Stellar Population and Star Formation Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yinghe; Gu, Qiusheng; Gao, Yu

    2011-02-01

    We study stellar populations, star formation histories (SFHs), and star formation properties for a sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) selected by cross-correlating the Gil de Paz et al. sample with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6. The sample includes 31 BCDs, which span a large range of galactic parameters. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we derive stellar populations and reconstruct SFHs for these BCDs. Our studies confirm that BCDs are not young systems experiencing their first star formation, but old systems undergoing a starburst activity. The stellar mass-weighted ages can be up to 10 Gyr, while the luminosity-weighted ages might be up to approximately three orders of magnitude younger (~10 Myr) for most galaxies. Based on multiwavelength data, we also study the integrated star formation properties. The star formation rate (SFR) for our sample galaxies spans nearly three orders of magnitude, from a few 10-3 to ~1 M sun yr-1, with a median value of ~0.1 M sun yr-1. We find that about 90% of BCDs in our sample have their birthrate parameter (the ratio of the current SFR to the averaged past SFR) b>2-3. We further discuss correlations of the current SFR with the integrated galactic stellar mass and explore the connection between SFR and metallicity.

  18. 77 FR 23318 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``African Cosmos: Stellar Arts... Cosmos: Stellar Arts,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, is...

  19. ClassLess: A Comprehensive Database of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Lynne; Baliber, Nairn

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a database housing published measurements of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) within ~1 kpc of the Sun. ClassLess, so called because it includes YSOs in all stages of evolution, is a relational database in which user interaction is conducted via HTML web browsers, queries are performed in scientific language, and all data are linked to the sources of publication. Each star is associated with a cluster (or clusters), and both spatially resolved and unresolved measurements are stored, allowing proper use of data from multiple star systems. With this fully searchable tool, myriad ground- and space-based instruments and surveys across wavelength regimes can be exploited. In addition to primary measurements, the database self consistently calculates and serves higher level data products such as extinction, luminosity, and mass. As a result, searches for young stars with specific physical characteristics can be completed with just a few mouse clicks.

  20. Searching for Young Stellar Objects in CG4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Rebull, L. M.; Hoette, V.; Mallory, C.; McCarron, K.; Gartner, C.; VanDerMolen, J.; Gamble, L.; Laher, R.; Legassie, M.; Crump, R.; Laorr, A.; Mork, K.; Steinbergs, E.; Wigley, E.; Caruso, S.; Killingstad, N.; McCanna, T.; Matche, L.; McCartney, A.; Doering, M.; Feig, M.; Mahmud, N.; Selic, T.; Kim, S.

    2011-01-01

    We used archival Spitzer infrared data to look for new young stellar objects (YSOs) in Cometary Globule 4 (CG4) in Puppis. CG4 is approximately 1300 parsecs away and one of about 30 cometary globules in the Gum Nebula, many of which are known to be forming stars. CG4 is dramatic in appearance, and that has brought it to the attention of both scientists and the public. Our team used archival Spitzer InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) data, combined with 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) data as well as optical data obtained by collaborators. We used infrared excess to investigate the properties of previously known YSOs in this region and identify additional new candidate YSOs in this region. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program and Archive Outreach funds.

  1. Exploring the association of Fermi sources with young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Romero, G. E.

    2011-11-01

    Massive protostars have associated bipolar outflows which can produce strong shocks when interact with the surrounding medium. In these conditions particle acceleration at relativistic velocities can occur leading to gamma ray emission, as some theoretical models predict. To identify young stellar objects (YSO) that may emit gamma rays we have crossed the Fermi First Year Catalog with some catalogs of known YSOs, and we have conducted Montecarlo simulations to find the probability of chance coincidence. With this crossing we obtained a list of YSOs spatially coincident with Fermi sources that may show gamma ray emission. Our results indicate that about 70% of the candidates should be gamma-ray sources with a confidence of 5 sigma. We have studied the coincidences one by one to check the viability of these YSOs as potential counterparts of Fermi sources and plan further detailed observations of few of them.

  2. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  3. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pitann, Jan; Bouwman, Jeroen; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Hennemann, Martin

    2011-12-10

    In this paper, we present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopy for 14 intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs). We use Spitzer spectroscopy to investigate the physical properties of these sources and their environments. Our sample can be divided into two types of objects: young isolated, embedded objects with spectra that are dominated by ice and silicate absorption bands, and more evolved objects that are dominated by extended emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pure H{sub 2} rotational lines. We are able to constrain the illuminating FUV fields by classifying the PAH bands below 9 {mu}m. For most of the sources we are able to detect several atomic fine structure lines. In particular, the [Ne II] line appearing in two regions could originate from unresolved photodissociation regions or J-shocks. We relate the identified spectral features to observations obtained from NIR through submillimeter imaging. The spatial extent of several H{sub 2} and PAH bands is matched with morphologies identified in previous Infrared Array Camera observations. This also allows us to distinguish between the different H{sub 2} excitation mechanisms. In addition, we calculate the optical extinction from the silicate bands and use this to constrain the spectral energy distribution fit, allowing us to estimate the masses of these YSOs.

  4. Young Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Young Stellar Objects in the VVV Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissova, J.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Alonso, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Kurtev, R.; Medina, N.; Navarro, C.; Kuhn, M.; Gromadzki, M.; Retamales, G.; Fernandez, M. A.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Chené, A.-N.; Minniti, D.; Contreras Pena, C.; Catelan, M.; Decany, I.; Thompson, M. A.; Morales, E. F. E.; Amigo, P.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the connections of the global properties of eight young stellar clusters projected in the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) ESO Large Public Survey disk area and their young stellar object (YSO) populations. The analysis is based on the combination of spectroscopic parallax-based reddening and distance determinations with main-sequence and pre-main-sequence ishochrone fitting to determine the basic parameters (reddening, age, distance) of the sample clusters. The lower mass limit estimations show that all clusters are low or intermediate mass (between 110 and 1800 M ⊙), the slope Γ of the obtained present-day mass functions of the clusters is close to the Kroupa initial mass function. The YSOs in the cluster’s surrounding fields are classified using low resolution spectra, spectral energy distribution fits with theoretical predictions, and variability, taking advantage of multi-epoch VVV observations. All spectroscopically confirmed YSOs (except one) are found to be massive (more than 8 M ⊙). Using VVV and GLIMPSE color-color cuts we have selected a large number of new YSO candidates, which are checked for variability and 57% are found to show at least low-amplitude variations. In few cases it was possible to distinguish between YSO and AGB classifications on the basis of light curves.

  5. Supernovae from yellow, blue supergiants: origin and consequences for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Georgy, Cyril; Saio, Hideyuki; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Groh, Jose

    2015-08-01

    A few core collapse supernovae progenitors have been found to be yellow or blue supergiants. We shall discuss possible scenarios involving single and close binary evolution allowing to explain this kind of core collapse supernova progenitors. According to stellar models for both single and close binaries, blue supergiants, at the end of their nuclear lifetimes and thus progenitors of core collapse supernovae, present very different characteristics for what concerns their surface compositions, rotational surface velocities and pulsational properties with respect to blue supergiants in their core helium burning phase. We discuss how the small observed scatter of the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity (FWGL) relation of blue supergiants constrains the evolution of massive stars after the Main-Sequence phase and the nature of the progenitors of supernovae in the mass range between 12 and 40 solar masses. The present day observed surface abundances of blue supergiants, of their pulsational properties, as well as the small scatter of the FWGL relation provide strong constraints on both internal mixing and mass loss in massive stars and therefore on the end point of their evolution.

  6. THE BLUE TIP OF THE STELLAR LOCUS: MEASURING REDDENING WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Juric, Mario; Schlegel, David J.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Gibson, Robert R.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2010-12-10

    We present measurements of reddening due to dust using the colors of stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the color of main-sequence turnoff stars by finding the 'blue tip' of the stellar locus: the prominent blue edge in the distribution of stellar colors. The method is sensitive to color changes of order 18, 12, 7, and 8 mmag of reddening in the colors u - g, g - r, r - i, and i - z, respectively, in regions measuring 90' by 14'. We present maps of the blue tip colors in each of these bands over the entire SDSS footprint, including the new dusty southern Galactic cap data provided by the SDSS-III. The results disfavor the best-fit O'Donnell and Cardelli et al. reddening laws, but are described well by a Fitzpatrick reddening law with R{sub V} = 3.1. The Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust map is found to trace the dust well, but overestimates reddening by factors of 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.4 in u - g, g - r, r - i, and i - z largely due to the adopted reddening law. In select dusty regions of the sky, we find evidence for problems in the SFD temperature correction. A dust map normalization difference of 15% between the Galactic north and south sky may be due to these dust temperature errors.

  7. Herschel Hi-GAL imaging of massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin, F. A.; Hoare, M. G.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Clay, S. J.; de Wit, W.-J.; Rafiq, I.; Pezzuto, S.; Molinari, S.

    2015-05-01

    We used Herschel Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane survey) data to determine whether massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) are resolved at 70 μm and to study their envelope density distribution. Our analysis of three relatively isolated sources in the l = 30° and 59° Galactic fields show that the objects are partially resolved at 70 μm. The Herschel Hi-GAL survey data have a high scan velocity which makes unresolved and partially resolved sources appear elongated in the 70 μm images. We analysed the two scan directions separately and examine the intensity profile perpendicular to the scan direction. Spherically symmetric radiative transfer models with a power-law density distribution were used to study the circumstellar matter distribution. Single dish submm data were also included to study how different spatial information affects the fitted density distribution. The density distribution which best fits both the 70 μm intensity profile and spectral energy distribution has an average index of ˜0.5. This index is shallower than expected and is probably due to the dust emission from bipolar outflow cavity walls not accounted for in the spherical models. We conclude that 2D axisymmetric models and Herschel images at low scan speeds are needed to better constrain the matter distribution around MYSOs.

  8. E/S0 GALAXIES ON THE BLUE COLOR-STELLAR MASS SEQUENCE AT z = 0: FADING MERGERS OR FUTURE SPIRALS?

    SciTech Connect

    Kannappan, Sheila J.; Guie, Jocelly M.; Baker, Andrew J. E-mail: jocelly@mail.utexas.edu

    2009-08-15

    We identify a population of morphologically defined E/S0 galaxies lying on the locus of late-type galaxies in color-stellar mass space - the 'blue sequence' -at the present epoch. Using three samples (from the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey or NFGS, a merged HyperLeda/Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog, and the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog), we analyze blue-sequence E/S0s with stellar masses {approx}>10{sup 8} M {sub sun}, arguing that individual objects may be evolving either up toward the red sequence or down into the blue sequence. Blue-sequence E/S0 galaxies become more common with decreasing stellar mass, comprising {approx}<2% of E/S0s near the 'shutdown mass' M{sub s} {approx} 1-2 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}, increasing to {approx}>5% near the 'bimodality mass' M{sub b} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun}, and sharply rising to {approx}> 20%-30% below the 'threshold mass' M{sub t} {approx} 4-6 x 10{sup 9} M {sub sun}, down to our completeness analysis limit at {approx}10{sup 9} M {sub sun}. The strong emergence of blue-sequence E/S0s below M{sub t} coincides with a previously reported global increase in mean atomic gas fractions below M{sub t} for galaxies of all types on both sequences, suggesting that the availability of cold gas may be basic to blue-sequence E/S0s' existence. Environmental analysis reveals that many sub-M{sub b} blue-sequence E/S0s reside in low-to-intermediate density environments. Thus, the bulk of the population we analyze appears distinct from the generally lower-mass cluster dE population; S0 morphologies with a range of bulge sizes are typical. In mass-radius and mass-{sigma} scaling relations, blue-sequence E/S0s are more similar to red-sequence E/S0s than to late-type galaxies, but they represent a transitional class. While some of them, especially in the high-mass range from M{sub b} to M{sub s} , resemble major-merger remnants that will likely fade onto the red sequence, most blue-sequence E/S0s below M{sub b

  9. CANDIDATES FOR THE YOUNG STELLAR OUTFLOWS: WATER AND METHANOL MASERS FROM YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Wanggi; Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Kee-Tae; Byun, Do-Young

    2012-11-01

    We conducted simultaneous 22 GHz water maser and 44 GHz class I methanol maser surveys of newly identified 282 H{sub 2} emission features from the 2.122 {mu}m H{sub 2} narrowband image survey in the Galactic plane (UWISH2 project) using Korean VLBI Network 21 m radio telescopes. We detected 16 and 13 new water and methanol maser sources, respectively. This result indicates that at least {approx}5% of the H{sub 2} emission features originate from young stellar objects (YSOs) that are in the right physical condition to produce the water and methanol masers. The masers are closely related to the current outflow activities in the Galactic plane. The power sources of these 23 diffused/collimated H{sub 2} emission features (six sources are detected for both masers) are likely to be intermediate- to high-mass YSOs, based on a comparison with the maser luminosities of other well-studied YSOs. Both maser velocities are mostly close to their own systemic velocities within {approx}<5 km s{sup -1}, even though water masers generally show larger variabilities in the intensity, velocity, and shape than methanol masers. We also discovered three new water maser sources with high-velocity components: {approx}25 km s{sup -1} redshifted CMHO 019, {approx}50 km s{sup -1} blueshifted CMHO 132, and {approx}120 km s{sup -1} blueshifted CMHO 182. In particular, we propose that the dominant blueshifted water maser of CHMO 182 can be a unique laboratory for the study of the high-mass young stellar jet and its acceleration.

  10. Imaging polarimetry of class I young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Roche, P. F.

    1998-09-01

    We present near-infrared imaging polarimetry of three class I young stellar objects in the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud. We use Monte Carlo simulations to analyse the flux distributions and polarization patterns of these three sources and five others from an earlier paper. In addition, we present high-resolution polarimetry of HL Tau using the shift and add technique. Most young stellar objects in the sample display sharp, unresolved, peaks in the scattered light distribution. This is most simply explained by a strong concentration of matter in the centre, which we model by applying the rho~r^-1.5 power law throughout the envelope. In terms of the Ulrich/Terebey, Shu and Cassen solution for the late stages of contraction of an initially spherical non-magnetic cloud, this corresponds to r_c<10 au. However, this almost spherically symmetric density distribution is inconsistent with observations of flattened, disc-like structures, so we conclude that this solution is not appropriate and different initial conditions apply. The multiple-scattering models with spherical grains do not reproduce some features of the observed polarization patterns, in particular the broad regions of aligned vectors seen in some sources. We interpret this as evidence for elongated aligned grains. The weak wavelength dependence of nebular morphology shows that the dust grains in circumstellar envelopes obey a much shallower extinction law than interstellar grains in the near-infrared, which we describe by the opacity ratio kappa(J/K)=1.8+/-0.3, compared to the interstellar value of 3.25. We place an upper limit on albedo of omega<0.6 from 1.25 to 2.2 μm and we find 0.1<0.4. With the addition of two more observables derived from the observed degrees of linear and circular polarization, we identify five

  11. 76 FR 81004 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Woman in Blue, Against...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Woman in Blue, Against Blue Water..., 2003), I hereby determine that the object ``Woman in Blue, Against Blue Water'' by Edvard...

  12. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history.

  13. ISOPHOT observations of circumstellar disks around young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Natta, A.; Beckwith, S. V. W.

    1999-03-01

    We observed 97 stars in five young clusters at 25 and 60 μm with ISOPHOT to determine the frequency of infrared emission from circumstellar disks. The clusters have ages between 1 and 300 Myr. Most stars (5/6) that have near-infrared excess emission, thought to be indicative of accretion disks, exhibit far-infrared emission; only one object that has no excess emission in the near-infrared exhibits far-infrared excess emission. No stars older than 10 Myr have evidence for optically-thick disks. These results show that dust in the disks between about 0.3 and 3 AU disappears on timescales of ~ 10 Myr, identical within the uncertainties to the timescale for cessation of accretion as indicated by near-infrared observations of similar samples. Detection of one object whose dust optical depth is intermediate between opaque and transparent suggests that the duration of the transition phase between optically-thick and thin disk emission is less than 300,000 yr. Broad-band photometry between 2.5 and 100 μm, low resolution spectra between 2 and 12 μm, and 200 μm maps of 18 young stars (1-3 Myr old) in the Taurus and Chamaeleon dark clouds suggests that the irradiation dominates over viscous dissipation of mass accretion in the heating of the disk. The spectral energy distributions are consistent with those predicted by models of disks heated centrally by the stellar/accretion photosphere or by scattering from a diffuse halo surrounding the disk. The observations demonstrate that heating by accretion through the disks contributes little or no power to the energy budget at distances more than a few tenths AU from the central star.

  14. Populations of Young Stellar Objects in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping

    2013-03-01

    We develop a new method for identifying young stellar objects (YSOs) from star-forming regions using the photometry data from Spitzer's c2d Legacy Project. The aim is to obtain YSO lists as complete as possible for studying statistical properties such as the star formation rate (SFR) and lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages. The largest obstacle in identifying YSOs comes from background galaxies with similar spectral energy distributions to YSOs. Traditionally, selected color-color and color-magnitude criteria are used to separate YSOs and galaxies. However, since there is no obvious boundary between YSOs and galaxies in color-color diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), those criteria may exclude faint YSOs near the boundary. In this paper, we separate the YSOs and galaxies in a multi-dimensional (multi-D) magnitude space, which is equivalent to using all variations of CMDs simultaneously. Comparing sources from molecular clouds to Spitzer's SWIRE data, which have a negligible amount of YSOs, we can naturally identify YSO candidates (YSOc) located outside of the galaxy-populated regions in the multi-D space. In the five c2d surveyed clouds, we select 322 new YSOc and miss/exclude 33 YSOc compared to Evans et al., and this results in 1313 YSOc in total. As a result, SFR increases 28% correspondingly, but the lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages remain unchanged. Compared to theories by Krumholz & McKee, our derived SFR suggests that star formation at a large scale is dominated by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields. Furthermore, we identify seven new very low luminosity objects.

  15. POPULATIONS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping E-mail: slai@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2013-03-01

    We develop a new method for identifying young stellar objects (YSOs) from star-forming regions using the photometry data from Spitzer's c2d Legacy Project. The aim is to obtain YSO lists as complete as possible for studying statistical properties such as the star formation rate (SFR) and lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages. The largest obstacle in identifying YSOs comes from background galaxies with similar spectral energy distributions to YSOs. Traditionally, selected color-color and color-magnitude criteria are used to separate YSOs and galaxies. However, since there is no obvious boundary between YSOs and galaxies in color-color diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), those criteria may exclude faint YSOs near the boundary. In this paper, we separate the YSOs and galaxies in a multi-dimensional (multi-D) magnitude space, which is equivalent to using all variations of CMDs simultaneously. Comparing sources from molecular clouds to Spitzer's SWIRE data, which have a negligible amount of YSOs, we can naturally identify YSO candidates (YSOc) located outside of the galaxy-populated regions in the multi-D space. In the five c2d surveyed clouds, we select 322 new YSOc and miss/exclude 33 YSOc compared to Evans et al., and this results in 1313 YSOc in total. As a result, SFR increases 28% correspondingly, but the lifetimes of YSOs in different evolutionary stages remain unchanged. Compared to theories by Krumholz and McKee, our derived SFR suggests that star formation at a large scale is dominated by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields. Furthermore, we identify seven new very low luminosity objects.

  16. WISE Identified Young Stellar Objects In BRC 38

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Rebull, L. M.; Laurence, W.; Marshall, R.; Murphy, M.; Orr, L.; Whitworth, C.; Burton, A.; Corris, T.; Goodey, S.; McGinnis, S.; Laurence, C.; Aschman, O.; Kikuchi, R.; Prather, J.; Whitley, L.; Billings, C.; Mader, C.

    2014-01-01

    Bright rimmed clouds (BRCs) are dense clumps of gas and dust within HII regions at the edges of molecular clouds; while the BRCs themselves are dark, their rims are optically bright from illumination by nearby O or B stars. Many BRCs show evidence of active star formation possibly triggered by the ionizing radiation from the nearby O or B stars. The large molecular cloud IC1396 is home to eleven BRCs thought to be driven by the O6.5V star HD206267. BRC 38 is located in the north of IC1396, at 21:40:42 +58:16:13. The immediate ~5'x5' region around BRC 38 has been extensively studied in many wavelengths from X-rays to infrared (IR), identifying ~100 young stellar objects (YSOs). We used data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to expand the search for YSOs to a 20 arcminute radius from the center of BRC 38. Starting with approximately 7000 sources identified in the WISE catalog, we used an updated version of the IR color selection scheme developed by Koenig et al. (2012) to identify ~40 objects having IR colors consistent with those of YSOs; some overlapping with the literature YSO candidates. Combining confirmed and candidate YSOs from literature with those we identified by color selection, we find 115 unique objects of interest. For each of these sources, we analyzed (a) the WISE, 2MASS, and Spitzer images to determine if they were point-like sources; (b) their IR colors to determine if they exhibited a clear IR excess; and (c) their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to determine if they had an SED shape consistent with their identification as YSO candidates. Our work adds several new YSO candidates to the list of YSOs in and near BRC 38 and newly identifies IR excesses for many of the previously identified YSOs in the region. We looked for evidence of triggered star formation in BRC 38, but are limited in our conclusions by small-number statistics. Support is provided for this work by the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP

  17. Three quasi-stellar objects acting as strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbin, F.; Faure, C.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Rérat, F.; Tewes, M.; Meylan, G.; Stern, D.; Mahabal, A.; Boroson, T.; Dheeraj, R.; Sluse, D.

    2012-04-01

    We report the discovery of three new cases of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) acting as strong gravitational lenses on background emission line galaxies: SDSS J0827+5224 (zQSO = 0.293, zs = 0.412), SDSS J0919+2720 (zQSO = 0.209, zs = 0.558), SDSS J1005+4016 (zQSO = 0.230, zs = 0.441). The selection was carried out using a sample of 22,298 SDSS spectra displaying at least four emission lines at a redshift beyond that of the foreground QSO. The lensing nature is confirmed from Keck imaging and spectroscopy, as well as from HST/WFC3 imaging in the F475W and F814W filters. Two of the QSOs have face-on spiral host galaxies and the third is a QSO+galaxy pair. The velocity dispersion of the host galaxies, inferred from simple lens modeling, is between σ = 210 and 285 km s-1, making these host galaxies comparable in mass with the SLACS sample of early-type strong lenses. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Also based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #GO12233.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION TRANSFER IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, B. A.; Honor, J.; Robitaille, T. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Dong, R.; Wolff, M. J.; Wood, K.

    2013-08-15

    We have updated our publicly available dust radiative transfer code (HOCHUNK3D) to include new emission processes and various three-dimensional (3D) geometries appropriate for forming stars. The 3D geometries include warps and spirals in disks, accretion hotspots on the central star, fractal clumping density enhancements, and misaligned inner disks. Additional axisymmetric (2D) features include gaps in disks and envelopes, ''puffed-up inner rims'' in disks, multiple bipolar cavity walls, and iteration of disk vertical structure assuming hydrostatic equilibrium (HSEQ). We include the option for simple power-law envelope geometry, which, combined with fractal clumping and bipolar cavities, can be used to model evolved stars as well as protostars. We include non-thermal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains, and external illumination from the interstellar radiation field. The grid structure was modified to allow multiple dust species in each cell; based on this, a simple prescription is implemented to model dust stratification. We describe these features in detail, and show example calculations of each. Some of the more interesting results include the following: (1) outflow cavities may be more clumpy than infalling envelopes. (2) PAH emission in high-mass stars may be a better indicator of evolutionary stage than the broadband spectral energy distribution slope; and related to this, (3) externally illuminated clumps and high-mass stars in optically thin clouds can masquerade as young stellar objects. (4) Our HSEQ models suggest that dust settling is likely ubiquitous in T Tauri disks, in agreement with previous observations.

  19. 78 FR 8682 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Vermeer's Woman in Blue...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Vermeer's Woman in Blue Reading a... ``Vermeer's Woman in Blue Reading a Letter,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within...

  20. The Dynamics of Outflows from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, Naomi A.

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of CO outflows around young stellar objects (YSOs) suggests that mass-loss is a necessary ingredient of the star-formation process, and they are thought to provide a means to remove angular momentum from the accreting matter. Our understanding of molecular outflows from low-mass YSOs has come from a large number of studies performed during the last decade. However there have been relatively few similar detailed studies of high-mass YSO outflows, and it is still not clear whether outflows from high-mass YSOs are generated and entrained by the same mechanism as those from their low-mass counterparts. Studies of high-mass star-formation which attempt to extend the established correlations between outflow momentum-flux and source bolometric luminosity into the high-mass regime are further hindered by the problem of Malmquist bias, which we show to be prevalent in the existing studies of high-mass YSOs. We therefore selected a sample of known intermediate to high-mass YSOs with outflows with a range of luminosities but all located at a distance of 2 +/- 0.3 kpc. With this sample we are able to test the correlations between outflow dynamical properties and source properties free from biases due to source distance, and to investigate whether the other phenomena associated with low-mass YSO outflows are also common in high-mass flows. We present high-sensitivity 12CO maps of the 11 outflows from intermediate to high-mass YSOs, and discuss their morphology and dynamics. These data were also used to re-investigate the uncertainties involved in using spectral-line data to derive flow properties, particularly the importance of variations in optical depth and the problem of separating ambient cloud emssion from flow emission. We also present 13CO and C18O observations of the ``cores'' surrounding each YSO and discuss how the cloud core and outflow may be related. The primary conclusions of this work are: The correlation between outflow momentum flux (FrmCO ) and

  1. Accelerating a water maser face-on jet from a high mass young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Kazuhito; Sorai, Kazuo; Honma, Mareki; Hirota, Tomoya; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Niinuma, Kotaro; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Fujisawa, Kenta

    2016-10-01

    We report on long-term single-dish and VLBI monitoring for intermittent flare activities of a dominant blue-shifted H2O maser associated with a southern high mass young stellar object, G353.273+0.641. Bi-weekly single-dish monitoring using the Hokkaido University Tomakomai 11 m radio telescope has shown that a systematic acceleration continues over four years beyond the lifetime of individual maser features. This fact suggests that the H2O maser traces a region where molecular gas is steadily accelerated. There were five maser flares during the five years of monitoring, and maser distributions in four of them were densely monitored by VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The overall distribution of the maser features suggests the presence of a bipolar jet, with the 3D kinematics indicating that it is almost face-on (inclination angle of ˜ 8°-17° from the line of sight). Most maser features were recurrently excited within a region of 100×100 au2 around the radio continuum peak, while their spatial distributions significantly varied between each flare. This confirms that episodic propagations of outflow shocks recurrently invoke intermittent flare activities. We also measured annual parallax, deriving a source distance of 1.70^{+0.19}_{-0.16} kpc that is consistent with the commonly used photometric distance.

  2. Polarization and Structure of Broad Absorption Line Quasi-Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Patrick Michael

    This thesis is a spectropolarimetric survey of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects (BAL QSO). We observed 36 BAL QSO at the Palomar and W. M. Keck Observatories. BAL QSO have higher polarization than other quasars, reinforcing the view that they are normal quasars viewed from an equatorial aspect. However, there is a wide distribution of polarization values, which may be due to intrinsic differences in the geometry or optical depth to scattering. No correlations are found among emission line or broad absorption line properties and continuum polarization, suggesting that these properties are regulated by internal differences unrelated to viewing angle. The continuum polarization of BAL QSO is weakly wavelength-dependent after correction for emission line dilution. In most objects, the polarisation rises to the blue, suggesting that dust scattering or absorption may be important. Broad emission line photons are polarized less than the continuum; and the position angle of the electric vector is rotated with respect to the continuum. The semi-forbidden C III) emission line is polarized differently than the C IV emission line, suggesting resonance scattering in the C III) emission line region. Resonantly scattered photons from the broad absorption line region are detected at high velocities red-ward and blue-ward of the C IV line center in the spectra of some objects. These photons are negatively polarized with respect to the continuum photons, showing that the broad absorption line region and the continuum scattering region are oriented perpendicular to each other. The polarization increases in the BAL troughs, due mainly to partial coverage of the central source by the broad absorption line region. The geometry of the intervening BAL clouds is skewed with respect to the continuum scattering region, which results in position angle rotations in the BAL. The variation of polarization with velocity in the BAL is consistent with a non-radial, accelerating outflow

  3. Near infrared photographic sky survey. 1: Catalog of red stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craine, E. R.; Duerr, R. E.; Horner, V. M.; Imhoff, C. L.; Routsis, D. E.; Swihart, D. L.; Turnshek, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Red stellar objects for which V-1 was greater than a value of about 2 (supm). 5 were extracted from photographs of 23 program fields. Tabular data for each field show the object name; the 1950 epoch right ascension, declination, galactic longitude, galactic latitude; radial distance from field venter in decimal degrees; color classes; and objects ordered by redness.

  4. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  5. Outflows from Young Stellar Objects: Bringing Numerical Simulations Closer to Observations of Herbig-Haro Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Edward C.

    High resolution observations of Young Stellar Object (YSO) jets show them to be composed of many small-scale knots or clumps. 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations were conducted with the code AstroBEAR to study how such clumps interact and create morphologies and kinematic patterns seen in emission line observations. Two main classes of simulations were used in this study: outflows of spherical, over-dense clumps, and pulsed jets in which the pulsations create clumps within the jet. Such flows lead to the formation of bow shocks which then interact with each other as faster material overtakes slower material. We show that much of the spatial structure apparent in emission line images of jets arises from the dynamics and interactions of these bow shocks. The simulations show a variety of time-dependent features, including bright knots associated with Mach stems where the shocks intersect, a "frothy" emission structure that arises from the presence of the Non-linear Thin Shell Instability (NTSI) along the surfaces of the bow shocks, and the merging and fragmentation of clumps. Simulations with magnetic fields show how the field affects the dynamics of YSO jets and the emission they produce. This work contributes to the ultimate goal of one day being able to observationally estimate the strength of the magnetic field within these jets. The simulations use a new non-equilibrium cooling method to produce synthetic emission maps in H? and [S II]. These are directly compared with multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Herbig-Haro (HH) jets. There is excellent agreement between features seen in the simulations and the observations in terms of both proper motion and morphologies. Thus, YSO jets may be dominated by heterogeneous structures, and interactions between these structures and the shocks they produce can account for many details of YSO jet evolution.

  6. TRANSITS AND LENSING BY COMPACT OBJECTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD: DISRUPTED STARS ORBITING BLUE STRAGGLERS

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2011-05-15

    Kepler's first major discoveries are two hot (T > 10,000 K) small-radius objects orbiting stars in its field. A viable hypothesis is that these are the cores of stars that have each been eroded or disrupted by a companion star. The companion, which is the star monitored today, is likely to have gained mass from its now-defunct partner and can be considered to be a blue straggler. KOI-81 is almost certainly the product of stable mass transfer; KOI-74 may be as well, or it may be the first clear example of a blue straggler created through three-body interactions. We show that mass-transfer binaries are common enough that Kepler should discover {approx}1000 white dwarfs orbiting main-sequence stars. Most of these, like KOI-74 and KOI-81, will be discovered through transits, but many will be discovered through a combination of gravitational lensing and transits, while lensing will dominate for a subset. In fact, some events caused by white dwarfs will have the appearance of 'anti-transits' - i.e., short-lived enhancements in the amount of light received from the monitored star. Lensing and other mass-measurement methods provide a way to distinguish white dwarf binaries from planetary systems. This is important for the success of Kepler's primary mission, in light of the fact that white dwarf radii are similar to the radii of terrestrial planets, and that some white dwarfs will have orbital periods that place them in the habitable zones of their stellar companions. By identifying transiting and/or lensing white dwarfs, Kepler will conduct pioneering studies of white dwarfs and of the end states of mass transfer. It may also identify orbiting neutron stars or black holes. The calculations inspired by the discovery of KOI-74 and KOI-81 have implications for ground-based wide-field surveys as well as for future space-based surveys.

  7. Transits and Lensing by Compact Objects in the Kepler Field: Disrupted Stars Orbiting Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.

    2011-05-01

    Kepler's first major discoveries are two hot (T > 10,000 K) small-radius objects orbiting stars in its field. A viable hypothesis is that these are the cores of stars that have each been eroded or disrupted by a companion star. The companion, which is the star monitored today, is likely to have gained mass from its now-defunct partner and can be considered to be a blue straggler. KOI-81 is almost certainly the product of stable mass transfer; KOI-74 may be as well, or it may be the first clear example of a blue straggler created through three-body interactions. We show that mass-transfer binaries are common enough that Kepler should discover ~1000 white dwarfs orbiting main-sequence stars. Most of these, like KOI-74 and KOI-81, will be discovered through transits, but many will be discovered through a combination of gravitational lensing and transits, while lensing will dominate for a subset. In fact, some events caused by white dwarfs will have the appearance of "anti-transits"—i.e., short-lived enhancements in the amount of light received from the monitored star. Lensing and other mass-measurement methods provide a way to distinguish white dwarf binaries from planetary systems. This is important for the success of Kepler's primary mission, in light of the fact that white dwarf radii are similar to the radii of terrestrial planets, and that some white dwarfs will have orbital periods that place them in the habitable zones of their stellar companions. By identifying transiting and/or lensing white dwarfs, Kepler will conduct pioneering studies of white dwarfs and of the end states of mass transfer. It may also identify orbiting neutron stars or black holes. The calculations inspired by the discovery of KOI-74 and KOI-81 have implications for ground-based wide-field surveys as well as for future space-based surveys.

  8. Exploring Cosmic Voids with GALEX: Stellar Populations and Primordial Jeans Mass Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Michael

    This proposed research program will revolutionize the study of cosmic voids and their inhabitant galaxy populations. By combining archival GALEX photometry with SDSS data for thousands of galaxies in hundreds of voids, we will be able to characterize voids, void galaxies, and the formation and evolution of galaxies in the lowest density environments of the Universe. In addition, we propose to use the joint GALEX-SDSS database to search in several of the nearest cosmic voids for the original building blocks of galaxy formation: surviving Jeans mass primordial objects which formed right after recombination during the earliest stages of structure formation in the Universe. Our program will first characterize known void galaxies in the UV using the extensive GALEX NUV and FUV imaging archives. Adding GALEX UV photometry to SDSS optical enables estimating star formation rates and also separating stars from unresolved galaxies. Based on this effort, we will look for trends in galaxy properties with location within a void and with global void properties such as size and underdensity. We are particularly interested in identifying and characterizing the early type galaxy population in voids. While most void galaxies are blue, there do exist ellipticals in voids; comparison with ellipticals in denser regions will inform elliptical galaxy models in new ways, and teach us about the oldest and earliest stages of galaxy formation in voids. Early type galaxies are easy to miss in void redshift surveys, even with the comprehensive nature of SDSS, because most have relied on emission line searches or infrared excess. Our approach is fundamentally different, using an enhanced GALEX UV-optical selection technique which we have developed specifically for this work. A search for early type objects is necessary to fully understand void galaxy populations. In parallel, we will use our UV-optical selection technique to search for primordial Jeans mass sized objects in the nearest voids

  9. SPARCO : a semi-parametric approach for image reconstruction of chromatic objects. Application to young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluska, J.; Malbet, F.; Berger, J.-P.; Baron, F.; Lazareff, B.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Monnier, J. D.; Soulez, F.; Thiébaut, E.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The emergence of optical interferometers with three and more telescopes allows image reconstruction of astronomical objects at the milliarcsecond scale. However, some objects contain components with very different spectral energy distributions (SED; i.e. different temperatures), which produces strong chromatic effects on the interferograms that have to be managed with care by image reconstruction algorithms. For example, the gray approximation for the image reconstruction process results in a degraded image if the total (u,v)-coverage given by the spectral supersynthesis is used. Aims: The relative flux contribution of the central object and an extended structure changes with wavelength for different temperatures. For young stellar objects, the known characteristics of the central object (i.e., stellar SED), or even the fit of the spectral index and the relative flux ratio, can be used to model the central star while reconstructing the image of the extended structure separately. Methods: We present a new method, called SPARCO (semi-parametric algorithm for the image reconstruction of chromatic objects), which describes the spectral characteristics of both the central object and the extended structure to consider them properly when reconstructing the image of the surrounding environment. We adapted two image-reconstruction codes ( Macim , Squeeze , and MiRA ) to implement this new prescription. Results: SPARCO is applied using Macim , Squeeze , and MiRA on a young stellar object model and also on literature data on HR 5999 in the near-infrared with the VLTI. We obtain smoother images of the modeled circumstellar emission and improve the χ2 by a factor 9. Conclusions: This method paves the way to improved aperture-synthesis imaging of several young stellar objects with existing datasets. More generally, the approach can be used on astrophysical sources with similar features, such as active galactic nuclei, planetary nebulae, and asymptotic giant branch

  10. The host galaxies of quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Timothy Scott

    The results of an archival study of 71 medium-redshift QSOs observed with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope are presented. The QSOs have magnitudes MV ≤ -23 mag (total nuclear + host light) and red shifts 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 0.46, with no additional criteria imposed. For each object, the nuclear light component is subtracted, using two-dimensional image fits, and the luminosity and size of the underlying host galaxy are determined by fitting both an r1/4 and an exponential light profile, which represent a bulge and disk component, respectively. The total number of objects considered is more than triple that of previous studies, and the general QSO population for redshifts z ≤ 0.46 is reasonably sampled. A luminosity function which is not grossly affected by selection criteria is derived for the QSO host galaxies. This luminosity function is compared with that of normal galaxies and a ratio of luminosity functions for QSO hosts and normal galaxies is derived. The logarithm of this ratio follows a nearly straight line when plotted against galaxy magnitude. Previous results which indicate that QSO hosts are more luminous than typical bright galaxies are confirmed. The relationship between host and nuclear luminosity is studied in the context of morphology and radio-loudness. The surface brightnesses of the host galaxies are compared to the known relationships between the effective surface magnitude and size of Brightest Cluster Galaxies. The surface brightness distribution is also examined in the context of radio-loudness and the merger history of the hosts. Black hole masses for a subset of the QSOs are taken from the literature and used to calculate the Eddington limit for those objects. The black hole mass, the nuclear luminosity, and the nuclear luminosity as a fraction of the Eddington limit are examined as functions of each other. Multi-parameter analyses are performed using Principal Components Analysis to search for

  11. A stellar endgame - the born-again Sakurai's object.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.; Gustafsson, B.; Lambert, D. L.; Kameswara Rao, N.

    1997-05-01

    The surface chemical composition of this remarkable star shows that it is hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich and enriched in the light s-process elements. Spectra taken in May and October 1996 indicate a decrease in the surface hydrogen abundance by 0.7dex in five months along with an increase in the abundances of Li, Sr, Y and Zr. The abundance changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of the star being a rapidly evolving "born-again" AGB star experiencing a final He-shell flash, similar to FGSge. The ^12^C/^13^C ratio in October is very low, also suggesting hydrogen ingestion. By chemical composition, Sakurai's object resembles the R Coronae Borealis (RCrB) stars.

  12. The real-time stellar evolution of Sakurai's object.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Marcin; Zijlstra, Albert A; Herwig, Falk; van Hoof, Peter A M; Kerber, Florian; Kimeswenger, Stefan; Pollacco, Don L; Evans, Aneurin; Lopéz, José A; Bryce, Myfanwy; Eyres, Stewart P S; Matsuura, Mikako

    2005-04-08

    After a hot white dwarf ceases its nuclear burning, its helium may briefly and explosively reignite. This causes the star to evolve back into a cool giant, whereupon it experiences renewed mass ejection before reheating. A reignition event of this kind was observed in 1996 in V4334 Sgr (Sakurai's object). Its temperature decrease was 100 times the predicted rate. To understand its unexpectedly fast evolution, we have developed a model in which convective mixing is strongly suppressed under the influence of flash burning. The model predicts equally rapid reheating of the star. Radio emission from freshly ionized matter now shows that this reheating has begun. Such events may be an important source of carbon and carbonaceous dust in the Galaxy.

  13. Hot and cold gas toward young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, George F.; Maillard, Jean-Pierre; Allen, Mark; Beer, Reinhard; Belcourt, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution M band spectra are presented for the seven embedded IR sources W3 IRS 5, S140 IRS1, NGC 7538 IRS 1, NGC 7538 IRS 9, GL 2136, LkH-alpha 101, and MWC 349A, and the data are combined with previously published work for W33A and GL 2591. Cold CO is seen toward all nine sources, with temperatures from 11 K to 66 K. Column densities of cold CO are presented. Hot gas is seen toward eight of the nine objects with temperatures from 120 K to 1010 K. New lower limits to the hot gas density are obtained. The hot gas toward GL 2591, GL 2136, W3 IRS 5, and S140 IRS 1 is probably very near the central source and heated via gas-grain collisions. The optical depth in the silicate feature is strongly correlated with the (C-13)O column density, confirming that silicate optical depth is a useful measure of gas column density. The ratio of solid-to-gaseous CO is obtained for seven sources.

  14. An Infrared Search for Young Stellar Objects in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Linahan, Marcella; Gibbs, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Archibald, Andrew R.; Dickmann, Samantha Rose; Hart, Erica A.; Hedlund, Audrey R.; Hilfer, Shannon L.; Lacher, Thomas; McKernan, John T.; Medeiros, Emma M.; Nelson, Samantha Brooks; O'Leary, Harrison; Peña, Nicholas D.; Peterson, Alexis; Reader, Livia K.; Ropinski, Brandi Lucia; Scarpa, Gabriella; Sundeen, Kiera A.; Takara, Amber L.; Thiel, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    About 700 parsecs away from Earth, IC1396 lies along the galactic plane, in the direction of the constellation Cepheus, and includes many dark nebulae, including the Elephant’s Trunk Nebula. IC 1396A has been examined with a variety of telescopes, including Spitzer, 2MASS, IPHAS, Chandra, and WISE. The YSOVAR project (Rebull et al. 2014) also has Spitzer monitoring data in this region at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. Our team has merged these catalogs and identified candidate YSOs using IR color selection, X-ray detection, and variability metrics. In order to interpret the YSOVAR light curves, it is critical to understand which of the 700+ YSO candidates in this region are likely YSOs, and which are foreground/background stars or are extragalactic objects. As a first attempt to confirm these candidate YSOs, we have created spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for wavelengths from IPHAS r band to 24 microns, which we use, coupled with image inspection, to confirm (or refute) YSO candidates from this list of identified YSO candidates. We will then compare our vetted list of YSO candidates to the lists of YSO candidates already identified in the literature in this region. The goal of this study is to identify candidate YSO sources, as well as support the greater understanding of the variety, evolution and variability of young stars. This project is a collaborative effort of high school students from three states. They analyzed data individually and later collaborated online to compare results. This project is the result of many years of work with the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP).

  15. Population Synthesis in the Blue. IV. Accurate Model Predictions for Lick Indices and UBV Colors in Single Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2007-07-01

    We present a new set of model predictions for 16 Lick absorption line indices from Hδ through Fe5335 and UBV colors for single stellar populations with ages ranging between 1 and 15 Gyr, [Fe/H] ranging from -1.3 to +0.3, and variable abundance ratios. The models are based on accurate stellar parameters for the Jones library stars and a new set of fitting functions describing the behavior of line indices as a function of effective temperature, surface gravity, and iron abundance. The abundances of several key elements in the library stars have been obtained from the literature in order to characterize the abundance pattern of the stellar library, thus allowing us to produce model predictions for any set of abundance ratios desired. We develop a method to estimate mean ages and abundances of iron, carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, and calcium that explores the sensitivity of the various indices modeled to those parameters. The models are compared to high-S/N data for Galactic clusters spanning the range of ages, metallicities, and abundance patterns of interest. Essentially all line indices are matched when the known cluster parameters are adopted as input. Comparing the models to high-quality data for galaxies in the nearby universe, we reproduce previous results regarding the enhancement of light elements and the spread in the mean luminosity-weighted ages of early-type galaxies. When the results from the analysis of blue and red indices are contrasted, we find good consistency in the [Fe/H] that is inferred from different Fe indices. Applying our method to estimate mean ages and abundances from stacked SDSS spectra of early-type galaxies brighter than L*, we find mean luminosity-weighed ages of the order of ~8 Gyr and iron abundances slightly below solar. Abundance ratios, [X/Fe], tend to be higher than solar and are positively correlated with galaxy luminosity. Of all elements, nitrogen is the more strongly correlated with galaxy luminosity, which seems to indicate

  16. A FOURIER OPTICS METHOD FOR CALCULATING STELLAR OCCULTATION LIGHT CURVES BY OBJECTS WITH THIN ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, E. F.

    2012-08-15

    A stellar occultation occurs when a solar system object passes in front of a distant star. The light curves resulting from stellar occultations can reveal many aspects of the obscuring object. For airless bodies, the diffraction light curve specifies the object's size, distance and, if several chords are observed, shape. Occultation light curves are especially sensitive to the presence of atmospheres; the refraction light curve is a function of the atmosphere's density, pressure, and temperature profiles. The goal of this paper is to develop a practical algorithm to model the simultaneous effects of diffraction and refraction for objects in which both phenomena are observable. The algorithm we present is flexible: it can be used to calculate light curves by objects with arbitrary shapes and arbitrary atmospheres (including the presence of opacity sources such as hazes), provided that the atmosphere can be represented by a thin screen with a phase delay and an opacity defined at each location in the screen. Because the algorithm is limited at present to thin atmospheres (in which rays from a star are bent but undergo virtually no translation as they pass through an atmosphere), the gas giants, Earth, Mars, and Venus are not treated. Examples of stellar occultations are presented for round or irregularly shaped objects having thin atmospheres of various column densities.

  17. The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars as a constraint for stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Georgy, Cyril

    2015-09-01

    Context. The flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship (FGLR) of blue supergiant stars (BSG) links their absolute magnitude to the spectroscopically determined flux-weighted gravity log g/T_text{eff ^4}. BSG are the brightest stars in the universe at visual light and the application of the FGLR has become a powerful tool for determining extragalactic distances. Aims: Observationally, the FGLR is a tight relationship with only small scatter. It is, therefore, ideal for using as a constraint for stellar evolution models. The goal of this work is to investigate whether stellar evolution can reproduce the observed FGLR and to develop an improved foundation for the FGLR as an extragalactic distance indicator. Methods: We used different grids of stellar models for initial masses between 9 and 40 M⊙ and for metallicities between Z = 0.002 and 0.014, with and without rotation, which were computed with various mass loss rates during the red supergiant phase. For each of these models, we discuss the details of post-main sequence evolution and construct theoretical FGLRs by means of population synthesis models that we then compare with the observed FGLR. Results: In general, the stellar evolution model FGLRs agree reasonably well with the observed one. There are, however, differences between the models, in particular with regard to the shape and width (scatter) in the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity plane. The best agreement is obtained with models that include the effects of rotation and assume that the large majority, if not all, of the observed BSG evolve toward the red supergiant phase and that only a few are evolving back from this stage. The effects of metallicity on the shape and scatter of the FGLR are small. Conclusions: The shape, scatter, and metallicity dependence of the observed FGLR are explained well by stellar evolution models. This provides a solid theoretical foundation for using this relationship as a robust extragalactic distance indicator.

  18. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Geha, Marla; Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter; Simon, Joshua D.; Djorgovski, S. G. E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl

    2013-09-10

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  19. Probing the link between dynamics and stellar evolution: Blue Straggler Stars in Globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.

    2009-11-01

    In this contribution we review the main observational properties of Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) in Galactic Globular Clusters. A flower of results on the BSS frequency, radial distribution, and chemical composition are presented and discussed.

  20. Combining colour and temperature: A blue object is more likely to be judged as warm than a red object.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Ni; Iwai, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Yuki; Watanabe, Junji; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2014-07-03

    It is commonly believed that reddish colour induces warm feelings while bluish colour induces cold feelings. We, however, demonstrate an opposite effect when the temperature information is acquired by direct touch. Experiment 1 found that a red object, relative to a blue object, raises the lowest temperature required for an object to feel warm, indicating that a blue object is more likely to be judged as warm than a red object of the same physical temperature. Experiment 2 showed that hand colour also affects temperature judgment, with the direction of the effect opposite to object colours. This study provides the first demonstration that colour can modulate temperature judgments when the temperature information is acquired by direct touch. The effects apparently oppose the common conception of red-hot/blue-cold association. We interpret this phenomenon in terms of "Anti-Bayesian" integration, which suggests that the brain integrates direct temperature input with prior expectations about temperature relationship between object and hand in a way that emphasizes the contrast between the two.

  1. A Model for (Quasi-)Periodic Multiwavelength Photometric Variability in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Aurora Y.; Petkova, Maya A.; Wood, Kenneth; Whitney, Barbara A.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Gregory, Scott G.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Rebull, L.; Alencar, S. H. P.

    2016-09-01

    We present radiation transfer models of rotating young stellar objects (YSOs) with hot spots in their atmospheres, inner disk warps, and other three-dimensional effects in the nearby circumstellar environment. Our models are based on the geometry expected from magneto-accretion theory, where material moving inward in the disk flows along magnetic field lines to the star and creates stellar hot spots upon impact. Due to rotation of the star and magnetosphere, the disk is variably illuminated. We compare our model light curves to data from the Spitzer YSOVAR project to determine if these processes can explain the variability observed at optical and mid-infrared wavelengths in young stars. We focus on those variables exhibiting “dipper” behavior that may be periodic, quasi-periodic, or aperiodic. We find that the stellar hot-spot size and temperature affects the optical and near-infrared light curves, while the shape and vertical extent of the inner disk warp affects the mid-IR light curve variations. Clumpy disk distributions with non-uniform fractal density structure produce more stochastic light curves. We conclude that magneto-accretion theory is consistent with certain aspects of the multiwavelength photometric variability exhibited by low-mass YSOs. More detailed modeling of individual sources can be used to better determine the stellar hot-spot and inner disk geometries of particular sources.

  2. Accretion-induced variability links young stellar objects, white dwarfs, and black holes.

    PubMed

    Scaringi, Simone; Maccarone, Thomas J; Körding, Elmar; Knigge, Christian; Vaughan, Simon; Marsh, Thomas R; Aranzana, Ester; Dhillon, Vikram S; Barros, Susana C C

    2015-10-01

    The central engines of disc-accreting stellar-mass black holes appear to be scaled down versions of the supermassive black holes that power active galactic nuclei. However, if the physics of accretion is universal, it should also be possible to extend this scaling to other types of accreting systems, irrespective of accretor mass, size, or type. We examine new observations, obtained with Kepler/K2 and ULTRACAM, regarding accreting white dwarfs and young stellar objects. Every object in the sample displays the same linear correlation between the brightness of the source and its amplitude of variability (rms-flux relation) and obeys the same quantitative scaling relation as stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei. We also show that the most important parameter in this scaling relation is the physical size of the accreting object. This establishes the universality of accretion physics from proto-stars still in the star-forming process to the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies.

  3. Accretion-induced variability links young stellar objects, white dwarfs, and black holes

    PubMed Central

    Scaringi, Simone; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Körding, Elmar; Knigge, Christian; Vaughan, Simon; Marsh, Thomas R.; Aranzana, Ester; Dhillon, Vikram S.; Barros, Susana C. C.

    2015-01-01

    The central engines of disc-accreting stellar-mass black holes appear to be scaled down versions of the supermassive black holes that power active galactic nuclei. However, if the physics of accretion is universal, it should also be possible to extend this scaling to other types of accreting systems, irrespective of accretor mass, size, or type. We examine new observations, obtained with Kepler/K2 and ULTRACAM, regarding accreting white dwarfs and young stellar objects. Every object in the sample displays the same linear correlation between the brightness of the source and its amplitude of variability (rms-flux relation) and obeys the same quantitative scaling relation as stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei. We also show that the most important parameter in this scaling relation is the physical size of the accreting object. This establishes the universality of accretion physics from proto-stars still in the star-forming process to the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. PMID:26601307

  4. BlueJ Visual Debugger for Learning the Execution of Object-Oriented Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens; Schulte, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment undertaken in order to evaluate the effect of a program visualization tool for helping students to better understand the dynamics of object-oriented programs. The concrete tool used was BlueJ's debugger and object inspector. The study was done as a control-group experiment in an introductory programming…

  5. Assessing the Effect of Stellar Companions from High-resolution Imaging of Kepler Objects of Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Lea A.; Ciardi, David R.; Howard, Andrew W.; Everett, Mark E.; Furlan, Elise; Saylors, Mindy; Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Teske, Johanna; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on 176 close (<2″) stellar companions detected with high-resolution imaging near 170 hosts of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). These Kepler targets were prioritized for imaging follow-up based on the presence of small planets, so most of the KOIs in these systems (176 out of 204) have nominal radii <6 {R}\\oplus . Each KOI in our sample was observed in at least two filters with adaptive optics, speckle imaging, lucky imaging, or the Hubble Space Telescope. Multi-filter photometry provides color information on the companions, allowing us to constrain their stellar properties and assess the probability that the companions are physically bound. We find that 60%–80% of companions within 1″ are bound, and the bound fraction is >90% for companions within 0.″5 the bound fraction decreases with increasing angular separation. This picture is consistent with simulations of the binary and background stellar populations in the Kepler field. We also reassess the planet radii in these systems, converting the observed differential magnitudes to a contamination in the Kepler bandpass and calculating the planet radius correction factor, X R = R p (true)/R p (single). Under the assumption that planets in bound binaries are equally likely to orbit the primary or secondary, we find a mean radius correction factor for planets in stellar multiples of X R = 1.65. If stellar multiplicity in the Kepler field is similar to the solar neighborhood, then nearly half of all Kepler planets may have radii underestimated by an average of 65%, unless vetted using high-resolution imaging or spectroscopy.

  6. Subjective and Objective Cancer Screening Knowledge Among White- and Blue-Collar Chinese Midlife Adults.

    PubMed

    Hou, Su-I

    2016-08-26

    Cancer is the leading cause of death among Chinese, yet little is known about cancer knowledge among this population. The study described the subjective and objective cancer screening knowledge among white- versus blue-collar Chinese midlife adults. A convenient sample of white-collar adults age 40+ years was recruited from government and academic agencies; and blue-collar adults age 40+ years were recruited from manufactory companies in Taiwan. An eight-item cancer screening knowledge test (CSKT) was used to measure objective knowledge and one five-point Likert scale item for assessing subjective (perceived) cancer screening knowledge. A total of 208 white- and 533 blue-collar workers completed the survey during 2008-2011. Mean ages between groups were comparable (41.1 versus 46.3 years), as well as family cancer history (41.5 %). About 76 % of the white-collar and 43 % of the blue-collar adults had college education. The mean score of the CSKT was lower in the blue-collar versus white-collar workers, 5.4 (SD = 1.76) versus 6.1 (SD = 1.40), indicating on average, 68 versus 76 % of the participants answered the cancer knowledge correctly. The subjective knowledge levels were, however, higher among the blue-collar workers (mean rating of 3.22 versus 2.78). The CSKT showed a good mix of relatively easy and moderately difficult items in both groups. Study showed that overall cancer screening knowledge was low among Chinese midlife adults. Although blue-collar workers scored lower on CSKT, the perceived knowledge level was higher. Results also suggest attention to communicating cancer screening information among Chinese blue-collar midlife workers in particular.

  7. Disk-mediated accretion burst in a high-mass young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti O Garatti, A.; Stecklum, B.; Garcia Lopez, R.; Eislöffel, J.; Ray, T. P.; Sanna, A.; Cesaroni, R.; Walmsley, C. M.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; de Wit, W. J.; Moscadelli, L.; Greiner, J.; Krabbe, A.; Fischer, C.; Klein, R.; Ibañez, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Solar-mass stars form via disk-mediated accretion. Recent findings indicate that this process is probably episodic in the form of accretion bursts, possibly caused by disk fragmentation. Although it cannot be ruled out that high-mass young stellar objects arise from the coalescence of their low-mass brethren, the latest results suggest that they more likely form via disks. It follows that disk-mediated accretion bursts should occur. Here we report on the discovery of the first disk-mediated accretion burst from a roughly twenty-solar-mass high-mass young stellar object. Our near-infrared images show the brightening of the central source and its outflow cavities. Near-infrared spectroscopy reveals emission lines typical for accretion bursts in low-mass protostars, but orders of magnitude more luminous. Moreover, the released energy and the inferred mass-accretion rate are also orders of magnitude larger. Our results identify disk-accretion as the common mechanism of star formation across the entire stellar mass spectrum.

  8. Spitzer Observations of Long-term Infrared Variability among Young Stellar Objects in Chamaeleon I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Kevin M.; DeMarchi, Lindsay; Muzerolle, James; Balog, Zoltan; Herbst, William; Megeath, S. Thomas; Furlan, Elise; Gutermuth, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Infrared variability is common among young stellar objects, with surveys finding daily to weekly fluctuations of a few tenths of a magnitude. Space-based observations can produce highly sampled infrared light curves, but are often limited to total baselines of about 1 month due to the orientation of the spacecraft. Here we present observations of the Chameleon I cluster, whose low declination makes it observable by the Spitzer Space Telescope over a 200-day period. We observe 30 young stellar objects with a daily cadence to better sample variability on timescales of months. We find that such variability is common, occurring in ˜80% of the detected cluster members. The change in [3.6]-[4.5] color over 200 days for many of the sources falls between that expected for extinction and fluctuations in disk emission. With our high cadence and long baseline we can derive power spectral density curves covering two orders of magnitude in frequency and find significant power at low frequencies, up to the boundaries of our 200-day survey. Such long timescales are difficult to explain with variations driven by the interaction between the disk and stellar magnetic field, which has a dynamical timescale of days to weeks. The most likely explanation is either structural or temperature fluctuations spread throughout the inner ˜0.5 au of the disk, suggesting that the intrinsic dust structure is highly dynamic.

  9. Study of young stellar objects around SNR G18.8+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis Peña, M.; Paron, S.

    2016-08-01

    In recent works, through observations of molecular lines, we found that the supernova remnant (SNR) G18.8+0.3 is interacting with a molecular cloud towards its southern edge. Also it has been proven the presence of several neighboring H ii regions very likely located at the same distance as the remnant. The presence of dense molecular gas and the existence of shock fronts generated by the SNR and H ii regions make this region an interesting scenario to study the population of young stellar objects. Thus, using the most modern colour criteria applied to the emission in the mid-infrared bands obtained from IRAC and MIPS on board Spitzer, we characterized all the point sources lying in this region. We analyzed the spectral energy distributions of sources that show signs of being young stellar objects in order to confirm their nature and derive stellar parameters. Additionally, we present a map of the CO J=32 emission obtained with the ASTE telescope towards one of the H ii regions embedded in the molecular cloud. The molecular gas was studied with the aim to analyze whether the cloud is a potential site of star formation.

  10. Size and Albedo of Kuiper Belt Object 55636 from a Stellar Occultation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    LETTERS Size and albedo of Kuiper belt object 55636 from a stellar occultation J. L. Elliot1,2,3, M. J. Person1, C. A. Zuluaga1, A. S. Bosh1, E. R...Ryan23, W. H. Ryan23, K. Morzinski24, B. Grigsby24, J. Brimacombe25, D. Ragozzine26, H. G. Montano27 & A. Gilmore28 The Kuiper belt is a collection of...small bodies ( Kuiper belt objects, KBOs) that lie beyond the orbit of Neptune and which are believed to have formed contemporaneously with the planets

  11. A new young stellar object in the S 187 complex: Photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Caplan, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery in the S 187 complex of a young stellar object with an optical counterpart. High resolution spectroscopy in the red and near infrared indicates that this object is a pre-main-sequence star. In the red, the spectrumis dominated by a very bright H-alpha line with a total width (wing to wing) greater than 1000 km/s. This line exhibits a special type of P Cygni profile (Beal's Type III). The object's near infrared spectrum is dominated by the Ca II triplet emission at 8498 A, 8542 A, and 8662 A; these lines are broad and optically thick. Numerous Fe I and Fe II emission lines are observed also, B, V, R, I, H, K, and L magnitudes of the object, as well as its H-alpha luminosity, indicate that it is probably a Herbig late Be or early Ae star. It presents many characteristics of the 'outflow group' of Herbig stars identified by Hamann & Persson (1992B); it is very similar, both in luminosity and geometry, to the well-known young stellar objects V645 Cyh and R Mon.

  12. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects in Lupus. Accretion properties of class II and transitional objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J. M.; Manara, C. F.; Natta, A.; Frasca, A.; Testi, L.; Nisini, B.; Stelzer, B.; Williams, J. P.; Antoniucci, S.; Biazzo, K.; Covino, E.; Esposito, M.; Getman, F.; Rigliaco, E.

    2017-03-01

    The mass accretion rate, Ṁacc, is a key quantity for the understanding of the physical processes governing the evolution of accretion discs around young low-mass (M⋆ ≲ 2.0 M⊙) stars and substellar objects (YSOs). We present here the results of a study of the stellar and accretion properties of the (almost) complete sample of class II and transitional YSOs in the Lupus I, II, III and IV clouds, based on spectroscopic data acquired with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph. Our study combines the dataset from our previous work with new observations of 55 additional objects. We have investigated 92 YSO candidates in total, 11 of which have been definitely identified with giant stars unrelated to Lupus. The stellar and accretion properties of the 81 bona fide YSOs, which represent more than 90% of the whole class II and transition disc YSO population in the aforementioned Lupus clouds, have been homogeneously and self-consistently derived, allowing for an unbiased study of accretion and its relationship with stellar parameters. The accretion luminosity, Lacc, increases with the stellar luminosity, L⋆, with an overall slope of 1.6, similar but with a smaller scatter than in previous studies. There is a significant lack of strong accretors below L⋆ ≈ 0.1 L⊙, where Lacc is always lower than 0.01 L⋆. We argue that the Lacc - L⋆ slope is not due to observational biases, but is a true property of the Lupus YSOs. The log Ṁacc - log M⋆ correlation shows a statistically significant evidence of a break, with a steeper relation for M⋆ ≲ 0.2 M⊙ and a flatter slope for higher masses. The bimodality of the Ṁacc - M⋆ relation is confirmed with four different evolutionary models used to derive the stellar mass. The bimodal behaviour of the observed relationship supports the importance of modelling self-gravity in the early evolution of the more massive discs, but other processes, such as photo-evaporation and planet formation during the YSO's lifetime, may

  13. QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT SELECTION ALGORITHM USING TIME VARIABILITY AND MACHINE LEARNING: SELECTION OF 1620 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT CANDIDATES FROM MACHO LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae-Won; Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, Charles; Trichas, Markos; Byun, Yong-Ik; Khardon, Roni

    2011-07-10

    We present a new quasi-stellar object (QSO) selection algorithm using a Support Vector Machine, a supervised classification method, on a set of extracted time series features including period, amplitude, color, and autocorrelation value. We train a model that separates QSOs from variable stars, non-variable stars, and microlensing events using 58 known QSOs, 1629 variable stars, and 4288 non-variables in the MAssive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) database as a training set. To estimate the efficiency and the accuracy of the model, we perform a cross-validation test using the training set. The test shows that the model correctly identifies {approx}80% of known QSOs with a 25% false-positive rate. The majority of the false positives are Be stars. We applied the trained model to the MACHO Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) data set, which consists of 40 million light curves, and found 1620 QSO candidates. During the selection none of the 33,242 known MACHO variables were misclassified as QSO candidates. In order to estimate the true false-positive rate, we crossmatched the candidates with astronomical catalogs including the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution LMC catalog and a few X-ray catalogs. The results further suggest that the majority of the candidates, more than 70%, are QSOs.

  14. LBT/LUCIFER near-infrared spectroscopy of PV Cephei. An outbursting young stellar object with an asymmetric jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia Lopez, R.; Weigelt, G.; Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Wheelwright, H.; Ilee, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Young stellar objects (YSOs) occasionally experience enhanced accretion events, the nature of which is still poorly understood. The discovery of various embedded outbursting YSOs has recently questioned the classical definition of EXors and FUors. Aims: We present a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the young eruptive star PV Cep, to improve our understanding of its nature and characterise its circumstellar environment after its last outburst in 2004. Methods: The analysis of our medium-resolution spectroscopy in the near-infrared (NIR, 0.9-2.35 μm), collected in 2012 at the Large Binocular Telescope with the IR spectrograph LUCIFER, allows us to infer the main stellar parameters (visual extinction, accretion luminosity, mass accretion and ejection rates), and model the inner disc, jet, and wind. Results: The NIR spectrum displays several strong emission lines associated with accretion/ejection activity and circumstellar environment. Our analysis shows that the brightness of PV Cep is fading, as well as the mass accretion rate (2 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1 in 2012 vs. ~5 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 in 2004), which is more than one order of magnitude lower than in the outburst phase. Among the several emission lines, only the [Fe ii] intensity increased after the outburst. The observed [Fe ii] emission delineates blue- and red-shifted lobes, both with high- and low-velocity components, which trace an asymmetric jet and wind, respectively. The observed emission in the jet has a dynamical age of 7-8 years, indicating that it was produced during the last outburst. The visual extinction decreases moving from the red-shifted (AV(red) = 10.1 ± 0.7 mag) to the blue-shifted lobe (AV(blue) = 6.5 ± 0.4 mag). We measure an average electron temperature of 17 500 K and electron densities of 30 000 cm-3 and 15 000 cm-3 for the blue and the red lobe, respectively. The mass ejection rate in both lobes is ~1.5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, approximately matching the high accretion rate observed

  15. NuSTAR Observations of Bright X-ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2016-05-01

    Bright x-ray flares are observed to occur on young stellar objects (YSOs) and are presumed to be driven by similar processes as those seen on our sun. Observations of the flaring activity of YSOs can add to our understanding of the early lives of stars and the development of planetary systems. In particular, x-ray observations of these stellar flares are essential for probing the youngest stars, as these stars are most obscured by dense molecular clouds. One such cloud complex of YSOs, rho Ophiuchi, has been a past target for soft x-ray (SXR) missions, including Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, the energy ranges covered by these missions drop off prior to the hard x-ray (HXR) regime, where the crossover to a dominant nonthermal component could be observed. Whether or not this nonthermal emission is strong enough to be observed could then be an indicator of how large an influence these flares have on the surrounding protoplanetary disk. To begin investigating this HXR emission, two 50ks observations of rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the preliminary analysis, including light curves and spectra, of the brightest of these flaring events. We explore the implications of the data for flaring activity of YSOs and compare the results to typical flaring activity of the sun.

  16. Identification of new young stellar objects associated with IRAS point sources. III. The northern Galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.; Persson, S.E.; Matthews, K.; New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque; Palomar Observatory, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-08-01

    A third list of new candidate young stellar objects found by searching the vicinities of IRAS positions along the galactic plane is presented. The list comprises 40 new objects in 39 fields with 2.2-micron magnitudes brighter than 10.5, and with near-infrared colors similar to those of fiducial objects such as GL 490. An additional 12 objects are identified as probable YSOs on the basis of incomplete data. Positions accurate to + or - 2 arcsec and deep red CCD pictures of 31 of the fields are given. Contemporaneous 10-micron observations allow an assessment of the reliability of the identifications; at least 80 percent of the near-infrared sources are directly related to the IRAS source, and the remainder are probably associated, but may not be the exciting sources of the regions. 11 refs.

  17. IRAS 19520+2759: a 105 L⊙ massive young stellar object driving a collimated outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, Aina; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Sahai, R.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Rizzo, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of massive star formation currently suffers from a scarce observational base of massive young stellar objects to compare with. In this paper, we present interferometric 12CO (1-0), 13CO (1-0), C18O (1-0) and 2.6 mm continuum images of the infrared source IRAS 19520+2759 together with complementary single-dish observations of CS (1-0), obtained with the 34 m antenna DSS-54 at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex, as well as archive images at different wavelengths. As a result from our work, IRAS 19520+2759, with a controversial nature in the past, is firmly established as a massive young stellar object associated with a strong and compact millimetre source and driving a collimated outflow. In addition, a second fainter millimetre source is discovered about 4 arcsec to the south, which is also driving an outflow. Furthermore, the two millimetre sources are associated with C18O clumps elongated perpendicularly to the outflows, which may be related to rotating toroids. The masses of gas and dust of the millimetre sources are estimated to be around 100 and 50 M⊙. MM1, the dominant source at all wavelengths, with a total luminosity of (1-2) × 105 L⊙ at 9 kpc, is however not associated with 6 cm emission down to an rms noise level of 0.1 mJy. We propose that IRAS 19520+2759 could be an example of the recent theoretical prediction of `bloated' or `swollen' star, i.e. a massive young stellar object whose radius has increased due to effects of accretion at a high-mass accretion rate.

  18. Stellar, Remnant, Planetary, and Dark-Object Masses from Astrometric Microlensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew P.; Bennett, David P.; Boden, Andrew; Depoy, Darren L.; Gaudi, Scott B.; Griest, Kim; Han, Cheongho; Paczynski, Bohdan; Reid, I. Neill

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of our project is to make a complete census of the stellar population of the Galaxy. We are broadening the term stellar here to include both ordinary stars and dark stars. Ordinary stars, burning their nuclear fuel and shining, can perhaps best be studied with traditional astronomical techniques, but dark stars, by which we include old brown dwarfs, black holes, old white dwarfs, neutron stars, and perhaps exotic objects such as mirror matter stars or primordial black holes, can only be studied by their gravitational effects. Traditionally, these objects have been probed in binaries, and thus selected in a way that may or may not be representative of their respective field populations. The only way to examine the field population of these stars is through microlensing, the deflection of light from a visible star in the background by an object (dark or not) in the foreground. When lensed, there are two images of the background star. Although these images cannot be resolved when the lens has a stellar mass, the lensing effect can be detected in two ways: photometrically, i.e. by measuring the magnification of the source by the lens, and astrometrically, i.e. by measuring the shift in the centroid of the two images. Photometric microlensing experiments have detected hundreds of microlensing events over the past decade. Despite its successes, photometric microlensing has so far been somewhat frustrating because these events are difficult to interpret. Almost nothing is known about the masses of individual lenses and very little is known about the statistical properties of the lenses treated as a whole, such as their average mass. Although probably over 100 of the lenses are in fact dark objects, we can't determine which they are, let alone investigate finer details such as what their masses are, and where they are in the Galaxy. With SIM, we will break the microlensing degeneracy, and allow detailed interpretation of individual microlensing events. We

  19. Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 Imaging of M16: Photoevaporation and Emerging Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, J. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Sankrit, R.; Lauer, T. R.; Ajhar, E. A.; Baum, W. A.; Code, A.; Currie, D. G.; Danielson, G. E.; Ewald, S. P.; Faber, S. M.; Grillmair, C. J.; Groth, E. J.; Holtzman, J. A.; Hunter, D. A.; Kristian, J.; Light, R. M.; Lynds, C. R.; Monet, D. G.; O'Neil, E. J., Jr.; Shaya, E. J.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Westphal, J. A.

    1996-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images of elephant trunks in the H II region M16. There are three principle results of this study. First, the morphology and stratified ionization structure of the interface between the dense molecular material and the interior of the H II region is well understood in terms of photoionization of a photoevaporative flow. Photoionization models of an empirical density profile capture the essential features of the observations, including the extremely localized region of [S II] emission at the interface and the observed offset between emission peaks in lower and higher ionization lines. The details of this structure are found to be a sensitive function both of the density profile of the interface and of the shape of the ionizing continuum. Interpretation of the interaction of the photoevaporative flow with gas in the interior of the nebula supports the view that much of the emission from H II regions may arise in such flows. Photoionization of photoevaporative flows may provide a useful paradigm for interpreting a wide range of observations of H II regions. Second, we report the discovery of a population of small cometary globules that are being uncovered as the main bodies of the elephant trunks are dispersed. Several lines of evidence connect these globules to ongoing star formation, including the association of a number of globules with stellar objects seen in IR images of M16 or in the continuum HST images themselves. We refer to these structures as evaporating gaseous globules, or "EGGs." These appear to be the same type of object as the nebular condensations seen previously in M42. The primary difference between the two cases is that in M16 we are seeing the objects from the side, while in M42 the objects are seen more nearly face-on against the backdrop of the ionized face of the molecular cloud. We find that the "evaporating globule" interpretation naturally accounts for the properties of objects in both nebulae, while

  20. Intense accretion and mass loss of a very low mass young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M.; Comerón, F.

    2001-12-01

    We present visible and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of LS-RCrA 1, a faint, very late-type object (M 6.5-M 7) seen in the direction of the R Coronae Australis star forming complex. While its emission spectrum shows prominent features of accretion and mass loss typical of young stellar objects, its underlying continuum and photometric properties are puzzling when trying to derive a mass and age based on pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks: the object appears to be far too faint for a young member of the R Coronae Australis complex of its spectral type. We speculate that this may be due to either its evolution along pre-main sequence tracks being substantially altered by the intense accretion, or to a combination of partial blocking and scattering of the light of the object by a nearly edge-on circumstellar disk. The rich emission line spectrum superimposed on the stellar continuum is well explained by an intense accretion process: the Halpha , CaII infrared triplet, and HeI 6678 lines show equivalent widths typical of very active classical T Tauri stars. The near-infrared observations show anomalously weak spectral features and no significant excess emission in the K band, which we tentatively interpret as indicating line filling due to emission in a magnetic accretion funnel flow. At the same time, numerous, strong forbidden optical lines ([OI], [NII] and [SII]) and H2 emission at 2.12 mu m suggest that the object is simultaneously undergoing mass loss, providing another example that shows that mass loss and accretion are closely related processes. Such an intense accretion and mass loss activity is observed for the first time in a young stellar object in the transition region between low mass stars and brown dwarfs, and provides a valuable observational test on the effects of accretion on the evolution of objects with such low masses. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory in La Silla and Cerro Paranal (Chile), in

  1. The Use of Stellar Occultations to Study Trans-Neptunian Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSSI, GUSTAVO B.; Sicardy, Bruno; Braga-Ribas, Felipe; Vieira Martins, Roberto; Camargo, Julio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-11-01

    The physical parameters of the Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNO's) such as size, shape, density, presence of atmosphere, and rings, provide important information on their formation and evolution. At more than 30 Astronomical Units (AU) from the Sun, those objects receive low solar radiation and have low mutual collisions velocities so they can be considered as remnants of the primordial outer Solar System. Besides that, information on TNO's is of great relevance when trying to establish a general formation scenario for the recently discovered planetary systems.The problem is that such bodies have a diameter smaller than 2300 km (Eris, one of the largest TNO, has 2326 km) and, when viewed from Earth, they usually subtend angles smaller than 50 milli-arcseconds, preventing direct imaging. One method to obtain very accurate information on the TNO's is the stellar occultation technique. Sizes at kilometer accuracies and pressure at nanobar levels can be achieved with this method, as well as detection of ring systems. Shape, density, albedo and other physical parameters can also be derived from this technique.Since 2010, we observed stellar occultations of several TNO's (Eris, Makemake, 2003VS2, Quaoar, Ixion, Varuna, 2002KX14, and 2003AZ84) besides some other occultations by Pluto and Charon, and by the largest Centaur known to date, Chariklo. We also predicted future events in 2014 and 2015 for 40 TNO's and Centaurs. On this work, we present the process of our campains - predictions, follow ups, world wide cooperation, post-occutation data analysis -, the new results obtained from recent stellar occultations of TNO's, and the expectations of improvements after GAIA.

  2. THE EXTENDED NARROW-LINE REGION OF TWO TYPE-I QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Semyeong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bennert, Vardha N.; Jungwiert, Bruno; Leipski, Christian; Albrecht, Marcus E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: bruno@ig.cas.cz E-mail: leipski@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    2013-04-20

    We investigate the narrow-line region (NLR) of two radio-quiet QSOs, PG1012+008 and PG1307+085, using high signal-to-noise spatially resolved long-slit spectra obtained with FORS1 at the Very Large Telescope. Although the emission is dominated by the point-spread function of the nuclear source, we are able to detect extended NLR emission out to several kiloparsec scales in both QSOs by subtracting the scaled central spectrum from outer spectra. In contrast to the nuclear spectrum, which shows a prominent blue wing and a broad line profile of the [O III] line, the extended emission reveals no clear signs of large-scale outflows. Exploiting the wide wavelength range, we determine the radial change of the gas properties in the NLR, i.e., gas temperature, density, and ionization parameter, and compare them with those of Seyfert galaxies and type-II QSOs. The QSOs have higher nuclear temperature and lower electron density than Seyferts, but show no significant difference compared to type-II QSOs, while the ionization parameter decreases with radial distance, similar to the case of Seyfert galaxies, For PG1012+008, we determine the stellar-velocity dispersion of the host galaxy. Combined with the black hole mass, we find that the luminous radio-quiet QSO follows the local M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of active galactic nuclei.

  3. The SEEDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey of Exoplanets Around Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyama, Taichi; Hashimoto, Jun; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Mayama, Satoshi; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Livingston, John; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mcelwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2017-03-01

    We present high-contrast observations of 68 young stellar objects (YSOs) that have been explored as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) survey on the Subaru telescope. Our targets are very young (<10 Myr) stars, which often harbor protoplanetary disks where planets may be forming. We achieve a typical contrast of ∼10‑4–10‑5.5 at an angular distance of 1″ from the central star, corresponding to typical mass sensitivities (assuming hot-start evolutionary models) of ∼10 M J at 70 au and ∼6 M J at 140 au. We detected a new stellar companion to HIP 79462 and confirmed the substellar objects GQ Lup b and ROXs 42B b. An additional six companion candidates await follow-up observations to check for common proper motion. Our SEEDS YSO observations probe the population of planets and brown dwarfs at the very youngest ages; these may be compared to the results of surveys targeting somewhat older stars. Our sample and the associated observational results will help enable detailed statistical analyses of giant planet formation.

  4. Studying the molecular ambient towards the young stellar object EGO G35.04-0.47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, Sergio; Ortega, Martín; Astort, Ana; Rubio, Mónica; Fariña, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    We are performing a systematic study of the interstellar medium around extended green objects (EGOs), likely massive young stellar objects driving outflows. EGO G35.04-0.47 is located towards a dark cloud at the north-western edge of an H II region. Recently, H2 jets were discovered towards this source, mainly towards its south-west, where the H2 1-0 S(1) emission peaks. Therefore, the source was catalogued as the molecular hydrogen emission-line object MHO 2429. In order to study the molecular ambient towards this star-forming site, we observed a region around the aforementioned EGO using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment in the 12CO J = 3-2, 13CO J = 3-2, HCO+ J = 4-3, and CS J = 7-6 lines with an angular and spectral resolution of 22'' and 0.11 km s-1, respectively. The observations revealed a molecular clump where the EGO is embedded at vLSR ˜ 51 km s-1, in coincidence with the velocity of a Class I 95 GHz methanol maser previously detected. Analyzing the 12CO line we discovered high velocity molecular gas in the range from 34 to 47 km s-1, most likely a blueshifted outflow driven by the EGO. The alignment and shape of this molecular structure coincide with those of the south-west lobe of MHO 2429, mainly between 46 and 47 km s-1, confirming that we are mapping its CO counterpart. Performing a spectral energy distribution analysis of EGO G35.04-0.47, we found that its central object should be an intermediate-mass young stellar object accreting mass at a rate similar to those found in some massive YSOs. We suggest that this source can become a massive YSO.

  5. Near-infrared observations of young stellar objects in the Rho Ophiuchi dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas P.; Young, Erick T.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted an imaging survey of 1.4 sq pc of the Rho Ophiuchi dark cloud in the J, H, and K near-infrared photometric bands. Approximately 337 of our 481 detected sources are associated with the cloud, and we estimate that 48 percent of these have near-infrared excesses, indicative of disks or circumstellar material surrounding these young stellar objects (YSOs). The K-band luminosity function is significantly different in different regions of our survey area, suggesting that YSOs in these regions have different ages or mass functions. We estimate that the entire survey area has a high star-formation efficiency, at roughly 23 percent. Finally, our many newly detected sources provide a relatively large, uniformly sensitive sample of objects for study at longer wavelengths to better determine true source luminosities and evolutionary lifetimes.

  6. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  7. Faint quasi-stellar-object candidates in selected areas 28 and 68 identified from multicolor photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.C.; Koo, D.C.; Kron, R.C.; California Univ., Berkeley; Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA; Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI )

    1989-04-01

    Forty-five QSO candidates over a total area of 0.53 square degree in two fields at high Galactic latitudes have been identified. These candidates reached B of about 21.5 for field Lynx.3 in SA 28 and B of about 22 for field SA68.2, and were selected from a subset of objects in catalogs generated from multicolor photometry (UBV) of deep Kitt Peak 4-m plates with limits of B of about 24. This subset consists of all objects which appeared stellar-like in size but which did not have the UBV colors of common Galactic stars. Besides several probable high-redshift QSOs, this study yields faint QSO counts consistent with those from other surveys, and thus provides further support to models that include mainly the luminosity evolution of QSOs. 29 refs.

  8. The peculiar dipping events in the disc-bearing young-stellar object EPIC 204278916

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, S.; Manara, C. F.; Barenfeld, S. A.; Groot, P. J.; Isella, A.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Knigge, C.; Maccarone, T. J.; Ricci, L.; Ansdell, M.

    2016-12-01

    EPIC 204278916 has been serendipitously discovered from its K2 light curve that displays irregular dimmings of up to 65 per cent for ≈25 consecutive days out of 78.8 d of observations. For the remaining duration of the observations, the variability is highly periodic and attributed to stellar rotation. The star is a young, low-mass (M-type) pre-main-sequence star with clear evidence of a resolved tilted disc from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We examine the K2 light curve in detail and hypothesize that the irregular dimmings are caused by either a warped inner disc edge or transiting cometary-like objects in either circular or eccentric orbits. The explanations discussed here are particularly relevant for other recently discovered young objects with similar absorption dips.

  9. Spectroscopic Assessment of WISE-based Young Stellar Object Selection Near λ and σ Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Xavier; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Padgett, Deborah L.; DeFelippis, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    We have conducted a sensitive search down to the hydrogen burning limit for unextincted stars over ∼200 square degrees around Lambda Orionis and 20 square degrees around Sigma Orionis using the methodology of Koenig & Leisawitz. From WISE and 2MASS data we identify 544 and 418 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the vicinity of λ and σ respectively. Based on our followup spectroscopy for some candidates and the existing literature for others, we found that ∼80% of the K14-selected candidates are probable or likely members of the Orion star-forming region. The yield from the photometric selection criteria shows that WISE sources with {K}S-w3\\gt 1.5 mag and KS between 10 and 12 mag are most likely to show spectroscopic signs of youth, while WISE sources with {K}S-w3 > 4 mag and {K}S\\gt 12 were often active galactic nuclei when followed up spectroscopically. The population of candidate YSOs traces known areas of active star formation, with a few new “hot spots” of activity near Lynds 1588 and 1589 and a more dispersed population of YSOs in the northern half of the H ii region bubble around σ and ɛ Ori. A minimal spanning tree analysis of the two regions to identify stellar groupings finds that roughly two-thirds of the YSO candidates in each region belong to groups of 5 or more members. The population of stars selected by WISE outside the MST groupings also contains spectroscopically verified YSOs, with a local stellar density as low as 0.5 stars per square degree.

  10. Near-infrared (JHK) spectroscopy of young stellar and substellar objects in orion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, P.; Albert, L.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.

    2014-02-10

    We performed low-resolution (R ∼ 40) near-infrared (0.9-2.4 μm) multi-object spectroscopy of 240 isolated point sources having apparent H-band magnitudes between 9 and 18 in the central 5' × 6' of the Orion Trapezium cluster. The observations were performed over four nights at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope using the visiting instrument SIMON, an infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph. We present the spectra of 104 objects with accurately derived spectral types including 7 new objects having masses below the hydrogen-burning limit, and 6 objects with masses below the deuterium-burning limit. The spectral classification is performed by fitting previously classified spectral templates of dwarf stars (K4-M3) and optically classified young stellar and substellar objects (M4-L0), to the entire 0.9-2.4 μm spectral energy distribution in order to assign a spectral type and visual extinction for each object. Of the 104 objects studied, 44 have been previously classified spectroscopically using various techniques. We perform a rigorous comparison between the previous classifications and our own and find them to be in good agreement. Using the dereddened H-band magnitudes, the classified objects are used to create an Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the cluster. We find that the previous age estimates of ∼1 Myr to be consistent with our results. Consistent with previous studies, numerous objects are observed to have luminosities several magnitudes above the 1 Myr isochrone. Numerous objects exhibiting emission features in the J band are also reported.

  11. Kinematics of the Stellar Halo and the Mass Distribution of the Milky Way Using Blue Horizontal Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Prajwal R.; Sharma, Sanjib; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-12-01

    Here, we present a kinematic study of the Galactic halo out to a radius of ~60 kpc, using 4664 blue horizontal branch stars selected from the SDSS/SEGUE survey to determine key dynamical properties. Using a maximum likelihood analysis, we determine the velocity dispersion profiles in spherical coordinates (σ r , σθ, σphi) and the anisotropy profile (β). The radial velocity dispersion profile (σ r ) is measured out to a galactocentric radius of r ~ 60 kpc, but due to the lack of proper-motion information, σθ, σphi, and β could only be derived directly out to r ~ 25 kpc. From a starting value of β ≈ 0.5 in the inner parts (9 < r/kpc < 12), the profile falls sharply in the range r ≈ 13-18 kpc, with a minimum value of β = -1.2 at r = 17 kpc, rising sharply at larger radius. In the outer parts, in the range 25 < r/kpc < 56, we predict the profile to be roughly constant with a value of β ≈ 0.5. The newly discovered kinematic anomalies are shown not to arise from halo substructures. We also studied the anisotropy profile of simulated stellar halos formed purely by accretion and found that they cannot reproduce the sharp dip seen in the data. From the Jeans equation, we compute the stellar rotation curve (v circ) of the Galaxy out to r ~ 25 kpc. The mass of the Galaxy within r <~ 25 kpc is determined to be 2.1 × 1011 M ⊙, and with a three-component fit to v circ(r), we determine the virial mass of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be M vir = 0.9+0.4 -0.3 × 1012 M ⊙ (R vir = 249+34 -31 kpc).

  12. Radio Properties of Young Stellar Objects in the Core of the Serpens South Infrared Dark Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Nicholas S.; Keown, Jared A.; Tobin, John J.; Mead, Adrian; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep radio continuum observations of the star-forming core of the Serpens South Infrared Dark Cloud with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Observations were conducted in two bands centered at 7.25 GHz (4.14 cm) and 4.75 GHz (6.31 cm) with a {σ }{rms} of 8.5 and 11.1 μJy/beam, respectively. We also use 2MASS, Spitzer and Herschel data to put our radio observations in the context of young stellar populations characterized by near and far-infrared observations. Within a 5‧ × 5‧ region of interest around the central cluster, we detect roughly eighteen radio sources, seven of which we determine are protostellar in nature due to their radio spectral indices and their association with infrared sources. We find evidence for a previously undetected embedded Class 0 protostar and reaffirm Class 0 protostellar classifications determined by previous millimeter wavelength continuum studies. We use our infrared data to derive mid-infrared luminosities for three of our protostellar sources and find relative agreement between the known young stellar object (YSO) radio luminosity versus bolometric luminosity correlation. Lastly, we marginally detect an additional six radio sources at the 2-3σ level that lie within two arcseconds of infrared YSO candidates, providing motivation for higher sensitivity studies to clarify the nature of these sources and further probe embedded and/or low luminosity YSOs in Serpens South.

  13. Migratory and resident blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus differ in their reaction to a novel object.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna L K; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Alerstam, Thomas; Bäckman, Johan

    2010-11-01

    Individuals differ consistently in their behavioural reactions towards novel objects and new situations. Reaction to novelty is one part of a suit of individually consistent behaviours called coping strategies or personalities and is often summarised as bold or shy behaviour. Coping strategies could be particularly important for migrating birds exposed to novel environments on their journeys. We compared the average approach latencies to a novel object among migrants and residents in partially migratory blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus. In this test, we found migrating blue tits to have shorter approach latencies than had resident ones. Behavioural reactions to novelty can affect the readiness to migrate and short approach latency may have an adaptive value during migration. Individual behaviour towards novelty might be incorporated among the factors associated with migratory or resident behaviour in a partially migratory population.

  14. Migratory and resident blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus differ in their reaction to a novel object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Anna L. K.; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Alerstam, Thomas; Bäckman, Johan

    2010-11-01

    Individuals differ consistently in their behavioural reactions towards novel objects and new situations. Reaction to novelty is one part of a suit of individually consistent behaviours called coping strategies or personalities and is often summarised as bold or shy behaviour. Coping strategies could be particularly important for migrating birds exposed to novel environments on their journeys. We compared the average approach latencies to a novel object among migrants and residents in partially migratory blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus. In this test, we found migrating blue tits to have shorter approach latencies than had resident ones. Behavioural reactions to novelty can affect the readiness to migrate and short approach latency may have an adaptive value during migration. Individual behaviour towards novelty might be incorporated among the factors associated with migratory or resident behaviour in a partially migratory population.

  15. Young Stellar Objects in Lynds 1641: Disks, Accretion, and Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; van Boekel, Roy; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Flaherty, Kevin

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Lynds 1641 (L1641) cloud using multi-wavelength data including Spitzer, WISE, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and XMM covering ~1390 YSOs across a range of evolutionary stages. In addition, we targeted a sub-sample of YSOs for optical spectroscopy with the MMT/Hectospec and the MMT/Hectochelle. We use these data, along with archival photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, masses, ages, and accretion rates. We obtain a disk fraction of ~50% in L1641. The disk frequency is almost constant as a function of stellar mass with a slight peak at log (M */M ⊙) ≈ -0.25. The analysis of multi-epoch spectroscopic data indicates that the accretion variability of YSOs cannot explain the two orders of magnitude of scatter for YSOs with similar masses. Forty-six new transition disk (TD) objects are confirmed in this work, and we find that the fraction of accreting TDs is lower than for optically thick disks (40%-45% versus 77%-79%, respectively). We confirm our previous result that the accreting TDs have a median accretion rate similar to normal optically thick disks. We confirm that two star formation modes (isolated versus clustered) exist in L1641. We find that the diskless YSOs are statistically older than the YSOs with optically thick disks and the TD objects have a median age that is intermediate between those of the other two populations. We tentatively study the star formation history in L1641 based on the age distribution and find that star formation started to be active 2-3 Myr ago.

  16. On the accretion properties of young stellar objects in the L1615/L1616 cometary cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Alcalá, J. M.; Frasca, A.; Zusi, M.; Getman, F.; Covino, E.; Gandolfi, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of FLAMES/UVES and FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations of 23 low-mass stars in the L1615/L1616 cometary cloud, complemented with FORS2 and VIMOS spectroscopy of 31 additional stars in the same cloud. L1615/L1616 is a cometary cloud in which the star formation was triggered by the impact of massive stars in the Orion OB association. From the measurements of the lithium abundance and radial velocity, we confirm the membership of our sample to the cloud. We use the equivalent widths of the Hα, Hβ, and the He i λ5876, λ6678, λ7065 Å emission lines to calculate the accretion luminosities, Lacc, and the mass accretion rates, Ṁacc. We find in L1615/L1616 a fraction of accreting objects (~30%), which is consistent with the typical fraction of accretors in T associations of similar age (~3 Myr). The mass accretion rate for these stars shows a trend with the mass of the central object similar to that found for other star-forming regions, with a spread at a given mass that depends on the evolutionary model used to derive the stellar mass. Moreover, the behavior of the 2MASS/WISE colors with Ṁacc indicates that strong accretors with log Ṁacc ≳ -8.5 dex show large excesses in the JHKs bands, as in previous studies. We also conclude that the accretion properties of the L1615/L1616 members are similar to those of young stellar objects in T associations, like Lupus. Based on FLAMES (UVES+GIRAFFE) observations collected at the Very Large Telescope (VLT; Paranal, Chile). Program 076.C-0385(A).Tables 3-6 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Near-IR imaging toward a puzzling young stellar object precessing jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Fariña, C.; Ortega, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The study of jets that are related to stellar objects in formation is important because it enables us to understand the history of how the stars have built up their mass. Many studies currently examine jets towards low-mass young stellar objects, while equivalent studies toward massive or intermediate-mass young stellar objects are rare. In a previous study, based on 12CO J = 3-2 and public near-IR data, we found highly misaligned molecular outflows toward the infrared point source UGPS J185808.46+010041.8 (IRS) and some infrared features suggesting the existence of a precessing jet. Methods: Using near-IR data acquired with Gemini-NIRI at the JHKs broad- and narrowbands centered on the emission lines of [FeII], H2 1-0 S(1), H2 2-1 S(1), Brγ, and CO 2-0 (bh), we studied the circumstellar environment of IRS with an angular resolution between 0.̋35 and 0.̋45. Results: The emission in the JHKs broadbands shows in great detail a cone-shaped nebula extending to the north-northeast of the point source, which appears to be attached to it by a jet-like structure. In the three bands the nebula is resolved in a twisted-shaped feature composed of two arc-like features and a bow-shock-like structure seen mainly in the Ks band, which strongly suggests the presence of a precessing jet. An analysis of proper motions based on our Gemini observations and UKIDSS data additionally supports the precession scenario. We present one of the best-resolved cone-like nebula that is most likely related to a precessing jet up to date. The analysis of the observed near-IR lines shows that the H2 is collisionally excited, and the spatially coincidence of the [FeII] and H2 emissions in the closer arc-like feature suggests that this region is affected by a J shock. The second arc-like feature presents H2 emission without [FeII], which suggests a nondissociated C shock or a less energetic J shock. The H2 1-0 S(1) continuum-subtracted image reveals several knots and filaments at a larger

  18. Blue compact dwarf galaxies. II - Near-infrared studies and stellar populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, T. X.

    1983-01-01

    An IR photometric survey was performed of 36 blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDG) where intense bursts of star formation have been observed. The survey covered the J, H, and K lines, with all readings taken at the level of a few mJy. Although the near-IR fluxes observed in the galaxies are due to K and M giants, the bursts have calculated ages of less than 50 million yr. However, the BCDG galaxies surveyed are not young, with the least chemically evolved galaxy observed, I Zw 18, featuring 50 pct of its stars formed prior to its last burst, but with a missing mass that is not accounted for by H I interferometric observations. It is concluded that the old stars must be more spatially extended than the young stars, and a mixture of OB stars with the K and M giants is projected as capable of displaying the colors observed. The star formation processes in the BCDG galaxies is defined as dependent on the total mass of the galaxies, with low mass galaxies having a high ratio of star formation, compared to their previous rates.

  19. Candidate stellar occultations by large trans-Neptunian objects up to 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assafin, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira Martins, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Sicardy, B.; Andrei, A. H.; da Silva Neto, D. N.

    2012-05-01

    Context. We study large trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) using stellar occultations. Aims: We derive precise astrometric predictions for stellar occultations by Eris, Haumea, Ixion, Makemake, Orcus, Quaoar, Sedna, Varuna, 2002 TX300, and 2003 AZ84 for 2011-2015. We construct local astrometric catalogs of stars complete to magnitudes as faint as R = 18 - 19 in the UCAC2 (Second US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog) frame covering the sky path of these objects. Methods: During 2007-2009, we carried out an observational program at the ESO2p2/WFI (2.2 m Max-Planck ESO telescope with the Wide Field Imager) instrument. The observations covered the sky path of the selected targets from 2008 to 2015. We performed the astrometry of 316 GB images using the Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically (PRAIA). With the help of field distortion patterns derived for the WFI mosaic of CCDs, we reduced the overlapping mosaics of CCDs. Results: We derive positions in the UCAC2 frame with 40 mas precision for stars up to the catalog magnitude completeness limit (about R = 19). New stellar proper motions are also determined with 2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey) and the USNO B1.0 (United States Naval Observatory B 1.0) catalog positions as a first epoch. Astrometric catalogs with proper motions were produced for each TNO, containing more than 5.35 million stars covering the sky paths with 30' width in declination. The magnitude completeness is about R = 19 with a limit of about R = 21. We predicted 2717 stellar occultation candidates for all targets. Ephemeris offsets with about from 50 mas to 100 mas precision were applied to each TNO orbit to improve the predictions. They were obtained during 2007-2010 from a parallel observational campaign carried out with telescopes from 0.6 m to 2.2 m in size. Conclusions: This extends our previous work for the Pluto system to large TNOs, using the same observational and astrometric procedures. The obtained astrometric

  20. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. III - Line ratios and physical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Costa, Jose L.; Kwan, John

    1990-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dependence of Br-gamma/Br-alpha and other hydrogen line ratios on nucleon density (over the range 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th/cu cm), column density (about 10 to the 18th - 10 to the 24th/sq cm), young stellar object (YSO) luminosity (about 10-10,000 solar luminosities), and distance of the gas cloud from the YSO, r (about 10 to the 12th - 10 to the 14th cm). For a given continuum model, the value of Br-gamma/Br-alpha can provide a constraint on r. The ionization and thermal structures of the emission region are described. The electron fraction is fairly constant and is small (less than 10 percent) in the region where most of the hydrogen line fluxes are produced. The temperature in this region is also quite constant, with a value of 5000-7000 K.

  1. High spatial resolution IR observations of young stellar objects - A possible disk surrounding HL Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, G. L.; Strom, S. E.; Strom, K. M.; Capps, R. W.; Thompson, D.; Castelaz, M.

    1984-01-01

    High spatial resolution images of the T Tauri star HL Tau were obtained at 1.6 microns and 2.2 microns. The original images as well as maximum entropy image reconstructions reveal a circumstellar envelope structure, similar at both wavelenghts, and extended along P.A. = 112 deg; the 10 percent width of the structure is 1.9 sec (300 AU at 160 pc). The extended structure is interpreted as light scattered toward earth by dust in a disk surrounding this young stellar object. Polarization measurements made at 2.2 microns support this hypothesis. The total solid particle mass is, at minimum, 5 x 10 to the -7th solar mass.

  2. IRAS observations of young stellar objects in the Corona Australis dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilking, Bruce A.; Greene, Thomas P.; Lada, Charles J.; Meyer, Michael R.; Young, Erick T.

    1992-01-01

    The young stellar object (YSO) population associated with the dark cloud complex in Corona Australis is studied by synthesizing IRAS data with newly obtained near-IR and mid-IR photometry and previously published optical/IR data. Twenty-four YSOs in the Cr A complex are identified. The observed range of spectral energy distribution shapes and bolometric luminosities are consistent with those observed in other dark clouds. The duration and efficiency of star formation are found to be similar to the Rho Ophiuchi IR cluster. The low number of YSOs compared to other dark clouds is understood by a reevaluation of the molecular mass of the R Cr A cloud which shows it to be much less massive than previously assumed.

  3. Accretion discs around young stellar objects and the proto-sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-01-01

    Observed IR and UV excesses have widely been interpreted as signatures for accretion disks around young stellar objects. Analyses of the observed properties of these disks are important for the investigation of star formation as well as the dynamics of the protoplanetary disk out of which the solar system was formed. Accretion-disk theories suggest that evolution of protoplanetary disks is determined by the efficiency of angular momentum transport. During the formation stages, the disk dynamics are regulated by mixing of infalling material and disk gas. In the outermost regions of the disk, self-gravity may promote the growth of nonaxisymmetric perturbations which can transfer angular momentum outwards. After infall has ceased, convectively driven turbulence can redistribute angular momentum with an evolutionary timescale of 0.1 - 1 Myr. Convection in protoplanetary disks may eventually be stabilized by surface heating as the disk material is depleted.

  4. Optical evidence for the unification of active galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S

    1995-12-05

    There is a variety of optical evidence for some unification of different types of active galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). The case is very strong for the unification of at least some Seyfert galaxies, where polarization data show that the type assigned to the Seyfert galaxy must depend on viewing direction. It has been proposed that Fanaroff-Riley type 2 (FR2) radio galaxies are quasars seen in a direction from which the quasar is obscured, and there is some limited direct evidence for this picture. The broad absorption line QSOs may be normal QSOs seen from a special direction. Some of the sources observed to have high luminosities in the far infrared could be obscured QSOs and active nuclei. Mergers and interactions are likely to play an important role in nuclear activity, and active galaxies and QSOs could change their apparent types through these encounters followed by subsequent evolution.

  5. Detection of water masers toward young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, A. K.; Migenes, V.; Breen, S. L.

    2014-02-01

    We present results from a search for water maser emission toward N4A, N190, and N206, three regions of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Four water masers were detected; two toward N4A, and two toward N190. In the latter region, no previously known maser emission has been reported. Future studies of maser proper motion to determine the galactic dynamics of the LMC will benefit from the independent data points the new masers in N190 provide. Two of these masers are associated with previously identified massive young stellar objects (YSOs), which strongly supports the authenticity of the classification. We argue that the other two masers identify previously unknown YSOs. No masers were detected toward N206, but it does host a newly discovered 22 GHz continuum source, also associated with a massive YSO. We suggest that future surveys for water maser emission in the LMC be targeted toward the more luminous, massive YSOs.

  6. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION W49

    SciTech Connect

    Saral, G.; Hora, J. L.; Willis, S. E.; Koenig, X. P.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Saygac, A. T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective of locating a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the young stellar objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color–color and color–magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49, we analyzed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with ≥7 members is found to be 52% for a cutoff distance of 96″, and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star-forming regions and concluded that W49 has the richest population, with seven subclusters of YSOs.

  7. Extended red objects and stellar-wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Remington O.; Povich, Matthew S.; Smith, Nathan; Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of infrared photometry on 39 extended red objects (EROs) in the Carina Nebula, observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most EROs are identified by bright, extended 8.0 μm emission, which ranges from 10 arcsec to 40 arcsec in size, but our sample also includes four EROs identified by extended 24 μm emission. Of particular interest are nine EROs associated with late O- or early B-type stars and characterized by arc-shaped morphology, suggesting dusty, stellar-wind bow shocks. These objects are preferentially oriented towards the central regions of the Carina Nebula, suggesting that these bow shocks are generally produced by the interactions of OB winds with the bulk expansion of the H II region rather than high proper motion. We identify preferred regions of mid-infrared colour space occupied by our bow shock candidates, which also contain bow shock candidates in M17 and RCW 49 but are well separated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or circumstellar discs. Colour cuts identify an additional 12 marginally resolved bow shock candidates, 10 of which are also associated with known late O or early B stars. H II region expansion velocities derived from bow shock candidate standoff distances are ˜10 km s-1, assuming typical H II region gas densities, comparable to expansion velocities derived from bow shocks in M17 and RCW 49. One candidate bow shock provides direct evidence of physical interaction between the massive stellar winds originating in the Trumpler 15 and Trumpler 14 clusters, supporting the conclusion that both clusters are at similar heliocentric distances.

  8. THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT POPULATION IN THE VELA-D MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Strafella, F.; Maruccia, Y.; Maiolo, B.; Lorenzetti, D.; Giannini, T.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Massi, F.; Olmi, L.

    2015-01-10

    We investigate the young stellar population in the Vela Molecular Ridge, Cloud-D, a star-forming region observed by both the Spitzer/NASA and Herschel/ESA space telescopes. The point-source, band-merged, Spitzer-IRAC catalog complemented with MIPS photometry previously obtained is used to search for candidate young stellar objects (YSOs), also including sources detected in less than four IRAC bands. Bona fide YSOs are selected by using appropriate color-color and color-magnitude criteria aimed at excluding both Galactic and extragalactic contaminants. The derived star formation rate and efficiency are compared with the same quantities characterizing other star-forming clouds. Additional photometric data, spanning from the near-IR to the submillimeter, are used to evaluate both bolometric luminosity and temperature for 33 YSOs located in a region of the cloud observed by both Spitzer and Herschel. The luminosity-temperature diagram suggests that some of these sources are representative of Class 0 objects with bolometric temperatures below 70 K and luminosities of the order of the solar luminosity. Far-IR observations from the Herschel/Hi-GAL key project for a survey of the Galactic plane are also used to obtain a band-merged photometric catalog of Herschel sources intended to independently search for protostars. We find 122 Herschel cores located on the molecular cloud, 30 of which are protostellar and 92 of which are starless. The global protostellar luminosity function is obtained by merging the Spitzer and Herschel protostars. Considering that 10 protostars are found in both the Spitzer and Herschel lists, it follows that in the investigated region we find 53 protostars and that the Spitzer-selected protostars account for approximately two-thirds of the total.

  9. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects. VI. H i line decrements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Rigliaco, E.; Alcalá, J. M.; Natta, A.; Stelzer, B.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Hydrogen recombination emission lines commonly observed in accreting young stellar objects represent a powerful tracer for the gas conditions in the circumstellar structures (accretion columns, and winds or jets). Aims: Here we perform a study of the H i decrements and line profiles, from the Balmer and Paschen H i lines detected in the X-shooter spectra of a homogeneous sample of 36 T Tauri objects in Lupus, the accretion and stellar properties of which were already derived in a previous work. We aim to obtain information on the H i gas physical conditions to delineate a consistent picture of the H i emission mechanisms in pre-main sequence low-mass stars (M∗< 2 M⊙). Methods: We have empirically classified the sources based on their H i line profiles and decrements. We identified four Balmer decrement types (which we classified as 1, 2, 3, and 4) and three Paschen decrement types (A, B, and C), characterised by different shapes. We first discussed the connection between the decrement types and the source properties and then compared the observed decrements with predictions from recently published local line excitation models. Results: We identify a few groups of sources that display similar H i properties. One third of the objects show lines with narrow symmetric profiles, and present similar Balmer and Paschen decrements (straight decrements, types 2 and A). Lines in these sources are consistent with optically thin emission from gas with hydrogen densities of order 109 cm-3 and 5000 < T < 15 000 K. These objects are associated with low mass accretion rates. Type 4 (L-shaped) Balmer and type B Paschen decrements are found in conjunction with very wide line profiles and are characteristic of strong accretors, with optically thick emission from high-density gas (log nH > 11 cm-3). Type 1 (curved) Balmer decrements are observed only in three sub-luminous sources viewed edge-on, so we speculate that these are actually type 2 decrements that are reddened

  10. A New Spectroscopic and Interferometric Study of the Young Stellar Object V645 Cyg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miroshinichenko, A. S.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Schertl, D.; Weigelt, G.; Kraus, S.; Manset, N.; Balega, Y. Y.; Klochkova, V. G.; Rudy, R. J.; Lynch, D. K.; Mazuk, S.; Venturini, C. C.; Grankin, K. N.; Puetter, R. C.; Perry, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. We present the results of high-resolution optical spectroscopy, low-resolution near-IR spectroscopy and near-infrared speckle interferometry of the massive young stellar object candidate V645 Cyg that were taken in order to refine its fundamental parameters and properties of its circumstellar envelope. Methods. Speckle interferometry in the H- and K-bands and an optical spectrum in the range 5200-6680 A with a spectral resolving power of R = 60000 were obtained at the 6 m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Another optical spectrum in the range 4300-10500 A with R = 79000 was obtained at the 3.6m CFHT. A low-resolution spectrum in the ranges 0.46-1.4 and 1.4-2.5 microns with a R approx. 800 and approx. 700, respectively, were obtained at the 3m Shain telescope of the Lick Observatory. Results. Using a new kinematic method based on non-linear modeling of the neutral hydrogen density profile in the direction toward the object, we suggest a new a distance D = 4.2+/-0.2 kpc. We also suggest a new estimate for the star's effective temperature, T(sub eff) approx. 25000 K. We have resolved the object in both H- and K-bands. Using a two-component ring fit, we derived a compact component size of 18 mas and 15 mas in the H- and K-band, respectively, which correspond to 37 and 33 AU at the new distance. Analysis of our and previously published data shows a approx. 2 mag drop of the near-infrared brightness of V645 Cyg in the beginning of the 1980 s. At the same time, the cometary nebular condensation N1 seems to fade in this wavelength range with respect to the N0 object, which represent the star with a nearly pole-on optically-thick disk and an optically-thin envelope. Conclusions. We conclude that V645 Cyg is a young massive main-sequence star, which recently emerged from its cocoon. and already passed the protostellar accretion stage. The presence of accretion is not necessary to account for the high observed luminosity of (2.6) x 10(exp 4) Solar Mass

  11. Infrared Search for Young Brown Dwarf Companions around Young Stellar Objects in the ρ Ophiuchi and the Serpens Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirono, Chiaki; Itho, Yoichi; Oasa, Yumiko

    2011-10-01

    We conducted an infrared search for faint companions around 351 young stellar objects in the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud and the Serpens molecular cloud. Nine objects in the Spitzer/IRAC archival images were identified as being young stellar companion candidates. They showed an intrinsic infrared excess; one object was extremely red both in the [3.6] - [4.5] color and in the [4.5] - [5.8] color, and two objects were red in the [4.5] - [5.8] color. They were as faint as 15 mag in the [3.6] band. Follow-up K-band spectroscopy revealed that the three objects had deep water absorption bands, indicative of low effective temperatures. By comparing their spectra and infrared spectral energy distributions with synthesized spectra of low-temperature objects, we derived the effective temperatures and continuum excesses for these objects. It is very likely that one is a low-mass stellar companion, and two others are young brown dwarf companions associated with young stellar objects.

  12. MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS MASQUERADING AS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Morales, Esteban F. E.; Johnston, Katharine G.

    2015-01-20

    In contrast to most other galaxies, star formation rates in the Milky Way can be estimated directly from young stellar objects (YSOs). In the central molecular zone the star formation rate calculated from the number of YSOs with 24 μm emission is up to an order of magnitude higher than the value estimated from methods based on diffuse emission (such as free-free emission). Whether this effect is real or whether it indicates problems with either or both star formation rate measures is not currently known. In this paper, we investigate whether estimates based on YSOs could be heavily contaminated by more evolved objects such as main-sequence stars. We present radiative transfer models of YSOs and of main-sequence stars in a constant ambient medium which show that the main-sequence objects can indeed mimic YSOs at 24 μm. However, we show that in some cases the main-sequence models can be marginally resolved at 24 μm, whereas the YSO models are always unresolved. Based on the fraction of resolved MIPS 24 μm sources in the sample of YSOs previously used to compute the star formation rate, we estimate the fraction of misclassified ''YSOs'' to be at least 63%, which suggests that the star formation rate previously determined from YSOs is likely to be at least a factor of three too high.

  13. The detection of a discrete outflow from the young stellar object GL 490

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. F.; Allen, M.; Beer, R.; Dekany, R.; Huntress, W.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution (0.059/cm) M-band spectrum has been obtained of the embedded young stellar object GL490. The spectrum shows interstellar absorption in the fundamental vibrational band, v = 1-0, of (C-12)O. Two strong and narrow (10 km/s) velocity components are present. One, at the velocity of GL490 (vLSR = -16 km/s), is likely gas in the molecular cloud within which GL490 is embedded. The other component is blueshifted by 13 km/s relative to GL490. An observation of emission from the J = 3-2 transition of HCO(+) using a 20-arcsec beam supports the view that the blueshifted gas is near the central object. The -29-km/s feature is interpreted as a recently ejected shell. It is conjectured that the extended outflows of cold molecular gas seen by millimeter CO emission observations are driven by sporadic outbursts rather than by continuous flows from the central object.

  14. Accretion, jets and winds: High-energy emission from young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.

    2011-06-01

    This article summarizes the processes of high-energy emission in young stellar objects. Stars of spectral type A and B are called Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars in this stage, all later spectral types are termed classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Both types are studied by high-resolution X-ray and UV spectroscopy and modeling. Three mechanisms contribute to the high-energy emission from CTTS: 1) CTTS have active coronae similar to main-sequence stars, 2) the accreted material passes through an accretion shock at the stellar surface, which heats it to a few MK, and 3) some CTTS drive powerful outflows. Shocks within these jets can heat the plasma to X-ray emitting temperatures. Coronae are already well characterized in the literature; for the latter two scenarios models are shown. The magnetic field suppresses motion perpendicular to the field lines in the accretion shock, thus justifying a 1D geometry. The radiative loss is calculated as optically thin emission. A mixture of shocked and coronal gas is fitted to X-ray observations of accreting CTTS. Specifically, the model explains the peculiar line-ratios in the He-like triplets of Ne IX and O VII. All stars require only small mass accretion rates to power the X-ray emission. In contrast, the HAeBe HD 163296 has line ratios similar to coronal sources, indicating that neither a high density nor a strong UV-field is present in the region of the X-ray emission. This could be caused by a shock in its jet. Similar emission is found in the deeply absorbed CTTS DG Tau. Shock velocities between 400 and 500 km s-1 are required to explain the observed spectrum. Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2010

  15. 76 FR 39974 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Titian's Woman in a Blue...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Titian's Woman in a Blue Dress `La... ``Titian's Woman in a Blue Dress `La Bella','' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the..., Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Department of State. BILLING CODE 4710-05-P...

  16. Size and albedo of Kuiper belt object 55636 from a stellar occultation.

    PubMed

    Elliot, J L; Person, M J; Zuluaga, C A; Bosh, A S; Adams, E R; Brothers, T C; Gulbis, A A S; Levine, S E; Lockhart, M; Zangari, A M; Babcock, B A; Dupré, K; Pasachoff, J M; Souza, S P; Rosing, W; Secrest, N; Bright, L; Dunham, E W; Sheppard, S S; Kakkala, M; Tilleman, T; Berger, B; Briggs, J W; Jacobson, G; Valleli, P; Volz, B; Rapoport, S; Hart, R; Brucker, M; Michel, R; Mattingly, A; Zambrano-Marin, L; Meyer, A W; Wolf, J; Ryan, E V; Ryan, W H; Morzinski, K; Grigsby, B; Brimacombe, J; Ragozzine, D; Montano, H G; Gilmore, A

    2010-06-17

    The Kuiper belt is a collection of small bodies (Kuiper belt objects, KBOs) that lie beyond the orbit of Neptune and which are believed to have formed contemporaneously with the planets. Their small size and great distance make them difficult to study. KBO 55636 (2002 TX(300)) is a member of the water-ice-rich Haumea KBO collisional family. The Haumea family are among the most highly reflective objects in the Solar System. Dynamical calculations indicate that the collision that created KBO 55636 occurred at least 1 Gyr ago. Here we report observations of a multi-chord stellar occultation by KBO 55636, which occurred on 9 October 2009 ut. We find that it has a mean radius of 143 +/- 5 km (assuming a circular solution). Allowing for possible elliptical shapes, we find a geometric albedo of in the V photometric band, which establishes that KBO 55636 is smaller than previously thought and that, like its parent body, it is highly reflective. The dynamical age implies either that KBO 55636 has an active resurfacing mechanism, or that fresh water-ice in the outer Solar System can persist for gigayear timescales.

  17. Nothing to Hide: An X-ray Survey for Young Stellar Objects in the Pipe Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Posselt, Bettina; Covey, Kevin R.; Lada, Charles J.

    2010-08-01

    We have previously analyzed sensitive mid-infrared observations to establish that the Pipe Nebula (PiN) has a very low star formation efficiency. That study focused on young stellar objects (YSOs) with excess infrared emission (i.e., protostars and pre-main-sequence stars with disks), however, and could have missed a population of more evolved pre-main-sequence stars or Class III objects (i.e., young stars with dissipated disks that no longer show excess infrared emission). Evolved pre-main-sequence stars are X-ray bright, so we have used ROSAT All-Sky Survey data to search for diskless pre-main-sequence stars throughout the PiN. We have also analyzed archival XMM-Newton observations of three prominent areas within the Pipe: Barnard 59 (B 59), containing a known cluster of YSOs; Barnard 68, a dense core that has yet to form stars; and the Pipe molecular ring, a high-extinction region in the bowl of the Pipe. We also characterize the X-ray properties of YSOs in B 59. The ROSAT and XMM-Newton data provide no indication of a significant population of more evolved pre-main-sequence stars within the Pipe, reinforcing our previous measurement of the Pipe's very low star formation efficiency.

  18. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; RamIrez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A. E-mail: sellgren@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2009-09-10

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2} (15.0 {mu}m), C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (13.7 {mu}m), and HCN (14.0 {mu}m). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH{sub 3}OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observations demonstrate the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  19. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of <αOX> = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  20. Velocity asymmetries in young stellar object jets. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, T.; Vlahakis, N.; Tsinganos, K.; Karampelas, K.; Sauty, C.; Cayatte, V.; Matt, S. P.; Massaglia, S.; Trussoni, E.; Mignone, A.

    2012-09-01

    Context. It is well established that some YSO jets (e.g. RW Aur) display different propagation speeds between their blue and red shifted parts, a feature possibly associated with the central engine or the environment in which the jet propagates. Aims: To understand the origin of asymmetric YSO jet velocities, we investigate the efficiency of two candidate mechanisms, one based on the intrinsic properties of the system and the other on the role of the external medium. In particular, a parallel or anti-parallel configuration between the protostellar magnetosphere and the disk magnetic field is considered, and the resulting dynamics examined both in an ideal and in a resistive magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) regime. Moreover, we explore the effects of a potential difference in the pressure of the environment, as a consequence of the nonuniform density distribution of molecular clouds. Methods: Ideal and resistive axisymmetric numerical simulations were carried out for a variety of models, all of which are based on a combination of two analytical solutions, a disk wind and a stellar outflow. The initial two-component jet is modified by either inverting the orientation of its inner magnetic field or imposing a constant surrounding pressure. The velocity profiles are studied by assuming steady flows as well as after strong time variable ejection is incorporated. Results: Discrepancies between the speeds of the two outflows in opposite directions can indeed occur both due to unaligned magnetic fields and different outer pressures. In the former case, the asymmetry appears only on the dependence of the velocity on the cylindrical distance, but the implied observed value is significantly altered when the density distribution is also taken into account. On the other hand, a nonuniform medium collimates the two jets unevenly, directly affecting their propagation speed. A further interesting feature of the pressure-confined outflow simulations is the formation of static knots

  1. Assessing the Effect of Stellar Companions to Kepler Objects of Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Lea; Ciardi, David R.; Howard, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Unknown stellar companions to Kepler planet host stars dilute the transit signal, causing the planetary radii to be underestimated. We report on the analysis of 165 stellar companions detected with high-resolution imaging to be within 2" of 159 KOI host stars. The majority of the planets and planet candidates in these systems have nominal radii smaller than 6 REarth. Using multi-filter photometry on each companion, we assess the likelihood that the companion is bound and estimate its stellar properties, including stellar radius and flux. We then recalculate the planet radii in these systems, determining how much each planet's size is underestimated if it is assumed to 1) orbit the primary star, 2) orbit the companion star, or 3) be equally likely to orbit either star in the system. We demonstrate the overall effect of unknown stellar companions on our understanding of Kepler planet sizes.

  2. A New Approach to Identifying Massive Young Stellar Objects: Extended Green Objects (EGOs) from the GLIMPSE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganowski, Claudia Jane Klimick

    2010-07-01

    A promising new diagnostic for identifying actively accreting massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) has emerged from large-scale Spitzer Space Telescope surveys of the Galactic plane: extended emission in the IRAC 4.5 micron band, believed to trace shocked molecular gas in active protostellar outflows. I present the GLIMPSE I catalog of extended 4.5 micron sources (called EGOs, Extended Green Objects, for the common coding of the [4.5] band as green in 3-color composite IRAC images) and the evidence that EGOs, as a population, are massive YSOs. I also present the results of high-resolution EVLA surveys of 20 EGOs in the 6.7 GHz Class II and 44 GHz Class I methanol maser transitions, which respectively trace high-mass protostars and molecular outflows, and a JCMT survey in the molecular outflow tracers HCO+ and SiO. High detection rates of all outflow tracers and the spatial distribution of the masers with respect to the midinfrared emission provide convincing evidence that the surveyed EGOs are much-sought MYSOs which are actively accreting and driving outflows. I complement the survey results with detailed case studies of two EGOs using SMA and CARMA data. The high-resolution mm observations reveal bipolar molecular outflows coincident with the 4.5 micron lobes in both sources. A single dominant outflow is identified in each of the studied EGOs, with tentative evidence for multiple flows in one source (G11.92-0.61). Strong SiO(2-1) emission is also detected, confirming that the extended 4.5 micron emission traces recently shocked gas in active outflows. The outflow driving sources are compact mm continuum cores that exhibit hot-core spectral line emission, and are associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The mm data also reveal considerable chemical and evolutionary diversity even within a small EGO subsample. The EGO G11.92-0.61 is associated with at least three compact cores, and is forming a protocluster of intermediate to high-mass stars. Other than the

  3. The evolution of the spectral energy distribution in massive young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Cesaroni, R.; Brand, J.; Faustini, F.; Testi, L.

    2008-04-01

    core prescriptions show that the three classes of sources possibly mark different periods in the formation of a massive YSO. The IR-P objects are consistent with being at the end of the main accretion phase, while MM-P sources are probably in an earlier evolutionary stage. The timescales for the formation decrease from ~ 4×105 to ~ 1×105 years with stellar mass increasing from ~6 to ~40 M⊙; these timescales, and the association with young clusters with median stellar age of a few 106 years suggest that the most massive objects are among the last ones to form. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with the high-mass star formation being a scaled-up analogue of the traditional accretion-dominated paradigm valid for the low-mass regime. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Ices around massive young stellar objects : the RAFGL 7009S test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; D'Hendecourt, L.

    2000-11-01

    With its large spectral coverage and resolution, well adapted to the study of solid state features arising from icy interstellar grain mantles present in dense molecular clouds, the SWS instrument on board ISO can be used to probe the molecular material in the lines of sight to bright infrared protostellar sources. An example is presented here with the observations of the protostellar object RAFGL 7009S. However, the results presented are applicable to numerous extinct massive young stellar objects which behave similarly. Deep solid state features are detected in such extinguished sources. These features can be compared with laboratory data which allow the identification of ice mixtures composed of H2O, CH4, CO, CO2 and CH3OH condensed on top of refractory grains. Quantitative estimates of the abundances of these molecules can therefore be derived. Superimposed on these solid state features, one generally observe the ro-vibrational lines of gas phase species such as H2O, CO, CO2 and CH4. Analysis of these lines helps to derive some physical parameters such as the gas temperature and the gas-to-solid ratios for these molecules. In the RAFGL 7009S source, an upper limit on the deuterium/hydrogen ratio can also be placed and the consequences for the high fractionation observed in the gas can be discussed. The analysis of the profile of the solid carbon dioxide ν2 bending mode reveals particular interactions in the ice mantles. Indeed, through the peculiar substructure observed in the CO2 band we can monitor in such sources the formation of a complex involving the CO2 and CH3OH and the temperature evolution of the ices. These results may shed light on the relationship between the gas and the grains with possible implication for interstellar chemistry around these objects. Careful laboratory experiments involving matrix isolation techniques allow us to describe the physical nature of the observed ices as well as their photochemical evolution.

  5. Mass Accretion Processes in Young Stellar Objects: Role of Intense Flaring Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Salvatore; Reale, Fabio; Peres, Giovanni; Mignone, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    According to the magnetospheric accretion scenario, young low-mass stars are surrounded by circumstellar disks which they interact with through accretion of mass. The accretion builds up the star to its final mass and is also believed to power the mass outflows, which may in turn have a signicant role in removing the excess angular momentum from the star-disk system. Although the process of mass accretion is a critical aspect of star formation, some of its mechanisms are still to be fully understood. On the other hand, strong flaring activity is a common feature of young stellar objects (YSOs). In the Sun, such events give rise to perturbations of the interplanetary medium. Similar but more energetic phenomena occur in YSOs and may influence the circumstellar environment. In fact, a recent study has shown that an intense flaring activity close to the disk may strongly perturb the stability of circumstellar disks, thus inducing mass accretion episodes (Orlando et al. 2011). Here we review the main results obtained in the field and the future perspectives.

  6. ABSENCE OF SIGNIFICANT COOL DISKS IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS EXHIBITING REPETITIVE OPTICAL OUTBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Hirano, Naomi; Takami, Michihiro; Dong, Ruobing; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Kóspál, Ágnes; Dunham, Michael M.; Henning, Thomas; Hashimoto, Jun; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-10

    We report Submillimeter Array 1.3 mm high angular resolution observations toward the four EXor-type outbursting young stellar objects VY Tau, V1118 Ori, V1143 Ori, and NY Ori. The data mostly show low dust masses M{sub dust} in the associated circumstellar disks. Among the sources, NY Ori possesses a relatively massive disk with M{sub dust} ∼ 9 × 10{sup −4}M{sub ⊙}. V1118 Ori has a marginal detection equivalent to M{sub dust} ∼ 6 × 10{sup −5}M{sub ⊙}. V1143 Ori has a non-detection also equivalent to M{sub dust} < 6 × 10{sup −5}M{sub ⊙}. For the nearest source, VY Tau, we get a surprising non-detection that provides a stringent upper limit M{sub dust} < 6 × 10{sup −6}M{sub ⊙}. We interpret our findings as suggesting that the gas and dust reservoirs that feed the short-duration, repetitive optical outbursts seen in some EXors may be limited to the small-scale, innermost region of their circumstellar disks. This hot dust may have escaped our detection limits. Follow-up, more sensitive millimeter observations are needed to improve our understanding of the triggering mechanisms of EXor-type outbursts.

  7. A modular set of synthetic spectral energy distributions for young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, T. P.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, I present a new set of synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for young stellar objects (YSOs) spanning a wide range of evolutionary stages, from the youngest deeply embedded protostars to pre-main-sequence stars with few or no disks. These models include significant improvements on the previous generation of published models: in particular, the new models cover a much wider and more uniform region of parameter space, do not include highly model-dependent parameters, and include a number of improvements that make them more suited to modeling far-infrared and sub-mm observations of forming stars. Rather than all being part of a single monolithic set of models, the new models are split up into sets of varying complexity. The aim of the new set of models is not to provide the most physically realistic models for young stars, but rather to provide deliberately simplified models for initial modeling, which allows a wide range of parameter space to be explored. I present the design of the model set, and show examples of fitting these models to real observations to show how the new grid design can help us better understand what can be determined from limited unresolved observations. The models, as well as a Python-based fitting tool are publicly available to the community.

  8. Star formation in the vicinity of nuclear black holes: young stellar objects close to Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, B.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Eckart, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Sabha, N.; Borkar, A.; Moultaka, J.; Mužić, K.; Moser, L.

    2014-10-01

    It is often assumed that the strong gravitational field of a super-massive black hole disrupts an adjacent molecular cloud preventing classical star formation in the deep potential well of the black hole. Yet, young stars have been observed across the entire nuclear star cluster of the Milky Way including the region close (<0.5 pc) to the central black hole, Sgr A*. Here, we focus particularly on small groups of young stars, such as IRS 13N located 0.1 pc away from Sgr A*, which is suggested to contain about five embedded massive young stellar objects (<1 Myr). We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to follow the evolution of molecular clumps orbiting about a 4 × 106 M⊙ black hole, to constrain the formation and the physical conditions of such groups. The molecular clumps in our models are assumed to be isothermal containing 100 M⊙ in <0.2 pc radius. Such molecular clumps exist in the circumnuclear disc of the Galaxy. In our highly eccentrically orbiting clump, the strong orbital compression of the clump along the orbital radius vector and perpendicular to the orbital plane causes the gas densities to increase to values higher than the tidal density of Sgr A*, which are required for star formation. Additionally, we speculate that the infrared excess source G2/DSO approaching Sgr A* on a highly eccentric orbit could be associated with a dust-enshrouded star that may have been formed recently through the mechanism supported by our models.

  9. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR-FORMING REGION N206

    SciTech Connect

    Romita, Krista Alexandra; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Carlson, Lynn Redding; Whitney, B.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Indebetouw, R.; Hora, J. L. E-mail: carlson@stsci.ed E-mail: brian@sal.wisc.ed E-mail: jhora@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-09-20

    We present analysis of the energetic star-forming region Henize 206 (N206) located near the southern edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on photometric data from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE-LMC; IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m and MIPS 24 {mu}m), Infrared Survey Facility near-infrared survey (J, H, K{sub s}), and the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS UBVI) covering a wavelength range of 0.36-24 {mu}m. Young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified based upon their location in infrared color-magnitude space and classified by the shapes of their spectral energy distributions in comparison with a pre-computed grid of YSO models. We identify 116 YSO candidates: 102 are well characterized by the YSO models, predominately Stage I, and 14 may be multiple sources or young sources with transition disks. Careful examination of the individual sources and their surrounding environment allows us to identify a factor of {approx}14.5 more YSO candidates than have already been identified. The total mass of these well-fit YSO candidates is {approx}520 M{sub sun}. We calculate a current star formation rate of 0.27 x 10{sup -1} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. The distribution of YSO candidates appears to follow shells of neutral material in the interstellar medium.

  10. Effects of Grain Growth on Molecular Abundances in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nanase; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Aikawa, Yuri; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Liu, Haoyu Baobab; Hirano, Naomi

    2017-03-01

    Recent observations suggested that the growth of dust grains may have already occurred in class 0/I young stellar objects (YSOs). Since chemical reactions on dust grain surfaces are important in determining molecular abundances, the dust size growth may affect chemical compositions in YSOs significantly. In this work, we aim to determine how grain growth affects chemical abundances. We use a time-dependent gas-grain chemical model for a star-forming core to calculate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemical abundances with variation of surface areas of grains to imitate grain growth. We also perform parameter studies in which the initial molecular abundances vary. Our results show that a smaller extent of the surface areas caused by grain growth changes the dominant form of sulfur-bearing molecules by decreasing H2S abundances and increasing SO and/or SO2 abundances. We also find that complex organic molecules such as CH3CN decrease in abundances with larger grain sizes, while the abundance of other species such as CH3OCH3 is dependent on other parameters such as the initial conditions. Comparisons with observations of a class 0 protostar, IRAS 16293-2422, indicate that the observed abundance ratios between sulfur-bearing molecules H2S, SO, and SO2 can be reproduced very well when dust grains grow to a maximum grain size of a max = 10–100 μm.

  11. Evolutionary stages and disk properties of young stellar objects in the Perseus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Gao, Yu; Fang, Min; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Ying-He; Chang, Rui-Xiang; Jiang, Xue-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Luo, A.-Li; Ma, Hong-Jun; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Long

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the evolutionary stages and disk properties of 211 young stellar objects (YSOs) across the Perseus cloud by modeling their broadband optical to mid-infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED). Our optical gri photometry data were obtained from the recently finished Purple Mountain Observatory Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic Anti-center (XSTPS-GAC). About 81% of our sample fall into the Stage II phase which is characterized by having optically thick disks, while 14% into the Stage I phase characterized by having significant infalling envelopes, and the remaining 5% into the Stage III phase characterized by having optically thin disks. The median stellar age and mass of the Perseus YSOs are 3.1 Myr and 0.3 M⊙ respectively. By exploring the relationships among the turnoff wave bands λturnoff (longward of which significant IR excesses above the stellar photosphere are observed), the excess spectral index αexcess as determined for λ > λturnoff, and the disk inner radius Rin (determined from SED modeling) for YSOs at different evolutionary stages, we found that the median and standard deviation of αexcess for YSOs with optically thick disks tend to increase with λturnoff, especially at λturnoff ≥5.8 μm, whereas the median fractional dust luminosities Ldust/L★ tend to decrease with increasing λturnoff. This points to an inside-out process of disk clearing for small dust grains. Moreover, a positive correlation between αexcess and Rin was found at αexcess ≳ 0 and Rin ≳ 10 × the dust sublimation radius Rsub, irrespective of λturnoff, Ldust/L★ and disk flaring. This suggests that the outer disk flaring either does not evolve synchronously with the inside-out disk clearing of small dust grains or has little appreciable influence on the spectral slopes at λ ≲ 24 μm. About 23% of our YSO disks are classified as transitional disks, which have λturnoff ≥ 5.8 μm and Ldust/L★ > 10-3. The transitional

  12. Young stellar object variability (YSOVAR): Long timescale variations in the mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Rebull, L. M.; Cody, A. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Carey, S. J.; Covey, K. R.; Günther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Gutermuth, R.; Song, I.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; James, D.; Vrba, F. J.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Bouvier, J.; and others

    2014-11-01

    The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller footprints in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ∼29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. We present the data collection and reduction for the Spitzer and ancillary data, and define the 'standard sample' on which we calculate statistics, consisting of fast cadence data, with epochs roughly twice per day for ∼40 days. We also define a 'standard sample of members' consisting of all the IR-selected members and X-ray-selected members. We characterize the standard sample in terms of other properties, such as spectral energy distribution shape. We use three mechanisms to identify variables in the fast cadence data—the Stetson index, a χ{sup 2} fit to a flat light curve, and significant periodicity. We also identified variables on the longest timescales possible of six to seven years by comparing measurements taken early in the Spitzer mission with the mean from our YSOVAR campaign. The fraction of members in each cluster that are variable on these longest timescales is a function of the ratio of Class I/total members in each cluster, such that clusters with a higher fraction of Class I objects also have a higher fraction of long-term variables. For objects with a YSOVAR-determined period and a [3.6]-[8] color, we find that a star with a longer period is more likely than those with shorter periods to have an IR excess. We do not find any evidence for variability that causes [3.6]-[4.5] excesses to appear or vanish within our data set; out of members and field objects combined, at most 0.02% may have transient IR excesses.

  13. Young Stellar Object VARiability (YSOVAR): Long Timescale Variations in the Mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Cody, A. M.; Covey, K. R.; Günther, H. M.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Stauffer, J. R.; Wolk, S. J.; Gutermuth, R.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Song, I.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; James, D.; Hora, J. L.; Vrba, F. J.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Bouvier, J.; Carey, S. J.; Carpenter, J. M.; Favata, F.; Flaherty, K.; Forbrich, J.; Hernandez, J.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Megeath, S. T.; Micela, G.; Smith, H. A.; Terebey, S.; Turner, N.; Allen, L.; Ardila, D.; Bouy, H.; Guieu, S.

    2014-11-01

    The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller footprints in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. We present the data collection and reduction for the Spitzer and ancillary data, and define the "standard sample" on which we calculate statistics, consisting of fast cadence data, with epochs roughly twice per day for ~40 days. We also define a "standard sample of members" consisting of all the IR-selected members and X-ray-selected members. We characterize the standard sample in terms of other properties, such as spectral energy distribution shape. We use three mechanisms to identify variables in the fast cadence data—the Stetson index, a χ2 fit to a flat light curve, and significant periodicity. We also identified variables on the longest timescales possible of six to seven years by comparing measurements taken early in the Spitzer mission with the mean from our YSOVAR campaign. The fraction of members in each cluster that are variable on these longest timescales is a function of the ratio of Class I/total members in each cluster, such that clusters with a higher fraction of Class I objects also have a higher fraction of long-term variables. For objects with a YSOVAR-determined period and a [3.6]-[8] color, we find that a star with a longer period is more likely than those with shorter periods to have an IR excess. We do not find any evidence for variability that causes [3.6]-[4.5] excesses to appear or vanish within our data set; out of members and field objects combined, at most 0.02% may have transient IR excesses.

  14. Do individual Spitzer young stellar object candidates enclose multiple UKIDSS sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Esteban F. E.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: We analyze United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) observations of a sample of 8325 objects taken from a catalog of intrinsically red sources selected in the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE). Given the differences in angular resolution (factor >2 better in UKIDSS), our aim is to investigate whether there are multiple UKIDSS sources that might all contribute to the GLIMPSE flux, or whether there is only one dominant UKIDSS counterpart. We then study possible corrections to estimates of the star formation rate (SFR) based on counts of GLIMPSE young stellar objects (YSOs). This represents an exploratory work toward the construction of a hierarchical YSO catalog. Methods: After performing PSF fitting photometry in the UKIDSS data, we implemented a technique to recognize the dominant UKIDSS sources automatically by evaluating their match with the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the associated GLIMPSE red sources. This is a generic method that could be robustly applied for matching SEDs across gaps at other wavelengths. Results: We found that most (87.0 ± 1.6%) of the candidate YSOs from the GLIMPSE red source catalog have only one dominant UKIDSS counterpart that matches the mid-infrared SED (fainter associated UKIDSS sources might still be present). Although at first sight this could seem surprising, given that YSOs are typically in clustered environments, we argue that within the mass range covered by the GLIMPSE YSO candidates (intermediate to high masses), clustering with objects with comparable mass is unlikely at the GLIMPSE resolution. Indeed, by performing simple clustering experiments based on a population synthesis model of Galactic YSOs, we found that although 60% of the GLIMPSE YSO enclose at least two UKIDSS sources, in general only one dominates the flux. Conclusions: No significant corrections are needed for estimates of the SFR of the Milky Way based on the assumption that the GLIMPSE YSOs

  15. A Large, Massive, Rotating Disk Around an Isolated Young Stellar Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Beuther, Henrik; Steinacker, Jürgen; Linz, Hendrik; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Zhang, Qizhou

    2010-07-01

    the molecules' abundances are similar to those found in other circumstellar disks. We furthermore detected C2H toward the objects and discuss this finding in the context of star formation. Finally, we have performed radiative transfer modeling of the K-band scattered light image varying a disk plus outflow two-dimensional density profile and the stellar properties. The model approximately reproduces extent and location of the dark lane, and the basic appearance of the outflow. We discuss our findings in the context of circumstellar disks across all mass regimes and conclude that our discovery is an ideal laboratory to study the early phases in the evolution of massive circumstellar disks surrounding young stellar objects. Based on observations made at the Calar Alto Observatory. This work is based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  16. Blue stragglers and X -ray binaries in open clusters: An observational study of alternative pathways in stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnell, Natalie Marie

    Membership studies of evolved open clusters reveal many alternative pathway stellar products whose evolution cannot be explained using single-star evolutionary models. These stars are neither rare nor anomalous, and in fact are a common occurrence in cluster populations. The goal of this thesis is to investigate the origin and evolutionary pathways of such stars through the careful study of X-ray binaries in NGC 6819 and white dwarf (WD) companions of mass transfer-formed blue straggler stars (BSSs) in NGC 188. I present the first X-ray study of the intermediate-age open cluster NGC 6819, using observations from XMM-Newton. This study of NGC 6819 is part of a systematic survey to investigate the relationship between the number of X-ray sources and cluster dynamics in the regime of massive open clusters. Of the 12 X-ray sources within the half-light radius of NGC 6819, four sources challenge single-star evolutionary models, including a candidate quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. Next, I present the first results from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-ultraviolet (FUV) campaign to search for WD companions of BSSs as indicators of mass transfer formation. I find direct observational detections of young (< 250 Myr), hot WD companions in three BSS binaries. Their presence in a well-studied cluster environment allows for unparalleled constraints on the pre-mass transfer system. I outline potential formation timelines for these three BSSs, which all formed through recent mass transfer. Finally, I use HST photometry of the complete NGC 188 BSS population to place limits on the mass transfer BSS formation frequency. Comparison of the observations with models for BSS FUV emission reveals seven WD companions with temperatures greater than 11,000 K. The location of the young BSSs on an optical color-magnitude diagram suggests that using single-star evolutionary models to age luminous BSSs may be problematic. Considering other formation scenarios, the total mass transfer

  17. Characterizing the nature of embedded young stellar objects through silicate, ice and millimeter observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapsi, A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2008-07-01

    Context: Determining the evolutionary stage of a Young Stellar Object (YSO) is of fundamental importance to test star formation theories. Classification schemes for YSOs are based on evaluating the degree of dissipation of the surrounding envelope, whose main effects are the extinction of the optical radiation from the central YSO and re-emission in the far-infrared to millimeter part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since extinction is a property of column density along the line of sight, the presence of a protoplanetary disk may lead to a misclassification of pre-main sequence stars with disks when viewed edge-on. Aims: We performed radiative transfer calculations to show the effects of different geometries on the main indicators of YSO evolutionary stage. In particular we tested not only the effects on the infrared colors, like the slope α of the flux between 2.2 and 24 μm, but also on other popular indicators of YSO evolutionary stage, such as the bolometric temperature and the optical depth of silicates and ices. Methods: We used the axisymmetric 3D radiative transfer codes RADMC and RADICAL to calculate the spectral energy distribution including silicates and ice features in a grid of models covering the range of physical properties typical of embedded and pre-main sequence sources. Results: Our set of models compares well with existing observations, supporting the assumed density parametrization and the adopted dust opacities. We show that for systems viewed at intermediate angles (25°-70°) the “classical” indicators of evolution are able to classify the degree of evolution of young stellar objects since they accurately trace the envelope column density, and they all agree with each other. On the other hand, edge-on system are misclassified for inclinations larger than 65° ± 5°, where the spread is mostly due to the range of mass and the flaring degree of the disk. In particular, silicate emission, typical of pre-main sequence stars with disks

  18. Orbit determination of trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs for the prediction of stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmars, J.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Assafin, M.; Vachier, F.; Colas, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Sicardy, B.; Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The prediction of stellar occultations by trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs is a difficult challenge that requires accuracy both in the occulted star position and in the object ephemeris. Until now, the most used method of prediction, involving dozens of TNOs/Centaurs, has been to consider a constant offset for the right ascension and for the declination with respect to a reference ephemeris, usually the latest public version. This offset is determined as the difference between the most recent observations of the TNO/Centaur and the reference ephemeris. This method can be successfully applied when the offset remains constant with time, i.e. when the orbit is stable enough. In this case, the prediction even holds for occultations that occur several days after the last observations. Aims: This paper presents an alternative method of prediction, based on a new accurate orbit determination procedure, which uses all the available positions of the TNO from the Minor Planet Center database, as well as sets of new astrometric positions from unpublished observations. Methods: Orbits were determined through a numerical integration procedure called NIMA, in which we developed a specific weighting scheme that considers the individual precision of the observation, the number of observations performed during one night by the same observatory, and the presence of systematic errors in the positions. Results: The NIMA method was applied to 51 selected TNOs and Centaurs. For this purpose, we performed about 2900 new observations in several observatories (European South Observatory, Observatório Pico dos Dias, Pic du Midi, etc.) during the 2007-2014 period. Using NIMA, we succeed in predicting the stellar occultations of 10 TNOs and 3 Centaurs between July 2013 and February 2015. By comparing the NIMA and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) ephemerides, we highlight the variation in the offset between them with time, by showing that, generally, the constant offset

  19. ICE CHEMISTRY IN EMBEDDED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, J. M.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Indebetouw, R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sloan, G. C.; Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F.; Gordon, K. D.; Boyer, M. L.; Shiao, B.; Meixner, M.; Madden, S.; Speck, A. K.; Marengo, M.

    2009-12-20

    We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of 15 embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These observations were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the SAGE-Spec Legacy program. We analyze the two prominent ice bands in the IRS spectral range: the bending mode of CO{sub 2} ice at 15.2 mum and the ice band between 5 and 7 mum that includes contributions from the bending mode of water ice at 6 mum among other ice species. The 5-7 mum band is difficult to identify in our LMC sample due to the conspicuous presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission superimposed onto the ice spectra. We identify water ice in the spectra of two sources; the spectrum of one of those sources also exhibits the 6.8 mum ice feature attributed in the literature to ammonium and methanol. We model the CO{sub 2} band in detail, using the combination of laboratory ice profiles available in the literature. We find that a significant fraction (approx>50%) of CO{sub 2} ice is locked in a water-rich component, consistent with what is observed for Galactic sources. The majority of the sources in the LMC also require a pure-CO{sub 2} contribution to the ice profile, evidence of thermal processing. There is a suggestion that CO{sub 2} production might be enhanced in the LMC, but the size of the available sample precludes firmer conclusions. We place our results in the context of the star formation environment in the LMC.

  20. Survey of Infrared Variability of Young Stellar Objects in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huard, Tracy L.; Storm, S.; Mundy, L. G.

    2012-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope archive provides a means for studying mid-infrared variability in large numbers of young stellar objects (YSOs) in different star-forming regions. We are conducting such a study, as part of NASA's Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP), to identify those YSOs exhibiting variability and to characterize the frequency, magnitude, and color of this variability. Our results for isolated core regions, for example, demonstrate that (70 +/- 20)% of Class I and Flat-spectrum YSOs exhibit variability over timescales of 1-2 years, while only (24 +/- 8)% of Class II and III YSOs appear to be variable over these times, suggestive of a dependence on evolutionary class. In contrast, we find no such dependence in the IC 5146 cluster forming region or the Perseus or Serpens regions, where 35-45% of the YSOs exhibit variability. In general, the variable YSOs brighten or dim consistently across the IRAC 3.6-8.0 micron bands; the mid-infrared color changes are typically inconsistent with variable line-of-sight extinction. The magnitude of maximum IRAC variability for many YSOs is inconsistent with starspots as the dominant cause. Instead, intermittent heating and cooling by episodic accretion is the favored mechanism. In some cases, YSO observations were repeated over shorter timescales, from 0.2 to 2 days. We analyzed these observations to determine whether YSOs exhibited variability over these timescales and, if so, whether it was consistent with the longterm variations that we observed. Results from this study and implications for accretion will be presented.

  1. Evolution of the Bolometric Temperature and Luminosity of Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, P. C.; Adams, F. C.; Chen, H.; Schaff, E.

    1998-01-01

    We model the broadband emission from a star-disk-envelope system to obtain expressions for the bolometric temperature Tbol and luminosity Lbol as functions of time, from the youngest class 0 protostars to stars on the zero-age main sequence. The model predicts evolution, driven by infall and contraction luminosity, in terms of position on the log Tbol-log Lbol diagram, a close analog of the H-R diagram. The evolutionary tracks depend on the envelope initial conditions, the main-sequence mass of the star, and the envelope dissipation timescale. The model Lbol rises due to infall and then falls due to contraction, while Tbol increases steadily toward the main sequence due to central heating and envelope dissipation. In order to smoothly join the protostellar and pre-main-sequence phases it is necessary to model the termination of infall as gradual rather than sudden. This change reduces the peak infall luminosity for the collapse of a singular isothermal sphere by a factor 4, bringing predicted infall luminosities into better agreement with observations. For stars of main-sequence mass 0.5 M⊙, the model decrease in Lbol from its peak value of ~3 L⊙ at Tbol ~ 250 K (class I) to ~0.4 L⊙ at Tbol ~ 3000 K (class II/III) closely matches the observed decrease in median Lbol for young stellar objects in Chamaeleon, Corona Australis, Lupus, Ophiuchus, and Taurus. The model should be useful for estimating the distributions of mass and age, and for describing the birth history, of stars younger than 1 Myr in well-studied complexes.

  2. MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER. I. SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION FROM SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; RamIrez, Solange V.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-08-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone, which spans the central {approx}300 pc region of the Milky Way. We obtained IRS spectra over 5-35 {mu}m using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 {mu}m shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice, suggestive of CO{sub 2} ice mixed with CH{sub 3}OH ice on grains. This 15.4 {mu}m shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that nine massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8-23 M{sub sun}, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of {approx}0.07 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} at the GC.

  3. Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center. 1; Spectroscopic Identification from Spitzer/IRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Smith, Howard A.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic Center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on IRAC colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), which spans the central approximately 300 pc region of the Milky Way Galaxy. We obtained IRS spectra over 5 micron to 35 micron using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 micron shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 micron CO2 ice, suggestive of CO2 ice mixed with CH30H ice on grains. This 15.4 micron shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that 9 massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from C02, C2H2, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8 - 23 solar Mass, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of approximately 0.07 solar mass/yr at the GC.

  4. Multi-Sensory Approach to Search for Young Stellar Objects in CG4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoette, Vivian L.; Rebull, L. M.; McCarron, K.; Johnson, C. H.; Gartner, C.; VanDerMolen, J.; Gamble, L.; Matche, L.; McCartney, A.; Doering, M.; Crump, R.; Laorr, A.; Mork, K.; Steinbergs, E.; Wigley, E.; Caruso, S.; Killingstad, N.; McCanna, T.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities - specifically individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and/or blind and visually-impaired (BVI) - have traditionally been underrepresented in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). The low incidence rate of these populations, coupled with geographic isolation, creates limited opportunities for students to work with and receive mentoring by professionals who not only have specialty knowledge in disability areas but also work in STEM fields. Yerkes Observatory scientists, along with educators from the Wisconsin School for the Deaf, the Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Breck School, and Oak Park and River Forest High School, are engaged in active research with a Spitzer Science Center (SSC) scientist. Our ultimate goals are threefold; to engage DHH and BVI students with equal success as their sighted and hearing peers, to share our techniques to make astronomy more accessible to DHH and BVI youth, and to generate a life-long interest which will lead our students to STEM careers. This poster tracks our work with an SSC scientist during the spring, summer, and fall of 2010. The group coauthored another AAS poster on finding Young Stellar Objects (YSO) in the CG4 Nebula in Puppis. During the project, the students, scientists and teachers developed a number of techniques for learning the necessary science as well as doing the required data acquisition and analysis. Collaborations were formed between students with disabilities and their non-disabled peers to create multi-media projects. Ultimately, the projects created for our work with NITARP will be disseminated through our professional connections in order to ignite a passion for astronomy in all students - with and without disabilities. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program and Archive Outreach funds.

  5. THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY ORION PROJECT: ECLIPSING BINARIES AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; RamIrez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, Steve B.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2011-08-15

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3.{sup 0}5 x 2.{sup 0}3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 {+-} 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known

  6. The Palomar Transient Factory Orion Project: Eclipsing Binaries and Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eyken, Julian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Stauffer, John R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Beichman, Charles A.; Boden, Andrew F.; von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M.; Hoard, D. W.; Howell, Steve B.; Kane, Stephen R.; Plavchan, Peter; Ramírez, Solange V.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; Mattingly, Sean; Surace, Jason A.

    2011-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is one of the experiments within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide (3fdg5 × 2fdg3) field of view available using the PTF camera installed at the Palomar 48 inch telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in 2009 December to 2010 January to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10 Myr) 25 Ori association. Little is known empirically about the formation of planets at these young ages, and the primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper, we describe the survey and the data reduction pipeline, and present some initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which are good candidate 25 Ori or Orion OB1a association members. Of these, two are potential young W UMa type systems. We report on the possible low-mass (M-dwarf primary) eclipsing systems in the sample, which include six of the candidate young systems. Forty-five of the binary systems are close (mainly contact) systems, and one of these shows an orbital period among the shortest known for W UMa binaries, at 0.2156509 ± 0.0000071 days, with flat-bottomed primary eclipses, and a derived distance that appears consistent with membership in the general Orion association. One of the candidate young systems presents an unusual light curve, perhaps representing a semi-detached binary system with an inflated low-mass primary or a star with a warped disk, and may represent an additional young Orion member. Finally, we identify 14 probable new classical T-Tauri stars in our data, along with one previously known (CVSO 35) and

  7. Early-stage young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Sloan, G. C.; Sewiło, M.; Kraemer, K. E.; Wood, P. R.; Indebetouw, R.; Filipović, M. D.; Crawford, E. J.; Wong, G. F.; Hora, J. L.; Meixner, M.; Robitaille, T. P.; Shiao, B.; Simon, J. D.

    2013-02-01

    We present new observations of 34 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The photometric selection required sources to be bright at 24 and 70 μm (to exclude evolved stars and galaxies). The anchor of the analysis is a set of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra, supplemented by ground-based 3-5 μm spectra, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer photometry, near-infrared (IR) imaging and photometry, optical spectroscopy and radio data. The sources' spectral energy distributions and spectral indices are consistent with embedded YSOs; prominent silicate absorption is observed in the spectra of at least 10 sources, silicate emission is observed towards four sources. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission is detected towards all but two sources. Based on band ratios (in particular the strength of the 11.3-μm and the weakness of the 8.6-μm bands) PAH emission towards SMC YSOs is dominated by predominantly small neutral grains. Ice absorption is observed towards 14 sources in the SMC. The comparison of H2O and CO2 ice column densities for SMC, Large Magellanic Cloud and Galactic samples suggests that there is a significant H2O column density threshold for the detection of CO2 ice. This supports the scenario proposed by Oliveira et al., where the reduced shielding in metal-poor environments depletes the H2O column density in the outer regions of the YSO envelopes. No CO ice is detected towards the SMC sources. Emission due to pure rotational 0-0 transitions of molecular hydrogen is detected towards the majority of SMC sources, allowing us to estimate rotational temperatures and H2 column densities. All but one source are spectroscopically confirmed as SMC YSOs. Based on the presence of ice absorption, silicate emission or absorption and PAH emission, the sources are classified and placed in an evolutionary sequence. Of the 33 YSOs identified in the SMC, 30 sources populate different

  8. HIGH- AND INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, Y.-H. E-mail: chu@astro.illinois.edu

    2009-09-01

    Archival Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and MIPS observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been used to search for young stellar objects (YSOs). We have carried out independent aperture photometry of these data and merged the results from different passbands to produce a photometric catalog. To verify our methodology we have also analyzed the data from the SAGE and SWIRE Legacy programs; our photometric measurements are in general agreement with the photometry released by these programs. A detailed completeness analysis for our photometric catalog of the LMC shows that the 90% completeness limits are, on average, 16.0, 15.0, 14.3, 13.1, and 9.2 mag at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 {mu}m, respectively. Using our mid-infrared photometric catalogs and two simple selection criteria, [4.5]-[8.0]>2.0 to exclude normal and evolved stars and [8.0]>14-([4.5]-[8.0]) to exclude background galaxies, we have identified a sample of 2910 sources in the LMC that could potentially be YSOs. We then used the Spitzer observations complemented by optical and near-infrared data to carefully assess the nature of each source. To do so we simultaneously considered multiwavelength images and photometry to assess the source morphology, spectral energy distribution (SED) from the optical through the mid-infrared wavelengths, and the surrounding interstellar environment to determine the most likely nature of each source. From this examination of the initial sample, we suggest that 1172 sources are most likely YSOs. We have also identified 1075 probable background galaxies, consistent with the expected number estimated from the SWIRE survey. Spitzer IRS observations of 269 of the brightest YSOs from our sample have confirmed that {approx}>95% are indeed YSOs. An examination of color-color and color-magnitude diagrams shows no simple criteria in color-magnitude space that can unambiguously separate the LMC YSOs from all asymptotic giant branch (AGB)/post-AGB stars, planetary

  9. Stellar Vampires Unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    Astronomers have found possible proofs of stellar vampirism in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, they found that some hot, bright, and apparently young stars in the cluster present less carbon and oxygen than the majority of their sisters. This indicates that these few stars likely formed by taking their material from another star. "This is the first detection of a chemical signature clearly pointing to a specific scenario to form so-called 'Blue straggler stars' in a globular cluster", said Francesco Ferraro, from the Astronomy Department of Bologna University (Italy) and lead-author of the paper presenting the results. Blue stragglers are unexpectedly young-looking stars found in stellar aggregates, such as globular clusters, which are known to be made up of old stars. These enigmatic objects are thought to be created in either direct stellar collisions or through the evolution and coalescence of a binary star system in which one star 'sucks' material off the other, rejuvenating itself. As such, they provide interesting constraints on both binary stellar evolution and star cluster dynamics. To date, the unambiguous signatures of either stellar traffic accidents or stellar vampirism have not been observed, and the formation mechanisms of Blue stragglers are still a mystery. The astronomers used ESO's Very Large Telescope to measure the abundance of chemical elements at the surface of 43 Blue straggler stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae [1]. They discovered that six of these Blue straggler stars contain less carbon and oxygen than the majority of these peculiar objects. Such an anomaly indicates that the material at the surface of the blue stragglers comes from the deep interiors of a parent star [2]. Such deep material can reach the surface of the blue straggler only during the mass transfer process occurring between two stars in a binary system. Numerical simulations indeed show that the coalescence of stars should not

  10. Chemistry of massive young stellar objects with a disk-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isokoski, K.; Bottinelli, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: Our goal is to take an inventory of complex molecules in three well-known high-mass protostars for which disks or toroids have been claimed and to study the similarities and differences with a sample of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) without evidence of such flattened disk-like structures. With a disk-like geometry, UV radiation can escape more readily and potentially affect the ice and gas chemistry on hot-core scales. Methods: A partial submillimeter line survey, targeting CH3OH, H2CO, C2H5OH, HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3, CH3CN, HNCO, NH2CHO, C2H5CN, CH2CO, HCOOH, CH3CHO, and CH3CCH, was made toward three massive YSOs with disk-like structures, IRAS 20126+4104, IRAS 18089-1732, and G31.41+0.31. Rotation temperatures and column densities were determined by the rotation diagram method, as well as by independent spectral modeling. The molecular abundances were compared with previous observations of massive YSOs without evidence of any disk structure, targeting the same molecules with the same settings and using the same analysis method. Results: Consistent with previous studies, different complex organic species have different characteristic rotation temperatures and can be classified either as warm (>100 K) or cold (<100 K). The excitation temperatures and abundance ratios are similar from source to source and no significant difference can be established between the two source types. Acetone, CH3COCH3, is detected for the first time in G31.41+0.31 and IRAS 18089-1732. Temperatures and abundances derived from the two analysis methods generally agree within factors of a few. Conclusions: The lack of chemical differentiation between massive YSOs with and without observed disks suggest either that the chemical complexity is already fully established in the ices in the cold prestellar phase or that the material experiences similar physical conditions and UV exposure through outflow cavities during the short embedded lifetime. Appendices are available in electronic form

  11. Solid CO2 in low-mass young stellar objects. Comparison between Spitzer and laboratory spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioppolo, S.; Sangiorgio, I.; Baratta, G. A.; Palumbo, M. E.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Solid interstellar CO2 is an abundant component of ice dust mantles. Its ubiquity towards quiescent molecular clouds, as well as protostellar envelopes, has recently been confirmed by the IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Although it has been shown that CO2 cannot be efficiently formed in the gas phase, the CO2 surface formation pathway is still unclear. To date several CO2 surface formation mechanisms induced by energetic (e.g., UV photolysis and cosmic ray irradiation) and non-energetic (e.g., cold atom addition) input have been proposed. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the contribution of cosmic ray irradiation to the formation of CO2 in different regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). To achieve this goal we compared quantitatively laboratory data with the CO2 bending mode band profile observed towards several young stellar objects (YSOs) and a field star by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Methods: All the experiments presented here were performed at the Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics in Catania (Italy). The interstellar relevant samples were all irradiated with fast ions (30-200 keV) and subsequently annealed in a stainless steel high vacuum chamber (P < 10-7 mbar). Chemical and structural modifications of the ice samples were monitored by means of infrared spectroscopy. Laboratory spectra were then used to fit some thirty observational spectra. Results: A qualitative analysis shows that a good fit can be obtained with a minimum of two components. The choice of the laboratory components is based on the chemical-physical condition of each source. A quantitative analysis of the sources with known visual extinction (AV) and methanol abundances highlights that the solid carbon dioxide can be efficiently and abundantly formed after ion irradiation of interstellar ices in all the selected YSOs in a time compatible with cloud lifetimes (3 × 107 years). Only in the case of field stars can the expected CO2 column

  12. Young Stellar Objects in the Magellanic Clouds: Herschel spectroscopy first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Joana M.; Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Sewilo, Marta

    2015-08-01

    As the nearest gas-rich galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) offer the opportunity to bridge the gap between star formation processes on large galactic-wide scales and on the small scales of individual Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). These metal-deficient galaxies (Z ~ 0.2-0.4 Z⊙) also provide an invaluable window into a region of parameter space hitherto observationally unexplored. Metallicity reveals itself in at least two ways: abundances of gas-phase carbon and oxygen (and their molecular products), and abundance and properties of dust grains. The most efficient cooling mechanisms during the early collapse stages are via radiation through fine structure lines of C and O, as well as rotational transitions in abundant molecules such as CO and H2O. Furthermore, dust grains are crucial in driving molecular cloud chemistry, as dust opacity shields cores from radiation, and icy mantles on grain surfaces enable chemical reactions to occur that would not happen in the gas phase.We present the first results of a programme using spectroscopy obtained with PACS and SPIRE onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The sample of massive SMC and LMC YSOs is well characterised at mid-IR wavelengths, and includes both deeply embedded sources and compact HII regions. We measure the strengths of key gas-phase cooling species ([OI], [CII], H2O, CO, OH), in order to estimate temperature, density, ionisation state and abundances. This analysis directly probes the potential metallicity effect, since it quantifies the relative luminosities of the species that promote envelope cooling and thus constrain the cooling budget of the YSO envelopes. Preliminary results indicate that while [OI], [CII] and CO emission is widely detected, H2O and OH is weak or absent in most YSOs. Does this re-enforce the scarcity of H2O hypothesized by Oliveira et al. (2011,2013), now in the gas-phase? We also use the extension and morphology of the [OI], [CII] and [OIII] emission to

  13. Envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects in the Serpens Molecular Cloud.

    PubMed

    Hogerheijde, M R; van Dishoeck, E F; Salverda, J M; Blake, G A

    1999-03-01

    Aperture-synthesis and single-dish (sub-) millimeter molecular-line and continuum observations reveal in great detail the envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects (SMM 1 = FIRS 1, SMM 2, SMM 3, SMM 4) in the densely star-forming Serpens Molecular Cloud. SMM 1, 3, and 4 show partially resolved (>2" = 800 AU) continuum emission in the beam of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array at lambda = 3.4-1.4 mm. The continuum visibilities accurately constrain the density structure in the envelopes, which can be described by a radial power law with slope -2.0 +/- 0.5 on scales of 300 to 8000 AU. Inferred envelope masses within a radius of 8000 AU are 8.7, 3.0, and 5.3 Msolar for SMM 1, 3, and 4, respectively. A point source with 20%-30% of the total flux at 1.1 mm is required to fit the observations on long baselines, corresponding to warm envelope material within approximately 100 AU or a circumstellar disk. No continuum emission is detected interferometrically toward SMM 2, corresponding to an upper limit of 0.2 Msolar assuming Td = 24 K. The lack of any compact dust emission suggests that the SMM 2 core does not contain a central protostar. Aperture-synthesis observations of the 13CO, C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, H13CN, N2H+ 1-0, SiO 2-1, and SO 2(2)-1(1) transitions reveal compact emission toward SMM 1, 3, and 4. SMM 2 shows only a number of clumps scattered throughout the primary field of view, supporting the conclusion that this core does not contain a central star. The compact molecular emission around SMM 1, 3, and 4 traces 5"-10" (2000-4000 AU) diameter cores that correspond to the densest regions of the envelopes, as well as material directly associated with the molecular outflow. Especially prominent are the optically thick HCN and HCO+ lines that show up brightly along the walls of the outflow cavities. SO and SiO trace shocked material, where their abundances may be enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude over dark-cloud values. A total of 31 molecular

  14. Envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects in the Serpens Molecular Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogerheijde, M. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Salverda, J. M.; Blake, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Aperture-synthesis and single-dish (sub-) millimeter molecular-line and continuum observations reveal in great detail the envelope structure of deeply embedded young stellar objects (SMM 1 = FIRS 1, SMM 2, SMM 3, SMM 4) in the densely star-forming Serpens Molecular Cloud. SMM 1, 3, and 4 show partially resolved (>2" = 800 AU) continuum emission in the beam of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array at lambda = 3.4-1.4 mm. The continuum visibilities accurately constrain the density structure in the envelopes, which can be described by a radial power law with slope -2.0 +/- 0.5 on scales of 300 to 8000 AU. Inferred envelope masses within a radius of 8000 AU are 8.7, 3.0, and 5.3 Msolar for SMM 1, 3, and 4, respectively. A point source with 20%-30% of the total flux at 1.1 mm is required to fit the observations on long baselines, corresponding to warm envelope material within approximately 100 AU or a circumstellar disk. No continuum emission is detected interferometrically toward SMM 2, corresponding to an upper limit of 0.2 Msolar assuming Td = 24 K. The lack of any compact dust emission suggests that the SMM 2 core does not contain a central protostar. Aperture-synthesis observations of the 13CO, C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, HCN, H13CN, N2H+ 1-0, SiO 2-1, and SO 2(2)-1(1) transitions reveal compact emission toward SMM 1, 3, and 4. SMM 2 shows only a number of clumps scattered throughout the primary field of view, supporting the conclusion that this core does not contain a central star. The compact molecular emission around SMM 1, 3, and 4 traces 5"-10" (2000-4000 AU) diameter cores that correspond to the densest regions of the envelopes, as well as material directly associated with the molecular outflow. Especially prominent are the optically thick HCN and HCO+ lines that show up brightly along the walls of the outflow cavities. SO and SiO trace shocked material, where their abundances may be enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude over dark-cloud values. A total of 31 molecular

  15. A Possible Origin of the H-H Objects in Young Stellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouveia dal Pino, E.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. La presencIa de flujos coljmados asocjados con objetos estelares j6venes es un fen6meno comun en reglones de formacI6n estelar. Estos chorros frecuentemente muestran una cadena de reglones de lineas de emjsI6n, a varIas de las cuales se les conoce desde bace mucho tlempo objetos HerbIg-Haro (HAl). En el presente trabajo examjnamos la poslbIlI dad de que estos nudos sean condensaciones producIdas por inestabilidad termica en un plasma que se se expande sujeto a `bremsstrahlung' reco - binaci6n y perdida por radjacj5n en lineas de emjsj6n. Nostramos que el valor minimo de = P0/PN0 bajo condjcjones Isobaricas para el crecimien to de la inestabilidad termica es = (6/5) [9/(STc\\)e) - 3/2]; en donde P0 es la presi6n de particulas, PM0 la presi6n magnetica, `)e la tasa de expansI5n y Tc el tiempo de enfriatniento radiativo en el flujo (3eI plasma ambiente. Haciendo calculos no lineales, encontratnos que l9s flujos colitnados de temperatura K, tasas de perdida de masa `4 = 10-6 - lO 8 Ne y velocidades de flujo VJ = 100-400 km/s, resultan favorables para la formacl6n de condensaciones por inestabilidad termica con contrastes de densidad Pp/ .3 -2.0 creados en intervalos de tiempo mas cortos que el tiempo estirnado de expansl6n en los chorros, en donde Pp(Po) es la densidad en la regi5n (ambiente) perturbada. ABSTRACT. The presence of collimated outflows associated with young stellar objects is a common phenomenon in star-fortning regions. These jets frequently show a chain of emission-line regions several of which have long been known as Herbig-Haro (H-H) objects. In this paper we examine the possibility that these knots are condensations produced by thermal instability in an expanding plasma , recombination and emission-line radiation losses. We show that the minimum value of = P /PNo under isobaric conditions for the growth of a thermal instability 0is = (6/5)1 [9/(STcN)e) - 3/2]; where P0 is the particle pressure, NQ tWe magnetic pressure, N) the expansion rate

  16. Linking low- to high-mass young stellar objects with Herschel-HIFI observations of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José-García, I.; Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Braine, J.; Herpin, F.; Johnstone, D.; van Kempen, T. A.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Water probes the dynamics in young stellar objects (YSOs) effectively, especially shocks in molecular outflows. It is therefore a key molecule for exploring whether the physical properties of low-mass protostars can be extrapolated to massive YSOs, an important step in understanding the fundamental mechanisms regulating star formation. Aims: As part of the WISH key programme, we investigate excited water line properties as a function of source luminosity, in particular the dynamics and the excitation conditions of shocks along the outflow cavity wall. Methods: Velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI spectra of the H2O 202-111 (988 GHz), 211-202 (752 GHz) and 312-303 (1097 GHz) lines were analysed, together with 12CO J = 10-9 and 16-15, for 52 YSOs with bolometric luminosities ranging from <1 to >105 L⊙. The H2O and 12CO line profiles were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components which are related to the different physical structures of the protostellar system. The non-LTE radiative transfer code radex was used to constrain the excitation conditions of the shocks along the outflow cavity. Results: The profiles of the three excited water lines are similar, indicating that they probe the same gas. Two main emission components are seen in all YSOs: a broad component associated with non-dissociative shocks in the outflow cavity wall ("cavity shocks") and a narrow component associated with the quiescent envelope material. More than 60% of the total integrated intensity in the excited water lines comes from the broad cavity shock component, while the remaining emission comes mostly from the envelope for low-mass Class I, intermediate- and high-mass objects, and dissociative "spot shocks" for low-mass Class 0 protostars. The widths of the water lines are surprisingly similar from low- to high-mass YSOs, whereas 12CO J = 10-9 line widths increase slightly with Lbol. The excitation analysis of the cavity shock component shows stronger 752 GHz emission for high

  17. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT SEARCH TOWARD THE BOUNDARY OF THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE WITH NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Shogo; Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: nagata@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We have carried out near-infrared polarimetry toward the boundary of the Central Molecular Zone, in the field of (–1.°4 ≲ l ≲ –0.°3 and 1.°0 ≲ l ≲ 2.°9, |b| ≲ 0.°1), using the near-infrared polarimetric camera SIRPOL on the 1.4 m Infrared Survey Facility telescope. We have selected 112 intrinsically polarized sources on the basis of the estimate of interstellar polarization on Stokes Q/I – U/I planes. The selected sources are brighter than K{sub S} = 14.5 mag and have polarimetric uncertainty δP < 1%. Ten of these distinctive polarized sources are fit well with spectral energy distributions of young stellar objects when using the photometry in the archive of the Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data. However, many sources have spectral energy distributions of normal stars suffering from heavy interstellar extinction; these might be stars behind dark clouds. Due to the small number of distinctive polarized sources and candidates of young stellar objects, we cannot judge if they are declining in number outside the Central Molecular Zone. Many massive candidates for young stellar objects in the literature have only small intrinsic polarization. This might suggest that their masses are 4-15 M {sub ☉}, whose intrinsic polarization has been expected to be small.

  18. MEASURING THE ABUNDANCE OF SUB-KILOMETER-SIZED KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sari, Re'em; Nelan, Edmund P.; Livio, Mario; Wenz, Michael; Muirhead, Philip; Javanfar, Nikta

    2012-12-20

    We present here the analysis of about 19,500 new star hours of low ecliptic latitude observations (|b| {<=} 20 Degree-Sign ) obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope's Fine Guidance Sensors over a time span of more than nine years, which is in addition to the {approx}12, 000 star hours previously analyzed by Schlichting et al. Our search for stellar occultations by small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) yielded one new candidate event corresponding to a body with a 530 {+-} 70 m radius at a distance of about 40 AU. Using bootstrap simulations, we estimate a probability of Almost-Equal-To 5% that this event is due to random statistical fluctuations within the new data set. Combining this new event with the single KBO occultation reported by Schlichting et al. we arrive at the following results: (1) the ecliptic latitudes of 6. Degree-Sign 6 and 14. Degree-Sign 4 of the two events are consistent with the observed inclination distribution of larger, 100-km-sized KBOs. (2) Assuming that small, sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have the same ecliptic latitude distribution as their larger counterparts, we find an ecliptic surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of N(r > 250 m) = 1.1{sup +1.5}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} deg{sup -2}; if sub-kilometer-sized KBOs have instead a uniform ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree-Sign < b < 20 Degree-Sign then N(r > 250 m) = 4.4{sup +5.8}{sub -2.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2}. This is the best measurement of the surface density of sub-kilometer-sized KBOs to date. (3) Assuming the KBO size distribution can be well described by a single power law given by N(> r){proportional_to}r{sup 1-q}, where N(> r) is the number of KBOs with radii greater than r, and q is the power-law index, we find q = 3.8 {+-} 0.2 and q = 3.6 {+-} 0.2 for a KBO ecliptic latitude distribution that follows the observed distribution for larger, 100-km-sized KBOs and a uniform KBO ecliptic latitude distribution for -20 Degree

  19. STELLAR ROTATION PERIODS OF THE KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST: A DEARTH OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS AROUND FAST ROTATORS

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; Aigrain, S.

    2013-09-20

    We present a large sample of stellar rotation periods for Kepler Objects of Interest, based on three years of public Kepler data. These were measured by detecting periodic photometric modulation caused by star spots, using an algorithm based on the autocorrelation function of the light curve, developed recently by McQuillan, Aigrain and Mazeh (2013). Of the 1919 main-sequence exoplanet hosts analyzed, robust rotation periods were detected for 737. Comparing the detected stellar periods to the orbital periods of the innermost planet in each system reveals a notable lack of close-in planets around rapid rotators. It appears that only slowly spinning stars with rotation periods longer than 5-10 days host planets on orbits shorter than 2 or 3 days, although the mechanism(s) that lead(s) to this is not clear.

  20. EC 19314 - 5915 - A bright, eclipsing cataclysmic variable from the Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Kilkenny, D.; Stobie, R. S.; Remillard, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    A deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable, with an orbital period of 4.75 hr, has been discovered in the southern Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey. The star, EC 19314 - 5915, lies close to the positional constraints of a previously unidentified HEAO-1 hard X-ray source, 1H1930 - 5989. Its optical spectrum is unusual in that it shows, apart from the emission lines characteristic of a novalike, or dwarf nova cataclysmic variable (Balmer, He I and He II), metallic absorption lines typical of a late-G star. The individual time-resolved spectra, with the tertiary absorption lines removed, show absorption reversals in the Balmer emission lines, increasing in strength for the higher series. The Balmer emission radial velocities are therefore severely distorted in comparison to the He II 4686-A emission and He I 4471-A absorption radial velocity curves. An independent distance estimate of about 600 pc is derived for EC19314 - 5915, from the spectroscopic parallax of the third star.

  1. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Padgett, Deborah L.; Terebey, Susan; Angione, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Leisawitz, David

    2014-06-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  2. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of Young Stellar Objects in the Lynds 1509 Dark Cloud in Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wilson M.; Padgett, Deborah L.; Terebey, Susan; Angione, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Leisawitz, David

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  3. Compact object mergers: observations of supermassive binary black holes and stellar tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, S.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    The capture and disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and the formation and coalescence of binaries, are inevitable consequences of the presence of SMBHs at the cores of galaxies. Pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and binary SMBHs are important stages in the evolution of galaxy mergers, and an intense search for these systems is currently ongoing. In the early and advanced stages of galaxy merging, observations of the triggering of accretion onto one or both BHs inform us about feedback processes and BH growth. Identification of the compact binary SMBHs at parsec and sub-parsec scales provides us with important constraints on the interaction processes that govern the shrinkage of the binary beyond the ``final parsec''. Coalescing binary SMBHs are among the most powerful sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the universe. Stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) appear as luminous, transient, accretion flares when part of the stellar material is accreted by the SMBH. About 30 events have been identified by multi-wavelength observations by now, and they will be detected in the thousands in future ground-based or space-based transient surveys. The study of TDEs provides us with a variety of new astrophysical tools and applications, related to fundamental physics or astrophysics. Here, we provide a review of the current status of observations of SMBH pairs and binaries, and TDEs, and discuss astrophysical implications.

  4. Bipolar Flows and X-ray Emission from Young Stellar Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uchida, Y.; Shibata, K.

    1985-01-01

    Production of both the large scale CO bipolar flows and the small scale optical bipolar jets from the star-forming regions is given interpretation in terms of a magnetic mechanism related to accretion model. It is shown by an axisymmetric 2.5-dimensional simulation that the large scale cold bipolar flow may be produced in the relaxation of the magnetic twist which is created by the rotational winding-up of the magnetic field in the contracting disk. In contrast, the small scale warm bipolar jets may be driven by the recoiling shocks which are produced in the crash at the stellar surface of the infalling material released from the inner edge of the disk through magnetic reconnections.

  5. YSOVAR: Mid-infrared Variability of Young Stellar Objects and Their Disks in the Cluster IRAS 20050+2720

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Cody, A. M.; Covey, K. R.; Günther, H. M.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Wolk, S. J.; Espaillat, C.; Forbrich, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Hora, J. L.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Song, Inseok

    2015-10-01

    We present a time-variability study of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cluster IRAS 20050+2720, performed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Spitzer Space Telescope; this study is part of the Young Stellar Object VARiability (YSOVAR) project. We have collected light curves for 181 cluster members over 60 days. We find a high variability fraction among embedded cluster members of ca. 70%, whereas young stars without a detectable disk display variability less often (in ca. 50% of the cases) and with lower amplitudes. We detect periodic variability for 33 sources with periods primarily in the range of 2-6 days. Practically all embedded periodic sources display additional variability on top of their periodicity. Furthermore, we analyze the slopes of the tracks that our sources span in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We find that sources with long variability time scales tend to display CMD slopes that are at least partially influenced by accretion processes, while sources with short variability timescales tend to display extinction-dominated slopes. We find a tentative trend of X-ray detected cluster members to vary on longer timescales than the X-ray undetected members.

  6. YSOVAR: MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND THEIR DISKS IN THE CLUSTER IRAS 20050+2720

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L.; Cody, A. M.; Covey, K. R.; Günther, H. M.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Forbrich, J.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Song, Inseok

    2015-10-15

    We present a time-variability study of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cluster IRAS 20050+2720, performed at 3.6 and 4.5 μm with the Spitzer Space Telescope; this study is part of the Young Stellar Object VARiability (YSOVAR) project. We have collected light curves for 181 cluster members over 60 days. We find a high variability fraction among embedded cluster members of ca. 70%, whereas young stars without a detectable disk display variability less often (in ca. 50% of the cases) and with lower amplitudes. We detect periodic variability for 33 sources with periods primarily in the range of 2–6 days. Practically all embedded periodic sources display additional variability on top of their periodicity. Furthermore, we analyze the slopes of the tracks that our sources span in the color–magnitude diagram (CMD). We find that sources with long variability time scales tend to display CMD slopes that are at least partially influenced by accretion processes, while sources with short variability timescales tend to display extinction-dominated slopes. We find a tentative trend of X-ray detected cluster members to vary on longer timescales than the X-ray undetected members.

  7. Outflow-Induced Dynamical and Radiative Instability in Stellar Envelopes with an Application to Luminous Blue Variables and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical models of the remnants of massive stars in a very hot, post-red-supergiant phase display no obvious instability if standard assumptions are made. However, the brightest observed classical luminous blue variables (LBVs) may well belong to such a phase. A simple time-dependent theory of moving stellar envelopes is developed in order to treat deep hydrodynamical disturbances caused by surface mass loss and to test the moving envelopes for dynamical instability. In the case of steady-state outflow, the theory reduces to the equivalent of the Castor, Abbott, and Klein formulation for optically thick winds at distances well above the sonic point. The time-dependent version indicates that the brightest and hottest LBVs are both dynamically and radiatively unstable, as a result of the substantial lowering of the generalized Eddington luminosity limit by the mass-loss acceleration. It is suggested that dynamical instability, by triggering secular cycles of mass loss, is primarily what differentiates LBVs from the purely radiatively unstable Wolf-Rayet stars. Furthermore, when accurate main-sequence mass-loss rates are used to calculate the evolutionary tracks, the predicted surface hydrogen and nitrogen abundances of the blue remnants agree much better with observations of the brightest LBVs than before.

  8. The nature of stationary components in jets from young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Peter

    2014-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that jets are essential for the star formation process. Our understanding of the jet launching process is, however, still fragmentary. In particular, new observations revealed (a) that jets from young stellar sources possess hot, stationary components close to the driving source that contrast the well-known moving parts of the jets further out and (b) possible evidence for plasma acceleration within a few 10 AU from the source.We propose to follow-up these new results by providing the required diagnostics to uncover the controversial origin of the stationary component and to constrain the location where the outflowing plasma is accelerated. Specifically, we propose to observe the classical T Tauri star DG Tau with STIS and the slit oriented along the jet axis to measure the plasma density of the warm (1e4 K) and hot (1e5 K) parts of the jet to distinguish between proposed models for the stationary component, as well as to follow the plasma traveling through the jet collimation region to test current jet launching models.

  9. Periodic Disk Eclipsing Stars: A New Class of Variable Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Laohakunakorn, N.; Seifahrt, A.; Staplefeldt, K.; Gee, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of 92.6 day periodic near-infrared flu variability for the Class I T Tauri star YLW 16A. Our data are from the 2MASS Calibration Point Source Working Database and constitute 1582 observations in J, H and Ks of a field in Rho Ophiuchus used to calibrate the 2MASS All-Sky Survey. We identify a light curve that brightens from a quiescent faint state by 0.4 mag for only 20% of the period. The long period cannot be explained by stellar rotation. We propose that YLW 16A is a triple YSO system, with an inner binary orbital period of 92.6 days. We postulate that we are observing a component of the binary being eclipsed by a circumbinary disk with respect to our line of site. YLW 16A joins WL 4 and KH-15D as a third member of a new class of disk-eclipsing young stars. Both YLW 16A and WL 4 have been identified to have tertiary companions with projected separations of 20--50 AU. We propose that the tertiary companion can warp the inner circumbinary disk to produce the disk eclipses. We present NIRSPEC observations of WL 4 that suggest three distinct radial velocity components, and present a model SED for YLW 16A. These systems will be useful in investigating terrestrial-zone YSO disk properties and dynamics at 1 Myr.

  10. Cataloged infrared sources in NIPSS data. I - The RSO 1 catalog. [Near Infrared Photographic Sky Survey Red Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, V. M.; Craine, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    A small number of selected near-infrared and visual photographic pairs from the Steward Observatory Near Infrared Photographic Sky Survey have been examined for content of stars more red than (V-I) of about 2.5 magnitudes. A simple manual extraction of these objects was carried out as a part of a preliminary evaluation of survey data and techniques for reducing it; the resulting list has been compiled as the first installment of a Catalog of Red Stellar Objects (Craine et al. 1979). Results of a cross correlation of this catalog with the IRC, AFGL, and EIC infrared catalogs are here presented. The results indicate that these photographs may be particularly useful for purposes of optical identification of short-wavelength infrared sources to limits much fainter than represented by presently existing infrared catalogs.

  11. Observation and Analysis of a Single-Chord Stellar Occultation by Kuiper Belt Object (50000) Quaoar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Allen B.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Person, M. J.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S.; Naranjo, O. A.; Navas, G. R.; Gulbis, A.; Winters, J. G.; Bianco, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Williams-MIT collaboration (www.stellaroccultations.info) predicted and observed a stellar occultation of 2UCAC 26260847 (mag 14.35) by KBO 50000 Quaoar (mag 18.9) on 8/9 July 2013. Observations were attempted from a total of five sites in Chile, Venezuela, and Massachusetts. Only one site, Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory in Venezuela, had a positive detection of the occultation, giving us a single chord on Quaoar. All other sites were cloudy. The light curve from the 8/9 July 2013 event has been analyzed with the assumption that Quaoar is ellipsoidal or spherical, placing bounds on some of Quaoar’s properties: diameter (> 1138 ± 25 km), density (< 1.82 ± 0.28 g cm-3), and albedo (< 0.14 ± 0.10). An independent prediction of the occultation’s shadow path by Fraser, Gwyn, et al. (2013) suggests that the chord is near-equatorial, which means that our bounds on Quaoar’s properties are closer to estimates. We will compare our result with that of the 11 February 2011 single-chord occultation detected by Sallum et al. (2011) and Person et al. (2011). A subsequent attempt to observe a second Quaoar occultation, that of 12/13 July 2013 in South Africa, failed because of cloudy weather. This work was supported in part by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants NNX08AO50G and NNH11ZDA001N to Williams College, NNX10AB27G to MIT, and USRA grant #8500-98-003 to Lowell Observatory. We thank Steven P. Souza at Williams, and other collaborators in planning and carrying out the various observations: including Libardo Zerpa, Joresly Villarreal, Richard Rojas, and Jorge Moreno at Llano del Hato, and Patricio Rojo and Matias Jones at Cerro Calan/U. Chile.

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/NEAR-INFRARED CAMERA AND MULTI-OBJECT SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE GLIMPSE9 STELLAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Messineo, Maria; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Trombley, Christine; Kudritzki, R. P.; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John

    2010-01-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer photometry, and low-resolution K-band spectra of the GLIMPSE9 stellar cluster. The newly obtained color-magnitude diagram shows a cluster sequence with H - K{sub S} = approx1 mag, indicating an interstellar extinction A{sub K{sub s}} = 1.6 +- 0.2 mag. The spectra of the three brightest stars show deep CO band heads, which indicate red supergiants with spectral type M1-M2. Two 09-B2 supergiants are also identified, which yield a spectrophotometric distance of 4.2 +- 0.4 kpc. Presuming that the population is coeval, we derive an age between 15 and 27 Myr, and a total cluster mass of 1600 +- 400 M{sub sun}, integrated down to 1 M{sub sun}. In the vicinity of GLIMPSE9 are several H II regions and supernova remnants, all of which (including GLIMPSE9) are probably associated with a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the inner galaxy. GLIMPSE9 probably represents one episode of massive star formation in this GMC. We have identified several other candidate stellar clusters of the same complex.

  13. A single sub-kilometre Kuiper belt object from a stellar occultation in archival data.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, H E; Ofek, E O; Wenz, M; Sari, R; Gal-Yam, A; Livio, M; Nelan, E; Zucker, S

    2009-12-17

    The Kuiper belt is a remnant of the primordial Solar System. Measurements of its size distribution constrain its accretion and collisional history, and the importance of material strength of Kuiper belt objects. Small, sub-kilometre-sized, Kuiper belt objects elude direct detection, but the signature of their occultations of background stars should be detectable. Observations at both optical and X-ray wavelengths claim to have detected such occultations, but their implied abundances are inconsistent with each other and far exceed theoretical expectations. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an occultation by a body with an approximately 500-metre radius at a distance of 45 astronomical units. The probability of this event arising from random statistical fluctuations within our data set is about two per cent. Our survey yields a surface density of Kuiper belt objects with radii exceeding 250 metres of 2.1(-1.7)(+4.8) x 10(7) deg(-2), ruling out inferred surface densities from previous claimed detections by more than 5sigma. The detection of only one event reveals a deficit of sub-kilometre-sized Kuiper belt objects compared to a population extrapolated from objects with radii exceeding 50 kilometres. This implies that sub-kilometre-sized objects are undergoing collisional erosion, just like debris disks observed around other stars.

  14. The evolution of accretion in young stellar objects: Strong accretors at 3-10 Myr

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Miller, Jon; McClure, Melissa; Hernández, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu

    2014-07-20

    While the rate of accretion onto T Tauri stars is predicted to decline with age, objects with strong accretion have been detected at ages of up to 10 Myr. We analyze a sample of these old accretors, identified by having a significant U band excess and infrared emission from a circumstellar disk. Objects were selected from the ∼3 Myr σ Ori, 4-6 Myr Orion OB1b, and 7-10 Myr Orion OB1a star forming associations. We use high-resolution spectra from the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle to estimate the veiling of absorption lines and calculate extinction for our T Tauri sample. We also use observations obtained with the Magellan Echellette and, in a few cases, the SWIFT Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope to estimate the excess produced in the accretion shock, which is then fit with accretion shock models to estimate the accretion rate. We find that even objects as old as 10 Myr may have high accretion rates, up to ∼10{sup –8} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. These objects cannot be explained by viscous evolution models, which would deplete the disk in shorter timescales unless the initial disk mass is very high, a situation that is unstable. We show that the infrared spectral energy distribution of one object, CVSO 206, does not reveal evidence of significant dust evolution, which would be expected during the 10 Myr lifetime. We compare this object to predictions from photoevaporation and planet formation models and suggest that neither of these processes have had a strong impact on the disk of CVSO 206.

  15. The Evolution of Accretion in Young Stellar Objects: Strong Accretors at 3-10 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Hernández, Jesus; Hartmann, Lee; Briceno, Cesar; Miller, Jon; Espaillat, Catherine; McClure, Melissa

    2014-07-01

    While the rate of accretion onto T Tauri stars is predicted to decline with age, objects with strong accretion have been detected at ages of up to 10 Myr. We analyze a sample of these old accretors, identified by having a significant U band excess and infrared emission from a circumstellar disk. Objects were selected from the ~3 Myr σ Ori, 4-6 Myr Orion OB1b, and 7-10 Myr Orion OB1a star forming associations. We use high-resolution spectra from the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle to estimate the veiling of absorption lines and calculate extinction for our T Tauri sample. We also use observations obtained with the Magellan Echellette and, in a few cases, the SWIFT Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope to estimate the excess produced in the accretion shock, which is then fit with accretion shock models to estimate the accretion rate. We find that even objects as old as 10 Myr may have high accretion rates, up to ~10-8 M ⊙ yr-1. These objects cannot be explained by viscous evolution models, which would deplete the disk in shorter timescales unless the initial disk mass is very high, a situation that is unstable. We show that the infrared spectral energy distribution of one object, CVSO 206, does not reveal evidence of significant dust evolution, which would be expected during the 10 Myr lifetime. We compare this object to predictions from photoevaporation and planet formation models and suggest that neither of these processes have had a strong impact on the disk of CVSO 206. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  16. [Searching for Rare Celestial Objects Automatically from Stellar Spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Eight].

    PubMed

    Si, Jian-min; Luo, A-li; Wu, Fu-zhao; Wu, Yi-hong

    2015-03-01

    There are many valuable rare and unusual objects in spectra dataset of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release eight (DR8), such as special white dwarfs (DZ, DQ, DC), carbon stars, white dwarf main-sequence binaries (WDMS), cataclysmic variable (CV) stars and so on, so it is extremely significant to search for rare and unusual celestial objects from massive spectra dataset. A novel algorithm based on Kernel dense estimation and K-nearest neighborhoods (KNN) has been presented, and applied to search for rare and unusual celestial objects from 546 383 stellar spectra of SDSS DR8. Their densities are estimated using Gaussian kernel density estimation, the top 5 000 spectra in descend order by their densities are selected as rare objects, and the top 300 000 spectra in ascend order by their densities are selected as normal objects. Then, KNN were used to classify the rest objects, and simultaneously K nearest neighbors of the 5 000 rare spectra are also selected as rare objects. As a result, there are totally 21 193 spectra selected as initial rare spectra, which include error spectra caused by deletion, redden, bad calibration, spectra consisting of different physically irrelevant components, planetary nebulas, QSOs, special white dwarfs (DZ, DQ, DC), carbon stars, white dwarf main-sequence binaries (WDMS), cataclysmic variable (CV) stars and so on. By cross identification with SIMBAD, NED, ADS and major literature, it is found that three DZ white dwarfs, one WDMS, two CVs with company of G-type star, three CVs candidates, six DC white dwarfs, one DC white dwarf candidate and one BL Lacertae (BL lac) candidate are our new findings. We also have found one special DA white dwarf with emission lines of Ca II triple and Mg I, and one unknown object whose spectrum looks like a late M star with emission lines and its image looks like a galaxy or nebula.

  17. Stellar encounters as the origin of distant Solar System objects in highly eccentric orbits.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Scott J; Bromley, Benjamin C

    2004-12-02

    The Kuiper belt extends from the orbit of Neptune at 30 au to an abrupt outer edge about 50 au from the Sun. Beyond the edge is a sparse population of objects with large orbital eccentricities. Neptune shapes the dynamics of most Kuiper belt objects, but the recently discovered planet 2003 VB12 (Sedna) has an eccentric orbit with a perihelion distance of 70 au, far beyond Neptune's gravitational influence. Although influences from passing stars could have created the Kuiper belt's outer edge and could have scattered objects into large, eccentric orbits, no model currently explains the properties of Sedna. Here we show that a passing star probably scattered Sedna from the Kuiper belt into its observed orbit. The likelihood that a planet at 60-80 au can be scattered into Sedna's orbit is about 50 per cent; this estimate depends critically on the geometry of the fly-by. Even more interesting is the approximately 10 per cent chance that Sedna was captured from the outer disk of the passing star. Most captures have very high inclination orbits; detection of such objects would confirm the presence of extrasolar planets in our own Solar System.

  18. H2O masers in a jet-driven bow shock: episodic ejection from a massive young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. A.; Handa, T.; Nagayama, T.; Sunada, K.; Omodaka, T.

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) multi-epoch VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) 22 GHz water maser observations of S255IR-SMA1, a massive young stellar object located in the S255 star-forming region. By annual parallax the source distance was measured as D = 1.78^{+0.12}_{-0.11} kpc and the source systemic motion was (μαcos δ, μδ) = (-0.13 ± 0.20, -0.06 ± 0.27) mas yr-1. Masers appear to trace a U-shaped bow shock whose morphology and proper motions are well reproduced by a jet-driven outflow model with a jet radius of about 6 au. The maser data, in the context of other works in the literature, reveal ejections from S255IR-SMA1 to be episodic, operating on time-scales of ˜1000 yr.

  19. MID-INFRARED SIZE SURVEY OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS: DESCRIPTION OF KECK SEGMENT-TILTING EXPERIMENT AND BASIC RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Monnier, J. D.; Tannirkulam, A.; Tuthill, P. G.; Ireland, M.; Cohen, R.; Perrin, M. D.

    2009-07-20

    The mid-infrared properties of pre-planetary disks are sensitive to the temperature and flaring profiles of disks for the regions where planet formation is expected to occur. In order to constrain theories of planet formation, we have carried out a mid-infrared ({lambda} = 10.7 {mu}m) size survey of young stellar objects using the segmented Keck telescope in a novel configuration. We introduced a customized pattern of tilts to individual mirror segments to allow efficient sparse-aperture interferometry, allowing full aperture synthesis imaging with higher calibration precision than traditional imaging. In contrast to previous surveys on smaller telescopes and with poorer calibration precision, we find that most objects in our sample are partially resolved. Here, we present the main observational results of our survey of five embedded massive protostars, 25 Herbig Ae/Be stars, 3 T Tauri stars, 1 FU Ori system, and five emission-line objects of uncertain classification. The observed mid-infrared sizes do not obey the size-luminosity relation found at near-infrared wavelengths and a companion paper will provide further modeling analysis of this sample. In addition, we report imaging results for a few of the most resolved objects, including complex emission around embedded massive protostars, the photoevaporating circumbinary disk around MWC 361A, and the subarcsecond binaries T Tau, FU Ori, and MWC 1080.

  20. FIRST KECK NULLING OBSERVATIONS OF A YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT: PROBING THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT OF THE HERBIG Ae STAR MWC 325

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, S.; Hrynevich, M.; Ohnaka, K.; Hillenbrand, L.; Ridgway, S. T.; Colavita, M. M.; Traub, W. A.; Akeson, R. L.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Cotton, W.; Danchi, W. C.

    2012-02-20

    We present the first N-band nulling plus K- and L-band V{sup 2} observations of a young stellar object, MWC 325, taken with the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. The Keck nuller was designed for the study of faint dust signatures associated with debris disks, but it also has a unique capability for studying the temperature and density distribution of denser disks found around young stellar objects. Interferometric observations of MWC 325 at K, L, and N encompass a factor of five in spectral range and thus, especially when spectrally dispersed within each band, enable characterization of the structure of the inner disk regions where planets form. Fitting our observations with geometric models such as a uniform disk or a Gaussian disk show that the apparent size increases monotonically with wavelength in the 2-12 {mu}m wavelength region, confirming the widely held assumption based on radiative transfer models, now with spatially resolved measurements over a broad wavelength range, that disks are extended with a temperature gradient. The effective size is a factor of about 1.4 and 2.2 larger in the L band and N band, respectively, compared to that in the K band. The existing interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution can be reproduced by a flat disk or a weakly shadowed nearly flat disk model, with only slight flaring in the outer regions of the disk, consisting of representative 'sub-micron' (0.1 {mu}m) and 'micron' (2 {mu}m) grains of a 50:50 ratio of silicate and graphite. This is in marked contrast to the disks previously found in other Herbig Ae/Be stars, suggesting a wide variety in the disk properties among Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  1. First Keck Nulling Observations of a Young Stellar Object: Probing the Circumstellar Environment of the Herbig Ae star MWC 325

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragland, S.; Ohnaka, K.; Hillenbrand, L.; Ridgway, S. T.; Colavita, M. M.; Akeson, R. L.; Cotton, W.; Danichi, W. C.; Hrynevych, M.; Milan-Gabet, R.; Traub, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first N-band nulling plus K- and L-band V(sup 2) observations of a young stellar object, MWC325, taken with the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. The Keck nuller was designed for the study of faint dust signatures associated with debris disks, but it also has a unique capability for studying the temperature and density distribution of denser disks found around young stellar objects. Interferometric observations of MWC 325 at K, L and N encompass a factor of five in spectral range and thus, especially when spectrally dispersed within each band, enable characterization of the structure of the inner disk regions where planets form. Fitting our observations with geometric models such as a uniform disk or a Gaussian disk show that the apparent size increases monotonically with wavelength in the 2-12 micrometer wavelength region, confirming the widely held assumption based on radiative transfer models, now with spatially resolved measurements over broad wavelength range, that disks are extended with a temperature gradient. The effective size is a factor of about 1.3 and 2 larger in the Lband and N-band, respectively, compared to that in the K-band. The existing interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution can be reproduced by a flat disk or a weakly shadowed nearly flat-disk model, with only slight flaring in the outer regions of the disk, consisting of representative "sub-micron" (0.1 micron) and "micron" (2 micron) grains of a 50:50 ratio of silicate and graphite. This is marked contrast with the disks previously found in other Herbig Ae/Be stars suggesting a wide variety in the disk properties among Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  2. First Keck Nulling Observations of a Young Stellar Object: Probing the Circumstellar Environment of the Herbig Ae Star MWC325

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragland, S.; Ohnaka, K.; Hillenbrand, L.; Ridgway, S. T.; Colavita, M. M.; Akeson, R. L.; Cotton, W.; Danchi, W. C.; Hrynevich, M.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Traub, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first N-band nulling plus K- and L-band V(sup 2) observations of a young stellar object, MWC 325, taken with the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. The Keck nuller was designed for the study of faint dust signatures associated with debris disks, but it also has a unique capability for studying the temperature and density distribution of denser disks found around young stellar objects. Interferometric observations of MWC 325 at K, L, and N encompass a factor of five in spectral range and thus, especially when spectrally dispersed within each band, enable characterization of the structure of the inner disk regions where planets form. Fitting our observations with . geometric models such as a uniform disk or a Gaussian disk show that the apparent size increases 'monotonically with wavelength in the 2-12/Lm wavelength region, confirming the widely held assumption based on radiative transfer models, now with spatially resolved measurements over a broad wavelength range, that disks are extended with a temperature gradient. The effective size is a factor of about 1.4 and 2.2 larger in the L band and N band, respectively, compared to that in the K band. The existing interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution can be reproduced by a flat disk or a weakly shadowed nearly flat disk model, with only slight flaring in the outer regions of the disk, consisting of representative "sub-micron" (0.1 micron) and "micron" (2 micron) grains of a 50:50 ratio of silicate and graphite. This is in marked contrast io the disks previously found in other Herbig Ae/Be stars, suggesting a wide variety in the disk properties among Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  3. A Mid-Infrared Imaging Survey of Embedded Young Stellar Objects in the (rho) Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsony, Mary; Ressler, Michael E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive, new, ground-based mid-infrared imaging survey of the young stellar population of the (rho) Ophiuchi cloud are presented. Data were acquired at the Palomar 5m and at the Keck 10m telescopes with the MIRLIN and LWS instruments, at 0'.5 and 0'.25 resolutions, respectively. Of 172 survey objects, 85 were detected. Among the 22 multiple systems observed, 15 were resolved and their individual component fluxes determined. A plot of the frequency distribution of the detected objects with SED spectral slope shows that YSOs spend approx.4 x 10(exp 5) yr in the flat-spectrum phase, clearing out their remnant infall envelopes. Mid-infrared variability is found among a significant fraction of the surveyed objects and is found to occur for all SED classes with optically thick disks. Large-amplitude near-infrared variability, also found for all SED classes with optically thick disks, seems to occur with somewhat higher frequency at the earlier evolutionary stages. Although a general trend of mid-infrared excess and near-infrared veiling exists progressing through SED classes, with Class I objects generally exhibiting r(sub K) >= 1, flat-spectrum objects with r(sub K) >= 0.58, and Class III objects with r(sub K) =0, Class II objects exhibit the widest range of r(sub K) values, ranging from 0 <= r(sub K) <= 4.5. However, the highly variable value of veiling that a single source can exhibit in any of the SED classes in which active disk accretion can take place is striking and is direct observational evidence for highly time-variable accretion activity in disks. Finally, by comparing mid-infrared versus near-infrared excesses in a subsample with well-determined effective temperatures and extinction values, disk-clearing mechanisms are explored. The results are consistent with disk clearing proceeding from the inside out.

  4. Insights into stellar and binary evolution from gravitational-wave observations of merging compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Advanced LIGO finished its first observing run (O1) at the begining of 2016, at a sensitivity ~3 times that of the initial LIGO detectors. This increased sensitivity makes the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves a realistic prospect over the next few years. One of the most promising sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors is the merger of two compact objects; neutron stars or black holes. These objects are formed as the end point of the evolution of massive stars in close binaries. There remain many poorly understood processes in the lives of massive stars and the evolution of close binary systems. These processes include the distribution of kicks received by black holes at birth, the amount of angular momentum lost from a system during a mass transfer episode, and the common envelope event. One way of attempting to understand these processes is to attempt to constrain them observationally using eventual gravitational-wave observations of compact binary mergers. Here we present recent work on this front.

  5. Application of USNO-B1.0 towards selecting objects with displaced blue and red components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayson, Joel S.

    2016-03-01

    We have conducted a feasibility study to determine the effectiveness of using USNO-B1.0 data to preferentially detect objects with displaced red and blue components. A procedure was developed to search catalogue entries for such objects, which include M dwarfs paired with white dwarfs or with earlier main-sequence stars, and galaxies with asymmetric colour distributions. Residual differences between red and blue and infrared and blue scanned emulsion images define vectors, which, when appropriately aligned and of sufficient length, signal potential candidates. Test sample sets were analysed to evaluate the effective discrimination of the technique. Over 91 000 USNO-B1.0 catalogue entries at points throughout the celestial sphere were then filtered for acceptable combinations of entry observations and magnitudes and the resulting total of about 17 000 entries was winnowed down to a little more than 200 objects of interest. These were screened by visual examination of photo images to a final total of 146 candidates. About one quarter of these candidates coincide with SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) data. Those constituents fall into two groups, single and paired objects. SDSS identified several galaxies in the first group. Regarding the second group, at least half of its members were tentatively identified as main-sequence pairs, the greater portion being of widely separated spectral types. Two white dwarf-main-sequence pairs were also identified. Most importantly, the vectors formed from USNO-B1.0 residuals were in alignment with corresponding SDSS pair position angles, thereby supporting this work's central thesis.

  6. Differential binding of colors to objects in memory: red and yellow stick better than blue and green.

    PubMed

    Kuhbandner, Christof; Spitzer, Bernhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Both evolutionary considerations and recent research suggest that the color red serves as a signal indicating an object's importance. However, until now, there is no evidence that this signaling function of red is also reflected in human memory. To examine the effect of red on memory, we conducted four experiments in which we presented objects colored in four different colors (red, green, blue, and yellow) and measured later memory for the presence of an object and for the color of an object. Across experiments, we varied the type of objects (words vs. pictures), task complexity (single objects vs. multiple objects in visual scenes), and intentionality of encoding (intentional vs. incidental learning). Memory for the presence of an object was not influenced by color. However, in all four experiments, memory for the color of an object depended on color type and was particularly high for red and yellow-colored objects and particularly low for green-colored objects, indicating that the binding of colors into object memory representations varies as a function of color type. Analyzing the observers' confidence in their color memories revealed that color not only influenced objective memory performance but also subjective confidence. Subjective confidence judgments differentiated well between correct and incorrect color memories for red-colored objects, but poorly for green-colored objects. Our findings reveal a previously unknown color effect which may be of considerable interest for both basic color research and applied settings like eyewitness testimony in which memory for color features is relevant. Furthermore, our results indicate that feature binding in memory is not a uniform process by which any attended feature is automatically bound into unitary memory representations. Rather, memory binding seems to vary across different subtypes of features, a finding that supports recent research showing that object features are stored in memory rather independently from

  7. A full 1---40 micron spectral energy distribution for the Becklin-Neugebauer object: Placing constraints on disk size for a runaway massive young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuping, Ralph; Keller, Luke D.; Adams, Joseph D.; Petkova, Maya; Wood, Kenneth; Herter, Terry; Sloan, Greg; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas; Greene, Thomas P.; Ennico, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    The Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) Object—one of the brightest infrared obejcts in the sky—is a highly luminous young stellar object (YSO) deeply embedded in Orion Molecular Cloud 1 (OMC-1), which sits behind the Orion Nebula (M42). The BN object is likely a 8—15 M⊙ star and has no obvious optical counterpart due to high visual extinction on the line of sight. Furthermore, recent radio studies show that BN is moving towards the northwest at approximately 26 km/s with respect to the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), which may indicate that BN was dynamically ejected from either the Trapezium or from within OMC-1 itself. Near-IR polarimetry suggests that BN is surrounded by a large (R=800 AU) disk, which is surprising since a close encounter leading to an ejection would likely disrupt and/or truncate a disk of this size. In this poster presentation, we present new SOFIA-FORCAST grism spectroscopy of BN from 10—40 μm. In conjunction with previous SOFIA-FORCAST photometry and data form the literature, we present the full 1—40 μm SED of BN which we compare to theoretical models using the HOCHUNK-3D radiative equilibrium code. We report constraints on disk parameters and discuss implications for dynamical ejection scenarios.

  8. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joe; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Godfrey, Paige A.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    The physical and atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs are deeply entangled due to the degenerate effects of mass, age, metallicity, clouds and dust, activity, rotation, and possibly even formation mechanism on observed spectra. Accurate determination of fundamental parameters for a wide diversity of objects at the low end of the IMF is thus crucial to testing stellar and planetary formation theories. To determine these quantities, we constructed and flux calibrated nearly-complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 221 M, L, T, and Y dwarfs using published parallaxes and 0.3-40 μm spectra and photometry. From these homogeneous SEDs, we calculated bolometric luminosity (Lbol), effective temperature (Teff), mass, surface gravity, radius, spectral indexes, synthetic photometry, and bolometric corrections (BCs) for each object. We used these results to derive Lbol, Teff, and BC polynomial relations across the entire very-low-mass star/brown dwarf/planetary mass regime. We use a subsample of objects with age constraints based on nearby young moving group membership, companionship with a young star, or spectral signatures of low surface gravity to define new age-sensitive diagnostics and characterize the reddening of young substellar atmospheres as a redistribution of flux from the near-infrared into the mid-infrared. Consequently we find the SED flux pivots at Ks band, making BCKs as a function of spectral type a tight and age independent relationship. We find that young L dwarfs are systematically 300 K cooler than field age objects of the same spectral type and up to 600 K cooler than field age objects of the same absolute H magnitude. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons of these empirical results to best fit parameters from four different model atmosphere grids via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis in order to create prescriptions for the reliable and efficient characterization of new ultracool dwarfs.

  9. ASSOCIATIONS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS WITH ACTIVE, LOW-REDSHIFT SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, G.; Napier, W. M. E-mail: smawmn@cardiff.ac.u

    2009-11-20

    Following the discovery in the 1960s of radio and optical QSOs it was found that some of them lie very close to low-redshift (z <= 0.01) spiral galaxies with separations of approx<2 arcmin. These were discovered both serendipitously by many observers, and systematically by Arp. They are some of the brightest QSOs in radio and optical wavelengths and are very rare. We have carried out a new statistical analysis of most of those galaxy-QSO pairs and find that the configurations have high statistical significance. We show that gravitational microlensing due to stars or other dark objects in the halos of the galaxies apparently cannot account for the excess. Sampling or identification bias likewise seems unable to explain it. Following this up we selected all approx4000 QSOs with g <= 18 from a catalog of confirmed QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and compared them with various subsets of galaxies from the RC 3 galaxy catalog. In contrast to the earlier results, no significant excess of such QSOs was found around these galaxies. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed.

  10. On the Nature of the FBS Blue Stellar Objects and the Completeness of the Bright Quasar Survey. Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A.; Goncalves, A.; Veron-Cetty, M.; Veron, P.

    In Paper I (Mickaelian et al. 1999), we compared the surface density of QSOs in the Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) and in the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) and concluded that the completeness of the BQS is of the order of 70% rather than 30-50% as suggested by several authors. A number of new observations recently became available, allowing a re-evaluation of this completeness. We now obtain a surface density of QSOs brighter than B = 16.16 in a subarea of the FBS covering ~2250 deg^2, equal to 0.012 deg^-2 (26 QSOs), implying a completeness of 53+/-10%.

  11. On the Nature of the FBS Blue Stellar Objects and the Completeness of the Bright Quasar Survey. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M. P.; Véron, P.

    2001-01-01

    In Paper I we compared the surface density of QSOs in the Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) and in the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) and concluded that the completeness of the BQS is of the order of 70% rather than 30-50% as suggested by several authors. A number of new observations recently became available, allowing a reevaluation of this completeness. We now obtain a surface density of QSOs brighter than B = 16.16 in a subarea of the FBS covering 2250 deg2, equal to 0.012 deg-2 (26 QSOs), implying a completeness of 53 ± 10%.

  12. Growth of a Massive Young Stellar Object Fed by a Gas Flow from a Companion Gas Clump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Ren, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Qizhou; Shen, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Keping

    2017-02-01

    We present a Submillimeter Array (SMA) observation toward the young massive double-core system G350.69-0.49. This system consists of a northeast (NE) diffuse gas bubble and a southwest (SW) massive young stellar object (MYSO), both clearly seen in the Spitzer images. The SMA observations reveal a gas flow between the NE bubble and the SW MYSO in a broad velocity range from 5 to 30 km s‑1 with respect to the system velocity. The gas flow is well confined within the interval between the two objects and traces a significant mass transfer from the NE gas bubble to the SW massive core. The transfer flow can supply the material accreted onto the SW MYSO at a rate of 4.2 × 10‑4 M⊙ yr‑1. The whole system therefore suggests a mode for the mass growth in the MYSO from a gas transfer flow launched from its companion gas clump, despite the driving mechanism of the transfer flow not being fully determined from the current data.

  13. A HIGHLY COLLIMATED WATER MASER BIPOLAR OUTFLOW IN THE CEPHEUS A HW3d MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chibueze, James O.; Imai, Hiroshi; Tafoya, Daniel; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Chong, Sze-Ning; Kameya, Osamu; Hirota, Tomoya; Torrelles, Jose M.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of multi-epoch very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) water (H{sub 2}O) maser observations carried out with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry toward the Cepheus A HW3d object. We measured for the first time relative proper motions of the H{sub 2}O maser features, whose spatio-kinematics traces a compact bipolar outflow. This outflow looks highly collimated and expanding through {approx}280 AU (400 mas) at a mean velocity of {approx}21 km s{sup -1} ({approx}6 mas yr{sup -1}) without taking into account the turbulent central maser cluster. The opening angle of the outflow is estimated to be {approx}30 Degree-Sign . The dynamical timescale of the outflow is estimated to be {approx}100 years. Our results provide strong support that HW3d harbors an internal massive young star, and the observed outflow could be tracing a very early phase of star formation. We also have analyzed Very Large Array archive data of 1.3 cm continuum emission obtained in 1995 and 2006 toward Cepheus A. The comparative result of the HW3d continuum emission suggests the possibility of the existence of distinct young stellar objects in HW3d and/or strong variability in one of their radio continuum emission components.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: South Galactic cap MCT blue objects (Lamontagne+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, R.; Demers, S.; Wesemael, F.; Fontaine, G.; Irwin, M. J.

    2016-07-01

    A detailed description of the first part of our survey, namely, the photographic observations (including plate scanning, photometric calibrations, and candidate selection), has been presented by Demers et al. (1986AJ.....92..878D). Briefly summarized, the MCT survey consists of 430 doubly exposed U and B plates, taken with the Curtis Schmidt telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) and covering 6750 deg2 (~15% of the whole sky) in a region defined by 19h<~RA<~7h and -90°<=DE<=0°. Our survey blankets most of the south Galactic cap of our Galaxy accessible from CTIO, up to b=-30°. The bulk of our spectroscopic material was gathered at CTIO with the 1.5m and 4m telescopes in the course of several observing runs since 1985. We have identified all 228 selected blue candidates [(U-B)pg<=-0.6] brighter than Bpg=16.5 in this region of the sky. (1 data file).

  15. Nature versus Nurture: Luminous Blue Variable Nebulae in and near Massive Stellar Clusters at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Morris, M. R.; Adams, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    Three luminous blue variables (LBVs) are located in and near the Quintuplet Cluster at the Galactic center: the Pistol Star, G0.120-0.048, and qF362. We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the region containing these three LBVs, obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. We argue that Pistol and G0.120-0.048 are identical "twins" that exhibit contrasting nebulae due to the external influence of their different environments. Our images reveal the asymmetric, compressed shell of hot dust surrounding the Pistol Star and provide the first detection of the thermal emission from the symmetric, hot dust envelope surrounding G0.120-0.048. However, no detection of hot dust associated with qF362 is made. Dust and gas composing the Pistol nebula are primarily heated and ionized by the nearby Quintuplet Cluster stars. The northern region of the Pistol nebula is decelerated due to the interaction with the high-velocity (2000 km s-1) winds from adjacent Wolf-Rayet Carbon (WC) stars. From fits to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Pistol nebula with the DustEM code we determine that the Pistol nebula is composed of a distribution of very small, transiently heated grains (10 to ~ 35 Å) having a total dust mass of 0.03 M ⊙, and that it exhibits a gradient of decreasing grain size from south to north due to differential sputtering by the winds from the WC stars. The total IR luminosity of the Pistol nebula is 5.2 × 105 L ⊙. Dust in the G0.120-0.048 nebula is primarily heated by the central star; however, the nebular gas is ionized externally by the Arches Cluster. Unlike the Pistol nebula, the G0.120-0.048 nebula is freely expanding into the surrounding medium. A grain size distribution identical to that of the non-sputtered region of the Pistol nebula satisfies the constraints placed on the G0.120-0.048 nebula from DustEM model fits to its SED and implies a total dust mass of 0.021 M ⊙. The total IR luminosity of the G0.120-0.048 nebula is ~105 L ⊙. From

  16. Nature versus nurture: Luminous blue variable nebulae in and near massive stellar clusters at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-04-20

    Three luminous blue variables (LBVs) are located in and near the Quintuplet Cluster at the Galactic center: the Pistol Star, G0.120-0.048, and qF362. We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the region containing these three LBVs, obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. We argue that Pistol and G0.120-0.048 are identical 'twins' that exhibit contrasting nebulae due to the external influence of their different environments. Our images reveal the asymmetric, compressed shell of hot dust surrounding the Pistol Star and provide the first detection of the thermal emission from the symmetric, hot dust envelope surrounding G0.120-0.048. However, no detection of hot dust associated with qF362 is made. Dust and gas composing the Pistol nebula are primarily heated and ionized by the nearby Quintuplet Cluster stars. The northern region of the Pistol nebula is decelerated due to the interaction with the high-velocity (2000 km s{sup –1}) winds from adjacent Wolf-Rayet Carbon (WC) stars. From fits to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Pistol nebula with the DustEM code we determine that the Pistol nebula is composed of a distribution of very small, transiently heated grains (10 to ∼ 35 Å) having a total dust mass of 0.03 M {sub ☉}, and that it exhibits a gradient of decreasing grain size from south to north due to differential sputtering by the winds from the WC stars. The total IR luminosity of the Pistol nebula is 5.2 × 10{sup 5} L {sub ☉}. Dust in the G0.120-0.048 nebula is primarily heated by the central star; however, the nebular gas is ionized externally by the Arches Cluster. Unlike the Pistol nebula, the G0.120-0.048 nebula is freely expanding into the surrounding medium. A grain size distribution identical to that of the non-sputtered region of the Pistol nebula satisfies the constraints placed on the G0.120-0.048 nebula from DustEM model fits to its SED and implies a total dust mass of 0.021 M {sub ☉}. The total IR luminosity of the G0

  17. THE MYSTERIOUS SICKLE OBJECT IN THE CARINA NEBULA: A STELLAR WIND INDUCED BOW SHOCK GRAZING A CLUMP?

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Preibisch, Thomas; Ratzka, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Optical and near-infrared images of the Carina Nebula show a peculiar arc-shaped feature, which we call the ''Sickle'', next to the B-type star Trumpler 14 MJ 218. We use multi-wavelength observations to explore and constrain the nature and origin of the nebulosity. Using submillimeter data from APEX/LABOCA as well as Herschel far-infrared maps, we discovered a dense, compact clump with a mass of {approx}40 M{sub Sun} located close to the apex of the Sickle. We investigate how the B star MJ 218, the Sickle, and the clump are related. Our numerical simulations show that, in principle, a B-type star located near the edge of a clump can produce a crescent-shaped wind shock front, similar to the observed morphology. However, the observed proper motion of MJ 218 suggests that the star moves with high velocity ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}) through the ambient interstellar gas. We argue that the star is just about to graze along the surface of the clump, and the Sickle is a bow shock induced by the stellar wind, as the object moves supersonically through the density gradient in the envelope of the clump.

  18. An EXES Search for Formaldehyde Gas in the Class I/II Young Stellar Object IRAS 04278+2253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin

    2013-10-01

    We propose to obtain high-resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy at 5.65915 microns wavelength of the Class I/II Young Stellar Object (YSO) IRAS 04278+2253 using EXES on SOFIA to search for absorption from formaldehyde (H2CO) gas. Low spectral resolution (R~90) Spitzer-IRS spectra of this YSO and a number of T Tauri stars (TTSs) show an unresolved band of absorption of full width half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.6 microns centered around 5.7 microns wavelength. Modeling of the Spitzer-IRS spectrum of IRAS 04278+2253 and the other TTSs indicates this band may be due to formaldehyde. Detection of individual absorption lines in high spectral resolution mid-infrared spectra of YSOs would be a significant finding, as the relatively recent mid-infrared spectral studies of TTSs that have found evidence for circumstellar gas in protoplanetary disks have found emission lines from gases such as H2O, OH, CO, CO2, HCN, and C2H2 (e.g., Carr & Najita 2008; Salyk et al 2008; Salyk et al 2009; Carr & Najita 2011; Pontoppidan et al 2011), but they do not find absorption lines, and they do not find H2CO.

  19. Near-infrared multiwavelength imaging polarimetry of the low-mass proto-stellar object HL Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, K.; Oya, S.; Pyo, T.-S.; Ishii, M.

    2008-12-01

    We present the {JHK}-band high-resolution polarimetric images of the low-mass proto-stellar object HL Tau using the adaptive optics-equipped CIAO instrument on the Subaru telescope. Our polarization images show a butterfly-shaped polarization disk with an ˜0.9 arcsec × 3.0 arcsec extension. In the nebula, where polarization vectors are centro-symmetrically aligned, the polarization is as high as PJ ˜30%, P_H˜42%, and PK ˜55%. On the other hand, low polarizations of P<3% in the J, H, and K bands and a low color excess ratio of EJ-H/EH-K=1.1 compared to the standard cloud value of 1.75 are detected towards the central star. We estimated the upper limit of the grain sizes a_max to be 0.4 μm in the nebula and ⪆0.7 μm in the line of sight towards the central star. Our high-resolution polarimetric data, which spatially resolves the polarization disk, provides us with important information about grain growth in the region close to the central star.

  20. THE SIZE, SHAPE, ALBEDO, DENSITY, AND ATMOSPHERIC LIMIT OF TRANSNEPTUNIAN OBJECT (50000) QUAOAR FROM MULTI-CHORD STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Braga-Ribas, F.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Sicardy, B.; Lellouch, E.; Lecacheux, J.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Tancredi, G.; Roland, S.; Bruzzone, S.; Assafin, M.; Vachier, F.; Colas, F.; Maury, A.; Emilio, M.; Amorim, A.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Almeida, L. A.; and others

    2013-08-10

    We present results derived from the first multi-chord stellar occultations by the transneptunian object (50000) Quaoar, observed on 2011 May 4 and 2012 February 17, and from a single-chord occultation observed on 2012 October 15. If the timing of the five chords obtained in 2011 were correct, then Quaoar would possess topographic features (crater or mountain) that would be too large for a body of this mass. An alternative model consists in applying time shifts to some chords to account for possible timing errors. Satisfactory elliptical fits to the chords are then possible, yielding an equivalent radius R{sub equiv} = 555 {+-} 2.5 km and geometric visual albedo p{sub V} = 0.109 {+-} 0.007. Assuming that Quaoar is a Maclaurin spheroid with an indeterminate polar aspect angle, we derive a true oblateness of {epsilon}= 0.087{sup +0.0268}{sub -0.0175}, an equatorial radius of 569{sup +24}{sub -17} km, and a density of 1.99 {+-} 0.46 g cm{sup -3}. The orientation of our preferred solution in the plane of the sky implies that Quaoar's satellite Weywot cannot have an equatorial orbit. Finally, we detect no global atmosphere around Quaoar, considering a pressure upper limit of about 20 nbar for a pure methane atmosphere.

  1. Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope’s Near Infrared Spectrograph: Observing Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Beck, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST’s sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec’s full wavelength coverage from 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We give examples of how this and other use cases are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  2. Probing the Evolution of Massive Young Stellar Objects using Weak Class II 6.7GHz Methanol Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Bethany Ann; Cunningham, Nichol

    2017-01-01

    We present results from an investigation of class II 6.7GHz methanol masers towards four Massive Young Stellar Objects (MYSOs). The sources, selected from the Red MSX Source (RMS) Survey (Lumsden et al. 2013), were previously understood to be non-detections for class II methanol maser emission in the methanol multi-beam (MMB) Survey (Caswell et al. 2010.) Class II methanol masers are a well-known sign post of massive star forming regions and may be utilized to probe their relatively poorly understood formation. It is possible that these non-detections are simply weak masers that are potentially associated with a younger evolutionary phase of MYSOs as hypothesized by Olmi et al. (2014). The sources were chosen to sample various stages of evolution, having similar 21 to 8 micron flux ratios and bolometric luminosities as other MYSOs with previous class II methanol maser detections. We observed all 4 MYSOs with ATCA (~2" resolution) at 10 times deeper sensitivity than previously obtained with the MMB survey and have a spectral resolution of 0.087kms^-1 . The raw data is reduced using the program Miriad (Sault, R. J., et al., 1995) and deconvolutioned using the program CASA (McMullin, J. P., et al. 2007.) We determine one of the four observed MYSOs is harboring a weak class II methanol maser. We discuss the possibility of sensitivity limitations on the remaining sources as well as environmental and evolutionary differences between the sources.

  3. A characterization of young stellar objects in BOK globules: Infrared imaging, spectral energy distributions, and molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Joao Lin

    1993-09-01

    A large-scale observational study of star formation in Bok globules is presented. A sample of 248 optically selected, small molecular clouds (mostly Bok globules) was probed using IRAS co-added images to search for associated young stellar objects (YSO's). Fifty-seven of the globules show evidence for a total of 72 point sources near locations of local dust heating. A sub-sample of 41 globules was observed, in the CO J = 1-0 line, to search for molecular outflows associated with the YSO's. Outflows were found in about one-third of the sample (14 of 41). The presence of an outflow was found to be correlated with the value of the IRAS-based spectral index (between 12 and 25 microns) of the YSO's. A near-infrared imaging survey of 34 globules containing YSO-candidates was conducted in the J, H, and K bands using infrared arrays. Eleven YSO-candidates displayed near-infrared nebulosities. This group of objects, when ordered by their values of the 12/25 microns spectral index, seems to form an evolutionary sequence, from younger objects with negative (red) indices and whose nebulosities are brighter in the K-band, to objects in later stages of pre-main-sequence evolution with positive (bluer) indices and whose nebular emission is brighter in the J-band. Comparison of the morphology of the infrared nebulae with the corresponding CO outflow morphology supports the idea that infrared reflection nebulae, seen at 2.2 microns, are good morphological tracers of CO mass outflow, and that CO outflows occur during the earliest YSO phases. Photometry of the near-infrared counterparts of the YSO-candidates was combined with their IRAS fluxes to yield broad-band spectral energy distributions (SED's). The broadness and steepness of the SED's indicated clear evidence of the evolutionary stage of the objects confirming their youth. Given all of the new information obtained, a firm conclusion emerged, namely that Bok globules are active sites of low-mass star formation.

  4. A MULTI-EPOCH, SIMULTANEOUS WATER AND METHANOL MASER SURVEY TOWARD INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jae-Han; Kim, Kee-Tae; Youn, So-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Hyunwoo; Oh, Chung Sik E-mail: whorujh@kasi.re.kr

    2011-10-01

    We report a multi-epoch, simultaneous 22 GHz H{sub 2}O and 44 GHz Class I CH{sub 3}OH maser line survey toward 180 intermediate-mass young stellar objects, including 14 Class 0 and 19 Class I objects, and 147 Herbig Ae/Be stars. We detected H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 3}OH maser emission toward 16 (9%) and 10 (6%) sources with one new H{sub 2}O and six new CH{sub 3}OH maser sources. The detection rates of both masers rapidly decrease as the central (proto)stars evolve, which is contrary to the trends in high-mass star-forming regions. This suggests that the excitations of the two masers are closely related to the evolutionary stage of the central (proto)stars and the circumstellar environments. H{sub 2}O maser velocities deviate on average 9 km s{sup -1} from the ambient gas velocities whereas CH{sub 3}OH maser velocities match quite well with the ambient gas velocities. For both maser emissions, large velocity differences (|v{sub H{sub 2}O} - v{sub sys}| > 10kms{sup -1} and |v{sub CH3OH} - v{sub sys}| > 1kms{sup -1}) are mostly confined to Class 0 objects. The formation and disappearance of H{sub 2}O masers is frequent and their integrated intensities change by up to two orders of magnitude. In contrast, CH{sub 3}OH maser lines usually show no significant change in intensity, shape, or velocity. This is consistent with the previous suggestion that H{sub 2}O maser emission originates from the base of an outflow while 44 GHz Class I CH{sub 3}OH maser emission arises from the interaction region of the outflow with the ambient gas. The isotropic maser luminosities are well correlated with the bolometric luminosities of the central objects. The fitted relations are L{sub H2O}= 1.71x10{sup -9}(L{sub bol}){sup 0.97} and L{sub CH3OH}= 1.71x10{sup -10}(L{sub bol}){sup 1.22}.

  5. Nested object watermarking: comparison of block-luminance and blue channel LSB wet paper code image watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielhauer, Claus; Dittmann, Jana

    2007-02-01

    Annotation watermarking (sometimes also called caption or illustration watermarking) denotes a specific application of watermarks, which embeds supplementary information directly in the media, so that additional information is intrinsically linked to media content and does not get separated from the media by non-malicious processing steps such as image cropping or compression. Recently, nested object annotation watermarking (NOAWM) has been introduced as a specialized annotation watermarking domain, whereby hierarchical object information is embedded in photographic images. In earlier work, the Hierarchical Graph Concept (HGC) has been suggested as a first approach to model object relations, which are defined by users during editing processes, into a hierarchical tree structure. The original HGC method uses a code-book decomposition of the annotation tree and a block-luminance algorithm for embedding. In this article, two new approaches for embedding nested object annotations are presented and experimentally compared to the original HGC approach. The first one adopts the code-book scheme of HGC using an alternative embedding based on Wet Paper Codes in blue-channel LSB domain, whereas the second suggests a new method based on the concept of intrinsic signal inheritance by sub-band energy and phase modulation of image luminance blocks. A comparative experimental evaluation based on more than 100 test images is presented in the paper, whereby aspects of transparency and robustness with respect to the most relevant image modifications to annotations, cropping and JPEG compression, are discussed comparatively for the two code-book schemes and the novel inheritance approach.

  6. Optical/Near-infrared Selection of Red Quasi-stellar Objects: Evidence for Steep Extinction Curves toward Galactic Centers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Venemans, B.; Noterdaeme, P.; Vestergaard, M.; Møller, P.; Ledoux, C.; Geier, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a search for red QSOs using a selection based on optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and near-infrared imaging from UKIDSS. Our main goal with the selection is to search for QSOs reddened by foreground dusty absorber galaxies. For a sample of 58 candidates (including 20 objects fulfilling our selection criteria that already have spectra in the SDSS), 46 (79%) are confirmed to be QSOs. The QSOs are predominantly dust-reddened except for a handful at redshifts z >~ 3.5. However, the dust is most likely located in the QSO host galaxies (and for two, the reddening is primarily caused by Galactic dust) rather than in the intervening absorbers. More than half of the QSOs show evidence of associated absorption (BAL absorption). Four (7%) of the candidates turned out to be late-type stars, and another four (7%) are compact galaxies. We could not identify the remaining four objects. In terms of their optical spectra, these QSOs are similar to the QSOs selected in the FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey except they are on average fainter, more distant, and only two are detected in the FIRST survey. As per the usual procedure, we estimate the amount of extinction using the SDSS QSO template reddened by Small-Magellanic-Cloud-(SMC) like dust. It is possible to get a good match to the observed (rest-frame ultraviolet) spectra, but it is not possible to match the observed near-IR photometry from UKIDSS for nearly all the reddened QSOs. The most likely reasons are that the SDSS QSO template is too red at optical wavelengths due to contaminating host galaxy light and because the assumed SMC extinction curve is too shallow. Three of the compact galaxies display old stellar populations with ages of several Gyr and masses of about 1010 M ⊙ (based on spectral energy distribution modeling). The inferred stellar densities in these galaxies exceed 1010 M ⊙ kpc-2, which is among the highest measured for early-type galaxies. Our survey has

  7. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  8. ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW LINES: ARE THEY DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Shields, G. A.; Smith, K. L.; Ammons, S. M. E-mail: mcgurk@ucsc.edu E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.edu E-mail: ammons@as.arizona.edu

    2011-09-20

    Active galaxies hosting two accreting and merging supermassive black holes (SMBHs)-dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs)-are predicted by many current and popular models of black-hole-galaxy co-evolution. We present here the results of a program that has identified a set of probable dual AGN candidates based on near-infrared laser guide star adaptive optics imaging with the Keck II telescope. These candidates are selected from a complete sample of radio-quiet quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which show double-peaked narrow AGN emission lines. Of the 12 AGNs imaged, we find 6 with double galaxy structure, of which four are in galaxy mergers. We measure the ionization of the two velocity components in the narrow AGN lines to test the hypothesis that both velocity components come from an active nucleus. The combination of a well-defined parent sample and high-quality imaging allows us to place constraints on the fraction of SDSS QSOs that host dual accreting black holes separated on kiloparsec scales: {approx}0.3%-0.65%. We derive from this fraction the time spent in a QSO phase during a typical merger and find a value that is much lower than estimates that arise from QSO space densities and galaxy merger statistics. We discuss possible reasons for this difference. Finally, we compare the SMBH mass distributions of single and dual AGNs and find little difference between the two within the limited statistics of our program, hinting that most SMBH growth happens in the later stages of a merger process.

  9. High Resolution SOFIA/EXES Spectroscopy of CH4 and SO2 toward Massive Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogert, Abraham C. A.; Richter, Matt; DeWitt, Curtis; Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, David A.; Karska, Agata; Bergin, Edwin A.; Smith, Rachel L.; Montiel, Edward

    2017-01-01

    The ro-vibrational transitions of molecules in the near to mid-infrared are excellent tracers of the composition, dynamics, and excitation of the inner regions of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). They sample a wide range of excitations in a short wavelength range, they can be seen in absorption against strong hot dust continuum sources, and they trace molecules without permanent dipole moment not observable at radio wavelengths. In particular, at high infrared spectral resolution, spatial scales smaller than those imaged by millimeter wave interferometers can be studied dynamically.We present high resolution (R=λ/Δλ˜50,000-100,000 6-12 km/s) infrared (7-8 μm) spectra of massive YSOs observed with the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Absorption lines of gas phase methane (CH4) are detected in our Cycle 2 observations. CH4 is thought to be a starting point of the formation of carbon chain molecules. Abundances are derived in the different dynamical regions along the sight-line towards the central star by comparing the line profiles to those of CO and other species observed at ground based facilities such as EXES' sister instrument TEXES at IRTF and Gemini. A search is also conducted for sulfur-dioxide, using data from our ongoing Cycle 4 program. SO2 was previously detected towards these massive YSOs with the space-based ISO/SWS instrument (Keane et al. 2001, A&A 376, L5) at much lower spectral resolution (R˜2,000). At high spectral resolution we should be able to pin-point the dynamical location of this SO2 gas. Up to 98% of the sulfur in dense clouds and protostellar envelopes is presently missing, and we are searching for that with the EXES/SOFIA observations.

  10. Apparent Disk-mass Reduction and Planetisimal Formation in Gravitationally Unstable Disks in Class 0/I Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Y.; Okuzumi, S.; Kataoka, A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the dust structure of gravitationally unstable disks undergoing mass accretion from the envelope, envisioning its application to Class 0/I young stellar objects (YSOs). We find that the dust disk quickly settles into a steady state and that, compared to a disk with interstellar medium (ISM) dust-to-gas mass ratio and micron-sized dust, the dust mass in the steady state decreases by a factor of 1/2 to 1/3, and the dust thermal emission decreases by a factor of 1/3 to 1/5. The latter decrease is caused by dust depletion and opacity decrease owing to dust growth. Our results suggest that the masses of gravitationally unstable disks in Class 0/I YSOs are underestimated by a factor of 1/3 to 1/5 when calculated from the dust thermal emission assuming an ISM dust-to-gas mass ratio and micron-sized dust opacity, and that a larger fraction of disks in Class 0/I YSOs is gravitationally unstable than was previously believed. We also investigate the orbital radius {r}{{P}} within which planetesimals form via coagulation of porous dust aggregates and show that {r}{{P}} becomes ∼20 au for a gravitationally unstable disk around a solar mass star. Because {r}{{P}} increases as the gas surface density increases and a gravitationally unstable disk has maximum gas surface density, {r}{{P}}∼ 20 {au} is the theoretical maximum radius for planetesimal formation. We suggest that planetesimal formation in the Class 0/I phase is preferable to that in the Class II phase because a large amount of dust is supplied by envelope-to-disk accretion.

  11. K- band integral field spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy of massive young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. L.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Sewiło, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present K-band integral field spectroscopic observations towards 17 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and two YSO candidates in the compact H II regions N81 and N88 A (also in the SMC). These sources, originally identified using Spitzer photometry and/or spectroscopy, have been resolved into 29 K-band continuum sources. By comparing Brγ emission luminosities with those presented for a Galactic sample of massive YSOs, we find tentative evidence for increased accretion rates in the SMC. Around half of our targets exhibit emission-line (Brγ, He I and H2) morphologies that extend significantly beyond the continuum source and we have mapped both the emission morphologies and the radial velocity fields. This analysis also reveals evidence for the existence of ionized low-density regions in the centre outflows from massive YSOs. Additionally, we present an analysis of optical spectra towards a similar sample of massive YSOs in the SMC, revealing that the optical emission is photoexcited and originates near the outer edges of molecular clouds, and is therefore consistent with a high mean-free path of UV photons in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the SMC. Finally, we discuss the sample of YSOs in an evolutionary context incorporating the results of previous infrared and radio observations, as well as the near-infrared and optical observations presented in this work. Our spectroscopic analysis in both the K band and the optical regimes, combined with previously obtained infrared and radio data, exposes differences between properties of massive YSOs in our own Galaxy and the SMC, including tracers of accretion, discs and YSO-ISM interactions.

  12. A FEATURE MOVIE OF SiO EMISSION 20-100 AU FROM THE MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT ORION SOURCE I

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, L. D.; Greenhill, L. J.; Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Chandler, C. J.; Kunz, M. W.

    2010-01-01

    We present multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array imaging of the {sup 28}SiO v = 1 and v = 2, J = 1-0 maser emission toward the massive young stellar object (YSO) Orion Source I. Both SiO transitions were observed simultaneously with an angular resolution of approx0.5 mas (approx0.2 AU for d = 414 pc) and a spectral resolution of approx0.2 km s{sup -1}. Here we explore the global properties and kinematics of the emission through two 19-epoch animated movies spanning 21 months (from 2001 March 19 to 2002 December 10). These movies provide the most detailed view to date of the dynamics and temporal evolution of molecular material within approx20-100 AU of a massive (approx>8 M{sub sun}) YSO. As in previous studies, we find that the bulk of the SiO masers surrounding Source I lie in an X-shaped locus; the emission in the south and east arms is predominantly blueshifted, and emission in the north and west is predominantly redshifted. In addition, bridges of intermediate-velocity emission are observed connecting the red and blue sides of the emission distribution. We have measured proper motions of over 1000 individual maser features and found that these motions are characterized by a combination of radially outward migrations along the four main maser-emitting arms and motions tangent to the intermediate-velocity bridges. We interpret the SiO masers as arising from a wide-angle bipolar wind emanating from a rotating, edge-on disk. The detection of maser features along extended, curved filaments suggests that magnetic fields may play a role in launching and/or shaping the wind. Our observations appear to support a picture in which stars with masses as high as at least 8 M{sub sun} form via disk-mediated accretion. However, we cannot yet rule out that the Source I disk may have been formed or altered following a recent close encounter.

  13. Looking for high-mass young stellar objects: H2O and OH masers in ammonia cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Cesaroni, R.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Furuya, R.; Testi, L.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The earliest stages of high-mass star formation have yet to be characterised well, because high-angular resolution observations are required to infer the properties of the molecular gas hosting the newly formed stars. Aims: We search for high-mass molecular cores in a large sample of 15 high-mass star-forming regions that are observed at high-angular resolution, extending a pilot survey based on a smaller number of objects. Methods: The sample was chosen from surveys of H2O and OH masers to favour the earliest phases of high-mass star formation. Each source was first observed with the 32-m single-dish Medicina antenna in the (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion transitions at 1.3 cm of ammonia, which is an excellent tracer of dense gas. High-resolution maps in the NH3(2, 2) and (3, 3) lines and the 1.3 cm continuum were obtained successively with the VLA interferometer. Results: We detect continuum emission in almost all the observed star-forming regions, which corresponds to extended and UCHii regions created by young stellar objects with typical luminosities of ˜10^4~L⊙. However, only in three cases do we find a projected overlap between Hii regions and H2O and OH maser spots. On the other hand, the VLA images detect eight ammonia cores closely associated with the maser sources. The ammonia cores have sizes of ˜10^4 AU, and high masses (up to 104M⊙), and are very dense (from ˜10^6 to a few ×10^9 cm-3). The typical relative NH3 abundance is ≤10-7, in agreement with previous measurements in high-mass star-forming regions. Conclusions: The statistical analysis of the distribution between H2O and OH masers, NH3 cores, and Hii regions confirms that the earliest stages of high-mass star formation are characterised by high-density molecular cores with temperatures of on average ≥30 K, either without a detectable ionised region or associated with a hypercompact Hii region.

  14. Time dependent emission line profiles in the radially streaming particle model of Seyfert galaxy nuclei and quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R.

    1974-01-01

    The radially-streaming particle model for broad quasar and Seyfert galaxy emission features is modified to include sources of time dependence. The results are suggestive of reported observations of multiple components, variability, and transient features in the wings of Seyfert and quasi-stellar emission lines.

  15. HETEROGENEITY IN {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO ABUNDANCE RATIOS TOWARD SOLAR-TYPE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rachel L.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Young, Edward D.; Morris, Mark R. E-mail: smithrl2@appstate.edu

    2015-11-10

    This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [{sup 12}C{sup 16}O]/[{sup 13}C{sup 16}O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ∼solar-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, and Vela, and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 μm fundamental and 2.3 μm overtone rovibrational bands of CO at very high spectral resolution (λ/Δλ ≈ 95,000), observed with the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (CRIRES) on the Very Large Telescope. We find [{sup 12}C{sup 16}O]/[{sup 13}C{sup 16}O] values ranging from ∼85 to 165, significantly higher than those of the local interstellar medium (ISM) (∼65–69). These observations are evidence for isotopic heterogeneity in carbon reservoirs in solar-type YSO environments, and encourage the need for refined galactic chemical evolution models to explain the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C discrepancy between the solar system and local ISM. The oxygen isotope ratios are consistent with isotopologue-specific photodissociation by CO self-shielding toward the disks, VV CrA N and HL Tau, further substantiating models predicting CO self-shielding on disk surfaces. However, we find that CO self-shielding is an unlikely general explanation for the high [{sup 12}C{sup 16}O]/[{sup 13}C{sup 16}O] ratios observed in this study. Comparison of the solid CO against gas-phase [{sup 12}C{sup 16}O]/[{sup 13}C{sup 16}O] suggests that interactions between CO ice and gas reservoirs need to be further investigated as at least a partial explanation for the unusually high [{sup 12}C{sup 16}O]/[{sup 13}C{sup 16}O] observed.

  16. Physical and Chemical Properties of Protocluster Clumps and Massive Young Stellar Objects Associated to Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The study of high-mass stars is important not only because of the effects they produce in their environment through outflows, expanding HII regions, stellar winds, and eventually supernova shock waves, but also because they play a crucial role in estimating star formation rates in other galaxies. Although we have an accepted evolutionary scenario that explains (isolated) low-mass star formation, the processes that produce massive stars (M_star > 8 M_sol) and star clusters, especially their earliest stages, are not well understood. The newly discovered class of interstellar clouds now termed infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent excellent laboratories to study the earliest stages of high-mass star formation given that some of the clumps within them are known to have high masses (~100's M_sol), high densities (n > 10^5 cm^-3), and low temperatures (10-20K) as expected for the birthplaces of high-mass stars. Some questions remain unanswered: Do IRDCs harbor the very early stages of high-mass star formation, i.e., the pre-protocluster phase? If so, how do they compare with low-mass star formation sites? Is there chemical differentiation in IRDC clumps? What is the mass distribution of IRDCs? In this dissertation and for the first time, a catalog of 12529 IRDC candidates at 24 um has been created using archival data from the MIPSGAL/Spitzer survey, as a first step in searching for the massive pre-protocluster clumps. From this catalog, a sample of ~60 clumps has been selected in order to perform single-pointing observations with the IRAM 30m, Effelsberg 100m, and APEX 12m telescopes. One IRDC clump seems to be a promising candidate for being in the pre-protocluster phase. In addition, molecular line mapping observations have been performed on three clumps within IRDCs and a detailed chemical study of 10 molecular lines has been carried out. A larger difference in column densities and abundances has been found between these clumps and high-m! ass protostellar objects

  17. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    edge-on, where the direct starlight is blocked by the dusty cocoon. Otherwise, the starlight would overwhelm the nebular light, making it very difficult to see the butterfly-shaped nebula. In a few hundred years, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star will energize the surrounding gas, causing it to glow brightly, and a planetary nebula is born. These observations were made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using three filters: yellow-green, blue, and near-infrared. The images were taken in 1997 by Sun Kwok and in 1996 by Matt Bobrowsky. Credits: Sun Kwok and Kate Su (University of Calgary), Bruce Hrivnak (Valparaiso University), and NASA ----------------- The Hubble Space Telescope Sees Remarkable Structure in the Heart of a Planetary Nebula [BOTTOM LEFT AND RIGHT] This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image of NGC 6818 shows two distinct layers of gas (with dust): a spherical outer region and a brighter, vase-shaped interior 'bubble.' Astronomers believe that a fast wind - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - is creating the inner elongated shape. The central star of the planetary nebula appears as a tiny blue dot. The material in the wind is traveling so fast that it smashes through older, slower-moving stellar debris, causing a 'blowout' at both ends of the bubble (lower right and upper left). This nebula looks like a twin of NGC 3918, another planetary nebula that has been observed by the Hubble telescope. The structure of NGC 3918 is remarkably similar to that of NGC 6818. It has an outer spherical envelope and an inner, brighter, elongated bubble. A fast-moving wind also appears to have created an orifice at one end (bottom right-hand corner) of the inner bubble. There are even faint wisps of material that were probably blown out of this hole. In the opposite direction (top left-hand corner), there is a protrusion that seems on the verge of breaking through to form a hole. By finding and studying such similar objects

  18. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  19. Envelope structure on 700 AU scales and the molecular outflows of low-mass young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Hogerheijde, M R; van Dishoeck, E F; Blake, G A; van Langevelde, H J

    1998-07-20

    Aperture synthesis observations of HCO+ J = 1-0, 13CO 1-0, and C18O 1-0 obtained with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array are used to probe the small-scale (5" approximately 700 AU) structure of the molecular envelopes of a well-defined sample of nine embedded low-mass young stellar objects in Taurus. The interferometer results can be understood in terms of: (1) a core of radius approximately or less than 1000 AU surrounding the central star, possibly flattened and rotating; (2) condensations scattered throughout the envelope that may be left over from the inhomogeneous structure of the original cloud core or that may have grown during collapse; and (3) material within the outflow or along the walls of the outflow cavity. Masses of the central cores are 0.001-0.1 M (solar), and agree well with dust continuum measurements. Averaged over the central 20" (3000 AU) region, an HCO+ abundance of 4 x 10(-8) is inferred, with a spread of a factor of 3 between the different sources. Reanalysis of previously presented single-dish data yields an HCO+ abundance of (5.0 +/- 1.7) x 10(-9), which may indicate an average increase by a factor of a few on the smaller scales sampled by the interferometer. Part of this apparent abundance variation could be explained by contributions from extended cloud emission to the single-dish C18O lines, and uncertainties in the assumed excitation temperatures and opacities. The properties of the molecular envelopes and outflows are further investigated through single-dish observations of 12CO J = 6-5, 4-3, and 3-2, 13CO 6-5 and 3-2, and C18O 3-2 and 2-1, obtained with the James Clerk Maxwell and IRAM 30 m telescopes, along with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Ratios of the mid-J CO lines are used to estimate the excitation temperature, with values of 25-80 K derived for the gas near line centre. The outflow wings show a similar range, although Tex is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in at least two sources. In contrast to the well-studied L1551

  20. Envelope structure on 700 AU scales and the molecular outflows of low-mass young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogerheijde, M. R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.; van Langevelde, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    Aperture synthesis observations of HCO+ J = 1-0, 13CO 1-0, and C18O 1-0 obtained with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array are used to probe the small-scale (5" approximately 700 AU) structure of the molecular envelopes of a well-defined sample of nine embedded low-mass young stellar objects in Taurus. The interferometer results can be understood in terms of: (1) a core of radius approximately or less than 1000 AU surrounding the central star, possibly flattened and rotating; (2) condensations scattered throughout the envelope that may be left over from the inhomogeneous structure of the original cloud core or that may have grown during collapse; and (3) material within the outflow or along the walls of the outflow cavity. Masses of the central cores are 0.001-0.1 M (solar), and agree well with dust continuum measurements. Averaged over the central 20" (3000 AU) region, an HCO+ abundance of 4 x 10(-8) is inferred, with a spread of a factor of 3 between the different sources. Reanalysis of previously presented single-dish data yields an HCO+ abundance of (5.0 +/- 1.7) x 10(-9), which may indicate an average increase by a factor of a few on the smaller scales sampled by the interferometer. Part of this apparent abundance variation could be explained by contributions from extended cloud emission to the single-dish C18O lines, and uncertainties in the assumed excitation temperatures and opacities. The properties of the molecular envelopes and outflows are further investigated through single-dish observations of 12CO J = 6-5, 4-3, and 3-2, 13CO 6-5 and 3-2, and C18O 3-2 and 2-1, obtained with the James Clerk Maxwell and IRAM 30 m telescopes, along with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Ratios of the mid-J CO lines are used to estimate the excitation temperature, with values of 25-80 K derived for the gas near line centre. The outflow wings show a similar range, although Tex is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in at least two sources. In contrast to the well-studied L1551

  1. Suzaku Observation of Strong Fluorescent Iron Line Emission from the Young Stellar Object V1647 Ori during Its New X-ray Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.; Richmond, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in August 2008. During the 87 ksec observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a. high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other young stellar objects. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT approx.5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Ka line with a remarkably large equivalent width of approx. 600 eV. Such a, large equivalent width indicates that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Ka line ; so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.

  2. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  3. APEX-CHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects. IV. Mechanical and radiative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Karska, A.; Belloche, A.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Güsten, R.; van Kempen, T. A.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Pérez-Beaupuits, J. P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.

    2015-04-01

    Context. During the embedded stage of star formation, bipolar molecular outflows and UV radiation from the protostar are important feedback processes. Both processes reflect the accretion onto the forming star and affect subsequent collapse or fragmentation of the cloud. Aims: Our aim is to quantify the feedback, mechanical and radiative, for a large sample of low-mass sources in a consistent manner. The outflow activity is compared to radiative feedback in the form of UV heating by the accreting protostar to search for correlations and evolutionary trends. Methods: Large-scale maps of 26 young stellar objects, which are part of the Herschel WISH key program are obtained using the CHAMP+ instrument on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (12CO and 13CO 6-5; Eup ~ 100 K), and the HARP-B instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (12CO and 13CO 3-2; Eup ~ 30 K). The maps have high spatial resolution, particularly the CO 6-5 maps taken with a 9″ beam, resolving the morphology of the outflows. The maps are used to determine outflow parameters and the results are compared with higher-J CO lines obtained with Herschel. Envelope models are used to quantify the amount of UV-heated gas and its temperature from 13CO 6-5 observations. Results: All sources in our sample show outflow activity, with the spatial extent decreasing from the Class 0 to the Class I stage. Consistent with previous studies, the outflow force, FCO, is larger for Class 0 sources than for Class I sources, even if their luminosities are comparable. The outflowing gas typically extends to much greater distances than the power-law envelope and therefore influences the surrounding cloud material directly. Comparison of the CO 6-5 results with HIFI H2O and PACS high-J CO lines, both tracing currently shocked gas, shows that the two components are linked, even though the transitions do not probe the same gas. The link does not extend down to CO 3-2. The conclusion is that CO 6-5 depends on the shock

  4. Impact of photometric variability on age and mass determination in young stellar objects: the case of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio; Parihar, Padmakar; Distefano, Elisa

    2017-03-01

    Very young stars, like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) members analysed in the present study, exhibit photometric variability with a wide range of amplitudes. Such a prominent variability reflects in the inferred values of stellar colours and luminosities and, in turn, in the inferred stellar ages and masses. In this study, we measure the amplitudes of the photometric variability in V, R and I optical bands of a sample of 346 ONC members. We use these measurements to investigate how this variability affects the inferred masses and ages and whether it alone can account for the age spread among ONC members reported by earlier studies. We make use of colour-magnitude and Hertzprung-Russell (HR) diagrams. We find that members that show periodic and smooth photometric rotational modulation have masses and ages that are unaffected by variability when theoretical isochrones and evolutionary mass tracks are used in either colour-magnitude or HR diagrams. On the other hand, members with periodic but very scattered photometric rotational modulation and non-periodic members have masses and ages that are significantly affected. Moreover, using HR diagrams, we find that the observed I-band photometric variability can take account of only a fraction (˜50 per cent) of the inferred age spread, whereas the V-band photometric variability is large enough to mask any age spread.

  5. The Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey - V. The end: Partial Zones 4-6; Galactic latitudes -50° > b > -90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Worters, H. L.; O'Donoghue, D.; Koen, C.; Koen, T.; Hambly, N.; MacGillivray, H.; Stobie, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Results for the remaining zones of the Edinburgh-Cape (EC) Blue Object survey are presented. These are incomplete, but lie in that part of the South Galactic Cap between 50° and 90° from the Galactic plane and south of about -12.3° of declination. This part of the survey comprises 79 UK Schmidt Telescope fields covering about 2150 deg2, in which we find 536 blue objects - including hot subdwarfs (˜33 per cent), white dwarfs (˜30 per cent), binaries (˜12 per cent), cataclysmic variables (˜1.5 per cent) and some `star-like' galaxies (˜12 per cent). A further 254 stars observed in the survey, mainly low-metallicity F- and G-type stars, are also listed. Low-dispersion spectroscopic classification is given for all the hot objects and UBV photometry for most of them. Either spectroscopy or photometry is listed for the cooler types.

  6. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    edge-on, where the direct starlight is blocked by the dusty cocoon. Otherwise, the starlight would overwhelm the nebular light, making it very difficult to see the butterfly-shaped nebula. In a few hundred years, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star will energize the surrounding gas, causing it to glow brightly, and a planetary nebula is born. These observations were made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using three filters: yellow-green, blue, and near-infrared. The images were taken in 1997 by Sun Kwok and in 1996 by Matt Bobrowsky. Credits: Sun Kwok and Kate Su (University of Calgary), Bruce Hrivnak (Valparaiso University), and NASA ----------------- The Hubble Space Telescope Sees Remarkable Structure in the Heart of a Planetary Nebula [BOTTOM LEFT AND RIGHT] This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image of NGC 6818 shows two distinct layers of gas (with dust): a spherical outer region and a brighter, vase-shaped interior 'bubble.' Astronomers believe that a fast wind - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - is creating the inner elongated shape. The central star of the planetary nebula appears as a tiny blue dot. The material in the wind is traveling so fast that it smashes through older, slower-moving stellar debris, causing a 'blowout' at both ends of the bubble (lower right and upper left). This nebula looks like a twin of NGC 3918, another planetary nebula that has been observed by the Hubble telescope. The structure of NGC 3918 is remarkably similar to that of NGC 6818. It has an outer spherical envelope and an inner, brighter, elongated bubble. A fast-moving wind also appears to have created an orifice at one end (bottom right-hand corner) of the inner bubble. There are even faint wisps of material that were probably blown out of this hole. In the opposite direction (top left-hand corner), there is a protrusion that seems on the verge of breaking through to form a hole. By finding and studying such similar objects

  7. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INFRARED-EXCESS STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of broadband near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the recently discovered mysterious stellar objects in the young supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. These objects, which show significant mid-infrared-excess emission, are embedded in a diffuse loop structure of {approx}1' in radius. Their near-infrared spectra reveal characteristics of late O- or early B-type stars with numerous H and He I absorption lines, and we classify their spectral types to be between O9 and B2 based on an empirical relation derived here between the equivalent widths of the H lines and stellar photospheric temperatures. The spectral types, combined with the results of spectral energy distribution fits, constrain the distance to the objects to be 6.0 {+-} 0.4 kpc. The photometric spectral types of the objects are consistent with those from the spectroscopic analyses, and the extinction distributions indicate a local enhancement of matter in the western part of the loop. If these objects originate via triggered formation by the progenitor star of G54.1+0.3, then their formations likely began during the later evolutionary stages of the progenitor, although a rather earlier formation may still be possible. If the objects and the progenitor belong to the same cluster of stars, then our results constrain the progenitor mass of G54.1+0.3 to be between 18 and {approx}35 M{sub Sun} and suggest that G54.1+0.3 was either a Type IIP supernova or, with a relatively lower possibility, Type Ib/c from a binary system.

  8. Blue stragglers as remnants of stellar mergers - The discovery of short-period eclipsing binaries in the globular cluster NGC 5466

    SciTech Connect

    Mateo, M.; Harris, H.C.; Nemec, J.; Olszewski, E.W. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ British Columbia Univ., Vancouver Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ )

    1990-08-01

    Results are reported from a search for short-period variables among blue stragglers in the central region of NGC 5466, based on analysis of 248 B and V CCD images obtained with the U.S. Naval Observatory 1-m, Palomar Observatory 1.5-m, and Steward Observatory 2.3-m telescopes during 1987-1989. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Nine variable blue stragglers are identified, of which three are eclipsing binaries with periods 0.298-0.511 d (two contact binaries of W UMa type and one detached or semidetached binary) and six are pulsating SX Phe stars. Theoretical models indicate that all of the noneclipsing blue stragglers could be merged close binaries, although other formation mechanisms cannot be completely ruled out. 111 refs.

  9. VY Monocerotis and the IC 446 region - Far-infrared and submillimeter images of a massive young stellar object and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S.C.; Harper, D.A. Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI )

    1990-10-01

    The reflection nebulae IC 446 has been mapped in an 8 x 8-arcmin area at 100, 160, and 370 microns using 32-channel bolometer-array detectors on the 0.9-m telescope of the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory and the 3-m telescope of the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. These data have been combined with IRAS profiles at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns to investigate the morphology and energetics of the region. The FIR through submm emission in the neighborhood of IC 446 is composed of three components: a compact point source associated with the young stellar object VY Mon, warm extended emission associated with dust in the reflection nebula IC 446, and cold extended emission associated with a dark absorption nebula or globule. 69 refs.

  10. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF YOUNG AND FIELD AGE OBJECTS WITH MASSES SPANNING THE STELLAR TO PLANETARY REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline; Cruz, Kelle L.; Van Gordon, Mollie M.; Looper, Dagny L.

    2015-09-10

    We combine optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared spectra and photometry to construct expanded spectral energy distributions for 145 field age (>500 Myr) and 53 young (lower age estimate <500 Myr) ultracool dwarfs (M6-T9). This range of spectral types includes very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary mass objects, providing fundamental parameters across both the hydrogen and deuterium burning minimum masses for the largest sample assembled to date. A subsample of 29 objects have well constrained ages as probable members of a nearby young moving group. We use 182 parallaxes and 16 kinematic distances to determine precise bolometric luminosities (L{sub bol}) and radius estimates from evolutionary models give semi-empirical effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) for the full range of young and field age late-M, L, and T dwarfs. We construct age-sensitive relationships of luminosity, temperature, and absolute magnitude as functions of spectral type and absolute magnitude to disentangle the effects of degenerate physical parameters such as T{sub eff}, surface gravity, and clouds on spectral morphology. We report bolometric corrections in J for both field age and young objects and find differences of up to a magnitude for late-L dwarfs. Our correction in Ks shows a larger dispersion but not necessarily a different relationship for young and field age sequences. We also characterize the NIR–MIR reddening of low gravity L dwarfs and identify a systematically cooler T{sub eff} of up to 300 K from field age objects of the same spectral type and 400 K cooler from field age objects of the same M{sub H} magnitude.

  11. X-shooter reveals powerful outflows in z ˜ 1.5 X-ray selected obscured quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Cresci, G.; Perna, M.; Marconi, A.; Mainieri, V.; Maiolino, R.; Salvato, M.; Lusso, E.; Santini, P.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Gilli, R.; La Franca, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Lutz, D.; Merloni, A.; Mignoli, M.; Onori, F.; Piconcelli, E.; Rosario, D.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present X-shooter at Very Large Telescope observations of a sample of 10 luminous, X-ray obscured quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) at z ˜ 1.5 from the XMM-COSMOS survey, expected to be caught in the transitioning phase from starburst to active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated systems. The main selection criterion is X-ray detection at bright fluxes (LX ≳ 1044 erg s-1) coupled to red optical-to-near-infrared-to-mid-infrared colours. Thanks to its large wavelength coverage, X-shooter allowed us to determine accurate redshifts from the presence of multiple emission lines for five out of six targets for which we had only a photometric redshift estimate, with an 80 per cent success rate, significantly larger than what is observed in similar programs of spectroscopic follow-up of red QSOs. We report the detection of broad and shifted components in the [O III] λλ5007, 4959 complexes for six out of eight sources with these lines observable in regions free from strong atmospheric absorptions. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) associated with the broad components are in the range FWHM ˜ 900-1600 km s-1, larger than the average value observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey type 2 AGN samples at similar observed [O III] luminosity, but comparable to those observed for QSO/ultraluminous infrared galaxies systems for which the presence of kpc scale outflows has been revealed through integral field unit spectroscopy. Although the total outflow energetics (inferred under reasonable assumptions) may be consistent with winds accelerated by stellar processes, we favour an AGN origin for the outflows given the high outflow velocities observed (v > 1000 km s-1) and the presence of strong winds also in objects undetected in the far-infrared.

  12. Investigation of the behaviour of the eruptive young stellar object V1647 Ori since its outburst in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, V.

    V1647 Ori is a young eruptive low mass pre-main sequence star that illuminates McNeil's nebula. The object has undergone two outbursts in the recent years - first in November 2003 and the second in mid 2008. While the first outburst lasted for about 2 years before it briefly recovered to its quiescent state, the object is still active since its second eruption in 2008. The nature of the V1647 ori outburst and its similarity with other pre-main sequence eruptive objects, namely FUors and EXors, are still debated. Both types of outburst are thought to be driven by a sudden increase of accretion through a circumstellar disk that feeds through a circumstellar envelope. Follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations in the near-IR(NIR) JHK bands were being made at Mt. Abu observatory using NICS and NICMOS. The NIR observations taken on several occasions during 2008 to 2012 show mean values of brightness in J, H and K bands of 10.82(sigma=0.146), 9.02(0.189) and 7.58(0.234) mags respectively. During the period, occasional brightening or fading by about 2-3 sigma was also noticed which can be attributed to disk accretion rate variations. The NIR spectra obtained in the K band showed Brackett gamma in emission with non-systematic variability. Our observations indicate slight fading out of V1647 ori during the early part of 2012. Modelling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in visible to sub-mm region (compiled from archival data) suggests increased disk mass accretion rate as compared to its quiescent state. The model parameters are in good agreement with those derived from observations. These results will be discussed in detail.

  13. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  14. Stellar Archaeology and Galaxy Genesis: The Need for Large Area Multi-Object Spectrograph on 8 m-Class Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Mike J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    The origin and evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way and M31 remain among the key questions in astrophysics. The galaxies we see today in and around the Local Group are representatives of the general field population of the Universe and have been evolving for the majority of cosmic time. As our nearest neighbour systems they can be studied in far more detail than their distant counterparts and hence provide our best hope for understanding star formation and prototypical galaxy evolution over the lifetime of the Universe [K. Freeman, J. Bland-Hawthorn in Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 40, 487 (2002)]. Significant observational progress has been made, but we are still a long way from understanding galaxy genesis. To unravel this formative epoch, detailed large area multi-object spectroscopy of spatial, kinematic and chemical structures on 8 m-class telescopes are required, to provide the link between local near-field cosmology and predictions from the high-redshift Universe.

  15. Development of a Virtual Observatory Tool for the Characterization of Stellar Objects in the DUNES Project Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Raúl; Solano, Enrique; Arévalo, María; Eiroa, Carlos

    Most of the projects that aim at detecting extrasolar planets require a careful selection of the central stars as well as an extremely detailed knowledge of their properties and environment. However, gathering information in a wide variety of types and formats from a large number of heterogeneous astronomical data services can be a tedious, very time-consuming task, even for a modest dataset. To overcome this situation the LAEFF Scientific Data Centre, in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory1, has developed a VO-compliant discovery tool for DUNES2. This tool allows accessing, visualizing, filtering and retrieving relevant information of lists of objects. In this poster we describe the main characteristics and functionalities of the system.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young stellar structures in NGC 6503 (Gouliermis+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, D. A.; Thilker, D.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Calzetti, D.; Lee, J. C.; Adamo, A.; Aloisi, A.; Cignoni, M.; Cook, D. O.; Dale, D. A.; Gallagher, J. S. Iii; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Davo, A. H.; Hunter, D. A.; Johnson, K. E.; Kim, H.; Nair, P.; Nota, A.; Pellerin, A.; Ryon, J.; Sabbi, E.; Sacchi, E.; Smith, L. J.; Tosi, M.; Ubeda, L.; Whitmore, B.

    2016-03-01

    LEGUS is an HST panchromatic stellar survey of 50 nearby star-forming dwarf and spiral galaxies with an emphasis on UV-enabled science applications. Images in a wide waveband coverage from the near-UV (NUV) to the I band are being collected with WFC3 and ACS in parallel, and combined with archival optical ACS data. The survey, its scientific objectives and the data reduction are described in Calzetti et al. (2015AJ....149...51C). We present a detailed clustering analysis of the young blue stellar population identified with LEGUS across the star-forming ring galaxy NGC 6503. We construct stellar surface density maps and apply a contour-based analysis technique to identify the stellar complexes' population of the galaxy. We identify 244 distinct structures at various stellar density (significance) levels. The complete catalogue of 244 structures is available online at LEGUS site https://legus.stsci.edu/. (1 data file).

  17. A search for stellar remnants of supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The slitless spectra of the stars in the central regions of six galactic supernova remnants Cas A, Kepler, Tycho, SN 1006, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop were obtained with the prime focus transmission gratings at the 4M telescopes on Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. It was found that no stellar remnant with an unusually blue or peculiar spectrum is present in any of the remnants down to the limit of m sub pg of 18.5. Except for the Cygnus Loop, the area searched in each remnant is large enough that objects with transverse velocities of 1000 km/s would be well within the field. The results are also compared with a computation of emission from gas near a neutron star and with the unpulsed emission from the Crab pulsar; in both cases upper limits were set which place constraints on a possible condensed stellar remnant.

  18. Surveying the agents of galaxy evolution in the tidally stripped, low metallicity small Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-SMC). III. Young stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Sewiło, M.; Carlson, L. R.; Seale, J. P.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, K.; Shiao, B. E-mail: carlson@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: meixner@stsci.edu E-mail: shiao@stsci.edu; and others

    2013-11-20

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Program SAGE-SMC allows global studies of resolved stellar populations in the SMC in a different environment than our Galaxy. Using the SAGE-SMC IRAC (3.6-8.0 μm) and MIPS (24 and 70 μm) catalogs and images combined with near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) and optical (UBVI) data, we identified a population of ∼1000 intermediate- to high-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the SMC (three times more than previously known). Our method of identifying YSO candidates builds on the method developed for the Large Magellanic Cloud by Whitney et al. with improvements based on what we learned from our subsequent studies and techniques described in the literature. We perform (1) color-magnitude cuts based on five color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), (2) visual inspection of multi-wavelength images, and (3) spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with YSO models. For each YSO candidate, we use its photometry to calculate a measure of our confidence that the source is not a non-YSO contaminant, but rather a true YSO, based on the source's location in the color-magnitude space with respect to non-YSOs. We use this CMD score and the SED fitting results to define two classes of sources: high-reliability YSO candidates and possible YSO candidates. We found that, due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, about half of our sources have [3.6]-[4.5] and [4.5]-[5.8] colors not predicted by previous YSO models. The YSO candidates are spatially correlated with gas tracers.

  19. Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-SMC). III. Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewiło, M.; Carlson, L. R.; Seale, J. P.; Indebetouw, R.; Meixner, M.; Whitney, B. A.; Robitaille, T. P.; Oliveira, J. M.; Gordon, K.; Meade, M. R.; Babler, B. L.; Hora, J. L.; Block, M.; Misselt, K.; van Loon, J. Th.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Churchwell, E.; Shiao, B.

    2013-11-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Program SAGE-SMC allows global studies of resolved stellar populations in the SMC in a different environment than our Galaxy. Using the SAGE-SMC IRAC (3.6-8.0 μm) and MIPS (24 and 70 μm) catalogs and images combined with near-infrared (JHK s ) and optical (UBVI) data, we identified a population of ~1000 intermediate- to high-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the SMC (three times more than previously known). Our method of identifying YSO candidates builds on the method developed for the Large Magellanic Cloud by Whitney et al. with improvements based on what we learned from our subsequent studies and techniques described in the literature. We perform (1) color-magnitude cuts based on five color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), (2) visual inspection of multi-wavelength images, and (3) spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with YSO models. For each YSO candidate, we use its photometry to calculate a measure of our confidence that the source is not a non-YSO contaminant, but rather a true YSO, based on the source's location in the color-magnitude space with respect to non-YSOs. We use this CMD score and the SED fitting results to define two classes of sources: high-reliability YSO candidates and possible YSO candidates. We found that, due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, about half of our sources have [3.6]-[4.5] and [4.5]-[5.8] colors not predicted by previous YSO models. The YSO candidates are spatially correlated with gas tracers.

  20. The VLTI/MIDI survey of massive young stellar objects . Sounding the inner regions around intermediate- and high-mass young stars using mid-infrared interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boley, Paul A.; Linz, Hendrik; van Boekel, Roy; Henning, Thomas; Feldt, Markus; Kaper, Lex; Leinert, Christoph; Müller, André; Pascucci, Ilaria; Robberto, Massimo; Stecklum, Bringfried; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Zinnecker, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Context. Because of inherent difficulties involved in observations and numerical simulations of the formation of massive stars, an understanding of the early evolutionary phases of these objects remains elusive. In particular, observationally probing circumstellar material at distances ≲100 AU from the central star is exceedingly difficult, as such objects are rare (and thus, on average, far away) and typically deeply embedded. Long-baseline mid-infrared interferometry provides one way of obtaining the necessary spatial resolution at appropriate wavelengths for studying this class of objects; however, interpreting such observations is often difficult due to sparse spatial-frequency coverage. Aims: We aim to characterize the distribution and composition of circumstellar material around young massive stars and to investigate exactly which physical structures in these objects are probed by long-baseline mid-infrared interferometric observations. Methods: We used the two-telescope interferometric instrument MIDI of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer of the European Southern Observatory to observe a sample of 24 intermediate- and high-mass young stellar objects in the N band (8-13 μm). We had successful fringe detections for 20 objects and present spectrally-resolved correlated fluxes and visibility levels for projected baselines of up to 128 m. We fit the visibilities with geometric models to derive the sizes of the emitting regions, as well as the orientation and elongation of the circumstellar material. Fourteen objects in the sample show the 10 μm silicate feature in absorption in the total and correlated flux spectra. For 13 of these objects, we were able to fit the correlated flux spectra with a simple absorption model, allowing us to constrain the composition and absorptive properties of the circumstellar material. Results: Nearly all of the massive young stellar objects observed show significant deviations from spherical symmetry at mid

  1. Intermittent maser flare around the high-mass young stellar object G353.273+0.641

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Kazuhito; Sorai, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Kenta; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Honma, Mareki

    2012-07-01

    The water maser site associated with G353.273+0.641 is classified as a dominant blueshifted H2O maser, which shows an extremely wide velocity range (+/- 100 km s-1) with almost all flux concentrated in the highly blueshifted emission. The previous study has proposed that this peculiar H2O maser site is excited by a pole-on jet from high mass protostellar object. We report on the monitoring of 22-GHz H2O maser emission from G353.273+0.641 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) and the Tomakamai 11-m radio telescope. Our VLBI imaging has shown that all maser features are distributed within a very small area of 200 × 200 au2, in spite of the wide velocity range (> 100 km s-1). The light curve obtained by weekly single-dish monitoring shows notably intermittent variation. We have detected three maser flares during three years. Frequent VLBI monitoring has revealed that these flare activities have been accompanied by a significant change of the maser alignments. We have also detected synchronized linear acceleration (-5 km s-1yr-1) of two isolated velocity components, suggesting a lower-limit momentum rate of 10-3 M⊙ km s-1yr-1 for the maser acceleration. All our results support the previously proposed pole-on jet scenario, and finally, a radio jet itself has been detected in our follow-up ATCA observation. If highly intermittent maser flares directly reflect episodic jet-launchings, G353.273+0.641 and similar dominant blueshifted water maser sources can be suitable targets for a time-resolved study of high mass protostellar jet.

  2. The multiple young stellar objects of HBC 515: An X-ray and millimeter-wave imaging study in (pre-main sequence) diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, D. A.; Sacco, G. G.; Kastner, J. H.; Wilner, D.; Stelzer, B.; Micela, G.

    2017-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory and Submillimeter Array (SMA) imaging of HBC 515, a system consisting of multiple young stellar objects (YSOs). The five members of HBC 515 represent a remarkably diverse array of YSOs, ranging from the low-mass Class I/II protostar HBC 515B, through Class II and transition disk objects (HBC 515D and C, respectively), to the "diskless", intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence (pre-MS) binary HBC 515A. Our Chandra/ACIS imaging establishes that all five components are X-ray sources, with HBC 515A - a subarcsecond-separation binary that is partially resolved by Chandra - being the dominant X-ray source. We detect an X-ray flare associated with HBC 515B. In the SMA imaging, HBC 515B is detected as a strong 1.3 mm continuum emission source; a second, weaker mm continuum source is coincident with the position of the transition disk object HBC 515C. These results strongly support the protostellar nature of HBC 515B, and firmly establish HBC 515A as a member of the rare class of relatively massive, X-ray luminous weak-lined T Tauri stars that are binaries and have shed their disks at very early stages of pre-MS evolution. The coexistence of two such disparate objects within a single, presumably coeval multiple YSO system highlights the influence of pre-MS star mass, binarity, and X-ray luminosity in regulating the lifetimes of circumstellar, planet-forming disks, and the timescales of star-disk interactions.

  3. [Fe II] 1.64 μm FEATURES OF JETS AND OUTFLOWS FROM YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jae-Joon; Chun, Moo-Young; Lyo, A.-Ran; Moon, Dae-Sik; Kyeong, Jaemann; Park, Byeong-Gon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Sung, Hwankyung; Hur, Hyeonoh

    2013-11-01

    We present [Fe II] 1.64 μm imaging observations for jets and outflows from young stellar objects (YSOs) over the northern part (∼24' × 45') of the Carina Nebula, a massive star-forming region. The observations were performed with IRIS2 of the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the seeing was ∼1.''5 ± 0.''5. Eleven jet and outflow features are detected at eight different regions and are termed ionized Fe objects (IFOs). One Herbig-Haro candidate that was missed in Hubble Space Telescope Hα observations is newly identified as HHc-16, referring to our [Fe II] images. IFOs have knotty or longish shapes, and the detection rate of IFOs against previously identified YSOs is 1.4%, which should be treated as a lower limit. Four IFOs show anti-correlated peak intensities in [Fe II] and Hα, where the ratio I([Fe II])/I(Hα) is higher for longish IFOs than for knotty IFOs. We estimate the outflow mass loss rate from the [Fe II] flux using two different methods. The jet-driving objects are identified for three IFOs (IFO-2, -4, and -7) for which we study the relations between the outflow mass loss rate and the YSO physical parameters from the radiative transfer model fitting. The ratios of the outflow mass loss rate over the disk accretion rate for IFO-4 and -7 are consistent with the previously reported values (10{sup –2}-10{sup +1}), while the ratio is higher for IFO-2. This excess may result from underestimating the disk accretion rate. The jet-driving objects are likely to be low- or intermediate-mass stars. Other YSO physical parameters, such as luminosity and age, show reasonable relations or trends.

  4. Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH). VI. Constraints on UV and X-ray irradiation from a survey of hydrides in low- to high-mass young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, A. O.; Bruderer, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Melchior, M.; Wampfler, S. F.; van der Tak, F.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Indriolo, N.; Kristensen, L. E.; Lis, D. C.; Mottram, J. C.; Bergin, E. A.; Caselli, P.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Liseau, R.; Nisini, B.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Hydrides are simple compounds containing one or a few hydrogen atoms bonded to a heavier atom. They are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides such as CH+ and OH+ (and also HCO+), which affect the chemistry of molecules such as water, provide complementary information on irradiation by far-UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature. Aims: We explore hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements in an observational survey covering young stellar objects (YSOs) with different mass and evolutionary state. The focus is on hydrides associated with the dense protostellar envelope and outflows, contrary to previous work that focused on hydrides in diffuse foreground clouds. Methods: Twelve YSOs were observed with HIFI on Herschel in six spectral settings providing fully velocity-resolved line profiles as part of the Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) program. The YSOs include objects of low (Class 0 and I), intermediate, and high mass, with luminosities ranging from 4 L⊙ to 2 × 105 L⊙. Results: The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, C+, and CH are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. The observed line parameters and correlations suggest two different origins related to gas entrained by the outflows and to the circumstellar envelope. The derived column densities correlate with bolometric luminosity and envelope mass for all molecules, best for CH, CH+, and HCO+. The column density ratios of CH+/OH+ are estimated from chemical slab models, assuming that the H2 density is given by the specific density model of each object at the beam radius. For the low-mass YSOs the observed ratio can be reproduced for an FUV flux of 2-400 times the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) at the location of the molecules. In two high

  5. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  6. The slow ionized wind and rotating disklike system that are associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Mardones, Diego; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Moran, James; Brooks, Kate J.; Nyman, Lars-Åke; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2014-12-01

    We report the detection, made using ALMA, of the 92 GHz continuum and hydrogen recombination lines (HRLs) H40α, H42α, and H50β emission toward the ionized wind associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677. This is the luminous central dominating source located in the massive and dense molecular clump associated with IRAS 16562–3959. The HRLs exhibit Voigt profiles, which is a strong signature of Stark broadening. We successfully reproduce the observed continuum and HRLs simultaneously using a simple model of a slow ionized wind in local thermodynamic equilibrium, with no need for a high-velocity component. The Lorentzian line wings imply electron densities of 5 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3} on average. In addition, we detect SO and SO{sub 2} emission arising from a compact (∼3000 AU) molecular core associated with the central young star. The molecular core exhibits a velocity gradient that is perpendicular to the jet-axis, which we interpret as evidence of rotation. The set of observations toward G345.4938+01.4677 are consistent with it being a young high-mass star associated with a slow photo-ionized wind.

  7. An EXES Medium Resolution Search for Formaldehyde Gas in the Class I/II Young Stellar Object IRAS 04278+2253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    We propose to obtain high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy at 5.8 microns wavelength of the Class I/II Young Stellar Object (YSO) IRAS 04278+2253 using EXES on SOFIA to search for absorption from formaldehyde (H2CO) gas. Low spectral resolution (R~90) Spitzer-IRS spectra of this YSO and a number of T Tauri stars (TTSs) show an unresolved band of absorption of full width half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.6 microns centered around 5.7 microns wavelength. Modeling of the Spitzer-IRS spectrum of IRAS 04278+2253 and the other TTSs indicates this band may be due to formaldehyde. Detection of individual absorption lines in high spectral resolution mid-infrared spectra of YSOs would be a significant finding, as the relatively recent mid-infrared spectral studies of TTSs that have found evidence for circumstellar gas in protoplanetary disks have found emission lines from gases such as H2O, OH, CO, CO2, HCN, and C2H2 (e.g., Carr & Najita 2008, Salyk et al 2008; Salyk et al 2009; Carr & Najita 2011; Pontoppidan et al 2011), but they do not find absorption lines, and they do not find H2CO.

  8. A high-NA solid immersion objective for imaging a Blue-ray disc and investigating subsurface damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, Victor; Kim, Young Sik; Milster, Tom; Watson, Matt; Kwok, Dolaphine

    2014-09-01

    Nano-scale resolution in miniature optical systems has been realized in the optical data storage industry. Numerical apertures greater than unity have been achieved in by utilizing the high index material of a hemispherical Solid Immersion Lens (SIL), which increases the resolution of the backing objective by a factor that is related to the refractive index of the SIL. In this research, a custom Hyper-Blu-Disc (HBD) NA=1.4 SIL objective is utilized for high-fidelity readout of data pits beneath a 100μm thick cover layer on an optical Blu-Ray Disc. If realized commercially, the increase in data density could be 3X today's Blu-Ray technology. A distinct difference between this work and other work with SILs in optical data storage is the relatively thick cover layer of 100μm. Recently, there has been interest in discovering new ways to apply the technology and methods used in optical data storage for other means. The inherent design of the HBD objective to image through a shallow layer of dielectric material may lend itself to be used as an effective means for characterizing subsurface damage in optical materials. This research will furthermore investigate the HBD objective as a means of detecting subsurface damage.

  9. Are forward bending of the trunk and low back pain associated among Danish blue-collar workers? A cross-sectional field study based on objective measures.

    PubMed

    Villumsen, Morten; Samani, Afshin; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Gupta, Nidhi; Madeleine, Pascal; Holtermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between the duration of objectively measured forward bending of the trunk and low back pain (LBP) intensity among 198 Danish blue-collar workers (male = 115; female = 83). The duration of forward bending of ≥ 30°, ≥ 60° and ≥ 90° was divided into high (the highest tertile) and low-moderate (the remaining tertiles) categories. High (>5) and low ( ≤ 5) pain intensities were categorised from a self-reported 0-9 scale. Results of multi-adjusted logistic regressions indicated no significant positive associations between forward bending and LBP intensity. On the contrary, higher duration of forward bending of ≥ 30° was associated with lower LBP intensity during all day (OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.15-1.02; p = 0.05) and work (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.17-1.15; p = 0.09). This indication of a negative association may be explained by fear-avoidance behaviour of the blue-collar worker, job crafting or healthy worker effect.

  10. Intermittent maser flare around the high-mass young stellar object G353.273+0.641 - I. Data and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, K.; Sorai, K.; Honma, M.; Minamidani, T.; Takekoshi, T.; Akiyama, K.; Tateuchi, K.; Hosaka, K.; Ohishi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Habe, A.; Kobayashi, H.

    2011-10-01

    We have performed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and single-dish monitoring of 22-GHz H2O maser emission from the high-mass young stellar object G353.273+0.641 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) and the Tomakamai 11-m radio telescope. Two maser flares have been detected, separated by almost two years. Frequent VLBI monitoring has revealed that the flare activity has been accompanied by structural change of the prominent shock front traced by H2O maser alignments. We have detected only blueshifted emission and all maser features have been distributed within a very small area of 200 × 200 au2, in spite of a wide velocity range (>100 km s-1). The light curve shows notably intermittent variation and suggests that the H2O masers in G353.273+0.641 are excited by an episodic radio jet. The time-scale of ˜2 yr and characteristic velocity of ˜500 km s-1 also support this interpretation. Two isolated velocity components, C50 (-53 ± 7 km s-1) and C70 (-73 ± 7 km s-1), have shown synchronized linear acceleration of the flux-weighted ? values (˜ -5 km s-1 yr-1) during the flare phase. This can be converted to the lower-limit momentum rate of 1.1 × 10-3 M⊙ km s-1 yr-1. The maser properties are quite similar to those of IRAS 20126+4104 especially. This corroborates the previous suggestion that G353.273+0.641 is a candidate high-mass protostellar object. The possible pole-on geometry of the disc-jet system may be suitable for direct imaging of the accretion disc in this case.

  11. Surface Abundances of NGC 188 Blue Stragglers as a Clue to Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliman, Katelyn; Mathieu, R. D.; Schuler, S. C.

    2013-06-01

    Studies of the old open cluster NGC 188 have discovered a blue straggler binary frequency nearly three times the binary fraction of main-sequence stars, and a secondary mass distribution peaking at 0.5 solar masses for long-period blue stragglers. These features suggest that asymptotic giant branch mass transfer in binary stars dominates the production of blue stragglers in open clusters. However, sophisticated N-body simulations point toward stellar collisions being the dominant formation process. These two mechanisms are expected to result in measurably different blue straggler surface abundances. Blue stragglers resulting from stellar collisions of main-sequence stars are predicted to retain roughly the same surface abundance as the more massive star in the collision. On the other hand, blue stragglers formed by mass transfer from an evolved companion will have a surface abundance altered by the nucleosynthesis that occurred within the evolved donor star. We present first results of a surface abundance study of 21 blue stragglers in NGC 188 using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. These results include measurements of barium, oxygen, and carbon and offer a clue to the formation history of blue stragglers in open clusters. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation under grant AST-0908082.

  12. Herschel-PACS observations of far-IR lines in young stellar objects. I. [OI] and H2O at 63 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Merín, B.; Kamp, I.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Gas plays a major role in the dynamical evolution of young stellar objects (YSOs). Its interaction with the dust is the key to our understanding planet formation later on in the protoplanetary disc stage. Studying the gas content is therefore a crucial step towards understanding YSO and planet formation. Such a study can be made through spectroscopic observations of emission lines in the far-infrared, where some of the most important gas coolants emit, such as the [OI] 3P1 →3P2 transition at 63.18 μm. Aims: We provide a compilation of observations of far-IR lines in 362 YSOs covering all evolutionary stages, from Class 0 to Class III with debris discs. In the present paper we focus on [OI] and o-H2O emission at 63 μm. Methods: We retrieved all the available Herschel-PACS spectroscopic observations at 63 μm that used the dominant observing mode, the chop-nod technique. We provide measurements of line fluxes for the [OI] 3P1 →3P2 and o-H2O808 → 717 transitions at 63 μm computed using different methods. Taking advantage of the PACS IFU, we checked for spatially extended emission and also studied multiple dynamical components in line emission. Results: The final compilation consists of line and continuum fluxes at 63 μm for a total of 362 young stellar objects (YSOs). We detect [OI] line emission at 63 μm in 194 sources out of 362, and line absorption in another five sources. o-H2O was detected in 42 sources. We find evidence of extended [OI] emission in 77 sources, and detect 3σ residual emission in 71 of them. The number of sources showing extended emission decays from Class 0 to Class II. We also searched for different components contributing to the line emission, and found evidence for multiple components in 30 sources. We explored correlations between line emission and continuum emission and found a clear correlation between WISE fluxes from 4.6 to 22 μm and [OI] line emission. We conclude that the observed emission is typically a

  13. The c2d Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of Ices Around Low-mass Young Stellar Objects. IV. NH3 and CH3OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottinelli, Sandrine; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Bouwman, Jordy; Beckwith, Martha; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Öberg, Karin I.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Linnartz, Harold; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Evans, Neal J., II; Lahuis, Fred

    2010-08-01

    NH3 and CH3OH are key molecules in astrochemical networks leading to the formation of more complex N- and O-bearing molecules, such as CH3CN and CH3OCH3. Despite a number of recent studies, little is known about their abundances in the solid state. This is particularly the case for low-mass protostars, for which only the launch of the Spitzer Space Telescope has permitted high-sensitivity observations of the ices around these objects. In this work, we investigate the ~8-10 μm region in the Spitzer IRS (InfraRed Spectrograph) spectra of 41 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs). These data are part of a survey of interstellar ices in a sample of low-mass YSOs studied in earlier papers in this series. We used both an empirical and a local continuum method to correct for the contribution from the 10 μm silicate absorption in the recorded spectra. In addition, we conducted a systematic laboratory study of NH3- and CH3OH-containing ices to help interpret the astronomical spectra. We clearly detect a feature at ~9 μm in 24 low-mass YSOs. Within the uncertainty in continuum determination, we identify this feature with the NH3 ν2 umbrella mode and derive abundances with respect to water between ~2% and 15%. Simultaneously, we also revisited the case of CH3OH ice by studying the ν4 C-O stretch mode of this molecule at ~9.7 μm in 16 objects, yielding abundances consistent with those derived by Boogert et al. based on a simultaneous 9.75 and 3.53 μm data analysis. Our study indicates that NH3 is present primarily in H2O-rich ices, but that in some cases, such ices are insufficient to explain the observed narrow FWHM. The laboratory data point to CH3OH being in an almost pure methanol ice, or mixed mainly with CO or CO2, consistent with its formation through hydrogenation on grains. Finally, we use our derived NH3 abundances in combination with previously published abundances of other solid N-bearing species to find that up to 10%-20% of nitrogen is locked up in known

  14. Results from a triple chord stellar occultation and far-infrared photometry of the trans-Neptunian object (229762) 2007 UK126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, K.; Wolf, J.; Bardecker, J.; Olsen, A.; Müller, T.; Kiss, C.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Herald, D.; Krabbe, A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. A stellar occultation by a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) provides an opportunity to probe the size and shape of these distant solar system bodies. In the past seven years, several occultations by TNOs have been observed, but mostly from a single location. Only very few TNOs have been sampled simultaneously from multiple locations. Sufficient data that enable a robust estimation of shadow size through an ellipse fit could only be obtained for two objects. Aims: We present the first observation of an occultation by the TNO 2007 UK126 on 15 November 2014, measured by three observers, one nearly on and two almost symmetrical to the shadow's centerline. This is the first multi-chord dataset obtained for a so-called detached object, a TNO subgroup with perihelion distances so large that the giant planets have likely not perturbed their orbits. We also revisit Herschel/PACS far-infrared data, applying a new reduction method to improve the accuracy of the measured fluxes. Combining both datasets allows us to comprehensively characterize 2007 UK126. Methods: We use error-in-variable regression to solve the non-linear problem of propagating timing errors into uncertainties of the ellipse parameters. Based on the shadow's size and a previously reported rotation period, we expect a shape of a Maclaurin spheroid and derive a geometrically plausible size range. To refine our size estimate of 2007 UK126, we model its thermal emission using a thermophysical model code. We conduct a parametric study to predict far-infrared fluxes and compare them to the Herschel/PACS measurements. Results: The favorable geometry of our occultation chords, combined with minimal dead-time imaging, and precise GPS time measurements, allow for an accurate estimation of the shadow size (best-fitting ellipse with axes 645.80 ± 5.68 km × 597.81 ± 12.74 km) and the visual geometric albedo (pV = 15.0 ± 1.6%). By combining our analyses of the occultation and the far-infrared data, we can

  15. THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEY OF THE ORION A AND B MOLECULAR CLOUDS. II. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF DUSTY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Megeath, S. T.; Kryukova, E.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Hora, J. L.; Myers, P. C.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.; Flaherty, K.; Hartmann, L.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.

    2016-01-15

    We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc{sup −2} to over 10,000 pc{sup −2}, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc{sup −2}, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ∼2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.

  16. The Effect of Broadband Soft X-Rays in SO2-Containing Ices: Implications on the Photochemistry of Ices toward Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Bergantini, A.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effects produced mainly by broadband soft X-rays up to 2 keV (plus fast (˜keV) photoelectrons and low-energy (˜eV) induced secondary electrons) in the ice mixtures containing H2O:CO2:NH3:SO2 (10:1:1:1) at two different temperatures (50 and 90 K). The experiments are an attempt to simulate the photochemical processes induced by energetic photons in SO2-containing ices present in cold environments in the ices surrounding young stellar objects (YSO) and in molecular clouds in the vicinity of star-forming regions, which are largely illuminated by soft X-rays. The measurements were performed using a high-vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. In situ analyses were performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Sample processing revealed the formation of several organic molecules, including nitriles, acids, and other compounds such as H2O2, H3O+, SO3, CO, and OCN-. The dissociation cross section of parental species was on the order of (2-7) × 10-18 cm2. The ice temperature does not seem to affect the stability of SO2 in the presence of X-rays. Formation cross sections of new species produced were also determined. Molecular half-lives at ices toward YSOs due to the presence of incoming soft X-rays were estimated. The low values obtained employing two different models of the radiation field of YSOs (TW Hydra and typical T-Tauri star) reinforce that soft X-rays are indeed a very efficient source of molecular dissociation in such environments.

  17. Deriving the Extinction to Young Stellar Objects using [Fe II] Near-infrared Emission Lines: Prescriptions from GIANO High-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecchioli, T.; Sanna, N.; Massi, F.; Oliva, E.

    2016-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission lines of Fe+ at 1.257, 1.321, and 1.644 μm share the same upper level; their ratios can then be exploited to derive the extinction to a line emitting region once the relevant spontaneous emission coefficients are known. This is commonly done, normally from low-resolution spectra, in observations of shocked gas from jets driven by Young Stellar Objects. In this paper we review this method, provide the relevant equations, and test it by analyzing high-resolution (R ∼ 50,000) NIR spectra of two young stars, namely the Herbig Be star HD 200775 and the Be star V1478 Cyg, which exhibit intense emission lines. The spectra were obtained with the new GIANO echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Notably, the high-resolution spectra allowed checking the effects of overlapping telluric absorption lines. A set of various determinations of the Einstein coefficients are compared to show how much the available computations affect extinction derivation. The most recently obtained values are probably good enough to allow reddening determination within 1 visual mag of accuracy. Furthermore, we show that [Fe ii] line ratios from low-resolution pure emission-line spectra in general are likely to be in error due to the impossibility to properly account for telluric absorption lines. If low-resolution spectra are used for reddening determinations, we advice that the ratio 1.644/1.257, rather than 1.644/1.321, should be used, being less affected by the effects of telluric absorption lines.

  18. THE HIGH A{sub V} Quasar Survey: Reddened Quasi-Stellar Objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry. II

    SciTech Connect

    Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vestergaard, M.; Geier, S.; Venemans, B. P.; Ledoux, C.; Møller, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Kangas, T.; Pursimo, T.; Smirnova, O.; Saturni, F. G.

    2015-03-15

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the ones used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared (near-IR) color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 μm flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 μm relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-IR selection of red QSOs.

  19. The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Orion A and B Molecular Clouds. II. The Spatial Distribution and Demographics of Dusty Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Kryukova, E.; Hora, J. L.; Allen, L. E.; Flaherty, K.; Hartmann, L.; Myers, P. C.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc-2 to over 10,000 pc-2, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities ≥10 pc-2, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups shows that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only ˜2 Myr in age. We find that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.

  20. Census of Blue Stars in SDSS DR8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2014-12-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g - r)0 < -0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  1. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r){sub 0} < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  2. Unveiling the near-infrared structure of the massive-young stellar object NGC 3603 IRS 9A* with sparse aperture masking and spectroastrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Hummel, C. A.; Tuthill, P.; Alberdi, A.; Schödel, R.; Lacour, S.; Stanke, T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Contemporary theory holds that massive stars gather mass during their initial phases via accreting disk-like structures. However, conclusive evidence for disks has remained elusive for most massive young objects. This is mainly due to significant observational challenges: objects are rare and located at great distances within dusty, highly opaque environments. Incisive studies, even targeting individual objects, are therefore relevant to the progression of the field. NGC 3603 IRS 9A* is a young massive stellar object that is still surrounded by an envelope of molecular gas for which previous mid-infrared observations with long-baseline interferometry have provided evidence of a plausible disk of 50 mas diameter at its core. Aims: This work aims at a comprehensive study of the physics and morphology of IRS 9A at near-infrared wavelengths. Methods: New sparse aperture-masking interferometry data, taken with the near-infrared camera NACO of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Ks and L' wavelengths, were analyzed together with archival high-resolution H2 and Brγ lines obtained with the cryogenic high-resolution infrared schelle spectrograph (CRIRES). Results: The trends in the calibrated visibilities at Ks and L'-bands suggest the presence of a partially resolved compact object with an angular size of ≤30 mas at the core of IRS 9A, together with the presence of over-resolved flux. The spectroastrometric signal of the H2 line, obtained from the CRIRES spectra, shows that this spectral feature proceeds from the large-scale extended emission (~300 mas), while the Brγ line appears to be formed at the core of the object (~20 mas). To better understand the physics that drive IRS 9A, we have performed continuum radiative transfer modeling. Our best model supports the existence of a compact disk with an angular diameter of 20 mas, together with an outer envelope of 1'' exhibiting a polar cavity with an opening angle of ~30°. This model reproduces the MIR morphology

  3. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  4. THE EFFECT OF BROADBAND SOFT X-RAYS IN SO{sub 2}-CONTAINING ICES: IMPLICATIONS ON THE PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF ICES TOWARD YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pilling, S.; Bergantini, A.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the effects produced mainly by broadband soft X-rays up to 2 keV (plus fast (∼keV) photoelectrons and low-energy (∼eV) induced secondary electrons) in the ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O:CO{sub 2}:NH{sub 3}:SO{sub 2} (10:1:1:1) at two different temperatures (50 and 90 K). The experiments are an attempt to simulate the photochemical processes induced by energetic photons in SO{sub 2}-containing ices present in cold environments in the ices surrounding young stellar objects (YSO) and in molecular clouds in the vicinity of star-forming regions, which are largely illuminated by soft X-rays. The measurements were performed using a high-vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratório de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP) coupled to the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. In situ analyses were performed by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Sample processing revealed the formation of several organic molecules, including nitriles, acids, and other compounds such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, SO{sub 3}, CO, and OCN{sup −}. The dissociation cross section of parental species was on the order of (2–7) × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2}. The ice temperature does not seem to affect the stability of SO{sub 2} in the presence of X-rays. Formation cross sections of new species  produced were also determined. Molecular half-lives at ices toward YSOs due to the presence of incoming soft X-rays were estimated. The low values obtained employing two different models of the radiation field of YSOs (TW Hydra and typical T-Tauri star) reinforce that soft X-rays are indeed a very efficient source of molecular dissociation in such environments.

  5. Stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the understanding and use of chromospheric diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) trends emerging from semiempirical models of single stars; (2) the validity of claims that theoretical models of chromospheres are becoming realistic; (3) the correlation between the widths of Ca 2 H and K line emission cores and stellar absolute luminosity extending over 15 magnitudes (Wilson-Bappu relation); and (4) the existence of systematic flow patterns in stellar chromospheres.

  6. THE FIRST DETECTION OF BLUE STRAGGLER STARS IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, W. I.; Rich, R. Michael; Sahu, Kailash C.; Anderson, Jay; Smith, T. Ed.; Brown, Thomas M.; Bond, Howard E.; Livio, Mario; Minniti, Dante; Zoccali, Manuela; Renzini, Alvio

    2011-07-01

    We report the first detections of Blue Straggler Stars (BSS) in the bulge of the Milky Way. Proper motions from extensive space-based observations along a single sight line allow us to separate a sufficiently clean and well-characterized bulge sample such that we are able to detect a small population of bulge objects in the region of the color-magnitude diagram commonly occupied by young objects and blue stragglers. Variability measurements of these objects clearly establish that a fraction of them are blue stragglers. Out of the 42 objects found in this region of the color-magnitude diagram, we estimate that at least 18 are genuine BSS. We normalize the BSS population by our estimate of the number of horizontal branch stars in the bulge in order to compare the bulge to other stellar systems. The BSS fraction is clearly discrepant from that found in stellar clusters. The blue straggler population of dwarf spheroidals remains a subject of debate; some authors claim an anticorrelation between the normalized blue straggler fraction and integrated light. If this trend is real, then the bulge may extend it by three orders of magnitude in mass. Conversely, we find that the genuinely young (<5 Gyr) population in the bulge, must be at most 3.4% under the most conservative scenario for the BSS population.

  7. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  8. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  9. Intermittent maser flare around the high-mass young stellar object G353.273 + 0.641 - II. Detection of a radio and molecular jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, K.; Sorai, K.; Niinuma, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Honma, M.; Fujisawa, K.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first detection of a radio continuum and molecular jet associated with a dominant blue-shifted maser source, G353.273+0.641. A radio jet is extended 3000 au along the north-west-south-east (NW-SE) direction. H2O masers are found to be clustered in the root of a bipolar radio jet. A molecular jet is detected by thermal SiO ( \\upsilon = 0, J = 2-1) emission. The SiO spectrum is extremely wide ( - 120 to +87 km s- 1) and significantly blue-shift dominated, similar to the maser emission. The observed geometry and remarkable spectral similarity between H2O maser and SiO strongly suggest the existence of a maser-scale ( ˜ 340 au) molecular jet that is enclosed by the extended radio jet. We propose a disc-masking scenario as the origin of the strong blue-shift dominance, where an optically thick disc obscures a red-shifted lobe of a compact jet.

  10. [Maternity blues].

    PubMed

    Gonidakis, F

    2007-04-01

    Maternity blues is a transient change of mood that occurs mainly between the 1st and 10th day of puerpartum and is characterized by bursts of tears, mild depressive mood, anxiety and liability of mood. The frequency of maternity blues varies in different studies form 4% to 80%. A number of biological and psychosocial parameters have been studied in order to determine their correlation with maternity blues. The most well studied biological parameters are progesterone and cortizol although their relation with maternity blues has not yet been clearly defined. Stress and the emotional state of the woman during pregnancy as well as history of mood disorders or maternity blues in a previous birth are the psychosocial parameters that are more likely to correlate with the occurrence of maternity blues. Most of the authors suggest that information on maternity blues and reassurance of the woman are the best way to deal with maternity blues both on preventive and therapeutical basis.

  11. Using modern stellar observables to constrain stellar parameters and the physics of the stellar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.

    2014-05-01

    stellar parameters and the physics of the interior. I examine how the acoustic signature of the location of the base of stellar convective envelopes can be used as an absolute abundance indicator, and describe a novel 3He-burning instability in low mass stars along with the observational signatures of such a process. Finally, I examine the manner in which stellar rotation, observed in a population of objects, can be used as a means to distinguish between different evolutionary states, masses, and ages. I emphasize that rotation periods can be used as age indicators (as often discussed in the literature), but that the interpretation of rotation periods must be made within the context of the full stellar population to arrive at accurate results.

  12. Radial velocities of blue stragglers in the old open cluster NGC 7789

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.

    NGC 7789 is a populous, old galactic cluster with a large number of blue stragglers. In an attempt to determine the stellar parameters of as many of these objects as possible in order to unravel their origin, the brighter blue stragglers of NGC 7789 were observed with the 4-meter echelle spectrograph at Kitt Peak and the 2.2-meter coude spectrograph at Calar Alto. This paper reports on the determination of radial velocities from these high resolution spectra. The results are compared with the previous radial velocity studies of Strom and Strom (1970) and Stryker and Hrivnak (1984).

  13. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  14. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  15. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  16. Extragalactic Stellar Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, D. J.; Smartt, S. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Herrero, A.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Venn, K.; McCarthy, J.

    1999-09-01

    The advent of large 8-10m telescopes heralds a new age in stellar astronomy. It is now possible to carry out detailed spectroscopic observations at high resolution of the brightest stars of galaxies in the Local Group, and it is envisaged that intermediate resolution observations will be extended to stars in the nearest galaxy clusters such as Virgo and Fornax. For some years the authors have been carrying out the groundwork involved in identifying young massive supergiant stars in nearby resolved galaxies, with a view to performing follow-up detailed studies of selected samples. In this article we summarize the contribution that the William Herschel Telescope has made to this project, and further, show that even a 4.2m telescope with a blue sensitive, large format CCD at a good site with dependable sub-arcsecond seeing can make an important contribution to the detailed study of our nearest spiral neighbours M31 and M33.

  17. Stellar cannibalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astronomers have obtained evidence that stars can literally swallow other stars, leading to the ejection of stellar material into space and the formation of extremely close pairs of stars, according to the National Science Foundation (NSF). The discovery supports theoretical predictions of the evolution of double stars.While studying the central stars of planetary nebulae—disk-shaped gas clouds that vaguely resemble planets—Albert D. Grauer of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and Howard E. Bond of Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge found that several of these central stars are actually very close stellar pairs. Previously, it had been thought that the central star in a planetary nebula was a single star that expelled a gas cloud as it neared the end of its life. Their latest discovery, the central star of planetary nebula Abell 41, consists of a pair of stars that orbit each other in 2 hours and 43 minutes. The researchers also have found three other central star pairs that have orbital periods of between 11 and 16 hours.

  18. Modelling realistic horizontal branch morphologies and their impact on spectroscopic ages of unresolved stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, Susan M.; Salaris, Maurizio

    2011-04-01

    The presence of an extended blue horizontal branch (HB) in a stellar population is known to affect the age inferred from spectral fitting to stellar population synthesis models. This is due to the hot blue component which increases the strength of the Balmer lines and can make an old population look spuriously young. However, most population synthesis models still rely on theoretical isochrones, which do not include realistic modelling of extended HBs. In this work, we create detailed models for a range of old simple stellar populations (SSPs), with metallicities ranging from [Fe/H]=-1.3 to solar, to create a variety of realistic HB morphologies, from extended red clumps, to extreme blue HBs. We achieve this by utilizing stellar tracks from the BaSTI data base and implementing a different mass-loss prescription for each SSP created. This includes setting an average mass and a Gaussian spread in masses of individual stars coming on to the zero-age HB for each model, and hence resulting in different HB morphologies. We find that, for each metallicity, there is some HB morphology which maximizes Hβ, making an underlying 14-Gyr population look ˜5-6 Gyr old for the low- and intermediate-metallicity cases, and as young as 2 Gyr in the case of the solar metallicity SSP. We explore whether there are any spectral indices capable of breaking the degeneracy between an old SSP with extended blue HB and a truly young or intermediate-age SSP, and find that the Ca II index of Rose and the strength of the Mg II doublet at 2800 Å are promising candidates, in combination with Hβ and other metallicity indicators, such as Mgb and Fe5406. We also run Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the level of statistical fluctuations in the spectra of typical stellar clusters. We find that fluctuations in spectral indices are significant even for average to large globular clusters and that various spectral indices are affected in different ways, which has implications for full

  19. A Study of the Stellar Population in Selected SO Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M.; Danks, A.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this program was to observe at least two SO galaxies with abnormal colors in the blue and clear optical signatures of dust and gas. The galaxies NGC 2217 and NGC 1808 were observed at least in one of the IUE cameras (1200-200 and 2000-3200 A) during the 13th episode, using the 4 US1 shifts assigned to this program. The galaxy NGC 2217 had been found to be part of a subgroup of SO galaxies with external gas rotating in retrograde motion with respect to the stars. This galaxy is a face-on object with indications of large amount of gas, quite rare for a SO galaxy. We observed this object on three different occasions with IUE at different positions of the large aperture (spacecraft roll angle) with respect to the nuclear region. These exposures allowed us to take full advantage of the spatial resolution of IUE by mapping nuclear and bulge region of this galaxy. We found that the data point to a marginally earlier stellar population toward the central region. The UV light as a whole is dominated by a late-type stellar population of principally G and K stars. The almost face-on view of this galaxy appears optically thick to UV light. It is conceivable that in analogy to out own Galaxy, the stellar populations weakly detected in NGC 2217, are mostly halo and late-type stars in the center with an increasing contribution of dust and early stellar populations (so far undetected) as we move outward along the faint spiral arms. This result is contrary to our initial expectation, since the counterrotating gas does not appear to be enhancing star formation in this galaxy. Even more interesting were the observations of NGC 1808; galaxy which has been classified, with a handful of other objects, both as a starburst and Seyfert galaxy. Attachment: 'The White-Dwarf Companions of 56 Persei and HR 3643.'

  20. STELLARATOR INJECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1962-09-01

    A method and means are described for injecting energetic neutral atoms or molecular ions into dense magnetically collimated plasma columns of stellarators and the like in such a manner that the atoms or ions are able to significantly penetrate the column before being ionized by collision with the plasma constituent particles. Penetration of the plasma column by the neutral atoms or molecular ions is facilitated by superposition of two closely spaced magnetic mirrors on the plasma confinement field. The mirrors are moved apart to magnetically sweep plasma from a region between the mirrors and establish a relatively low plasma density therein. By virture of the low density, neutral atoms or molecular ions injected into the region significantly penetrate the plasma column before being ionized. Thereafter, the mirrors are diminished to permit the injected material to admix with the plasma in the remainder of the column. (AEC)

  1. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  2. Chaotic pulsations in stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchler, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The irregular behavior of large-amplitude pulsating stars undergoing radial oscillations is examined theoretically, with a focus on hydrodynamic simulations of the W Virginis population II Cepheids (stars which show both regular and RV Tau characteristics). Sequences of models are constructed as one-parameter families (with luminosity, mass, and composition fixed and Teff as the control parameter) and analyzed to derive a systematic map of the bifurcation set; i.e., of the possible types of pulsations. The results are presented graphically, and it is shown that both cascades of period doubling (via destabilization of an overtone through a half-integer-type resonance) and tangent bifurcation are possible routes to chaos in these systems, depending on the stellar parameters. The general robustness of the chaotic behavior and the existence of a 'chaotic blue edge' in stellar-parameter space are demonstrated. 55 refs.

  3. Detailed Analysis of Starburst and AGN Activity in Blue E/S0 Galaxies in RESOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Ashley; Snyder, Elaine M.; Kannappan, Sheila; Norman, Dara J.; Norris, Mark A.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Stark, David; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We identify a population of ~120 blue E/S0 galaxies among the ~1350 galaxies that are targeted for spectroscopy and have measured morphologies in the highly complete REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local Volume (RESOLVE) survey. Blue E/S0s are identified as being early type objects morphologically classified between E and S0/a that fall on the blue sequence. Most (~85%) of our blue E/S0s have stellar masses <10^10 M_sun. Using pPXF, we have measured the stellar velocity dispersions (sigma values) from high resolution 485 - 550 nm spectroscopy for ~15% of the blue E/S0 sample. Using three variations of the M_BH -- sigma relation, this kinematic subsample is estimated to typically host central black holes within the range log M_BH = 4-6 M_sun. Following up on previous suggestions of nuclear activity in the blue E/S0 population, we investigate nuclear starburst and/or AGN activity occurring within the full sample. Preliminary results from cross-checking known AGN catalogs with the blue E/S0 sample have revealed nuclear activity in ~20 of these galaxies based on heterogeneous criteria (BPT line ratio analysis, spectral line broadening, etc.), some of which may not entirely distinguish starburst from AGN activity. In an attempt to break the degeneracy between AGN and starburst activity, we perform detailed spectral analysis for a few of the galaxies with kinematic data. We also consider the viability of alternate AGN detection methods based on L_Edd estimates calculated from the M_BH estimates. This research has been supported by the National Science Foundation through the CAP REU Program (ACI-1156614) and the RESOLVE Survey (AST-0955368) as well as the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program and the NC Space Grant Consortium.

  4. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    from the same cloud. The blue dots sprinkled across the image represent older Milky Way stars at various distances along this line of sight. This image is a five-channel, false-color composite, showing emission from wavelengths of 3.6 and 4.5 microns (blue), 5.8 microns (cyan), 8 microns (green), and 24 microns (red).

    The top right (fig. 2) image from the infrared array camera show that the nebula is still actively forming stars. The wisps of red (represented as green in the combined image) are organic molecules mixed with dust, which has been illuminated by nearby star formation. The infrared array camera picture is a four-channel, false-color composite, showing emission from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red).

    The bottom right image (fig. 3) from the multiband imaging photometer shows the colder dust of the nebula and unwraps the youngest stellar babies from their dusty covering. This is a false-color image showing emission at 24 microns (red).

  5. The status of blue straggler studies (II): observational properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Deng, Li-Cai; Liang, Yan-Chun

    2006-09-01

    The obervational features of blue stragglers (BSs) show great differences among the different stellar systems, such as Galactic halo, open clusters, globular clusters, and dwarf galaxies. These differences reveal the distinctive formation of BSs and the physical conditions of the systems and their stellar populations. Therefore, studying the observational properties of BSs could be an effective method for studying the formation mechanisms of BSs, the evolution of single stars and binary systems, and the dynamical evolution of stellar systems.

  6. Trends of stellar entropy along stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Guilherme Bronzato, Marcio; Alvares de Souza, Rodrigo; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to discussing the difference in the thermodynamic entropy budget per baryon in each type of stellar object found in the Universe. We track and discuss the actual decrease of the stored baryonic thermodynamic entropy from the most primitive molecular cloud up to the final fate of matter in black holes, passing through evolved states of matter as found in white dwarfs and neutron stars. We then discuss the case of actual stars with different masses throughout their evolution, clarifying the role of the virial equilibrium condition for the decrease in entropy and related issues. Finally, we discuss the role of gravity in driving the composition and the structural changes of stars with different Main Sequence masses during their evolution up to the final product. Particularly, we discuss the entropy of a black hole in this context arguing that the dramatic increase in its entropy, differently from the other cases, is due to the gravitational field itself.

  7. Spectroscopy of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, P.; Bolte, M.; Wilson, C. D.; Patel, K.

    1993-12-01

    Optical spectra (at 0.9 Angstroms /pixel dispersion) for 24 candidate blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have been obtained with ARGUS, the multi-object spectrograph on the CTIO 4.0m telescope. In addition to strong hydrogen lines, ten of the stars exhibit the 4471 Angstroms line of neutral helium. The equivalent widths of this line, the full widths of H_γ and H_δ at the 20% absorption level and BV CCD photometry have been used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities and surface helium abundances for our program objects. With the exception of one star which has an exceptionally strong 4471 Angstroms line, all of the objects with detected helium are consistent with the rather low value of N(He)/N(H) =~ 0.008, suggesting that neither enhanced atmospheric helium nor increased stellar rotation is responsible for the extremely blue horizontal branch observed in this intermediate metallicity cluster.

  8. RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, K. J.; Jahnke, K.; Rix, H.-W.; Van de Ven, G.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies of the tight scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies have suggested that in the past BHs constituted a larger fraction of their host galaxies' mass. However, these arguments are limited by selection effects and difficulties in determining robust host galaxy masses at high redshifts. Here we report the first results of a new, complementary diagnostic route: we directly determine a dynamical host galaxy mass for the z = 1.3 luminous quasar J090543.56+043347.3 through high spatial resolution (0.''47, 4 kpc FWHM) observations of the host galaxy gas kinematics over 30 x 40 kpc using the European Southern Observatory/Very Large Telescope/SINFONI with laser guide star adaptive optics. Combining our result of M{sub dyn} = 2.05{sup +1.68}{sub -0.74} x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (within a radius 5.25 {+-} 1.05 kpc) with M{sub BH,MgII} = 9.02 {+-} 1.43 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, M{sub BH,H{alpha}} = 2.83{sup +1.93}{sub -1.13} x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, we find that the ratio of BH mass to host galaxy dynamical mass for J090543.56+043347.3 matches the present-day relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}, well within the IR scatter, and deviating at most by a factor of two from the mean. J090543.56+043347.3 displays clear signs of an ongoing tidal interaction and of spatially extended star formation at a rate of 50-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, above the cosmic average for a galaxy of this mass and redshift. We argue that its subsequent evolution may move J090543.56+043347.3 even closer to the z = 0 relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}. Our results support the picture in which any substantive evolution in these relations must occur prior to z {approx} 1.3. Having demonstrated the power of this modeling approach, we are currently analyzing similar data on seven further objects to better constrain such evolution.

  9. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Census of blue stars in SDSS DR8 (Scibelli+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibelli, S.; Newberg, H. J.; Carlin, J. L.; Yanny, B.

    2015-02-01

    We present a census of the 12060 spectra of blue objects ((g-r)0<-0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. (3 data files).

  11. Stellar Astrophysics for the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Herrero, A.; Sánchez, F.

    2011-06-01

    1. Fundamentals of stellar evolution theory: understanding the HRD C. Chiosi; 2. Observations of the most luminous stars in local group galaxies P. Massey; 3. Quantitative spectroscopy of the brightest blue supergiant stars in galaxies R. P. Kudritzki; 4. Calibration of the extragalactic distance scale B. F. Madore and W. L. Freedman; 5. Dwarf galaxies G. S. Da Costa; 6. Resolved stellar populations of the luminous galaxies in the local group M. Mateo; 7. Chemical evolution of the ISM in nearby galaxies E. D. Skillman; 8. Populations of massive stars and the interstellar medium C. Leitherer.

  12. Devastated Stellar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the nasty effects of living near a group of massive stars: radiation and winds from the massive stars (white spot in center) are blasting planet-making material away from stars like our sun. The planetary material can be seen as comet-like tails behind three stars near the center of the picture. The tails are pointing away from the massive stellar furnaces that are blowing them outward.

    The picture is the best example yet of multiple sun-like stars being stripped of their planet-making dust by massive stars.

    The sun-like stars are about two to three million years old, an age when planets are thought to be growing out of surrounding disks of dust and gas. Astronomers say the dust being blown from the stars is from their outer disks. This means that any Earth-like planets forming around the sun-like stars would be safe, while outer planets like Uranus might be nothing more than dust in the wind.

    This image shows a portion of the W5 star-forming region, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. It is a composite of infrared data from Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer. Light with a wavelength of 3.5 microns is blue, while light from the dust of 24 microns is orange-red.

  13. Stellar metallicity of the extended disk and distance of the spiral galaxy NGC 3621

    SciTech Connect

    Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Bresolin, Fabio; Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Przybilla, Norbert E-mail: bresolin@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Miguel.Urbaneja-Perez@uibk.ac.at

    2014-06-10

    Low resolution (∼4.5 Å) ESO VLT/FORS spectra of blue supergiant stars are analyzed to determine stellar metallicities (based on elements such as iron, titanium, and magnesium) in the extended disk of the spiral galaxy, NGC 3621. Mildly subsolar metallicity (–0.30 dex) is found for the outer objects beyond 7 kpc, independent of galactocentric radius and compatible with the absence of a metallicity gradient, confirming the results of a recent investigation of interstellar medium H II region gas oxygen abundances. The stellar metallicities are slightly higher than those from the H II regions when based on measurements of the weak forbidden auroral oxygen line at 4363 Å but lower than the ones obtained with the R {sub 23} strong line method. It is shown that the present level of metallicity in the extended disk cannot be the result of chemical evolution over the age of the disk with the present rate of in situ star formation. Additional mechanisms must be involved. In addition to metallicity, stellar effective temperatures, gravities, interstellar reddening, and bolometric magnitudes are determined. After the application of individual reddening corrections for each target, the flux-weighted gravity-luminosity relationship of blue supergiant stars is used to obtain a distance modulus of 29.07 ± 0.09 mag (distance D = 6.52 ± 0.28 Mpc). This new distance is discussed in relation to Cepheid and the tip of the red giant branch distances.

  14. Catalog of Non-Stellar Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-12

    Nebula (a planetary nebulae), the Horsehead Nebula (a reflection-emission nebulosity), the Crab Nebula (a supernova remnant), the nebulosity around...Their motion is a combination of their revolution about the Sun as well as the motion of the Earth . Their magnitude variations are due to a...0) = !• The apparent magnitude of an asteroid with phase angle a, a distance r A.U. from the Sun, A A.U. from the Earth , with geometric albedo p

  15. Models of Individual Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Alison

    This chapter describes the current state of models of individual blue stragglers. Stellar collisions, binary mergers (or coalescence), and partial or ongoing mass transfer have all been studied in some detail. The products of stellar collisions retain memory of their parent stars and are not fully mixed. Very high initial rotation rates must be reduced by an unknown process to allow the stars to collapse to the main sequence. The more massive collision products have shorter lifetimes than normal stars of the same mass, while products between low mass stars are long-lived and look very much like normal stars of their mass. Mass transfer can result in a merger, or can produce another binary system with a blue straggler and the remnant of the original primary. The products of binary mass transfer cover a larger portion of the colour-magnitude diagram than collision products for two reasons: there are more possible configurations which produce blue stragglers, and there are differing contributions to the blended light of the system. The effects of rotation may be substantial in both collision and merger products, and could result in significant mixing unless angular momentum is lost shortly after the formation event. Surface abundances may provide ways to distinguish between the formation mechanisms, but care must be taken to model the various mixing mechanisms properly before drawing strong conclusions. Avenues for future work are outlined.

  16. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  17. The Evolution of Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DÍaz, Angeles I.; Hardy, Eduardo

    We summarize the discussion section on `Evolution of Stellar Populations' we led on May 27, 2000 in Granada, Spain, as part of the Euroconference on The Evolution of Galaxies. I- Observational Clues. The discussion was organized around two groups of topics. In the first, Population Synthesis, the accent was partially placed on the use of tools and techniques centered around the question of the unicity of the models, their sensitivity to input and the question of the age-metallicity degeneracy. In the second group, Stellar Systems a stronger accent was placed on astrophysical questions, although we included there the need for `truth tests' that apply spectral synthesis techniques to objects for which there is detailed a priori knowledge of their stellar populations. We also provide a partial comparison between the present knowledge of these topics and that which existed at the time of the Crete Conference of 1995.

  18. Advanced stellarator power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The stellarator is a class of helical/toroidal magnetic fusion devices. Recent international progress in stellarator power plant conceptual design is reviewed and comparisons in the areas of physics, engineering, and economics are made with recent tokamak design studies.

  19. Stellarator status, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F. ); Grieger, G.; Rau, F. ); Iiyoshi, A. ); Navarro, A.P. ); Kovrizhnykh, L.M. . Inst. Obshchey Fiziki); Pavlichenko, O.S. (AN Ukrain

    1990-07-01

    The present status of stellarator experiments and recent progress in stellarator research (both experimental and theoretical) are reported by groups in the United States, the USSR, Japan, Australia, and the European Community (the Federal Republic of Germany and Spain). Experiments under construction and studies of large, next-generation stellarators are also described. 73 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  1. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2011-11-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid γ Dor/ δ Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as η Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  2. The Hibernating Stellar Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Optically Active Magnetar-Candidate Discovered Astronomers have discovered a most bizarre celestial object that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again. It is most likely to be a missing link in the family of neutron stars, the first case of an object with an amazingly powerful magnetic field that showed some brief, strong visible-light activity. Hibernating Stellar Magnet ESO PR Photo 31/08 The Hibernating Stellar Magnet This weird object initially misled its discoverers as it showed up as a gamma-ray burst, suggesting the death of a star in the distant Universe. But soon afterwards, it exhibited some unique behaviour that indicates its origin is much closer to us. After the initial gamma-ray pulse, there was a three-day period of activity during which 40 visible-light flares were observed, followed by a brief near-infrared flaring episode 11 days later, which was recorded by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Then the source became dormant again. "We are dealing with an object that has been hibernating for decades before entering a brief period of activity", explains Alberto J. Castro-Tirado, lead author of a paper in this week's issue of Nature. The most likely candidate for this mystery object is a 'magnetar' located in our own Milky Way galaxy, about 15 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox. Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion billion times stronger than that of the Earth. "A magnetar would wipe the information from all credit cards on Earth from a distance halfway to the Moon," says co-author Antonio de Ugarte Postigo. "Magnetars remain quiescent for decades. It is likely that there is a considerable population in the Milky Way, although only about a dozen have been identified." Some scientists have noted that magnetars should be evolving towards a pleasant retirement as their magnetic fields decay, but no suitable source had been identified up to now as evidence for

  3. Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEMS WITH W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A FOR A RADIO SELECTED SAMPLE OF 77 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MAGNETIC FIELDS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J. E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.c

    2010-03-01

    We present a catalog of Mg II absorption systems obtained from high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/VLT data of 77 quasi-stellar objects in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0, and down to an equivalent width W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A. The statistical properties of our sample are found to be in agreement with those from the previous work in the literature. However, we point out that the previously observed increase with redshift of partial derivN/partial derivz for weak absorbers pertains exclusively to very weak absorbers with W{sub 0} < 0.1 A. Instead, partial derivN/partial derivz for absorbers with W{sub 0} in the range 0.1-0.3 A actually decreases with redshift, similar to the case of strong absorbers. We then use this catalog to extend our earlier analysis of the links between the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the quasars and the presence of intervening Mg II absorbing systems in their spectra. In contrast to the case with strong Mg II absorption systems (W{sub 0} > 0.3 A), the weaker systems do not contribute significantly to the observed RM of the background quasars. This is possibly due to the higher impact parameters of the weak systems compared to strong ones, suggesting that the high column density magnetized material that is responsible for the Faraday rotation is located within about 50 kpc of the galaxies. Finally, we show that this result also rules out the possibility that some unexpected secondary correlation between the quasar redshift and its intrinsic RM is responsible for the association of high RM and strong intervening Mg II absorption that we have presented elsewhere, since this would have produced an equal effect for the weak absorption line systems, which exhibit a very similar distribution of quasar redshifts.

  4. THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE SURVEY OF THE ORION A AND B MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. A CENSUS OF DUSTY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND A STUDY OF THEIR MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Megeath, S. T.; Kryukova, E.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Flaherty, K.; Hora, J. L.; Myers, P. C.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.; Hartmann, L.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    We present a survey of the Orion A and B molecular clouds undertaken with the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board Spitzer. In total, five distinct fields were mapped, covering 9 deg{sup 2} in five mid-IR bands spanning 3-24 {mu}m. The survey includes the Orion Nebula Cluster, the Lynds 1641, 1630, and 1622 dark clouds, and the NGC 2023, 2024, 2068, and 2071 nebulae. These data are merged with the Two Micron All Sky Survey point source catalog to generate a catalog of eight-band photometry. We identify 3479 dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds by searching for point sources with mid-IR colors indicative of reprocessed light from dusty disks or infalling envelopes. The YSOs are subsequently classified on the basis of their mid-IR colors and their spatial distributions are presented. We classify 2991 of the YSOs as pre-main-sequence stars with disks and 488 as likely protostars. Most of the sources were observed with IRAC in two to three epochs over six months; we search for variability between the epochs by looking for correlated variability in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands. We find that 50% of the dusty YSOs show variability. The variations are typically small ({approx}0.2 mag) with the protostars showing a higher incidence of variability and larger variations. The observed correlations between the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 {mu}m variability suggests that we are observing variations in the heating of the inner disk due to changes in the accretion luminosity or rotating accretion hot spots.

  5. The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Orion A and B Molecular Clouds. I. A Census of Dusty Young Stellar Objects and a Study of Their Mid-infrared Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.; Muzerolle, J.; Kryukova, E.; Flaherty, K.; Hora, J. L.; Allen, L. E.; Hartmann, L.; Myers, P. C.; Pipher, J. L.; Stauffer, J.; Young, E. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    2012-12-01

    We present a survey of the Orion A and B molecular clouds undertaken with the IRAC and MIPS instruments on board Spitzer. In total, five distinct fields were mapped, covering 9 deg2 in five mid-IR bands spanning 3-24 μm. The survey includes the Orion Nebula Cluster, the Lynds 1641, 1630, and 1622 dark clouds, and the NGC 2023, 2024, 2068, and 2071 nebulae. These data are merged with the Two Micron All Sky Survey point source catalog to generate a catalog of eight-band photometry. We identify 3479 dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds by searching for point sources with mid-IR colors indicative of reprocessed light from dusty disks or infalling envelopes. The YSOs are subsequently classified on the basis of their mid-IR colors and their spatial distributions are presented. We classify 2991 of the YSOs as pre-main-sequence stars with disks and 488 as likely protostars. Most of the sources were observed with IRAC in two to three epochs over six months; we search for variability between the epochs by looking for correlated variability in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. We find that 50% of the dusty YSOs show variability. The variations are typically small (~0.2 mag) with the protostars showing a higher incidence of variability and larger variations. The observed correlations between the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm variability suggests that we are observing variations in the heating of the inner disk due to changes in the accretion luminosity or rotating accretion hot spots.

  6. The Blue Bottle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandaveer, Walter R., IV; Mosher, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of the classic Blue Bottle demonstration that involves the alkaline glucose reduction of methylene blue. Uses other indicators in the classic Blue Bottle to produce a rainbow of colors. (JRH)

  7. COS Spectroscopy of White Dwarf Companions to Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnell, Natalie M.; Geller, Aaron M.; Knigge, Christian; Mathieu, Robert D.; Sills, Alison; Leiner, Emily; Leigh, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Complete membership studies of open stellar clusters reveal that 25% of the evolved stars follow alternative pathways in stellar evolution, meaning something in the history of these stars changed their composition or mass (or both). In order to draw a complete picture of stellar evolution we must include these canonically "strange" stars in our definition of standard stellar populations. The formation mechanism of blue straggler stars, traditionally defined to be brighter and bluer than the main sequence turnoff in a star cluster, has been an outstanding question for almost six decades. Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-ultraviolet (far-UV) observations directly reveal that the blue straggler stars in the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 are predominantly formed through mass transfer. We will present HST far-UV COS spectroscopy of white dwarf companions to blue stragglers. These white dwarfs are the remnants of the mass transfer formation process. The effective temperatures and surface gravities of the white dwarfs delineate the timeline of blue straggler formation in this cluster. The existence of these binaries in a well-studied cluster environment provides an unprecedented opportunity to observationally constrain mass transfer models and inform our understanding of many other alternative pathway stellar products.

  8. PRIMUS: The Dependence of AGN Accretion on Host Stellar Mass and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that the incidence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the distribution of their accretion rates do not depend on the stellar masses of their host galaxies, contrary to previous studies. We use hard (2-10 keV) X-ray data from three extragalactic fields (XMM-LSS, COSMOS, and ELAIS-S1) with redshifts from the Prism Multi-object Survey to identify 242 AGNs with L 2-10 keV = 1042-44 erg s-1 within a parent sample of ~25,000 galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 over ~3.4 deg2 and to i ~ 23. We find that although the fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN at fixed X-ray luminosity rises strongly with stellar mass, the distribution of X-ray luminosities is independent of mass. Furthermore, we show that the probability that a galaxy will host an AGN can be defined by a universal Eddington ratio distribution that is independent of the host galaxy stellar mass and has a power-law shape with slope -0.65. These results demonstrate that AGNs are prevalent at all stellar masses in the range 9.5 and that the same physical processes regulate AGN activity in all galaxies in this stellar mass range. While a higher AGN fraction may be observed in massive galaxies, this is a selection effect related to the underlying Eddington ratio distribution. We also find that the AGN fraction drops rapidly between z ~ 1 and the present day and is moderately enhanced (factor ~2) in galaxies with blue or green optical colors. Consequently, while AGN activity and star formation appear to be globally correlated, we do not find evidence that the presence of an AGN is related to the quenching of star formation or the color transformation of galaxies.

  9. Stability in straight stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-07-01

    The stability of the straight stellarator against localized interchange modes is investigated employing the Mercier-Greene-Johnson criterion. Critical values of ..beta.. are obtained both numerically and analytically. The conclusion is that for classical helical stellarators the average limiting ..beta..'s are quite low of order three to four percent.

  10. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  11. Measuring Doppler Shifts of X-Ray Lines to Determine the Stellar Wind X-Ray Locations in OB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Wayne

    1999-09-01

    For almost 20 years we have been trying to determine the source of the X-ray emission in OB stars. It is generally believed that this emission is caused by a distribution of stellar wind shocks. The AXAF grating spectrometers will provide the ultimate test of X-ray models. The shock model predicts that X-ray lines must be Doppler blue-shifted, hence, our primary objective is to measure these blue-shifts. MARX simulations show that the expected X-ray line shifts will be at least 4 times the MEG1 energy resolution limit. ASCA observations have provided stronger constraints on X-ray models, but they have also raised additional questions (e.g., X-ray abundance anomalies). The large number of X-ray lines predicted by MARX simulations will allow us to probe X-ray densities and abundances.

  12. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  13. Frontiers of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses theoretical and observational views of star formation, spectroscopic constraints on the evolution of massive stars, very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, asteroseismology, globular clusters as tests of stellar evolution, observational tests of stellar evolution, and mass loss from cool evolved giant stars. Also discussed are white dwarfs and hot subdwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, supernovae from single stars, close binaries with evolved components, accretion disks in interacting binaries, supernovae in binary systems, stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution, and interacting binaries containing compact components.

  14. Spectroscopy of Stellar Coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    I review the important spectroscopic results that have come from observations of stellar coronae, mainly by EUVE and ASCA, but also from HST. The plasma parameters that can be determined from such spectra include the electron density and temperature distributions, and relative element abundances. With high resolution spectra dynamical information can be obtained. Such parameters can then be used to put constraints on models of the heating and structure of stellar coronae. Throughout, I try to emphasise the similarities and differences between stellar coronal spectroscopy and that of the solar corona.

  15. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  16. Evolving sparse stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzual, Gustavo; Gladis Magris, C.; Hernández-Pérez, Fabiola

    2017-03-01

    We examine the role that stochastic fluctuations in the IMF and in the number of interacting binaries have on the spectro-photometric properties of sparse stellar populations as a function of age and metallicity.

  17. MOCK OBSERVATIONS OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: e.glebbeek@astro.ru.nl E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-11-10

    We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will select approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates their lifetimes. We show that our model blue stragglers follow similar trends with cluster properties (core mass, binary fraction, total mass, collision rate) as the true Milky Way blue stragglers as long as we restrict ourselves to model clusters with an initial binary fraction higher than 5%. We also show that, in contrast to earlier work, the number of blue stragglers in the cluster core does have a weak dependence on the collisional parameter Γ in both our models and in Milky Way globular clusters.

  18. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  19. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.

    2013-04-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  20. Blue Supergiant X-Ray Binaries in the Nearby Dwarf Galaxy IC 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Binder, Breanna; Prestwich, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In young starburst galaxies, the X-ray population is expected to be dominated by the relics of the most massive and short-lived stars, black hole and neutron-star high-mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). In the closest such galaxy, IC 10, we have made a multi-wavelength census of these objects. Employing a novel statistical correlation technique, we have matched our list of 110 X-ray point sources, derived from a decade of Chandra observations, against published photometric data. We report an 8σ correlation between the celestial coordinates of the two catalogs, with 42 X-ray sources having an optical counterpart. Applying an optical color–magnitude selection to isolate blue supergiant (SG) stars in IC 10, we find 16 matches. Both cases show a statistically significant overabundance versus the expectation value for chance alignments. The blue objects also exhibit systematically higher {f}x/{f}v ratios than other stars in the same magnitude range. Blue SG-XRBs include a major class of progenitors of double-degenerate binaries, hence their numbers are an important factor in modeling the rate of gravitational-wave sources. We suggest that the anomalous features of the IC 10 stellar population are explained if the age of the IC 10 starburst is close to the time of the peak of interaction for massive binaries.

  1. Stellar and Gaseous Properties of Tidal Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Mirabel, I. F.; Brinks, E.

    Small galaxies may form as a result of interactions between galaxies. This idea is consistent with a number of observations of the outer regions of interacting systems: optical condensations, as luminous as dwarf galaxies, are often found at the end of tidal tails. We will present multi--wavelength observations of a few systems and highlight the existence of a new class of objects, which have been named ``tidal dwarf galaxies'', that are made of material pulled out from colliding galaxies. They are gas--rich, associated with massive HI clouds and, like traditional dwarf irregular and blue compact dwarf galaxies, they host active star formation regions. However, they have a high metallicity for their mass. This is the very result of their peculiar mode of formation which is based on cosmic recycling. Part of their stellar populations consists of young stars formed from the collapse in the intergalactic medium of tidally expelled HI clouds, while another fraction is composed of old stars pulled out from the disks of the parent galaxies. We have found for the first time evidence that some tidal dwarfs might already be gravitationally bound and therefore have become independent galaxies. Systematic studies of the properties of dwarf galaxies in different environments are underway in order to estimate the fraction of recycled objects among them.

  2. The Blue Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, J. Joel

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the advantages of an elementary science activity in which students discover that blowing through a straw into a bromthymol blue solution changes the color to yellow. Directions are provided for preparing the bromthymol blue solution. (JR)

  3. Blue nightshade poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... when someone eats parts of the blue nightshade plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT ... is found in the blue nightshade ( Solanum dulcamara ) plant, especially in the fruit and leaves.

  4. Binary Populations and Stellar Dynamics in Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Mennekens, N.

    2008-06-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, η Car, ζ Pup, γ2 Velorum and WR 140.

  5. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  6. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83<λ<2.5μm) for a sample of 1200 stars in the Southern sky using the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph at the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope. We developed a dedicated observing strategy and customized the telescope control software in order to achieve the highest possible level of data homogeniety. As of 2015, we observed about 600 stars of all spectral types and luminosity classes making our library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  7. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    constellation Ara (the Altar). It was discovered in 1961 from Australia by Swedish astronomer Bengt Westerlund, who later moved from there to become ESO Director in Chile (1970 - 74). This cluster is behind a huge interstellar cloud of gas and dust, which blocks most of its visible light. The dimming factor is more than 100,000 - and this is why it has taken so long to uncover the true nature of this particular cluster. In 2001, the team of astronomers identified more than a dozen extremely hot and peculiar massive stars in the cluster, so-called "Wolf-Rayet" stars. They have since studied Westerlund 1 extensively with various ESO telescopes. They used images from the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the 2.2-m ESO/MPG as well as from the SUperb Seeing Imager 2 (SuSI2) camera on the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT). From these observations, they were able to identify about 200 cluster member stars. To establish the true nature of these stars, the astronomers then performed spectroscopic observations of about one quarter of them. For this, they used the Boller & Chivens spectrograph on the ESO 1.52-m telescope and the ESO Multi-Mode Instrument (EMMI) on the NTT. An Exotic Zoo These observations have revealed a large population of very bright and massive, quite extreme stars. Some would fill the solar system space within the orbit of Saturn (about 2,000 times larger than the Sun!), others are as bright as a million Suns. Westerlund 1 is obviously a fantastic stellar zoo, with a most exotic population and a true astronomical bonanza. All stars identified are evolved and very massive, spanning the full range of stellar oddities from Wolf-Rayet stars, OB supergiants, Yellow Hypergiants (nearly as bright as a million Suns) and Luminous Blue Variables (similar to the exceptional Eta Carinae object - see ESO PR 31/03). All stars so far analysed in Westerlund 1 weigh at least 30-40 times more than the Sun. Because such stars have a rather short life - astronomically speaking

  8. Origins of Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2016-08-01

    This contribution reviews ideas about the origins of stellar halos. It includes discussion of the theoretical understanding of and observational evidence for stellar populations formed ``in situ'' (meaning formed in orbits close to their current ones), ``kicked-out'' (meaning formed in the inner galaxy in orbits unlike their current ones) and ``accreted'' (meaning formed in a dark matter halo other than the one they currently occupy). At this point there is general agreement that a significant fraction of any stellar halo population is likely ``accreted''. There is modest evidence for the presence of a ``kicked-out'' population around both the Milky Way and M31. Our theoretical understanding of and the observational evidence for an ``in situ'' population are less clear.

  9. Galaxy bimodality versus stellar mass and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldry, I. K.; Balogh, M. L.; Bower, R. G.; Glazebrook, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Bamford, S. P.; Budavari, T.

    2006-12-01

    We analyse a z < 0.1 galaxy sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey focusing on the variation in the galaxy colour bimodality with stellar mass and projected neighbour density Σ, and on measurements of the galaxy stellar mass functions. The characteristic mass increases with environmental density from about 1010.6 to (Kroupa initial mass function, H0 = 70) for Σ in the range 0.1-10Mpc-2. The galaxy population naturally divides into a red and blue sequence with the locus of the sequences in colour-mass and colour-concentration indices not varying strongly with environment. The fraction of galaxies on the red sequence is determined in bins of 0.2 in logΣ and bins). The red fraction fr generally increases continuously in both Σ and such that there is a unified relation: . Two simple functions are proposed which provide good fits to the data. These data are compared with analogous quantities in semi-analytical models based on the Millennium N-body simulation: the Bower et al. and Croton et al. models that incorporate active galactic nucleus feedback. Both models predict a strong dependence of the red fraction on stellar mass and environment that is qualitatively similar to the observations. However, a quantitative comparison shows that the Bower et al. model is a significantly better match; this appears to be due to the different treatment of feedback in central galaxies.

  10. The Galactic stellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study of the Milky Way stellar discs in the context of galaxy formation is discussed. In particular, we explore the properties of the Milky Way disc using a new sample of about 550 dwarf stars for which we have recently obtained elemental abundances and ages based on high-resolution spectroscopy. For all the stars we also have full kinematic information as well as information about their stellar orbits. We confirm results from previous studies that the thin and the thick discs have distinct abundance patterns. But we also explore a larger range of orbital parameters than what has been possible in our previous studies. Several new results are presented. We find that stars that reach high above the Galactic plane and have eccentric orbits show remarkably tight abundance trends. This implies that these stars formed out of well-mixed gas that had been homogenized over large volumes. We find some evidence that suggest that the event that most likely caused the heating of this stellar population happened a few billion years ago. Through a simple, kinematic exploration of stars with super-solar [Fe/H], we show that the solar neighbourhood contains metal-rich, high velocity stars that are very likely associated with the thick disc. Additionally, the HR1614 moving group and the Hercules and Arcturus stellar streams are discussed and it is concluded that, probably, a large fraction of the groups and streams so far identified in the disc are the result of evolution and interactions within the stellar disc rather than being dissolved stellar clusters or engulfed dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Also based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain, and at the European Southern Observatories on La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Proposals no. 65.L-0019(B), 67.B-0108(B), 69.B-0277.

  11. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  12. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  13. The galaxy population of Abell 1367: the stellar mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhcine, M.; Kriwattanawong, W.; James, P. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using wide baseline broad-band photometry, we analyse the stellar population properties of a sample of 72 galaxies, spanning a wide range of stellar masses and morphological types, in the nearby spiral-rich and dynamically young galaxy cluster Abell 1367. The sample galaxies are distributed from the cluster centre out to approximately half the cluster Abell radius. The optical/near-infrared colours are compared with simple stellar population synthesis models from which the luminosity-weighted stellar population ages and metallicities are determined. The locus of the colours of elliptical galaxies traces a sequence of varying metallicity at a narrow range of luminosity-weighted stellar ages. Lenticular galaxies in the red sequence, however, exhibit a substantial spread of luminosity-weighted stellar metallicities and ages. For red-sequence lenticular galaxies and blue cloud galaxies, low-mass galaxies tend to be on average dominated by stellar populations of younger luminosity-weighted ages. Sample galaxies exhibit a strong correlation between integrated stellar mass and luminosity-weighted stellar metallicity. Galaxies with signs of morphological disturbance and ongoing star formation activity, tend to be underabundant with respect to passive galaxies in the red sequence of comparable stellar masses. We argue that this could be due to tidally driven gas flows towards the star-forming regions, carrying less enriched gas and diluting the pre-existing gas to produce younger stellar populations with lower metallicities than would be obtained prior to the interaction. Finally, we find no statistically significant evidence for changes in the luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities for either red-sequence or blue-cloud galaxies, at fixed stellar mass, with location within the cluster. We dedicate this work to the memory of our friend and colleague C. Moss who died suddenly recently.

  14. Dynamical evolution effects on the hot stellar populations in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Piotto, Giampaolo

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of FUV properties of Galactic globular clusters are presented. The spatially resolved spectra measured with the IUE satellite are used to find indications of color gradients in two clusters with the postcore-collapse (PCC) morphology, NGC 6752 and NGC 7099, but not in the case of NTGC 6093, a cluster with the classical King-model-type morphology. These FUV color gradients may be caused by the presence of a highly concentrated population of hot objects, such as the extreme BHB stars, blue stragglers, etc. This result extends to the FUV regime the trends seen in the ground-based data in the visible regime. PCC or highly concentrated small-core lusters are found to have bluer HB morphologies and bluer FUV colors, and the bluest FUV colors at a given metallicity. These trends indicate that dynamical evolution of clusters played some role in determining the net abundance and the spatial distribution of their hot stellar populations.

  15. Dynamical evolution effects on the hot stellar populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Piotto, Giampaolo

    1992-12-01

    Results of a study of FUV properties of Galactic globular clusters are presented. The spatially resolved spectra measured with the IUE satellite are used to find indications of color gradients in two clusters with the postcore-collapse (PCC) morphology, NGC 6752 and NGC 7099, but not in the case of NTGC 6093, a cluster with the classical King-model-type morphology. These FUV color gradients may be caused by the presence of a highly concentrated population of hot objects, such as the extreme BHB stars, blue stragglers, etc. This result extends to the FUV regime the trends seen in the ground-based data in the visible regime. PCC or highly concentrated small-core lusters are found to have bluer HB morphologies and bluer FUV colors, and the bluest FUV colors at a given metallicity. These trends indicate that dynamical evolution of clusters played some role in determining the net abundance and the spatial distribution of their hot stellar populations.

  16. Dawes Review 6: The Impact of Companions on Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Orsola; Izzard, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Astrophysicists are increasingly taking into account the effects of orbiting companions on stellar evolution. New discoveries have underlined the role of binary star interactions in a range of astrophysical events, including some that were previously interpreted as being due uniquely to single stellar evolution. We review classical binary phenomena, such as type Ia supernovae, and discuss new phenomena, such as intermediate luminosity transients, gravitational wave-producing double black holes, and the interaction between stars and their planets. Finally, we reassess well-known phenomena, such as luminous blue variables, in light of interpretations that include both single and binary stars. At the same time we contextualise the new discoveries within the framework of binary stellar evolution. The last decade has seen a revival in stellar astrophysics as the complexity of stellar observations is increasingly interpreted with an interplay of single and binary scenarios. The next decade, with the advent of massive projects such as the Square Kilometre Array, the James Webb Space Telescope, and increasingly sophisticated computational methods, will see the birth of an expanded framework of stellar evolution that will have repercussions in many other areas of astrophysics such as galactic evolution and nucleosynthesis.

  17. From stellar nebula to planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Alibert, Yann; Cabral, Nahuel; Benz, Willy

    2014-10-01

    Context. Solar and extrasolar comets and extrasolar planets are the subject of numerous studies in order to determine their chemical composition and internal structure. In the case of planetesimals, their compositions are important as they govern in part the composition of future planets. Aims: The present works aims at determining the chemical composition of icy planetesimals, believed to be similar to present day comets, formed in stellar systems of solar chemical composition. The main objective of this work is to provide valuable theoretical data on chemical composition for models of planetesimals and comets, and models of planet formation and evolution. Methods: We have developed a model that calculates the composition of ices formed during the cooling of the stellar nebula. Coupled with a model of refractory element formation, it allows us to determine the chemical composition and mass ratio of ices to rocks in icy planetesimals throughout in the protoplanetary disc. Results: We provide relationships for ice line positions (for different volatile species) in the disc, and chemical compositions and mass ratios of ice relative to rock for icy planetesimals in stellar systems of solar chemical composition. From an initial homogeneous composition of the nebula, a wide variety of chemical compositions of planetesimals were produced as a function of the mass of the disc and distance to the star. Ices incorporated in planetesimals are mainly composed of H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3. The ice/rock mass ratio is equal to 1 ± 0.5 in icy planetesimals following assumptions. This last value is in good agreement with observations of solar system comets, but remains lower than usual assumptions made in planet formation models, taking this ratio to be of 2-3.

  18. ESTIMATION OF DISTANCES TO STARS WITH STELLAR PARAMETERS FROM LAMOST

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; Li, Guangwei; Luo, A-Li; Wu, Yue; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Haotong; Beers, Timothy C.; Chen, Li; Hou, Jinliang; Smith, Martin C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Lépine, Sébastien; Yanny, Brian; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-07-15

    We present a method to estimate distances to stars with spectroscopically derived stellar parameters. The technique is a Bayesian approach with likelihood estimated via comparison of measured parameters to a grid of stellar isochrones, and returns a posterior probability density function for each star’s absolute magnitude. This technique is tailored specifically to data from the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey. Because LAMOST obtains roughly 3000 stellar spectra simultaneously within each ∼5° diameter “plate” that is observed, we can use the stellar parameters of the observed stars to account for the stellar luminosity function and target selection effects. This removes biasing assumptions about the underlying populations, both due to predictions of the luminosity function from stellar evolution modeling, and from Galactic models of stellar populations along each line of sight. Using calibration data of stars with known distances and stellar parameters, we show that our method recovers distances for most stars within ∼20%, but with some systematic overestimation of distances to halo giants. We apply our code to the LAMOST database, and show that the current precision of LAMOST stellar parameters permits measurements of distances with ∼40% error bars. This precision should improve as the LAMOST data pipelines continue to be refined.

  19. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Opacity of stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  1. Introduction to Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    This book is the final one in a series of three texts which together provide a modern, complete and authoritative account of our present knowledge of the stars. It discusses the internal structure and the evolution of stars, and is completely self-contained. There is an emphasis on the basic physics governing stellar structure and the basic ideas on which our understanding of stellar structure is based. The book also provides a comprehensive discussion of stellar evolution. Careful comparison is made between theory and observation, and the author has thus provided a lucid and balanced introductory text for the student. As for volumes 1 and 2, volume 3 is self-contained and can be used as an independent textbook. The author has not only taught but has also published many original papers in this subject. Her clear and readable style should make this text a first choice for undergraduate and beginning graduate students taking courses in astronomy and particularly in stellar astrophysics.

  2. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  3. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  4. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, G H; Brown, T G; Gates, D A; Lu, K P; Zarnstorff, M C; Boozer, A H; Harris, J H; Meneghini, O; Mynick, H E; Pomphrey, N; Reiman, A H; Xanthopoulos, P

    2011-01-05

    The quasi-axisymmetric stellarator (QAS) concept offers a promising path to a more compact stellarator reactor, closer in linear dimensions to tokamak reactors than previous stellarator designs. Concept improvements are needed, however, to make it more maintainable and more compatible with high plant availability. Using the ARIES-CS design as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. While the ARIES-CS features a through-the-port maintenance scheme, we have investigated configuration changes to enable a sector-maintenance approach, as envisioned for example in ARIES AT. Three approaches are reported. The first is to make tradeoffs within the QAS design space, giving greater emphasis to maintainability criteria. The second approach is to improve the optimization tools to more accurately and efficiently target the physics properties of importance. The third is to employ a hybrid coil topology, so that the plasma shaping functions of the main coils are shared more optimally, either with passive conductors made of high-temperature superconductor or with local compensation coils, allowing the main coils to become simpler. Optimization tools are being improved to test these approaches.

  5. A stellar audit: the computation of encounter rates for 47 Tucanae and omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Melvyn B.; Benz, Willy

    1995-10-01

    Using King-Mitchie models, we compute encounter rates between the various stellar species in the globular clusters omega Cen and 47 Tuc. We also compute event rates for encounters between single stars and a population of primordial binaries. Using these rates, and what we have learnt from hydrodynamical simulations of encounters performed earlier, we compute the production rates of objects such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), smothered neutron stars and blue stragglers (massive main-sequence stars). If 10 per cent of the stars are contained in primordial binaries, the production rate of interesting objects from encounters involving these binaries is as large as that from encounters between single stars. For example, encounters involving binaries produce a significant number of blue stragglers in both globular cluster models. The number of smothered neutron stars may exceed the number of LMXBs by a factor of 5-20, which may help to explain why millisecond pulsars are observed to outnumber LMXBs in globular clusters.

  6. IUE observations of blue halo high luminosity stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Franco, M. L.; Stalio, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two high luminosity population II blue stars of high galactic latitude, BD+33 deg 2642 and HD 137569 were observed at high resolution. The stellar spectra show the effect of mass loss in BD+33 deg 2642 and abnormally weak metallic lines in HD 137569. The interstellar lines in the direction of BD+33 deg 2642, which lies at a height z greater than or equal to 6.2 kpc from the galactic plane, are split into two components. No high ionization stages are found at the low velocity component; nor can they be detected in the higher velocity clouds because of mixing with the corresponding stellar/circumstellar lines.

  7. On the local stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Klaus; Chini, Rolf; Kaderhandt, Lena; Chen, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of the local stellar populations from a volume-complete all-sky survey of the about 500 bright stars with distances less than 25 pc and down to main-sequence effective temperatures Teff ≥ 5300 K. The sample is dominated by a 93 per cent fraction of Population I stars, only 22 sources (5 per cent) are Population II stars, and 9 sources (2 per cent) are intermediate-disc stars. No source belongs to the halo. By following the mass of the stars instead of their light, the resulting subset of 136 long-lived stars distributes as 22 (16.2 per cent):6 (4.4 per cent):108 (79.4 per cent) for the Population II:intermediate disc:Population I, respectively. Along with the much larger scaleheight reached by Population II, this unbiased census of long-lived stars provides plain evidence for a starburst epoch in the early Milky Way, with the formation of a massive, rotationally supported, and dark Population II. The same conclusion arises from the substantial early chemical enrichment levels, exemplified here by the elements magnesium and iron, as it arises also from the local Population II white dwarfs. The kinematics, metallicity distribution functions, star formation rates, age-metallicity relations, the inventory of young stars, and the occurrence of blue straggler stars are discussed. A potentially new aspect of the survey is the possibility for substructure among the local Population II stars that may further subdivide into metal-poor and metal-rich sources.

  8. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  9. DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

  10. Neoclassical transport in stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    The stellarator neoclassical transport due to particles trapped in local helical wells is calculated in the low-collisionality regime using a systematic expansion. The behavior of electron transport is found to be the same over a wide range of energies, but the behavior of ion transport for low energy ions is found to be different than that for high energy ions. Furthermore, the electron fluxes do not vary with the change in the radial ambipolar electric field nearly as much as do the ion fluxes. Thus, the particle diffusion is controlled by the electrons. A nonradial ambipolar electric field is induced by ion drift. This electric field enhances the transport by about 15 to 20%. A convenient graphical method that allows one to determine the magnitude of the radial ambipolar field for machines with different parameters is presented. Numerical examples show that electron energy confinement time is comparable to the ion energy confinement time for all the different size stellarators studied. Although the neoclassical losses are large, it is shown that ignition can be achieved in a reasonably sized stellarator reactor. Finally, from the standpoint of reactor economics, the confinement scaling law shows that in order to increase n tau, it is better to increase the aspect ratio than the overall dimensions of the reactor.

  11. List 47: blue honeysuckle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This summary presents the descriptions of a newly released blue honeysuckle (Lonicera cerulea L.) cultivar for the List of New Fruit and Nut Cultivars. This blue honeysuckle cultivar was released in Canada in 2012 and has pending Plant Breeder’s Rights Certification with Agriculture Canada. The cult...

  12. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  13. Blue Ocean Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  14. Introducing the Blues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the blues and presents a list of resources that are designed to introduce the blues, both as a feeling and as an influential part of American music and culture. Includes picture books and nonfiction for young readers, nonfiction for older readers, Web sites, and compact disks. (LRW)

  15. After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Light May Help Beat the Blues Akin to sunlight, it could ward off depression during rehab, study ... facility used "blue" light in its lighting system. Sunlight is humans' largest source of blue-spectrum light, ...

  16. Object Oriented Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We apply the object oriented software engineering (OOSE) design methodology for software objects (SOs) to learning objects (LOs). OOSE extends and refines design principles for authoring dynamic reusable LOs. Our learning object class (LOC) is a template from which individualised LOs can be dynamically created for, or by, students. The properties…

  17. No Evidence for Multiple Stellar Populations in the Low-mass Galactic Globular Cluster E 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Strader, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Multiple stellar populations are a widespread phenomenon among Galactic globular clusters. Even though the origin of the enriched material from which new generations of stars are produced remains unclear, it is likely that self-enrichment will be feasible only in clusters massive enough to retain this enriched material. We searched for multiple populations in the low mass (M˜ 1.4× {10}4 {M}⊙ ) globular cluster E3, analyzing SOAR/Goodman multi-object spectroscopy centered on the blue cyanogen (CN) absorption features of 23 red giant branch stars. We find that the CN abundance does not present the typical bimodal behavior seen in clusters hosting multistellar populations, but rather a unimodal distribution that indicates the presence of a genuine single stellar population, or a level of enrichment much lower than in clusters that show evidence for two populations from high-resolution spectroscopy. E3 would be the first bona fide Galactic old globular cluster where no sign of self-enrichment is found. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  18. BLUE STRAGGLER EVOLUTION CAUGHT IN THE ACT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD GLOBULAR CLUSTER HODGE 11

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard; Liu Xiangkun; Deng Licai E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2013-06-10

    High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging observations show that the radial distribution of the field-decontaminated sample of 162 'blue straggler' stars (BSs) in the 11.7{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster Hodge 11 exhibits a clear bimodality. In combination with their distinct loci in color-magnitude space, this offers new evidence in support of theoretical expectations that suggest different BS formation channels as a function of stellar density. In the cluster's color-magnitude diagram, the BSs in the inner 15'' (roughly corresponding to the cluster's core radius) are located more closely to the theoretical sequence resulting from stellar collisions, while those in the periphery (at radii between 85'' and 100'') are preferentially found in the region expected to contain objects formed through binary mass transfer or coalescence. In addition, the objects' distribution in color-magnitude space provides us with the rare opportunity in an extragalactic environment to quantify the evolution of the cluster's collisionally induced BS population and the likely period that has elapsed since their formation epoch, which we estimate to have occurred {approx}4-5 Gyr ago.

  19. Blue Straggler Evolution Caught in the Act in the Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Cluster Hodge 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Liu, Xiangkun

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging observations show that the radial distribution of the field-decontaminated sample of 162 "blue straggler" stars (BSs) in the 11.7^{+0.2}_{-0.1} Gyr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster Hodge 11 exhibits a clear bimodality. In combination with their distinct loci in color-magnitude space, this offers new evidence in support of theoretical expectations that suggest different BS formation channels as a function of stellar density. In the cluster's color-magnitude diagram, the BSs in the inner 15'' (roughly corresponding to the cluster's core radius) are located more closely to the theoretical sequence resulting from stellar collisions, while those in the periphery (at radii between 85'' and 100'') are preferentially found in the region expected to contain objects formed through binary mass transfer or coalescence. In addition, the objects' distribution in color-magnitude space provides us with the rare opportunity in an extragalactic environment to quantify the evolution of the cluster's collisionally induced BS population and the likely period that has elapsed since their formation epoch, which we estimate to have occurred ~4-5 Gyr ago.

  20. FROM BLUE JEANS TO BLUE GENES

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue in color and vary in size, number and location, and account for the majority of consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important as they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. Dr Mulliken envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of two young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for-gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in the field of vascular anomalies. Two blue genes’ mutations were discovered, which account for the majority, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved thanks to Dr Mulliken, who inspired two young investigators in blue jeans to find two blue genes. PMID:19190503

  1. From blue jeans to blue genes.

    PubMed

    Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2009-03-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue and vary in size, number, and location and account for most consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important because they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues, and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. John B. Mulliken, MD, envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of 2 young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in vascular anomalies. Two blue genes' mutations were discovered, which account for most, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved through the help of Dr Mulliken, who inspired 2 young investigators in blue jeans to find 2 blue genes.

  2. Prussian blue type nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Guari, Y; Guérin, C; Larionova, J

    2016-11-28

    Prussian blue type nanoparticles are exciting nano-objects that combine the advantages of molecule-based materials and nanochemistry. Here we provide a short overview focalizing on the recent advances of these nano-objects designed for biomedical applications and give an outlook on the future research orientations in this domain.

  3. A direct imaging search for close stellar and sub-stellar companions to young nearby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, N.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Contreras-Quijada, A.; Schmidt, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 28 young nearby stars (ages {≤ 60} Myr) have been observed in the K_s-band with the adaptive optics imager Naos-Conica of the Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. Among the targets are ten visual binaries and one triple system at distances between 10 and 130 pc, all previously known. During a first observing epoch a total of 20 faint stellar or sub-stellar companion-candidates were detected around seven of the targets. These fields, as well as most of the stellar binaries, were re-observed with the same instrument during a second epoch, about one year later. We present the astrometric observations of all binaries. Their analysis revealed that all stellar binaries are co-moving. In two cases (HD 119022 AB and FG Aqr B/C) indications for significant orbital motions were found. However, all sub-stellar companion candidates turned out to be non-moving background objects except PZ Tel which is part of this project but whose results were published elsewhere. Detection limits were determined for all targets, and limiting masses were derived adopting three different age values; they turn out to be less than 10 Jupiter masses in most cases, well below the brown dwarf mass range. The fraction of stellar multiplicity and of the sub-stellar companion occurrence in the star forming regions in Chamaeleon are compared to the statistics of our search, and possible reasons for the observed differences are discussed. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 083.C-0150(B), 084.C-0364(A), 084.C-0364(B), 084.C-0364(C), 086.C-0600(A) and 086.C-0600(B).

  4. Cylindrical Mixing Layer Model in Stellar Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Seung-Urn; Yu, Kyoung Hee

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a cylindrical mixing layer model of a stellar jet including cooling effect in order to understand an optical emission mechanism along collimated high velocity stellar jets associated with young stellar objects. The cylindrical results have been calculated to be the same as the 2D ones presented by Canto & Raga(1991) because the entrainment efficiency in our cylindrical model has been obtained to be the same value as the 2D model has given. We have discussed the morphological and physical characteristics of the mixing layers by the cooling effect. As the jet Mach number increases, the initial temperature of the mixing layer goes high because the kinetic energy of the jet partly converts to the thermal energy of the mixing layer. The initial cooling of the mixing layer is very severe, changing its outer boundary radius. A subsequent change becomes adiabatic. The number of the Mach disks in the stellar jet and the total radiative luminosity of the mixing layer, based on our cylindrical calculation, have quite agreed with the observation.

  5. Blue ocean strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  6. The solar-stellar connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampapa, Mark S.

    2016-07-01

    A review of some principal results achieved in the area of stellar astrophysics with its origins in solar physics - the Solar-Stellar Connection - is presented from the perspective of an observational astronomer. The historical origins of the Solar-Stellar Connection are discussed followed by a review of key results from observations of stellar cycles analogous to the solar cycle in terms of parameters relevant to dynamo theory. A review of facets of angular momentum evolution and irradiance variations, each of which is determined by emergent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields, is given. Recent considerations of the impacts of stellar magnetic activity on the ambient radiative and energetic particle environment of the habitable zone of exoplanet systems are summarized. Some anticipated directions of the Solar-Stellar Connection in the new era of astronomy as defined by the advent of transformative facilities are presented.

  7. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  8. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-02-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  9. A Stellar Ripple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This false-color composite image shows the Cartwheel galaxy as seen by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far ultraviolet detector (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope's wide field and planetary camera 2 in B-band visible light (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared array camera at 8 microns (red); and the Chandra X-ray Observatory's advanced CCD imaging spectrometer-S array instrument (purple).

    Approximately 100 million years ago, a smaller galaxy plunged through the heart of Cartwheel galaxy, creating ripples of brief star formation. In this image, the first ripple appears as an ultraviolet-bright blue outer ring. The blue outer ring is so powerful in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations that it indicates the Cartwheel is one of the most powerful UV-emitting galaxies in the nearby universe. The blue color reveals to astronomers that associations of stars 5 to 20 times as massive as our sun are forming in this region. The clumps of pink along the outer blue ring are regions where both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation are superimposed in the image. These X-ray point sources are very likely collections of binary star systems containing a blackhole (called massive X-ray binary systems). The X-ray sources seem to cluster around optical/ultraviolet-bright supermassive star clusters.

    The yellow-orange inner ring and nucleus at the center of the galaxy result from the combination of visible and infrared light, which is stronger towards the center. This region of the galaxy represents the second ripple, or ring wave, created in the collision, but has much less star formation activity than the first (outer) ring wave. The wisps of red spread throughout the interior of the galaxy are organic molecules that have been illuminated by nearby low-level star formation. Meanwhile, the tints of green are less massive, older visible-light stars.

    Although astronomers have not identified exactly which galaxy collided with the Cartwheel, two of three

  10. Radio Telescopes Reveal Youngest Stellar Corpse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Astronomers using a global combination of radio telescopes to study a stellar explosion some 30 million light-years from Earth have likely discovered either the youngest black hole or the youngest neutron star known in the Universe. Their discovery also marks the first time that a black hole or neutron star has been found associated with a supernova that has been seen to explode since the invention of the telescope nearly 400 years ago. M51 An artist's impression of Supernova 1986J. The newly discovered nebula around the black hole or neutron star in the center is shown in blue, and is in the center of the expanding, fragmented shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion, which is shown in red. CREDIT: Norbert Bartel and Michael F. Bietenholz, York University; Artist: G. Arguner (Click on image for larger version) Image Files Artist's Conception (above image, 836K) Galaxy and Supernova (47K) A VLA image (left) of the galaxy NGC 891, showing the bright supernova explosion below the galaxy's center. At right, a closer view of the supernova, made with a global array of radio telescopes. CREDIT: Miguel A. Perez-Torres, Antxon Alberdi and Lucas Lara, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia - CSIC, Spain, Jon Marcaide and Jose C. Guirado, Universidad de Valencia, Spain Franco Mantovani, IRA-CNR, Italy, Eduardo Ros, MPIfR, Germany, and Kurt W. Weiler, Naval Research Laboratory, USA Multi-Frequency Closeup View (201K) Blue and white area shows the nebula surrounding the black hole or neutron star lurking in the center of the supernova. This nebula is apparent at a higher radio frequency (15 GHz). The red and also the contours show the distorted, expanding shell of material thrown off in the supernova explosion. This shell is seen at a lower radio frequency (5 GHz). CREDIT: Michael F. Bietenholz and Norbert Bartel, York University, Michael Rupen, NRAO, NRAO/AUI/NSF A supernova is the explosion of a massive star after it exhausts its supply of nuclear fuel and

  11. Mergers and obliquities in stellar triples

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-10-01

    Many close stellar binaries are accompanied by a faraway star. The 'eccentric Kozai-Lidov' (EKL) mechanism can cause dramatic inclination and eccentricity fluctuations, resulting in tidal tightening of inner binaries of triple stars. We run a large set of Monte Carlo simulations, including the secular evolution of the orbits, general relativistic precession, and tides, and we determine the semimajor axis, eccentricity, inclination, and spin-orbit angle distributions of the final configurations. We find that the efficiency of forming tight binaries (≲ 16 days) when taking the EKL mechanism into account is ∼21%, and about 4% of all simulated systems ended up in a merger event. These merger events can lead to the formation of blue stragglers. Furthermore, we find that the spin-orbit angle distribution of the inner binaries carries a signature of the initial setup of the system; thus, observations can be used to disentangle close binaries' birth configuration. The resulting inner and outer final orbits' period distributions and their estimated fraction suggest that secular dynamics may be a significant channel for the formation of close binaries in triples and even blue stragglers.

  12. Stellar Jewels Shine in New Spitzer Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    One of the most prolific birthing grounds in our Milky Way galaxy, a nebula called RCW 49, is exposed in superb detail for the first time in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located 13,700 light-years away in the southern constellation Centaurus, RCW 49 is a dark and dusty stellar nursery that houses more than 2,200 stars.

    Because many of the stars in RCW 49 are deeply embedded in plumes of dust, they cannot be seen at visible wavelengths. When viewed with Spitzer's infrared eyes, however, RCW 49 becomes transparent. Like cracking open a quartz rock to discover its jewels inside, the nebula's newborn stars have been dramatically exposed.

    This image taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera highlights the nebula's older stars (blue stars in center pocket), its gas filaments (green) and dusty tendrils (pink). Speckled throughout the murky clouds are more than 300 never-before-seen newborn stars.

    Astronomers are interested in further studying these newfound proto-stars because they offer a fresh look at star formation in our own galaxy.

    This image was taken on Dec. 23, 2003, and is composed of photographs obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  13. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePlus

    ... bruises. This can raise a question about possible child abuse. It is important to recognize that Mongolian blue ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 11. Read More Benign Child abuse - physical Rashes Review Date 4/14/2015 Updated ...

  14. Mongolian blue spots (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian blue spots are flat bluish- to bluish-gray skin markings commonly appearing at birth or shortly ... back and also can appear on the shoulders. Mongolian spots are benign and are not associated with ...

  15. Methylene blue test

    MedlinePlus

    Methemoglobinemia - methylene blue test ... No special preparation is required for this test. ... which are genetic (problem with your genes). This test is used to tell the difference between methemoglobinemia ...

  16. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  17. Advances in stellarator gyrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Bird, T.; Jenko, F.; Kleiber, R.; Plunk, G. G.; Proll, J. H. E.; Riemann, J.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-01

    Recent progress in the gyrokinetic theory of stellarator microinstabilities and turbulence simulations is summarized. The simulations have been carried out using two different gyrokinetic codes, the global particle-in-cell code EUTERPE and the continuum code GENE, which operates in the geometry of a flux tube or a flux surface but is local in the radial direction. Ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) and trapped-electron modes are studied and compared with their counterparts in axisymmetric tokamak geometry. Several interesting differences emerge. Because of the more complicated structure of the magnetic field, the fluctuations are much less evenly distributed over each flux surface in stellarators than in tokamaks. Instead of covering the entire outboard side of the torus, ITG turbulence is localized to narrow bands along the magnetic field in regions of unfavourable curvature, and the resulting transport depends on the normalized gyroradius ρ* even in radially local simulations. Trapped-electron modes can be significantly more stable than in typical tokamaks, because of the spatial separation of regions with trapped particles from those with bad magnetic curvature. Preliminary non-linear simulations in flux-tube geometry suggest differences in the turbulence levels in Wendelstein 7-X and a typical tokamak.

  18. THE TRIFID NEBULA: STELLAR SIBLING RIVALRY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Trifid Nebula reveals a stellar nursery being torn apart by radiation from a nearby, massive star. The picture also provides a peek at embryonic stars forming within an ill-fated cloud of dust and gas, which is destined to be eaten away by the glare from the massive neighbor. This stellar activity is a beautiful example of how the life cycles of stars like our Sun is intimately connected with their more powerful siblings. The Hubble image shows a small part of a dense cloud of dust and gas, a stellar nursery full of embryonic stars. This cloud is about 8 light-years away from the nebula's central star, which is beyond the top of this picture. Located about 9,000 light-years from Earth, the Trifid resides in the constellation Sagittarius. A stellar jet [the thin, wispy object pointing to the upper left] protrudes from the head of a dense cloud and extends three-quarters of a light-year into the nebula. The jet's source is a very young stellar object that lies buried within the cloud. Jets such as this are the exhaust gases of star formation. Radiation from the massive star at the center of the nebula is making the gas in the jet glow, just as it causes the rest of the nebula to glow. The jet in the Trifid is a 'ticker tape,' telling the history of one particular young stellar object that is continuing to grow as its gravity draws in gas from its surroundings. But this particular ticker tape will not run for much longer. Within the next 10,000 years the glare from the central, massive star will continue to erode the nebula, overrunning the forming star, and bringing its growth to an abrupt and possibly premature end. Another nearby star may have already faced this fate. The Hubble picture shows a 'stalk' [the finger-like object] pointing from the head of the dense cloud directly toward the star that powers the Trifid. This stalk is a prominent example of the evaporating gaseous globules, or 'EGGs,' that were seen

  19. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  20. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  1. A catalog of stellar spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.; Shore, S. N.; White, R. E.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A machine-readable catalog of stellar spectrophotometric measurements made with rotating grating scanner is introduced. Consideration is given to the processes by which the stellar data were collected and calibrated with the fluxes of Vega (Hayes and Latham, 1975). A sample page from the spectrophotometric catalog is presented.

  2. Stellar populations in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  3. Chromospheric activity and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippenhahn, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study of stellar chromospheres based on the internal structure of particular stars is presented. Used are complex flow diagrams of the linkage paths between mass loss, angular momentum loss, magnetic field from the turbulent dynamo and its relations to differential rotations and the convection zone, and stellar evolution.

  4. Charged compact stellar model in Finch-Skea spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanpal, B. S.; Pandya, D. M.; Sharma, R.; Das, S.

    2017-04-01

    Making use of the Finch and Skea ansatz (Class. Quantum Gravity 6:467, 1989), we present a new class of solutions for a compact stellar object whose exterior space-time is described by the Riessner-Nordström metric. We generate the solution by assuming a specific charge distribution and show its relevance in the context of relativistic spherical objects possessing a net charge. In particular, we analyze the impact of charge on the mass-radius (M-R) relationship of compact stellar objects.

  5. Skylab ultraviolet stellar astronomy experiment S019.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, F G; Henize, K G; Wray, J D

    1977-04-01

    An objective-prism stellar spectrograph of 15-cm aperture was flown on all three Skylab missions. The wavelength region from 1300 A to 5000 A was covered by a special optical system containing a combination of reflecting telescope optics, a CaF(2) objective prism, and an achromatized field corrector lens system of CaF(2) and LiF. Observations of 188 star fields, each covering 4.0 degrees 5.0 degrees , were conducted at the Skylab antisolar airlock with the aid of an articulated mirror system (AMS) which allowed acquisition within 30 degrees degrees 360 degrees band of the sky.

  6. IPS guidestar selection for stellar mode (ASTRO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, Larry; Wooten, Lewis

    1988-01-01

    This report describes how guide stars are selected for the Optical Sensor Package (OSP) for the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) when it is operating in the stellar mode on the ASTRO missions. It also describes how the objective loads are written and how the various roll angles are related; i.e., the celestial roll or position angle, the objective load roll angles, and the IPS gimbal angles. There is a brief description of how the IPS operates and its various modes of operation; i.e., IDOP, IDIN, and OSPCAL.

  7. Skylab ultraviolet stellar astronomy experiment S019

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocallaghan, F. G.; Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    An objective-prism stellar spectrograph of 15-cm aperture was flown on all three Skylab missions. The wavelength region from 1300 A to 5000 A was covered by a special optical system containing a combination of reflecting telescope optics, a CaF2 objective prism, and an achromatized field-corrector lens system of CaF2 and LiF. Observations of 188 star fields, each covering 4.0 x 5.0 deg of arc, were conducted at the Skylab antisolar airlock with the aid of an articulated mirror system which allowed acquisition within a 30 by 360 deg band of the sky.

  8. Si-based blue light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavar, Fereydoon

    1994-05-01

    Phase 1 results demonstrated for the first time a strong, stable blue-green emission from C-implanted red-emitting porous silicon. The objective of Phase 1 was to obtain blue-green emission from porous Si structure either by increasing the bandgap of the substrate by growth of Si-C random alloys prior to forming nanostructures with quantum confined properties, or by increasing the confinement energy of red-emitting Si nanostructures. Porous structures fabricated from group 4 alloys epitaxially grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) resulted in an enhancement in light emission of about one order of magnitude after incorporation of a very small amount of carbon in the epitaxial grown films. Strong blue-green light emission was observed by the naked eye from C-implanted and annealed porous Si. Using AlGaAs as a reference, we observed that the intensity of blue-green emission was one order of magnitude higher than that of the original red-emitting porous Si. Catholuminescence measurements of our samples performed at the University of Colorado show blue emission at 1.80 eV and 2.80 eV. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of a blue-green emitting porous structure shows an IR absorption line identical to that of SiC and electron diffraction studies clearly show reflections corresponding to beta-SiC. Phase 1 results indicate that blue-green light is from SiC nanostructures with quantum confined properties. This material may be used to fabricate blue light-emitting Si-based devices which can be easily integrated into Si technology.

  9. Nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Axelrod, T.S.; Weaver, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The final evolution and explosion of stars from 10 M/sub solar/ to 10/sup 6/ M/sub solar/ are reviewed with emphasis on factors affecting the expected nucleosynthesis. We order our paper in a sequence of decreasing mass. If, as many suspect, the stellar birth function was peaked towards larger masses at earlier times (see e.g., Silk 1977; but also see Palla, Salpeter, and Stahler 1983), this sequence of masses might also be regarded as a temporal sequence. At each stage of Galactic chemical evolution stars form from the ashes of preceding generations which typically had greater mass. A wide variety of Type I supernova models, most based upon accreting white dwarf stars, are also explored using the expected light curves, spectra, and nucleosynthesis as diagnostics. No clearly favored Type I model emerges that is capable of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints.

  10. Resolving stellar surface spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T.; Rice, J. B.; Savanov, I. S.

    Doppler imaging of stellar surfaces is a novel technique with similarities to medical brain tomography (instead of a fixed brain and a rotating scanner, astronomers have a fixed spectrograph and a rotating brain, star of course). The number of free (internal) parameters is of the order of the number of surface grid points and only constrained by the number of input data points. This obviously ill-posed situation requires modern inversion algorithms with penalty functions of the form of maximum entropy or Tikhonov etc.. We present a brief status review of our Doppler imaging codes at AIP that span from temperature and spot-filling-factor mapping to full Stokes-based magnetic field mapping.

  11. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  12. Herschel Views on Stellar and Circumstellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelkens, Christoffel

    2010-05-01

    We review the first results of Herschel on stellar and circumstellar evolution. - For main-sequence stars, PACS and SPIRE measurements of the debris disks surrounding Vega and Beta Pictoris are presented, revealing the disks with unprecedented spatial resolution at the peaks of their spectral energy distribution. - Through imaging and spectroscopic studies, the mass loss mechanisms and histories during the final stages of stellar evolution are investigated. Imaging of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars enables a detailed discussion of the discontinuous nature of the mass loss processes which induce the final evolution. With their moderately high spectral resolution, PACS and SPIRE reveal spectacularly rich molecular diagnostics on the dynamics of and the chemistry in the environments of objects such as CW Leo and VY CMa.

  13. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  14. Blue Stragglers in Globular Clusters: Observations, Statistics and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Christian

    This chapter explores how we might use the observed statistics of blue stragglers in globular clusters to shed light on their formation. This means we will touch on topics also discussed elsewhere in this book, such as the discovery and implications of bimodal radial distributions and the "double sequences" of blue stragglers that have recently been found in some clusters. However, we will focus particularly on the search for a "smoking gun" correlation between the number of blue stragglers in a given globular cluster and a physical cluster parameter that would point towards a particular formation channel. As we shall see, there is little evidence for an intrinsic correlation between blue straggler numbers and stellar collision rates, even in dense cluster cores. On the other hand, there is a clear correlation between blue straggler numbers and the total (core) mass of the cluster. This would seem to point towards a formation channel involving binaries, rather than dynamical encounters. However, the correlation between blue straggler numbers and actual binary numbers—which relies on recently determined empirical binary fractions—is actually weaker than that with core mass. We explain how this surprising result may be reconciled with a binary formation channel if binary fractions depend almost uniquely on core mass. If this is actually the case, it would have significant implications for globular cluster dynamics more generally.

  15. Observed upper limits on lithium abundances in blue stragglers

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, L.M.; Mathieu, R.D. Wisconsin, University, Madison )

    1991-05-01

    High-dispersion echelle spectra which include the Li I 6708 A line are reported for four blue stragglers. Two are field Population II stars with Fe/H near {minus}1.4, while the other two are members of the open cluster M 67. The Li I line is not detected in the spectra of any of these four blue stragglers; consequent upper limits on the surface lithium abundances are further deduced from suitable model atmospheres. The upper limits are significantly lower than the initial lithium abundances inferred for the respective stellar populations associated with these blue stragglers. The negative results for the two metal-deficient stars may reveal the existence of a narrow 'lithium gap' along the Population II main sequence. Alternatively, some mechanism associated with the formation and evolution of halo blue stragglers may account for their reduced atmospheric lithium abundance. The negative results in M 67 argue that blue stragglers do not result from delayed star formation, and that blue stragglers do not remain near the main sequence for extended lifetimes as a result of interior mixing, unless the surfaces of such stars are also mixed. 32 refs.

  16. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-09-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  17. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  18. Atypical cellular blue nevus or malignant blue nevus?*

    PubMed Central

    Daltro, Luise Ribeiro; Yaegashi, Lygia Bertalha; Freitas, Rodrigo Abdalah; Fantini, Bruno de Carvalho; Souza, Cacilda da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Blue nevus is a benign melanocytic lesion whose most frequent variants are dendritic (common) blue nevus and cellular blue nevus. Atypical cellular blue nevus presents an intermediate histopathology between the typical and a rare variant of malignant blue nevus/melanoma arising in a cellular blue nevus. An 8-year-old child presented a pigmented lesion in the buttock since birth, but with progressive growth in the last two years. After surgical excision, histopathological examination revealed atypical cellular blue nevus. Presence of mitoses, ulceration, infiltration, cytological atypia or necrosis may occur in atypical cellular blue nevus, making it difficult to differentiate it from melanoma. The growth of blue nevus is unusual and considered of high-risk for malignancy, being an indicator for complete resection and periodic follow-up of these patients. PMID:28225968

  19. Statistical Methods for Characterizing Variability in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisewski, Jessi; Yale Astrostatistics

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen a proliferation in the number of exoplanets discovered. One technique for uncovering exoplanets relies on the detection of subtle shifts in the stellar spectra due to the Doppler effect caused by an orbiting object. However, stellar activity can cause distortions in the spectra that mimic the imprint of an orbiting exoplanet. The collection of stellar spectra potentially contains more information than is traditionally used for estimating its radial velocity curve. I will discuss some statistical methods that can be used for characterizing the sources of variability in the spectra. Statistical assessment of stellar spectra is a focus of the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI)'s yearlong program on Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy's Working Group IV (Astrophysical Populations).

  20. Time-Domain Studies as a Probe of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Adam Andrew

    This dissertation focuses on the use of time-domain techniques to discover and characterize these rare astrophysical gems, while also addressing some gaps in our understanding of the earliest and latest stages of stellar evolution. The observational studies presented herein can be grouped into three parts: (i) the study of stellar death (supernovae); (ii) the study of stellar birth; and (iii) the use of modern machine-learning algorithms to discover and classify variable sources. I present observations of supernova (SN) 2006gy, the most luminous SN ever at the time of discovery, and the even-more luminous SN 2008es. Together, these two supernovae (SNe) demonstrate that core-collapse SNe can be significantly more luminous than thermonuclear type Ia SNe, and that there are multiple channels for producing these brilliant core-collapse explosions. For SN 2006gy I show that the progenitor star experienced violent, eruptive mass loss on multiple occasions during the centuries prior to explosion, a scenario that was completely unexpected within the cannon of massive-star evolution theory. I also present observations of SN 2008iy, one of the most unusual SNe ever discovered. Typical SNe take ≲3 weeks to reach peak luminosity; SN 2008iy exhibited a slow and steady rise for ˜400 days before reaching maximum brightness. The best explanation for such behavior is that the progenitor of SN 2008iy experienced an episodic phase of mass loss ˜100 yr prior to explosion. The three SNe detailed in this dissertation have altered our understanding of massive-star mass loss, namely, these SNe provide distinct evidence that post-main sequence mass loss, for at least some massive stars, occurs in sporatic fits, rather than being steady. They also demonstrate that core collapse is not restricted to the red supergiant and Wolf-Rayet stages of stellar evolution as theory predicted. Instead, some massive stars explode while in a luminous blue variable-like state. I also present

  1. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON RED AND BLUE HELIUM BURNING SEQUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Holtzman, Jon

    2011-10-10

    We derive the optical luminosity, colors, and ratios of the blue and red helium burning (HeB) stellar populations from archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of nineteen starburst dwarf galaxies and compare them with theoretical isochrones from Padova stellar evolution models across metallicities from Z = 0.001 to 0.009. We find that the observational data and the theoretical isochrones for both blue and red HeB populations overlap in optical luminosities and colors and the observed and predicted blue to red HeB ratios agree for stars older than 50 Myr over the time bins studied. These findings confirm the usefulness of applying isochrones to interpret observations of HeB populations. However, there are significant differences, especially for the red HeB population. Specifically, we find (1) offsets in color between the observations and theoretical isochrones of order 0.15 mag (0.5 mag) for the blue (red) HeB populations brighter than M{sub V} {approx} -4 mag, which cannot be solely due to differential extinction; (2) blue HeB stars fainter than M{sub V} {approx} -3 mag are bluer than predicted; (3) the slope of the red HeB sequence is shallower than predicted by a factor of {approx}3; and (4) the models overpredict the ratio of the most luminous blue to red HeB stars corresponding to ages {approx}< 50 Myr. Additionally, we find that for the more metal-rich galaxies in our sample (Z {approx}> 0.5 Z{sub sun}), the red HeB stars overlap with the red giant branch stars in the color-magnitude diagrams, thus reducing their usefulness as indicators of star formation for ages {approx}> 100 Myr.

  2. Stellar Work of Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This painterly portrait of a star-forming cloud, called NGC 346, is a combination of multiwavelength light from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared), the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope (visible), and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton space telescope (X-ray).

    The infrared observations highlight cold dust in red, visible data show glowing gas in green, and X-rays show very warm gas in blue. Ordinary stars appear as blue spots with white centers, while young stars enshrouded in dust appear as red spots with white centers.

    The colorful picture demonstrates that stars in this region are being created by two different types of triggered star formation one involving wind, and the other, radiation. Triggered star formation occurs when massive stars spur new, smaller stars into existence. The first radiation-based mechanism is demonstrated near the center of the cloud. There, radiation from the massive stars is eating away at the surrounding dust cloud, creating shock waves that compress gas and dust into new stars. This compressed material appears as an arc-shaped orange-red filament, while the new stars within this filament are still blanketed with dust and cannot be seen.

    The second wind-based mechanism is at play higher up in the cloud. The isolated, pinkish blob of stars at the upper left was triggered by winds from a massive star located to the left of it. This massive star blew up in a supernova explosion 50,000 years ago, but before it died, its winds pushed gas and dust together into new stars. While this massive star cannot be seen in the image, a bubble created when it exploded can be seen near the large, white spot with a blue halo at the upper left (this white spot is actually a collection of three stars).

    NGC 346 is the brightest star-forming region in the Small Magellanic Cloud, an irregular dwarf galaxy that orbits our Milky Way

  3. Dynamical age differences among coeval star clusters as revealed by blue stragglers.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F R; Lanzoni, B; Dalessandro, E; Beccari, G; Pasquato, M; Miocchi, P; Rood, R T; Sigurdsson, S; Sills, A; Vesperini, E; Mapelli, M; Contreras, R; Sanna, N; Mucciarelli, A

    2012-12-20

    Globular star clusters that formed at the same cosmic time may have evolved rather differently from the dynamical point of view (because that evolution depends on the internal environment) through a variety of processes that tend progressively to segregate stars more massive than the average towards the cluster centre. Therefore clusters with the same chronological age may have reached quite different stages of their dynamical history (that is, they may have different 'dynamical ages'). Blue straggler stars have masses greater than those at the turn-off point on the main sequence and therefore must be the result of either a collision or a mass-transfer event. Because they are among the most massive and luminous objects in old clusters, they can be used as test particles with which to probe dynamical evolution. Here we report that globular clusters can be grouped into a few distinct families on the basis of the radial distribution of blue stragglers. This grouping corresponds well to an effective ranking of the dynamical stage reached by stellar systems, thereby permitting a direct measure of the cluster dynamical age purely from observed properties.

  4. Stellar winds and the evolution of luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range 7-60 solar masses has been investigated for stellar models in which Carson's opacities have been employed. Several cases of mass loss have been considered. It is found that the assumption of heavy mass loss from both blue and red supergiants can account well for the relevant observations of OBN stars, WN stars, and very luminous supergiants of all spectral types. But no amount of mass loss can account adequately for the properties of the B supergiants of lowest luminosity. A critical comparison is made between the present results and some earlier results based on the adoption of Cox-Stewart opacities.

  5. Stellar Temporal Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kian, Tan Peng

    Stellar intensity interferometry was developed by Hanbury-Brown & Twiss [1954, 1956b, 1957, 1958] to bypass the diffraction limit of telescope apertures, with successful measurements including the determination of 32 stellar angular diameters using the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer [Hanbury-Brown et al., 1974]. This was achieved by measuring the intensity correlations between starlight received by a pair of telescopes separated by varying baselines b which, by invoking the van Cittert-Zernicke theorem [van Cittert, 1934; Zernicke, 1938], are related to the angular intensity distributions of the stellar light sources through a Fourier transformation of the equal-time complex degree of coherence gamma(b) between the two telescopes. This intensity correlation, or the second order correlation function g(2) [Glauber, 1963], can be described in terms of two-photoevent coincidence measurements [Hanbury-Brown, 1974] for our use of photon-counting detectors. The application of intensity interferometry in astrophysics has been largely restricted to the spatial domain but not found widespread adoption due to limitations by its signal-to-noise ratio [Davis et al., 1999; Foellmi, 2009; Jensen et al., 2010; LeBohec et al., 2008, 2010], although there is a growing movement to revive its use [Barbieri et al., 2009; Capraro et al., 2009; Dravins & Lagadec, 2014; Dravins et al., 2015; Dravins & LeBohec, 2007]. In this thesis, stellar intensity interferometry in the temporal domain is investigated instead. We present a narrowband spectral filtering scheme [Tan et al., 2014] that allows direct measurements of the Lorentzian temporal correlations, or photon bunching, from the Sun, with the preliminary Solar g(2)(tau = 0) = 1.3 +/- 0.1, limited mostly by the photon detector response [Ghioni et al., 2008], compared to the theoretical value of g(2)(0) = 2. The measured temporal photon bunching signature of the Sun exceeded the previous records of g(2)(0) = 1.03 [Karmakar et al

  6. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    programme of stellar clusters containing massive stars, whose main objective is to answer the two scientific questions. In order to perform this study we need to measure the main physical variables of the cluster, determine cluster membership and mass and age of cluster members. The obtaining of this is best carried out through determination of the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of stars in the field, from multiband UBVRIHα + JHKs photometry. In this conference, we want to present some results for clusters currently under study.

  7. Blue cotton, Blue Rayon and Blue Chitin in the analysis of heterocyclic aromatic amines--a review.

    PubMed

    Skog, Kerstin

    2004-03-25

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are a group of compounds formed when protein-rich foods, such as meat or fish, are prepared under normal cooking conditions, such as frying, grilling, or broiling. To evaluate and estimate the risks associated with HCAs contained in the diet, it is important to determine the levels in cooked foods, and the levels of HCAs and metabolites in the body. HCAs are normally found at low amounts in a complex matrix, which necessitates a good purification method and a sensitive detection system. The objective of this review was to briefly present the current knowledge on the use of Blue Cotton, Blue Rayon and Blue Chitin in the analysis of HCAs.

  8. Stellar populations of stellar halos: Results from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. A.; Conroy, C.; Pillepich, A.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of both major and minor mergers is expected to significantly affect gradients of stellar ages and metallicities in the outskirts of galaxies. Measurements of observed gradients are beginning to reach large radii in galaxies, but a theoretical framework for connecting the findings to a picture of galactic build-up is still in its infancy. We analyze stellar populations of a statistically representative sample of quiescent galaxies over a wide mass range from the Illustris simulation. We measure metallicity and age profiles in the stellar halos of quiescent Illustris galaxies ranging in stellar mass from 1010 to 1012 M ⊙, accounting for observational projection and luminosity-weighting effects. We find wide variance in stellar population gradients between galaxies of similar mass, with typical gradients agreeing with observed galaxies. We show that, at fixed mass, the fraction of stars born in-situ within galaxies is correlated with the metallicity gradient in the halo, confirming that stellar halos contain unique information about the build-up and merger histories of galaxies.

  9. Ultraviolet stellar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.; Kondo, Y.; Ocallaghan, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During all three Skylab missions, prism-on observations were obtained in 188 starfields and prism-off observations in 31 starfields. In general, the fields are concentrated in the Milky Way where the frequency of hot stars is highest. These fields cover an area approximately 3660 degrees and include roughly 24 percent of a band 30 deg wide centered on the plane of the Milky Way. A census of stars in the prism-on fields shows that nearly 6,000 stars have measurable flux data at a wavelength of 2600A, that 1,600 have measurable data at 2000A, and that 400 show useful data at 1500A. Obvious absorption or emission features shortward of 2000A are visible in approximately 120 stars. This represents a bonanza of data useful for statistical studies of stellar classification and of interstellar reddening as well as for studies of various types of peculiar stars.

  10. Stellar duplicity and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Half or more of all stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by one (or more) companion stars. Many companions are close enough that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by the transfer of mass and angular momentum from one star to the other. Such mass transfer is highly likely during the late stages of evolution, such as on the giant branches, which are quite coincidentally also when stars undergo interesting nucleosynthesis. Direct mass transfer truncates the (A)GB prematurely compared to single stars and the ensuing stellar envelope is ejected perhaps to form a (chemically peculiar?) planetary nebula. In wider binaries, where one star has captured material from a long-dead companion, we can probe the nucleosynthesis that happened in ancient stars as well as fundamental astrophysical phenomena like wind accretion and circumbinary disc formation. I will focus on recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in mass-transfer systems, such as carbon-enhanced metal-poor and barium stars, and highlight some of the key open questions - and opportunities - that will dominate the next decade of duplicitous nucleosynthesis.

  11. SI: The Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager (SI) will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 milliarcsec resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and simple snapshots into spellbinding evolving views. SI s science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI s prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era by imaging a sample of magnetically active stars with enough resolution to map their evolving dynamo patterns and their internal flows. By exploring the Universe at ultra-high resolution, SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magnetohydrodynamically controlled structures and processes in the Universe.

  12. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  13. Blue diffuse dwarf galaxies: a clearer picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.

    2017-03-01

    The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e. galaxies with <1/10 solar metallicity. However, due to the bright emission-line-based search criteria traditionally used to find XMPs, we may not be sampling the full XMP population. In 2014, we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ∼150 'blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here, we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43 < 12 + log(O/H) < 8.01), with ∼20 per cent of our sample classified as being XMP galaxies, and find that they are actively forming stars at rates of ∼1-33 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 in H II regions randomly embedded in a blue, low-surface-brightness continuum. Stellar masses are calculated from population synthesis models and estimated to be in the range log (M*/M⊙) ≃ 5-9. Unlike other low-metallicity star-forming galaxies, BDDs are in agreement with the mass-metallicity relation at low masses, suggesting that they are not accreting large amounts of pristine gas relative to their stellar mass. BDD galaxies appear to be a population of actively star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies which fall within the class of low-surface-brightness dIrr galaxies. Their ongoing star formation and irregular morphology make them excellent analogues for galaxies in the early Universe.

  14. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO WITH BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS FROM THE TWO-DEGREE FIELD QUASAR REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Harrison, Craig D.; Mares, Peter J.

    2010-08-20

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch stars from the 2Qz Redshift Survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance, and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index {approx}-2.5 in two different directions separated by about 150{sup 0} on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds, or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase toward large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non-Gaussian beyond 60 kpc. We argue that the outer halo consists of a multitude of low luminosity overlapping tidal streams from recently accreted objects.

  15. Stellar Spectral Synthesis with OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas R.; Townsend, R.

    2011-01-01

    Given an appropriate model atmosphere, synthesizing the spectrum of a star is a relatively straightforward task -- *if* the star is spherical and homogeneous across its surface. Many astronomically interesting objects do not, however, fall into this category. Examples include single stars that are spotted, rapidly rotating or pulsating, and binary stars in eclipsing or ellipsoidal-variable configurations. To synthesize a spectrum in such cases, it is necessary to construct a 3-D model of the stellar surface; determine which regions of the surface are visible to an external observer; and then calculate the observer-directed radiation from these regions. The Open Graphics Library (OpenGL), a cross-platform application programming interface for creation of 2-D and 3-D graphics, already includes much of the functionality required to implement these steps. We describe a new approach to stellar spectral synthesis that leverages this functionality. A 3-D mesh is constructed to represent the (possibly non-spherical) geometry of the stellar surface (or surfaces, in the case of binary or multiple systems). Textures are laid over this mesh to represent the run of physical attributes such as temperature, gravity, velocity, etc. The textured mesh is then rendered by OpenGL into a framebuffer, a step which naturally takes care of projection and occultation effects. The attributes of each framebuffer pixel are used to look up an appropriate spectrum in pre-calculated tables of specific intensities; and finally, summing the spectra from all pixels gives the disk-integrated synthetic flux spectrum of the star. The advantage of this approach lies in its efficiency (many OpenGL features are hardware-implemented), flexibility and manifest simplicity. Possible applications include binary light-curve modeling, mode identification in pulsating stars, and stellar population synthesis.

  16. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  17. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  18. Is scalar-tensor gravity consistent with polytropic stellar models?

    SciTech Connect

    Henttunen, K.; Vilja, I. E-mail: vilja@utu.fi

    2015-05-01

    We study the scalar field potential V(φ) in the scalar-tensor gravity with self-consistent polytropic stellar configurations. Without choosing a particular potential, we numerically derive the potential inside various stellar objects. We restrict the potential to conform to general relativity or to f(R) gravity inside and require the solution to arrive at SdS vacuum at the surface. The studied objects are required to obtain observationally valid masses and radii corresponding to solar type stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. We find that the resulting scalar-tensor potential V(φ) for the numerically derived polytrope that conforms to general relativity, in each object class, is highly dependent on the matter configuration as well as on the vacuum requirement at the boundary. As a result, every stellar configuration arrives at a potential V(φ) that is not consistent with the other stellar class potentials. Therefore, a general potential that conforms to all these polytropic stellar classes could not be found.

  19. The axisymmetric stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Hillier, D. John; Harries, Tim J.; Howarth, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical linear spectropolarimetry of the Luminous Blue Variable AG Carinae obtained after a recent visual brightness increase. The absence of He II lambda 4686 emission, together with the weakening of the He I spectrum and the appearance of Fe lines in the region around 5300 A, confirm that AG Car has started a new excursion across the HR diagram. The H alpha line profile exhibits very extended line wings that are polarized differently in both amount and position angle from either the continuum or the line core. The polarization changes across H alpha, together with variable continuum polarization, indicate the presence of intrinsic polarization. Coexistence of the line-wing polarization with extended flux-line wings evidences that both are formed by electron scattering in a dense wind. The position angle rotates across the line profiles, in a way that presently available models suggest is due to rotation and expansion of the scattering material. AG Car displays very large variations of its linear polarization with time, Delta P approximately 1.2%, indicating significant variations in envelope opacity. We find that the polarization varies along a preferred position angle of approximately 145 deg (with a scatter of +/- 10 deg) which we interpret as a symmetry axis of the stellar wind (with an ambiguity of 90 deg). This position angle is co-aligned with the major axis of the AG Car ring nebula and perpendicular to the AG Car jet. Our observations thus suggest that the axisymmetric geometry seen in the resolved circumstellar environment at various distances already exists within a few stellar radii of AG Car. From the H alpha polarization profile we deduce an interstellar polarization of Q = 0.31%, U = -1.15% at H alpha. The inferred interstellar polarization implies that the intrinsic polarization is not always of the same sign. This indicates either significant temporal changes in the envelope geometry, or it may arise from effects of multiple scattering

  20. Stellar winds of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stee, Ph.; Chesneau, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we summarize the basic properties of radiative stellar winds from the theoretical and observational point of views. We illustrate two examples of a radiative code applied to stellar physics: the SIMECA code successfully used to constrain the physics of the circumstellar environment of the Be star α Arae constrained by VLTI-AMBER spectrally resolved measurements and the CMFGEN code applied to the BA supergiants Deneb and Rigel constrained by CHARA-VEGA measurements.

  1. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  2. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  3. MOVING OBJECTS IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alexandros; Von Hippel, Ted E-mail: alexg@nhn.ou.edu

    2013-09-01

    We identify proper motion objects in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF) using the optical data from the original UDF program in 2004 and the near-infrared data from the 128 orbit UDF 2012 campaign. There are 12 sources brighter than I = 27 mag that display >3{sigma} significant proper motions. We do not find any proper motion objects fainter than this magnitude limit. Combining optical and near-infrared photometry, we model the spectral energy distribution of each point-source using stellar templates and state-of-the-art white dwarf models. For I {<=} 27 mag, we identify 23 stars with K0-M6 spectral types and two faint blue objects that are clearly old, thick disk white dwarfs. We measure a thick disk white dwarf space density of 0.1-1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} pc{sup -3} from these two objects. There are no halo white dwarfs in the UDF down to I = 27 mag. Combining the Hubble Deep Field North, South, and the UDF data, we do not see any evidence for dark matter in the form of faint halo white dwarfs, and the observed population of white dwarfs can be explained with the standard Galactic models.

  4. Eddington's Stellar Models and Early Twentieth Century Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisberg, Joann

    1991-06-01

    Between 1916 and 1926, Arthur Stanley Eddington developed models of the temperature, pressure and density in the interior of stars. The models generated a relationship between stellar mass and luminosity that agreed well with observation. Coupled with the evolutionary theory that astronomers then thought governed stars, the models explained the distribution of stars upon the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. This thesis argues that Eddington's models were shaped by the cosmological concerns that had preoccupied the British astronomical community in the preceding decade. British astronomers participated in a program of statistical cosmology, spearheaded by the Dutch astronomer, J. C. Kapteyn, to map the universe by studying the distribution of stars in neighborhoods successively more distant from the sun. The parameters of chief concern in this program were proper motion, which was used to measure stellar distance, and luminosity, considered the most important inherent characteristic of a star. In 1913 Henry Norris Russell published an empirical diagram of stellar luminosity and spectral type, on which he based a new theory of the evolution of stars from bright, red giants to bright, blue giants, to faint red dwarfs. British astronomers recognized the theory and diagram as fruits of the statistical program, and they rapidly accepted its parameters as the ones a stellar model should generate. Prompted by his interest in cepheid variable stars to construct a model of stars in radiative equilibrium, Eddington's first concern was to reproduce the features of Russell's diagram. Russell's evolutionary theory played so large a role in Eddington's work that when his own mass -luminosity relationship threatened to overturn it, he tailored his theory of stellar energy generation to preserve it.

  5. Stellar content of extremely red quiescent galaxies at z > 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; Vazdekis, A.; Gutiérrez, C. M.; Castro-Rodríguez, N.

    2017-04-01

    Context. A set of 20 extremely red galaxies at 2.5 ≤ zphot. ≤ 3.8 with photometric features of old passive-evolving galaxies without dust, with stellar masses of 1011M⊙, have colors that could be related to passive-evolving galaxies with mean ages larger than 1 Gyr. This suggests they have been formed, on average, when the Universe was very young (<1 Gyr). Aims: We provide new estimates for the stellar content of these 20 galaxies, with a deeper analysis for two of them that includes spectroscopy. Methods: We obtained, with the GRANTECAN-10.4 m, ultraviolet rest-frame spectra of two galaxies and analyzed them together with photometric data. The remaining 18 galaxies are analyzed only with photometry. We fit the data with models of a single-burst stellar population (SSP), combinations of two SSPs, as well as with extended star formation. Results: Fits based on one SSP do not provide consistent results for the blue and red wavelengths. Moreover, the absence in the spectra of a break at 2 × 103 Å indicates that a rather young component is necessary. Using two SSPs we can match the photometric and spectroscopic data, with the bulk of the stellar population being very old (several Gyr) and the remaining contribution (<5% of stellar mass fraction) from a young, likely residual star formation component with age ≲ 0.1 Gyr. Exponentially decaying extended star formation (τ) models improve slightly the fits with respect to the single burst model, but they are considerably worse than the two SSP based fits, further supporting the residual star formation scenario. Conclusions: The fact that one SSP cannot match these early-type galaxies highlights the limitations for the use of age estimators based on single lines or breaks, such as the Balmer break used in cosmic chronometers, thus questioning this approach for cosmological purposes.

  6. [Blue light and eye health].

    PubMed

    Zou, Leilei; Dai, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Blue light, with the wavelength between 400 nm and 500 nm, has caused public concern because of the injury to the retinal cells. Meanwhile, it is important in circadian rhythm regulation, scotopic vision and ocular growth. Is the blue light safe? Should it be eliminated from the daily life? Here we review the effect and safety of the blue light.

  7. Learning the Blues. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This lesson introduces students to the "blues," one of the most distinctive and influential elements of African-American musical tradition. With this lesson plan, students can take a virtual field trip to Memphis, Tennessee, one of the prominent centers of blues activities, and explore the history of the blues in the work of W. C. Handy…

  8. Classification of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    How does a scientist approach the problem of trying to understand countless billions of objects? One of the first steps is to organize the data and set up a classification scheme which can provide the best insights into the nature of the objects. Perception and insight are the main purposes of classification. In astronomy, where there are `billions and billions' of stars, classification is an ong...

  9. The Blue Emu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descalzi, Doug; Gillett, John; Gordon, Carlton; Keener, ED; Novak, Ken; Puente, Laura

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal in designing the Blue Emu was to provide an airline with a cost efficient and profitable means of transporting passengers between the major cities in Aeroworld. The design attacks the market where a demand for inexpensive transportation exists and for this reason the Blue Emu is an attractive investment for any airline. In order to provide a profitable aircraft, special attention was paid to cost and economics. For example, in manufacturing, simplicity was stressed in structural design to reduce construction time and cost. Aerodynamic design employed a tapered wing which reduced the induced drag coefficient while also reducing the weight of the wing. Even the propulsion system was selected with cost effectiveness in mind, yet also to maintain the marketability of the aircraft. Thus, in every aspect of the design, consideration was given to economics and marketability of the final product.

  10. Relativistic compact anisotropic charged stellar models with Chaplygin equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a new model of static spherically symmetric relativistic charged stellar objects with locally anisotropic matter distribution together with the Chaplygin equation of state. The interior spacetime has been matched continuously to the exterior Reissner-Nordström geometry. Different physical properties of the stellar model have been investigated, analyzed, and presented graphically.

  11. A close look at the heart of Luminous Blue Variables nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, Carla; Trigilio, Corrado; Cerrigone, Luciano; Umana, Grazia; Leto, Paolo; Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) are a class of evolved massive stars which undergo a short but violent transition from the main sequence toward the Wolf-Rayet stage. During their evolution, LBVs lose a huge quantity of mass from their original envelope, leading to the formation of extended circumstellar nebulae. There are still many open questions about the LBV mass-loss phenomenon, including the origin and the mechanism of mass-loss episodes, and the formation and shaping of the resulting nebulae, which quite often exhibit a bipolar morphology. We propose ATCA observations in 4 cm and 7 mm bands of two galactic LBVs in order to obtain unprecedented high angular resolution and high sensitivity images of the inner nebulae enclosing their stellar object. The ATCA images will detect and resolve the faint shells that have been ejected from the central stars. These data will help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the asymmetrical shapes and the differences between the gas and dust distributions observed in these objects. By examining the structure of the shells, we can learn about the recent mass-loss history of these rapidly evolving objects.

  12. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  13. Voyager 1 'Blue Movie'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the original Voyager 'Blue Movie' (so named because it was built from Blue filter images). It records the approach of Voyager 1 during a period of over 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storms shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  14. Blue metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, George W.; Sneden, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    We review the discovery of blue metal-poor (BMP) stars and the resolution of this population into blue stragglers and intermediate-age Main-Sequence stars by use of binary fractions. We show that the specific frequencies of blue stragglers in the halo field and in globular clusters differ by an order of magnitude. We attribute this difference to the different modes of production of these two populations. We report carbon and s-process enrichment among very metal-poor field blue stragglers and discuss how this result can be used to further resolve field blue stragglers into groups formed during RGB and AGB evolution of their erstwhile primary companions.

  15. The young stellar population at the center of NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Saviane, I.; Perina, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Federici, L.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Galleti, S.

    2009-08-01

    Context: NGC 205 is a peculiar dwarf elliptical galaxy hosting in its center a population of young blue stars. Their origin is still matter of debate, the central fresh star formation activity possibly being related to dynamical interactions between NGC 205 and M 31. Aims: The star formation history in the central 30´´ (~120 pc) around the NGC 205 central nucleus is investigated in order to obtain clues to the origin of the young stellar population. Methods: Deep HST/ACS CCD photometry is compared with theoretical isochrones and luminosity functions to characterize the stellar content of the region under study and compute the recent SF rate. Results: Our photometry reveals a previously undetected blue plume of young stars clearly distinguishable down to I≃ 26. Our analysis suggests that 1.9 × 105 M_⊙ were produced between approximately 62 Myr and 335 Myr ago in the NGC 205 inner regions, with a latest minor episode occurring ~25 Myr ago. This implies a star formation rate of ~7× 10-4 M_⊙/yr over this period. Conclusions: The excellent fit of the observed luminosity function of young main sequence stars obtained with a model having a constant star formation rate argues against a tidally triggered star formation activity over the last ~300 Myr. Rather, a constant SF may be consistent with NGC 205 being on its first interaction with M 31.

  16. Geometry and physical conditions in the stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitherer, Claus; Allen, Richard; Altner, Bruce; Damineli, Augusto; Drissen, Laurent; Idiart, Thais; Lupie, Olivia; Nota, Antonella; Robert, Carmelle; Schmutz, Werner

    1994-01-01

    AG Carinae is one of the prototypes of the class of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). Since 1990 the star has continuously brightened in its visual continuum. We report on a multi-instrument and -wavelength observing campaign to monitor the current activity phase of AG Car. Ground-based photometry, polarimetry, spectroscopy, and space-ultraviolet spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry have been obtained. From the variability of the polarization at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths we detect significant intrinsic polarization. P(sub int) greater than or equal to 0.5% is a large value for a hot, luminous star, suggesting departure from spherical symmetry in the wind of AG Car. The intrinsic polarization is variable on a timescale of 2 months or less. The measured ultraviolet polarization (intrinsic + interstellar) dropped to 0.5% in 1992 May and returned to 1% in 1992 July. The results are interpreted in terms of a variable outflow with a density enhancement in the equatorial plane. A similar model was suggested for the related object R127 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This geometry is reminiscent of the large-scale morphology of the gas nebula and dust 'jet' surrounding AG Car. It is therefore likely that physical conditions close to the stellar surface are responsible for the geometry of the spatially resolved circumstellar material around AG Car. Despite the drastic change of the photospheric conditions, the mass-loss rate did not increase. We find no evidence for a positive correlation between wind density and stellar radius. This makes models that explain the radius increase by opacity effects in the outflow unlikely. The mechanism responsible for the temperature and radius variations is still unknown but most likely has its origin in subphotospheric regions.

  17. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  18. STELLAR BINARY COMPANIONS TO SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-12-20

    For typical models of binary statistics, 50%-80% of core-collapse supernova (ccSN) progenitors are members of a stellar binary at the time of the explosion. Independent of any consequences of mass transfer, this has observational consequences that can be used to study the binary properties of massive stars. In particular, the secondary companion to the progenitor of a Type Ib/c SN is frequently (approx50%) the more optically luminous star since the high effective temperatures of the stripped progenitors make it relatively easy for a lower luminosity, cooler secondary to emit more optical light. Secondaries to the lower mass progenitors of Type II SN will frequently produce excess blue emission relative to the spectral energy distribution of the red primary. Available data constrain the models weakly. Any detected secondaries also provide an independent lower bound on the progenitor mass and, for historical SN, show that it was not a Type Ia event. Bright ccSN secondaries have an unambiguous, post-explosion observational signature-strong, blueshifted, relatively broad absorption lines created by the developing SN remnant (SNR). These can be used to locate historical SN with bright secondaries, confirm that a source is a secondary, and, potentially, measure abundances of ccSN ejecta. Luminous, hot secondaries will re-ionize the SNR on timescales of 100-1000 yr that are faster than re-ionization by the reverse shock, creating peculiar H II regions due to the high metallicity and velocities of the ejecta.

  19. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  20. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: FORMATION OF COMPACT BINARIES, MERGER/COLLISION PRODUCTS AND G2-LIKE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Snezana; Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B. E-mail: antonini@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-02-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of binaries around massive black holes (MBHs) in nuclear stellar clusters. We focus on their secular evolution due to the perturbation by the MBHs, while simplistically accounting for their collisional evolution. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbits around MBHs are strongly affected by secular processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (e.g., Kozai-Lidov cycles). During periapsis approach, dissipative processes such as tidal friction may become highly efficient, and may lead to shrinkage of a binary orbit and even to its merger. Binaries in this environment can therefore significantly change their orbital evolution due to the MBH third-body perturbative effects. Such orbital evolution may impinge on their later stellar evolution. Here we follow the secular dynamics of such binaries and its coupling to tidal evolution, as well as the stellar evolution of such binaries on longer timescales. We find that stellar binaries in the central parts of nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are highly likely to evolve into eccentric and/or short-period binaries, and become strongly interacting binaries either on the main sequence (at which point they may even merge), or through their later binary stellar evolution. The central parts of NSCs therefore catalyze the formation and evolution of strongly interacting binaries, and lead to the enhanced formation of blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and possible supernova progenitors. Induced mergers/collisions may also lead to the formation of G2-like cloud-like objects such as the one recently observed in the Galactic center.

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): stellar mass functions by Hubble type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelvin, Lee S.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Taylor, Edward N.; Graham, Alister W.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Baldry, Ivan; Bamford, Steven P.; Bauer, Amanda E.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J. I.; Colless, Matthew; Conselice, Christopher J.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Lara-López, Maritza A.; Liske, Jochen; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Loveday, Jon; Norberg, Peder; Phillipps, Steven; Popescu, Cristina C.; Prescott, Matthew; Sansom, Anne E.; Tuffs, Richard J.

    2014-10-01

    We present an estimate of the galaxy stellar mass function and its division by morphological type in the local (0.025 < z < 0.06) Universe. Adopting robust morphological classifications as previously presented (Kelvin et al.) for a sample of 3727 galaxies taken from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey, we define a local volume and stellar mass limited sub-sample of 2711 galaxies to a lower stellar mass limit of {M}=10^{9.0} M_{{⊙}}. We confirm that the galaxy stellar mass function is well described by a double-Schechter function given by {M}^{*}=10^{10.64} M_{{⊙}}, α1 = -0.43, φ 1^{*}=4.18dex^{-1} Mpc^{-3}, α2 = -1.50 and φ 2^{*}=0.74dex^{-1} Mpc^{-3}. The constituent morphological-type stellar mass functions are well sampled above our lower stellar mass limit, excepting the faint little blue spheroid population of galaxies. We find approximately 71{}_{-4}^{+3} per cent of the stellar mass in the local Universe is found within spheroid-dominated galaxies; ellipticals and S0-Sas. The remaining 29{}_{-3}^{+4} per cent falls predominantly within late-type disc-dominated systems, Sab-Scds and Sd-Irrs. Adopting reasonable bulge-to-total ratios implies that approximately half the stellar mass today resides in spheroidal structures, and half in disc structures. Within this local sample, we find approximate stellar mass proportions for E : S0-Sa : Sab-Scd : Sd-Irr of 34 : 37 : 24 : 5.

  2. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION OF LOCAL GALAXIES SEGREGATES BY COLOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Puebla, Aldo; Yang, Xiaohu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Jing, Y. P.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv

    2015-02-01

    By means of a statistical approach that combines different semi-empirical methods of galaxy-halo connection, we derive the stellar-to-halo mass relations (SHMR) of local blue and red central galaxies. We also constrain the fraction of halos hosting blue/red central galaxies and the occupation statistics of blue and red satellites as a function of halo mass, M {sub h}. For the observational input we use the blue and red central/satellite galaxy stellar mass functions and two-point correlation functions in the stellar mass range of 9 < log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) <12. We find that: (1) the SHMR of central galaxies is segregated by color, with blue centrals having a SHMR above that of red centrals; at log(M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ∼12, the M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratio of the blue centrals is ≈0.05, which is ∼1.7 times larger than the value of red centrals. (2) The constrained scatters around the SHMRs of red and blue centrals are ≈0.14 and ≈0.11 dex, respectively. The scatter of the average SHMR of all central galaxies changes from ∼0.20 dex to ∼0.14 dex in the 11.3 < log(M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) <15 range. (3) The fraction of halos hosting blue centrals at M{sub h}=10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} is 87%, but at 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} decays to ∼20%, approaching a few percent at higher masses. The characteristic mass at which this fraction is the same for blue and red galaxies is M{sub h}≈7×10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Our results suggest that the SHMR of central galaxies at large masses is shaped by mass quenching. At low masses processes that delay star formation without invoking too strong supernova-driven outflows could explain the high M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratios of blue centrals as compared to those of the scarce red centrals.

  3. Discovering Our Stellar Neighborhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, David V.

    2014-01-01

    The stars closest to Earth are not particularly remarkable or exciting. They are average stars typical of the spiral arms of our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, until recently, most astronomy and Earth science textbooks ignored all but the largest of them to focus on distant, more exotic objects like red supergiants or black holes. The recent discovery…

  4. Stellar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Fortuitous stellar alignments can be fitted to structural orientations with relative ease by the unwary. Nonetheless, cautious approaches taking into account a broader range of cultural evidence, as well as paying due attention to potential methodological pitfalls, have been successful in identifying credible stellar alignments—and constructing plausible assessments of their cultural significance—in a variety of circumstances. These range from single instances of alignments upon particular asterisms where the corroborating historical or ethnographic evidence is strong to repeated instances of oriented structures with only limited independent cultural information but where systematic, data-driven approaches can be productive. In the majority of cases, the identification and interpretation of putative stellar alignments relates to groups of similar monuments or complex single sites and involves a balance between systematic studies of the alignments themselves, backed up by statistical analysis where appropriate, and the consideration of a range of contextual evidence, either derived from the archaeological record alone or from other relevant sources.

  5. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  6. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  7. HUBBLE SPIES BROWN DWARFS IN NEARBY STELLAR NURSERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Probing deep within a neighborhood stellar nursery, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope uncovered a swarm of newborn brown dwarfs. The orbiting observatory's near-infrared camera revealed about 50 of these objects throughout the Orion Nebula's Trapezium cluster [image at right], about 1,500 light-years from Earth. Appearing like glistening precious stones surrounding a setting of sparkling diamonds, more than 300 fledgling stars and brown dwarfs surround the brightest, most massive stars [center of picture] in Hubble's view of the Trapezium cluster's central region. All of the celestial objects in the Trapezium were born together in this hotbed of star formation. The cluster is named for the trapezoidal alignment of those central massive stars. Brown dwarfs are gaseous objects with masses so low that their cores never become hot enough to fuse hydrogen, the thermonuclear fuel stars like the Sun need to shine steadily. Instead, these gaseous objects fade and cool as they grow older. Brown dwarfs around the age of the Sun (5 billion years old) are very cool and dim, and therefore are difficult for telescopes to find. The brown dwarfs discovered in the Trapezium, however, are youngsters (1 million years old). So they're still hot and bright, and easier to see. This finding, along with observations from ground-based telescopes, is further evidence that brown dwarfs, once considered exotic objects, are nearly as abundant as stars. The image and results appear in the Sept. 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The brown dwarfs are too dim to be seen in a visible-light image taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 [picture at left]. This view also doesn't show the assemblage of infant stars seen in the near-infrared image. That's because the young stars are embedded in dense clouds of dust and gas. The Hubble telescope's near-infrared camera, the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer, penetrated those clouds to capture a view of those

  8. Transonic canards and stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Paul; Knobloch, Edgar; Wechselberger, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Parker’s classical stellar wind solution [20] describing steady spherically symmetric outflow from the surface of a star is revisited. Viscous dissipation is retained. The resulting system of equations has slow-fast structure and is amenable to analysis using geometric singular perturbation theory. This technique leads to a reinterpretation of the sonic point as a folded saddle and the identification of shock solutions as canard trajectories in space [22]. The results shed light on the location of the shock and its sensitivity to the system parameters. The related spherically symmetric stellar accretion solution of Bondi [4] is described by the same theory.

  9. Hughes, Rosner, Weiss: Stellar MHD: Magnetohydrodynamics of stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Rosner, Robert; Weiss, Nigel

    2005-08-01

    David Hughes, Robert Rosner and Nigel Weiss describe what was achieved during a programme on stellar magnetic fields at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge. Over a four-month period more than 90 participants visited the Institute for a mixture of structured workshops and informal collaboration.

  10. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  11. The Blue Marble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 'blue marble' image is based on the most detailed collection of true-color imagery of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. Most of the information contained in this image came from MODIS, illustrating MODIS' outstanding capacity to act as an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of this image is based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the satellite's view on any single day. Global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data was used to simulate the ocean surface. MODIS doesn't measure 3-D features of the Earth, so the surface observations were draped over topographic data provided by the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR sensor-the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of MODIS imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. A large collection of imagery based on the blue marble in a variety of sizes and formats, including animations and the full (1 km) resolution imagery, is available at the Blue Marble page. Image by Reto Stockli, Render by Robert Simmon. Based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  12. Magnetic main sequence stars as progenitors of blue supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, I.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.

    2015-01-01

    Blue supergiants (BSGs) to the right the main sequence band in the HR diagram can not be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. We investigate whether a reduced convective core mass due to strong internal magnetic fields during the main sequence might be able to recover this population of stars. We perform calculations with a reduced mass of the hydrogen burning convective core of stars in the mass range 3-30 M ⊙ in a parametric way, which indeed lead to BSGs. It is expected that these BSGs would still show large scale magnetic fields in the order of 10 G.

  13. Luminous Blue Variable Eruptions Triggered and Powered by Binary Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Amit

    2010-12-01

    We suggest that major Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) eruptions are a result of a periastron passage interaction with the secondary star. The interaction must take place when the primary envelope is in an unstable phase. In our model the mass transferred to the secondary accounts for the energy and light curve of the eruption. We propose that all major LBV eruptions are triggered by stellar companions, and that in extreme cases a short duration event with a huge mass transfer rate can lead to a bright transient event on time scales of weeks to months (a `supernova impostor').

  14. Stellar pulsations in beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Kenna-Allison, Michael; Koyama, Kazuya

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class recover the predictions of general relativity in the solar system whilst admitting novel cosmologies, including late-time de Sitter solutions in the absence of a cosmological constant. Deviations from Newton's law are predicted inside astrophysical bodies, which allow for falsifiable, smoking-gun tests of the theory. In this work we study the pulsations of stars by deriving and solving the wave equation governing linear adiabatic oscillations to find the modified period of pulsation. Using both semi-analytic and numerical models, we perform a preliminary survey of the stellar zoo in an attempt to identify the best candidate objects for testing the theory. Brown dwarfs and Cepheid stars are found to be particularly sensitive objects and we discuss the possibility of using both to test the theory.

  15. The ALMA early science view of FUor/EXor objects - I. Through the looking-glass of V2775 Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, Alice; Cieza, Lucas A.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Canovas, Hector; Perez, Sebastian; Hales, Antonio; Mužić, Koraljka; Principe, David A.; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Dary; Tobin, John; Zhang, Yichen; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Casassus, Simon; Prieto, Jose L.

    2017-02-01

    As part of an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimiter Array (ALMA) survey to study the origin of episodic accretion in young eruptive variables, we have observed the circum-stellar environment of the star V2775 Ori. This object is a very young, pre-main sequence object which displays a large amplitude outburst characteristic of the FUor class. We present Cycle-2 band 6 observations of V2775 Ori with a continuum and CO (2-1) isotopologue resolution of 0.25 arcsec (103 au). We report the detection of a marginally resolved circum-stellar disc in the ALMA continuum with an integrated flux of 106 ± 2 mJy, characteristic radius of ˜30 au, inclination of 14.0^{+7.8}_{-14.5} deg and is oriented nearly face-on with respect to the plane of the sky. The 12CO emission is separated into distinct blue and redshifted regions that appear to be rings or shells of expanding material from quasi-episodic outbursts. The system is oriented in such a way that the disc is seen through the outflow remnant of V2775 Ori, which has an axis along our line of sight. The 13CO emission displays similar structure to that of the 12CO, while the C18O line emission is very weak. We calculated the expansion velocities of the low- and medium-density material with respect to the disc to be of -2.85 (blue), 4.4 (red) and -1.35 and 1.15 km s-1 (for blue and red) and we derived the mass, momentum and kinetic energy of the expanding gas. The outflow has an hourglass shape where the cavities are not seen. We interpret the shapes that the gas traces as cavities excavated by an ancient outflow. We report a detection of line emission from the circumstellar disc and derive a lower limit of the gas mass of 3 MJup.

  16. Blue upconversion thulium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Faulkner, George E.; Weber, Michael E.; Dulick, Michael

    1990-04-01

    We report a blue emission upconversion solid-state laser based on Tm3+:YLF. Under double resonance excitation at 780.8 nm (near-ir) and 648.8 nm (red), the Tm3+ ion is sequentially excited from the 3H6 ground state to the 1D2 excited state through the 3H4 intermediate level. The laser output at 450 and 453 nm corresponds to the 1D2 -> 3F4 transitions of Tm3+ ions in YLF.

  17. Keratoglobus and blue sclera.

    PubMed

    Biglan, A W; Brown, S I; Johnson, B L

    1977-02-01

    Five patients from two families had similar features including keratoglobus, blue scleras, hyperextensibility of the hand, wrist, and ankle joints, sensorineural conduction hearing alterations, and mottling of the teeth. Keratoglobus had been observed in all patients at, or shortly after, birth. Corneal perforations developed in seven of the ten eyes after minimal trauma. Repair of these perforations was complicated by the extremely thin corneas and six eyes had to be either enucleated or eviscerated. Histopathological examination of two of the enucleated eyes showed the corneal stromas of both eyes to be estremely thin, Bowman's membrane was absent, and Descemet's membrane was unusually thick. This condition has an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern.

  18. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  19. Mapping the star formation history of Mrk 86. II. Stellar populations and global interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, continuation of Gil de Paz et al. (Paper I), we derive the main properties of the stellar populations in the Blue Compact Dwarf galaxy Mrk 86. Ages, stellar masses, metallicites and burst strengths have been obtained using the combination of Monte Carlo simulations, a maximum likelihood estimator and Cluster and Principal Component Analysis. The three stellar populations detected show well defined properties. We have studied the underlying stellar population, which shows an age between 5-13 Gyr and no significant color gradients. The intermediate aged (30 Myr old) central starburst show a very low dust extinction with high burst strength and high stellar mass content ( ~ 9x106 Msun). Finally, the properties of 46 low-metallicity ( ~ 1/10 Zsun ) star-forming regions were also studied. The properties derived suggest that the most recent star-forming activity in Mrk 86 was triggered by the evolution of a superbubble originated at the central starburst by the energy deposition of stellar winds and supernova explosions. This superbubble produced the blowout of a fraction of the interstellar medium at distances of about 1 kpc with high gas surface densities, leading to the activation of the star formation. Finally, different mechanisms for the star formation triggering in this massive central starburst are studied, including the merging with a low mass companion and the interaction with UGC 4278. We have assumed a distance to Mrk 86 of 6.9 Mpc.

  20. FORMATION OF ULTRA-COMPACT BLUE DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR EVOLUTION INTO NUCLEATED DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-10-10

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf–dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf–dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf–dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z ∼ [0.2–1]Z{sub ⊙}). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass densities (10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −3}) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40−100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R < 100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multiple stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. These very compact blue remnants can be identified as UCBDs soon after merging and as nucleated dwarfs after the young stars fade. We discuss these results in the context of the origins of metal-rich ultra-compact dwarfs and SGNs.

  1. The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G): Stellar Masses, Sizes, and Radial Profiles for 2352 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael; Kim, Taehyun; Laine, Jarkko; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gil de Paz, Armando; Comeron, Sebastien; Hinz, Joannah; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Bouquin, Alexandre Y. K.; Schinnerer, Eva; Ho, Luis; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Madore, Barry; Holwerda, Benne; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Knapen, Johan H.; Meidt, Sharon; Querejeta, Miguel; Mizusawa, Trisha; Seibert, Mark; Laine, Seppo; Courtois, Helene

    2015-07-01

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies is a volume, magnitude, and size-limited survey of 2352 nearby galaxies with deep imaging at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. In this paper, we describe our surface photometry pipeline and showcase the associated data products that we have released to the community. We also identify the physical mechanisms leading to different levels of central stellar mass concentration for galaxies with the same total stellar mass. Finally, we derive the local stellar mass-size relation at 3.6 μm for galaxies of different morphologies. Our radial profiles reach stellar mass surface densities below ˜ 1 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2. Given the negligible impact of dust and the almost constant mass-to-light ratio at these wavelengths, these profiles constitute an accurate inventory of the radial distribution of stellar mass in nearby galaxies. From these profiles we have also derived global properties such as asymptotic magnitudes (and the corresponding stellar masses), isophotal sizes and shapes, and concentration indices. These and other data products from our various pipelines (science-ready mosaics, object masks, 2D image decompositions, and stellar mass maps) can be publicly accessed at IRSA (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/S4G/).

  2. Circumstellar Surroundings of Young Stellar Objectse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien

    1992-12-01

    The close surroundings of young low mass stars hold a multitude of physical phenomena related to star formation. This thesis presents a set of works on theoretical, experimental, and observational issues connected with these phenomena. After a description of the properties of T Tauri, FU Orionis and Ae/Be Herbig stars, with a particular emphasis on their accretion disks, I study the vertical structure of such disks which results from the radiative transfer and the hydrostatic equilibrium. The energy dissipation comes from both the viscous friction of disk particles accreting onto the star and from the absorption of the stellar radiation. A disk ``chromosphere'' is shown to result from the grazing stellar radiation. In the following I study the possibility of detecting directly the circumstellar features (disk, binarity, planets, jets,...) thanks to the high angular resolution techniques (adaptive optics and interferometry). I then present the prototype of a coronagraph at high spatial resolution that I designed, modelized, built and tested for that kind of observations. Finally I describe the observations of the young stellar system Z Canis Majoris, which I obtained at the diffraction limit of the 3.6 meter ESO telescope in the near infrared. This object is shown to be composed of a binary system in addition to an elongated disk-like structure perpendicular to the known jet and illuminated not by the central source but by the infrared companion. [A copy of this thesis (which is mostly in french) can be obtained in binary mode by ftp. There is a file 'these_malbet.tar' in the directory '/pub/publications/' at the FTP node 'gag.observ-gr.fr (IP 130.190.200.11)'. By doing 'tar -xvf these_malbet.tar', you create a directory 'these_malbet/' where there is a 'readme' which gives all information.

  3. Probing the Environment of Accreting Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Manfred

    2011-04-01

    X-ray binaries are the topic of this thesis. They consist of a compact object -- a black hole or a neutron star -- and an ordinary star, which loses matter to the compact object. The gravitational energy released through this process of mass accretion is largely converted into X-rays. The latter are used in the present work to screen the environment of the compact object. The main focus in the case of a massive star is on its wind, which is not homogeneous, but may display structures in form of temperature and density variations. Since great importance is, in multiple respects, attached to stellar winds in astrophysics, there is large interest in general to understand these structures more thoroughly. In particular for X-ray binaries, whose compact object obtains matter from the wind of its companion star, the state of the wind can decisively influence mass accretion and its related radiation processes. A detailed introduction to the fundamentals of stellar winds, compact objects, accretion and radiation processes in X-ray binaries, as well as to the employed instruments and analysis methods, is given in chapter 1. The focus of this investigation is on Cygnus X-1, a binary system with a black hole and a blue supergiant, which form a persistently very bright X-ray source because of accretion from the stellar wind. It had been known for a long time that this source -- when the black hole is seen through the dense stellar wind -- often displays abrupt absorption events whose origin is suspected to be in clumps in the wind. More detailed physical properties of these clumps and of the wind in general are explored in this work. Observations that were specifically acquired for this study, as well as archival data from different satellite observatories, are analyzed in view of signatures of the wind and its fine structures. These results are presented in chapter 2. In a first part of the analysis, the statistical distribution of the brightness of Cyg X-1, as measured since

  4. Detecting faint echoes in stellar-flare light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    1992-01-01

    Observational considerations are discussed for detecting echoes from flare-star photospheres and from stellar or planetary companions. Synthetic spectra are used to determine optimal conditions for the recovery of echoes in flare light curves. The most detectable echoes are expected to appear in broadband observations of the UV continuum. Short-lived flares are ideal for resolving echoes from the flare-star photosphere and may provide constraints for stellar-flare models. Strong outbursts may be used to detect stellar or planetary companions of a flare star. However, the possible planetary configurations that may be probed by this method are limited to Jupiter-size objects in tight orbits about the parent star.

  5. [The dangers of blue light: True story!].

    PubMed

    Renard, G; Leid, J

    2016-05-01

    The dangers of the blue light are the object of numerous publications, for both the scientific community and the general public. The new prolific development of light sources emitting potentially toxic blue light (415-455nm) ranges from LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lamps for interior lighting to television screens, computers, digital tablets and smartphones using OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) or AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology. First we will review some technical terms and the main characteristics of light perceived by the human eye. Then we will discuss scientific proof of the toxicity of blue light to the eye, which may cause cataract or macular degeneration. Analysis of the light spectra of several light sources, from natural light to LED lamps, will allow us to specify even better the dangers related to each light source. LED lamps, whether used as components for interior lighting or screens, are of concern if they are used for extended viewing times and at short distance. While we can protect ourselves from natural blue light by wearing colored glasses which filter out, on both front and back surfaces, the toxic wavelengths, it is more difficult to protect oneself from LED lamps in internal lighting, the use of which should be restricted to "white warmth" lamps (2700K). As far as OLED or AMOLED screens are concerned, the only effective protection consists of using them occasionally and only for a short period of time.

  6. The s process: Nuclear physics, stellar models, and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käppeler, F.; Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Aoki, Wako

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis in the s process takes place in the He-burning layers of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and during the He- and C-burning phases of massive stars. The s process contributes about half of the element abundances between Cu and Bi in solar system material. Depending on stellar mass and metallicity the resulting s-abundance patterns exhibit characteristic features, which provide comprehensive information for our understanding of the stellar life cycle and for the chemical evolution of galaxies. The rapidly growing body of detailed abundance observations, in particular, for AGB and post-AGB stars, for objects in binary systems, and for the very faint metal-poor population represents exciting challenges and constraints for stellar model calculations. Based on updated and improved nuclear physics data for the s-process reaction network, current models are aiming at an ab initio solution for the stellar physics related to convection and mixing processes. Progress in the intimately related areas of observations, nuclear and atomic physics, and stellar modeling is reviewed and the corresponding interplay is illustrated by the general abundance patterns of the elements beyond iron and by the effect of sensitive branching points along the s-process path. The strong variations of the s-process efficiency with metallicity bear also interesting consequences for galactic chemical evolution.

  7. Testing Cosmic-Ray Acceleration in Young, Embedded Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukri, Komin; Marcowith, Alexandre; Lamanna, Giovanni; Maurin, Gilles; Krayzel, Fabien

    2016-07-01

    Most of the massive stars appear grouped in clusters located in giant molecular clouds. Their strong wind activity generates large structures known as stellar wind bubbles and induces collective effects which could accelerate particles up to high energy and produce gamma-rays. The best objects to observe these effects are young massive star clusters in which no supernova explosion has occurred yet. We model these star clusters as a spherical leaky box (the molecular cloud) surrounding a central cosmic ray source (the stellar cluster). We developed a phenomenological model to estimate the cosmic and gamma-ray production for a set of 8 selected clusters. We compare the predicted gamma-ray emission with data obtained with the Fermi-LAT telescope. No significant emission has been detected from any of the selected cluster. Comparing the upper limit on the gamma-ray flux with the prediction from our phenomenological model indicates that not more than 10% of the stellar wind luminosity of the stellar clusters is converted into cosmic rays. If all O-type stars do not contribute more than 10% of their stellar wind luminosity to cosmic-ray acceleration they do not contribute to more than on percent of the total cosmic-ray luminosity.

  8. Blue Fermi flat spectrum radio quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.; Sbarrato, T.; Ghirlanda, G.; Maraschi, L.

    2012-09-01

    Many blazars detected by the Fermi satellite, observed spectroscopically in the optical, are line-less, and have been classified as BL Lac objects. Optical-ultraviolet (UV) photometry of nearly 100 of them allowed us to determine the redshift for a handful of objects and redshift upper limits in the great majority. A few of these are candidates to be 'blue quasars', namely flat spectrum radio quasars whose broad emission lines are hidden by an overwhelming synchrotron emission peaking in the UV. This implies that the emitting electrons have high energies. In turn, this requires relatively weak radiative cooling, a condition that can be met if the main radiative dissipation of the jet power occurs outside the broad-line region. We confirm this hypothesis by studying and modelling the spectral energy distributions of the four 'blue quasars' recently discovered. Furthermore, we discuss the distribution of Fermi blazars in the γ-ray spectral index-γ-ray luminosity plane, and argue that 'blue quasars' objects are a minority within the blazar populations.

  9. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  10. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  11. Synthetic stellar libraries for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo, R.

    A large database of synthetic stellar libraries has been collected for the Gaia mission. I will present the libraries in the context of their usage in APSIS, the system of algorithms developed to deal with the automated classification and parameter determination of the observed sources.

  12. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  13. Chandrasekhar and modern stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    2011-03-01

    Stellar dynamics occupied Chandrasekhar's interest for a brief interlude between his more prolonged studies of stellar structure and radiative transfer. This paper traces the history of one of his ideas -- namely, that the shape of the galactic potential controls the orientation of the stellar velocity dispersion tensor. It has its roots in papers by Eddington (1915) and Chandrasekhar (1939), and provoked a fascinating dispute between these two great scientists -- less well-known than their famous controversy over the white dwarf stars. In modern language, Eddington claimed that the integral curves of the eigenvectors of the velocity dispersion tensor provide a one-dimensional foliation into mutually orthogonal surfaces. Chandrasekhar challenged this, and explicitly constructed a counter-example. In fact, the work of neither of these great scientists was without flaws, though further developments in stellar dynamics were to ultimately draw more on Eddington's insight than Chandrasekhar's. We conclude with a description of modern attempts to measure the orientation of the velocity dispersion tensor for populations in the Milky Way Galaxy, a subject that is coming into its own with the dawning of the age of precision astrometry.

  14. Chandrasekhar and modern stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    2011-12-01

    Stellar dynamics occupied Chandrasekhar's interest for a brief interlude between his more prolonged studies of stellar structure and radiative transfer. This paper traces the history of one of his ideas - namely, that the shape of the galactic potential controls the orientation of the stellar velocity dispersion tensor. It has its roots in papers by Eddington (1915) and Chandrasekhar (1939), and provoked a fascinating dispute between these two great scientists - less well-known than their famous controversy over the white dwarf stars. In modern language, Eddington claimed that the integral curves of the eigenvectors of the velocity dispersion tensor provide a one-dimensional foliation into mutually orthogonal surfaces. Chandrasekhar challenged this, and explicitly constructed a counter-example. In fact, the work of neither of these great scientists was without flaws, though further developments in stellar dynamics were to ultimately draw more on Eddington's insight than Chandrasekhar's. We conclude with a description of modern attempts to measure the orientation of the velocity dispersion tensor for populations in the Milky Way Galaxy, a subject that is coming into its own with the dawning of the age of precision astrometry.

  15. Summary of the Stellar Chromospheres Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, O. C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies on solar-type stellar chromospheres include diagnostic techniques, observations on different kinds of apparently existing chromospheres, enhancement dynamics of chromospheric activity, and interpretation of stellar spectroscopy with theoretical explanations for chromospheric lines.

  16. Blue ocean leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

  17. The Color and Stellar Mass Dependence of Small-scale Galaxy Clustering in SDSS-III BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law-Smith, Jamie; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    We measure the color and stellar mass dependence of clustering in spectroscopic galaxies at 0.6 < z < 0.65 using data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey component of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We greatly increase the statistical precision of our clustering measurements by using the cross-correlation of 66,657 spectroscopic galaxies to a sample of 6.6 million fainter photometric galaxies. The clustering amplitude w(R) is measured as the ratio of the mean excess number of photometric galaxies found within a specified radius annulus around a spectroscopic galaxy to that from a random photometric galaxy distribution. We recover many of the familiar trends at high signal-to-noise ratio. We find the ratio of the clustering amplitudes of red and blue massive galaxies to be {w}{red}/{w}{blue}=1.92+/- 0.11 in our smallest annulus of 75–125 kpc. At our largest radii (2–4 Mpc), we find {w}{red}/{w}{blue}=1.24+/- 0.05. Red galaxies therefore have denser environments than their blue counterparts at z ∼ 0.625, and this effect increases with decreasing radius. Irrespective of color, we find that w(R) does not obey a simple power-law relation with radius, showing a dip around 1 Mpc. Holding stellar mass fixed, we find a clear differentiation between clustering in red and blue galaxies, showing that clustering is not solely determined by stellar mass. Holding color fixed, we find that clustering increases with stellar mass, especially for red galaxies at small scales (more than a factor of 2 effect over 0.75 dex in stellar mass).

  18. The SLUGGS survey: globular cluster stellar population trends from weak absorption lines in stacked spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Christopher; Forbes, Duncan A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Conroy, Charlie; Foster, Caroline; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Arnold, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey, we stack 1137 Keck DEIMOS (Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph) spectra of globular clusters from 10 galaxies to study their stellar populations in detail. The stacked spectra have median signal-to-noise ratios of ˜90 Å-1. Besides the calcium triplet, we study weaker sodium, magnesium, titanium and iron lines as well as the Hα and higher order Paschen hydrogen lines. In general, the stacked spectra are consistent with old ages and a Milky Way-like initial mass function. However, we see different metal line index strengths at fixed colour and magnitude, and differences in the calcium triplet-colour relation from galaxy to galaxy. We interpret this as strong evidence for variations in the globular cluster colour-metallicity relation between galaxies. Two possible explanations for the colour-metallicity relation variations are that the average ages of globular clusters vary from galaxy to galaxy or that the average abundances of light elements (i.e. He, C, N and O) differ between galaxies. Stacking spectra by magnitude, we see that the colours become redder and metal line indices stronger with brighter magnitudes. These trends are consistent with the previously reported `blue tilts' being mass-metallicity relations.

  19. A tidally stripped stellar component of the Magellanic bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Majewski, Steven R.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Muñoz, Ricardo R. E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl

    2013-12-20

    Deep photometry of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) stellar periphery (R = 4°, 4.2 kpc) is used to study its line-of-sight depth with red clump (RC) stars. The RC luminosity function is affected little by young (≲1 Gyr) blue-loop stars in these regions because their main-sequence counterparts are not observed in the color-magnitude diagrams. The SMCs eastern side is found to have a large line-of-sight depth (∼23 kpc) while the western side has a much shallower depth (∼10 kpc), consistent with previous photographic plate photometry results. We use a model SMC RC luminosity function to deconvolve the observed RC magnitudes and construct the density function in distance for our fields. Three of the eastern fields show a distance bimodality with one component at the 'systemic' ∼67 kpc SMC distance and a second component at ∼55 kpc. Our data are not reproduced well by the various extant Magellanic Cloud and Stream simulations. However, the models predict that the known H I Magellanic Bridge (stretching from the SMC eastward toward the Large Magellanic Cloud, LMC) has a decreasing distance with angle from the SMC and should be seen in both the gaseous and stellar components. From comparison with these models, we conclude that the most likely explanation for our newly identified ∼55 kpc stellar structure in the eastern SMC is a stellar counterpart of the H I Magellanic Bridge that was tidally stripped from the SMC ∼200 Myr ago during a close encounter with the LMC. This discovery has important implications for microlensing surveys of the SMC.

  20. Spinning like a blue straggler: the population of fast rotating blue straggler stars in ω Centauri

    SciTech Connect

    Mucciarelli, A.; Lovisi, L.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.

    2014-12-10

    By using high-resolution spectra acquired with FLAMES-GIRAFFE at the ESO/VLT, we measured the radial and rotational velocities for 110 blue straggler stars (BSSs) in ω Centauri, the globular cluster-like stellar system harboring the largest known BSS population. According to their radial velocities, 109 BSSs are members of the system. The rotational velocity distribution is very broad, with the bulk of BSSs spinning at less than ∼40 km s{sup –1} (in agreement with the majority of such stars observed in other globular clusters) and a long tail reaching ∼200 km s{sup –1}. About 40% of the sample has v{sub e} sin i > 40 km s{sup –1} and about 20% has v{sub e} sin i > 70 km s{sup –1}. Such a large fraction is very similar to the percentage of fast rotating BSSs observed in M4. Thus, ω Centauri is the second stellar cluster, beyond M4, with a surprisingly high population of fast spinning BSSs. We found a hint of radial behavior for a fraction of fast rotating BSSs, with a mild peak within one core radius, and a possible rise in the external regions (beyond four core radii). This may suggest that recent formation episodes of mass transfer BSSs occurred preferentially in the outskirts of ω Centauri, or that braking mechanisms able to slow down these stars are least efficient in the lowest density environments.