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Sample records for blunt trauma fractures

  1. [Isolated hyoid bone fracture due to blunt trauma: case report].

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Mehmet Ozgür; Koşargelir, Mehmet; Yorulmaz, Rasim; Meriç, Kaan; Erdoğan, Barış

    2013-05-01

    Fractures of the hyoid bone are very rare. Diagnosis of hyoid fracture is difficult and can be made only with a strong degree of suspicion. We report a case of isolated hyoid bone fracture due to blunt trauma to the neck. A 26-year-old woman was admitted to emergency department for motor vehicle accident. She complained of dysphagia and anterior neck discomfort. Physical examination showed hyperemia and tenderness of neck. A tomographic scan of neck was performed. The findings demonstrated hyoid fracture. Patient was observed with medical therapy for 24 hours and discharged with recommendation of outpatient control.Emergency physician has to be aware of the possibility of hyoid fractures in blunt traumas. Patients with hyoid fracture should be observed for 24 hours. Generally, medical treatment is satisfactory in isolated hyoid fractures.

  2. Isolated linear skull fractures in children with blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Powell, Elizabeth C; Atabaki, Shireen M; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra; Wisner, David; Mahajan, Prashant; Glass, Todd; Miskin, Michelle; Stanley, Rachel M; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Children and adolescents with minor blunt head trauma and isolated skull fractures are often admitted to the hospital. The objective of this study was to describe the injury circumstances and frequency of clinically important neurologic complications among children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated linear skull fractures. This study was a planned secondary analysis of a large prospective cohort study in children <18 years old with blunt head trauma. Data were collected in 25 emergency departments. We analyzed patients with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14 or 15 and isolated linear skull fractures. We ascertained acute neurologic outcomes through clinical information collected during admission or via telephone or mail at least 1 week after the emergency department visit. In the parent study, we enrolled 43,904 children (11,035 [25%] <2 years old). Of those with imaging studies, 350 had isolated linear skull fractures. Falls were the most common injury mechanism, accounting for 70% (81% for ages <2 years old). Of 201 hospitalized children, 42 had computed tomography or MRI repeated; 5 had new findings but none required neurosurgical intervention. Of 149 patients discharged from the hospital, 20 had repeated imaging, and none had new findings. Children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated linear skull fractures are at very low risk of evolving other traumatic findings noted in subsequent imaging studies or requiring neurosurgical intervention. Hospital admission for neurologically normal children with isolated linear skull fractures after minor blunt head trauma for monitoring is typically unnecessary. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Facial palsy after blunt trauma and without facial bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Coltro, Pedro Soler; Goldenberg, Dov Charles; Aldunate, Johnny Leandro Conduta Borda; Alessi, Mariana Sisto; Chang, Alexandre Jin Bok Audi; Alonso, Nivaldo; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2010-07-01

    A 14-year-old patient had a low-energy facial blunt trauma that evolved to right facial paralysis caused by parotid hematoma with parotid salivary gland lesion. Computed tomography and angiography demonstrated intraparotid collection without pseudoaneurysm and without radiologic signs of fracture in the face. The patient was treated with serial punctures for hematoma deflation, resolving with regression and complete remission of facial paralysis, with no late sequela. The authors discuss the relationship between facial nerve traumatic injuries associated or not with the presence of facial fractures, emphasizing the importance of early recognition and appropriate treatment of such cases.

  4. Sternal fractures and delayed cardiac tamponade due to a severe blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huai-min; Chen, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Er-yong; Hu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Sternal fractures caused by blunt chest trauma are associated with an increased incidence of cardiac injury. Reports of the incidence of cardiac injury associated with sternal fracture range from 18% to 62%. Delayed cardiac tamponade is a rare phenomenon that appears days or weeks after injury. Moreover, after nonpenetrating chest trauma, cardiac tamponade is very rare and occurs in less than 1 of 1000. This case describes a patient who had delayed cardiac tamponade 17 days after a severe blunt chest trauma.

  5. Fracture pattern interpretation in the skull: differentiating blunt force from ballistics trauma using concentric fractures.

    PubMed

    Hart, Gina O

    2005-11-01

    There have been several anthropological studies on trauma analysis in recent literature, but few studies have focused on the differences between the three mechanisms of trauma (sharp force trauma, blunt force trauma and ballistics trauma). The hypothesis of this study is that blunt force and ballistics fracture patterns in the skull can be differentiated using concentric fractures. Two-hundred and eleven injuries from skulls exhibiting concentric fractures were examined to determine if the mechanism of trauma could be determined by beveling direction. Fractures occurring in buttressed and non-buttressed regions were examined separately. Contingency tables and Pearson's Chi-Square were used to evaluate the relationship between the two variables (the mechanism of trauma and the direction of beveling), while Pearson's r correlation was used to determine the strength of the relationship. Contingency tables and Chi-square tests among the entire sample, the buttressed areas, and the non-buttressed areas led to the null hypothesis (no relationship) to be rejected. Pearson's r correlation indicated that the relationship between the variables studied is greater than chance allocation.

  6. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus.

  7. Scapular Fractures in Blunt Chest Trauma – Self-Experience Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sadek, Tabet A.; Niklev, Desislav; Al-Sadek, Ahmed; Al-Sadek, Lina

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this retrospective study was to report the scapular fractures in patients with blunt chest trauma and to present the type and the frequency of associated thoracic injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients with fractures of the scapula were included in the study. The mechanisms of the injury, the type of scapular fractures and associated thoracic injuries were analysed. RESULTS: Scapular fractures were caused by high-energy blunt chest trauma. The body of the scapula was fractured in all scapular fractures. In all cases, scapular fractures were associated with other thoracic injuries (average 3.25/per case). Rib fractures were present in eight patients, fractured clavicula - in four cases, the affection of pleural cavity - in eight of the patients and pulmonary contusion in all nine cases. Eight patients were discharged from the hospital up to the 15th day. One patient had died on the 3rd day because of postconcussional lung oedema. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the role of scapular fractures as a marker for the severity of the chest trauma (based on the number of associated thoracic injuries), but doesn’t present scapular fractures as an indicator for high mortality in blunt chest trauma patients. PMID:28028415

  8. Secondary left ventricular injury with haemopericardium caused by a rib fracture after blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Pankaj; Somsekhar, Ganti; Macauley, Graeme

    2006-01-01

    Trauma is the third most common cause of death in the West. In the US, approximately 90,000 deaths annually are traumatic in nature and over 75% of casualties from blunt trauma are due to chest injuries. Cardiac injuries from rib fractures following blunt trauma are extremely rare. We report the unusual case of a patient who fell from a height and presented with haemopericardium and haemothorax as a result of left ventricular and lingular lacerations and was sucessfully operated upon. PMID:16722596

  9. Clinical Presentations and Outcomes of Children With Basilar Skull Fractures After Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Tunik, Michael G; Powell, Elizabeth C; Mahajan, Prashant; Schunk, Jeff E; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Miskin, Michelle; Zuspan, Sally Jo; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra; Atabaki, Shireen M; Hoyle, John D; Holmes, James F; Dayan, Peter S; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    We describe presentations and outcomes of children with basilar skull fractures in the emergency department (ED) after blunt head trauma. This was a secondary analysis of an observational cohort of children with blunt head trauma. Basilar skull fracture was defined as physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture without basilar skull fracture on computed tomography (CT), or basilar skull fracture on CT regardless of physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture. Other definitions included isolated basilar skull fracture (physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture or basilar skull fracture on CT with no other intracranial injuries on CT) and acute adverse outcomes (death, neurosurgery, intubation for >24 hours, and hospitalization for ≥2 nights with intracranial injury on CT). Of 42,958 patients, 558 (1.3%) had physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture, basilar skull fractures on CT, or both. Of the 525 (94.1%) CT-imaged patients, 162 (30.9%) had basilar skull fracture on CT alone, and 104 (19.8%) had both physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture and basilar skull fracture on CT; 269 patients (51.2%) had intracranial injuries other than basilar skull fracture on CT. Of the 363 (91.7%) CT-imaged patients with physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture, 104 (28.7%) had basilar skull fracture on CT. Of 266 patients with basilar skull fracture on CT, 104 (39.1%) also had physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture. Of the 256 CT-imaged patients who had isolated basilar skull fracture, none had acute adverse outcomes (0%; 95% confidence interval 0% to 1.4%), including none (0%; 95% confidence interval 0% to 6.1%) of 59 with isolated basilar skull fractures on CT. Approximately 1% of children with blunt head trauma have physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture or basilar skull fracture on CT. The latter increases the risk of acute adverse outcomes more than physical examination signs of

  10. Esophageal perforation associated with fracture of the upper thoracic spine from blunt trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tetsuji; Abe, Michio

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful conservative management of an unusual case of esophageal perforation associated with an upper thoracic spinal fracture from blunt trauma in Minamata, Kumamoto, Japan. A 69-year-old man became paraplegic secondary to an L1 burst fracture caused by a boating accident and underwent posterior fixation on the day of admission. The patient also had a minimally displaced T4 vertebral fracture. Fever, dyspnea and elevated inflammatory markers all persisted postoperatively. Computed tomography showed free mediastinal air at the T4 level, and an esophagram showed contrast medium leakage, which helped diagnose esophageal perforation. The esophageal perforation healed with conservative treatment without life-threatening complications. The possibility of esophageal injury should always be considered when treating upper thoracic spinal injuries due to blunt trauma. PMID:28053736

  11. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, V O; Ladipo, J K; Brimmo, I A; Adebo, A O

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgical unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan on all consecutive, blunt chest injury patients treated between May 1975 and April 1999. The period of study was divided into 2 periods: May 1975-April 1987, May 1987-April 1999. The aim was to determine the pattern of injury, the management and complications of the injury among the treated. Blunt chest trauma patients were 69% (1331 patients) of all chest injury patients (1928 patients) treated. Mean age for the 2 periods was 38.3 +/- 15 years and 56.4 +/- 6.2 years, the male:female ratio was 4:1 and 2:1 respectively. The incidence of blunt chest trauma tripled in the second period. Blunt chest trauma was classified as involving bony chest wall or without the involvement of bony chest wall. Majority of the blunt chest injuries were minor chest wall injuries (68%, 905 patients), 7.6% (101 patients) had major but stable chest wall injuries, 10.8% (144 patients) had flail chest injuries. Thoracic injuries without fractures of bony chest wall occurred in 181 patients (13.6%). Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients (59.1%) had associated extra-thoracic injuries, in 426 patients (54.1%) two or more extra-thoracic systems were involved. While orthopaedic injury was the most frequent extra-thoracic injury (69.5%) associated with blunt chest trauma, craniospinal injury (31.9%) was more common injury among the patients with severe or life threatening chest trauma. The most common extra-thoracic operation was laparotomy (221 patients). Nine hundred and seventy patients (72.9%) had either closed thoracostomy drainage or clinical observation, 361 patients (27.1%) had major thoracic surgical intervention (emergent in 134 patients, late in 227 patients). Most of the severe lung contusion that needed ventilatory care (85 patients) featured among patients with bony chest wall injury, 15 were without chest wall injury. Majority of patients 63.2% (835 patients) had no

  12. Number of rib fractures thresholds independently predict worse outcomes in older patients with blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Shulzhenko, Nikita O; Zens, Tiffany J; Beems, Megan V; Jung, Hee Soo; O'Rourke, Ann P; Liepert, Amy E; Scarborough, John E; Agarwal, Suresh K

    2017-04-01

    There have been conflicting reports regarding whether the number of rib fractures sustained in blunt trauma is associated independently with worse patient outcomes. We sought to investigate this risk-adjusted relationship among the lesser-studied population of older adults. A retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank was performed for patients with blunt trauma who were ≥65 years old and had rib fractures between 2009 and 2012 (N = 67,695). Control data were collected for age, sex, injury severity score, injury mechanism, 24 comorbidities, and number of rib fractures. Outcome data included hospital mortality, hospital and intensive care unit durations of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the occurrence of pneumonia. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. Sustaining ≥5 rib fractures was associated with increased intensive care unit admission (odds ratio: 1.14, P < .001) and hospital duration of stay (relative duration: 105%, P < .001). Sustaining ≥7 rib fractures was associated with an increased incidence of pneumonia (odds ratio: 1.32, P < .001) and intensive care unit duration of stay (relative duration: 122%, P < .001). Sustaining ≥8 rib fractures was associated with increased mortality (odds ratio: 1.51, P < .001) and duration of mechanical ventilation (relative duration: 117%, P < .001). In older patients with trauma, sustaining at least 5 rib fractures is a significant predictor of worse outcomes independent of patient characteristics, comorbidities, and trauma burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiolucent hair accessories causing depressed skull fracture following blunt cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Omar N; Hankinson, Todd C; Mack, William J; Feldstein, Neil A; Anderson, Richard C E

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric neurosurgeons frequently care for children with traumatic scalp and skull injury. Foreign objects are often observed on imaging and may influence the clinician's decision-making process. The authors report on 2 cases of poorly visualized hair beads that had become embedded into the skull during blunt trauma. In both cases, skull radiography and CT scanning demonstrated depressed, comminuted fractures with poorly demonstrated spherical radiolucencies in the overlying scalp. The nature of these objects was initially unclear, and they could have represented air that entered the scalp during trauma. In one case, scalp inspection demonstrated no evidence of the bead. In the other case, a second bead was observed at the site of scalp laceration. In both cases, the beads were surgically removed, the fractures were elevated, and the patients recovered uneventfully. Radiolucent fashion accessories, such as hair beads, may be difficult to appreciate on clinical examination and may masquerade as clinically insignificant air following cranial trauma. If they are not removed, these foreign bodies may pose the risk of an infection. Pediatric neurosurgeons should consider hair accessories in the differential diagnosis of foreign bodies that may produce skull fracture following blunt trauma.

  14. Thoracolumbar fracture in blunt trauma: is clinical exam enough for awake patients?

    PubMed

    Sava, Jack; Williams, Michael D; Kennedy, Susan; Wang, Dennis

    2006-07-01

    Physical examination is widely used to screen trauma patients for thoracolumbar fracture (TLFx). Retrospective data suggests that patients with altered sensorium may not manifest symptoms after TLFx. This study was designed to prospectively test the sensitivity of physical examination for detection of TLFx in patients with altered mentation. Prospective data collection in a large urban Level I trauma center from April 2002 to December 2003. During the study period, thoracolumbar radiography was performed on patients with signs or symptoms of TLFx, and also on patients with significant blunt trauma and any alteration in mentation, including drowsiness or apparent intoxication. All patients were classified as reliable if Glasgow coma score was >13 and the treating physician judged them capable of accurately reporting pain, and those who did not met both these conditions were deemed unreliable. Patients with normal mentation and no signs or symptoms were excluded. Injuries, mental status, symptoms, physical examination, and X-ray film results were recorded. There were 3,028 blunt trauma patients evaluated during the study period. Thoracolumbar radiography was performed on 537 patients. Of these, 442 patients were deemed reliable, and 166 had no signs or symptoms of TLFx. Of these asymptomatic patients, 10 were found to have TLFx. Of these 10 reliable patients with TLFx despite negative examination, none required surgery, but four required a brace. Thoracolumbar fractures are often clinically silent in blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium, even when they appear able to reliably report pain. X-ray screening of these patients is appropriate to prevent missed injury.

  15. Comminuted Laryngeal Fracture Following Blunt Trauma: A Need for Strict Legislation on Roads!

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Singh, Pragya; Gupta, Minal; Kamble, Bhavna; Phatak, Suresh S

    2017-01-01

    Laryngeal fracture is a rare condition with potential life-long implications related to airway patency, voice quality, and swallowing. Rarity of the condition leads to lack of consensus on the most suitable way to manage this injury. The mode of injury can be prevented by strict legislation on the roads. We report a case of a 28-year-old Indian male who sustained a comminuted displaced fracture of the thyroid cartilage with disruption of anterior commissure due to blunt trauma caused by the metallic side rod of a ladder projecting from the rear of a vehicle in front of the bike on which he was riding. He presented with breathing difficulty, change in voice, surgical emphysema, and pneumomediastinum, but without any skin changes over the neck. His airway could be restored due to early tracheostomy and open reduction with internal fixation with sutures along with laryngeal stenting. He has no significant swallowing or breathing problem and reasonably good voice 6 months after surgery. This case highlights the need for strict legislation on roads in India and the importance of high level of suspicion for laryngeal fracture in acute trauma patient. Early identification and timely internal fixation not only restore the airway but also improve long-term voice and airway outcomes.

  16. Cranial nerve injuries are associated with specific craniofacial fractures after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Kampshoff, Jesse L; Cogbill, Thomas H; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kallies, Kara J; Martin, Lynn T

    2010-11-01

    Identification of cranial nerve (CN) injuries after blunt trauma is often delayed due to concomitant life-threatening trauma, altered mental status, and associated bony or soft tissue injuries. We hypothesized that specific craniofacial fracture (FX) patterns are associated with CN injuries, permitting earlier diagnosis. The trauma registry at a single institution was queried for all CN injuries and craniofacial FXs. Associations were determined by Fisher's exact test. Ninety CN injuries were identified in 59 patients. CN injuries were diagnosed on the day of admission in 24 (41%) patients. The most frequently injured CNs were CN VII (22), CN I (16), and CN VI (14). Occipital FXs were associated with CN I injury (P = 0.001). Sphenoid and ethmoid FXs were correlated with CN III trauma (P = 0.019 and 0.04). Temporal bone FXs were associated with CN VII injuries (P = 0.025). Maxillary FXs were associated with CN V injuries (P = 0.041). Complete or partial recovery was documented after 17 per cent and 39 per cent of CN injuries, respectively. Diagnostic delay was documented in 59 per cent of patients. Specific craniofacial FXs were correlated with certain CN injuries. Partial or complete recovery of function occurred after 56 per cent of CN injuries.

  17. Ocular and periocular injuries associated with an isolated orbital fracture depending on a blunt cranial trauma: anatomical and surgical aspects.

    PubMed

    Karabekir, H Selim; Gocmen-Mas, Nuket; Emel, Erhan; Karacayli, Umit; Koymen, Ramazan; Atar, Elmas Kagnici; Ozkan, Nezih

    2012-10-01

    The anatomical location of fractures following blunt cranio-orbital trauma is important for neurosurgeons and maxillofacial surgeons. In this study, 588 cranio-orbital fractures following blunt trauma were evaluated retrospectively with regard to the anatomical site and surgical treatment. Orbital cranial nerve injuries and the outcomes of the medical and/or surgical treatment are described. Distribution of the zygomatic complex and orbital fractures were as follows: zygomatic complex fractures (n:304), isolated orbital fractures (n:58), complex comminuted fractures (n:226). In 58 cases, 69 orbit fractures were found (11 bilateral and 47 unilateral fractures). The lateral wall was the most frequent fracture (n:63). The least frequent fracture was the roof of the orbit (n:11). The accompanying lesions were as follows: 89.65% of cases were associated with periorbital haematoma (n:52), 13.79% of cases with retrobulbar haemorrhage (n:8), 96.55% cases with periorbital soft tissue oedema (n:56), 53.45% cases with pneumocephalus (n:31), 8.62% cases with intra-parenchymal contusion (n:5), 6.89% cases with enophthalmia (n:4), 5.17% of cases with rhinorrhoea (n: 3), 5.17% cases with optic bulb injury and adnexial trauma (n:3), 32.76% cases with intra-orbital emphysema (n:19), and 20.69% with vision dysfunctions (n:12), of whom 2 had no optic nerve injury. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparison study of pelvic fractures and associated abdominal injuries between pediatric and adult blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Olsha, Oded; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Pelvic fractures are a marker of severe injury, mandating a thorough investigation for the presence of associated injuries. Anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children may lead to a different impact of pelvic fractures on these populations. The purpose of this study is to compare pelvic fractures between pediatric and adult blunt trauma victims, mainly regarding their severity and associated intraabdominal injuries. A retrospective study involving blunt trauma patients suffering pelvic fractures, according to the records of the Israeli National Trauma Registry. Patients included children, aged 0-14years, and adults between 15 and 64years. The presence and severity of associated injuries were assessed. Overall, 7621 patients aged 0-64years were identified with pelvic fractures following blunt trauma. The incidence of pelvic fractures in children was (0.8%), as compared to 4.3% in adults, p <0.0001. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident (MVA) in adults, and pedestrian hit by car (PHBC) in children. About a quarter of the patients in both groups had an ISS >25. Adults sustained significantly more moderate to severe pelvic fractures (AIS≥3) than children (26.7% vs. 17.4%, p<0.0001). The overall mortality rate was similar among the two groups (5.4% in adults, 5.2% in children, p=0.7554). The only associated injury with statistically significant difference in incidence among the two groups was rectal injury (1.2% among children, 0.2% among adults, p<0.0001). Among adult patients, there was a clear correlation between the severity of pelvic fractures and the severity of concomitant splenic and hepatic injuries (p=0.026, p=0.0004, respectively). Among children, a similar correlation was not demonstrated. Adults involved in blunt trauma are more likely to sustain pelvic fractures, and these are generally more severe fractures, as compared to children suffering from blunt trauma. Nonetheless, mortality rates were found

  19. Pelvic fracture from major blunt trauma. Outcome is determined by associated injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, G V; Ward, E F; Muakkassa, F F; Hsu, H S; Griswold, J A; Rhodes, R S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic hemorrhage has been implicated as the cause of death in 50% of patients who die following pelvic fractures. To establish correlates of morbidity and mortality from pelvic fractures due to blunt trauma, we reviewed 236 patients treated during 4 years. The average age of the 144 men and 92 women was 31.5 years, the average Injury Severity Score was 21.3, the average blood requirement was 5 units, and the average hospital stay was 16.8 days. One hundred fifty-two patients (64.4%) were injured in motor vehicle accidents, 33 (14%) had motor vehicle-pedestrian accidents, 16 (6.8%) had crush injuries, 12 (5.1%) each had either motorcycle accidents or falls, and 11 (4.6%) had miscellaneous accidents. Eighteen patients (7.6%) died, with seven (38.9%) deaths due to hemorrhage. Only one death was caused by pelvic hemorrhage. Other deaths were due to hemorrhage from other sites (6), head injury (5), sepsis or multiple-organ failure (4), pulmonary injury (1), and pulmonary embolus (1). None of the septic deaths was related to a pelvic hematoma. Multivariate multiple regression analysis showed that the severity of injury was correlated with indices of severity of pelvic fractures such as fracture site (p less than 0.0001), fracture displacement (p less than 0.005), pelvic stability (p less than 0.0001), and vector of injury (p less than 0.01). However death could not be predicted on the basis of these indices of severity (p greater than 0.28). Of the nine patients who underwent pelvic arteriography, three required embolization of actively bleeding pelvic vessels, but seven had intra-abdominal hemorrhage that required laparotomy, and eight developed a coagulopathy. Massive bleeding from pelvic fractures was uncommon, and the major threat of hemorrhage was from nonpelvic sites. Furthermore, although injury severity was correlated with the severity of the pelvic fracture, hospital outcome was determined by associated injuries and not by the pelvic fracture. PMID:2039283

  20. Estimating the timing of long bone fractures: correlation between the postmortem interval, bone moisture content, and blunt force trauma fracture characteristics*.

    PubMed

    Wieberg, Danielle A M; Wescott, Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    There is very limited knowledge about how long perimortem fracture characteristics persist into the postmortem interval (PMI). Therefore, in this study, 60 porcine long bones were exposed to natural taphonomic conditions and fractured with a steel bone breaking apparatus every 28 days throughout a 141-day period. Differences between macroscopic blunt force trauma fracture characteristics (fracture angle, surface morphology, and outline) were examined to determine if they varied over time or in relationship to bone moisture content (ash weight) and overall assessment. There are significant relationships between (1) PMI and percent ash weight (%AW), fracture surface, and fracture angle and (2) %AW and fracture surface and fracture angle. Bone moisture content correlates significantly with fracture morphology and other characteristics commonly used by forensic anthropologists to determine the timing of traumatic injuries. However, fracture characteristics normally associated with perimortem trauma can persist long into the PMI.

  1. Skull wounds linked with blunt trauma (hammer example). A report of two depressed skull fractures--elements of biomechanical explanation.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Yann; Becart, Anne; Colard, Thomas; Delille, Rémi; Tournel, Gilles; Hedouin, Valéry; Gosset, Didier

    2012-09-01

    The lesions of the skull following perforating traumas can create complex fractures. The blunt traumas can, according to the swiftness and the shape of the object used, create a depressed fracture. The authors describe through two clinical cases the lesional characteristic of the blunt traumas, perforating the skull using a hammer. In both cases the cranial lesions were very typical: they were geometrical, square shaped, of the same size than the tool (head and tip of the hammer). On the outer table of the skull, the edges of the wounds were sharp and regular. On the inner table, the edges of the wounds were beveled and irregular. The bony penetration in the depressed fracture results from a rupture of the outer table of the bone under tension, in periphery, by the bend of the bone to the impact (outbending) and then, from the inner table with comminuted bony fragmentation. Breeding on the fractures of the size and the shape of the blunt objects used is inconstant and differs, that it is the objects of flat surface or wide in opposition to those of small surface area. Fractures morphologies depend on one hand on these extrinsic factors and on the other hand, of intrinsic factors (structure of the bone). To identify them, we had previously conducted experimental work on cranial bone samples. The bone was submitted to a device for three-point bending. This work had shown properties of thickness and stiffness of the various areas of the vault. Our cases are consistent with these results and illustrate the variability of bone lesions according to region and mode of use of blunt weapons. Many studies have identified criteria for identification of the weapons and the assistance of digital and biomechanical models will be an invaluable contribution with this aim in the future.

  2. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  3. The surgical stabilization of multiple rib fractures using titanium elastic nail in blunt chest trauma with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Tarng, Yih-Wen; Liu, Yuan-Yuarn; Huang, Fong-Dee; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Wu, Tzu-Chin; Chou, Yi-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Blunt chest injuries are usually combined with multiple rib fractures and severe lung contusions. This can occasionally induce acute respiratory failure and prolong ventilations. In order to reduce the periods of ventilator dependency, we propose a less invasive method of fixing multiple rib fractures. Since October 2009, we have developed a new method to fix fractured ribs caused by blunt trauma. Rib fixations were performed using 2.0- or 2.5-mm intramedullary titanium elastic nails (TEN), with the help of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and minimal thoracic incisions. All the patients' demographics and postoperative data were collected. From January 2010 to December 2012, a total of 65 patients presenting with multiple rib fractures resulting in acute respiratory failure were included in the study. Twelve patients received the new surgical fixation. Rib fixations were performed at an average of 4 days after trauma. Patients were successfully weaned off ventilators after an average of 3 days. The average length of stay in the hospital and the intensive care unit (ICU) was shorter for the patients with fixation than for nonsurgical patients. All twelve patients returned to normal daily activities and work. In the reconstruction of an injured chest wall, the VATS with TENs fixation in multiple rib fractures is feasible. This method is also effective in decreasing the length of the surgical wound. Because the structure of the chest cage is protected, the period of mechanical ventilation is shortened and the length of stay in the hospital and the ICU can be reduced.

  4. Laryngeal Fracture after Blunt Cervical Trauma in Motorcycle Accident and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro Sousa, Pedro; Abreu Pereira, Diogo; Azevedo, Paula; Duarte, Delfim

    2017-01-01

    Laryngeal fracture is a rare traumatic injury, potentially fatal, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 30,000 patients admitted to severe trauma centers. Because of the rarity of this injury, physician may be not aware of its existence, leading to a late diagnosis of this entity. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman admitted to the emergency room after a motorcycle accident with cervical trauma. The patient presented with dysphonia, hemoptysis, cervical subcutaneous emphysema, and increasing respiratory distress that led to the intubation of the patient. CT-scan demonstrated displaced fracture of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage. The patient was submitted to tracheostomy and the fracture was surgically repaired. Tracheostomy was removed in third postoperative month. The patient presented a good recovery, reporting only hoarseness but without swallowing or breathing problems at 6-month follow-up. PMID:28261512

  5. Laryngeal Fracture after Blunt Cervical Trauma in Motorcycle Accident and Its Management.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Costa, Nuno; Carneiro Sousa, Pedro; Abreu Pereira, Diogo; Azevedo, Paula; Duarte, Delfim

    2017-01-01

    Laryngeal fracture is a rare traumatic injury, potentially fatal, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 30,000 patients admitted to severe trauma centers. Because of the rarity of this injury, physician may be not aware of its existence, leading to a late diagnosis of this entity. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman admitted to the emergency room after a motorcycle accident with cervical trauma. The patient presented with dysphonia, hemoptysis, cervical subcutaneous emphysema, and increasing respiratory distress that led to the intubation of the patient. CT-scan demonstrated displaced fracture of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage. The patient was submitted to tracheostomy and the fracture was surgically repaired. Tracheostomy was removed in third postoperative month. The patient presented a good recovery, reporting only hoarseness but without swallowing or breathing problems at 6-month follow-up.

  6. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Pelvic X-ray misses out on detecting sacral fractures in the elderly - Importance of CT imaging in blunt pelvic trauma.

    PubMed

    Schicho, Andreas; Schmidt, Stefan A; Seeber, Kevin; Olivier, Alain; Richter, Peter H; Gebhard, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Patients aged 75 years and older with blunt pelvic trauma are frequently seen in the ER. The standard diagnostic tool in these patients is the plain a.p.-radiograph of the pelvis. Especially lesions of the posterior pelvic ring are often missed due to e.g. bowel gas projection and enteric overlay. With a retrospective study covering these patients over a 3 year period in our level I trauma centre, we were able to evaluate the rate of missed injuries in the a.p.-radiograph whenever a corresponding CT scan was performed. Age, gender, and accompanying fractures of the pelvic ring were recorded. The intrinsic test characteristics and the performance in the population were calculated according to standard formulas. Thus, 233 consecutive patients with blunt pelvic trauma with both conventional radiographic examination and computed tomography (CT) were included. Thereof, 56 (23%) showed a sacral fracture in the CT scan. Of 233 pelvic X-ray-images taken, 227 showed no sacral fracture. 51 (21.7%) of these were false negative, yielding a sensitivity of just 10.5%. Average age of patients with sacral fractures was 85.1±6.1 years, with 88% being female. Sacral fractures were often accompanied by lesions of the anterior pelvic ring with pubic bone fractures in 75% of sacrum fracture cases. Second most concomitant fractures are found at the acetabulum (23.3%). Plain radiographic imaging is especially likely to miss out fractures of the posterior pelvic ring, which nowadays can be of therapeutic consequence. Besides the physicians experience in the ED, profound knowledge of insensitivity of plain radiographs in finding posterior pelvic ring lesions is crucial for a reliable diagnostic routine. Since the high mortality caused by prolonged immobilisation due to pelvic ring injuries, all fractures should be identified. We therefore provide a diagnostic algorithm for blunt pelvic trauma in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, K. Thanvir Mohamed; Raja, Dharmesh Kumar; Prakash, R.; Balaji, V. R.; Manikandan, D.; Ulaganathan, G.; Yoganandha, R.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture. PMID:27829776

  9. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Niazi, K Thanvir Mohamed; Raja, Dharmesh Kumar; Prakash, R; Balaji, V R; Manikandan, D; Ulaganathan, G; Yoganandha, R

    2016-10-01

    Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture.

  10. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-01-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractures. The two modalities were compared in terms of effectiveness based on simple radiographic readings and US examination results. We also investigated the factors that influenced the effectiveness of US examination. Rib fractures were detected on radiography in 69 patients (34.3%) but not in 132 patients. Rib fractures were diagnosed by using US examination in 160 patients (84.6%). Of the 132 patients who showed no rib fractures on radiography, 92 showed rib fractures on US. Among the 69 patients of rib fracture detected on radiography, 33 had additional rib fractures detected on US. Of the patients, 76 (37.8%) had identical radiographic and US results, and 125 (62.2%) had fractures detected on US that were previously undetected on radiography or additional fractures detected on US. Age, duration until US examination, and fracture location were not significant influencing factors. However, in the group without detected fractures on radiography, US showed a more significant effectiveness than in the group with detected fractures on radiography (P=0.003). US examination could detect unnoticed rib fractures on simple radiography. US examination is especially more effective in the group without detected fractures on radiography. More attention should be paid to patients with chest trauma who have no detected fractures on radiography. PMID:28119889

  11. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-12-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractures. The two modalities were compared in terms of effectiveness based on simple radiographic readings and US examination results. We also investigated the factors that influenced the effectiveness of US examination. Rib fractures were detected on radiography in 69 patients (34.3%) but not in 132 patients. Rib fractures were diagnosed by using US examination in 160 patients (84.6%). Of the 132 patients who showed no rib fractures on radiography, 92 showed rib fractures on US. Among the 69 patients of rib fracture detected on radiography, 33 had additional rib fractures detected on US. Of the patients, 76 (37.8%) had identical radiographic and US results, and 125 (62.2%) had fractures detected on US that were previously undetected on radiography or additional fractures detected on US. Age, duration until US examination, and fracture location were not significant influencing factors. However, in the group without detected fractures on radiography, US showed a more significant effectiveness than in the group with detected fractures on radiography (P=0.003). US examination could detect unnoticed rib fractures on simple radiography. US examination is especially more effective in the group without detected fractures on radiography. More attention should be paid to patients with chest trauma who have no detected fractures on radiography.

  12. Coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Fahad; Tai, Javed Majid; Bokhari, Saira

    2014-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma may result in cardiac injuries ranging from simple arrhythmias to fatal cardiac rupture. Coronary artery dissection culminating in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rare after blunt chest trauma. Here we report a case of a 37-year-old man who had an AMI secondary to coronary dissection resulting from blunt chest trauma after involvement in a physical fight. PMID:25246456

  13. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  15. Blunt laryngeal trauma secondary to sporting injuries.

    PubMed

    Mendis, D; Anderson, J A

    2017-08-01

    Laryngeal injury after blunt trauma is uncommon, but can cause catastrophic airway obstruction and significant morbidity in voice and airway function. This paper aims to discuss a case series of sports-related blunt laryngeal trauma patients and describe the results of a thorough literature review. Retrospective case-based analysis of laryngeal trauma referrals over six years to a tertiary laryngology centre. Twenty-eight patients were identified; 13 (46 per cent) sustained sports-related trauma. Most were young males, presenting with dysphonia, some with airway compromise (62 per cent). Nine patients were diagnosed with a laryngeal fracture. Four patients were managed conservatively and nine underwent surgery. Post-treatment, the majority of patients achieved good voice outcomes (83 per cent) and all had normal airway function. Sports-related neck trauma can cause significant injury to the laryngeal framework and endolaryngeal soft tissues, and most cases require surgical intervention. Clinical presentation may be subtle; a systematic approach along with a high index of suspicion is essential, as early diagnosis and treatment have been reported to improve airway and voice outcome.

  16. Blunt pancreatic trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Klin, Baruch; Abu-Kishk, Ibrahim; Jeroukhimov, Igor; Efrati, Yigal; Kozer, Eran; Broide, Efrat; Brachman, Yuri; Copel, Laurian; Scapa, Eitan; Eshel, Gideon; Lotan, Gad

    2011-07-01

    To report our experience with blunt pancreatic trauma in pediatric patients and evaluate several various management strategies. Ten children admitted over the last 10 years with pancreatic blunt trauma were included in the present series. The average time from injury to hospital admission was 2.4 days. All injuries resulted from accidents: bicycle handlebar injuries (5), being kicked by a horse (2), falls from a height (2), and injury sustained during closure of an electric gate (1). Additional systemic and abdominal injuries were recorded in 7 patients. The amylase levels at the time of patient admission were normal in 3 patients, mildly raised in 4 patients, and elevated in 3 patients. Abdominal computed tomography was performed in 10 patients, ultrasonography in 5, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in 4. Pancreatic injuries comprised 4 grade I, 3 grade II, and 3 grade III injuries. Grade I and II injuries were successfully managed by conservative treatment. The 3 children with grade III trauma and pancreatic ductal injury in the neck (1), body (1), and tail (1) of the gland were surgically treated, having an uneventful postoperative stay of 8-14 days and no complications during the 1-year follow-up period. The present study supports early ERCP as an essential part of the initial patient evaluation when pancreatic transection is highly suspected.

  17. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps.

  18. Blunt force cranial trauma in the Cambodian killing fields.

    PubMed

    Ta'ala, Sabrina C; Berg, Gregory E; Haden, Kathryn

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present a unique pattern of blunt force cranial trauma that was observed in 10 of a sample of 85 crania from a Cambodian skeletal collection comprised of Khmer Rouge victims. Initial examination of the trauma, which presents as substantial damage to the occipital with fractures extending to the cranial base, suggested the pattern was classifiable as a basilar or ring fracture. However, further investigation, including trauma analysis and historical research, revealed that this fracture type is distinctive from basilar and ring fractures. Historical data indicate that a particular execution method was the likely source of the trauma. Recognition of this trauma pattern is significant because it exemplifies the distinct fracture configuration resulting from an apparently categorical and methodical execution technique. Identification of this fracture type could potentially assist forensic investigators in the recognition of specific methods of murder or execution.

  19. Laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma in a civilian trauma service.

    PubMed

    Howes, N; Walker, T; Allorto, N L; Oosthuizen, G V; Clarke, D L

    2012-03-29

    tomography (CT) scan findings were a problem in 3 cases, in 1 case hypotension and a fractured pelvis on admission prompted laparotomy, and in the other cases clinical findings prompted laparotomy. All patients who underwent negative laparotomy survived. There were 10 pelvic fractures, 5 lower limb fractures, 2 spinal injuries, 4 femur fractures and 2 upper limb fractures. CT scans were done in 25 patients. In 20 patients the systolic blood pressure on presentation was <90 mmHg and in 41 the pulse rate was >110 beats/min. In 16 patients there was a base excess of <-4 on presentation. Conclusion. Laparotomy is needed in less than 10% of patients who sustain blunt abdominal trauma. Solid visceral injury requiring laparotomy presents with haemodynamic instability. Hollow visceral injury has a more insidious presentation and is associated with a delay in diagnosis. CT scan is the most widely used investigation in blunt abdominal trauma. It is both sensitive and specific for solid visceral injury, but its accuracy for the diagnosis of hollow visceral injury is less well defined. Clinical suspicion must be high, and hollow visceral injury needs to be actively excluded.

  20. Superman play and pediatric blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Machi, J M; Gyuro, J; Losek, J D

    1996-01-01

    Two pediatric patients with life-threatening intra-abdominal injuries associated with Superman play are presented. The cases illustrate the importance of knowing the mechanism of injury in the assessment of children with blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnostic value of liver enzymes and the controversies surrounding the radiographic assessment of pediatric blunt abdominal trauma are presented.

  1. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions.

  2. Thyroid Gland Hematoma After Blunt Neck Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Saylam, Baris; Çomçali, Bülent; Ozer, Mehmet Vasfi; Coskun, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Hemorrhage of a previously normal thyroid gland as a result of blunt trauma is a very rare condition. We report a case of blunt trauma that caused acute hemorrhage into the thyroid gland and presented with hoarseness. The diagnosis of thyroid gland hematoma was made with a combination of fiberoptic laryngoscopy, cervical computed tomography, and carotid angiography. The patient was treated conservatively, had a favorable course without further complications, and was discharged four days after admission. PMID:20046242

  3. Discrimination of falls and blows in blunt head trauma: systematic study of the hat brim line rule in relation to skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Célia; Racette, Stéphanie; Dionne, Charles-Antoine; Sauvageau, Anny

    2008-05-01

    In the discrimination of falls from blows in blunt head trauma, the hat brim line rule is one of the most often used criteria. The present study assesses the validity of the hat brim line rule for skull fractures and looks at other possible criteria. All autopsy cases were retrospectively analyzed on a 5-year period. Cases selected consisted of downstairs falls (n = 13), falls from one's own height (n = 23), and homicidal blows (n = 44). Results show that fractures above the hat brim line are more in favor of blows, while fractures in the hat brim line zone are more difficult to distinguish. The majority of fractures were located on the left side for homicidal blows and on the right side for falls. A higher average number of lacerations was revealed for homicidal blows. In conclusion, this study establishes three criteria in favor of blows: (i) localization of a wound above the hat brim line; (ii) left side lateralization; and (iii) a high number of lacerations.

  4. Isolated transverse process fractures of the subaxial cervical spine: a clinically insignificant injury or not?: a prospective, longitudinal analysis in a consecutive high-energy blunt trauma population.

    PubMed

    Schotanus, Maaike; van Middendorp, Joost J; Hosman, Allard J F

    2010-09-01

    Prospective single cohort study. To analyze the incidence, associated injuries, treatment outcomes and associated adverse events of isolated transverse process fractures (TPFs) of the subaxial cervical spine in a high-energy blunt trauma population. Currently, TPFs of the subaxial cervical spine are considered to be clinically insignificant. However, this hypothesis is based on clinical experience and has never been supported by research previously. During a 32-month period, routine computed tomography scans of the spine were obtained in high-energy blunt trauma patients. Patients with isolated TPFs of the subaxial cervical spine were prospectively identified. For each enrolled patient, gender, age, mechanism of injury, trauma severity, neurologic deficit, injury levels, affected structures, treatment, radiographic follow-up, functional outcome (Cybex goniometer, neck disability index), and patient satisfaction (10 point visual analog scale) were recorded. Of 865 enrolled patients, 21 patients (2.4%) had 25 isolated TPFs of the subaxial cervical spine. The seventh vertebra was involved predominantly (76%). The initial treatment regimen was unrestricted movement in all patients. No associated adverse events were observed. A follow-up of 13 to 39 months was available in 14 patients. Follow-up showed a stable and intact subaxial cervical spine in all patients' radiographs, a patient satisfaction of 9.3 (SD 1.48), a Cybex measured range of motion in the sagittal plane of 109 degrees (SD 12.5, 95-129), the frontal plane of 70 (SD 17.8, 37-100) and the transverse plane of 144 (SD 12.5, 116-164), and a mean neck disability index score of 3.93 (SD 8.24). The incidence of isolated TPFs of the subaxial cervical spine was 2.4%. Unrestricted movement resulted in satisfying functional, anatomic, and neurologic outcomes without associated adverse events. This study confirms that isolated TPFs of the subaxial cervical spine can be considered as clinically insignificant and do not

  5. Multidetector CT of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; Avery, Laura L; Asrani, Ashwin V; Novelline, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Thoracic injuries are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. These injuries account for approximately 25% of trauma-related deaths in the United States, second only to head injuries. Radiologic imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of blunt chest trauma. In addition to conventional radiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being used, since it can quickly and accurately help diagnose a wide variety of injuries in trauma patients. Furthermore, multiplanar and volumetric reformatted CT images provide improved visualization of injuries, increased understanding of trauma-related diseases, and enhanced communication between the radiologist and the referring clinician. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  6. The double jeopardy of blunt thoracoabdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Berg, Regan J; Okoye, Obi; Teixeira, Pedro G; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-06-01

    To examine the specific injuries, need for operative intervention, and clinical outcomes of patients with blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. Trauma registry and medical record review. Level I trauma center in Los Angeles, California. All patients with thoracoabdominal injuries from January 1996 to December 2010. Injuries, incidence and type of operative intervention, clinical outcomes, and risk factors for mortality. Blunt thoracoabdominal injury occurred in 1661 patients. Overall, 474 (28.5%) required laparotomy, 31 (1.9%) required thoracotomy (excluding resuscitative thoracotomy), and 1146 (69.0%) required no thoracic or abdominal operation. Overall incidence of intraabdominal solid organ injury was 59.7% and hollow viscus injury, 6.0%. Blunt cardiac trauma occurred in 6.3%; major thoracic vessel injury, in 4.6%; and diaphragmatic trauma, in 6.0%. The majority of solid organ injuries were managed nonoperatively (liver, 83.9%; spleen, 68.3%; and kidney, 91.2%). Excluding patients with severe head trauma, mortality ranged from 4.5% with nonoperative management to 18.1% and 66.7% in those requiring laparotomy and dual cavitary exploration, respectively. Age 55 years or older, Injury Severity Score of 25 or more, Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less, initial hypotension, massive transfusion, and liver, cardiac, or abdominal vascular trauma were all independent risk factors for mortality. Most patients with blunt thoracoabdominal trauma are managed nonoperatively. The need for non-resuscitative thoracotomy or combined thoracoabdominal operation is rare. The abdomen contains the overwhelming majority of injuries requiring operative intervention and should be the initial cavity of exploration in the patient requiring emergent surgery without directive radiologic data.

  7. Blunt pediatric laryngotracheal trauma: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kadish, H; Schunk, J; Woodward, G A

    1994-03-01

    Blunt laryngotracheal trauma can be a life-threatening event. Two cases of isolated blunt laryngotracheal trauma in pediatric patients are presented. One case involves a 12-year-old mate who suffered isolated tracheal trauma from a fall. He developed respiratory distress and required a tracheostomy. Intraoperatively he was noted to have a thyroid cartilage fracture. The other case involves a 14-year-old female who was kicked in the neck by a horse. After unsuccessful intubation attempts that completed a tracheal transection, she required an emergency cricothyrotomy and a subsequent tracheostomy. The diagnosis, differential diagnosis, associated injuries, and treatment options for blunt laryngeal trauma are reviewed.

  8. Factors Associated with ICU Admission following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Etteri, Massimiliano; Cantaluppi, Francesca; Pina, Paolo; Guanziroli, Massimo; Bianchi, AnnaMaria; Casazza, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background. Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 10% of all trauma patients presenting to emergency departments worldwide. When the injury is not as severe, deciding which blunt chest wall trauma patients require a higher level of clinical input can be difficult. We hypothesized that patient factors, injury patterns, analgesia, postural condition, and positive airway pressure influence outcomes. Methods. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized with at least 3 rib fractures (RF) and at least one pulmonary contusion and/or at least one pneumothorax lower than 2 cm. Results. A total of 140 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Ten patients (7.1%) were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) within the first 72 hours, because of deterioration of the clinical conditions and gas exchange with worsening of chest X-ray/thoracic ultrasound/chest computed tomography. On univariable analysis and multivariable analysis, obliged orthopnea (p = 0.0018) and the severity of trauma score (p < 0.0002) were associated with admission to ICU. Conclusions. Obliged orthopnea was an independent predictor of ICU admission among patients incurring non-life-threatening blunt chest wall trauma. The main therapeutic approach associated with improved outcome is the prevention of pulmonary infections due to reduced tidal volume, namely, upright postural condition and positive airway pressure. PMID:28044070

  9. Combined tracheoesophageal transection after blunt neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Umar Imran; Jones, James Mark

    2013-04-01

    Survival following tracheoesophageal transection is uncommon. Establishing a secure airway has the highest priority in trauma management. Understanding the mechanism of the incident can be a useful adjunct in predicting the likelihood and severity of specific anatomical patterns of injuries. We discuss published literature on combined tracheoesophageal injuries after blunt neck trauma and their outcome. A search of MEDLINE for papers published regarding tracheoesophageal injury was made. The literature search identified 14 such articles referring to a total of 27 patients. Age ranged from 3-73 years. The mechanism of injury was secondary to a rope/wire in 33%, metal bar in 4% of cases and unspecified in 63%. All of the patients were managed surgically. A number of tissues were used to protect the anastomosis including pleural and sternocleidomastoid muscle flaps. There were no reported mortalities. Patients with combined tracheoesophageal injury after blunt neck trauma require acute management of airway along with concomitant occult injuries.

  10. Suicide by blunt head trauma - Two cases with striking similarities.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejin; Lee, Bongwoo; Yoon, Connie

    2015-10-01

    There have been several forensic pathological studies on the distinction between falls from height and homicidal blows in blunt head trauma, but few studies have focused on suicidal blows. Self-inflicted blunt head trauma is usually a part of a complex suicide with more than one suicidal method applied. Actually, no reports on suicide indicate blunt head trauma to be the singular cause of death in recent publications. Cases with self-inflicted blunt trauma are often challenging for those involved in the investigation because they are confronted with findings that are also found in homicides. A refined guideline to differentiate suicidal blows from homicidal blows in blunt head trauma allows for a more accurate representation of the events surrounding death. This paper presents two cases of suicide by self-inflicted blunt head trauma in which blunt head trauma from repeatedly hitting the decedent's head with a hammer was considered to be the only cause of death.

  11. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  12. Surgical Treatment for Occipital Condyle Fracture, C1 Dislocation, and Cerebellar Contusion with Hemorrhage after Blunt Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Fukuda, Miyuki; Hoshimaru, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Occipital condyle fractures (OCFs) have been treated as rare traumatic injuries, but the number of reported OCFs has gradually increased because of the popularization of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The patient in this report presented with OCFs and C1 dislocation, along with traumatic cerebellar hemorrhage, which led to craniovertebral junction instability. This case was also an extremely rare clinical condition in which the patient presented with traumatic lower cranial nerve palsy secondary to OCFs. When the patient was transferred to our hospital, the occipital bone remained defective extensively due to surgical treatment of cerebellar hemorrhage. For this reason, concurrent cranioplasty was performed with resin in order to fix the occipital bone plate strongly. The resin-made occipital bone was used to secure a titanium plate and screws enabled us to perform posterior fusion of the craniovertebral junction. Although the patient wore a halo vest for 3 months after surgery, lower cranial nerve symptoms, including not only neck pain but also paralysis of the throat and larynx, improved postoperatively. No complications were detected during outpatient follow-up, which continued for 5 years postoperatively. PMID:27800203

  13. Extremity compartment syndrome following blunt trauma: a level I trauma center's 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Zuchelli, Daniel; Divaris, Nicholas; McCormack, Jane E; Huang, Emily C; Chaudhary, Neeta D; Vosswinkel, James A; Jawa, Randeep S

    2017-05-10

    Extremity compartment syndrome is a recognized complication of trauma. We evaluated its prevalence and outcomes at a suburban level 1 trauma center. The trauma registry was reviewed for all blunt trauma patients aged ≥18 years, admitted between 2010 and 2014. Chart review of patients with extremity compartment syndrome was performed. Of 6180 adult blunt trauma admissions, 83 patients developed 86 extremity compartment syndromes; two patients had compartment syndromes on multiple locations. Their (n = 83) median age was 44 years (interquartile range: 31.5-55.5). The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle/motor cycle accident (45.8%) followed by a fall (21.7%). The median injury severity score was 9 (interquartile range: 5-17); 65.1% had extremity abbreviate injury score ≥3. Notably, 15 compartment syndromes did not have an underlying fracture. Among patients with fractures, the most commonly injured bone was the tibia, with tibial plateau followed by tibial diaphyseal fractures being the most frequent locations. Fasciotomies were performed, in order of frequency, in the leg (n = 53), forearm (n = 15), thigh (n = 9), foot (n = 5), followed by multiple or other locations. Extremity compartment syndrome was a relatively uncommon finding. It occurred in all extremity locations, with or without an associated underlying fracture, and from a variety of mechanisms. Vigilance is warranted in evaluating the compartments of patients with extremity injuries following blunt trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Coronary Occlusion Secondary to Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lijoi, Antonio; Tallone, Mariano; Parodi, Enrico; Dottori, Vincenzo; Passerone, Gian Carlo; Della Rovere, Francesco; De Gaetano, Giuseppe

    1992-01-01

    There have been only 58 angiographically documented reports of transmural myocardial infarction due to closed-chest trauma. None of these cases has been treated by percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who developed an anterior-wall myocardial infarction secondary to blunt chest trauma suffered in an automobile accident. Angiographic study performed 2 months after the injury revealed an isolated total obstruction of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The patient was judged a good candidate for balloon angioplasty, but total reocclusion occurred within 24 hours of the procedure and a 2nd attempt did not restore patency. Surgical revascularization was performed a week later. A year after his injury, the patient remains asymptomatic and is back at work. Despite the failure of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in its 1st application to coronary artery repair after blunt chest trauma, we believe it to be the treatment of choice in young patients and in single-vessel disease. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1992;19:291-3) Images PMID:15227457

  15. Blunt chest trauma: is there a place for rib stabilization?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are a common and highly morbid finding in patients with blunt chest trauma. Over the past decade, a renewed interest in (and instrumentation for) rib fixation in this cohort has occurred. Stabilization of the chest wall in this setting, particularly when a flail segment is present, is associated with significant reductions in the rates of respiratory failure, pneumonia, ICU stay, and mortality. Thoracic surgeons should remain actively involved in this evolving area of our specialty to further optimize patient outcomes. PMID:28446987

  16. Blunt ocular trauma secondary to "war games".

    PubMed

    Mamalis, N; Monson, M C; Farnsworth, S T; White, G L

    1990-11-01

    "War games" are gaining popularity in the western United States. These recreational contests involve members of one team attempting to shoot their opponents with high-velocity dye or paint pellets fired from air guns. Unfortunately, serious eye injuries occur when participants do not use protective eye wear. We report a case of severe blunt ocular trauma resulting in a hyphema, choroidal rupture, and retinal and vitreal hemorrhage secondary to a paint pellet striking an unprotected eye. This injury resulted in a significant visual defect in this patient.

  17. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma. PMID:27175338

  18. Traumatic mesenteric cyst after blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Falidas, Evangelos; Mathioulakis, Stavros; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Pavlakis, Emmanouil; Anyfantakis, Georgios; Villias, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare abdominal tumors of unclear histologic origin, usually asymptomatic. Post-traumatic mesenteric cyst usually results as a consequence of a mesenteric lymphangitic rupture or a hematoma followed by absorption and cystic degeneration. The preoperative histological and radiological diagnosis is difficult. We present the case of a 45-year-old male patient with sizable, palpable abdominal tumor, the gradual swelling of which the patient himself combined with the blunt abdominal trauma he acquired from an opponent's knee in a football game 5 months ago. PMID:22096714

  19. Missed Gastric Injuries in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Naiem, Ahmed A.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Kendi, Badriya H.; Al-Qadhi, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Hollow viscus injuries of the digestive tract are an uncommon occurrence in blunt abdominal trauma. We report a 39-year-old male who was hit by a vehicle as a pedestrian and admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2015. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy which revealed injuries to the distal stomach, liver and descending colon. Postoperatively, the patient was febrile, tachycardic and hypotensive. Abdominal examination revealed distention and tenderness. The next day, a repeat laparotomy identified a gastric injury which had not been diagnosed during the initial laparotomy. Although the defect was repaired, the patient subsequently died as a result of multiorgan failure. Missed gastric injuries are rare and are associated with a grave prognosis, particularly for trauma patients. Delays in diagnosis, in addition to associated injuries, contribute to a high mortality rate. PMID:28003902

  20. Isolated proximal esophageal injury from blunt trauma: endoscopic stricture dilatation.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Benoit C; Ott, David J

    2003-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma can cause isolated esophageal injuries that may be difficult to recognize. A high index of suspicion is necessary for optimal identification and management of this condition. We report a case of blunt esophageal trauma resulting from a motor vehicle accident that was initially unrecognized until the patient developed a tight stricture of the cervical esophagus. This was successfully dilated endoscopically. Aerodigestive trauma resulting from neck injuries is reviewed with emphasis on the pathophysiology of esophageal trauma.

  1. Characterization of blunt chest trauma in a long-term porcine model of severe multiple trauma

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Simon, T. P.; Pfeifer, R.; Teuben, M.; Almahmoud, K.; Zhi, Q.; Santos, S. Aguiar; Wembers, C. Castelar; Leonhardt, S.; Heussen, N.; Störmann, P.; Auner, B.; Relja, B.; Marzi, I.; Haug, A. T.; van Griensven, M.; Kalbitz, M.; Huber-Lang, M.; Tolba, R.; Reiss, L. K.; Uhlig, S.; Marx, G.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chest trauma has a significant relevance on outcome after severe trauma. Clinically, impaired lung function typically occurs within 72 hours after trauma. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we aimed to establish an experimental long-term model to investigate physiological, morphologic and inflammatory changes, after severe trauma. Male pigs (sus scrofa) sustained severe trauma (including unilateral chest trauma, femur fracture, liver laceration and hemorrhagic shock). Additionally, non-injured animals served as sham controls. Chest trauma resulted in severe lung damage on both CT and histological analyses. Furthermore, severe inflammation with a systemic increase of IL-6 (p = 0.0305) and a local increase of IL-8 in BAL (p = 0.0009) was observed. The pO2/FiO2 ratio in trauma animals decreased over the observation period (p < 0.0001) but not in the sham group (p = 0.2967). Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) revealed differences between the traumatized and healthy lung (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, a clinically relevant, long-term model of blunt chest trauma with concomitant injuries has been developed. This reproducible model allows to examine local and systemic consequences of trauma and is valid for investigation of potential diagnostic or therapeutic options. In this context, EIT might represent a radiation-free method for bedside diagnostics. PMID:28000769

  2. Acute renal failure following blunt civilian trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Matas, A J; Payne, W D; Simmons, R L; Buselmeier, T J; Kjellstrand, C M

    1977-01-01

    Renal failure developed in 20 patients following blunt civilian trauma. Ten recovered normal renal function; 8 currently survive. Survivors and nonsurvivors did not differ in age, time from trauma to anuria, mean blood urea nitrogen or creatinine level prior to the first or to subsequent dialyses. However, there was an increased incidence of sepsis and liver failure in those who died. When outcome was related to site of injury, patients with closed head injury and/or intra-abdominal injury had a worse prognosis than those with thoracic or extremity injury only. Only 2 patients with perforated bowel survived; both had peritoneal dialysis combined with peritoneal lavage with antibiotic solutions. Mortality in patients with posttraumatic renal failure remains high; however, death is usually a result of associated complications rather than a result of the renal failure. Aggressive management of other complications of the trauma, especially sepsis or potential sepsis, is necessary. We recommend peritoneal dialysis combined with peritoneal antibiotic lavage where there is a potential for posttraumatic intra-abdominal sepsis associated with renal failure. PMID:843128

  3. Operative fixation of rib fractures after blunt trauma: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kasotakis, George; Hasenboehler, Erik A; Streib, Erik W; Patel, Nimitt; Patel, Mayur B; Alarcon, Louis; Bosarge, Patrick L; Love, Joseph; Haut, Elliott R; Como, John J

    2017-03-01

    Rib fractures are identified in 10% of all injury victims and are associated with significant morbidity (33%) and mortality (12%). Significant progress has been made in the management of rib fractures over the past few decades, including operative reduction and internal fixation (rib ORIF); however, the subset of patients that would benefit most from this procedure remains ill-defined. The aim of this project was to develop evidence-based recommendations. Population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) questions were formulated for patients with and without flail chest. Outcomes of interest included mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation (DMV), hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), incidence of pneumonia, need for tracheostomy, and pain control. A systematic review and meta-analysis of currently available evidence was performed per the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. Twenty-two studies were identified and analyzed. These included 986 patients with flail chest, of whom 334 underwent rib ORIF. Rib ORIF afforded lower mortality; shorter DMV, hospital LOS, and ICU LOS; and lower incidence of pneumonia and need for tracheostomy. The data quality was deemed very low, with only three prospective randomized trials available. Analyses for pain in patients with flail chest and all outcomes in patients with nonflail chest were not feasible due to inadequate data. In adult patients with flail chest, we conditionally recommend rib ORIF to decrease mortality; shorten DMV, hospital LOS, and ICU LOS; and decrease incidence of pneumonia and need for tracheostomy. We cannot offer a recommendation for pain control, or any of the outcomes in patients with nonflail chest with currently available data. Systematic review/meta-analysis, level III.

  4. Combined Gastric and Duodenal Perforation Through Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Adarshpal; Singla, Archan Lal; Kumar, Ashwani; Yadav, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Blunt abdominal traumas are uncommonly encountered despite their high prevalence, and injuries to the organ like duodenum are relatively uncommon (occurring in only 3%-5% of abdominal injuries) because of its retroperitoneal location. Duodenal injury combined with gastric perforation from a single abdominal trauma impact is rarely heard. The aim of this case report is to present a rare case of blunt abdominal trauma with combined gastric and duodenal injuries. PMID:25738037

  5. Duodenal perforation as result of blunt abdominal trauma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hartholt, Klaas Albert; Dekker, Jan Willem T

    2015-12-23

    Blunt abdominal trauma may cause severe intra-abdominal injuries, while clinical findings could be mild or absent directly after the trauma. The absence of clinical findings could mislead physicians into underestimating the severity of the injury at the primary survey, and inevitably leads to a delay in the diagnosis. The Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score may help to identify children who are at a high risk for intra-abdominal injuries in an early stage and requires additional tests directly. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is presented. A delay in diagnosis may lead to an increased morbidity and mortality rate. A low admission threshold for children with abdominal pain after a blunt trauma is recommended.

  6. Surviving Right Atrial Rupture From Blunt Thoracic Trauma After Pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Sepehr Seyed; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Nova, George; Marshman, David

    2016-02-01

    Right atrial rupture secondary to blunt trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case report of blunt chest trauma and right atrial rupture in a patient with a background of pericardiectomy that were successfully managed surgically. Right atrial rupture must be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with blunt chest trauma. In patients with previous pericardiectomy, this injury may manifest with massive hemothorax, and insertion of a chest drain should be performed with extreme caution. In our experience, urgent exploratory thoracotomy and repair of the defect are the mainstays of acute management.

  7. Arterial Injuries Associated with Blunt Fractures in the Lower Extremity.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jamie J; Tavoosi, Saharnaz; Zarzaur, Ben L; Brewer, Brian L; Rozycki, Grace S; Feliciano, David V

    2016-09-01

    Problems related to the combination of an arterial injury and a blunt fracture in the lower extremity are well known-delayed diagnosis, damaged soft tissue, and high amputation rate. The actual incidence of this injury pattern is, however, unknown. The purposes of this study were to determine the current incidence of named arterial injuries in patients with blunt fractures in the lower extremities and assess potential associated risk factors. This was a 7-year (2007-2013) retrospective review of patients ≥18 years with blunt lower extremity fractures at a Level I trauma center. Fracture location and concomitant arterial injury were determined and patients stratified by age, gender, and injury velocity. Low injury velocity was defined as falls or assaults, whereas an injury secondary to a motorized vehicle was defined as high velocity. A total of 4413 patients (mean age 52.2 years, 54.3% male, mean Injury Severity Score 13.1) were identified. Forty-six patients (1.04%) had arterial injuries (20.4% common femoral, 8.2% superficial femoral, 44.9% popliteal, and 26.5% shank). After stratifying by age and injury velocity, younger age was associated with a significantly higher rate of vascular injury. For high-velocity injuries, there was no difference based on age. In conclusion, the prevalence of arterial injury after blunt lower extremity fractures is 1.04 per cent in our study. A significant paradoxical relationship exists between age and associated arterial injuries in patients with low-velocity injuries. If these data are confirmed in future studies, a low index of suspicion in patients >55 years after falls is appropriate.

  8. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  9. Trauma attenuating backing improves protection against behind armor blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Sondén, Anders; Rocksén, David; Riddez, Louis; Davidsson, Johan; Persson, Jonas K; Gryth, Dan; Bursell, Jenny; Arborelius, Ulf P

    2009-12-01

    Body armor is used by military personnel, police officers, and security guards to protect them from fatal gunshot injuries to the thorax. The protection against high-velocity weapons may, however, be insufficient. Complementary trauma attenuating backings (TAB) have been suggested to prevent morbidity and mortality in high-velocity weapon trauma. Twenty-four Swedish landrace pigs, protected by a ceramid/aramid body armor without (n = 12) or with TAB (n = 12) were shot with a standard 7.62-mm assault rifle. Morphologic injuries, cardiorespiratory, and electroencephalogram changes as well as physical parameters were registered. The bullet impact caused a reproducible behind armor blunt trauma (BABT) in both the groups. The TAB significantly decreased size of the lung contusion and prevented hemoptysis. The postimpact apnea, desaturation, hypotension, and rise in pulmonary artery pressure were significantly attenuated in the TAB group. Moreover, TAB reduced transient peak pressures in thorax by 91%. Our results indicate that ordinary body armor should be complemented by a TAB to prevent thoracic injuries when the threat is high-velocity weapons.

  10. Airway management in laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debnath; Agarwal, Rita; Bajaj, Lalit; Teng, Sarena N; Prager, Jeremy D

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma are extremely rare, but can be potentially catastrophic. Early diagnosis and skillful airway management is critical in avoiding significant morbidity and mortality associated with these cases. We present a case of a patient who suffered a complete tracheal transection and cervical spine fracture following a clothesline injury to the anterior neck. A review of the mechanisms of injury, clinical presentation, initial airway management, and anesthetic considerations in laryngotracheal injuries from blunt neck trauma in children are presented.

  11. Predicting extubation failure in blunt trauma patients with pulmonary contusion.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John F; Davis, James W; Cagle, Kathleen M; Kaups, Krista L

    2013-08-01

    The need for reintubation after weaning from mechanical ventilation (extubation failure) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In blunt trauma patients with pulmonary contusion, factors predicting successful weaning have not been reliably defined. The purpose of this study was to identify criteria predicting successful extubation in these patients. Retrospective review during a 10-year period at a Level 1 trauma center was performed. A total of 173 extubations in 163 blunt trauma patients with pulmonary contusion requiring mechanical ventilation. Exclusion criteria include Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 9T before extubation, successful use of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation after extubation, quadriplegia, and preextubation FIO2 of greater than 0.5. Data included age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), ventilator days, as well as GCS score, FIO2, the ratio of arterial oxygen tension to FIO2 (P/F ratio), and alveolar-arterial oxygen (A-a) difference at the time of extubation. Failure was defined as reintubation within 72 hours (excluding stridor or acute decline in GCS score). Mann-Whitney U-test, χ2 analysis, and logistic regression analysis determined variables associated with extubation failure. Odds ratios were used to compare P/F and A-a values associated with failed extubation. A total of 147 extubations (85%) were successful; 26 required reintubation. Patients did not differ by ISS, chest Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, presence of sternal or rib fractures, and admission pneumothorax or hemothorax. Increased age, A-a difference (≥ 120 mm Hg), and decreased P/F (<280) were associated with reintubation (p < 0.0001). By logistic regression analysis, P/F and A-a were independent variables for failed extubation; both remained independent risk factors when adjusted for age, ventilator days, GCS score, and preextubation FIO2. Using receiver operating characteristic curve inflection points for both P/F and A-a difference (area

  12. Current experience with computed tomographic cystography and blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Deck, A J; Shaves, S; Talner, L; Porter, J R

    2001-12-01

    We present our experience with computed tomographic (CT) cystography for the diagnosis of bladder rupture in patients with blunt abdominal and pelvic trauma and compare the results of CT cystography to operative exploration. We identified all blunt trauma patients diagnosed with bladder rupture from January 1992 to September 1998. We also reviewed the radiology computerized information system (RIS) for all CT cystograms performed for the evaluation of blunt trauma during the same time period. The medical records and pertinent radiographs of the patients with bladder rupture who underwent CT cystography as part of their admission evaluation were reviewed. Operative findings were compared to radiographic findings. Altogether, 316 patients had CT cystograms as part of an initial evaluation for blunt trauma. Of these patients, 44 had an ultimate diagnosis of bladder rupture; 42 patients had CT cystograms indicating bladder rupture. A total of 28 patients underwent formal bladder exploration; 23 (82%) had operative findings that exactly (i.e., presence and type of rupture) matched the CT cystogram interpretation. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CT cystography for detection of bladder rupture were 95% and 100%, respectively. For intraperitoneal rupture, the sensitivity and specificity were 78% and 99%, respectively. CT cystography provides an expedient evaluation for bladder rupture caused by blunt trauma and has an accuracy comparable to that reported for plain film cystography. We recommend CT cystography over plain film cystography for patients undergoing CT evaluation for other blunt trauma-related injuries.

  13. Gross and histologic evidence of sharp and blunt trauma in North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) killed by vessels.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Barco, Susan G; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Knowlton, Amy R; McLellan, William A; Rotstein, David S; Moore, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    Vessel-whale collision events represented the ultimate cause of death for 21 (52.5%) of the 40 North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) necropsied between 1970 and December 2006. Injuries seen in vessel-struck whales fall into two distinct categories: 1) sharp trauma, often resulting from contact with the propeller, and 2) blunt trauma, presumably resulting from contact with a vessel's hull. This study analyzes four trauma cases that resulted from vessel-whale collisions, which together provide a framework for a more critical understanding of lethal blunt and sharp trauma resulting from vessel collisions with right whales. In case no. 1, contact with a propeller resulted in three deep lacerations. The animal survived acute trauma only to succumb nearly 14 years later when the lesions reopened and became infected. In case no. 2, anecdotal reports linked the laceration of large arteries of the peduncle and histologic evidence of perimortem trauma at a bone fracture site to vessel-whale collision trauma. Case no. 3 had a laceration of the oral rete and a fracture of the rostrum. Both of the areas displayed histologic evidence of perimortem blunt trauma. Finally, in case no. 4, an antemortem mandibular fracture, two additional skull fractures, and widespread hemorrhage were consistent with severe blunt trauma. Evidence from each case, including the timing of trauma relative to the time of death and identifying characteristics of both trauma types, are presented. Before this study, no detailed comparative analysis of trauma pathology that resulted from lethal interactions between vessels and right whales had been conducted. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed gross and histologic examination in determining the significance and timing of traumatic events. This work represents a new paradigm for the differential diagnosis of lethal sharp and blunt trauma in right whales hit by ships and will enhance the present understanding of the impact of

  14. Partial tearing of the interventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, Nilson; Ramírez Gil, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac trauma after blunt chest trauma is a rare complication of patients arriving alive to an emergency department. We here present the case of patient who had a partial rupture of the interventricular septum after having had a blunt chest trauma in a traffic accident. As there was no ventricular septal defect, conservative management was deemed appropriate. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was free of right heart failure symptoms suggestive of the septal defect progression. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Iaselli, Francesco; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Firetto, Cristina; D'Elia, Domenico; Squitieri, Nevada Cioffi; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The bowel and the mesentery represent the third most frequently involved structures in blunt abdominal trauma after the liver and the spleen. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal and/or mesenteric injury from blunt abdominal trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. Multi-detector computed tomography, thanks to its high spatial, time and contrast resolutions, allows a prompt identification and proper classification of such conditions. The radiologist, in fact, is asked not only to identify the signs of trauma but also to provide an indication of their clinical significance, suggesting the chance of conservative treatment in the cases of mild and moderate, non-complicated or self-limiting injuries and focusing on life-threatening conditions which may benefit from immediate surgical or interventional procedures. Specific and non-specific CT signs of bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed in this paper.

  16. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Hong, Hye-Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Ha, Hong Il; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. Results The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Conclusion Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity. PMID:23901318

  17. Obesity and increased mortality in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Choban, P S; Weireter, L J; Maynes, C

    1991-09-01

    To determine the effect of admission body weight on blunt trauma victims, a chart review of all patients greater than 12 years of age admitted to Sentara Norfolk General Hospital between January 1 and July 31, 1987 was undertaken. The charts of 351 patients were reviewed; 184 records contained admission height and weight. These 184 patients made up the study group and age, gender, injuries, Injury Severity Score (ISS), ventilator days (VD), complications, length of stay (LOS), and outcome were noted. Body Mass Index (BMI) (weight (kg)/(height(m))2, was calculated for each patient. The average ISS was 21.87 (range, 1-66) and the average BMI was 25.15 kg/m2 (range, 16-46 kg/m2). The overall mortality for the population was 9%. The population was grouped according to BMI: average (less than 27 kg/m2), overweight (27-31 kg/m2), and severely overweight (greater than 31 kg/m2). The mortality of 5.0% and 8.0% in the average and overweight groups was not different. The severely overweight group had a higher mortality at 42.1% compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.0001). The groups did not differ in age, ISS, LOS, nor VD. Age, BMI, and ISS were subjected to regression analysis. By this method BMI and ISS were independent determinants of outcome (p less than 0.0001). There was an increase in complications, mainly pulmonary problems, in the SO group (p less than 0.05). The three groups were subdivided into survivors and nonsurvivors. The nonsurvivors had a longer average LOS at 26.6 days compared with nonsurvivors in the overweight (5.0 days) or severely overweight (8.62 days) groups (p less than 0.007). The severely group was characterized by a rapid deterioration and demise that was unresponsive to intervention. ISS did not differ among nonsuvivors. Among survivors the severely overweight group had a lower ISS, 9.73. This was different from the overweight group (21.57) and from the average group (20.21) (p less than 0.04).

  18. Isolated gallbladder injury in a case of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Birn, Jeffrey; Jung, Melissa; Dearing, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of blunt injury to the gallbladder may constitute a significant challenge to the diagnostician. There is often a delay in presentation with non-specific clinical symptoms. In the absence of reliable clinical symptoms, diagnostic imaging becomes an invaluable tool in the rapid identification of gallbladder injury. We present a case of isolated gallbladder injury following blunt abdominal trauma which was diagnosed by computed tomography and subsequently confirmed by cholecystectomy.

  19. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  20. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  1. Blunt Criterion trauma model for head and chest injury risk assessment of cal. 380 R and cal. 22 long blank cartridge actuated gundog retrieval devices.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Bockholdt, Britta; Peters, Dieter; Lange, Joern; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter

    2011-05-20

    Blunt ballistic impact trauma is a current research topic due to the widespread use of kinetic energy munitions in law enforcement. In the civilian setting, an automatic dummy launcher has recently been identified as source of blunt impact trauma. However, there is no data on the injury risk of conventional dummy launchers. It is the aim of this investigation to predict potential impact injury to the human head and chest on the basis of the Blunt Criterion which is an energy based blunt trauma model to assess vulnerability to blunt weapons, projectile impacts, and behind-armor-exposures. Based on experimentally investigated kinetic parameters, the injury risk of two commercially available gundog retrieval devices (Waidwerk Telebock, Germany; Turner Richards, United Kingdom) was assessed using the Blunt Criterion trauma model for blunt ballistic impact trauma to the head and chest. Assessing chest impact, the Blunt Criterion values for both shooting devices were higher than the critical Blunt Criterion value of 0.37, which represents a 50% risk of sustaining a thoracic skeletal injury of AIS 2 (moderate injury) or AIS 3 (serious injury). The maximum Blunt Criterion value (1.106) was higher than the Blunt Criterion value corresponding to AIS 4 (severe injury). With regard to the impact injury risk to the head, both devices surpass by far the critical Blunt Criterion value of 1.61, which represents a 50% risk of skull fracture. Highest Blunt Criterion values were measured for the Turner Richards Launcher (2.884) corresponding to a risk of skull fracture of higher than 80%. Even though the classification as non-guns by legal authorities might implicate harmlessness, the Blunt Criterion trauma model illustrates the hazardous potential of these shooting devices. The Blunt Criterion trauma model links the laboratory findings to the impact injury patterns of the head and chest that might be expected. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical review: initial management of blunt pelvic trauma patients with haemodynamic instability.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, Thomas; Chhor, Vibol; Cheisson, Gaëlle; Martin, Laurent; Bessoud, Bertrand; Ozanne, Augustin; Duranteau, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic trauma can lead to severe, uncontrollable haemorrhage and death related to prolonged shock and multiple organ failure. Massive retroperitoneal haematoma should be assumed to be present in cases of post-traumatic haemodynamic instability associated with pelvic fracture in the absence of extrapelvic haemorrhagic lesions. This review describes the pathophysiology of retroperitoneal haematoma in trauma patient with blunt pelvic fracture, considering the roles of venous and arterial bleeding. Efficacy and safety of haemostatic procedures are also discussed, and particular attention is given to the efficacy of pelvic angiographic embolization and external pelvic fixation. A decision making algorithm is proposed for the treatment of trauma patients with pelvic fracture that takes haemodynamic status and associated lesions into account.

  3. Multivariate analysis of patients with blunt trauma and possible factors affecting mortality.

    PubMed

    Özpek, Adnan; Yücel, Metin; Atak, İbrahim; Baş, Gürhan; Alimoğlu, Orhan

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the signs and prognosis of the patients hospitalized due to blunt trauma injuries and identify possible factors that affect mortality. Between January 2009 and January 2013, a total of 237 patients admitted with blunt trauma injury were retrospectively analyzed. The age and gender of the patients, type of the trauma, injury site, Injury Severity Scores (ISS), Revised Trauma Scores (RTS), Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) results, hemodynamic status, need for transfusion, treatment modalities, treatment outcomes, and mortality rates were recorded. Of the patients, 187 (78.9%) were male, 50 (21.1%) were female and mean age was 36.9±16.9 years (3-81 years). Of the patients, 131 (55.3%) suffered thoracic injuries, 110 (46.6%) abdominal injuries, 96 (40.5%) pelvic and limb injuries, 34 (14.3%) head and neck injuries, 26 (11%) maxillofacial injuries, and 24 (10.1%) skin and subcutaneous tissue injuries. Forty-five patients (19%), including 33 patients with hemodynamic instability and 12 patients with peritonitis-related signs, were operated on. Mortality was seen in 26 patients (11%), including 10 (38.5%) with unstable pelvic fractures. Mortality rates; in patients with packing performed was 75%, in patients without any need for packing was 33.3%, in patients with hemodynamic instablity was 60.6%, in hemodynamically stable patients was 8.3% and in FAST (+) patients was 20.5%, in FAST(-) patients was 3.4% (p<0.05). Blunt trauma often presents with multi-trauma involving more than one anatomical structure of the body. Thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic injuries usually accompany blunt trauma. The majority of abdominal solid organ injuries are followed non-operatively. Our study results show that ISS, RTS, FAST result, hemodynamic unstability, packing requirment, and need for transfusion are statistically invaluable in identifying the mortality risk.

  4. Prognostic factors in blunt chest trauma. Analysis of 652 cases.

    PubMed

    Svennevig, J L; Bugge-Asperheim, B; Geiran, O R; Vaage, J; Pillgram-Larsen, J; Fjeld, N B; Birkeland, S

    1986-01-01

    All records of 652 patients treated for blunt chest trauma at Ullevål Hospital, Surgical Department 3, during the period 1973-1981 were analyzed for factors predictive of prognosis. Mortality for the whole group was 7.7%. Age, blood pressure on admission, the number of fractured ribs, the need for blood transfusions and the need for artificial ventilation were the most important predictors of prognosis. Mortality increased significantly when at least two extrathoracic injuries were present (22.6%). Intrathoracic injuries did not increase mortality in cases of isolated thoracic injuries. Combined thoraco-abdominal injuries carried a high mortality (25%), especially when the injury had resulted in rupture of the diaphragm (57.1%). There were no sex-related differences. The majority of the patients could be handled adequately with oxygen support, chest drainage, physiotherapy and pain relief. The incidence of bronchial infection, septicaemia and hypercoagulability was significantly higher for patients on ventilators than for patients breathing spontaneously. Mortality increased when septicaemia or bronchial infection was present (30.8 and 21.9%, respectively). The injury severity score (ISS) for the 50 patients who died in the hospital was similar to that of some other reports.

  5. Peritoneal lavage and other diagnostic procedures in blunt abdominal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Burney, R.E.

    1986-08-01

    Diagnostic procedures such as peritoneal lavage, computed tomography, emergency angiography, nuclear scintigraphy, and contrast studies of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts can assist in the identification, quantification, and localization of injury after blunt abdominal trauma. Use of these procedures should be determined by careful clinically assessment as part of an aggressive approach to the diagnosis of the injured patient. 22 references.

  6. Evaluating an Ultrasound Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma RTO-MP-HFM-109 P6 - 7 Table 1: Patients undergoing laparotomy U S US results C T CT result...11] Henneman PL, Marx JA, Moore EE. 1990. Diagnostic

  7. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  8. Development of a Murine Model of Blunt Hepatic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A; Hwang, Haejin; Hampel, Joseph A; Yu, Bi; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of blunt hepatic trauma in humans, there are few rodent models of blunt trauma that can be used to study the associated inflammatory responses. We present a mouse model of blunt hepatic trauma that was created by using a cortical contusion device. Male mice were anesthetized with ketamine–xylazine–buprenorphine and placed in left lateral recumbency. A position of 2 mm ventral to the posterior axillary line and 5 mm caudal to the costal margin on the right side was targeted for impact. An impact velocity of 6 m/s and a piston depth of 12 mm produced a consistent pattern of hepatic injury with low mortality. All mice that recovered from anesthesia survived without complication for the length of the study. Mice were euthanized at various time points (n = 5 per group) until 7 d after injury for gross examination and collection of blood and peritoneal lavage fluids. Some mice were reanesthetized for serial monitoring of hepatic lesions via MRI. At 2 h after trauma, mice consistently displayed laceration, hematoma, and discoloration of the right lateral and caudate liver lobes, with intraabdominal hemorrhage but no other gross injuries. Blood and peritoneal lavage fluid were collected from all mice for cytokine analysis. At 2 h after trauma, there were significant increases in plasma IL10 as well as peritoneal lavage fluid IL6 and CXCL1/KC; however, these levels decreased within 24 h. At 7 d after trauma, the mice had regained body weight, and the hepatic lesions, which initially had increased in size during the first 48 h, had returned to their original size. In summary, this technique produced a reliable, low mortality, murine model that recreates features of blunt abdominal liver injury in human subjects with similar acute inflammatory response. PMID:24210016

  9. Indications for angiography in blunt thoracic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Barcia, T.C.; Livoni, J.P.

    1983-04-01

    The clinical charts and radiographs of 113 patients who underwent aortography for suspected blunt injury to the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels were reviewed to identify the most useful indications for angiography. Eight previously described clinical criteria and 14 previously described radiographic criteria were evaluated in each of these patients, 27 of whom had either an aortic or brachiocephalic injury. Contrary to previous reports, our data indicate that no single clinical or radiographic sign is highly specific for vascular injury. An abnormal aortic outline and mediastinal widening remain the most sensitive criteria, although these were also present in a large number of patients without vascular injury. Displaced paraspinous lines and nasogastric tubes are also useful signs.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. Objectives: To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Results: Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Conclusions: Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid. PMID:25763079

  11. Vascular injuries after blunt chest trauma: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, James V; Byrne, Christopher; Scalea, Thomas M; Griffith, Bartley P; Neschis, David G

    2009-01-01

    Background Although relatively rare, blunt injury to thoracic great vessels is the second most common cause of trauma related death after head injury. Over the last twenty years, the paradigm for management of these devastating injuries has changed drastically. The goal of this review is to update the reader on current concepts of diagnosis and management of blunt thoracic vascular trauma. Methods A review of the medical literature was performed to obtain articles pertaining to both blunt injuries of the thoracic aorta and of the non-aortic great vessels in the chest. Articles were chosen based on authors' preference and clinical expertise. Discussion Blunt thoracic vascular injury remains highly lethal, with most victims dying prior to reaching a hospital. Those arriving in extremis require immediate intervention, which may include treatment of other associated life threatening injuries. More stable injuries can often be medically temporized in order to optimize definitive management. Endovascular techniques are being employed with increasing frequency and can often significantly simplify management in otherwise very complex patient scenarios. PMID:19751511

  12. Aortic valve perforation secondary to blunt force trauma.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sachin; Wilson, Gibbs; Suarez, Keith; Chiles, Christopher D

    2017-07-01

    Blunt chest trauma has seldom been reported as a cause of rupture of an aortic valve cusp. We report the case of a 63-year-old man who had a motor vehicle collision resulting in transection of the descending thoracic aorta, splenic pseudoaneurysm, and rupture of an aortic valve cusp causing severe aortic regurgitation. Despite replacement of the aortic valve, he died of multiorgan failure.

  13. Aortic valve perforation secondary to blunt force trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gibbs; Suarez, Keith; Chiles, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma has seldom been reported as a cause of rupture of an aortic valve cusp. We report the case of a 63-year-old man who had a motor vehicle collision resulting in transection of the descending thoracic aorta, splenic pseudoaneurysm, and rupture of an aortic valve cusp causing severe aortic regurgitation. Despite replacement of the aortic valve, he died of multiorgan failure. PMID:28670065

  14. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  15. Mothers’ Unresolved Trauma Blunts Amygdala Response to Infant Distress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sohye; Fonagy, Peter; Allen, Jon; Strathearn, Lane

    2014-01-01

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neurobiological study documenting that mothers’ attachment-related trauma, when unresolved, undermines her optimal brain response to her infant’s distress. We examined the amygdala blood oxygenation level-dependent response in 42 first-time mothers as they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, viewing happy and sad face images of their own infant, along with those of a matched unknown infant. Whereas mothers with no trauma demonstrated greater amygdala responses to the sad faces of their own infant as compared to their happy faces, mothers who were classified as having unresolved trauma in the Adult Attachment Interview (Dynamic Maturational Model) displayed blunted amygdala responses when cued by their own infants’ sadness as compared to happiness. Unknown infant faces did not elicit differential amygdala responses between the mother groups. The blunting of the amygdala response in traumatized mothers is discussed as a neural indication of mothers’ possible disengagement from infant distress, which may be part of a process linking maternal unresolved trauma and disrupted maternal caregiving. PMID:24635646

  16. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohye; Fonagy, Peter; Allen, Jon; Strathearn, Lane

    2014-01-01

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neurobiological study documenting that mothers' attachment-related trauma, when unresolved, undermines her optimal brain response to her infant's distress. We examined the amygdala blood oxygenation level-dependent response in 42 first-time mothers as they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, viewing happy- and sad-face images of their own infant, along with those of a matched unknown infant. Whereas mothers with no trauma demonstrated greater amygdala responses to the sad faces of their own infant as compared to their happy faces, mothers who were classified as having unresolved trauma in the Adult Attachment Interview (Dynamic Maturational Model) displayed blunted amygdala responses when cued by their own infants' sadness as compared to happiness. Unknown infant faces did not elicit differential amygdala responses between the mother groups. The blunting of the amygdala response in traumatized mothers is discussed as a neural indication of mothers' possible disengagement from infant distress, which may be part of a process linking maternal unresolved trauma and disrupted maternal caregiving.

  17. Hepatic Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Delayed Presentation after a Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Toktas, Osman; Bora, Aydın; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition that is life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated rapidly. We present a case of a spontaneously ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm that occurred after a blunt trauma, and provide a review of the current literature on this topic. This case study demonstrates a spontaneously ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm which emerged following a blunt trauma and it also presents current literature studies on the topic. Case Report A man at the age of 34 years with blunt trauma dating back to 1.5 month was admitted to the emergency department of a hospital with hematemesis and epigastric tenderness. He also had a duodenal ulcer, blood in the gastric lumen and a large pseudoaneurysm that developed from the left hepatic artery. Soon after the diagnosis, the patient worsened and underwent distal gastrectomy and cholecystectomy that included removing the bleeding aneurysm. Conclusions Ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm stands as a deadly condition which has to be diagnosed and managed as soon as possible. Physicians need to take aneurysms of abdominal arteries into consideration after routine diagnostic practises as long as the cause of gastrointestinal haemorrhage is unidentified. PMID:26171087

  18. Leukocytosis as a Predictor of Severe Injury in Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Claudia A.; Purcell, Thomas B.; Mejia, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine if the white blood cell count can predict severity of injury in blunt trauma victims. Methods This was a retrospective study comparing two groups of blunt trauma victims by severity of injury, one with significant injury and one without significant injury, and comparing their initial WBC in the emergency department (ED). We also examined if WBC correlates with degree of injury using Injury Severity Score (ISS) in both groups combined. Further, we examined the WBC as a predictor of serious injury. Results Our study showed a difference in mean WBC between the two groups that was statistically significant (p<0.001). A positive relationship between ISS and WBC was found, although the association was weak (correlation coefficient = 0.369). While the WBC had moderate discriminatory capability for serious injury, it could not, in isolation, reliably rule in or out serious injury. Nevertheless, this study supports using WBC on presentation to the ED as an adjunct for making disposition decisions. Conclusion A significant elevation in WBC in a blunt trauma patient, even with minimal initial signs of severe injury, should heighten suspicion for occult injury. PMID:19561712

  19. Thyroid storm induced by blunt thyroid gland trauma.

    PubMed

    Delikoukos, Stylianos; Mantzos, Fotios

    2007-12-01

    Isolated thyroid gland injury due to blunt neck trauma is uncommon and rarely complicated by thyroid storm in patients without known hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to report our experience on blunt thyroid gland injury followed by massive gland hemorrhage, acute airway obstruction, and symptoms of thyroid storm. Among 231 patients with neck trauma, four patients appeared with isolated thyroid gland injury. In two of them, the diagnosis of simultaneous thyrotoxic crisis was made on the basis of clinical findings and confirmed on emergency laboratory tests. The diagnosis of thyroid gland injury was supposed by the history and physical examination and established after neck exploration. Therapy was directed at stabilizing the patients by correcting the hyperthyroid state, followed by operative treatment. Left lobectomy and total thyroidectomy were performed and, along with postoperative medical measures, led to uneventful recovery. This study demonstrates that thyroid gland injury due to blunt neck trauma, although uncommon, may result in potentially life-threatening thyroid storm due to rupture of acini and liberation of thyroid hormones into the bloodstream. This may occur in patients without known hyperthyroidism.

  20. Isolated renal pelvis rupture secondary to blunt trauma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Taken, Kerem; Oncü, Mehmet Reşit; Ergün, Müslüm; Eryılmaz, Recep; Güneş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated rupture of the renal pelvis is a very rare condition and thus causes delays in the diagnosis of the rupture. It is most commonly seen in the setting of obstructive ureteric calculus. Other rare causes include neoplasms, trauma, and iatrogenic procedures. Diagnosis is usually established on computed tomography (CT) which demonstrates the extravasation of the contrast in the peripelvic, perinephric, or retroperitoneal collections. Presentation of case A 27-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital due to multiple traumas associated with motor vehicle accidents. The patient had clear urine output. A large pelvic rupture was detected by abdominal contrast-enhanced CT and after consulting with other departments, emergency repair of the renal pelvis was performed and a ureteral stent was implanted. Discussion Only a few isolated cases of pelvis rupture with resultant extravasation have been reported in the literature. The treatment of pelvic rupture should be preceded by the removal of underlying causes, followed by conservative management. However, surgical intervention should be warranted in the emergency cases presenting with the symptoms that may impede the decision-making process and in the cases whose diagnosis cannot be clarified by radiological techniques. Conclusion Renal pelvic injury must be considered in the differential diagnosis of blunt trauma. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some cases. We present a case who underwent surgery due to isolated renal pelvis rupture caused by blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:25734319

  1. Incidence and pattern of direct blunt neurovascular injury associated with trauma to the skull base.

    PubMed

    Feiz-Erfan, Iman; Horn, Eric M; Theodore, Nicholas; Zabramski, Joseph M; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D; Lekovic, Gregory P; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Partovi, Shahram; Goslar, Pamela W; Petersen, Scott R

    2007-08-01

    Skull base fractures are often associated with potentially devastating injuries to major neural arteries in the head and neck, but the incidence and pattern of this association are unknown. Between April and September 2002, 1738 Level 1 trauma patients were admitted to St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona. Among them, a skull base fracture was diagnosed in 78 patients following computed tomography (CT) scans. Seven patients had no neurovascular imaging performed and were excluded. Altogether, 71 patients who received a diagnosis of skull base fractures after CT and who also underwent a neurovascular imaging study were included (54 men and 17 women, mean age 29 years, range 1-83 years). Patients underwent CT angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, or digital subtraction angiography of the head and craniovertebral junction, or combinations thereof. Nine neurovascular injuries were identified in six (8.5%) of the 71 patients. Fractures of the clivus were very likely to be associated with neurovascular injury (p < 0.001). A high risk of neurovascular injury showed a strong tendency to be associated with fractures of the sella turcica-sphenoid sinus complex (p = 0.07). The risk of associated blunt neurovascular injury appears to be significant in Level 1 trauma patients in whom a diagnosis of skull base fracture has been made using CT. The incidence of neurovascular trauma is particularly high in patients with clival fractures. The authors recommend neurovascular imaging for Level 1 trauma patients with a high-risk fracture pattern of the central skull base to rule out cerebrovascular injuries.

  2. Altered lower extremity fracture characteristics in obese pediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Shawn R; MacLennan, Paul A; Backstrom, Ian; Creek, Aaron; Sawyer, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether there are differences in fracture patterns and femur fracture treatment choices in obese versus nonobese pediatric trauma patients. Prognostic study, retrospective chart review. Two level I pediatric trauma centers. The trauma registries of 2 pediatric hospitals were queried for patients with lower extremity long-bone fractures resulting from blunt trauma. 2858 alerts were examined, and 397 patients had lower extremity fractures. Three hundred thirty-one patients with a total of 394 femur or tibia fractures met the inclusion criteria, and 70 patients (21%) were obese. Weight for age >95th percentile was defined as obese. Radiographs were reviewed, and fractures were classified according the OTA/AO pediatric fracture classification system. Fracture patterns (OTA subsegment), severity, and choice of intervention for femur fractures were the primary outcomes. Overall, obese patients were twice as likely [risk ratio (RR), 2.20; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-3.89] to have fractures involving the physis. Physeal fracture risk was greater for femur fractures (RR, 3.25; 95% CI, 1.35-7.78) than tibia fractures (RR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.76-3.26). Severity did not differ between groups. Obese patients with femur fractures were more likely to be treated with locked nails. Obese pediatric trauma patients are more likely to sustain fractures involving the physis than nonobese patients. This could be related to intrinsic changes to the physis related to obesity or altered biomechanical forces. This is consistent with the observed relationships between obesity and other conditions affecting the physis including Blount disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  3. Altered lower extremity fracture characteristics in obese pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Paul A.; Backstrom, Ian; Creek, Aaron; Sawyer, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there are differences in fracture patterns and femur fracture treatment choices in obese vs. non-obese pediatric trauma patients. Design Prognostic study, retrospective chart review. Setting Two level I pediatric trauma centers. Patients The trauma registries of two pediatric hospitals were queried for patients with lower extremity long bone fractures resulting from blunt trauma. 2858 alerts were examined and 397 patients had lower extremity fractures. 331 patients with a total of 394 femur or tibia fractures met inclusion criteria, and 70 patients (21%) were obese. Main Outcome Measurements Weight for age >95th percentile was defined as obese. Radiographs were reviewed and fractures were classified according the OTA/AO pediatric fracture classification system. Fracture patterns (OTA subsegment), severity, and choice of intervention for femur fractures were primary outcomes. Results Overall, obese patients were twice as likely (RR=2.20, 95% CI 1.25–3.89) to have fractures involving the physis. Physeal fracture risk was greater for femur fractures (RR=3.25, 95% CI 1.35–7.78) than tibia fractures (RR=1.58, 95% CI 0.76–3.26). Severity did not differ between groups. Obese patients with femur fractures were more likely to be treated with locked nails. Conclusion Obese pediatric trauma patients are more likely to sustain fractures involving the physis than non-obese patients. This could be related to intrinsic changes to the physis related to obesity, or altered biomechanical forces. This is consistent with the observed relationships between obesity and other conditions affecting the physis including Blount’s and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. PMID:24740109

  4. Isolated rupture of the gallbladder following blunt abdominal trauma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; da Silva, Dorivaldo Lopes; Elias, Naim Carlos; Sica, Gustavo Tricta Augusto; Fávaro, Murillo de Lima; Ribeiro, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal trauma is a rare event recognized on evaluation and treatment of other visceral injuries during laparotomy. Isolated gallbladder rupture secondary to blunt abdominal trauma is even more uncommon. The clinical presentation of gallbladder injury is variable, resulting in a delay in diagnosis and treatment. We report the case of a patient who suffered an isolated gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma. PMID:23843066

  5. Distal thoracic oesophageal perforation secondary to blunt trauma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Dirk C; Tandon, Ruchi; Mason, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Background Traumatic perforation of the distal oesophagus due to blunt trauma is a very rare condition and is still associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. This is further exacerbated by delayed diagnosis and management as symptoms and signs are often masked by or ascribed to more common blunt thoracic injuries. Case report We present a case of a distal oesophageal perforation, secondary to a fall from a third storey window, which was masked by concomitant thoracic injuries and missed on both computed tomography imaging and laparotomy. The delay in his diagnosis significantly worsened the patient's recovery by allowing the development of an overwhelming chest sepsis that contributed to his death. Conclusion Early identification of an intrathoracic oesophageal perforation requires deliberate consideration and is essential to ensure a favorable outcome. Treatment should be individualised taking into account the nature of the oesophageal defect, time elapsed from injury and the patient's general condition. PMID:17374175

  6. Blunt intestinal trauma. A modern-day review.

    PubMed Central

    Dauterive, A H; Flancbaum, L; Cox, E F

    1985-01-01

    During the 5-year period from January 1978 through December 1982, 196 patients with blunt trauma to the small bowel, colon, or mesentery were treated at the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS) Shock Trauma Center. More than 80% of these patients were the victims of motor vehicle accidents and therefore commonly had multisystem injuries. Sixty of these patients suffered 83 major injuries in the form of perforation or mesenteric injury resulting in ischemic bowel. This group accounted for 6.9% of the 870 patients who had celiotomy for blunt trauma during this period. Several significant observations were made. All injuries, except one, were diagnosed by peritoneal lavage. Only two duodenal injuries were present. Perforations involving the jejunum and ileum were distributed throughout the entire length of the small bowel. Colon injuries comprised one-fourth of the major injuries, with most occurring in the ascending and sigmoid colon. There were 16 deaths, 6 of which occurred as a result of complications from the bowel injury. PMID:3970600

  7. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma in children: Review of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Englum, Brian R; Gulack, Brian C; Rice, Henry E; Scarborough, John E; Adibe, Obinna O

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to examine the current management strategies and outcomes after blunt pancreatic trauma in children using a national patient registry. Using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2007-2011, we identified all patients ≤18years old who suffered blunt pancreatic trauma. Patients were categorized as undergoing nonoperative pancreatic management (no abdominal operation, abdominal operation without pancreatic-specific procedure, or pancreatic drainage alone) or operative pancreatic management (pancreatic resection/repair). Patient characteristics, operative details, clinical outcomes, and factors associated with operative management were examined. Of 610,402 pediatric cases in the NTDB, 1653 children (0.3%) had blunt pancreatic injury and 674 had information on specific location of pancreatic injury. Of these 674 cases, 514 (76.3%) underwent nonoperative pancreatic management. The groups were similar in age, gender, and race; however, pancreatic injury grade>3, moderate to severe injury severity, and bicycle accidents were associated with operative management in multivariable analysis. Children with pancreatic head injuries or GCS motor score<6 were less likely to undergo pancreatic operation. Overall morbidity and mortality rates were 26.5% and 5.3%, respectively. Most outcomes were similar between treatment groups, including mortality (2.5% vs. 6.7% in operative vs. nonoperative cohorts respectively; p=0.07). Although rare, blunt pancreatic trauma in children continues to be a morbid injury. In the largest analysis of blunt pancreatic trauma in children, we provide data on which to base future prospective studies. Operative management of pancreatic trauma occurs most often in children with distal ductal injuries, suggesting that prospective studies may want to focus on this group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described.

  9. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Hoyle, John; Atabaki, Shireen; Tunik, Michael G; Lichenstein, Richard; Miskin, Michelle; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    To determine the risk of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children with headaches after minor blunt head trauma, particularly when the headaches occur without other findings suggestive of TBIs (ie, isolated headaches). This was a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of children 2 to 18 years with minor blunt head trauma (ie, Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14-15). Clinicians assessed the history and characteristics of headaches at the time of initial evaluation, and documented findings onto case report forms. Our outcome measures were (1) clinically important TBI (ciTBI) and (2) TBI visible on computed tomography (CT). Of 27 495 eligible patients, 12 675 (46.1%) had headaches. Of the 12 567 patients who had complete data, 2462 (19.6%) had isolated headaches. ciTBIs occurred in 0 of 2462 patients (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0%-0.1%) in the isolated headache group versus 162 of 10 105 patients (1.6%; 95% CI: 1.4%-1.9%) in the nonisolated headache group (risk difference, 1.6%; 95% CI: 1.3%-1.9%). TBIs on CT occurred in 3 of 456 patients (0.7%; 95% CI: 0.1%-1.9%) in the isolated headache group versus 271 of 6089 patients (4.5%; 95% CI: 3.9%-5.0%) in the nonisolated headache group (risk difference, 3.8%; 95% CI: 2.3%-4.5%). We found no significant independent associations between the risk of ciTBI or TBI on CT with either headache severity or location. ciTBIs are rare and TBIs on CT are very uncommon in children with minor blunt head trauma when headaches are their only sign or symptom. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Discrimination of falls and blows in blunt head trauma: assessment of predictability through combined criteria.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Célia; Sauvageau, Anny

    2009-07-01

    The discrimination of falls from homicidal blows in blunt head injuries is a common but difficult problem in both forensic anthropology and pathology. Three criteria have been previously proposed for this distinction: the hat brim line rule, side lateralization of fractures, and number of lacerations. The aim of the present study was to achieve a better distinction rate by combining those criteria and assess the predictability of these combined criteria tools. Over a 6-year period, a total of 114 cases (92 males and 22 females) were studied: 21 cases of downstairs falls, 29 cases of falls from one's own height, and 64 cases of head trauma by a blunt weapon. The results revealed predictability rates varying from 62.5 to 83.3% for criteria pointing towards a fall. As for combined criteria in favor of a blow, the assumption was accurate in all cases (100%).

  11. Isolated Esophageal Injury Following Blunt Thoracic Trauma: A Rarity

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Satish; Dalal, Nityasha; Goyal, Pawan

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal injury following blunt trauma to chest is an extremely rare event, with only a limited number of cases being reported in the world literature. We report a case of perforation of the lower thoracic esophagus following a crush injury to the chest in a 14 year old child. An appropriately placed chest drain and decompression gastrostomy resulted in complete resolution of the esophageal leak within four weeks. This case report demonstrates that a conservative approach to lower thoracic esophageal perforations can be carried out successfully without the added morbidity of thoracotomy and risks of direct repair. PMID:27956976

  12. Duodenal rupture secondary to blunt trauma from a football.

    PubMed

    Luther, Alison; Mann, Christopher; Hart, Colin; Khalil, Khalil

    2013-01-04

    Duodenal rupture secondary to blunt trauma is a relatively uncommon event and is usually a result of a road traffic accident. As the duodenum is a retroperitoneal organ, delays in diagnosis can occur, as the patient may present with vague abdominal symptoms and other non-specific signs. Computed tomographic scanning is therefore a useful tool in the diagnosis of this condition. We present a 19-year-old girl who was hit in the abdomen with a football and subsequently had a duodenal rupture.

  13. Blunt cardiac injury in trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V; Avery, Laura L; Novelline, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4) in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7), eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P < 0.001).

  14. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A.; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Novelline, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4) in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7), eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P < 0.001). PMID:22046549

  15. Investigation of surfactant protein-D and interleukin-6 levels in patients with blunt chest trauma with multiple rib fractures and pulmonary contusions: a cross-sectional study in Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Aysel; Turut, Hasan; Acipayam, Ahmet; Kirbas, Aynur; Yuce, Suleyman; Cumhur Cure, Medine; Cure, Erkan

    2016-10-12

    Multiple rib fractures (RFs) and pulmonary contusions (PCs), with resulting systemic lung inflammation, are the most common injuries caused by blunt chest trauma (BCT) in motor vehicle accidents. This study examined levels of the inflammation marker interleukin (IL)-6 and those of the acute-phase reactant surfactant protein (SP)-D in patients with BCT. Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Single-centre, tertiary care hospital in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. The study included 60 patients with BCT who were hospitalised in our thoracic surgery department. The SP-D and IL-6 serum levels of patients with RFs (two or more RFs) (n=30) and patients with PCs (n=30) were measured after 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days, and compared with those of age-matched and gender-matched healthy participants. The 6-hour serum SP-D levels of the RFs (p=0.017) and PCs (p<0.001) groups were significantly higher than those of the healthy controls. The 24-hour and 7-day SP-D levels of both groups were also higher than the control group. The serum IL-6 levels of both groups were significantly higher than those of the control group. We have found Injury Severity Score to be independently related to 6-hour IL-6 (β=1.414, p<0.001) and 24-hour IL-6 levels (β=1.067, p<0.001). The development of complications was independently related to 6-hour SP-D level (β=0.211, p=0.047). RFs and PCs after BCT lead to local and systemic inflammation due to lung injury. The levels of the systemic inflammation marker IL-6 and those of the acute-phase reactant SP-D were elevated in the present study. The SP-D level may be used as a marker in the follow-up of BCT-related complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Investigation of surfactant protein-D and interleukin-6 levels in patients with blunt chest trauma with multiple rib fractures and pulmonary contusions: a cross-sectional study in Black Sea Region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Aysel; Turut, Hasan; Acipayam, Ahmet; Kirbas, Aynur; Yuce, Suleyman; Cumhur Cure, Medine; Cure, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Multiple rib fractures (RFs) and pulmonary contusions (PCs), with resulting systemic lung inflammation, are the most common injuries caused by blunt chest trauma (BCT) in motor vehicle accidents. This study examined levels of the inflammation marker interleukin (IL)-6 and those of the acute-phase reactant surfactant protein (SP)-D in patients with BCT. Design Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Setting Single-centre, tertiary care hospital in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. Participants The study included 60 patients with BCT who were hospitalised in our thoracic surgery department. Parameters measures The SP-D and IL-6 serum levels of patients with RFs (two or more RFs) (n=30) and patients with PCs (n=30) were measured after 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days, and compared with those of age-matched and gender-matched healthy participants. Results The 6-hour serum SP-D levels of the RFs (p=0.017) and PCs (p<0.001) groups were significantly higher than those of the healthy controls. The 24-hour and 7-day SP-D levels of both groups were also higher than the control group. The serum IL-6 levels of both groups were significantly higher than those of the control group. We have found Injury Severity Score to be independently related to 6-hour IL-6 (β=1.414, p<0.001) and 24-hour IL-6 levels (β=1.067, p<0.001). The development of complications was independently related to 6-hour SP-D level (β=0.211, p=0.047). Conclusions RFs and PCs after BCT lead to local and systemic inflammation due to lung injury. The levels of the systemic inflammation marker IL-6 and those of the acute-phase reactant SP-D were elevated in the present study. The SP-D level may be used as a marker in the follow-up of BCT-related complications. PMID:27733410

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in blunt trauma: identification of independent risk factors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Preston R; Croce, Martin A; Kilgo, Patrick D; Scott, John; Fabian, Timothy C

    2002-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Although many injuries and conditions are believed to be associated with ARDS independent risk factors in trauma patients and their relative importance in development of the syndrome are undefined. The aim of this project is to identify independent risk factors for the development of ARDS in blunt trauma patients and to examine the contributions of each factor to ARDS development. Patients with ARDS were identified from the registry of a Level I trauma center over a 4.5-year period. Records were reviewed for demographics, injury characteristics, transfusion requirements, and hospital course. Variables examined included age >65 years, Injury Severity Score (ISS) >25, hypotension on admission (systolic blood pressure <90), significant metabolic acidosis (base deficit <-5.0), severe brain injury as shown by a Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) <8 on admission, 24-hour transfusion requirement >10 units packed red blood cells, pulmonary contusion (PC), femur fracture, and major infection (pneumonia, empyema, or intra-abdominal abscess). Both univariate and stepwise logistic regression were used to identify independent risk factors, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine the relative contribution of each risk factor. A total of 4397 patients having sustained blunt trauma were admitted to the intensive care unit and survived >24 hours between October 1995 and May 2000. Of these patients 200 (4.5%) developed ARDS. All studied variables were significantly associated with ARDS in univariate analyses. Stepwise logistic regression, however, demonstrated age >65 years, ISS >25, hypotension on admission, 24-hour transfusion requirement >10 units, and pulmonary contusion as independent risk factors, whereas admission metabolic acidosis, femur fracture, infection, and severe brain injury were not. Using a model based on the logistic

  18. Mechanisms of blunt liver trauma patterns: An analysis of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wangxun; Deng, Liming; Lv, Heping; Zhang, Qiyu; Zhu, Jinying

    2013-02-01

    Blunt liver trauma is the most dangerous and the second most frequent solid organ trauma that occurs in the abdominal cavity. Management of this life-threatening situation remains a significant challenge. The present study identified that the patterns of blunt liver trauma were closely correlated with the characteristics of the blunt force. Illustrations of findings from this study have been included in the hope that they may aid surgeons in improving the management of this emergency. In total, 53 cases of blunt liver trauma that underwent laparotomy in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College between 1999 and 2009 were retrospectively studied. The cause of the injury, the direction and site of the blunt force, surgical records and CT films were carefully studied to obtain information on the patterns and severity of the liver injury and the correlation with blunt forces. Trauma in the right lobe of the liver was mainly caused by acceleration, deceleration and compression of the liver, while in the left lobe of the liver, acceleration was the main cause of the trauma. Liver lacerations were always located close to the attachment sites of the ligaments which bore the majority of the shearing stress. The characteristics of the blunt force play a key role in the different patterns of blunt liver trauma. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms of blunt liver trauma may aid doctors in the management of patients with this condition.

  19. Clostridium difficile Infections after Blunt Trauma: A Different Patient Population?

    PubMed Central

    Vanzant, Erin L.; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Liu, Huazhi; Malik, Seemab; Davis, Ruth; Lanz, Jennifer; Miggins, Makesha V.; Gentile, Lori F.; Cuenca, Angela; Cuenca, Alex G.; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Moore, Frederick A.; Ang, Darwin N.; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile-associated infection (CDI) has changed, and it is evident that susceptibility is related not only to exposures and bacterial potency, but host factors as well. Several small studies have suggested that CDI after trauma is associated with a different patient phenotype. The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the epidemiologic factors associated with C. difficile in blunt trauma patients without traumatic brain injury using the Trauma-Related Database as a part of the “Inflammation and Host Response to Injury” (Glue Grant) and the University of Florida Integrated Data Repository. Methods: Previously recorded baseline characteristics, clinical data, and outcomes were compared between groups (67 C. difficile and 384 uncomplicated, 813 intermediate, and 761 complicated non-C. difficile patients) as defined by the Glue Grant on admission and at days seven and 14. Results: The majority of CDI patients experienced complicated or intermediate clinical courses. The mean ages of all cohorts were less than 65 y and CDI patients were significantly older than uncomplicated patients without CDI. The CDI patients had increased days in the hospital and on the ventilator, as well as significantly higher new injury severity scores (NISS), and a greater percentage of patients with NISS >34 points compared with non-CDI patients. They also had greater Marshall and Denver multiple organ dysfunction scores than non-CDI uncomplicated patients, and greater creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, neutrophil count, lactic acid, and PiO2:FiO2 compared with all non-CDI cohorts on admission. In addition, the CDI patients had higher glucose concentrations and base deficit from uncomplicated patients and greater leukocytosis than complicated patients on admission. Several of these changes persisted to days seven and 14. Conclusion: Analysis of severe blunt trauma patients with C. difficile, as compared with non

  20. Traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma in a motocross rider.

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, Federico; Mattia, Consalvo; Ricci, Massimo; Chirichilli, Ilaria; Santo, Chiara; Rose, David; Muzzi, Luigi; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo; Sartini, Patrizio; Ferrari, Riccardo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Laghi, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    This article details a case report of a traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma. Thoracic aorta false aneurysms are a rare and life-threatening complication of aortic surgery, infection, genetic disorders and trauma.

  1. Traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma in a motocross rider

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Federico; Mattia, Consalvo; Ricci, Massimo; Chirichilli, Ilaria; Santo, Chiara; Rose, David; Muzzi, Luigi; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo; Sartini, Patrizio; Ferrari, Riccardo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Laghi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This article details a case report of a traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma. Thoracic aorta false aneurysms are a rare and life-threatening complication of aortic surgery, infection, genetic disorders and trauma. PMID:18452593

  2. Nonoperative management for major blunt hepatic trauma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mingoli, Andrea; Saracino, Andrea; Brachini, Gioia; Mariotta, Giovanni; Migliori, Emanuele; Silvestri, Vania

    2015-03-16

    Over the past 20 years the management of blunt liver trauma has evolved from a primary operative approach to a nonoperative one, for both low and high grade injuries, only on the basis of hemodynamic stability. However, in spite of a high success rate of non operative management, it is frequently observed, also in our country, an old fashioned way to approach these patients, based on habit more than observation and evidence based medicine. We present a case of successful nonoperative treatment of a grade IV blunt liver trauma (lacero-contusive injury of V, VI and VII segments) in a 34-year-old woman. Nowadays more than 85% of liver injuries are managed without operative intervention, irrespective of the injury grade. Success rate of the conservative approach ranges from 82% to 100% and almost all complications (14% in high grade injuries) can be managed with interventional radiology procedures, still avoiding major surgery. Today, in the absence of other abdominal injuries requiring surgical exploration, hemodynamic instability from ongoing hemorrhage after primary evaluation and resuscitative treatment, is the only indication to an operative management of traumatic liver injuries.

  3. Aneurysm rupture from blunt abdominal trauma after endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ilknur G; Tutun, Ufuk; Iscan, Zafer; Ayabakan, Nurcan; Ozdemir, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of aneurysm rupture from severe blunt abdominal trauma due to fight in a patient who had endovascular aneurysm repair. The patient presented to the emergency service with computed tomography evidence of an endoleak and a large retroperitoneal hematoma. The contrast abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a type Ib endoleak, increase in the aneurysm diameter and hematoma in the retroperitoneum. The patient has been taken under interventional procedure for endovascular aneurysm repair revision under urgent condition. Type Ib endoleak was treated by placement of a covered iliac extension limb, but a second leakage from graft body was found in control computed tomography images and open surgical conversion was necessary. Operative findings included a type III endoleak from graft body, defect on fabric. It was seen that the aneurysm sac anterior and posterior parts were ruptured. Upon reviewing the literature, we found that it was an interesting case as the first rupture case which had been developed after severe blunt abdominal trauma during the follow-up period of a patient on which endovascular aneurysm repair procedure had been performed and progressed in this manner. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Thyroid gland rupture caused by blunt trauma to the neck.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirotaka; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2016-02-19

    Thyroid rupture following blunt trauma is extremely rare, and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. However, hemorrhage and hematoma subsequently causes severe tracheal compression and respiratory distress. A 71-year-old Japanese woman visited our emergency room with a complaint of increasing right-sided neck pain at the thyroid cartilage level after she tripped and accidentally hit her neck against a pole 3 h back. On admission, her vital signs were stable. There was no swelling or subcutaneous emphysema. Laryngeal endoscopy revealed mild laryngeal edema, although there was no impairment in vocal fold mobility on either side. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed rupture of the right lobe of the thyroid gland accompanied by a large hematoma extending from the neck to the mediastinum. Under general anesthesia, the right lobe was resected and the hematoma was evacuated. Only a few isolated cases of thyroid rupture caused by blunt neck trauma have been reported in patients with normal thyroid glands and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. When suspected, CT should be performed to confirm the diagnosis determine the optimal treatment.

  5. Outer Retinal Structure Following Closed Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Flatter, John A.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubow, Michael J.; Pinhas, Alexander; Singh, Ravi S.; Kapur, Rashmi; Shah, Nishit; Walsh, Ryan D.; Hong, Sang H.; Weinberg, David V.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Wirostko, William J.; Robison, Scott; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.; Connor, Thomas B.; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outer retinal structural abnormalities in patients with visual deficits following closed globe blunt ocular trauma (cgBOT). Methods Nine subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT were examined between 1 month post-trauma and 6 years post-trauma. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to assess outer retinal architecture, while adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) was used to analyze photoreceptor mosaic integrity. Results Visual deficits ranged from central scotomas to decreased visual acuity. SD-OCT defects included focal foveal photoreceptor lesions, variable attenuation of the interdigitation zone, and mottling of the outer segment band, with one subject having normal outer retinal structure. AOSLO revealed disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic in all subjects, variably manifesting as foveal focal discontinuities, perifoveal hyporeflective cones, and paracentral regions of selective cone loss. Conclusions We observe persistent outer retinal disruption in subjects with visual complaints following cgBOT, albeit to a variable degree. AOSLO imaging allows assessment of photoreceptor structure at a level of detail not resolvable using SD-OCT or other current clinical imaging tools. Multimodal imaging appears useful for revealing the cause of visual complaints in patients following cgBOT. Future studies are needed to better understand how photoreceptor structure changes longitudinally in response to various trauma. PMID:24752010

  6. When backyard fun turns to trauma: risk assessment of blunt ballistic impact trauma due to potato cannons.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Jobski, Oliver; Bockholdt, Britta; Grossjohann, Rico; Stengel, Dirk; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although potato cannons are an area of great interest among internet users, they are almost completely unknown in the medical community. These simple ballistic devices are made from plastic plumbing pipes and are powered with propellant gas from aerosol cans. By combustion of the gas-oxygen mixture, a high pressure is produced which propels the potato chunks through the barrel. It is the aim of this study to investigate the hazardous potential of these shooting devices. Test shots were performed using three illegally manufactured potato cannons that were confiscated by police authorities. Velocity, impulse, kinetic energy, and energy density were calculated. The risk of head and chest injuries was investigated by using Sturdivan's Blunt Criterion (BC), an energy based five parametric trauma model assessing the vulnerability to blunt weapons, projectile impacts, and behind-body-armor exposures. The probability of lethality due to blunt impact trauma to the chest was assessed using Sturdivan's lethality model. For potential head impacts, all test shots far exceeded the critical BC (head) value which corresponds to a 50% risk of skull fracture. The risk of injury with regard to chest impacts was similar. All but two test shots far exceeded the critical BC (chest) value corresponding to a 50% risk of sustaining a thoracic skeletal injury of Abbreviated Injury Scale 2 or 3. The probability of a lethal injury due to blunt chest impact was as high as 20%. To conclude, this work demonstrates that potato cannons should be considered dangerous weapons rather than as toys used by adventurous adolescents.

  7. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma.

  8. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dirk; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas; Mutze, Sven

    2015-09-14

    Ultrasonography (performed by means of a four-quadrant, focused assessment of sonography for trauma (FAST)) is regarded as a key instrument for the initial assessment of patients with suspected blunt abdominal and thoraco-abdominal trauma in the emergency department setting. FAST has a high specificity but low sensitivity in detecting and excluding visceral injuries. Proponents of FAST argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of unnecessary multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scans, and enable quicker triage to surgical and non-surgical care. Given the proven accuracy, increasing availability of, and indication for, MDCT among patients with blunt abdominal and multiple injuries, we aimed to compile the best available evidence of the use of FAST-based assessment compared with other primary trauma assessment protocols. To assess the effects of diagnostic algorithms using ultrasonography including in FAST examinations in the emergency department in relation to the early, late, and overall mortality of patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. The most recent search was run on 30th June 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Participants were patients with blunt torso, abdominal, or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. The intervention was diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). The control was diagnostic algorithms without US examinations (for example, primary computed tomography (CT) or diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL)). Outcomes were mortality, use of CT or invasive procedures (DPL

  9. Long-term pulmonary function after recovery from pulmonary contusion due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Amital, Anat; Shitrit, David; Fox, Benjamin D; Raviv, Yael; Fuks, Leonardo; Terner, Irit; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2009-11-01

    Blunt chest trauma can cause severe acute pulmonary dysfunction due to hemo/pneumothorax, rib fractures and lung contusion. To study the long-term effects on lung function tests after patients' recovery from severe chest trauma. We investigated the outcome and lung function tests in 13 patients with severe blunt chest trauma and lung contusion. The study group comprised 9 men and 4 women with an average age of 44.6 +/- 13 years (median 45 years). Ten had been injured in motor vehicle accidents and 3 had fallen from a height. In addition to lung contusion most of them had fractures of more than three ribs and hemo/pneumothorax. Ten patients were treated with chest drains. Mean intensive care unit stay was 11 days (range 0-90) and mechanical ventilation 19 (0-60) days. Ten patients had other concomitant injuries. Mean forced expiratory volume in the first second was 81.2 +/- 15.3%, mean forced vital capacity was 85 +/- 13%, residual volume was 143 +/- 33.4%, total lung capacity was 101 +/- 14% and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity 87 +/- 24. Post-exercise oxygen saturation was normal in all patients (97 +/- 1.5%), and mean oxygen consumption max/kg was 18 +/- 4.3 ml/kg/min (60.2 +/- 15%). FEV1 was significantly lower among smokers (71.1 +/- 12.2 vs. 89.2 +/- 13.6%, P = 0.017). There was a non-significant tendency towards lower FEV1 among patients who underwent mechanical ventilation. Late after severe trauma involving lung contusion, substantial recovery was demonstrated with improved pulmonary function tests. These results encourage maximal intensive care in these patients. Further larger studies are required to investigate different factors affecting prognosis.

  10. Imaging of the thoracic and lumbar spine in a high volume level 1 trauma center: are reformatted images of the spine essential for screening in blunt trauma?

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, Aleksandr; Weinstein, Jonathan C; Flanders, Adam E; Sharma, Pranshu

    2017-02-01

    Reformatted CTs of the thoracic and lumbar spine (CT T/L) from CTs of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (CT body) may be performed for screening the thoracolumbar spine in patients sustaining blunt trauma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a difference in the rate of detection of spinal fractures on CTs of the body compared to the reformatted T/L spine. A secondary endpoint was to evaluate whether cases dictated by trainees improved fracture detection rate. We reviewed the records of 250 consecutive blunt trauma patients that received CTs of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis (CT body) with concurrent CT T/L reformats. Each report was reviewed to determine if there was a thoracolumbar fracture and whether a trainee had been involved in interpreting the CT body. If a fracture was identified on either report, then the number, type, and location of each fracture was documented. Sixty-nine fractures, from a total of 38 patients, were identified on either the CT of the body or the CT T/L. Sensitivity for CT body interpretations was 94 % (95 % CI: 86-98 %) compared to a 97 % (95 % CI: 89-100 %) sensitivity for the CT T/L (p > 0.5). Although the sensitivity was 97 % (95 % CI: 88-100 %) when a trainee was involved in interpreting the body CT, there was no statistically significant improvement. The results suggest that with careful scrutiny most spine fractures can be diagnosed on body CT images without the addition of spine reformats. The most commonly missed finding is an isolated non-displaced transverse process fracture, which does not require surgical intervention and does not alter clinical management. The results suggest that thin section reformats do not need to be routinely ordered in screening blunt trauma patients, unless a bony abnormality is identified on the thicker section body CT images.

  11. Validity of a decision rule to reduce cervical spine radiography in elderly patients with blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Touger, Michael; Gennis, Paul; Nathanson, Noel; Lowery, Douglas W; Pollack, Charles V; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R

    2002-09-01

    A decision instrument based on 5 clinical criteria has been shown to be highly sensitive in selecting patients who require cervical spine imaging after blunt trauma, while simultaneously reducing overall imaging. We examine the performance of this instrument in the elderly and explore some of the common features of geriatric cervical spine injury (CSI). The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) was a prospective, observational, multicenter study conducted at 21 geographically diverse centers. We analyzed the performance of the NEXUS decision instrument among patients at least 65 years of age. The study group consisted of 2,943 (8.6%) geriatric patients, representing 8.6% of the entire NEXUS sample. The rate of CSI was twice as great in these patients as it was in nongeriatric patients (4.59% versus 2.19%). Odontoid fractures were particularly common in geriatric patients, accounting for 20% of geriatric fractures compared with 5% of nongeriatric fractures. The frequency of patients meeting NEXUS criteria was similar in the 2 groups, with 14% of geriatric patients and 12.5% of nongeriatric patient classified as low risk. CSI occurred in only 2 low-risk geriatric patients, and these patients' injuries met our preset definition of a clinically insignificant injury. The sensitivity of the NEXUS decision instrument for clinically significant injury in the geriatric group was therefore 100% (95% confidence interval 97.1% to 100%). The prevalence of CSI, and especially odontoid fracture, is relatively increased among geriatric patients with blunt trauma. The NEXUS decision instrument can be applied safely to these patients, with an expected reduction in cervical imaging comparable with that achieved in nongeriatric patients.

  12. Diagnostic performance of isolated orbital CT scan for assessment of globe rupture in acute blunt facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chieh; Lou, Yun-Ting; Hanna, Eissa; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lee, Su-Shin; Lai, Hsin-Ti; Chang, Kao-Ping; Wang, Hui-Min David; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2016-05-01

    We determine the diagnostic performance of emergent orbital computed tomography (CT) scans for assessing globe rupture in patients with blunt facial trauma. We performed a retrospective cohort study based on prospectively collected trauma registry and acute care surveillance data in a tertiary-care hospital. Patients aged at least 18 years who underwent isolated orbital CT scanning for assessing potential ocular trauma were examined. Analyses were performed to evaluate the magnitude of agreement between diagnosis by CT scanning and ophthalmic assessment, including globe rupture. Our study cohort comprised 136 patients, 30% of whom (41 patients) sustained orbital wall fractures. Concordance for orbital CT diagnosis and the ophthalmic assessment of globe rupture was substantial (k=0.708). The relative risk of globe rupture was 0.692 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.054-8.849) for superior wall fractures, 0.459 (95% CI: 0.152-1.389) for inferior wall fractures, 2.286 (95% CI: 1.062-4.919) for lateral wall fractures, and 0.637 (95% CI: 0.215-1.886) for medial wall fractures. According to multivariate analysis, lateral wall fractures were an independent risk factor for globe ruptures (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=12.01, P=0.011), and medial or inferior wall fracture was a protective factor (adjusted OR=0.14, P=0.012). In the stratified analysis of diagnostic performance of CT scan, specificity was highest among patients with orbital wall fractures (97.2%), followed by negative predictive volume (NPV, 97%), and accuracy (95.1%). Among patients with blunt facial trauma who underwent isolated orbital CT scanning as part of ocular trauma assessment, the diagnostic performance of CT in detecting globe rupture is more accurate in patients with orbital wall fractures. Nevertheless, isolated orbital CT alone does not have a sufficiently high diagnostic performance to be reliable to rule out all globe ruptures. Lateral orbital wall fractures in blunt facial trauma patients, in

  13. Blunt abdominal trauma and mesenteric avulsion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kordzadeh, A; Melchionda, V; Rhodes, K M; Fletcher, E O; Panayiotopolous, Y P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the biomechanics, presentation and diagnosis of mesenteric avulsions following blunt abdominal trauma and reach a consensus on their overall management. A systematic review of literature in MedLine, Embase, Scopus and CINHAL in English language from 1951 to November 2014 was performed. A total of 20 reported cases were identified. Variables including patient's demographics, signs and symptoms, mechanism of injury, investigative modality, management, length of stay, follow-up and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. The median age of the cohort was 28.5 years (range 10-58 years), with a male-to-female ratio of 3:1. The commonest mechanism of injury was road traffic accident due to seat belt restraint (n = 12, 60 %). The commonest presentation was diffuse abdominal tenderness (n = 10, 45 %) followed by ecchymosis/bruising (n = 9, 40 %). Computed tomography (CT) remained the investigative modality of choice (n = 9, 45 %). All cases had an emergency exploratory laparotomy (n = 18, 90 %) within the initial 24 h and the median length of stay was 19 days (range 4-90 days). The overall mortality was 15 % (n = 3). Mesenteric avulsion is rare and has a complex and vague presentation. Due to its potential mortality and morbidity, emergency physicians should keep a high index of suspicion in individuals with blunt abdominal trauma from any mechanism of injury.

  14. Oxygen Saturation in Closed-Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma.

    PubMed

    Long, Chongde; Wen, Xin; Zhong, Liu-Xue-Ying; Zheng, Yongxin; Gao, Qianying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels in patients after closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Design. Retrospective observational case series. Methods. Retinal oximetry was performed in both eyes of 29 patients with unilateral closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation (SO2), arteriolar diameter, venular diameter, and arteriovenous difference in diameter were measured. Association parameters including age, finger pulse oximetry, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and heart rate were analyzed. Results. The mean SaO2 in traumatic eyes (98.1% ± 6.8%) was not significantly different from SaO2 in unaffected ones (95.3% ± 7.2%) (p = 0.136). Mean SvO2 in traumatic eyes (57.1% ± 10.6%) was significantly lower than in unaffected ones (62.3% ± 8.4%) (p = 0.044). The arteriovenous difference in SO2 in traumatic eyes (41.0% ± 11.2%) was significantly larger than in unaffected ones (33.0% ± 6.9%) (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed between traumatic eyes and unaffected ones in arteriolar (p = 0.249) and venular diameter (p = 0.972) as well as arteriovenous difference in diameter (p = 0.275). Conclusions. Oxygen consumption is increased in eyes after cgBOT, associated with lower SvO2 and enlarged arteriovenous difference in SO2 but not with changes in diameter of retinal vessels.

  15. Oxygen Saturation in Closed-Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chongde; Wen, Xin; Gao, Qianying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels in patients after closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Design. Retrospective observational case series. Methods. Retinal oximetry was performed in both eyes of 29 patients with unilateral closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation (SO2), arteriolar diameter, venular diameter, and arteriovenous difference in diameter were measured. Association parameters including age, finger pulse oximetry, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and heart rate were analyzed. Results. The mean SaO2 in traumatic eyes (98.1% ± 6.8%) was not significantly different from SaO2 in unaffected ones (95.3% ± 7.2%) (p = 0.136). Mean SvO2 in traumatic eyes (57.1% ± 10.6%) was significantly lower than in unaffected ones (62.3% ± 8.4%) (p = 0.044). The arteriovenous difference in SO2 in traumatic eyes (41.0% ± 11.2%) was significantly larger than in unaffected ones (33.0% ± 6.9%) (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed between traumatic eyes and unaffected ones in arteriolar (p = 0.249) and venular diameter (p = 0.972) as well as arteriovenous difference in diameter (p = 0.275). Conclusions. Oxygen consumption is increased in eyes after cgBOT, associated with lower SvO2 and enlarged arteriovenous difference in SO2 but not with changes in diameter of retinal vessels. PMID:27699174

  16. Surgical repair of rupture of the membranous septum after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Tarmiz, Amine; Lopez, Stéphane; Honton, Ben; Riu, Béatrice

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of the membranous septum is a very rare complication of blunt chest trauma. In this report, we describe a 22-year-old man who sustained multiple blunt trauma injuries during a motor vehicle accident. Rupture of the membranous septum was diagnosed 48 hours after the initial trauma and the defect was closed with Gore-Tex (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ). However, the operation was complicated by complete atrioventricular block requiring implantation of a permanent DDD pacemaker.

  17. Vertebral artery injury associated with blunt cervical spine trauma: a multivariate regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebl, Darren R; Bono, Christopher M; Velmahos, George; Metkar, Umesh; Nguyen, Joseph; Harris, Mitchel B

    2013-07-15

    Retrospective analysis of prospective registry data. To determine the patient characteristics, risk factors, and fracture patterns associated with vertebral artery injury (VAI) in patients with blunt cervical spine injury. VAI associated with cervical spine trauma has the potential for catastrophical clinical sequelae. The patterns of cervical spine injury and patient characteristics associated with VAI remain to be determined. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data from the American College of Surgeons trauma registries at 3 level-1 trauma centers identified all patients with a cervical spine injury on multidetector computed tomographic scan during a 3-year period (January 1, 2007, to January 1, 2010). Fracture pattern and patient characteristics were recorded. Logistic multivariate regression analysis of independent predictors for VAI and subgroup analysis of neurological events related to VAI was performed. Twenty-one percent of 1204 patients with cervical injuries (n = 253) underwent screening for VAI by multidetector computed tomography angiogram. VAI was diagnosed in 17% (42 of 253), unilateral in 15% (38 of 253), and bilateral in 1.6% (4 of 253) and was associated with a lower Glasgow coma scale (P < 0.001), a higher injury severity score (P < 0.01), and a higher mortality (P < 0.001). VAI was associated with ankylosing spondylitis/diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperosteosis (crude odds ratio [OR] = 8.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-49.68; P = 0.034), and occipitocervical dissociation (P < 0.001) by univariate analysis and fracture displacement into the transverse foramen 1 mm or more (adjusted OR = 3.29; 95% CI, 1.15-9.41; P = 0.026), and basilar skull fracture (adjusted OR = 4.25; 95% CI, 1.25-14.47; P= 0.021), by multivariate regression model. Subgroup analyses of neurological events secondary to VAI occurred in 14% (6 of 42) and the stroke-related mortality rate was 4.8% (2 of 42). Neurological events were associated with male sex (P

  18. Variation in Specialists’ Reported Hospitalization Practices of Children Sustaining Blunt Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Cheryl W.; Lee, Moon O.; Holmes, James F.; Sokolove, Peter E.; Palchak, Michael J.; Morris, Beth A.; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Questions surround the appropriate emergency department (ED) disposition of children who have sustained blunt head trauma (BHT). Our objective was to identify physician disposition preferences of children with blunt head trauma (BHT) and varying computed tomography (CT) findings. Methods: We surveyed pediatric and general emergency physicians (EP), pediatric neurosurgeons (PNSurg), general neurosurgeons (GNSurg), pediatric surgeons (PSurg) and trauma surgeons regarding care of two hypothetical patients: Case 1: a 9-year-old who fell 10 feet and Case 2: an 11-month-old who fell 5 feet. We presented various CT findings and asked physicians about disposition preferences. We evaluated predictors of patient discharge using multivariable regression analysis adjusting for hospital and ED characteristics and clinician experience. Pediatric EPs served as the reference group. Results: Of 2,341 eligible surveyed, 715 (31%) responded. Most would discharge children with linear skull fractures (Case 1, 71%; Case 2, 62%). Neurosurgeons were more likely to discharge children with small subarachnoid hemorrhages (Case 1 PNSurg OR 6.87, 95% CI 3.60, 13.10; GNSurg OR 6.54, 95% CI 2.38, 17.98; Case 2 PNSurg OR 5.38, 95% CI 2.64, 10.99; GNSurg OR 6.07, 95% CI 2.08, 17.76). PSurg were least likely to discharge children with any CT finding, even linear skull fractures (Case 1 OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.08, 0.23; Case 2 OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.11, 0.30). Few respondents (<6%) would discharge children with small intraventricular, subdural, or epidural bleeds. Conclusion: Substantial variation exists between specialties in reported hospitalization practices of neurologically-normal children with BHT and traumatic CT findings. PMID:23447754

  19. Is there any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in blunt trauma?

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, Maziar; Skouras, Christos; Shah, Rajesh

    2013-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is any role for resuscitative emergency department thoracotomy in severe blunt trauma. Emergency thoracotomy is an accepted intervention for patients with penetrating cardiothoracic trauma. However, its role in blunt trauma has been challenged and has been a subject of considerable debate. Altogether, 186 relevant papers were identified, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date, country of publication and relevant outcomes are tabulated. The 14 studies comprised 2 systematic reviews and 12 retrospective studies. The systematic review performed by the Trauma Committee of the American College of Surgeons included 42 studies and a cumulative total of 2193 blunt trauma patients who underwent an emergency department thoracotomy, reporting a survival rate of 1.6%. According to this review, 15% of the survivors suffered from neurological sequelae, but survivors from both penetrating and blunt trauma were included. A systematic review comprising 24 studies reported a survival rate of 1.4% among 1047 blunt trauma patients. Of the retrospective studies, 11 report poor survival rates, ranging from 0 to 6%. Only one study reports a higher survival rate (12.2%). Five of the studies reported on the neurological outcome of survivors. The majority of the studies suffered from limitations due to the small number of included cases. The reported survival after an emergency department thoracotomy for blunt trauma is very low in the vast majority of available studies. Furthermore, the neurological sequelae in the few survivors are frequent and severe. Interestingly, some author groups recommend that emergency department thoracotomy should be contraindicated in cases of blunt trauma with no signs of life at the scene of trauma or on arrival at the emergency department. Larger, well-designed series will

  20. Role of the trauma-room chest x-ray film in assessing the patient with severe blunt traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Barry A.; Ali, Jameel; Towers, Mark J.; Sharkey, P. William

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To examine the accuracy of standard trauma-room chest x-ray films in assessing blunt abdominal trauma and to determine the significance of missed injuries under these circumstances. Design A retrospective review. Setting A regional trauma unit in a tertiary-care institution. Patients Multiply injured trauma patients admitted between January 1988 and December 1990 who died within 24 hours of injury and in whom an autopsy was done. Intervention Standard radiography of the chest. Main Outcome Measures Chest injuries diagnosed and recorded by the trauma room team from standard anteroposterior x-ray films compared with the findings at autopsy and with review of the films by a staff radiologist initially having no knowledge of the injuries and later, if injuries remained undetected, having knowledge of the autopsy findings. Results Thirty-seven patients met the study criteria, and their cases were reviewed. In 11 cases, significant injuries were noted at autopsy and not by the trauma-room team, and in 7 cases these injuries were also missed by the reviewing radiologist. Injuries missed by the team were: multiple rib fractures (11 cases), sternal fractures (3 cases), diaphragmatic tear (2 cases) and intimal aortic tear (1 case). In five cases, chest tubes were not inserted despite the presence (undiagnosed) of multiple rib fractures and need for intubation and positive-pressure ventilation. Conclusions Significant blunt abdominal trauma, potentially requiring operative management or chest-tube insertion, may be missed on the initial anteroposterior chest x-ray film. Caution must therefore be exercised in interpreting these films in the trauma resuscitation room. PMID:8599789

  1. Utility of intercostal nerve conventional thermal radiofrequency ablations in the injured worker after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Engel, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Intercostal nerve blocks offer short-term therapeutic relief and serve as a diagnostic test for intercostal neuralgia. This original case report demonstrates the efficacy of radiofrequency ablations for long-term pain relief of intercostal neuralgia. To date, there have been no studies that demonstrate the efficacy of thermal conventional intercostal nerve radiofrequency ablations for intercostal neuralgia. Describe the use of conventional thermal radiofrequency ablations of the intercostal nerves to treat blunt chest wall trauma. Case report. Clinical practice. Six patients suffering from work-related injuries to the chest wall whose treatment focused on conventional thermal radiofrequency ablations of the intercostal nerves. Four of the 6 patients were pain free by their final visit. The remaining 2 patients experienced pain relief until one began wearing a brace after an L5-S1 fusion; the other required repeat treatment after 5.5 months. Case series. There was limited follow-up as patients were either discharged after receiving potentially curative care or were lost to follow-up. Following conventional thermal radiofrequency ablations of the intercostal nerves, 5 of the 6 patients experienced either long-term pain relief or required no additional care. The treatment has potential efficacy for injuries, including rib fractures or intercostal neuralgia, stemming from blunt trauma to the chest wall. In addition, there may be a potential for this treatment to help patients suffering from postthoracotomy pain.

  2. Melaena as the presenting symptom of gastric mucosal injury due to blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Saeb‐Parsy, K; Omer, A; Hall, N R

    2006-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is a common cause of admission to the typical trauma centre. Hollow viscus injury from blunt trauma, however, is unusual and rarely involves the stomach. A 15 year old boy sustained a bicycle handle bar injury to the abdomen and presented to the casualty department four days later with melaena. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showed normal findings but endoscopy revealed two “kissing” areas of mucosal ulceration on the anterior and posterior wall of the gastric antrum. The patient received a blood transfusion for anaemia but was otherwise treated conservatively and made a full recovery. The authors believe this to be the first reported case of melaena as the primary presenting symptom of gastric ulceration secondary to blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnosis of hollow viscus injuries due to blunt abdominal trauma requires a high index of suspicion and thorough investigation, particularly if the presentation is delayed. PMID:16627828

  3. Contrecoup fractures of the anterior cranial fossae as a consequence of blunt force caused by a fall.

    PubMed

    Hein, P M; Schulz, E

    1990-01-01

    Contrecoup fractures of the base of the skull are regarded as rare in the clinical literature. In our material (n = 171 falls on the same level and on or from stairs), the overall frequency of contrecoup fractures of the anterior cranial fossa in fatal cranio-cerebral trauma due to falls was 12%, as compared to 24% with occipital point of impact of the head. The relationships between the impact site on the head, form of fracture at the point of impact with involvement of the skull cap and/or the base of the skull, coup and contrecoup injuries of the brain, localization of contrecoup fractures in the anterior cranial fossa and the occurrence of monocle and spectacle haematomas display a major variability. Fractures occur in the form of simple fractures and as impression fractures (fracture fragments or fracture boundaries displaced to the inside). Clinical diagnosis is difficult because of the concealed position of the anterior skull base. Contrecoup fractures become of forensic medical significance when symptoms of a frontobasal injury occur for the first time after trauma which has occurred some time in the past and when the question arises as to the causal connection with the original trauma. In investigation of living persons, it may be difficult to decide whether haemorrhages in the region of the orbit and its vicinity result from a direct blunt force or derive from fractures of the base of the skull, especially contrecoup fractures.

  4. Renal masses presenting 25 and 50 years following blunt renal trauma.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, R S; Issa, M M; Kabalin, J N; Terris, M K

    1998-10-01

    The long-term consequences of blunt renal trauma are not well described. We report on 2 patients with a history of blunt renal trauma who presented with radiographically detected renal masses suspicious for renal tumor. Both patients suffered blows to the kidney during boxing matches followed by flank pain and hematuria. The injuries occurred 25 and 50 years prior to the detection of renal masses. Subsequent nephrectomy and histopathological evaluation revealed benign dystrophic renal tissue. These presentations represent probable long-term sequelae of blunt renal trauma.

  5. Associated injuries in traumatic sternal fractures: a review of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Jackson, Hope T; Obirieze, Augustine C; Moore, Danier; Branche, Marc J; Greene, Wendy R; Cornwell, Edward E; Siram, Suryanarayana M

    2013-07-01

    Sternal fractures occur infrequently with blunt force trauma. The demographics and epidemiology of associated injuries have not been well characterized from a national trauma database. The National Trauma Data Bank was queried for patients with closed sternal fractures. The demographics were analyzed by age, gender, mechanism and indicators of anatomic and physiologic injuries. Types of commonly associated injuries were also determined. A total of 23,985 records were analyzed. Males accounted for 68.3 per cent and whites 70.9 per cent. Motor vehicle crash was the leading mechanism. More than 56 per cent had severe injuries based on Injury Severity Score (greater than 15) and 17 per cent with Glasgow Coma Score 8 or less. Crude mortality was 7.9 per cent. The majority (57.8%) and approximately one-third (33.7%) of the patients had rib fractures and lung contusions, respectively, 22.0 per cent with closed pneumothorax, 21.6 per cent had a closed thoracic vertebra fracture, 16.9 per cent with lumbar spine fracture, 3.9 per cent with concussion, and blunt cardiac injury in 3.6 per cent. Sternal fractures are usually associated with severe blunt trauma. Lung contusion remains the leading associated injury followed by vertebral spine fractures. Cardiac injuries are less frequent and vascular injuries less so. Mechanism of injury and presence of sternal fractures should alert providers to these potential associated injuries.

  6. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury.

    PubMed

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Mahoney, Eric; Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul; Burke, Peter; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim

    2016-02-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6%). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87%, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2%, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. • CTA screening is important to identify patients with underlying BCVI • Cervical spine and/or skullbase fractures were significantly associated with BCVI • BCVI may occur in up to 11% of patients with blunt trauma injuries.

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the Profunda Femoris Artery following Blunt Trauma Treated by Endovascular Coil Embolization: Review of Two Cases and Relevant Literature

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Patrick; Kiproff, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Profunda femoris artery (PFA) pseudoaneurysm after blunt trauma without associated femur fracture is a rare occurrence. Most of the reported cases of PFA pseudoaneurysm in the English literature developed after penetrating trauma, surgical procedures, and femur fractures. We present two such cases following blunt trauma and without any associated long bone injury. After initial imaging failed to show any long bone fracture, CT angiography confirmed pseudoaneurysm of the branch of the PFA. Both patients were then treated with emergent coil embolization of the bleeding vessel. Pseudoaneurysms typically present late and signs of persistent hip pain, thigh swelling, presence of a pulsatile mass, and even unexplained anemia all may suggest the diagnosis. Recognition of PFA pseudoaneurysm requires high index of suspicion and is often difficult to diagnose clinically because of its location. PMID:28246563

  8. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  9. Hepatic duct confluence injury in blunt abdominal trauma: case report and synopsis on management.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Meena; Gates, Jonathan; Ferzoco, Stephen J

    2003-10-01

    Injuries of the extra hepatic biliary tree following blunt trauma to the abdomen are rare. We present here a case of injury to the confluence of the hepatic ducts and a brief synopsis on diagnosis and management of blunt injury to the extrahepatic biliary system.

  10. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  11. Variability in CT imaging of blunt trauma among ED physicians, surgical residents, and trauma surgeons.

    PubMed

    James, Melissa K; Lee, Shi-Wen; Minneman, Jennifer A; Moore, Maureen D; Klein, Taylor R; Robitsek, R Jonathan; Barie, Phillip S; Schubl, Sebastian D

    2017-06-01

    Trauma triage decisions can be influenced by both knowledge and experience. Consequently, there may be substantial variability in computed tomography (CT) scans desired by emergency medicine physicians, surgical chief residents, and attending trauma surgeons. We quantified this difference and studied the effects of each group's decisions on missed injuries, cost, and radiation exposure. All blunt trauma activations at an urban level 1 trauma center were studied over a 6-mo period. Three months into the study, a pan-scan protocol was introduced. Prior to CT imaging, providers separately completed a survey that asked which CT scans were desired for each patient. Based on the completed surveys, hypothetical missed injuries, radiation exposure, and cost were determined. The variability in the number of CT scans desired by each of the three providers and the resulting cost and radiation exposure were not statistically significant. Substantial variability was predominantly seen in the indications for the desired scans, with the difference between proportions ranging from 3.1%-68.7%. Agreement among the three providers was highest for head and c-spine scans (80%-100%) and lowest for maxillary face (57%-80%) and chest scans (52%-74%). Overall, the missed injury rate was similar for all the providers; chief residents missed significantly more major injuries than trauma attendings during the pan-scan period (P = 0.03). Trauma training and level of training did not have a substantial effect on radiological decisions during the initial trauma assessment. This study sheds light on the growing uniformity among providers with regard to medical decision-making in the initial work-up of trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcomes in both blunt and penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Wendy R; Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Bowers, Umar; Haider, Adil H; Mellman, Thomas A; Cornwell, Edward E; Siram, Suryanarayana M; Chang, David C

    2010-04-01

    Patients with penetrating injuries are known to have worse outcomes than those with blunt trauma. We hypothesize that within each injury mechanism there should be no outcome difference between insured and uninsured patients. The National Trauma Data Bank version 7 was analyzed. Patients aged 65 years and older and burn patients were excluded. The insurance status was categorized as insured (private, government/military, or Medicaid) and uninsured. Multivariate analysis adjusted for insurance status, mechanism of injury, age, race, sex, injury severity score, shock, head injury, extremity injury, teaching hospital status, and year. A total of 1,203,243 patients were analyzed, with a mortality rate of 3.7%. The death rate was significantly higher in penetrating trauma patients versus blunt trauma patients (7.9% vs 3.0%; P < .001), and higher in the uninsured (5.3% vs 3.2%; P < .001). On multivariate analysis, uninsured patients had an increased odds of death than insured patients, in both penetrating and blunt trauma patients. Penetrating trauma patients with insurance still had a greater risk of death than blunt trauma patients without insurance. Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcome in both penetrating and blunt trauma. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma due to sea traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Vincelj, Josip; Sokol, Ivan; Samodol, Ante; Grubisić-Cabo, Robert

    2007-09-14

    Myocardial infarction as a complication of blunt chest trauma has been reported most commonly in victims of car accidents. Other cases have been very rarely reported. To our knowledge, sea traffic accident as the cause of coronary artery injury has not been described. The authors report on a rare case of acute anterior wall myocardial infarction in a 60-year-old woman following blunt chest trauma caused by sea traffic accident.

  14. Myocardial contusion in blunt trauma: clinical characteristics, means of diagnosis, and implications for patient management.

    PubMed

    Fabian, T C; Mangiante, E C; Patterson, C R; Payne, L W; Isaacson, M L

    1988-01-01

    The incidence, diagnosis, and impact on surgical management of myocardial contusion (MC) are incompletely defined. During a 12-month period, all patients admitted to a Level I trauma center with blunt trauma were prospectively evaluated for MC (n = 1,110). Those with anterior chest wall contusions, sternal or anterior rib fractures, or pain/tenderness of the anterior chest (n = 140, 13%) underwent immediate and daily ECG, and CPK isoenzymes were measured at admission and every 6 hours in the first 24 hours. Eighty-nine of these patients underwent gated ventricular angiography (GVA) and 66 underwent two-dimensional echocardiography (2D ECHO). MC was considered present if either: 1) CPK-MB was greater than or equal to 5% of total CPK, or 2) an abnormal admission ECG reverted to normal before patient discharge. Fifty-six patients (5% of admissions, 40% of those with apparent chest trauma) were positive by one or both criteria. Thirty patients (54%) were positive by CPK alone, 23 (41%) by both CPK and ECG, and three (5%) by ECG alone. Of the 53 with elevated CPK-MB, 14 (26%) were normal on admission with the remainder becoming elevated in the first 24 hours. 2D ECHO was abnormal in only three of 21 positive patients (14%), and GVA was abnormal in only three of 40 positive patients (7%). Surgical procedures requiring general anesthesia were performed in 37 (66%) of the positive patients. No significant arrhythmias developed under general anesthesia.

  15. Ruptured Gall Bladder containing Stones following Blunt Trauma Abdomen: A Rare Presentation of Hemodynamic Instability.

    PubMed

    Goel, V; Kumar, N; Soni, N

    2015-01-01

    Gall bladder injuries are seen in 2% of patients undergoing laparotomy for blunt trauma abdomen. Isolated gall bladder injury is a rare event with associated presence of stones is even rarer. The associated visceral injuries lead to intraoperative identification in most cases. Here we present a case of 30 years old male with isolated gall bladder laceration following blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnosis of gallbladder perforation after blunt injury may be suspected in patients with signs of an acute abdomen and hypotension that is not explained by blood loss. Early suspicion and prompt exploration is imperative. Cholecystectomy is an adequate treatment for the condition.

  16. Cervical esophageal rupture after blunt trauma resulting from a car accident

    PubMed Central

    Jabłoński, Sławomir; Terlecki, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic perforation of the cervical esophagus due to blunt trauma is a very rare condition which continues to be associated with significant mortality rates. The symptoms and signs of this injury are often masked by or ascribed to more common blunt thoracic injuries. This paper presents a case of cervical esophageal perforation secondary to blunt trauma resulting from a car accident. The injury was diagnosed early by computed tomography examination, and the patient underwent prompt and successful surgical repair performed to prevent the development of descending mediastinitis. PMID:27785145

  17. Brain and skull lesions resulting from use of percussive bolt, cervical dislocation by stretching, cervical dislocation by crushing and blunt trauma in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M A; Turner, P V; Nykamp, S G; Widowski, T M

    2010-11-27

    Three experiments were conducted to assess brain damage resulting from percussive bolt shooting and cervical dislocation by crushing (neck crushing) in turkey hens (mean [se] bodyweight 11.4 [0.1] kg); percussive bolt shooting and blunt trauma in turkey toms (13.1 [0.2] kg); and percussive bolt shooting, blunt trauma and cervical dislocation by stretching (neck stretching) in broiler turkeys (3.9 [0.3] kg). Brain and skull damage were assessed using macroscopic and microscopic evaluations and CT. Macroscopic subcutaneous haemorrhage was significantly greater with the percussive bolt in all three experiments (hens P=0.01, toms P=0.02, broilers P=0.0003), and skull fractures were more severe for toms (P<0.0001) and broilers (P=0.03) killed with the percussive bolt versus blunt trauma. In a subsample of turkeys, microscopic brain damage was present in all turkeys killed by percussive bolt shooting (five hens, 10 toms and four broilers) and blunt trauma (nine toms and three broilers), but only in one of four turkeys killed by neck crushing and one of four turkeys killed by neck stretching. Percussive bolt shooting and blunt trauma most likely caused death by directly disrupting brain function, whereas neck stretching and neck crushing probably resulted in death from cerebral hypoxia and ischaemia.

  18. Five-Year Retrospective Review of Blunt Renal Injuries at a Level I Trauma Center.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jessica; Brown, Megan; Assi, Zakaria I; Ferguson, Eric J

    2017-02-01

    We report the experience of a Level I trauma center in the management of blunt renal injury during a 5-year period, with special attention to those treated using angiography with embolization. The institutional trauma registry was queried for all patients with blunt renal injury between September 1, 2009 and August 30, 2014. Each injury was graded using the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma guidelines. Patients that underwent angiography with embolization were reviewed for case-specific information including imaging findings, treatment, materials used, clinical course, and mortality. The registry identified 48 blunt renal injury patients. Median Injury Severity Score was higher and hospital length of stay was significantly longer in those with blunt renal injury when compared with those without blunt renal injury (P < 0.001). The majority of patients with blunt renal injury were managed nonoperatively. Mortality was three out of 48 patients (5%). Nine patients underwent exploratory laparotomy. These operations were always performed for reasons other than the renal trauma (e.g., splenic injury, free fluid, free air). No patient underwent invasive renal operation. Six patients were treated using angiography with embolization. Of the six, one patient died of pulmonary septic complications. We conclude that selective nonoperative management is the mainstay of treatment for blunt renal injury. Angiography with embolization is a useful modality for cases of ongoing bleeding, and is typically preferable to nephrectomy in our experience.

  19. Death from undetected acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery dissection after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Puanglumyai, Supot; Thamtakerngkit, Somboon; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a common occurrence in automobile accidents. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by coronary dissection following blunt thoracic trauma is rare. We report a case of healthy 24-year-old man with a history of blunt thoracic injury with subsequent undetected AMI who died of acute decompensated heart failure 4 days after the insult. The autopsy findings showed a 90% luminal narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery by dissecting hematoma, 3 cm in length. The myocardium revealed transmural myocardial infarction affecting apex, most part of left ventricular free wall, and interventricular septum. Both lungs were heavy, wet, and noncrepitant. Histological findings of the infarcted myocardium were consistent with 3-5 days post-AMI. Sections from both lungs revealed massive pulmonary edema, reflecting acute decompensated heart failure following a large AMI secondary to coronary dissection. Blunt thoracic trauma may obscure typical chest pain associated with cardiac ischemia especially in cases with a high tolerance for pain.

  20. Bilateral ureteropelvic disruption following blunt abdominal trauma: case report.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Fumiaki; Miyazaki, Yoshibumi; Kobayashi, Tastuho; Kikuchi, Hiroko; Mastuda, Kiyoshi

    2011-07-07

    Ureteral injury occurs in less than 1% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, partly because the ureters are relatively well protected in the retroperitoneum. Bilateral ureteral injury is extremely rare, with only 10 previously reported cases. Diagnosis may be delayed if ureteric injury is not suspected, and delay of 36 hours or longer has been observed in more than 50% of patients with ureteric injury following abdominal trauma, leading to increased morbidity. A 29-year-old man was involved in a highway motor vehicle collision and was ejected from the front passenger seat even though wearing a seatbelt. He was in a preshock state at the scene of the accident. An intravenous line and left thoracic drain were inserted, and he was transported to our hospital by helicopter. Whole-body, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan showed left diaphragmatic disruption, splenic injury, and a grade I injury to the left kidney with a retroperitoneal haematoma. He underwent emergency laparotomy. The left diaphragmatic and splenic injuries were repaired. Although a retroperitoneal haematoma was observed, his renal injury was treated conservatively because the haematoma was not expanding. In the intensive care unit, the patient's haemodynamic state was stable, but there was no urinary output for 9 hours after surgery. Anuresis prompted a review of the abdominal x-ray which had been performed after the contrast-enhanced CT. Leakage of contrast material from the ureteropelvic junctions was detected, and review of the repeat CT scan revealed contrast retention in the perirenal retroperitoneum bilaterally. He underwent cystoscopy and bilateral retrograde pyelography, which showed bilateral complete ureteral disruption, preventing placement of ureteral stents. Diagnostic laparotomy revealed complete disruption of the ureteropelvic junctions bilaterally. Double-J ureteral stents were placed bilaterally and ureteropelvic anastomoses were performed. The patient's postoperative progress

  1. Screening ultrasonography of 2,204 patients with blunt abdominal trauma in the Wenchuan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jixiang; Huang, Jiwei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Heqing; Prasoon, Pankaj; Xu, Yinglong; Bai, Yannan; Qiu, Jianguo; Zeng, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Abdominal injuries constitute a small proportion of all earthquake-related traumas; however, it often resulted in fatal hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has been described as an effective triage tool in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. We aimed to present an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of screening ultrasonography for patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to various hospitals during the Wenchuan earthquake in China. We retrospectively analyzed the patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent ultrasonography after admission to various hospitals. Ultrasonography findings were considered positive if evidence of free fluid or a parenchymal injury was identified. Ultrasonography findings were compared with the findings of computed tomography, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, repeated ultrasonography, cystography, operation, and/or the clinical course. Findings from 2,204 ultrasonographic examinations were evaluated. Findings of 199 ultrasonographic examinations (9.0%) were considered positive. Of the patients, 12 (0.5%) had a false-negative ultrasonographic findings; of this group, 3 (25%) required exploratory laparotomy. Ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 91.9%, specificity of 96.9%, and an accuracy of 96.6% for detection of abdominal injuries. Positive predictive value was 68.3%, and negative predictive value was 99.4%. Screening ultrasonography is highly reliable in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma after earthquake. It should be used as an initial diagnostic modality in the evaluation of most blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnostic study, level III.

  2. Coronary artery dissection: an unusual cause of hypoxia in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Burns, Brian J; Healy, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    A 41-year-old motocross rider sustained blunt trauma to the chest following a collision with another rider. He was initially hypoxic and was given oxygen with a non-rebreather mask. He complained of chest pain. A prehospital extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (eFAST) scan was negative for pneumothorax, but demonstrated a hypokinetic left ventricle. An electrocardiogram (ECG) in the emergency department confirmed anterior myocardial infarction, found to be due to a traumatic left anterior descending coronary artery dissection. This case highlights a rare but life-threatening cause of hypoxia in blunt chest trauma.

  3. Application of Percutaneous Cardiopulmonary Support for Cardiac Tamponade Following Blunt Chest Trauma: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Yeong Dae; Cho, Jeong Su; Lee, Chung Won; Lee, Jong Geun

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS), its application has been extended to massively injured patient. Cardiac injury following blunt chest trauma brings out high mortality and morbidity. In our cases, patients had high injury severity score by blunt trauma and presented sudden hemodynamic collapse in emergency room. We quickly detected cardiac tamponade by focused assessment with sonography for trauma and implemented PCPS. As PCPS established, their vital sign restored and then, they were transferred to the operation room (OR) securely. After all injured lesion repaired, PCPS weaned successfully in OR. They were discharged without complication on day 26 and 55, retrospectively. PMID:23130310

  4. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma.

  5. [Post-traumatic aneurysm of the dorsal nasal artery. A rarity following blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Schuldt, T

    2010-12-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old male patient who appeared in our clinic with persistent swelling on the right middle nasal bridge of 3 months' standing following blunt trauma. On physical examination the swelling was pulsatile and a flow was identified on color Doppler sonography. MRT of the head demonstrated an aneurysm of the dorsal nasal artery. We treated the aneurysm in an open surgical procedure under local anaesthesia. Due to the superficial position of this artery, open injuries are common after blunt nasal trauma. Some cases of aneurysm of the temporal artery have been described. Aneurysm of the dorsal nasal artery is a rare result of nasal trauma.

  6. Evaluation of the criteria for angiotomography indications in the diagnosis of carotid and vertebral arterial injury associated with blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Blunt carotid and vertebral artery injury (BCVI) occur infrequently. The incidence of this type of injury is difficult to determine as many emergency room patients are neurologically asymptomatic. The statistics have not been reported in Brazil. The objectives of the current study were: To evaluate the accuracy of criteria used to recommend angiotomography in the diagnosis of cervical BCVI in 100 patients with blunt cervical trauma in the trauma services section of a Brazilian quaternary care hospital. Methods During a 30-month (2006-2008), all patients admitted to the emergency room of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo with blunt cervical trauma and potential risk of cervical vessel injury, were subjected to cervical angiotomography to diagnose BCVI. The data analyzed are presented as mean ± standard deviation, and statistical analyses included Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, and the Mann-Whitney test. Results During the study period 2467 blunt trauma patients were admitted. In 100 patients that met the criteria for inclusion in the study, angiotomography identified 23 with BCVI, including 17 males and six females. The mean patient age was 34.81 ± 14.84 years. Car crash (49%) and car-pedestrian accidents (24%) were the most frequent causes of injury. Ten patients had internal carotid artery injuries, two patients had common carotid artery injuries, and 11 patients had vertebral artery injuries. Seven patients presented with Degree I arterial injuries, 10 patients presented with Degree II artery injuries, four patients presented with Degree IV artery injuries, one patient presented with a Degree V artery injury, and one patient had a carotid fistula. Seven out of the 23 patients with BCVI (30.4%) presented with cervical vertebrae fractures, and 11 out of the 23 patients with BCVI (47.8%) presented with facial fractures (LeFort II and III). Conclusions Although there is no consensus regarding the criteria

  7. Successful diagnosis of pericardial rupture caused by blunt chest trauma using contrast ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Tatekoshi, Yuki; Yuda, Satoshi; Ogasawara, Makoto; Muranaka, Atsuko; Kokubu, Nobuaki; Hase, Mamoru; Tachibana, Kazutoshi; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Higami, Tetsuya; Miura, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old male developed acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery dissection and tricuspid valve injury after blunt chest trauma. Acute myocardial infarction was treated by coronary artery intervention; however, refractory heart failure with pleural effusion remained. The first transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) on admission failed to clearly visualize the tricuspid valve and right ventricle due to poor image quality. A follow-up TTE with contrast ultrasonography revealed pericardial rupture in addition to tricuspid regurgitation. Ruptures of the tricuspid papillary muscle and pericardium were confirmed during surgery and were repaired successfully. Blunt chest trauma results in various cardiac injuries including cardiac rupture, intramural hematoma, valvular injury, coronary artery injury, and electrical disturbances, leading to critical conditions and high mortality. Of such blunt trauma-induced injuries, coronary artery dissection, tricuspid valve injury, and pericardial rupture caused by blunt chest trauma are rare, and simultaneous occurrence of the three types of injuries that were successfully repaired has not been reported. In addition, this case indicates the utility of contrast ultrasonography for diagnosis of pericardial rupture caused by blunt chest trauma.

  8. Intraosseous injection of iodinated computed tomography contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Thomas E; Paxton, James H; Myers, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Intraosseous venous access can be life-saving in trauma patients when traditional methods for obtaining venous access are difficult or impossible. Because many blunt trauma patients require expeditious evaluation by computed tomography (CT) scans with intravenous contrast, it is important to evaluate whether intraosseous catheters can be used for administering CT contrast agents in lieu of waiting until secure peripheral intravenous or central venous catheter access can be established. Previous case reports have demonstrated that tibial intraosseous catheters can be used to safely administer CT contrast in the pediatric patient population. Here we report a case in which intraosseous access was the only means of administering intravenous contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient. An intraosseous catheter was placed in the standard manner in the right proximal humerus. Intravenous contrast agent was administered through the intraosseous catheter, using the standard blunt trauma protocol at our institution. CT scans were evaluated by a staff radiologist and assessed for the adequacy of diagnosis for blunt traumatic injuries. CT scans of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were considered to be adequate for diagnostic purposes and subjectively equivalent to those of studies using traditional central venous access. The intraosseous catheter was discontinued the following day. No complications of intraosseous placement or of contrast administration were identified. Intraosseous catheterization appears to be a feasible and effective alternative to traditional methods of venous access in the administration of iodinated contrast agents for CT evaluation in adult blunt trauma patients. Further study is warranted.

  9. Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury in Cervical Spine Fractures: Are More-Liberal Screening Criteria Warranted?

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Gregory; Robertson, Ryan N.; Barton, Blair M.; Cairns, Mark A.; Webb, Sharon W.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective comparative study. Objective To compare strict Biffl criteria to more-liberal criteria for computed tomography angiography (CTA) when screening for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods All CTAs performed for blunt injury between 2009 and 2011 at our institution were reviewed. All patients with cervical spine fractures who were evaluated with CTA were included; patients with penetrating trauma and atraumatic reasons for imaging were excluded. We then categorized the patients' fractures based on the indications for CTA as either within or outside Biffl criteria. For included subjects, the percentage of studies ordered for loose versus strict Biffl criteria and the resulting incidences of BCVI were determined. Results During our study period, 1,000 CTAs were performed, of which 251 met inclusion criteria. Of the injuries, 192 met Biffl criteria (76%). Forty-nine were found to have BCVIs (19.5%). Forty-one injuries were related to fractures meeting Biffl criteria (21.4%), and 8 were related to fractures not meeting those criteria (13.6%). The relative risk of a patient with a Biffl criteria cervical spine injury having a vascular injury compared with those imaged outside of Biffl criteria was 1.57 (p = 0.19). Conclusions Our data demonstrates that although cervical spine injuries identified by the Biffl criteria trend toward a higher likelihood of concomitant BCVI (21.4%), a significant incidence of 13.6% also exists within the non-Biffl fracture cohort. As a result, a more-liberal screening than proposed by Biffl may be warranted. PMID:27781188

  10. Intrathoracic pressure impulse predicts pulmonary contusion volume in ballistic blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Prat, Nicolas; Rongieras, Frédéric; Voiglio, Eric; Magnan, Pascal; Destombe, Casimir; Debord, Eric; Barbillon, Franck; Fusai, Thierry; Sarron, Jean-Claude

    2010-10-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma including behind armour blunt trauma or impact from a less lethal kinetic weapon (LLKW) projectile may cause injuries, including pulmonary contusions that can result in potentially lethal secondary complications. These lung injuries may be caused by intrathoracic pressure waves. The aim of this study was to observe dynamic changes in intrathoracic hydrostatic pressure during ballistic blunt thoracic trauma and to find correlations between these hydrostatic pressure parameters (especially the impulse parameter) and physical damages. Thirty anesthetized pigs sustained a blunt thoracic trauma. In group 1 (n = 20), pigs were protected by a National Institute of Justice class III or IV bulletproof vest and shot with 7.62 NATO bullets. In group 2 (n = 10), pigs were shot by an LLKW. Intrathoracic pressure was recorded with an intraesophageal pressure sensor and three parameters were determined: intrathoracic maximum pressure, intrathoracic maximum pressure impulse (PI(max)), and the Pd.P/dt(max), derived from Viano's viscous criterion. Relative right lower lung lobe contusion volume was also measured. Different thoracic loading conditions were obtained. PI(max) best correlated with relative pulmonary contusion volume (R² = 0.64 and p < 0.0001). This result was homogenous for all experiments and was not related to the type of chest impact (LLKW-induced trauma or behind armour blunt trauma). The PI(max) is a good predictor of pulmonary contusion volume after ballistic blunt thoracic trauma. It is a useful criterion when the kinetic energy record or thoracic wall displacement data are unavailable, and the recording and calculation of this physical value are quite simple on animals.

  11. Modeling Thoracic Blunt Trauma; Towards A Finite-Element-Based Design Methodology for Body Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Maio, M., Parks, S ., Schilke , P., Campman, S ., Meyers, C., Georgia, J., and Flemming, D., in preparation: Effects of Ballistically Induced Blunt...1 MODELING THORACIC BLUNT TRAUMA; TOWARDS A FINITE-ELEMENT-BASED DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR BODY ARMOR Martin N. Raftenberg U. S . Army Research...Section 2 the WSTM is applied to the case of the M882 bullet at 445 m/ s versus a multi-ply Kevlar vest plus thorax. For this situation

  12. Definition of hemodynamic stability in blunt trauma patients: a systematic review and assessment amongst Dutch trauma team members.

    PubMed

    Loggers, S A I; Koedam, T W A; Giannakopoulos, G F; Vandewalle, E; Erwteman, M; Zuidema, W P

    2016-11-30

    Trauma is a great contributor to mortality worldwide. One of the challenges in trauma care is early identification and management of bleeding. The circulatory status of blunt trauma patients in the emergency room is evaluated using hemodynamic (HD) parameters. However, there is no consensus on which parameters to use. In this study, we evaluate the used terms and definitions in the literature for HD stability and compare those to the opinion of Dutch trauma team members. A systematic review was performed to collect the definitions used for HD stability. Studies describing the assessment and/or treatment of blunt trauma patients in the emergency room were included. In addition, an online survey was conducted amongst Dutch trauma team members. Out of a total of 222, 67 articles were found to be eligible for inclusion. HD stability was defined in 70% of these articles. The most used parameters were systolic blood pressure and heart rate. Besides the variety of parameters, a broad range of corresponding cut-off points is noted. Despite some common ground, high inter- and intra-variability is seen for the physicians that are part of the Dutch trauma teams. All authors acknowledge HD stability as the most important factor in the assessment and management of blunt trauma patients. There is, however, no consensus in the literature as well as none-to-fair consensus amongst Dutch trauma team members in the definition of HD stability. A trauma team ready to co-operate with consensus-based opinions together with a valid scoring system is in our opinion the best method to assess and treat seriously injured trauma patients.

  13. Heterogeneity of defensive responses after exposure to trauma: blunted autonomic reactivity in response to startling sounds.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Wendy; Pole, Nnamdi; DePierro, Jonathan; Freed, Steven; Wallace, D Brian

    2013-10-01

    Research on threat responses, particularly among trauma-exposed individuals, has traditionally focused on increased autonomic arousal and reactivity. However, clinical features associated with trauma exposure, such as dissociation (e.g., shutting down or "spacing out") manifest as the opposite pattern: non-reactivity and blunted arousal. These clinical features suggest that the possibility of threat responses other than fight/flight, namely, immobilization may be undergirded by hyper- or hypo-arousal. The goal of this paper is to examine autonomic responses to a stressful stimulus (acoustic startle) using analytic approaches which have been previously used to examine defensive responses before: heart rate acceleration, heart rate deceleration, and skin conductance response. We examined these responses in relation to symptoms (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, and dissociation) and trauma exposure (cumulative exposure, age of onset) in a sample of trauma-exposed college students. We found evidence of blunted reactivity, with decreased acceleration and skin conductance, but with increased deceleration, particularly among individuals who had significant symptoms and early exposure to multiple types of trauma. However, individuals with sub-clinical symptoms and more attenuated exposure had large heart rate acceleration and skin conductance responses during the task. Taken together, these findings suggest that moderate symptoms and trauma exposure are related to exaggerated autonomic responses, while extreme symptoms and trauma exposure are related to blunted autonomic responses. These findings further suggest heterogeneity of stress responses within individuals with PTSD and with trauma exposure. © 2013.

  14. Diagnosis and management of testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Jin-Rui; Huang, Yu-Meng; Wang, Long; Liu, Long-Fei; Wei, Yong-Bao; Huang, Liang; Zhu, Quan; Zeng, Ming-Qiang; Tang, Zheng-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Testicular rupture, one of the most common complications in blunt scrotal trauma, is the rupture of tunica albuginea and extrusion of seminiferous tubules. Testicular rupture is more inclined to young men, and injury mechanisms are associated with sports and motor accidents. After history taking and essential physical examination, scrotal ultrasound is the first-line auxiliary examination. MRI is also one of the vital complementary examinations to evaluate testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma. Surgical exploration and repair may be necessary when the diagnosis of testicular rupture is definite or suspicious. Postoperative follow-up is to monitor the relief of local symptoms and changes of testicular functions. This review sums up the literatures about testicular rupture after blunt scrotal trauma in recent 16 years and also refers some new advantages and perspectives on diagnosis and management of testicular rupture.

  15. [Non-operative management of a hepatic pseudoaneurysm and a biloma complicating a blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Schott, A; Michel, F; Chaumoître, K; Merrot, T; Desjeux, A; Lagier, P; Martin, C

    2008-05-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm and bilioma are rare complications of blunt abdominal trauma in children. We report a case in an 11-year-old patient after a hepatic and splenic blunt trauma following a car accident. The initial evolution was simple with haemodynamic stability. On Day 12, a pseudoaneurysm was discovered on an abdominal magnetic resonance imaging whereas the patient presented a major pain syndrome and an icteric cholestase. Embolisation was realised a few hours later in emergency because of a haemorrhagic shock. On Day 26, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography highlighted two bilary leaks: one extrahepatic, the other intrahepatic. The first one was treated with a stent and the second one needed three drains: two peritoneal and one in the biloma. The characteristic of this case relies on the association of two complications. It underlines the need of multidiscipline and non-operative management of pediatric blunt hepatic trauma.

  16. Incidence of blunt craniocervical artery injuries: use of whole-body computed tomography trauma imaging with adapted computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Steffen K; Langner, Soenke; Baldauf, Joerg; Kirsch, Michael; Kohlmann, Thomas; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of traumatic craniocervical artery dissection varies in published trauma series. To determine the frequency of traumatic craniocervical artery injury in polytrauma patients by using standardized whole-body trauma computed tomography with adapted computed tomography angiography of the craniocervical vessels. A total of 718 consecutive patients requiring whole-body trauma computed tomography (16-row multislice) because of the mechanism of their injury patterns and an Injury Severity Scale score greater than 16 were analyzed prospectively. After a cranial scan, computed tomography angiography of the craniocervical vessels with 40 mL of iodinated contrast agent was performed using bolus tracking. The overall incidence of blunt carotid and vertebral injuries (BCVIs) in the screened population was 1.7%. BCVIs were observed in 27.3% of patients with detected isolated cervical spine injuries and in 3.9% of patients with isolated cranial fractures with or without intracranial hemorrhage, whereas 5.3% of patients with combined cervical and cranial lesions were associated with BCVIs. In addition, 0.4% of BCVIs occurred in patients without evidence of head or neck trauma. Whole-body trauma computed tomography with an adapted scanning protocol for the craniocervical vessels is a fast, safe, and feasible method for detecting vascular injuries. It allows prompt further treatment if necessary. Computed tomography angiography could be a part of a broad screening protocol for craniocervical vessels in documented injuries of the head and neck and in trauma mechanisms influencing the craniocervical region as well.

  17. Impact of Yankee Stadium Bat Day on blunt trauma in northern New York City.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, S L; Rennie, W P; Alagappan, K

    1994-03-01

    To determine the incidence of blunt trauma in northern New York City before and after the distribution of 25,000 baseball bats at Yankee Stadium. Prospective multicenter study, including ten days before and ten days after Bat Day (June 3, 1990). Ten emergency departments in the Bronx and northern Manhattan. All patients presenting to the ED with baseball bat injuries. Each hospital collected the following data for each subject: date and time of injury, patient's age and sex, extent of injury, whether a Yankee bat was used, presence of loss of consciousness, results of computed tomography scan of the brain (if performed), history source, and disposition of the patient. Average daily atmospheric temperature was recorded for each day of the study. Seventy-seven patients sustained bat injuries, 38 (49%) before and 36 (47%) after Bat Day. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to age, sex, time of injury, number and distribution of fractures and lacerations, incidence of loss of consciousness, source of history, or dispostion. There was a positive association between the number of cases on a given day and the average temperature that day (r = .5; P < .01). The distribution of 25,000 wooden baseball bats to attendees at Yankee Stadium did not increase the incidence of bat-related trauma in the Bronx and northern Manhattan. There was a positive correlation between daily temperature and the incidence of bat injury. The informal but common impressions of emergency clinicians about the cause-and-effect relationship between Bat Day and bat trauma were unfounded.

  18. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma in children: Review of the National Trauma Data Bank☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Englum, Brian R.; Gulack, Brian C.; Rice, Henry E.; Scarborough, John E.; Adibe, Obinna O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to examine the current management strategies and outcomes after blunt pancreatic trauma in children using a national patient registry. Methods Using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2007–2011, we identified all patients ≤18 years old who suffered blunt pancreatic trauma. Patients were categorized as undergoing nonoperative pancreatic management (no abdominal operation, abdominal operation without pancreatic-specific procedure, or pancreatic drainage alone) or operative pancreatic management (pancreatic resection/repair). Patient characteristics, operative details, clinical outcomes, and factors associated with operative management were examined. Results Of 610,402 pediatric cases in the NTDB, 1653 children (0.3%) had blunt pancreatic injury and 674 had information on specific location of pancreatic injury. Of these 674 cases, 514 (76.3%) underwent nonoperative pancreatic management. The groups were similar in age, gender, and race; however, pancreatic injury grade > 3, moderate to severe injury severity, and bicycle accidents were associated with operative management in multivariable analysis. Children with pancreatic head injuries or GCS motor score < 6 were less likely to undergo pancreatic operation. Overall morbidity and mortality rates were 26.5% and 5.3%, respectively. Most outcomes were similar between treatment groups, including mortality (2.5% vs. 6.7% in operative vs. nonoperative cohorts respectively; p = 0.07). Conclusion Although rare, blunt pancreatic trauma in children continues to be a morbid injury. In the largest analysis of blunt pancreatic trauma in children, we provide data on which to base future prospective studies. Operative management of pancreatic trauma occurs most often in children with distal ductal injuries, suggesting that prospective studies may want to focus on this group. PMID:27577183

  19. Splenic injury after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer (football) game.

    PubMed

    Padlipsky, Patricia S; Brindis, Seth; Young, Kelly D

    2014-10-01

    The spleen is the most commonly injured abdominal organ in children who sustain blunt abdominal trauma, and pediatric splenic injury may result from minor mechanisms of injury, including sports participation. We present 2 cases of splenic injury in soccer goalies because of blunt abdominal trauma sustained during game play. Although abdominal organ injuries are uncommon in soccer, emergency medicine and primary care physicians must be aware of the possibility. A high index of suspicion and careful physical examination are key in making the diagnosis.

  20. Intrarenal artery pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report of successful superselective angioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Antunes-Lopes, T; Pinto, R; Morgado, P; Madaleno, P; Silva, J; Silva, C; Cruz, F

    2014-01-01

    Renal artery pseudoaneurysm is a very rare complication after blunt trauma injury. We report on a case of a 54-year-old man admitted to our hospital for right flank pain and gross hematuria, 5 days after blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnosis of interlobar renal pseudoaneurysm was established by a computed tomography scan and confirmed by angiography. Successful superselective angioembolization was performed. This radiographic intervention is an effective and minimally invasive technique to stop active bleeding from renal artery pseudoaneurysms, when patients are hemodynamically stable and where technically feasible. A review of the literature was carried out. PMID:24809039

  1. Right Coronary Artery Fistula and Occlusion Causing Myocardial Infarction after Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Won Yong; Ko, Ho Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Soo; Lee, Hee Sung

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) secondary to coronary artery fistula and the subsequent occlusion of the distal right coronary artery (RCA) after blunt chest trauma is a rare entity. Here, we describe a case of coronary artery fistula and occlusion with an inferior MI that occurred following blunt chest trauma. At the initial visit to the emergency room after a car accident, this patient had been undiagnosed with acute myocardial infarction, readmitted five months after ischemic insult, and revealed to have experienced MI due to RCA-right atrial fistula and occlusion of the distal RCA. He underwent coronary surgery and recovered without complications. PMID:25207252

  2. Thyroid gland rupture: a rare finding after a blunt neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Faisal; Varshney, Rickul; Payne, Richard J; Manoukian, John J

    2013-05-01

    This is a case report of a 13 years old boy with a thyroid rupture secondary to a hockey stick blunt trauma to his neck and a literature review focused on diagnosis and management. There are 14 other cases in the literature, 7 of which required surgical intervention mainly to evacuate a hematoma. The case in this review did not develop any complications. This is the first reported case in the literature of thyroid gland rupture due to a blunt trauma in a child. Patients with thyroid gland rupture should be monitored closely for developing a hematoma or thyroid storm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Congenital spine deformities: a new screening indication for blunt cerebrovascular injuries after cervical trauma?

    PubMed

    Capone, Christine; Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad

    2010-12-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) carry significant morbidity if not diagnosed and treated early. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to recognize the injury patterns associated with this condition and to order the requisite imaging studies needed to diagnose it accurately. We report of BCVI associated with a congenital cervical spine malformation after blunt trauma. We recommend inclusion of cervical spine malformations to the current Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma screening criteria for BCVI and explain our rationale for the same.

  4. [Mandibular fractures. Experience in a trauma hospital].

    PubMed

    Rojas, René A; Julián, Gerardo; Lankin, Jorge

    2002-05-01

    Facial trauma has reached a peak in the last decades in the world; however, scanty epidemiological information is available in Chile. To report the experience in the treatment of mandibular fractures in the maxillofacial unit at Hospital del Trabajador, Santiago. A retrospective study of patients with mandibular fractures treated in a seven years period (1990-1996). Demographic and clinical aspects of the patients are analyzed, with emphasis in causes of trauma, anatomic distribution of the fractures, treatment and complications. One hundred and sixty patients (aged 14 to 65 years old) sustained 245 mandibular fractures. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of fractures (46%). The most common mandibular fracture was subcondylar. Thirty eight patients (24%) presented with associated facial fractures, while 34 (21%) had also other non-facial fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed in 88 subjects. Complications occurred in 60 patients (38%). Road traffic accidents are the main cause of mandibular fractures in this series of patients. The most common mandibular fracture is subcondylar, which can be linked to the high rate of occlusal complications observed.

  5. The case of the missing testicle: blunt scrotal trauma in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Megan H; Bradin, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    Serious blunt scrotal trauma in the pediatric population is rare and can pose significant danger to the viability of the testes. The following case describes an adolescent boy who presented with a single testis in his scrotum after low-impact perineal trauma, consistent with testicular dislocation. The literature regarding scrotal trauma includes few cases of testicular dislocation from low-impact perineal trauma. Included is a brief review of the most recent data including epidemiology, differential diagnosis, acute management, and complications pertinent to the pediatric emergency clinician.

  6. Thyroid gland rupture after blunt neck trauma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Arana-Garza, Sebastian; Juarez-Parra, Marco; Monterrubio-Rodríguez, Jeronimo; Cedillo-Alemán, Enrique; Orozco-Agüet, David; Zamudio-Vázquez, Zaire; Garza-Jasso, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Soft tissue injuries are relatively common after blunt neck trauma, because of its complex anatomy, many vital structures can be compromised. Isolated trauma to the thyroid is highly uncommon and there are few cases reported in the literature. Presentation of case A 19 year-old female patient with no known pathologies who sustained direct blunt trauma to the right frontal half of the neck after falling down from a stair case. She arrived at the ER with moderate neck swelling and pain. There were no visible hematomas and no respiratory compromise was noted. Contrast enhanced CT-scan showed rupture and hematoma of the right thyroid lobe; she underwent surgical exploration with hemi thyroidectomy and recovered uneventfully. Discussion Despite soft tissue injuries are relatively common after blunt neck trauma, isolated thyroid gland injury is extremely rare and is present in about 1–2% of the cases and in most of the cases there is an underlining pathology within the gland. Most patients arrived at the emergency room hemodynamically stable, presenting neck swelling, pain, respiratory distress, dysphagia and hoarseness. Diagnosis strategy should be focused to rule out respiratory or vascular compromise. Surgical exploration remains the most common treatment strategy. Conclusions Although the rarity of this condition, physicians should take in mind the possibility of thyroid injury after blunt neck trauma. Early detection and prompt treatment, can reduce life threatening complications. Management should be individualized to patient’s characteristics and surgeon’s experience. PMID:26001363

  7. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for blunt hepatic trauma: an animal experiment.

    PubMed

    Yekuo, Li; Shasha, Wang; Xiansheng, Zhu; Qi, Chen; Guoxin, Luo; Feng, Huo

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to study the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the diagnosis of active hemorrhage and intraparenchymal lesions in blunt hepatic trauma versus conventional ultrasound (US). Twenty heparinized and anesthetized domestic pigs have been created to animal models with blunt hepatic trauma by a special impacting device. Conventional US and CEUS were performed to determine if hepatic traumas were present. Active hemorrhage, the presence of intraparenchymal lesions, and sonographic pattern were evaluated for conventional US and CEUS, as compared with laparotomy and pathologic findings. Contrast-enhanced US detected active hemorrhage from the injured livers in all cases, but conventional US did not find that in any case. The sensitivity of CEUS and conventional US in diagnosing intraparenchymal lesions of blunt hepatic trauma were 100% and 60%, respectively. Contrast-enhanced US is more sensitive than conventional US in determining the active hemorrhage and intraparenchymal lesions in blunt hepatic trauma. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Traumatic aortic injury score (TRAINS): an easy and simple score for early detection of traumatic aortic injuries in major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Boix, Ricardo; Lopez-Perez, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2012-09-01

    To develop a risk score based on physical examination and chest X-ray findings to rapidly identify major trauma patients at risk of acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI). A multicenter retrospective study was conducted with 640 major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma classified into ATAI (aortic injury) and NATAI (no aortic injury) groups. The score data set included 76 consecutive ATAI and 304 NATAI patients from a single center, whereas the validation data set included 52 consecutive ATAI and 208 NATAI patients from three independent institutions. Bivariate analysis identified variables potentially influencing the presentation of aortic injury. Confirmed variables by logistic regression were assigned a score according to their corresponding beta coefficient which was rounded to the closest integer value (1-4). Predictors of aortic injury included widened mediastinum, hypotension less than 90 mmHg, long bone fracture, pulmonary contusion, left scapula fracture, hemothorax, and pelvic fracture. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.96. In the score data set, sensitivity was 93.42 %, specificity 85.85 %, Youden's index 0.79, positive likelihood ratio 6.60, and negative likelihood ratio 0.08. In the validation data set, sensitivity was 92.31 % and specificity 85.1 %. Given the relative infrequency of traumatic aortic injury, which often leads to missed or delayed diagnosis, application of our score has the potential to draw necessary clinical attention to the possibility of aortic injury, thus providing the chance of a prompt specific diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  9. Evaluation of leadership skills during the simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Schott, Eric; Brautigam, Robert T; Smola, Jacqueline; Burns, Karyl J

    2012-04-01

    Leadership skills of senior residents, trauma fellows, and a nurse practitioner were assessed during simulation training for the initial management of blunt trauma. This was a pilot, observational study, that in addition to skill development and assessment also sought to determine the need for a dedicated leadership training course for surgical residents. The study evaluated the leadership skills and adherence to Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines of the team leaders during simulation training. The team leaders' performances on criteria regarding prearrival planning, critical actions based on ATLS, injury identification, patient management, and communication were evaluated for each of five blunt-trauma scenarios. Although there was a statistically significant increase in leadership skills for performing ATLS critical actions, P < 0.05, there were 10 adverse events. A structured simulation program dedicated to developing skills for team leadership willbe a worthwhile endeavor at our institution.

  10. Intrathoracic Kidney after Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Halis, Fikret; Amasyali, Akin Soner; Yucak, Aysel; Yildiz, Turan; Gokce, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is responsible for most genitourinary injuries. The incidence of renal artery injury and intrathoracic kidney is quite low in patients who present with blunt trauma experiencing damage. There are four defined etiologies for intrathoracic kidney, which include real intrathoracic ectopic kidney, eventration of the diaphragm, congenital diaphragmatic herniation, and traumatic diaphragmatic rupture. The traumatic intrathoracic kidney is an extremely rare case. We presented intrathoracic kidney case after traumatic posterior diaphragmatic rupture. PMID:26881170

  11. Failure of chest X-rays to diagnose pneumothoraces after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Collins, J A; Samra, G S

    1998-01-01

    We report four cases of occult pneumothorax in patients who had suffered blunt trauma. In each case supine chest X-rays failed to diagnose an anterior pneumothorax. Subsequent spiral computerised tomography scans of the chest showed anterior pneumothoraces in all cases. In two of the cases anterior pneumothoraces were present in spite of a chest drain having been placed in the pleural cavity. We recommend the insertion of anteriorly positioned chest drains to relieve pneumothoraces in severely injured trauma patients.

  12. Ocular consequences of blunt trauma in two species of nocturnal raptors (Athene noctua and Otus scops).

    PubMed

    Seruca, Cristina; Molina-López, Rafael; Peña, Teresa; Leiva, Marta

    2012-07-01

      To determine the type, prevalence, and prognosis of ocular and periocular lesions in free-living little owls (LO) and scops owls (SO), injured by blunt trauma.   Medical records from LO and SO with ocular or periocular lesions secondary to blunt trauma were reviewed. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed in all birds. Short protocol electroretinography (ERG) and ocular ultrasound were performed as dictated by the case.   During the study period, a total of 158 LO and 99 SO with blunt trauma were admitted. Among these, 43 LO (27.8%) and 27 SO (27.3%) had ocular or periocular lesions. Bilateral injuries (72.1% LO and 81.5% SO) were more common than unilateral. Common findings in both species were: corneal erosions/superficial ulcers, anterior and posterior uveitis, cataracts, hyphema, posterior synechia, vitreal hemorrhage, and retinal detachment. Electroretinography was performed in 32 LO and eight SO, which had posterior segment lesions or opacity of the transparent media. Normal to nonrecordable b-wave amplitudes were observed. Follow-up was available in 13 LO and 11 SO. Among these, nine LO (14 eyes) and 10 SO (17 eyes) had resolution of the clinical signs following medical treatment.   Ocular lesions are common in LO and SO injured by blunt trauma. Electroretinography is a valuable diagnostic tool to assess the severity of retinal dysfunction secondary to blunt trauma and to determine the response to medical treatment. A complete ophthalmic examination is a determining factor in the early management of trauma in these species. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. CT Chest with IV Contrast Compared with CT Angiography after Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Andrea A; Stewart, Donovan; Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Sun, Beatrice; Ashrafian, Sogol; Hotz, Heidi; Chung, Rex; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Blunt aortic injury (BAI) after chest trauma is a potentially lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis is important to appropriately treat patients. The purpose of this study was to compare CT with intravenous contrast (CTI) to CT with angiography (CTA) in the initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma patients. This was a retrospective review of all blunt trauma patients who received a CTI or CTA during the initial evaluation at an urban Level I trauma center from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Two-hundred and eighty-one trauma patients met inclusion criteria. Most, 167/281 (59%) received CTI and 114/281 (41%) received CTA. There were no differences between cohorts in age, gender, initial heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale in emergency department. Mortality rates were similar for CTI and CTA (4% vs 8%, P = 0.20). CTI identified an injury in 54 per cent compared with 46 per cent in CTA (P = 0.05). Overall, 2 per cent of patients had BAI with similar rates in CTI and CTA (2% vs 2%, P = 0.80). BAI was not missed using either CTI or CTA. Trauma patients studied with CTI had similar diagnostic findings as CTA. CTI may be preferable to CTA during the initial assessment for possible BAI because of a single contrast injection for whole body CT.

  14. Blunt splenic injury: are early adverse events related to trauma, nonoperative management, or surgery?

    PubMed

    Frandon, Julien; Rodiere, Mathieu; Arvieux, Catherine; Vendrell, Anne; Boussat, Bastien; Sengel, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Bricault, Ivan; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare clinical outcomes and early adverse events of operative management (OM), nonoperative management (NOM), and NOM with splenic artery embolization (SAE) in blunt splenic injury (BSI) and identify the prognostic factors. Medical records of 136 consecutive patients with BSI admitted to a trauma center from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were separated into three groups: OM, NOM, and SAE. We focused on associated injuries and early adverse events. Multivariate analysis was performed on 23 prognostic factors to find predictors. The total survival rate was 97.1%, with four deaths all occurred in the OM group. The spleen salvage rate was 91% in NOM and SAE. At least one adverse event was observed in 32.8%, 62%, and 96% of patients in NOM, SAE, and OM groups, respectively (P < 0.001). We found significantly more deaths, infectious complications, pleural drainage, acute renal failures, and pancreatitis in OM and more pseudocysts in SAE. Six prognostic factors were statistically significant for one or more adverse events: simplified acute physiology score 2 ≥25 for almost all adverse events, age ≥50 years for acute respiratory syndrome, limb fracture for secondary bleeding, thoracic injury for pleural drainage, and at least one associated injury for pseudocyst. Adverse events were not related to the type of BSI management. Patients with BSI present worse outcome and more adverse events in OM, but this is related to the severity of injury. The main predictor of adverse events remains the severity of injury.

  15. Is behind armour blunt trauma a real threat to users of body armour? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carr, Debra J; Horsfall, I; Malbon, C

    2016-02-01

    Behind armour blunt trauma (BABT) has been defined as a non-penetrating injury caused by the rapid deformation of body armour. There has been an increasing awareness of BABT as an injury mechanism in both the military and civilian worlds; whether BABT results in serious injuries is debatable. A systematic review of the openly accessible literature was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses method to investigate those injuries classified as BABT and their severity. 50 sources were identified that included pertinent information relevant to this systematic review on BABT injuries. Typical injuries reported included skin contusion, laceration and penetration, rib fracture and contusions to lungs, kidneys, spleen and (rarely) the heart. No evidence of fatal injuries due to BABT was identified. Whether BABT can lead to life-threatening injuries when small-arms ammunition impacts body armour components designed to stop that ammunition is debatable. It should be emphasised that other data may be available in government reports that are not openly available. Further research should be considered that investigates developments in body armour, including initiatives that involve reducing burden, and how they affect BABT. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M. R.; Ahmad, W. Y. W.; Samsuri, A.; Salleh, J.; Abidin, M. H.

    2010-03-11

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367+-9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  17. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. R.; Ahmad, W. Y. W.; Samsuri, A.; Salleh, J.; Abidin, M. H.

    2010-03-01

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367±9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  18. Globe Rupture of a Post-LASIK Keratectasia Eye From Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Albert Y; Heidemann, David G

    2016-12-01

    To report a case of globe rupture in a patient with post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia after blunt trauma. Observational case report. A 42-year-old man with a history of post-LASIK ectasia sustained paracentral corneal rupture secondary to blunt trauma from a fist to his left eye (OS). Slit-lamp examination revealed rupture in the posterior stroma (inferior paracentral) of the OS with an overlying intact LASIK flap; however, the inferior edges of the LASIK flap were Seidel positive. The anterior chamber was flat. Although he was initially managed with cyanoacrylate glue and a bandage contact lens, the patient eventually required tectonic penetrating keratoplasty. The postoperative course was unremarkable, and over 1 year later, the visual acuity OS was 20/25 with -7.50 + 2.00 × 0.50. Globe rupture from blunt trauma has not been shown to be more common in patients with a history of LASIK. Although blunt trauma to the post-LASIK globe would generally incur a similar risk of rupture to that of the normal eye, keratectasia after LASIK may predispose the globe to rupture.

  19. [Sonographic diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture following blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Dietz, H G; Fendel, H

    1987-10-01

    A posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed by ultrasound and x-ray examinations 1 year after a blunt trauma of the chest and abdomen. The diaphragmatic lesion could be seen retrospectively in the initial sonograms which were performed during the acute illness. It was however not possible to confirm the rupture during laparatomy.

  20. Blunt-mechanism facial fracture patterns associated with internal carotid artery injuries: recommendations for additional screening criteria based on analysis of 4,398 patients.

    PubMed

    Mundinger, Gerhard S; Dorafshar, Amir H; Gilson, Marta M; Mithani, Suhail K; Manson, Paul N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2013-12-01

    Blunt internal carotid artery injuries (BCAIs) can result from craniofacial trauma, yet the association between craniofacial fractures and BCAIs is poorly understood. A retrospective cohort study of patients with blunt-mechanism facial fracture(s) presenting to a large trauma center was undertaken to identify facial fracture patterns predictive of BCAIs. Predictor variables included specific facial fracture patterns. Additional variables included demographic, injury mechanism, and associated injury classifications. Outcome variables included the presence or absence of BCAIs. All radiographic fracture patterns were confirmed by author review of computed tomographic imaging. BCAIs were confirmed and graded using the Biffl system. Differences in fracture patterns and demographic parameters in patients who presented with versus without concomitant BCAIs were compared, and relative risks for BCAI were calculated. Existing Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma Level III Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury (BCVI) screening criteria then were applied to the dataset to determine if additional fracture patterns would be useful in BCAI screening as determined by alterations in screening sensitivity and specificity. Seventy BCAIs were identified in 54 of 4,398 patients with facial fractures (1.2%). Bilateral fractures in each facial third, complex midface, Le Fort, and subcondylar fractures, fractures in association with the cervical spine, and basilar skull fractures were high risk for concomitant BCAI. Twenty percent of BCAIs would not have been captured by existing Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma Level III BCVI screening criteria. When patients meeting these screening criteria were removed from the study population, Le Fort I and subcondylar fractures were the only fracture patterns conferring increased risk for BCAI. Addition of these criteria to existing criteria improved the screening negative predictive value. Specific facial fracture patterns, including

  1. [Stenosis of the right major bronchus from blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Stanić, Vojkan; Vulović, Tatjana; Durković, Savo; Cvijanović, Vlado; Ristanović, Aleksandar; Gulić, Bojan; Stamenović, Davor

    2006-05-01

    A severe blunt injury to the chest might cause rupture of the tracheobronchial tree. A certain time following the management of the injury, stenosis of the bronchi may develop at the site of the rupture. We reported a patient injured in a traffic accident. The injury was followed by the signs of pneumothorax, bleeding, and respiratory insufficiency. After the management of the injury using thoracal drainage, the condition of the injured was stabilized. Two weeks later, however, difficulties in breathing and fatigue occurred. Circular stenosis of the right major bronchus was clinically, radiographically and bronchoscopically confirmed. Right thoracotomy and circular resection of the major bronchus with termino-terminal anastomosis were performed. In severe blunt injuries to the chest, it is very important to suspect the injury of the tracheobronchial tree in order to correctly understand the clinical signs of an injury and to interprete a radiographic image of it, so as to decide upon the optimal treatment on time.

  2. Children With Arachnoid Cysts Who Sustain Blunt Head Trauma: Injury Mechanisms and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alexander J; Kuppermann, Nathan; Thelen, Angela E; Stanley, Rachel M; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-03-01

    Arachnoid cysts are abnormal intracranial fluid collections, and there is concern that these cysts may bleed or rupture following blunt head trauma. Our objective was to determine the risk of cyst-related complications in a cohort of children with arachnoid cysts who were evaluated for head trauma. We analyzed the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) head trauma public use data set, which was the product of a study that enrolled children with blunt head trauma from June 2004 to September 2006. We identified children with arachnoid cysts on cranial computed tomography (CT) and described the patient demographics, mechanisms of injury, clinical presentations, CT evidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and clinical outcomes. Clinically important TBI was defined as TBI leading to: 1) death from TBI, 2) neurosurgical intervention, 3) intubation for > 24 hours for the TBI, or 4) hospitalization for 2 or more nights for the head injury in association with TBI on CT. Data were available for 43,399 children who sustained blunt head trauma, of whom 15,899 had cranial CT scans obtained and 68 (0.4%) had arachnoid cysts. Falls were the most common mechanisms of injury (47%) and 87% of children had either moderate or severe injury mechanisms. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores ranged from 6 to 15, with 61 (90%) having GCS scores of 15. Two of the children with arachnoid cysts had TBIs on CT, one of which was clinically important. There were no identified cases of arachnoid cyst-related bleeding or complications. In this cohort of 68 children with arachnoid cysts who sustained head trauma, none demonstrated cyst-related bleeding or complications. This suggests the risk of arachnoid cyst-related complications in children following blunt head trauma is low and evaluation should align with existing clinical decision rules. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. The Association between Blunt Cardiac Injury and Isolated Sternal Fracture

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, Jason; Desai, Pathik J.; Desai, Sapan S.; Kuy, SreyRam; Mata, Maggy; Cooper, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of isolated sternal fractures (ISF) throughout the world is heterogeneous. This study aimed to identify the incidence, morbidity, and mortality associated with isolated fractures of the sternum and describe current practice for diagnosis and management of ISF and cardiac injury at a level I trauma center in the UK. A retrospective cohort study of adult patients (>16 years) with ISF presenting from 2006 to 2010 was conducted. Eighty-eight patients with ISF were identified. Most patients (88%, 77) were admitted to hospital with 66% (58) of them discharged within 48 hours. Two (2%) patients had an ER EKG with abnormality but both resolved to normal sinus rhythm within 6 hours of follow-up. Serum CEs were drawn from 55 (63%) patients with only 2 (2%) having a rise in serum troponin >0.04; however, in both of these patients troponin quickly normalized. Six (7%) patients underwent echocardiograms without significant findings. In all 88 patients with ISF, no cases of clinically significant cardiac injury were identified. Patients presenting with an isolated sternal fracture with no changes on EKG or chest X-ray do not warrant an admission to hospital and may be discharged from the ER. PMID:24653859

  4. Occult pneumothorax in the blunt trauma patient: tube thoracostomy or observation?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather; Ellsmere, James; Tallon, John; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    The term occult pneumothorax (OP) describes a pneumothorax that is not suspected on the basis of either clinical examination or initial chest radiography, but is subsequently detected on computed tomography (CT) scan. The optimal management of OP in the blunt trauma setting remains controversial. Some physicians favour placement of a thoracostomy tube for patients with OP, particularly those undergoing positive pressure ventilation (PPV), while others favour close observation without chest drainage. This study was conducted both to determine the incidence of OP and to describe its current treatment status in the blunt trauma population at a Canadian tertiary trauma centre. Of interest were the rates of tube thoracostomy vs. observation without chest drainage and their respective outcomes. A retrospective review was conducted of the Nova Scotia Trauma Registry. The data on all consecutive blunt trauma patients between October 1994 and March 2003 was reviewed. Outcome measures evaluated include length of stay, discharge status-dead vs. alive, intervention and time to intervention (tube thoracostomy and its relation to institution of PPV). Direct comparison was made between the OP with tube thoracostomy group and OP without tube thoracostomy group (observation or control group). They were compared in terms of their baseline characteristics and outcome measures. In 1881 consecutive blunt trauma patients over a 102-month period there were 307 pneumothoraces of which 68 were occult. Thirty five patients with OP underwent tube thoracostomy, 33 did not. Twenty nine (82.8%) with tube thoracostomy received positive pressure ventilation (PPV), as did 16 (48.4%) in the observation group. Mean injury severity score (ISS) for tube thoracostomy and observation groups were similar (25.80 and 22.39, p=0.101) whereas length of stay (LOS) was different (17.4 and 10.0 days, p=0.026). Mortality was similar (11.4% and 9.1%). There were no tension pneumothoraces. The natural history of

  5. Comparison of outcomes following decompressive craniectomy in children with accidental and nonaccidental blunt cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Wilkinson, C Corbett; Stence, Nicholas V; Fenton, Laura Z; McNatt, Sean A; Handler, Michael H

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this study was to compare clinical outcomes following decompressive craniectomy performed for intracranial hypertension in children with nonaccidental, blunt cranial trauma with outcomes of decompressive craniectomy in children injured by other mechanisms. All children in a prospectively acquired database of trauma admissions who underwent decompressive craniectomy over a 9-year span, beginning January 1, 2000, are the basis for this study. Clinical records and neuroimaging studies were systematically reviewed. Thirty-seven children met the inclusion criteria. Nonaccidental head trauma was the most common mechanism of injury (38%). The mortality rate in patients with abusive brain injury (35.7%) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in patients with other causes of traumatic brain injury (4.3%). Children with inflicted head injuries had a 12-fold increase in the odds of death and 3-fold increase in the odds of a poor outcome (King's Outcome Scale for Closed Head Injury score of 1, 2, or 3). Children with nonaccidental blunt cranial trauma have significantly higher mortality following decompressive craniectomy than do children with other mechanisms of injury. This understanding can be interpreted to mean either that the threshold for decompression should be lower in children with nonaccidental closed head injury or that decompression is unlikely to alter the path to a fatal outcome. If decompressive craniectomy is to be effective in reducing mortality in the setting of nonaccidental blunt cranial trauma, it should be done quite early.

  6. A rare case of blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with small bowel perforation from air bags.

    PubMed

    Liverani, A; Pezzatini, M; Conte, S; Mari, F; Milillo, A; Gasparrini, M; Marino, G; Catracchia, V; -Favi, F

    2009-05-01

    Vehicle collisions represent more than 75% of mechanism of blunt abdominal trauma. In spite of the incomparable improvement of car safety devices, recent studies pointed out that the air bags might cause injuries, specially when it is not associated with seatbelt. In fact, some studies pointed out that crash victims using air bags alone have increased injury severity, hospitalisations, thoracoabdominal procedure, and rehabilitation. Some of the most frequently injured organs reported from air bag deployment are the liver (38%), the spleen (23%) and digestive system (17%). Injury of the hollow viscera are far less common. In particular, blunt abdominal trauma resulting in small bowel perforation is an infrequent lesion. These injuries are difficult to diagnose because specific signs are poor and a delay in treatment increases mortality and morbidity of the patients. We describe a case of thoracoabdominal trauma that occurred during a head-on collision after an air bag deployment without seatbelt use.

  7. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-07-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almost 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma.

  8. Esophageal perforation due to blunt chest trauma: Difficult diagnosis because of coexisting severe disturbance of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Mezuki, Satomi; Shono, Yuji; Akahoshi, Tomohiko; Hisanaga, Kana; Saeki, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Momii, Kenta; Maki, Jun; Tokuda, Kentaro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-08-19

    Esophageal perforation due to blunt trauma is a rare clinical condition, and the diagnosis is often difficult because patients have few specific symptoms. Delayed diagnosis may result in a fatal clinical course due to mediastinitis and subsequent sepsis. In this article, we describe a 26-year-old man with esophageal perforation due to blunt chest trauma resulting from a motor vehicle accident. Because a severe disturbance of consciousness masked the patient's trauma-induced thoracic symptoms, we required 11h to diagnose the esophageal perforation. Therefore, the patient developed septic shock due to mediastinitis. However, his subsequent clinical course was good because of prompt combined therapy involving surgical repair and medical treatment after the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A simulation education course for the initial management of blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Robert T; Schott, Eric; Burns, Karyl J

    2009-05-01

    A simulation education course was developed at Hartford Hospital to teach members of the trauma team the initial management of blunt trauma. Five educational scenarios were created using Sim-Man (Laerdal) with injuries to the 1. head, 2. chest, 3. abdomen, 4. extremities, and 5. multiple injuries. Students were assessed on self-efficacy and knowledge before and after participation in the scenarios, debriefing, and PowerPoint lectures. Self-efficacy increased significantly from pre- to posttesting for each of the five scenarios. Knowledge increased significantly from pre- to post-testing for the head, chest and extremities scenarios. The Simulation Education Course for Blunt Trauma is a worthwhile educational program. As with all educational efforts, attention must be given to course content, delivery, and evaluation.

  10. Delayed bile leak in a patient with grade IV blunt liver trauma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hassani, Ammar; Jabbour, Gaby; ElLabib, Mohammad; Kanbar, Ahad; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Delayed bile leak following blunt liver trauma is not common. Presentation of case We presented a case report and literature review of delayed bile leak in a young male patient who presented with grade IV blunt liver injury following a motor vehicle collision; he was a restrained driver who hit a fixed object. Physical examination was unremarkable except for revelaed tachycardia, right upper quadrant abdominal tenderness, and open left knee fracture. A diagnosis of grade IV multiple liver lacerations with large hemo-peritoneum was made and urgent exploratory laparotomy was performed. The patient developed a biloma collection post- operatively. He underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and common bile duct stenting. His recovery was uneventful, and he was discharged home after 1 month. Discussion This is a rare case with no intra or extra hepatic biliary radicle injury seen on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and no evidence of leak by ERCP. A review of the literature to highlight the incidence of delayed bile leak revealed only few reported cases. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the need for prompt diagnosis and treatment of delayed bile leak in blunt liver injuries. When these principles are followed, a successful outcome is possible. PMID:26279258

  11. Incidence of combined cranial and cervical spine injuries in patients with blunt minor trauma: are combined CT examinations of the head and cervical spine justified?

    PubMed

    Vahldiek, Janis L; Thieme, Stefan; Hamm, Bernd; Niehues, Stefan M

    2017-07-01

    Background The use of computed tomography (CT) scans of the head and cervical spine has markedly increased in patients with blunt minor trauma. The actual likelihood of a combined injury of head and cervical spine following a minor trauma is estimated to be low. Purpose To determine the incidence of such combined injuries in patients with a blunt minor trauma in order to estimate the need to derive improved diagnostic guidelines. Material and Methods A total of 1854 patients were retrospectively analyzed. All cases presented to the emergency department and in all patients combined CT scans of head and cervical spine were conducted. For the following analysis, only 1342 cases with assured blunt minor trauma were included. Data acquisition covered age, sex, and presence of a head injury as well as presence of a cervical spine injury or both. Results Of the 1342 cases, 46.9% were men. The mean age was 65.6 years. CT scans detected a head injury in 116 patients; of these, 70 cases showed an intracranial hemorrhage, 11 cases a skull fracture, and 35 cases an intracranial hemorrhage as well as a skull fracture. An injury of the cervical spine could be detected in 40 patients. A combined injury of the head and cervical spine could be found in one patient. Conclusion The paradigm of the coincidence of cranial and cervical spine injuries should be revised in patients with blunt minor trauma. Valid imaging decision algorithms are strongly needed to clinically detect high-risk patients in order to save limited resources.

  12. Transcranial Doppler investigation of hemodynamic alterations associated with blunt cervical vascular injuries in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Dianna L; Crutchfield, Kevin; Trickey, Amber W; Aldaghlas, Tayseer; Rizzo, Anne; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2013-10-01

    Blunt cervical vascular injuries, often missed with current screening methods, have substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is a need for improved screening. Elucidation of cerebral hemodynamic alterations may facilitate serial bedside monitoring and improved management. Thus, the objective of this study was to define cerebral flow alterations associated with single blunt cervical vascular injuries using transcranial Doppler sonography and subsequent Doppler waveform analyses in a trauma population. In this prospective pilot study, patients with suspected blunt cervical vascular injuries had diagnoses by computed tomographic angiography and were examined using transcranial Doppler sonography to define cerebral hemodynamics. Multiple vessel injuries were excluded for this analysis, as the focus was to identify hemodynamic alterations from isolated injuries. The inverse damping factor characterized altered extracranial flow patterns; middle cerebral artery flow velocities, the pulsatility index, and their asymmetries characterized altered intracranial flow patterns. Twenty-three trauma patients were evaluated: 4 with single internal carotid artery injuries, 5 with single vertebral artery injuries, and 14 without blunt cervical vascular injuries. All internal carotid artery injuries showed a reduced inverse damping factor in the internal carotid artery and dampened ipsilateral mean flow and peak systolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery. Vertebral artery injuries produced asymmetry of a similar magnitude in the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity with end-diastolic velocity alterations. These data indicate that extracranial and intracranial hemodynamic alterations occur with internal carotid artery and vertebral artery blunt cervical vascular injuries and can be quantified in the acute injury phase by transcranial Doppler indices. Further study is required to elucidate cerebral flow changes resulting from a single blunt cervical vascular injury

  13. Does Helicopter Emergency Care Service Improve Blunt Trauma Mortality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    to a Level I trauma center experienced a reduction in predicted mortality rates . The medical records of 78 consecutive ground ambulance patients and...demonstrated no decrease in predicted and actual mortality rates . In this group, 16 patients were predicted to die and 18 actual deaths occurred.

  14. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neur...

  15. Blunt cervical spine trauma as a cause of spinal cord injury and delayed cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M T; Robinson, H K; Bone, I; McLean, A N; Allan, D B

    2007-10-01

    Case report. To present and discuss the case of a patient who sustained a significant flexion compression injury of the cervical spine with resulting tetraplegia and development of cortical blindness. National Spinal Injuries Unit and Institute of Neurological Sciences, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Clinical and radiological follow-up of the patient. Cortical blindness resulted from vertebral artery dissection associated with blunt cervical spine trauma. The patient is registered blind and is ventilator dependent. The potential complications of blunt vertebral artery injury remain poorly recognised. Screening is routinely not performed. Advances in noninvasive radiological techniques may result in recognition of asymptomatic disease and the potential for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Evaluation of the multi-slice computed tomography outcomes in diaphragmatic injuries related to penetrating and blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Turmak, Mehmet; Deniz, Muhammed Akif; Özmen, Cihan Akgül; Aslan, Aydın

    2017-09-06

    Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture is a diagnostic challenge for both surgeons and radiologists and generally occurs secondary to blunt and penetrating trauma of thoracoabdominal region. 56 patients who underwent surgical procedure due to blunt or penetrating trauma were included to the study. There were 37 diaphragmatic ruptures in the left side and 19 patients in the right side. The most common radiological finding was "the direct monitoring of defect" (54,3%). Findings suggestive of diaphragmatic rupture must be carefully evaluated in patients with blunt or penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Extremity injuries as predictors of emergency care resource needs among blunt trauma patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Shinji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Ueno, Masato; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Ichikawa, Masao; Yokota, Junichiro

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to exhaustively examine associations between prehospital variables and emergency care resource needs among blunt trauma patients. The study included blunt trauma patients aged 15 years or older who were admitted to a tertiary care medical center in Osaka, Japan, from January 2005 to December 2009. The primary end point was a composite measure of overall emergency care resource needs. Predictive variables were easily detectable upper and lower extremity injuries. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify associations between the predictive variables and the end point; this model included other covariates known to be associated with emergency care resource needs (demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, and physiological parameters). Of 982 blunt trauma patients, 81 died, and 573 required overall emergency care resources. Upper extremity injury (odds ratio [OR], 2.60) and lower extremity injury (OR, 4.50) were significantly associated with overall emergency care resource needs after controlling for other covariates. The results of this study suggest that easily detectable extremity injuries may be useful predictors of the emergency care resource needs of trauma patients. Further studies are needed to validate the predictive values of these injuries and to determine ways to use information about extremity injuries to improve triage decisions.

  18. The presence of nonthoracic distracting injuries does not affect the initial clinical examination of the cervical spine in evaluable blunt trauma patients: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Agathoklis; Plurad, David; Barmparas, Galinos; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Bukur, Marko; Branco, Bernardino C; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-09-01

    A distracting injury mandates cervical spine (c-spine) imaging in the evaluable blunt trauma patient who demonstrates no pain or tenderness over the c-spine. The purpose of this study was to examine which distracting injuries can negatively affect the sensitivity of the standard clinical examination of the c-spine. This is a prospective observational study conducted at a Level I Trauma Center from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009. After institutional review board approval, all evaluable (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≥13) blunt trauma patients older than 16 years sustaining a c-spine injury were enrolled. A distracting injury was defined as any immediately evident bony or soft tissue injury or a complaint of non-c-spine pain whether or not an actual injury was subsequently diagnosed. Information regarding the initial clinical examination and the presence of a distracting injury was collected from the senior resident or attending trauma surgeon involved in the initial management. During the study period, 101 evaluable patients sustained a c-spine injury. Distracting injuries were present in 88 patients (87.1%). The most common was rib fracture (21.6%), followed by lower extremity fracture (20.5%) and upper extremity fracture (12.5%). Only four (4.0%) patients had no pain or tenderness on the initial examination of the c-spine. All four patients had bruising and tenderness to the upper anterior chest. None of these four patients developed neurologic sequelae or required a surgical stabilization or immobilization. C-spine imaging may not be required in the evaluable blunt trauma patient despite distracting injuries in any body regions that do not involve the upper chest. Further definition of distracting injuries is mandated to avoid unnecessary utilization of resources and to reduce the imaging burden associated with the evaluation of the c-spine.

  19. Evaluation of acute traumatic coagulopathy in dogs and cats following blunt force trauma.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Dara L; Prittie, Jennifer; Buriko, Yekaterina; Lamb, Kenneth E

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in dogs and cats following blunt trauma and to relate coagulation variables with injury severity and admission variables. Prospective, single center, observational study from 2013 to 2014. Urban private referral hospital. Eighteen and 19 client-owned dogs and cats, respectively, sustaining blunt trauma within 8 hours of presentation without prior resuscitation; 17 healthy staff and client-owned control cats METHODS: Blood samples were collected upon presentation for measurement of blood gas, lactate, blood glucose, ionized calcium, PCV, total plasma protein, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, platelet count, and thromboelastography. ATC was diagnosed in 1 dog and 1 cat on presentation. Hypercoagulability was documented in 4/18 (22%) of dogs and 1/19 (5.3%) of cats. In dogs, prolongation of PT (P = 0.018), aPTT (P = 0.013) and decrease in maximum amplitude (MA) (P = 0.027) were significantly associated with injury severity as measured by the animal trauma triage (ATT) score. In cats, PT, aPTT, MA, and clot strength (G) were not associated with injury severity. In cats, increasing blood glucose and lactate were significantly associated with decreasing MA (P = 0.041, P = 0.031) and G (P = 0.014, P = 0.03). In both dogs (P = 0.002) and cats (P = 0.007), fibrinogen concentration was significantly correlated with G. ATC is rare in minimally injured dogs and cats following blunt trauma. In dogs, ATT score is significantly associated with PT, aPTT, and MA, suggesting an increased risk of ATC in more severely injured animals. ATT score does not appear to predict coagulopathies in cats. Future studies including more severely injured animals are warranted to better characterize coagulation changes associated with blunt trauma. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  20. Severity and treatment of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Parreira, José G; Oliari, Camilla B; Malpaga, Juliano M D; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Soldá, Silvia C; Assef, José C

    2016-01-01

    to assess the severity and treatment of "occult" intra-abdominal injuries in blunt trauma victims. Retrospective analysis of charts and trauma register data of adult blunt trauma victims, admitted without abdominal pain or alterations in the abdominal physical examination, but were subsequently diagnosed with intra-abdominal injuries, in a period of 2 years. The severity was stratified according to RTS, AIS, OIS and ISS. The specific treatment for abdominal injuries and the complications related to them were assessed. Intra-abdominal injuries were diagnosed in 220 (3.8%) out of the 5785 blunt trauma victims and 76 (34.5%) met the inclusion criteria. The RTS and ISS median (lower quartile, upper quartile) were 7.84 (6.05, 7.84) and 25 (16, 34). Sixty seven percent had a GCS≥13 on admission. Injuries were identified in the spleen (34), liver (33), kidneys (9), intestines (4), diaphragm (3), bladder (3) and iliac vessels (1). Abdominal injuries scored AIS≥3 in 67% of patients. Twenty-one patients (28%) underwent laparotomy, 5 of which were nontherapeutic. The surgical procedures performed were splenectomy (8), suturing of the diaphragm (3), intestines (3), bladder (2), kidneys (1), enterectomy/anastomosis (1), ligation of the common iliac vein (1), and revascularization of the common iliac artery (1). Angiography and embolization of liver and/or spleen injuries were performed in 3 cases. Three patients developed abdominal complications, all of which were operatively treated. There were no deaths directly related to the abdominal injuries. Severe "occult" intra-abdominal injuries, requiring specific treatment, may be present in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intravenous Hemostatic Nanoparticles Increase Survival Following Blunt Trauma Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shoffstall, Andrew J.; Atkins, Kristyn T.; Groynom, Rebecca E.; Varley, Matthew E.; Everhart, Lydia M.; Lashof-Sullivan, Margaret M.; Martyn-Dow, Blaine; Butler, Robert S.; Ustin, Jeffrey S.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death for people ages 1-44, with blood loss comprising 60-70% of mortality in the absence of lethal CNS or cardiac injury. Immediate intervention is critical to improving chances of survival. While there are several products to control bleeding for external and compressible wounds including pressure dressings, tourniquets or topical materials (e.g. QuikClot, HemCon), there are no products that can be administered in the field for internal bleeding. There is a tremendous unmet need for a hemostatic agent to address internal bleeding in the field. We have developed hemostatic nanoparticles (GRGDS-NPs) that reduce bleeding times by ~50% in a rat femoral artery injury model. Here, we investigated their impact on survival following administration in a lethal liver resection injury in rats. Administration of these hemostatic nanoparticles reduced blood loss following the liver injury and dramatically and significantly increased 1-hour survival from 40 and 47% in controls (inactive nanoparticles and saline, respectively) to 80%. Furthermore, we saw no complications following administration of these nanoparticles. We further characterized the nanoparticles’ effect on clotting time (CT) and maximum clot firmness (MCF) using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), a clinical measurement of whole-blood coagulation. Clotting time is significantly reduced, with no change in MCF. Administration of these hemostatic nanoparticles after massive trauma may help staunch bleeding and improve survival in the critical window following injury, and this could fundamentally change trauma care. PMID:22998772

  2. Renal Artery Injury Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma – Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zahoor; Nabir, Syed; Ahmed, Mohamed Nadeem; Al Hilli, Shatha; Ravikumar, Vajjala; Momin, Umais Zaid

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Blunt abdominal trauma is routinely encountered in the Emergency Department. It is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality amongst the population below the age of 35 years worldwide. Renal artery injury secondary to blunt abdominal trauma however, is a rare occurrence. Here, we present two such cases, encountered in the emergency department sustaining polytrauma following motor vehicle accidents. Case Report We hereby report two interesting cases of renal artery injury sustained in polytrauma patients. In these two cases we revealed almost the entire spectrum of findings that one would expect in renal arterial injuries. Conclusions Traumatic renal artery occlusion is a rare occurrence with devastating consequences if missed on imaging. Emergency radiologists need to be aware of the CT findings so as to accurately identify renal artery injury. This case report stresses the need for immediate CT assessment of polytrauma patients with suspected renal injury, leading to timely diagnosis and urgent surgical or endovascular intervention. PMID:28058071

  3. Blunt splenic injury: are early adverse events related to trauma, nonoperative management, or surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Frandon, Julien; Rodiere, Mathieu; Arvieux, Catherine; Vendrell, Anne; Boussat, Bastien; Sengel, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Bricault, Ivan; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to compare clinical outcomes and early adverse events of operative management (OM), nonoperative management (NOM), and NOM with splenic artery embolization (SAE) in blunt splenic injury (BSI) and identify the prognostic factors. METHODS Medical records of 136 consecutive patients with BSI admitted to a trauma center from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were separated into three groups: OM, NOM, and SAE. We focused on associated injuries and early adverse events. Multivariate analysis was performed on 23 prognostic factors to find predictors. RESULTS The total survival rate was 97.1%, with four deaths all occurred in the OM group. The spleen salvage rate was 91% in NOM and SAE. At least one adverse event was observed in 32.8%, 62%, and 96% of patients in NOM, SAE, and OM groups, respectively (P < 0.001). We found significantly more deaths, infectious complications, pleural drainage, acute renal failures, and pancreatitis in OM and more pseudocysts in SAE. Six prognostic factors were statistically significant for one or more adverse events: simplified acute physiology score 2 ≥25 for almost all adverse events, age ≥50 years for acute respiratory syndrome, limb fracture for secondary bleeding, thoracic injury for pleural drainage, and at least one associated injury for pseudocyst. Adverse events were not related to the type of BSI management. CONCLUSION Patients with BSI present worse outcome and more adverse events in OM, but this is related to the severity of injury. The main predictor of adverse events remains the severity of injury. PMID:26081719

  4. Cardiac changes after simulated behind armor blunt trauma or impact of nonlethal kinetic projectile ammunition.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian N; Arborelius, Ulf P; Gryth, Dan; Sonden, Anders; Gustavsson, Jenny; Wangyal, Tashi; Svensson, Leif; Rocksén, David

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac-related injuries caused by blunt chest trauma remain a severe problem. The aim of this study was to investigate pathophysiological changes in the heart that might arise after behind armor blunt trauma or impacts of nonlethal projectiles. Sixteen pigs were shot directly at the sternum with "Sponge Round eXact I Mpact" (nonlethal ammunition; diameter 40 mm and weight 28 g) or hard-plastic ammunition (diameter 65 mm and weight 58 g) to simulate behind armor blunt trauma. To evaluate the influence of the shot location, seven additional pigs where exposed to an oblique heart shot. Physiologic parameters, electrocardiography, echocardiogram, the biochemical marker troponin I (TnI), and myocardial injuries were analyzed. Nonlethal kinetic projectiles (101-108 m/s; 143-163 J) did not cause significant pathophysiological changes. Five of 18 pigs shot with 65-mm plastic projectiles (99-133 m/s; 284-513 J) to the front or side of the thorax died directly after the shot. No major physiologic changes could be observed in surviving animals. Animals shot with an oblique heart shot (99-106 m/s; 284-326 J) demonstrated a small, but significant decrease in saturation. Energy levels over 300 J caused increased TnI and myocardial damages in most of the pigs. This study indicates that nonlethal kinetic projectiles "eXact iMpact" does not cause heart-related damage under the examined conditions. On impact, sudden heart arrest may occur independently from the cardiac's electrical cycle. The cardiac enzyme, TnI, can be used as a reliable diagnostic marker to detect heart tissue damages after blunt chest trauma.

  5. Positive FAST without hemoperitoneum due to fluid resuscitation in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Slutzman, Jonathan E; Arvold, Lisa A; Rempell, Joshua S; Stone, Michael B; Kimberly, Heidi H

    2014-10-01

    The focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) examination is an important screening tool in the evaluation of blunt trauma patients. To describe a case of a hemodynamically unstable polytrauma patient with positive FAST due to fluid resuscitation after blunt trauma. We describe a case of a hemodynamically unstable polytrauma patient who underwent massive volume resuscitation prior to transfer from a community hospital to a trauma center. On arrival at the receiving institution, the FAST examination was positive for free intraperitoneal fluid, but no hemoperitoneum or significant intra-abdominal injuries were found during laparotomy. In this case, it is postulated that transudative intraperitoneal fluid secondary to massive volume resuscitation resulted in a positive FAST examination. This case highlights potential issues specific to resuscitated trauma patients with prolonged transport times. Further study is likely needed to assess what changes, if any, should be made in algorithms to address the effect of prior resuscitative efforts on the test characteristics of the FAST examination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rare electrocution due to powerline contact in a hot-air balloon: comparison with fatalities from blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    McConnell, T S; Zumwalt, R E; Wahe, J; Haikal, N A; McFeeley, P J

    1992-09-01

    Powerline contact by hot-air balloons is one of the most frequent concurrences in balloon accidents resulting in injury or death. Injuries and deaths are usually a result of blunt trauma from falls. In this report, we describe the aircraft, the circumstances of the accidents and the autopsy data in two powerline contact accidents involving three deaths, one from electrocution and two, from blunt trauma sustained in falls. Appropriate pilot behavior is briefly discussed.

  7. Emergency department practice variation in computed tomography use for children with minor blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Rachel M; Hoyle, John D; Dayan, Peter S; Atabaki, Shireen; Lee, Lois; Lillis, Kathy; Gorelick, Marc H; Holubkov, Richard; Miskin, Michelle; Holmes, James F; Dean, J Michael; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    To describe factors associated with computed tomography (CT) use for children with minor blunt head trauma that are evaluated in emergency departments. Planned secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of children <18 years with minor blunt head trauma between 2004 and 2006 at 25 emergency departments. CT scans were obtained at the discretion of treating clinicians. We risk-adjusted patients for clinically important traumatic brain injuries and performed multivariable regression analyses. Outcome measures were rates of CT use by hospital and by clinician training type. CT rates varied between 19.2% and 69.2% across hospitals. Risk adjustment had little effect on the differential rate of CT use. In low- and middle-risk patients, clinicians obtained CTs more frequently at suburban and nonfreestanding children's hospitals. Physicians with emergency medicine (EM) residency training obtained CTs at greater rates than physicians with pediatric residency or pediatric EM training. In multivariable analyses, compared with pediatric EM-trained physicians, the OR for CT use among EM-trained physicians in children <2 years was 1.24 (95% CI 1.04-1.46), and for children >2 years was 1.68 (95% CI 1.50-1.89). Physicians of all training backgrounds, however, overused CT scans in low-risk children. Substantial variation exists in the use of CT for children with minor blunt head trauma not explained by patient severity or rates of positive CT scans or clinically important traumatic brain injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Homicide by blunt trauma in Brescia county (northern Italy) between 1982 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Verzeletti, Andrea; Bin, Paola; De Ferrari, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Blunt force injuries are produced by a variety of objects, including hands and feet (which is human strength) and many different weapons. Some of these objects produce distinctive patterns of injury of potential evidentiary value. This article presents a series of 53 homicides by blunt trauma along the period from 1982 to 2012, representing 16% of all homicides treated by the University Institute of Forensic Medicine in Brescia (northern Italy). Fifty-seven percent (30 cases) of the victims were male. The mean age of the victims was 47.9 years. The weapon most frequently involved was human strength. Not surprisingly, head trauma was the most common cause of death (66%). Forty-seven percent (25 cases) of the victims survived their assaults for varying periods. Homicides due to blunt trauma are still a relevant challenge for the forensic pathologist, who must obtain a complete and accurate history of the crime (including details regarding the crime scene), interpret patterns of injury and other findings at autopsy, and correlate all of the findings to make an accurate ruling of the cause and manner of death.

  9. [The mechanisms of formation of liver injuries associated with the blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovina, I A; Dubrovin, I A

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of liver damage associated with the blunt abdominal trauma are considered based on the analysis of the literature publications. The general characteristic of these mechanisms and the processes underlying the development of liver injuries is presented. It is argued that the mechanisms underlying the formation of damages to the liver differ depending on the form of the traumatic impact, the injurious factor, and the processes leading to the destruction of the hepatic tissue. The main forms of traumatic impact in the case of a blunt abdominal trauma include the strike (blow), pressure, and concussion of the organ while the major traumatic factors are deformation, displacement, and "shock-resistant effects". The mechanisms underlying tissue destruction are compression and stretching. These two mechanisms are responsible for the formation of different variants of liver destruction. The results of the study suggest the necessity of the search for other mechanisms of degradation of the hepatic tissue following a blunt abdominal trauma for the improvement of forensic medical diagnostics of its cause and the underlying mechanism.

  10. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cagini, Lucio; Gravante, Sabrina; Malaspina, Corrado Maria; Cesarano, Elviro; Giganti, Melchiorre; Rebonato, Alberto; Fonio, Paolo; Scialpi, Michele

    2013-07-15

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children.

  11. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children. PMID:23902930

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  13. [Urogenital trauma associated with pelvic ring fractures].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, T; Houcek, P; Hora, M; Hlavácová, J; Linhart, M

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate, in a retrospective study, injuries to the urogenital tract in patients with pelvic ring fractures. MATERIAL In the years 1998-2007, a total of 308 patients with pelvic ring fractures were treated. The study did not comprise patients with low-energy fractures, such as apophyseolysis in children, osteoporotic bone fractures or pathologic fractures. It also did not include patients with multiple injuries who died within 6 hours of admission to the hospital. The group consisted of 186 men and 122 women with an average age of 34 (range, 6 to 76) years. The fractures sustained were classified as type A in 5 %, type B in 57 % and type C in 38 % of the patients. The average follow-up was 71 (range, 13 to 121) months. A primary injury to the urogenital tract was recorded in 50 (16 %) patients. Injury to the urethra was found in 23 (7.5%) and urinary bladder trauma in 18 (6%) patients, vaginal injury was in four women (1%), and penis injury in three (1%) and lacerated testicles in two men (1%). Injury to the urogenital tract was associated with a pelvic ring fracture type A in 5 %, type B in 34 % and type C in 61 % of the patients. Out of the 23 patients with urethral trauma, only six (26 %) were free from functional and subjective complaints; eight (35 %) continued to receive therapy for urethral stenosis seven (30 %) reported urinary incontinence, and seven men (30 %) had erection problems. In six patients (26%) the lasting sequelae were combined. The 18 patients with injury to the bladder reported no subjective complaints at a one-year follow-up. Two patients with penis root injury had erectile dysfunction. Two patients with the loss of both testicles were in the care of a psychiatrist. The patients' satisfaction was evaluated on a 0-to10-point scale. The average value for the whole group was 4.1 points. In the patients with erectile dysfunction, the value was 0.8, and in those with isolated injury to the urinary bladder it was 9.4 points. The increasing

  14. Prevalence of Intracranial Hemorrhage after Blunt Head Trauma in Patients on Pre-injury Dabigatran

    PubMed Central

    Chenoweth, James A.; Johnson, M. Austin; Shook, Laura; Sutter, Mark E.; Nishijima, Daniel K.; Holmes, James F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dabigatran etexilate was the first direct-acting oral anticoagulant approved in the United States. The prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage after blunt head trauma in patients on dabigatran is currently unknown, complicating adequate ability to accurately compare the risks and benefits of dabigatran to alternative anticoagulants. We aimed to determine the prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage for patients on dabigatran presenting to a Level I trauma center. Methods This is a retrospective observational study of adult patients on dabigatran who presented to a Level I trauma center and received cranial computed tomography (CT) following blunt head trauma. Patients who met inclusion criteria underwent manual chart abstraction. Our primary outcome was intracranial hemorrhage on initial cranial CT. Results We included a total of 33 eligible patient visits for analysis. Mean age was 74.8 years (SD 11.2, range 55–91). The most common cause of injury was ground-level fall (n = 22, 66.7%). One patient (3.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.[1–15.8%]) had intracranial hemorrhage on cranial CT. No patients (0%, 95% CI [0–8.7%]) required neurosurgical intervention. One in-hospital death occurred from infection. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage after blunt head trauma for patients on dabigatran presenting to the emergency department, including those not admitted. The intracranial hemorrhage prevalence in our study is similar to previous reports for patients on warfarin. Further studies are needed to determine if the prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage seen in our patient population is true for a larger patient population in more diverse clinical settings.

  15. The BIG Score and Prediction of Mortality in Pediatric Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Adrienne L; Wales, Paul W; Malik, Tahira; Stephens, Derek; Razik, Fathima; Schuh, Suzanne

    2015-09-01

    To examine the association between in-hospital mortality and the BIG (composed of the base deficit [B], International normalized ratio [I], Glasgow Coma Scale [G]) score measured on arrival to the emergency department in pediatric blunt trauma patients, adjusted for pre-hospital intubation, volume administration, and presence of hypotension and head injury. We also examined the association between the BIG score and mortality in patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). A retrospective 2001-2012 trauma database review of patients with blunt trauma ≤ 17 years old with an Injury Severity score ≥ 12. Charts were reviewed for in-hospital mortality, components of the BIG score upon arrival to the emergency department, prehospital intubation, crystalloids ≥ 20 mL/kg, presence of hypotension, head injury, and disposition. 50/621 (8%) of the study patients died. Independent mortality predictors were the BIG score (OR 11, 95% CI 6-25), prior fluid bolus (OR 3, 95% CI 1.3-9), and prior intubation (OR 8, 95% CI 2-40). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.95 (CI 0.93-0.98), with the optimal BIG cutoff of 16. With BIG <16, death rate was 3/496 (0.006, 95% CI 0.001-0.007) vs 47/125 (0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.7) with BIG ≥ 16, (P < .0001). In patients requiring admission to the ICU, the BIG score remained predictive of mortality (OR 14.3, 95% CI 7.3-32, P < .0001). The BIG score accurately predicts mortality in a population of North American pediatric patients with blunt trauma independent of pre-hospital interventions, presence of head injury, and hypotension, and identifies children with a high probability of survival (BIG <16). The BIG score is also associated with mortality in pediatric patients with trauma requiring admission to the ICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine on blunt chest trauma-induced pulmonary contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojing; Song, Xuemin; Li, Ningtao; Zhan, Liying; Meng, Qingtao; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2013-02-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a new and highly selective α2-adrenoreceptor agonist with potent anti-inflammatory capacity. This study explored the effects of dexmedetomidine on regulating hemodynamics, the plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) levels, immunohistochemical localization of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) from blunt chest trauma-induced pulmonary contusion in rats. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into five equal groups (n = 10) as follows: uninjured control group, uninjured plus dexmedetomidine group, injured group, injured plus dexmedetomidine group, injured plus dexmedetomidine plus yohimbine (IDY), an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, group. Dexmedetomidine was infused continuously through the left femoral vein cannula at the rate of 5.0 µg/kg per hour after blunt chest trauma 30 minutes in uninjured plus dexmedetomidine group, injured plus dexmedetomidine group, and IDY group. Animals in the IDY group received 0.2-mg/kg yohimbine immediately after the administration of dexmedetomidine. The right femoral artery was cannulated to monitor mean arterial pressure and heart rate and to draw blood samples. The plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The lung tissue NF-κB expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Bilateral blunt chest trauma produced progressive hypotension and a prolonged descent in heart rate. The plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels as well as the NF-κB activation of lung significantly increased after blunt chest trauma challenge alone. Dexmedetomidine not only significantly modified hemodynamics and relieved the infiltration of inflammatory cells into alveolar spaces but also inhibited the plasma TNF-α and IL-1β production as well as the lung NF-κB activation (p < 0.05, respectively). Yohimbine treatment significantly reversed the effects of dexmedetomidine (p < 0.05). The administration of dexmedetomidine has beneficial effects on pulmonary

  17. Blunt trauma of thorax with subclavian and axillary artery lesion--case report.

    PubMed

    Fudurić, Jurica; Erdeljac, Željko; Frketić, Ivan; Miletić, Matija; Zadro, Ana Soštarić; Bacić, Ivan; Rašić, Zarko; Zadro, Zvonko; Martinac, Miran; Missoni, Eduard

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case of blunt trauma of the axillary artery in a 20-year-old man who was injured as a motorcycle rider and received severe body injuries. Injuries included severe trauma of the left lower leg with contusion and extensive soft tissue and bone trauma of these regions with poor general condition and with the presence of clinical signs of traumatic shock. Upon arrival, we found that in addition to earlier clearly visible trauma to the leg, there was a hematoma of the medial side of the left supraclavicular region and the absence of the radial artery pulse with paralysis of the left arm. Given the clinical findings, emergency radiological examination was made to the patient (X-ray, US, CDFI, MSCT-angiography) and we found out that there was trauma of axillary artery with clear signs of thrombosis of extra thoracic part of subclavian artery due to its transition into the axillary artery. After hemodynamic stabilization, above knee amputation of the left leg was performed and emergency exploration of earlier mentioned arteries. Bypass of the damaged arteries with synthetic graft 6 mm in diameter was made. Control MSCT angiography showed normal flow in the arterial tree of the whole left hand and the MRI of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle did not found lesions of the brachial plexus. SSEP demonstrated the absence of pulses on the left hand. Patient on regular check-ups showed normal general condition, with adequate passable graft and pronounced paralysis on the left hand. In the process of rehabilitation physiotherapy was also included. Blunt trauma to the axillary artery is an extremely rare example of trauma of blood vessels which makes only 0.03% of all vascular injuries.

  18. Pain management for blunt thoracic trauma: A joint practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Trauma Anesthesiology Society.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel Michael; Smith, Charles E; Varon, Albert J; Hasenboehler, Erik A; Sultan, Shahnaz; Shaefer, Gregory; To, Kathleen B; Fox, Adam D; Alley, Darrell E R; Ditillo, Michael; Joseph, Bellal A; Robinson, Bryce R H; Haut, Elliot R

    2016-11-01

    Thoracic trauma is the second most prevalent nonintentional injury in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity. Analgesia for blunt thoracic trauma was first addressed by the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) with a practice management guideline published in 2005. Since that time, it was hypothesized that there have been advances in the analgesic management for blunt thoracic trauma. As a result, updated guidelines for this topic using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) framework recently adopted by EAST are presented. Five systematic reviews were conducted using multiple databases. The search retrieved articles regarding analgesia for blunt thoracic trauma from January1967 to August 2015. Critical outcomes of interest were analgesia, postoperative pulmonary complications, changes in pulmonary function tests, need for endotracheal intubation, and mortality. Important outcomes of interest examined included hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. Seventy articles were identified. Of these, 28 articles were selected to construct the guidelines. The overall risk of bias for all studies was high. The majority of included studies examined epidural analgesia. Epidural analgesia was associated with lower short-term pain scores in most studies, but the quality and quantity of evidence were very low, and no firm evidence of benefit or harm was found when this modality was compared with other analgesic interventions. The quality of evidence for paravertebral block, intrapleural analgesia, multimodal analgesia, and intercostal nerve blocks was very low as assessed by GRADE. The limitations with the available literature precluded the formulation of strong recommendations by our panel. We propose two evidence-based recommendations regarding analgesia for patients with blunt thoracic trauma. The overall risk of bias for all studies was high. The limitations with the available literature

  19. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings

    PubMed Central

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. Methods: The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. Results: 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. Conclusion: 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy. PMID:27299142

  20. Classification of blunt aortic injuries a new systematic overview of aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Prijon, Ticijana; Ermenc, Branko

    2010-02-25

    Blunt (non-penetrating) aortic injuries, in which the arterial wall is damaged in the direction from the intima towards the adventitia, are most commonly the result of a traffic accident. The various forms of blunt aortic injuries, from limited laceration of the intima to complete transection of the aorta, depend on the morphological structure of the arterial wall and the strength of forces causing the trauma. An overview of the literature and medical documentation reveals that different terms, including tear, laceration, disruption, transection, rupture and pseudoaneurysm, are used to describe certain forms of traumatic aortic injuries, which can lead to misinterpretation of findings or diagnoses. We therefore, propose a classification that would enable uniform systematic screening of all forms of blunt aortic injuries. In a retrospective examination of autopsy reports from 1999 to 2006, all those who had died in traffic accidents and who had blunt aortic injuries were selected from the archive at the Institute of Forensic Medicine of the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Blunt aortic injuries (ruptures) were classified into three basic types and corresponding subtypes: type I (intramural), type II (transmural) and type III (multiple) aortic ruptures. The study included 230 deceased persons with 355 aortic ruptures. According to our classification, type I ruptures were observed in 25 (11%), type II ruptures in 131 (57%) and type III ruptures in 74 (32%) cases. The new classification we propose allows simple and systematic screening of all types of blunt aortic injuries. It prevents misinterpretation of various types of aortic injury in medical practice. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    PubMed

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Paediatric blunt abdominal trauma - are we doing too many computed tomography scans?

    PubMed

    Arnold, M; Moore, S W

    2013-02-14

    Blunt abdominal trauma in childhood contributes significantly to both morbidity and mortality. Selective non-operative management of blunt abdominal trauma in children depends on both diagnostic and clinical factors. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is widely used to facilitate better management. Increased availability of CT may, however, result in its overuse in the management of blunt abdominal trauma in children, which carries significant radiation exposure risks. To evaluate the use and value of CT scanning in the overall management and outcome of blunt abdominal trauma in children in the Tygerberg Academic Hospital trauma unit, Parow, Cape Town, South Africa, before and after improved access to CT as a result of installation of a new rapid CT scanner in the trauma management area (previously the scanner had been 4 floors away). Patients aged 0 - 13 years who were referred with blunt abdominal trauma due to vehicle-related accidents before the introduction of the new CT scanner (group 1, n=66, November 2003 - March 2009) were compared with those seen in the 1-year period after the scanner was installed (group 2, n=37, April 2009 - April 2010). Details of clinical presentation, imaging results and their influence on management were retrospectively reviewed. A follow-up group was evaluated after stricter criteria for abdominal CT scanning (viz. prior evaluation by paediatric surgical personnel) were introduced (group 3, n=14, November 2011 - May 2012) to evaluate the impact of this clinical screening on the rate of negative scans. There were 66 patients in group 1 and 37 in group 2. An apparent increase in CT use with increased availability was accompanied by a marked increase in negative CT scans (38.9% compared with 6.2%; p<0.006). Despite a slightly higher prevalence of associated injuries in group 2, as well as a slightly longer length of hospital stay, there was a similar prevalence of intra-abdominal injuries detected in positive scans in the two groups

  3. Origin of unrealistic blunting during atomistic fracture simulations based on MEAM potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Won-Seok; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2014-06-01

    Atomistic simulations based on interatomic potentials have frequently failed to correctly reproduce the brittle fracture of materials, showing an unrealistic blunting. We analyse the origin of the unrealistic blunting during atomistic simulations by modified embedded-atom method (MEAM) potentials for experimentally well-known brittle materials such as bcc tungsten and diamond silicon. The radial cut-off which has been thought to give no influence on MEAM calculations is found to have a decisive effect on the crack propagation behaviour. Extending both cut-off distance and truncation range can prevent the unrealistic blunting, reproducing many well-known fracture behaviour which have been difficult to reproduce. The result provides a guideline for future atomistic simulations that focus on various fracture-related phenomena including the failure of metallic-covalent bonding material systems using MEAM potentials.

  4. Aortic regurgitation and sinus of Valsalva-right atrial fistula after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Rehr, R B; Mack, M; Firth, B G

    1982-01-01

    Non-penetrating chest trauma commonly causes a wide variety of cardiac injuries. Disruption of the aortic valve with resultant aortic regurgitation is not uncommon; conversely, a sinus of Valsalva-right atrial fistula, in the absence of a congenital sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, has been reported only once previously. This report describes the detection by preoperative cardiac catheterisation of both aortic regurgitation, and a sinus of Valsalva-right atrial fistula after blunt chest trauma, and its surgical management. The need for preoperative cardiac catheterisation in patients suffering from non-penetrating cardiac trauma is emphasised, even when the diagnosis appears cleas, because of the diverse nature and possible multiplicity of cardiac lesions. Images PMID:7126393

  5. Traumatic optic neuropathy prediction after blunt facial trauma: derivation of a risk score based on facial CT findings at admission.

    PubMed

    Bodanapally, Uttam K; Van der Byl, Giulia; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Katzman, Lee; Geraymovych, Elena; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Mirvis, Stuart E; Sudini, Kuladeep R; Krejza, Jaroslaw; Shin, Robert Kang

    2014-09-01

    To determine the specific facial computed tomographic (CT) findings that can be used to predict traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) in patients with blunt craniofacial trauma and propose a scoring system to identify patients at highest risk of TON. This study was compliant with HIPAA, and permission was obtained from the institutional review board. Facial CT examination findings in 637 consecutive patients with a history of blunt facial trauma were evaluated retrospectively. The following CT variables were evaluated: midfacial fractures, extraconal hematoma, intraconal hematoma, hematoma along the optic nerve, hematoma along the posterior globe, optic canal fracture, nerve impingement by optic canal fracture fragment, extraconal emphysema, and intraconal emphysema. A prediction model was derived by using regression analysis, followed by receiver operating characteristic analysis to assess the diagnostic performance. To examine the degree of overfitting of the prediction model, a k-fold cross-validation procedure (k = 5) was performed. The ability of the cross-validated model to allow prediction of TON was examined by comparing the mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) from cross-validations with that obtained from the observations used to create the model. The five CT variables with significance as predictors were intraconal hematoma (odds ratio, 12.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.16, 31.42; P < .001), intraconal emphysema (odds ratio, 5.21; 95% CI: 2.03, 13.36; P = .001), optic canal fracture (odds ratio, 4.45; 95% CI: 1.91, 10.35; P = .001), hematoma along the posterior globe (odds ratio, 0.326; 95% CI: 0.111, 0.958; P = .041), and extraconal hematoma (odds ratio, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.03, 5.41; P = .042). The AUC was 0.818 (95% CI: 0.734, 0.902) for the proposed model based on the observations used to create the model and 0.812 (95% CI: 0.723, 0.9) after cross-validation, excluding substantial overfitting of the model. The risk model

  6. Use of abdominal computed tomography in blunt trauma: Do we scan too much?

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Bryan G.; Bigelow, Eric; Yelle, Jean-Denis; Pagliarello, Guiseppe

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To determine what proportion of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans ordered after blunt trauma are positive and the applicability and accuracy of existing clinical prediction rules for obtaining a CT scan of the abdomen in this setting. Setting A leading trauma hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients and methods All patients with blunt trauma admitted to hospital over a 1-year period having an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 who underwent CT of the abdomen during the initial assessment. Recorded data included age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, ISS, type of injuries, number of abdominal CT scans ordered, and scan results. Two clinical prediction rules were found in the literature that identify patients likely to have intra-abdominal injuries. These rules were applied retrospectively to the cohort. The predicted proportion of positive CT scans was compared with the observed proportion, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were estimated. Results Of the 297 patients entered in the study, 109 underwent abdominal CT. The median age was 32 years, 71% were male and the median ISS was 24. In only 36.7% (40 of 109) of scans were findings suggestive of intra-abdominal injuries. Application of one of the clinical prediction rules gave a sensitivity of 93.8% and specificity of 25.5% but excluded 23% of patients because of a GCS score less than 11. The second prediction rule tested could be applied to all patients and was highly sensitive (92.5%) and specific (100.0%). Conclusions The assessment of the abdomen in blunt trauma remains a challenge. Accuracy in predicting positive scans in equivocal cases is poor. Retrospective application of an existing clinical prediction rule was found to be highly accurate in identifying patients with positive CT findings. Prospective use of such a rule could reduce the number of CT scans ordered without missing significant injuries. PMID

  7. Retrospective evaluation of the BIG score to predict mortality in pediatric blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Grandjean-Blanchet, Charlotte; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Beaudin, Marianne; Gravel, Jocelyn

    2017-08-14

    This study's objective was to measure the criterion validity of the BIG score (a new pediatric trauma score composed of the initial base deficit [BD], international normalized ratio [INR], and Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS]) to predict in-hospital mortality among children admitted to the emergency department with blunt trauma requiring an admission to the intensive care unit, knowing that a score <16 identifies children with a high probability of survival. This was a retrospective cohort study performed in a single tertiary care pediatric hospital between 2008 and 2016. Participants were all children admitted to the emergency department for a blunt trauma requiring intensive care unit admission or who died in the emergency department. The primary analysis was the association between a BIG score ≥16 and in-hospital mortality. Twenty-eight children died among the 336 who met the inclusion criteria. Two hundred eighty-four children had information on the three components of the BIG score, and they were included in the primary analysis. A BIG score ≥16 demonstrated a sensitivity of 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.76-0.98) and specificity of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.78-0.87) to identify mortality. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, the area under the curve was higher for the BIG score (0.97; 95% IC: 0.95-0.99) in comparison to the Injury Severity Score (0.78; 95% IC: 0.71-0.85). In this retrospective cohort, the BIG score was an excellent predictor of survival for children admitted to the emergency department following a blunt trauma.

  8. Effect of Cerebrospinal Fluid Modelling on Spherically Convergent Shear Waves during Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Madhukar, Amit; Chen, Ying; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-03-14

    The MRI-based computational model, previously validated by tagged MRI and HARP imaging analysis technique on in vivo human brain deformation, is employed to study transient wave dynamics during blunt head trauma. Three different constitutive models are used for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): incompressible solid elastic, viscoelastic and fluid-like elastic using an equation of state model. Three impact cases are simulated which indicate that the blunt impacts give rise not only to a fast pressure wave but also to a slow, and potentially much more damaging, shear (distortional) wave that converges spherically towards the brain center. The wave amplification due to spherical geometry is balanced by damping due to tissues' viscoelasticity and the heterogeneous brain structure, suggesting a stochastic competition of these two opposite effects. It is observed that this convergent shear wave is dependent on the constitutive property of the CSF whereas the peak pressure is not as significantly affected.

  9. Origin of the 44-mm behind-armor blunt trauma standard.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Erin; Gillich, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    A number of armed assaults on public officials occurred in the early 1970s, which prompted the Lightweight Soft Body Armor Program to develop modern, concealable, soft body armor. Methodology needed to be developed to (1) determine the effectiveness of the soft body armor to stop bullet penetration and (2) assess the potential injury from nonpenetrating blunt impacts to the body. Extensive research was performed under the program to develop methodologies to assess soft body armor, including behind-armor blunt trauma (BABT) evaluation. This methodology is still used today, and it has been applied extensively beyond the original intent. However, the origin of this methodology is not well understood by many researchers in the various fields in which it is being applied because the original documentation is difficult to obtain. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the BABT to offer researchers information about its history and limitations.

  10. Early Secondary Neurologic Deterioration After Blunt Spinal Trauma: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Oto, Brandon; Corey, Domenic John; Oswald, James; Sifford, Derek; Walsh, Brooks

    2015-10-01

    The objectives were to review published reports of secondary neurologic deterioration in the early stages of care after blunt spinal trauma and describe its nature, context, and associated risk factors. The authors searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases for English-language studies. Cases were included meeting the criteria age 16 years or older, nonpenetrating trauma, and experiencing neurologic deterioration during prehospital or emergency department (ED) care prior to definitive management (e.g., discharge, spinal clearance by computed tomography, admission to an inpatient service, or surgical intervention). Results were qualitatively analyzed for characteristics and themes. Forty-one qualifying cases were identified from 12 papers. In 30 cases, the new deficits were apparently spontaneous and were not detected until routine reassessment. In 12 cases the authors did attribute deterioration to temporally associated precipitants, seven of which were possibly iatrogenic; these included removal of a cervical collar, placement of a halo device, patient agitation, performance of flexion/extension films, "unintentional manipulation," falling in or near the ED, and forced collar application in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Thirteen cases occurred during prehospital care, none of them sudden and movement-provoked, and all reported by a single study. Published reports of early secondary neurologic deterioration after blunt spinal trauma are exceptionally rare and generally poorly documented. High-risk features may include altered mental status and ankylosing spondylitis. It is unclear how often events are linked with spontaneous patient movement and whether such events are preventable. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. Complementary exams in blunt torso trauma. Perform only radiographs and fast: is it safe?

    PubMed

    Botelho Filho, Fábio Mendes; de Oliveira e Silva, Roberto Carlos; Starling, Sizenando Vieira; Zille, Diego Pereira; Drumond, Domingos André Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate effectiveness of using chest X-ray (CXR), pelvis X-ray (RXP) and FAST (Focused Abdominal Sonography on Trauma) to exclude significant lesions of the body in blunt trauma. a prospective study involving 74 patients whom made the three tests (CXR, RXP and FAST) during the initial evaluation between October 2013 and February 2014. The results were compared to the tomography of the same patients or clinical outcome. If the patient did not have alterations on the CT scans or during the observation time, the initial workup was considered safe. All patients were evaluated at the Hospital João XXIII, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. of the 74 patients studied the average age was 33 years, RTS: 6.98, ECG: 12. From 44 (59.45%) patients with exams (radiographs and FAST) unchanged, three had significant injuries (two splenic injuries and one liver injury) diagnosed by clinical monitoring. The remaining patients - 30 (40.55%) - had at least one alteration in conventional tests. Of these group 27 (90%) had significant injuries and three (10%) minor injuries. The sensitivity of all three tests for screening considerable lesions was 90% and the specificity was 93%. The negative predictive value was 93% and the positive predictive value 89%. this research showed that all the three exams - chest X-ray, pelvis and FAST - are safe to lead with the blunt trauma if well used and associated with clinical examination.

  12. Blunt abdominal trauma. A 5-year analysis of 870 patients requiring celiotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, E F

    1984-01-01

    This study represents the experience with blunt trauma to the abdomen of patients from a major regional trauma center. Eight hundred and seventy patients with blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed, representing 12.89% of the total admissions over a 5-year period. The motor vehicle continues to be the major cause (89.5%) of injury to these patients. Thirty per cent had positive blood alcohol. Intra-abdominal injuries in this group necessitating operative intervention were based on the use of peritoneal lavage. Negative celiotomies occurred in 10.2% of these patients. Of the injuries incurred, the spleen was involved 42%, the liver 35.6%, the serosa, diaphragm, bowel, and blood vessels were involved to a lesser extent. Only 0.4% of the patients suffered direct injury to the stomach, duodenum, and pancreas, data which should preclude routine exploration of retroperitoneal structures unless by obvious retroperitoneal injury is noted. Additional surgical intervention for associated injuries was seen in 50.54% of this patient group. PMID:6712323

  13. Delayed splenic vascular injury after nonoperative management of blunt splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Alessandro; Tublin, Mitchell E; Rees, Mitchell A; Nicholas, Dederia H; Sperry, Jason L; Alarcon, Louis H

    2017-05-01

    Delayed splenic vascular injury (DSVI) is traditionally considered a rare, often clinically occult, harbinger of splenic rupture in patients with splenic trauma that are managed conservatively. The purpose of our study was to assess the incidence of DSVI and associated features in patients admitted with blunt splenic trauma and managed nonoperatively. A retrospective analysis was conducted over a 4-y time. Patients admitted with blunt splenic trauma, managed no-operatively and with a follow-up contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan study during admission were included. The CT scans were reviewed for American Association for the Surgery of Trauma splenic injury score, amount of hemoperitoneum, and presence of DSVI. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the risk factors associated with DSVI. A total of 100 patients (60 men and 40 women) constituted the study group. Follow-up CT scan demonstrated a 23% incidence of DSVI. Splenic artery angiography validated DSVI in 15% of the total patient population. Most DSVIs were detected only on arterial phase CT scan imaging. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma splenic injury score (odds ratio = 1.73; P = 0.045) and the amount of hemoperitoneum (odds ratio = 1.90; P = 0.023) on admission CT scan were associated with the development of DSVI on follow-up CT scan. DSVI on follow-up CT scan imaging of patients managed nonoperatively after splenic injury is common and associated with splenic injury score assessed on admission CT scan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pseudopancreatitis on computed tomography in a patient with isolated blunt head trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computed tomography is commonly used to exclude occult injuries in patients with trauma, but imaging can reveal findings that are of uncertain etiology or clinical significance. We present a case of unsuspected pancreatic abnormality in a female patient with trauma who sustained an isolated blunt head injury. Case presentation A 25-year-old female Caucasian patient sustained massive blunt and penetrating head trauma, secondary to a large object penetrating through the vehicle windshield. Based on the mechanism of injury and clinical evaluation, it was felt to be an isolated head injury. However, computed tomography of her abdomen revealed an occult, intra-abdominal finding of significant pancreatic enlargement and peripancreatic fluid. There was no computed tomography evidence of parenchymal pancreatic laceration. The appearance of her pancreas on computed tomography was identical to that of acute pancreatitis or low-grade pancreatic injury, but her clinical history and laboratory values were not consistent with this, hence the term ‘pseudopancreatitis’. Later surgery for organ donation confirmed diffuse pancreatic and peripancreatic edema, but no hematoma, contusion or other evidence for direct traumatic injury. This was an isolated intra-abdominal abnormality. Conclusion The routine use of computed tomography in patients who have sustained trauma has led to increasing detection of unexpected findings. Clinical information such as mechanism of injury and blood work, along with careful evaluation of ancillary imaging findings (or lack of), is important for the provision of an appropriate differential diagnosis. We discuss the possible mechanism and differential diagnosis of an isolated pancreatic abnormality in the setting of non-abdominal trauma, which includes shock pancreas, overhydration, traumatic pancreatic injury and pancreatitis secondary to other etiologies. PMID:24529327

  15. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  16. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients.

  17. Quantitative analysis of brain microstructure following mild blunt and blast trauma.

    PubMed

    Begonia, M T; Prabhu, R; Liao, J; Whittington, W R; Claude, A; Willeford, B; Wardlaw, J; Wu, R; Zhang, S; Williams, L N

    2014-11-28

    We induced mild blunt and blast injuries in rats using a custom-built device and utilized in-house diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) software to reconstruct 3-D fiber tracts in brains before and after injury (1, 4, and 7 days). DTI measures such as fiber count, fiber length, and fractional anisotropy (FA) were selected to characterize axonal integrity. In-house image analysis software also showed changes in parameters including the area fraction (AF) and nearest neighbor distance (NND), which corresponded to variations in the microstructure of Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) brain sections. Both blunt and blast injuries produced lower fiber counts, but neither injury case significantly changed the fiber length. Compared to controls, blunt injury produced a lower FA, which may correspond to an early onset of diffuse axonal injury (DAI). However, blast injury generated a higher FA compared to controls. This increase in FA has been linked previously to various phenomena including edema, neuroplasticity, and even recovery. Subsequent image analysis revealed that both blunt and blast injuries produced a significantly higher AF and significantly lower NND, which correlated to voids formed by the reduced fluid retention within injured axons. In conclusion, DTI can detect subtle pathophysiological changes in axonal fiber structure after mild blunt and blast trauma. Our injury model and DTI method provide a practical basis for studying mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in a controllable manner and for tracking injury progression. Knowledge gained from our approach could lead to enhanced mTBI diagnoses, biofidelic constitutive brain models, and specialized pharmaceutical treatments.

  18. Traumatic Tricuspid Valve Rupture after Blunt Chest Trauma - A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Stoica, B; Paun, S; Tanase, I; Negoi, I; Runcanu, A; Beuran, M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high frequency of thoracic injuries secondary to traffic related accidents, the blunt cardiac valve rupture is extremely rare. Case report and review of the literature using PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. A 38 year old female patient, victim of car accident was admitted. On primary survey the patient was conscious, cooperative and hemodynamic and respiratory stable. On secondary survey was found a bilateral open leg fracture and a seat belt sign. Whole body Computed Tomography revealed minimal haemorrhagic contusion of the cortex, left hemopneumothorax and right pneumothorax, bilateral rib fractures, liver contusion, left femoral neck fracture and fracture to the lumbar spinal column. After bilateral pleurostomy, the patient becomes hemodynamically unstable, but with no signs of external bleeding. The transthoracic echocardiography revealed an acute severe tricuspid regurgitation with hepatic veins reflux. After orthopaedic surgeries, the tricuspid valve rupture was managed by replacing the valve with a bioprostheses. The hospital stay was 122 days. Only a high index of suspicion may reveal blunt cardiac lesions as a cause for hemodynamic instability in acute setting. Celsius.

  19. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  20. [Surgical treatment of blunt liver trauma, indications for surgery and results].

    PubMed

    Morales Uribe, Carlos H; López, Carolina Arenas; Cote, Juan Camilo Correa; Franco, Sebastián Tobón; Saldarriaga, Maria Fernanda; Mosquera, Jackson; Villegas Lanau, María I

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the most frequently injured organ in blunt abdominal trauma. Patients that are hemodynamically unstable must undergo inmmediate surgical treatment. There are 2 surgical approaches for these patients; Anatomical Liver resection or non-anatomic liver resection. Around 80-90% of patients are candidates for non-operative management. -Several risk factors have been studied to select the patients most suited for a non operative management. We performed a retrospective study based on a prospective database. We searched for risk factors related to immediate surgical management and failed non-operative management. We also described the surgical procedures that were undertaken in this cohort of patients and their outcomes and complications. During the study period 117 patients presented with blunt liver trauma. 19 patients (16.2%) required a laparotomy during the initial 24h after their admission. There were 11 deaths (58%) amongst these patients. Peri-hepatic packing and suturing were the most common procedures performed. A RTS Score<7.8 (RR: 7.3; IC 95%: 1.8-30.1), and ISS Score >20 (RR 2,5 IC 95%: 1.0-6.7), and associated intra-abdominal injuries (RR: 2.95; IC 95%: 1.25-6.92) were risk factors for immediate surgery. In 98 (83.7%) patients a non-operative management was performed. 7 patients had a failed non-operative management. The need for immediate surgical management is related to the presence of associated intra-abdominal injuries, and the ISS and RTS scores. In this series the most frequently performed procedure for blunt liver trauma was peri-hepatic packing. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of observation on cranial computed tomography utilization for children after blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Nigrovic, Lise E; Schunk, Jeff E; Foerster, Adele; Cooper, Arthur; Miskin, Michelle; Atabaki, Shireen M; Hoyle, John; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2011-06-01

    Children with minor blunt head trauma often are observed in the emergency department before a decision is made regarding computed tomography use. We studied the impact of this clinical strategy on computed tomography use and outcomes. We performed a subanalysis of a prospective multicenter observational study of children with minor blunt head trauma. Clinicians completed case report forms indicating whether the child was observed before making a decision regarding computed tomography. We defined clinically important traumatic brain injury as an intracranial injury resulting in death, neurosurgical intervention, intubation for longer than 24 hours, or hospital admission for 2 nights or longer. To compare computed tomography rates between children observed and those not observed before a decision was made regarding computed tomography use, we used a generalized estimating equation model to control for hospital clustering and patient characteristics. Of 42 412 children enrolled in the study, clinicians noted if the patient was observed before making a decision on computed tomography in 40 113 (95%). Of these, 5433 (14%) children were observed. The computed tomography use rate was lower in those observed than in those not observed (31.1% vs 35.0%; difference: -3.9% [95% confidence interval: -5.3 to -2.6]), but the rate of clinically important traumatic brain injury was similar (0.75% vs 0.87%; difference: -0.1% [95% confidence interval: -0.4 to 0.1]). After adjustment for hospital and patient characteristics, the difference in the computed tomography use rate remained significant (adjusted odds ratio for obtaining a computed tomography in the observed group: 0.53 [95% confidence interval: 0.43-0.66]). Clinical observation was associated with reduced computed tomography use among children with minor blunt head trauma and may be an effective strategy to reduce computed tomography use.

  2. Cranial computed tomography use among children with minor blunt head trauma: association with race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Natale, JoAnne E; Joseph, Jill G; Rogers, Alexander J; Mahajan, Prashant; Cooper, Arthur; Wisner, David H; Miskin, Michelle L; Hoyle, John D; Atabaki, Shireen M; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2012-08-01

    To determine if patient race/ethnicity is independently associated with cranial computed tomography (CT) use among children with minor blunt head trauma. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. Pediatric research network of 25 North American emergency departments. In total, 42 412 children younger than 18 years were seen within 24 hours of minor blunt head trauma. Of these, 39 717 were of documented white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, or Hispanic race/ethnicity. Using a previously validated clinical prediction rule, we classified each child's risk for clinically important traumatic brain injury to describe injury severity. Because no meaningful differences in cranial CT rates were observed between children of black non-Hispanic race/ethnicity vs Hispanic race/ethnicity, we combined these 2 groups. Cranial CT use in the emergency department, stratified by race/ethnicity. In total, 13 793 children (34.7%) underwent cranial CT. The odds of undergoing cranial CT among children with minor blunt head trauma who were at higher risk for clinically important traumatic brain injury did not differ by race/ethnicity. In adjusted analyses, children of black non-Hispanic or Hispanic race/ethnicity had lower odds of undergoing cranial CT among those who were at intermediate risk (odds ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96) or lowest risk (odds ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.65-0.80) for clinically important traumatic brain injury. Regardless of risk for clinically important traumatic brain injury, parental anxiety and request was commonly cited by physicians as an important influence for ordering cranial CT in children of white non-Hispanic race/ethnicity. Disparities may arise from the overuse of cranial CT among patients of nonminority races/ethnicities. Further studies should focus on explaining how medically irrelevant factors, such as patient race/ethnicity, can affect physician decision making, resulting in exposure of children to unnecessary health care risks.

  3. Isolated loss of consciousness in children with minor blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lois K; Monroe, David; Bachman, Michael C; Glass, Todd F; Mahajan, Prashant V; Cooper, Arthur; Stanley, Rachel M; Miskin, Michelle; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2014-09-01

    A history of loss of consciousness (LOC) is frequently a driving factor for computed tomography use in the emergency department evaluation of children with blunt head trauma. Computed tomography carries a nonnegligible risk for lethal radiation-induced malignancy. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) derived 2 age-specific prediction rules with 6 variables for clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI), which included LOC as one of the risk factors. To determine the risk for ciTBIs in children with isolated LOC. This was a planned secondary analysis of a large prospective multicenter cohort study. The study included 42 ,412 children aged 0 to 18 years with blunt head trauma and Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14 and 15 evaluated in 25 emergency departments from 2004-2006. A history of LOC after minor blunt head trauma. The main outcome measures were ciTBIs (resulting in death, neurosurgery, intubation for >24 hours, or hospitalization for ≥2 nights) and a comparison of the rates of ciTBIs in children with no LOC, any LOC, and isolated LOC (ie, with no other PECARN ciTBI predictors). A total of 42 412 children were enrolled in the parent study, with 40 693 remaining in the current analysis after exclusions. Of these, LOC occurred in 15.4% (6286 children). The prevalence of ciTBI with any history of LOC was 2.5% and for no history of LOC was 0.5% (difference, 2.0%; 95% CI, 1.7-2.5). The ciTBI rate in children with isolated LOC, with no other PECARN predictors, was 0.5% (95% CI, 0.2-0.8; 13 of 2780). When comparing children who have isolated LOC with those who have LOC and other PECARN predictors, the risk ratio for ciTBI in children younger than 2 years was 0.13 (95% CI, 0.005-0.72) and for children 2 years or older was 0.10 (95% CI, 0.06-0.19). Children with minor blunt head trauma presenting to the emergency department with isolated LOC are at very low risk for ciTBI and do not routinely require computed tomographic

  4. Blunt vertebral vascular injury in trauma patients: ATLS(®) recommendations and review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Shafafy, Roozbeh; Suresh, Sukrit; Afolayan, John O; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Panchmatia, Jaykar R

    2017-06-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) encompasses two distinct clinical entities: traumatic carotid artery injury (TCAI) and traumatic vertebral artery injury (TVAI). The latter is the focus of our review. These are potentially devastating injuries which pose a diagnostic challenge in the acute trauma setting. There is still debate regarding the optimal screening criteria, diagnostic imaging modality and treatment methods. In 2012 the American College of Surgeons proposed criteria for investigating patients with suspected TVAI and subsequent treatment methods, caveated with the statement that evidence is limited and still evolving. Here we review the historical evidence and recent literature relating to these recommendations.

  5. Characteristics of Hollow Viscus Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma; a Single Centre Experience from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Nawal Kishore; Yadav, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Rajshekhar; Sinha, Dipendra Kumar; Kumar, Sandip; Kerketta, Marshal Daud; Sinha, Mini; Anand, Abhinav; Gandhi, Anjana; Ranjan, Satish Kumar; Yadav, Jitin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presentation, anatomical distribution, diagnostic method, management and outcome of hollow viscus injury (HVI) from blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: This  was  a  retrospective  cross-ecnal  study  including  patients  with  blunt  abdominal  trauma leading to HVI admitted at Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences, Ranchi, over a period of 4.5 years (January 2009 to July 2014). Data were retrieved from patients’ medical records. Total 173 patients with HVI due to blunt abdominal trauma, who underwent laparotomy at our institute, were reviewed. Data regarding clinical presentation, anatomical distribution, management and outcome were recorded and analysed. Results: Out of 173 patients 87.1% were men and 12.9% were women. Mean age of patients was 29±14.02 years. The most common site of injury was ileum (46.2%) followed by jejunum (44.5%). There were 5 gastric perforations (2.9%), 2 (1.15%) duodenal, 2 (1.15%) colonic, 2 (1.15%) sigmoidal and 2 (1.15%) rectal injuries. One caecal injury was also recorded. Road traffic accident was the most common mechanism of injury (57.2%) followed by fall from height (36.4%) and assault (6.4%). Free gas under diaphragm on erect abdomen radiography was seen in 85.5% of cases while preoperative CT Abdomen was done in 11.6% of cases. Treatment consisted of simple closure of the perforation (66.5%), resection and anastomosis (11.0%) and stoma (22.5%). Major complication was anastamotic leak which was recorded in 6.4% cases and 15.6% patients developed burst abdomen. Average hospital stay was 13±6 days. Overall mortality rate was 12.7%. Conclusion: Although early recognition of intestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma may be difficult in all cases, it is very important due to its tremendous life threatening potential. Age of the patient, anatomical site and time of presentation are probably main prognostic factors. PMID:27162889

  6. Usefulness of low dose chest CT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jung; Bista, Anjali Basnyat; Min, Young Gi; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Sun, Joo Sung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to compare the diagnostic performance and inter-observer consistency between low dose chest CT (LDCT) and standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in the patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 69 patients who met criteria indicative of blunt chest trauma (77% of male; age range, 16–85) were enrolled. All patients underwent LDCT without intravenous (IV) contrast and SDCT with IV contrast using parameters as following: LDCT, 40 mAs with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and 100 kVp (BMI <25, n = 51) or 120 kVp (BMI>25, n = 18); SDCT, 180 mAs with ATCM and 120 kVp. Transverse, coronal, sagittal images were reconstructed with 3-mm slice thickness without gap and provided for evaluation of 3 observers. Reference standard images (transverse, coronal, sagittal) were reconstructed using SDCT data with 1-mm slice thickness without gap. Reference standard was established by 2 experienced thoracic radiologists by consensus. Three observers independently evaluated each data set of LDCT and SDCT. Multiple-reader receiver operating characteristic analysis for comparing areas under the ROC curves demonstrated that there was no significant difference of diagnostic performance between LDCT and SDCT for the diagnosis of pulmonary injury, skeletal trauma, mediastinal injury, and chest wall injury (P > 0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient was measured for inter-observer consistency and revealed that there was good inter-observer consistency in each examination of LDCT and SDCT for evaluation of blunt chest injury (0.8601–1.000). Aortic and upper abdominal injury could not be appropriately compared as LDCT was performed without using contrast materials and this was limitation of this study. The effective radiation dose of LDCT (average DLP = 1.52 mSv⋅mGy−1 cm−1) was significantly lower than those of SDCT (7.21 mSv mGy−1 cm−1). There is a great potential benefit to use of LDCT for initial evaluation of blunt chest trauma

  7. The role of repairing lung lacerations during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery evacuations for retained haemothorax caused by blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Yi-Pin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Soo, Kwan-Ming; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Chiang, Hsin-I.; Huang, Fong-Dee; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Retained haemothorax and pneumothorax are the most common complications after blunt chest traumas. Lung lacerations derived from fractures of the ribs are usually found in these patients. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is usually used as a routine procedure in the treatment of retained pleural collections. The objective of this study was to find out if there is any advantage in adding the procedure for repairing lacerated lungs during VATS. METHODS Patients who were brought to our hospital with blunt chest trauma were enrolled into this prospective cohort study from January 2004 to December 2011. All enrolled patients had rib fractures with type III lung lacerations diagnosed by CT scans. They sustained retained pleural collections and surgical drainage was indicated. On one group, only evacuation procedure by VATS was performed. On the other group, not only evacuations but also repair of lung injuries were performed. Patients with penetrating injury or blunt injury with massive bleeding, that required emergency thoracotomy, were excluded from the study, in addition to those with cardiovascular or oesophageal injuries. RESULTS During the study period, 88 patients who underwent thoracoscopy were enrolled. Among them, 43 patients undergoing the simple thoracoscopic evacuation method were stratified into Group 1. The remaining 45 patients who underwent thoracoscopic evacuation combined with resection of lung lacerations were stratified into Group 2. The rates of post-traumatic infection were higher in Group 1. The durations of chest-tube drainage and ventilator usage were shorter in Group 2, as were the lengths of patient intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS When compared with simple thoracoscopic evacuation methods, repair and resection of the injured lungs combined may result in better clinical outcomes in patients who sustained blunt chest injuries. PMID:24242850

  8. Unusual case of life threatening subcutaneous hemorrhage in a blunt trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Hefny, Ashraf F.; Kaka, Laith N.; Salim, El Nazeer A.; Al Khoury, Nabil N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hemorrhage is the most common cause of shock in injured patients. Bleeding into the subcutaneous plane is underestimated cause of hypovolemic shock. Presentation of case Unrestrained male driver involved in a rollover car crash. On examination, his pulse rate was 144 bpm, blood pressure 80/30 mmHg, and GCS was 7/15. His right pupil was dilated but reactive. Back examination revealed severe contusion with friction burns and lacerations. A Focused Assessment Sonography for Trauma (FAST) was performed. No free intraperitoneal fluid was detected. CT scan of the brain has shown right temporo-parietal subdural hematoma and extensive hematoma in the deep subcutaneous soft tissues of the back. Decompressive cranicotomy and evacuation of the subdural hematoma was performed. On the 4th postoperative day, three liters of dark brown altered blood was drained from the subcutaneous plane. Discussion The patient developed severe hypovolemic shock and our aim was to identify and control the source of bleeding during the resuscitation. The source of bleeding was not obvious. Severe shearing force in blunt trauma causes separation between the loose subcutaneous tissues and the underlying relatively immobile deep fascia. This is known as post-traumatic closed degloving injury. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English Literature with severe subcutaneous hemorrhage in blunt trauma patients without any previous medical disease. Conclusion Bleeding into the subcutaneous plane in closed degloving injury can cause severe hypovolemic shock. It is important for the clinicians managing trauma patients to be aware this serious injury. PMID:26339790

  9. Traumatic aortic injuries associated with major visceral vascular injuries in major blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Cao, Ignacio; Gulías, Daniel; Muñiz, Javier; Herrera-Noreña, José M; Cuenca, José J

    2012-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to report the clinical and radiological characteristics and outcomes of a series of acute traumatic aortic injuries (ATAIs) with associated injury to major aortic abdominal visceral branches (MAAVBs). From January 2000 to August 2011, 10 consecutive major blunt trauma patients with associated ATAI and injury to MAAVBs (group A) and 42 major blunt trauma patients presenting only an ATAI without MAAVB injuries (group B) were admitted to our institution. Overall in-hospital mortality was 32.7%. In-hospital mortality in group A was 40% and in group B it was 31% (p = 0.86). Observed in-hospital mortality was slightly lower than the expected in-hospital mortality in both groups. Mean peak creatine phosphokinase was significantly higher in group A than in group B patients (23,008 ± 33,400 vs. 3,970 ± 3,495 IU/L; p < 0.001). Acute renal injury occurred in 50% of group A and in 26.2% of group B patients. Hemodiafiltration was required in 30% of group A and in 9.5% of group B patients. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range = 1-130 months). Group A survival was 60% at 1, 5 and 10 years. Group B survival was 69% at 1 year and 63.3% at 5 and 10 years (p = 0.15). Aortic injuries associated with MAAVB injuries in major trauma patients seem to present in a different clinical scenario. These patients present increased risk of rhabdomyolysis, visceral ischemia, and acute renal failure, as well as higher in-hospital mortality. A multidisciplinary approach combining endovascular and open surgical techniques for a staged treatment of these life-threatening aortic and MAAVB injuries is mandatory in this critical subset of trauma patients.

  10. A Genomic Analysis of Clostridium difficile Infections in Blunt Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Philip Alexander; Liu, Huazhi; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Cuenca, Alex Gervacio; Gentile, Lori Filichia; Miggins, Makesha Vernee; Bihorac, Azra; Baker, Henry V.; Moore, Frederick Alan; Moldawer, Lyle Linc; Ang, Darwin N

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence demonstrates that susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infection (C. diff. ) is related as much to host risk factors as bacterial potency. Using blood leukocyte genome-wide expression patterns of severe blunt trauma patients obtained by the NIGMS sponsored Glue Grant “Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury” we examined C. diff. patients’ leukocyte genomic profiles to determine pre- and post-infection gene expression changes. Methods The genomic responses of 21 severe trauma patients were analyzed (5 C. diff. 16 controls matched for age and severity of injury). After elimination of probe sets whose expression was below baseline or were unchanged, remaining probe sets underwent hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis. Molecular pathways were generated through Ingenuity Pathways Analysis ®. Results Supervised analysis demonstrated 118 genes whose expression in C. diff. patients varied before and after their infection. Supervised analysis comparing C. diff. to matched non-C. diff. patients prior to infection suggested that the expression of 501 genes were different in the two groups with up to 87% class prediction (p<0.05). Many of these genes are related to cell-mediated immune responses, signaling and interaction. Conclusions Genomic analysis of severe blunt trauma patients reveals a distinct leukocyte expression profile of C. diff. both prior to and after infection. We conclude that an association may exist between a severe trauma patient’s leukocyte genomic expression profile and subsequent susceptibility to C. diff. Further prospective expression analysis of this C. diff. population may reveal potential therapeutic interventions and allow early identification of C. diff. susceptible patients. Level of Evidence Level III prognostic/diagnostic study. PMID:23271108

  11. Chronic abdominal pain as the initial manifestation of pancreatic injury due to remote blunt trauma of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Sittig, K; Favrot, D; McDonald, J C

    1994-09-01

    Three patients were admitted with severe abdominal pain that began after an asymptomatic latent period following blunt trauma to the abdomen. During initial medical evaluation 3 months to 1 year after the trauma, serum amylase levels were normal or minimally elevated, and computed tomography scanning revealed edema and/or pseudocyst formation in the tail of the pancreas. Pancreatography showed ductal stenosis or obstruction in the midbody of the pancreas in each patient. At surgery, chronic pancreatitis in the tail was clearly demarcated from the normal head of the gland. Distal pancreatectomy was curative. Blunt traumatic pancreatic ductal injury may occur without typical immediate posttraumatic acute pancreatitis. Chronic distal pancreatitis following an asymptomatic latent period may culminate in delayed admission months to years after the initial injury. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography should be considered for evaluation of patients with chronic abdominal pain and prior blunt trauma to the abdomen.

  12. Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia: A Rare Cause of Cardiac Arrest Following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Ozyilmaz, Sinem; Ergul, Yakup; Akdeniz, Celal; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an electrophysiological disorder of a physically normal heart that occurs in children when the body is subjected to intense emotional or physical stress that causes adrenergic discharge. This troubling disease can be sporadic (spontaneous) or familial (genetic/inherited). Unfortunately, its associated ventricular tachycardia may cause sudden death, so early diagnosis of CPVT is very important. Treatment modalities include medical treatment, implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator, or surgical sympatectomy; but the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) should be the first choice in patients with a history of cardiac arrest. We herein present the case of a patient diagnosed with CPVT after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation triggered by blunt chest trauma. We implanted an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and started oral B-blocker treatment. During the course of follow-up, flecainide was added to his treatment depending on the patient’s status regarding recurrent ICD shock. The patient has now continued follow-up without recurrent ICD shock since flecainide treatment was initiated. In conclusion, in patients with syncope and sudden cardiac arrest secondary to physical stress or blunt chest trauma, CPVT should be considered and an implantable cardioverter defibrillator must be implanted. Additionally, flecainide theraphy should be considered to decrease recurrent ICD shock. PMID:27122894

  13. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M; Hoppe, M; Rauber, K; Popella, C; Rau, W S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard.

  14. Dynamic response due to behind helmet blunt trauma measured with a human head surrogate.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Christopher J; Mathis, James T; Scott, Nikki; Bigger, Rory P; Mackiewicz, James

    2014-01-01

    A Human Head Surrogate has been developed for use in behind helmet blunt trauma experiments. This human head surrogate fills the void between Post-Mortem Human Subject testing (with biofidelity but handling restrictions) and commercial ballistic head forms (with no biofidelity but ease of use). This unique human head surrogate is based on refreshed human craniums and surrogate materials representing human head soft tissues such as the skin, dura, and brain. A methodology for refreshing the craniums is developed and verified through material testing. A test methodology utilizing these unique human head surrogates is also developed and then demonstrated in a series of experiments in which non-perforating ballistic impact of combat helmets is performed with and without supplemental ceramic appliques for protecting against larger caliber threats. Sensors embedded in the human head surrogates allow for direct measurement of intracranial pressure, cranial strain, and head and helmet acceleration. Over seventy (70) fully instrumented experiments have been executed using this unique surrogate. Examples of the data collected are presented. Based on these series of tests, the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Human Head Surrogate has demonstrated great potential for providing insights in to injury mechanics resulting from non-perforating ballistic impact on combat helmets, and directly supports behind helmet blunt trauma studies.

  15. A rat model for isolated bilateral lung contusion from blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Marschke, Cristi J; Manderscheid, Patricia; Woytash, James A; Notter, Robert H; Knight, Paul R

    2005-11-01

    Lung contusion affects 17%-25% of adult blunt trauma patients, and is the leading cause of death from blunt thoracic injury. A small animal model for isolated bilateral lung contusion has not been developed. We induced lung contusion in anesthetized rats by dropping a 0.3-kg weight onto a precordial protective shield to direct the impact force away from the heart and toward the lungs. Lung injury was characterized as a function of chest impact energy (1.8-2.7 J) by measurements of arterial oxygenation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) albumin and cytology, pressure-volume mechanics, and histopathology. Histology confirmed bilateral lung contusion without substantial cardiac muscle trauma. Rats receiving 2.7 J of chest impact energy had 33% mortality that exceeded prospectively defined limits for sublethal injury. Hypoxemia in rats with maximal sublethal injury (2.45 J) met criteria for acute lung injury at < or =24 h, improving by 48 h. BAL albumin levels were highest at < or =24 h, and remained elevated along with increased BAL leukocytes and decreased lung volumes at 48 h. We concluded that an impact energy of 2.45 J induces isolated, bilateral lung contusion and provides a useful model for future mechanistic pathophysiological assessments.

  16. Dynamic Response Due to Behind Helmet Blunt Trauma Measured with a Human Head Surrogate

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Christopher J.; Mathis, James T.; Scott, Nikki; Bigger, Rory P.; MacKiewicz, James

    2014-01-01

    A Human Head Surrogate has been developed for use in behind helmet blunt trauma experiments. This human head surrogate fills the void between Post-Mortem Human Subject testing (with biofidelity but handling restrictions) and commercial ballistic head forms (with no biofidelity but ease of use). This unique human head surrogate is based on refreshed human craniums and surrogate materials representing human head soft tissues such as the skin, dura, and brain. A methodology for refreshing the craniums is developed and verified through material testing. A test methodology utilizing these unique human head surrogates is also developed and then demonstrated in a series of experiments in which non-perforating ballistic impact of combat helmets is performed with and without supplemental ceramic appliques for protecting against larger caliber threats. Sensors embedded in the human head surrogates allow for direct measurement of intracranial pressure, cranial strain, and head and helmet acceleration. Over seventy (70) fully instrumented experiments have been executed using this unique surrogate. Examples of the data collected are presented. Based on these series of tests, the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Human Head Surrogate has demonstrated great potential for providing insights in to injury mechanics resulting from non-perforating ballistic impact on combat helmets, and directly supports behind helmet blunt trauma studies. PMID:24688303

  17. Blunt Liver Trauma at Sunnybrook Medical Centre: A 13 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarello, G.; Taylor, G.; Miller, H.; Scarth, H. M. C.; Brenneman, F.

    1991-01-01

    Between June 1, 1976 and June 30, 1989 The Regional Trauma Unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada received 3730 patients. Of these 335 (9%) sustained a liver injury, 95% being due to blunt trauma. Open peritoneal lavage was performed on 80% of liver trauma patients (267/335), 99% being true positive. A laparotomy was performed on 97% of patients (324/335). Major surgical treatment was required in 132 patients (41%) and minor treatment in 192 patients (59%). The remaining 11 patients were treated conservatively (n = 3) or died during resuscitation (n = 8). Morbidity directly related to the liver injury was seen in 29 of 249 surviving patients (11%) although overall morbidity was 27% (67/249). Reoperation was required in 6% (14/249) with abscess or hematoma accounting for 11 of 14 operations. The overall mortality rate was 26% (86/335). Eighty two percent of patients (n = 276) had a grade I, II or III liver trauma according to Moore’s classification with a mortality of 12% (n = 32). The remaining 18% of patients (n = 59) had a grade IV or V liver trauma with a mortality of 44% (n = 26). Of the 86 deaths, head injury accounted for 48 (56% of deaths); liver hemorrhage for 17 (20%), liver sepsis for (1%) and other causes for 20 deaths (23%). Thus death due to the liver injury itself (hemorrhage and sepsis) occurred in 18 out of 335 patients (5% overall). Head injury accounted for the death of 48 out of 335 patients (14% overall). Over the past 13 years a trend has occurred at our institution whereby we are seeing less liver trauma in our population of multiply injured patients from 12% (1976–1983) down to 7% (1985–1989); with a gradual decline in overall mortality from 32% (1976–1983) to 19% (1985–1989), whereas the precentage of deaths due to head injuries and liver injury have increased. PMID:1911476

  18. Reduced Mortality by Physician-Staffed HEMS Dispatch for Adult Blunt Trauma Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of domestic physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) for the transport of patients with severe trauma to a hospital. The study included patients with blunt trauma who were transported to our hospital by physician-staffed HEMS (Group P; n = 100) or nonphysician-staffed HEMS (Group NP; n = 80). Basic patient characteristics, transport time, treatment procedures, and medical treatment outcomes assessed using the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) were compared between groups. We also assessed patients who were transported to the hospital within 3 h of injury in Groups P (Group P3; n = 50) and NP (Group NP3; n = 74). The severity of injury was higher, transport time was longer, and time from hospital arrival to operation room transfer was shorter for Group P than for Group NP (P < 0.001). Although Group P patients exhibited better medical treatment outcomes compared with Group NP, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.134 vs. 0.730). However, the difference in outcomes was statistically significant between Groups P3 and NP3 (P = 0.035 vs. 0.546). Under the current domestic trauma patient transport system in South Korea, physician-staffed HEMS are expected to increase the survival of patients with severe trauma. In particular, better treatment outcomes are expected if dedicated trauma resuscitation teams actively intervene in the medical treatment process from the transport stage and if patients are transported to a hospital to receive definitive care within 3 hours of injury. PMID:27550497

  19. Reduced Mortality by Physician-Staffed HEMS Dispatch for Adult Blunt Trauma Patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Huh, Yo; Lee, John Cj; Kim, Younghwan; Moon, Jonghwan; Youn, Seok Hwa; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Tea Youn; Kim, Juryang; Kim, Hyoju

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of domestic physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) for the transport of patients with severe trauma to a hospital. The study included patients with blunt trauma who were transported to our hospital by physician-staffed HEMS (Group P; n = 100) or nonphysician-staffed HEMS (Group NP; n = 80). Basic patient characteristics, transport time, treatment procedures, and medical treatment outcomes assessed using the Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) were compared between groups. We also assessed patients who were transported to the hospital within 3 h of injury in Groups P (Group P3; n = 50) and NP (Group NP3; n = 74). The severity of injury was higher, transport time was longer, and time from hospital arrival to operation room transfer was shorter for Group P than for Group NP (P < 0.001). Although Group P patients exhibited better medical treatment outcomes compared with Group NP, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.134 vs. 0.730). However, the difference in outcomes was statistically significant between Groups P3 and NP3 (P = 0.035 vs. 0.546). Under the current domestic trauma patient transport system in South Korea, physician-staffed HEMS are expected to increase the survival of patients with severe trauma. In particular, better treatment outcomes are expected if dedicated trauma resuscitation teams actively intervene in the medical treatment process from the transport stage and if patients are transported to a hospital to receive definitive care within 3 hours of injury.

  20. Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe blunt head trauma: does the type of monitoring device matter?

    PubMed

    Aiolfi, Alberto; Khor, Desmond; Cho, Jayun; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-05-26

    OBJECTIVE Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has become the standard of care in the management of severe head trauma. Intraventricular devices (IVDs) and intraparenchymal devices (IPDs) are the 2 most commonly used techniques for ICP monitoring. Despite the widespread use of these devices, very few studies have investigated the effect of device type on outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to compare outcomes between 2 types of ICP monitoring devices in patients with isolated severe blunt head trauma. METHODS This retrospective observational study was based on the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program database, which was searched for all patients with isolated severe blunt head injury who had an ICP monitor placed in the 2-year period from 2013 to 2014. Extracted variables included demographics, comorbidities, mechanisms of injury, head injury specifics (epidural, subdural, subarachnoid, intracranial hemorrhage, and diffuse axonal injury), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score for each body area, Injury Severity Score (ISS), vital signs in the emergency department, and craniectomy. Outcomes included 30-day mortality, complications, number of ventilation days, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay, and functional independence. RESULTS During the study period, 105,721 patients had isolated severe traumatic brain injury (head AIS score ≥ 3). Overall, an ICP monitoring device was placed in 2562 patients (2.4%): 1358 (53%) had an IVD and 1204 (47%) had an IPD. The severity of the head AIS score did not affect the type of ICP monitoring selected. There was no difference in the median ISS; ISS > 15; head AIS Score 3, 4, or 5; or the need for craniectomy between the 2 device groups. Unadjusted 30-day mortality was significantly higher in the group with IVDs (29% vs 25.5%, p = 0.046); however, stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the type of ICP monitoring was not an independent risk factor for death

  1. Factors associated with cervical spine injury in children after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Julie C; Kuppermann, Nathan; Olsen, Cody; Babcock-Cimpello, Lynn; Brown, Kathleen; Mahajan, Prashant; Adelgais, Kathleen M; Anders, Jennifer; Borgialli, Dominic; Donoghue, Aaron; Hoyle, John D; Kim, Emily; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Lillis, Kathleen A; Nigrovic, Lise E; Powell, Elizabeth C; Rebella, Greg; Reeves, Scott D; Rogers, Alexander J; Stankovic, Curt; Teshome, Getachew; Jaffe, David M

    2011-08-01

    Cervical spine injuries in children are rare. However, immobilization and imaging for potential cervical spine injury after trauma are common and are associated with adverse effects. Risk factors for cervical spine injury have been developed to safely limit immobilization and radiography in adults, but not in children. The purpose of our study is to identify risk factors associated with cervical spine injury in children after blunt trauma. We conducted a case-control study of children younger than 16 years, presenting after blunt trauma, and who received cervical spine radiographs at 17 hospitals in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) between January 2000 and December 2004. Cases were children with cervical spine injury. We created 3 control groups of children free of cervical spine injury: (1) random controls, (2) age and mechanism of injury-matched controls, and (3) for cases receiving out-of-hospital emergency medical services (EMS), age-matched controls who also received EMS care. We abstracted data from 3 sources: PECARN hospital, referring hospital, and out-of-hospital patient records. We performed multiple logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of cervical spine injury and calculated the model's sensitivity and specificity. We reviewed 540 records of children with cervical spine injury and 1,060, 1,012, and 702 random, mechanism of injury, and EMS controls, respectively. In the analysis using random controls, we identified 8 factors associated with cervical spine injury: altered mental status, focal neurologic findings, neck pain, torticollis, substantial torso injury, conditions predisposing to cervical spine injury, diving, and high-risk motor vehicle crash. Having 1 or more factors was 98% (95% confidence interval 96% to 99%) sensitive and 26% (95% confidence interval 23% to 29%) specific for cervical spine injury. We identified similar risk factors in the other analyses. We identified an 8-variable model for

  2. Clinical decision rule to prevent unnecessary chest X-ray in patients with blunt multiple traumas.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Safari, Saeed; Niazazari, Maryam; Baratloo, Alireza; Hashemi, Behrooz; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Rahmati, Farhad; Sanei Taheri, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    Since the diagnostic yield of chest X-ray (CXR) is not high enough, when it is ordered for all the multiple trauma patients, this study was aimed to evaluate the relationship between clinical and CXR findings in order to formulate a clinical decision rule to prevent unnecessary CXR in these patients. Stable multiple blunt trauma patients referring to the ED were included. The clinical and radiographic findings of all the patients were collected and the relationships between these variables analysed. Finally, based on the regression coefficients (β) of the variables, the Thoracic Injury Rule-out Criteria (TIRC) were designed. A total of 2607 patients were included (males: 78.9%, mean age: 34.1 ± 15.0 years). Age over 60 (β = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.27-1.34; P = 0.003), crepitation (β = 4.33; 95% CI: 1.65-7.0; P < 0.001), loss of consciousness (β = 3.16; 95% CI: 2.44-3.88; P < 0.001), decrease in pulmonary sounds (β = 2.67; 95% CI: 1.73-3.6; P < 0.001), chest wall pain (β = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.63-2.61; P < 0.001) and tenderness (β = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.26-2.27; P < 0.001), dyspnea (β = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.41-2.18; P = 0.004) and abrasion (β = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.22-0.83; P = 0.03) were independent factors predicting thoracic injury. CXR in stable conscious multiple blunt trauma patients under 60 years, without chest wall pain and tenderness, decrease in pulmonary sounds, crepitation, skin abrasion, and dyspnea did not provide any additional findings. Based on TIRC, it seems that CXR in stable multiple blunt trauma patients who are conscious and under 60 and have no decrease in pulmonary sounds, no dyspnea, no thoracic skin abrasion, and no crepitation can be ignored. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  3. Effect of Analgesia on the Changes in Respiratory Parameters in Blunt Chest Injury with Multiple Rib Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ekpe, Eyo Effiong; Eyo, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blunt chest injury with multiple rib fractures can result in such complications as pneumonia, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, empyema thoracis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and prolonged Intensive Care Unit and hospital stay, with its concomitant mortality. These may be prevented or reduced by good analgesic therapy which is the subject of this study. Methods: This was a prospective study of effects of analgesia on changes in pulmonary functions of patients with traumatic multiple rib fractures resulting from blunt chest injury. Results: There were 64 adult patients who were studied with multiple rib fractures caused by blunt chest trauma. Of these patients, 54 (84.4%) were male and 10 (15.6%) were female. Motorcycle (popularly known as “okada”) and tricycle (popularly known as keke napep) accidents significantly accounted for the majority of the multiple rib fractures, that is, in 50 (78.1%) of the patients. Before analgesic administration, no patient had a normal respiratory rate, but at 1 h following the administration of analgesic, 21 (32.8%) of patients recorded normal respiratory rates and there was a significant reduction in the number (10.9% vs. 39.1%) of patients with respiratory rates >30 breaths/min. Before commencement of analgesic, no patient recorded up to 99% of oxygen saturation (SpO2) as measured by pulse oximeter, while 43.8% recorded SpO2 of 96%. This improved after 1 h of administration of analgesics to SpO2 of 100% in 18.8% of patients and 99% in 31.3% of patients and none recording SpO2 of < 97% (P = 0.006). Before analgesia, no patient was able to achieve peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) value >100% of predicted while only 9 (14.1%) patients were able to achieve a PEFR value in the range of 91%–100% of predicted value. One hour after analgesia, a total of 6 (9.4%) patients were able to achieve PEFR values >100% predicted, while 35 (54.7%) patients achieved PEFR values in the range of 91%–100% predicted. Conclusion

  4. Blunt forehead trauma and optic canal involvement: finite element analysis of anterior skull base and orbit on causes of vision impairment.

    PubMed

    Huempfner-Hierl, Heike; Bohne, Alexander; Wollny, Gert; Sterker, Ina; Hierl, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies report on vision impairment after blunt frontal head trauma. A possible cause is damage to the optic nerve bundle within the optic canal due to microfractures of the anterior skull base leading to indirect traumatic optic neuropathy. A finite element study simulating impact forces on the paramedian forehead in different grades was initiated. The set-up consisted of a high-resolution skull model with about 740 000 elements, a blunt impactor and was solved in a transient time-dependent simulation. Individual bone material parameters were calculated for each volume element to increase realism. Results showed stress propagation from the frontal impact towards the optic foramen and the chiasm even at low-force fist-like impacts. Higher impacts produced stress patterns corresponding to typical fracture patterns of the anterior skull base including the optic canal. Transient simulation discerned two stress peaks equalling oscillation. It can be concluded that even comparatively low stresses and oscillation in the optic foramen may cause micro damage undiscerned by CT or MRI explaining consecutive vision loss. Higher impacts lead to typical comminuted fractures, which may affect the integrity of the optic canal. Finite element simulation can be effectively used in studying head trauma and its clinical consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Blunt prenatal trauma resulting in fetal epidural or subdural hematoma: case report and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Garton, Hugh J L

    2017-01-01

    Blunt prenatal trauma is known to have consequences to the developing brain, and can result in subdural hematoma (SDH) or epidural hematoma (EDH). The authors present a case of blunt prenatal trauma resulting in a fetal SDH, intraparenchymal hematoma, and intraventricular hemorrhage, and perform a systematic review of the literature. This systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Relevant studies (up to April 2016) that reported on cases of fetal SDH or EDH after blunt prenatal trauma were identified from the PubMed database. The primary outcome was fetal mortality, and the secondary outcome was neurological outcome. Fourteen studies were included in the analysis, comprising a total of 14 patients including the present case. The average gestational age at discovery of hemorrhage was 30.1 weeks. Nine mothers were in a motor vehicle collision and 3 were assaulted; the mechanism of injury for 2 mothers was not defined. Twelve patients had SDH, 1 had EDH, and 1 had conflicting reports. Three patients had intrauterine fetal demise, and 3 died in the neonatal period after birth. Three patients had persistent neurological deficit, and 5 were neurologically intact. Fetal SDH or EDH after blunt trauma to the mother trauma is rare and is associated with mortality. However, a significant number of patients can have good neurological outcomes.

  6. Effects of Ibuprofen and High-Voltage Electric Stimulation on Acute Edema Formation After Blunt Trauma to Limbs of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Michael G; Graves, Paul; Nakazawa, Chika; Delano, Teresa; Hutson, Alan; Mendel, Frank C

    2005-01-01

    Context: Ibuprofen is widely used to manage pain and inflammation after orthopaedic trauma, but its effect on acute swelling has not been investigated. Cathodal high-voltage pulsed current (CHVPC) at 120 pulses per second and 90% of visible motor threshold is known to curb edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Objective: To examine the effects of ibuprofen, continuous CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC on acute edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Design: Randomized, parallel-group, repeated-measures design. Setting: Laboratory animal facility. Participants: A total of 21 3-month-old Zucker Lean rats (mass = 288 ± 55 g) were studied. Intervention(s): We assessed the effects of ibuprofen, continuous CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC on acute edema formation after blunt trauma to the hind limbs of rats. Main Outcome Measure(s): Limb volumes were measured immediately before and after trauma and every 30 minutes over the 4 hours of the experiment. Results: Volumes of treated limbs of all 3 experimental groups were smaller (P < .05) than those of untreated limbs, but no treatment was more effective than another. Conclusions: Ibuprofen, CHVPC, and simultaneous ibuprofen and CHVPC effectively curbed edema after blunt injury by roughly 50% relative to untreated but similarly injured control limbs of rats. PMID:15970957

  7. Is non-operative management safe and effective for all splenic blunt trauma? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The goal of non-operative management (NOM) for blunt splenic trauma (BST) is to preserve the spleen. The advantages of NOM for minor splenic trauma have been extensively reported, whereas its value for the more severe splenic injuries is still debated. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available published evidence on NOM in patients with splenic trauma and to compare it with the operative management (OM) in terms of mortality, morbidity and duration of hospital stay. Methods For this systematic review we followed the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses" statement. A systematic search was performed on PubMed for studies published from January 2000 to December 2011, without language restrictions, which compared NOM vs. OM for splenic trauma injuries and which at least 10 patients with BST. Results We identified 21 non randomized studies: 1 Clinical Controlled Trial and 20 retrospective cohort studies analyzing a total of 16,940 patients with BST. NOM represents the gold standard treatment for minor splenic trauma and is associated with decreased mortality in severe splenic trauma (4.78% vs. 13.5% in NOM and OM, respectively), according to the literature. Of note, in BST treated operatively, concurrent injuries accounted for the higher mortality. In addition, it was not possible to determine post-treatment morbidity in major splenic trauma. The definition of hemodynamic stability varied greatly in the literature depending on the surgeon and the trauma team, representing a further bias. Moreover, data on the remaining analyzed outcomes (hospital stay, number of blood transfusions, abdominal abscesses, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection) were not reported in all included studies or were not comparable, precluding the possibility to perform a meaningful cumulative analysis and comparison. Conclusions NOM of BST, preserving the spleen, is the treatment of choice for the American Association for the

  8. The current role of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing cervical spine injury in blunt trauma patients with negative computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Meghann L; Whealon, Matthew D; Barrios, Cristobal; Kong, Allen P; Lekawa, Michael E; Dolich, Matthew O

    2012-10-01

    Clearance of cervical spine (CS) precautions in the neurologically altered blunt trauma patient can be difficult. Physical examination is not reliable, and although computed tomography (CT) may reveal no evidence of fracture, it is generally believed to be an inferior modality for assessing ligamentous and cord injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is expensive and may be risky in critically ill patients. Conversely, prolonged rigid collar use is associated with pressure ulceration and other complications. Multidetector CT raises the possibility of clearing CS on the basis of CT alone. We performed a retrospective review at our Level I trauma center of all blunt trauma patients with Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14 or less who underwent both CT and MRI CS with negative CT. One hundred fourteen patients met inclusion criteria, of which 23 had MRI findings. Seven (6%) of these had neurologic deficits and/or a change in management on the basis of MRI findings. Although use of the single-slice scanner was significantly associated with MRI findings (odds ratio, 2.62; P=0.023), no significant clinical risk factors were identified. Patients with MRI findings were heterogeneous in terms of age, mechanism, and Injury Severity Score. We conclude that CS MRI continues play a vital role in the workup of neurologically altered patients.

  9. Impact of Injury Severity on Dynamic Inflammation Networks Following Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Almahmoud, Khalid; Namas, Rami A; Abdul-Malak, Othman; Zaaqoq, Akram M; Zamora, Ruben; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Sperry, Jason; Peitzman, Andrew B; Billiar, Timothy R; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2015-08-01

    Clinical outcomes following trauma depend on the extent of injury and the host's response to injury, along with medical care. We hypothesized that dynamic networks of systemic inflammation manifest differently as a function of injury severity in human blunt trauma. From a cohort of 472 blunt trauma survivors studied following institutional review board approval, three Injury Severity Score (ISS) subcohorts were derived after matching for age and sex: mild ISS (49 patients [33 males and 16 females, aged 42 ± 1.9 years; ISS 9.5 ± 0.4]); moderate ISS (49 patients [33 males and 16 females, aged 42 ± 1.9; ISS 19.9 ± 0.4]), and severe ISS (49 patients [33 males and 16 females, aged 42 ± 2.5 years; ISS 33 ± 1.1]). Multiple inflammatory mediators were assessed in serial blood samples. Dynamic Bayesian Network inference was utilized to infer causal relationships based on probabilistic measures. Intensive care unit length of stay, total length of stay, days on mechanical ventilation, Marshall Multiple Organ Dysfunction score, prevalence of prehospital hypotension and nosocomial infection, and admission lactate and base deficit were elevated as a function of ISS. Multiple circulating inflammatory mediators were significantly elevated in severe ISS versus moderate or mild ISS over both the first 24 h and out to 7 days after injury. Dynamic Bayesian Network suggested that interleukin 6 production in severe ISS was affected by monocyte chemotactic protein 1/CCL2, monokine inducible by interferon γ (MIG)/CXCL9, and IP-10/CXCL10; by monocyte chemotactic protein 1/CCL2 and MIG/CXCL9 in moderate ISS; and by MIG/CXCL9 alone in mild ISS over 7 days after injury. Injury Severity Score correlates linearly with morbidity, prevalence of infection, and early systemic inflammatory connectivity of chemokines to interleukin 6.

  10. Medical pre-hospital management reduces mortality in severe blunt trauma: a prospective epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Severe blunt trauma is a leading cause of premature death and handicap. However, the benefit for the patient of pre-hospital management by emergency physicians remains controversial because it may delay admission to hospital. This study aimed to compare the impact of medical pre-hospital management performed by SMUR (Service Mobile d'Urgences et de Réanimation) with non-medical pre-hospital management provided by fire brigades (non-SMUR) on 30-day mortality. Methods The FIRST (French Intensive care Recorded in Severe Trauma) study is a multicenter cohort study on consecutive patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to university hospital intensive care units within the first 72 hours. Initial clinical status, pre-hospital life-sustaining treatments and Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were recorded. The main endpoint was 30-day mortality. Results Among 2,703 patients, 2,513 received medical pre-hospital management from SMUR, and 190 received basic pre-hospital management provided by fire brigades. SMUR patients presented a poorer initial clinical status and higher ISS and were admitted to hospital after a longer delay than non-SMUR patients. The crude 30-day mortality rate was comparable for SMUR and non-SMUR patients (17% and 15% respectively; P = 0.61). After adjustment for initial clinical status and ISS, SMUR care significantly reduced the risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio (OR): 0.55, 95% CI: 0.32 to 0.94, P = 0.03). Further adjustments for the delay to hospital admission only marginally affected these results. Conclusions This study suggests that SMUR management is associated with a significant reduction in 30-day mortality. The role of careful medical assessment and intensive pre-hospital life-sustaining treatments needs to be assessed in further studies. PMID:21251331

  11. Predictors of nephrectomy in high grade blunt renal trauma patients treated primarily with conservative intent.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Narla Hari; Devraj, Rahul; Chandriah, G Ram; Sagar, S Vidya; Reddy, Ch Ram; Murthy, Pisapati Venkata Lakshmi Narsimha

    2014-04-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal management of high grade renal trauma. Delayed surgery increases the likelihood of secondary hemorrhage and persistent urinary extravasation, whereas immediate surgery results in high renal loss. Hence, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the predictors of nephrectomy and outcome of high Grade (III-V) renal injury, treated primarily with conservative intent. The records of 55 patients who were admitted to our institute with varying degrees of blunt renal trauma from January 2005 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Grade III-V renal injury was defined as high grade blunt renal trauma and was present in 44 patients. The factors analyzed to predict emergency intervention were demographic profile, grade of injury, degree of hemodynamic instability, requirement of blood transfusion, need for intervention, mode of intervention, and duration of intensive care unit stay. Rest of the 40 patients with high grade injury (grade 3 and 4)did not require emergency intervention and underwent a trail of conservative management. 7 of the 40 patients with high grade renal injury (grade 3 and 4), who were managed conservatively experienced complications requiring procedural intervention and three required a delayed nephrectomy. Presence of grade V injuries with hemodynamic instability and requirement of more than 10 packed cell units for resuscitation were predictors of nephrectomy. Predictors of complications were urinary extravasation and hemodynamic instability at presentation. Majority of the high grade renal injuries can be successfully managed conservatively. Grade V injuries and the need for more packed cell transfusions during resuscitation predict the need for emergency intervention.

  12. Discrimination of falls and blows in blunt head trauma: a multi-criteria approach.

    PubMed

    Guyomarc'h, Pierre; Campagna-Vaillancourt, Maude; Kremer, Célia; Sauvageau, Anny

    2010-03-01

    In the discrimination of falls versus blows, the hat brim line (HBL) rule is mentioned in several textbooks as the most useful single criterion. Recent studies, however, have found that the HBL rule is only moderately valid and that its use on its own is not recommended. The purpose of this 6-year retrospective study was to find additional individually useful criteria in the distinction of falls from blows. Overall, the following criteria were found to point toward blows: more than three lacerations, laceration length of 7 cm or more, comminuted or depressed calvarial fractures, lacerations or fractures located above the HBL, left-side lateralization of lacerations or fractures, more than four facial contusions or lacerations, presence of ear lacerations, presence of facial fractures, and presence of postcranial osseous and/or visceral trauma. Based on the most discriminating criteria, a decision tree was constructed to be potentially applicable to future cases.

  13. The value of endoscopic diagnosis and the treatment of pancreas injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A; Bernhardt, J; Patrzyk, M; Heidecke, C-D

    2005-05-01

    Injuries to the pancreas following blunt abdominal trauma are rare due to its protected retroperitoneal position. Many pancreatic lesions remain unnoticed at first and only become apparent when complications arise or during treatment of other injuries. The mortality rate is between 12 and 30%, and if treatment is delayed it is as high as 60%. Using medical records over the past 5 years, we investigated when and in what circumstances endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) was used in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreas injuries after blunt abdominal trauma. Penetrating injuries were not taken into consideration. An ERCP was performed on a total of five patients with suspected injuries to the pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma. No duct participation could be determined in three of the patients with a first degree pancreatic lesion. A 44-year-old woman sustained severe internal and external injuries after a traffic accident. Because of the nature of her injuries, pancreatic left resection with splenectomy was necessary. After the operation, a pancreatic fistula diagnosed. The ductus pancreaticus (DP) was successfully treated by stenting with the use of endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography. A 24-year old woman was kicked in the epigastrium by a horse. On the day after the incident, she complained of increasing pain in the upper abdomen, and she had elevated amylase and lipase levels. Computed tomography scan showed free fluid. Less than 48 h after the accident, ERCP was performed and a leakage in the DP in the head-body region (fourth degree) was identified. We placed a stent, and during the subsequent laparoscopy the omental bursa was flushed out and a drainage laid. After 14 days, the patient was sent home. We removed the drainage 4 weeks after the accident, and the stent after 12 weeks. The major advantage of the prompt retrograde discription of the pancreatobiliary system after an accident in which pancreas involvement is suspected is the

  14. Detection of vascular injuries in patients with blunt pelvic trauma by using 64-channel multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Jennifer L; Anderson, Stephan W; Murakami, Akira M; Pieroni, Sabrina; Rhea, James T; Soto, Jorge A

    2009-01-01

    Vascular injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with blunt pelvic trauma. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has traditionally been used to detect pelvic arterial injuries and to treat active arterial hemorrhage. Improvements in the technology of computed tomography (CT) have facilitated the implementation of CT angiography, which is beginning to replace DSA in the evaluation of patients with acute trauma. Pelvic CT angiography can reliably depict various pelvic arterial injuries and can help differentiate arterial hemorrhage from venous hemorrhage on the basis of multiphasic acquisitions, a method that may be used to tailor the subsequent clinical approach. With the use of a 64-channel multidetector CT scanner, multiphasic pelvic CT angiography can be integrated into the evaluation of trauma patients by using 1.25-mm reconstructed section thickness, pitch of 1:0.987, and gantry revolution time of 0.5 second to achieve near-isotropic results. A standard dose of 100 mL intravenous contrast material is injected at a rate of 5 mL/sec, and 30 mL saline solution, also at 5 mL/sec, is injected as a "chasing" bolus to follow the contrast material. (c) RSNA, 2009.

  15. CT Chest with IV Contrast Compared with CT Angiography after Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Andrea A; Stewart, Donovan; Murry, Jason S; Hoang, David M; Sun, Beatrice; Ashrafian, Sogol; Hotz, Heidi; Chung, Rex; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt aortic injury (BAI) after chest trauma is a potentially lethal condition that requires rapid diagnosis for appropriate treatment. We compared CT with IV contrast (CTI) with CT with angiography (CTA) during the initial phase of care at an urban Level I trauma center from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Overall, 281 patients met inclusion criteria with 167 (59%) CTI and 114 (41%) CTA. There were no differences between cohorts in age, gender, initial heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale. Mortality rates were similar for CTI and CTA (4% vs 8%, P = 0.20). CTI identified any chest injury in 54 per cent of patients compared with 46 per cent with CTA (P = 0.05). The rate of BAI was similar with CTI and CTA (2% vs 2%, P = 0.80), and neither modality was falsely negative. We conclude that CTI and CTA are similar at evaluating trauma patients for BAI, although CTI may be preferable during the initial assessment phase because the contrast injection may be combined with abdominal scanning and image time is reduced when whole-body CT is required.

  16. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Julien; Frandon, Julien; Barbois, Sandrine; Vendrell, Anne; Rodiere, Mathieu; Sengel, Christian; Bricault, Ivan; Arvieux, Catherine; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Mesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding. The medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, and the complications of embolization. Six endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration. In mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.

  17. A review of the management of blunt splenic trauma in England and Wales: have regional trauma networks influenced management strategies and outcomes?

    PubMed

    Yiannoullou, P; Hall, C; Newton, K; Pearce, L; Bouamra, O; Jenks, T; Scrimshire, A B; Hughes, J; Lecky, F; Macdonald, Adh

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The spleen remains one of the most frequently injured organs following blunt abdominal trauma. In 2012, regional trauma networks were launched across England and Wales with the aim of improving outcomes following trauma. This retrospective cohort study investigated the management and outcomes of blunt splenic injuries before and after the establishment of regional trauma networks. METHODS A dataset was drawn from the Trauma Audit Research Network database of all splenic injuries admitted to English and Welsh hospitals from 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2014. Demographic data, injury severity, treatment modalities and outcomes were collected. Management and outcomes were compared before and after the launch of regional trauma networks. RESULTS There were 1457 blunt splenic injuries: 575 between 2010 and 2012 and 882 in 2012-14. Following the introduction of the regional trauma networks, use of splenic artery embolotherapy increased from 3.5% to 7.6% (P = 0.001) and splenectomy rates decreased from 20% to 14.85% (P = 0.012). Significantly more patients with polytrauma and blunt splenic injury were treated with splenic embolotherapy following 2012 (61.2% vs. 30%, P < 0.0001). Increasing age, injury severity score, polytrauma and Charlson Comorbidity Index above 10 were predictors of increased mortality (P < 0.001). Increasing systolic blood pressure (odds ratio, OR, 0.757, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.716-0.8) and Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.988, 95% CI 0.982-0.995) were protective. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates a reduction in splenectomy rate and an increased use of splenic artery embolotherapy since the introduction of the regional trauma networks. This may have resulted from improved access to specialist services and reduced practice variation since the establishment of these networks.

  18. Crack blunting, crack bridging and resistance-curve fracture mechanics in dentin: effect of hydration.

    PubMed

    Kruzic, J J; Nalla, R K; Kinney, J H; Ritchie, R O

    2003-12-01

    Few studies have focused on a description of the fracture toughness properties of dentin in terms of resistance-curve (R-curve) behavior, i.e., fracture resistance increasing with crack extension, particularly in light of the relevant toughening mechanisms involved. Accordingly, in the present study, fracture mechanics based experiments were conducted on elephant dentin in order to determine such R-curves, to identify the salient toughening mechanisms and to discern how hydration may affect their potency. Crack bridging by uncracked ligaments, observed directly by microscopy and X-ray tomography, was identified as a major toughening mechanism, with further experimental evidence provided by compliance-based experiments. In addition, with hydration, dentin was observed to display significant crack blunting leading to a higher overall fracture resistance than in the dehydrated material. The results of this work are deemed to be of importance from the perspective of modeling the fracture behavior of dentin and in predicting its failure in vivo.

  19. Detection of cervical spine injuries in alert, asymptomatic geriatric blunt trauma patients: who benefits from radiologic imaging?

    PubMed

    Ong, Adrian W; Rodriguez, Aurelio; Kelly, Robert; Cortes, Vicente; Protetch, Jack; Daffner, Richard H

    2006-09-01

    There are differing recommendations in the literature regarding cervical spine imaging in alert, asymptomatic geriatric patients. Previous studies also have not used computed tomography routinely. Given that cervical radiographs may miss up to 60 per cent of fractures, the incidence of cervical spine injuries in this population and its implications for clinical management are unclear. We conducted a retrospective study of blunt trauma patients 65 years and older who were alert, asymptomatic, hemodynamically stable, and had normal neurologic examinations. For inclusion, patients were required to have undergone computed tomography and plain radiographs. The presence and anatomic location of potentially distracting injuries or pain were recorded. Two hundred seventy-four patients were included, with a mean age of 76 +/- 10 years. The main mechanisms of injury were falls (51%) and motor vehicle crashes (41%). Nine of 274 (3%) patients had cervical spine injuries. The presence of potentially distracting injuries above the clavicles was associated with cervical injury when compared with patients with distracting injuries in other anatomic locations or no distracting injuries (8/115 vs 1/159, P = 0.03). There was no association of cervical spine injury with age greater or less than 75 years or with mechanism of injury. The overall incidence of cervical spine injury in the alert, asymptomatic geriatric population is low. The risk is increased with a potentially distracting injury above the clavicles. Patients with distracting injuries in other anatomic locations or no distracting injuries may not need routine cervical imaging.

  20. Development and validation of subject-specific finite element models for blunt trauma study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weixin; Niu, Yuqing; Mattrey, Robert F; Fournier, Adam; Corbeil, Jackie; Kono, Yuko; Stuhmiller, James H

    2008-04-01

    This study developed and validated finite element (FE) models of swine and human thoraxes and abdomens that had subject-specific anatomies and could accurately and efficiently predict body responses to blunt impacts. Anatomies of the rib cage, torso walls, thoracic, and abdominal organs were reconstructed from X-ray computed tomography (CT) images and extracted into geometries to build FE meshes. The rib cage was modeled as an inhomogeneous beam structure with geometry and bone material parameters determined directly from CT images. Meshes of soft components were generated by mapping structured mesh templates representative of organ topologies onto the geometries. The swine models were developed from and validated by 30 animal tests in which blunt insults were applied to swine subjects and CT images, chest wall motions, lung pressures, and pathological data were acquired. A comparison of the FE calculations of animal responses and experimental measurements showed a good agreement. The errors in calculated response time traces were within 10% for most tests. Calculated peak responses showed strong correlations with the experimental values. The stress concentration inside the ribs, lungs, and livers produced by FE simulations also compared favorably to the injury locations. A human FE model was developed from CT images from the Visible Human project and was scaled to simulate historical frontal and side post mortem human subject (PMHS) impact tests. The calculated chest deformation also showed a good agreement with the measurements. The models developed in this study can be of great value for studying blunt thoracic and abdominal trauma and for designing injury prevention techniques, equipments, and devices.

  1. Bilateral Radial Head Fractures in a Woman With Trivial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Zakir; Patel, Kuntal J.; Elbo, A.; Guisasola, I.

    2005-01-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries, occurring in about 20% of all acute elbow injuries. Isolated radial head fractures are not common and include about 2% of all fractures around the elbow. Bilateral radial head fractures are rare and usually associated with severe trauma and associated fractures and dislocations. We report a case of bilateral undisplaced radial head fracture in a woman, following a simple fall. Early recognition, proper management, and physical therapy led to complete recovery and full functional movement of the elbow. PMID:16369234

  2. Distal Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula with Iliac Vein Thrombosis after Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Sil; Kim, Sung Wan; Lee, Hyun Seok; Byun, Kyung Hwan; Choe, Michael SungPil

    2017-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman arrived at our emergency department, complaining of severe pain and swelling of her left leg. She had slipped down stairs and injured on her left leg about 3 months ago. Computed tomography angiography showed left distal superficial femoral artery’s pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula and thrombotic occlusion of left common iliac vein. We decided to do endovascular intervention due to severe venous hypertension and chronic inflammation around the fistula. The femoral arteriovenous fistula was closed via stent-graft (7 mm×5, 9 mm×5 cm) deployment. The occluded left iliac vein was reopened by nitinol metal stenting (12 mm×4 cm, 14 mm×4 cm). The authors report a very rare case of femoral arteriovenous fistula combined with iliac vein thrombosis developed after a blunt trauma. PMID:28377911

  3. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea. PMID:22880189

  4. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung Chul

    2012-08-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea.

  5. Fat from contused adipose tissue may cause yellow discoloration of clothes in blunt trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, D; Wuest, F; Bielefeld, L; Große Perdekamp, M; Pircher, R; Pollak, S; Thierauf-Emberger, A; Huppertz, L M

    2014-12-01

    In some fatalities from intense blunt trauma, the victims' clothes show strikingly yellow discoloration being in topographic correspondence with lacerated skin and crush damage to the underlying fatty tissue. This phenomenon is especially pronounced in light-colored textiles such as underwear made of cotton and in the absence of concomitant blood-staining. The constellation of findings seems to indicate that the fabric has been soaked with liquid body fat deriving from the contused adipose tissue. To check this hypothesis, textiles suspected to be contaminated with fat were investigated in 6 relevant cases. GC-MS-analysis proved the presence of 11 fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was similar to that of human adipose tissue with a high proportion of oleic acid (18:1). In total, the morphological and chemical findings demonstrated that the yellow discoloration of the victims' clothes was caused by fat from traumatized adipose tissue.

  6. Transient pressure wave in the behind armor blunt trauma: experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shaomin; Xu, Cheng; Wang, Shu; Wen, Yaoke

    2017-02-01

    In the last few decades, various researches focus on the transient pressure in the behind armor blunt trauma. This paper presented a investigation on the transient pressure in the ballistic gelatin behind a soft body armor subjected to the impacting from three ammunitions. Experimental results show that three peaks appear on the pressure-time curves without taking into account the ammunition type and the impact velocity. Furthermore, numerical models of the test were created to compare modelling results to the pressure from the pressure gauges buried in the gelatin block. The main features on the pressure-time cure were discussed to analyze the wave formation and propagation. With the verified model, the effect of the boundary was also investigated to explain the wave reflection which appeared after two peaks.

  7. Controversies in emergency radiology. CT versus ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rhea, James T; Garza, Daniel H; Novelline, Robert A

    2004-07-01

    There has been controversy regarding ultrasonography (US) versus CT in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). Each modality has its strengths and weaknesses. US is fast and allows resuscitative efforts to proceed while the patient is being scanned. However, the sensitivity of US is inferior to that of CT, and there is user variability. CT is better at determining the extent, type, and grade of injury, resulting in a more tailored therapeutic plan and safe conservative management of many patients. However, CT involves ionizing radiation, cannot be performed portably, and requires only visual monitoring while scanning. Given each modality's strengths and weaknesses we conclude that CT is the preferred examination when the BAT patient is stable or moderately stable, enough to be taken to CT. If a BAT patient is unstable, US is beneficial in screening for certain injuries or large hemoperitoneum prior to an exploratory laparotomy.

  8. Distal Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula with Iliac Vein Thrombosis after Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Sil; Kim, Sung Wan; Lee, Hyun Seok; Byun, Kyung Hwan; Choe, Michael SungPil

    2017-03-01

    A 39-year-old woman arrived at our emergency department, complaining of severe pain and swelling of her left leg. She had slipped down stairs and injured on her left leg about 3 months ago. Computed tomography angiography showed left distal superficial femoral artery's pseudoaneurysm with arteriovenous fistula and thrombotic occlusion of left common iliac vein. We decided to do endovascular intervention due to severe venous hypertension and chronic inflammation around the fistula. The femoral arteriovenous fistula was closed via stent-graft (7 mm×5, 9 mm×5 cm) deployment. The occluded left iliac vein was reopened by nitinol metal stenting (12 mm×4 cm, 14 mm×4 cm). The authors report a very rare case of femoral arteriovenous fistula combined with iliac vein thrombosis developed after a blunt trauma.

  9. Evaluation of Cervical Spine Clearance by Computed Tomographic Scan Alone in Intoxicated Patients With Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bush, Lisa; Brookshire, Robert; Roche, Breanna; Johnson, Amelia; Cole, Frederic; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Long, William; Martin, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Current trauma guidelines dictate that the cervical spine should not be cleared in intoxicated patients, resulting in prolonged immobilization or additional imaging. Modern computed tomography (CT) technology may obviate this and allow for immediate clearance. To analyze cervical spine clearance practices and the utility of CT scans of the cervical spine in intoxicated patients with blunt trauma. We performed a prospective observational study of 1668 patients with blunt trauma aged 18 years and older who underwent cervical spine CT scans from March 2014 to March 2015 at an American College of Surgeons-verified Level I trauma center. Intoxication was determined by serum alcohol levels and urine drug screens. Physical examination and CT scan findings were evaluated for cervical spine injuries (CSI) and the incidence of missed injuries. Clinically relevant CSIs requiring cervical stabilization. The hypotheses formed prior to data collection were that cervical CT scans are sensitive and specific enough to diagnose CSIs that require stabilization and that normal CT scans are sufficient to clear CSIs in intoxicated patients. Of 1668 patients, 1103 (66.1%) were male, with a mean (SD) age of 49 (20) years and a mean (SD) Injury Severity Score of 10 (9). Vehicular (734 [44.0%]) and falls (579 [34.7%]) were the most common mechanisms for hospitalization. Intoxication was identified in 632 of 1429 of patients tested (44.2%; 425 [29.7%] by serum alcohol levels and 350 [24.5%] by urine drug screens). Half (316 [50.0%]) were admitted with cervical spine immobilization, and 38 (12%) of these were solely owing to the presence of intoxication. There were 65 abnormal CT scans (10.3%) in the intoxicated group. Among 567 normal CT scans, 4 (0.7%) had central cord syndrome found on initial physical examination, and 1 (0.2%) had a symptomatic unstable ligament injury that was misread as normal on CT scan but was abnormal on magnetic resonance imaging. The 316 patients kept in a

  10. Clinical Significance and Prognostic Implications of Quantifying Pulmonary Contusion Volume in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ismail; El-Menyar, Ayman; Younis, Basil; Ahmed, Khalid; Nabir, Syed; Ahmed, Mohamed Nadeem; Al-Yahri, Omer; Mahmood, Saeed; Consunji, Rafael; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Background Pulmonary contusion (PC) is the most frequent blunt chest injury which could be used to identify patients at high-risk of clinical deterioration. We aimed to investigate the clinical correlation between PC volume and outcome in patients with blunt chest trauma (BCT). Material/Methods BCT patients with PC were identified retrospectively from the prospectively collected trauma registry database over a 2-year period. Contusion volume was measured and expressed as percentage of total lung (CTCV) volume using three-dimensional reconstruction of thoracic CT images on admission. Data included patients’ demographics, mechanism of injury (MOI) and injury severity, associated injuries, CTCV, mechanical ventilation, complications, and mortality. Results A total of 226 BCT patients were identified to have PC with a mean age of 35.2 years. Motor vehicle crash (54.4%) and falls (16.4%) were the most frequent MOIs. Bilateral PC (61.5%) was more prevalent than right-sided (19.5%) and left-sided PC (19%). CTCV had a significant positive correlation with ISS; whereas, age and PaO2/FiO2 ratio showed a negative correlation (p<0.05 for all). The median CTCV was significantly higher in patients who developed in-hospital complications (p=0.02). A CTCV >20% was associated with increasedrisk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), blood transfusion and prolonged mechanical ventilation. However, multiple linear regression analysis showed that CTCV alone was not an independent predictor of in-hospital outcomes. Presence of chest infection, CTCV, and Injury Severity Scores were predictors of ARDS. Conclusions Quantifying pulmonary contusion volume could allow identification of patients at high-risk of ARDS. CTCV has a significant correlation with injury severity in patients with BCT. Further prospective studies are needed to address the validity of CTCV in the patients care. PMID:28746303

  11. Effects of penehyclidine hydrochloride on pulmonary contusion from blunt chest trauma in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Jing; Xia, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Ling-Li; Luo, Tao; Zhan, Li-Ying; Meng, Qing-Tao; Song, Xue-Min

    2012-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is widely recognised as a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in the triggering of innate immunity. Lung inflammation and systemic innate immune responses are dependent on TLR4 activation undergoing pulmonary contusion. Therefore, the author investigated the effects of penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) on the expression of TLR4 and inflammatory responses of blunt chest trauma-induced pulmonary contusion. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned into three groups: normal control (NC) group, pulmonary contusion (PC) group and penehyclidine hydrochloride treatment (PHC) group. Pulmonary contusion was induced in anesthetised rats at fixed chest impact energy of 2.45J. Lung injury was assessed by the histopathology changes, arterial blood gas and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of lung. The serum tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The expression of TLR4 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Blunt chest trauma produced leucocytosis in the interstitial capillaries, hypoxemia, and increased MPO activity. The expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 and TLR4 in the lung were significantly enhanced during pulmonary contusion. PHC treatments effectively attenuated pulmonary inflammation responses, as shown by improved pulmonary oxygenation, histopathology damage, decreased the MPO activity, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, and TLR4 after lung injury. It might be concluded that PHC exhibit anti-inflammatory and protective effects in traumatic lung injury via the inhibition of the TLR4 pathway. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to blunt trauma: Endovascular management by means of neurostents and flow diverters.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Rajz, Gustavo; Rosenthal, Guy; El Hassan, Hosni Abu; Moscovici, Samuel; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-10-01

    Extracranial vertebral pseudoaneurysms that develop following blunt trauma to the cervical area may have a benign course; however, embolic or ischemic stroke and progressive pseudoaneurysm enlargement may occur. We review the presentation and endovascular management of pseudoaneurysms of the cervical vertebral artery (VA) due to blunt trauma in nine patients (eight male, mean age 27years). Pseudoaneurysms occurred in dominant vessels in seven patients and coexisted with segmental narrowing in six. We favored endovascular intervention during the acute phase only in cases with significant narrowing of a dominant VA, especially when anticoagulation was contraindicated. Four patients were treated during the acute stage (contraindication to anticoagulation, mass effect, severely injured dominant VA/impending stroke); five during the chronic phase (pseudoaneurysm growth, ischemic stroke on aspirin prophylaxis, patient preference). Reconstructive techniques were favored over deliberate endovascular occlusion when dominant vessels were involved. Arterial reconstruction was performed in eight of nine patients using a flow-diverter implant (5 patients), stent-assisted coiling (1), overlapping stent implant (1), or implantation of a balloon-expandable stent (1). Deliberate VA occlusion with coils was performed in one of nine patients due to suboptimal expansion of the stented artery after flow-diverter implant. No neurological complications occurred during follow-up. All cases treated by reconstructive techniques showed complete, persistent pseudoaneurysm occlusion and full arterial patency. Endovascular therapy of traumatic VA pseudoaneurysms using neurostents and flow-diverters resulted in occlusion of the pseudoaneurysms, preservation of the parent vessel, and no periprocedural or delayed clinical complications, supporting the feasibility and safety of the approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality Improvement Effort to Reduce Cranial CTs for Children With Minor Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Nigrovic, Lise E; Stack, Anne M; Mannix, Rebekah C; Lyons, Todd W; Samnaliev, Mihail; Bachur, Richard G; Proctor, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    Blunt head trauma is a common injury in children, although it rarely requires surgical intervention. Cranial computed tomography (CT) is the reference standard for the diagnosis of traumatic brain injury but has been associated with increased lifetime malignancy risk. We implemented a multifaceted quality improvement initiative to decrease the use of cranial CT for children with minor head injuries. We designed and implemented a quality improvement effort that included an evidence-based guideline as well as individual feedback for children aged 0 to 21 years who present to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of minor blunt head trauma. Our primary outcome was cranial CT rate, and our balancing measure was any return to the ED within 72 hours that required hospitalization. We used statistical process control methodology to measure cranial CT rates over time. We included 6851 ED visits of which 4242 (62%) occurred in the post-guideline implementation period. From a baseline CT rate of 21%, we observed an absolute reduction of 6% in cranial CT rate (95% confidence interval 3% to 9%) after initial guideline implementation and an additional absolute reduction of 6% (95% confidence interval 4% to 8%) after initiation of individual provider feedback. No children discharged from the ED required admission within 72 hours of initial evaluation. An ED quality improvement effort that included an evidence-based guideline as well as individual provider feedback was associated with a reduction in cranial CT rates without an increase in missed significant head injuries. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Role of plasma ammonia level in detecting intra-abdominal hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Davood; Fadaki, Ali Akbar Khademi; Kianmehr, Nahid; Abbasi, Saeed; Rezai, Mahdi; Marashi, Mohammad; Mofidi, Mani

    2014-11-01

    Blunt abdominal injury is a leading cause of death in trauma patients. A reliable test predicting intra-abdominal hemorrhage would be a novel method. The study objective was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of plasma ammonia in detection of intra-abdominal bleeding in patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). In this observational study, all patients suffering from BAT, referred to our university teaching hospital included. The levels of ammonia were measured at the time of emergency department admission and 1 h after initial treatment. Demographic data, vital signs, and venous blood gas reports were recorded. Findings of contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography scan and laparotomy were assumed as a gold standard for abdominal injuries. A total of 104 patients was enrolled in the study. 15 patients (14.4%) had intra-abdominal hemorrhage and the mean plasma ammonia level in this group was significantly higher than the other patients on admission time (101.73 ± 5.41 μg/dL vs. 47.36 ± 26.31 μg/dL, P < 0.001). On receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis, in cutoff point of 89 μg/dL, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79.6-100), 93.26% (95% CI, 86-96.8), 14.83 (95% CI, 6.84-32.12), and 0, respectively. The study findings suggest the measurement of ammonia level at the time of admission in the patients with BAT would be a useful test predicting intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Furthermore, decrease in the ammonia level could be a useful marker for monitoring response to treatment in these patients.

  15. Minimal aortic injury after blunt trauma: selective nonoperative management is safe.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jasmeet S; Neideen, Todd; Tutton, Sean; Milia, David; Tolat, Parag; Foley, Dennis; Brasel, Karen

    2011-12-01

    An increasing number of minimal aortic injuries (MAIs) are being identified with modern computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques. The optimal management and natural history of these injuries are unknown. We have adopted a policy of selective multidisciplinary nonoperative management of MAI. This study examines our experience with these patients from July 2004 to June 2009. Retrospective chart review of all blunt trauma patients who underwent chest CT angiography to evaluate for blunt aortic injury (BAI) was undertaken. All patients deemed to have a MAI were managed nonoperatively, and those with a severe aortic injury underwent repair. Data collected included age, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, type and location of aortic injury, intensive care unit length of stay (LOS), overall LOS, ventilator days, disposition, and mortality. In addition, all BAIs were graded according to the Presley Trauma Center CT Grading System of Aortic Injury. Forty-seven patients with BAI were identified. Thirty-two were classified as severe injuries, and 15 were considered MAI (32%). Nineteen underwent operative repair, 13 underwent endovascular stent graft repair, and 15 were managed nonoperatively. The average Injury Severity Score was 31 ± 10, and the average age was 44 ± 20 with no significant difference across treatment groups. There was no difference in overall or intensive care unit LOS. The nonoperative group had a shorter duration of ventilator days (1.1 vs. 4.28, p = 0.02). There were five deaths, none in the nonoperative group. None of these patients required subsequent intervention. All nonoperative patients had follow-up imaging at median of 4 days; on CT chest angiography, five injuries had resolved, eight had stable intimal flaps or pseudoaneurysm, and two had no detectable injury on subsequent aortogram. Almost one-third of our BAI were safely managed nonoperatively. Patients with MAI should be considered for selective nonoperative management in a

  16. A fracture prevention service reduces further fractures two years after incident minimal trauma fracture.

    PubMed

    Van der Kallen, John; Giles, Michelle; Cooper, Kerry; Gill, Kerry; Parker, Vicki; Tembo, Agness; Major, Gabor; Ross, Linda; Carter, Jan

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of a fracture prevention clinic service on initiation of treatment, continuing treatment and subsequent minimal trauma fractures (MTF). Participants were people aged 50 and over, with a minimal trauma fracture presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) in a large tertiary referral hospital in New South Wales, Australia, between February 2007 and March 2009. A cohort of patients who attended a Fracture Prevention Clinic (clinic group) were compared with a cohort who did not attend the clinic (non-clinic group). A telephone questionnaire was conducted with participants or their carers between December 2010 and April 2011 at least 12 months post-fracture presentation. Questionnaire items included demographics, fracture types, osteoporosis treatment, recurrent fractures and smoking and dietary habits. Data were compared using chi-squared test for categorical variables and Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test for continuous variables. Two hundred and fourteen clinic attendees and 220 non-clinic attendees were surveyed between 12 and 40 months (mean 24 months) post-initial fracture. New fracture rates were lower in the clinic group (5.1%) than the non-clinic group (16.4%, P < 0.001). Treatment rates for bone fragility were higher in the clinic group (81.3%) than in the non-clinic group (54.1%, P < 0.001) with 66.8% of the clinic group and 34.1% of the non-clinic group on a bisphosphonate or strontium ranelate at the time of the survey (P < 0.001). Patients managed by a fracture prevention clinic service following a MTF have fewer new fractures and are more likely to be on treatment for bone fragility. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Kinetic therapy in multiple trauma patients with severe blunt chest trauma: an analysis at a level-1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Zeckey, C; Wendt, K; Mommsen, P; Winkelmann, M; Frömke, C; Weidemann, J; Stübig, T; Krettek, C; Hildebrand, F

    2015-01-01

    Chest trauma is a relevant risk factor for mortality after multiple trauma. Kinetic therapy (KT) represents a potential treatment option in order to restore pulmonary function. Decision criteria for performing kinetic therapy are not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the decision making process to initiate kinetic therapy in a well defined multiple trauma cohort. A retrospective analysis (2000-2009) of polytrauma patients (age > 16 years, ISS ⩾ 16) with severe chest trauma (AIS(Chest) ⩾ 3) was performed. Patients with AIS(Head) ⩾ 3 were excluded. Patients receiving either kinetic (KT+) or lung protective ventilation strategy (KT-) were compared. Chest trauma was classified according to the AIS(Chest), Pulmonary Contusion Score (PCS), Wagner Jamieson Score and Thoracic Trauma Severity Score (TTS). There were multiple outcome parameters investigated included mortality, posttraumatic complications and clinical data. A multivariate regression analysis was performed. Two hundred and eighty-three patients were included (KT+: n=160; KT-: n=123). AIS(Chest), age and gender were comparable in both groups. There were significant higher values of the ISS, PCS, Wagner Jamieson Score and TTS in group KT+. The incidence of posttraumatic complications and mortality was increased compared to group KT- (p< 0.05). Despite that, kinetic therapy failed to be an independent risk factor for mortality in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Kinetic therapy is an option in severely injured patients with severe chest trauma. Decision making is not only based on anatomical aspects such as the AIS(Chest), but on overall injury severity, pulmonary contusions and physiological deterioration. It could be assumed that the increased mortality in patients receiving KT is primarily caused by these factors and does not reflect an independent adverse effect of KT. Furthermore, KT was not shown to be an independent risk factor for mortality.

  18. Yield and Clinical Predictors of Thoracic Spine Injury from Chest Computed Tomography for Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Langdorf, Mark I.; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A.; Bithell, Chelsey; Rowther, Armaan A.; Reed, Karin; Anderson, Craig L.; Lotfipour, Shahram; Rodriguez, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cost and radiation risk have prompted intense examination of trauma patient imaging. A proposed decision instrument (DI) for the use of chest computed tomography (CT), (CCT) in blunt trauma patients includes thoracic spine (TS) tenderness, altered mental status (AMS) and distracting painful injury (DPI) as potential predictor variables. TS CT is a separate, costly study whose value is currently ill-defined. The objective of this study is to determine test characteristics of these predictor variables alone, and in combination, to derive a TS injury DI. Methods Prospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients age > 14 in a Level I Trauma Center who had either CCT or TS CT. Results Of 1,798 blunt trauma patients, 1,174 (65.3%) had CCT, and 46 (2.6%) had a TS CT at physician discretion. CCT identified 58 TS injuries in 1,220 patients (4.8%). For 1,032 patients without AMS, 18/35 had TS tenderness, for sensitivity of 51.4%, specificity 84.7%, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of 10.5% and 98.0%. Positive likelihood ratio (+LR) was 3.35, with negative (−LR) 0.57. Among the 58 TS injuries, 23 had AMS for sensitivity of 39.7%, with other test characteristics of 85.8%, 12.2%, 96.6%, with +LR 2.79 and −LR 0.70. Thirty-eight of 58 had DPI, for sensitivity 65.5%, with other test characteristics 65.7%, 8.7%, and 97.4%, with +LR 1.91 and −LR 0.52. Combining 3 predictor variables into a proposed DI found 56/58 injuries for test characteristics of 96.6% (95% CI 88.1–99.6%), 49.1% (46.1–52.0%), 8.6% (6.6–11.1%) and 99.7% (CI 98.7–100%), with +LR 1.90 (1.76–2.04) and −LR 0.07 (0.02–0.28). If validated, the DI would exclude 572/1,220 CCT patients from separate TS CT (46.9%, CI 44.1–49.7%), and 141/511 (27.6%, CI 23.8–31.7%) patients who actually had TS CT in our cohort. Medicare payment at our center for sagittal reconstructions of TS CT is $280 for professional plus technical charges ($3,312 per study). The DI, if validated

  19. Global aphasia without hemiparesis may be caused by blunt head trauma: An adolescent boy with transient aphasia.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Sevim; Türkdoğan, Dilşad; Hacıfazlıoğlu, Nilüfer Eldeş; Yalçın, Emek Uyur; Eksen, Zehra Yılmaz; Ekinci, Gazanfer

    2017-05-01

    Global aphasia without hemiparesis is a rare condition often associated with embolic stroke. Posttraumatic causes have not been reported, in the literature, to our knowledge. We report a 15-year old boy with transient global aphasia without hemiparesis due to blunt head trauma. In our case, clinical findings occurred 1week later following head trauma. Emergence of the symptoms after a period of the first mechanical head trauma, draws attention to the importance of secondary process in traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Concomitant hollow viscus injuries in patients with blunt hepatic and splenic injuries: an analysis of a National Trauma Registry database.

    PubMed

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Matter, Ibrahim; Olsha, Oded; Ashkenazi, Itamar; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2014-09-01

    Non-operative management has become the standard approach for treating stable patients sustaining blunt hepatic or splenic injuries in the absence of other indications for laparotomy. The liberal use of computed tomography (CT) has reduced the rate of unnecessary immediate laparotomies; however, due to its limited sensitivity in the diagnosis of hollow viscus injuries (HVI), this may be at the expense of a rise in the incidence of missed HVI. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of concomitant HVI in blunt trauma patients diagnosed with hepatic and/or splenic injuries, and to evaluate whether a correlation exists between this incidence and the severity of hepatic or splenic injuries. A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients with splenic and/or liver injuries, between the years 1998 and 2012 registered in the Israel National Trauma Registry. The association between the presence and severity of splenic and/or liver injuries and the incidence of HVI was examined. Of the 57,130 trauma victims identified as suffering from blunt torso injuries, 2335 (4%) sustained hepatic injuries without splenic injuries (H group), 3127 (5.4%) had splenic injuries without hepatic injuries (S group), and 564 (1%) suffered from both hepatic and splenic injuries (H+S group). Overall, 957 patients sustained 1063 HVI. The incidence of HVI among blunt torso trauma victims who sustained neither splenic nor hepatic injuries was 1.5% which is significantly lower than in the S (3.1%), H (3.1%), and H+S (6.7%) groups. In the S group, there was a clear correlation between the severity of the splenic injury and the incidence of HVI. This correlation was not found in the H group. The presence of blunt splenic and/or hepatic injuries predicts a higher incidence of HVI, especially if combined. While in blunt splenic injury patients there is a clear correlation between the incidence of HVI and the severity of splenic injury, such a correlation does not exist in patients

  1. Blunt urogenital trauma in prepubescent female patients: more than meets the eye!

    PubMed

    Lynch, J M; Gardner, M J; Albanese, C T

    1995-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injury to the urogenital region in the prepubescent girl is commonly evaluated in pediatric emergency departments (ED). The purpose of this study is: 1) to establish recommendations for an accurate, painless (both physically and psychologically), and timely diagnosis, and 2) to determine whether the ED examination can accurately determine the extent of the injury. Over a 24-month period (January 1991 through December 1992), 22 girls with blunt trauma to the urogenital region (mean age 5.7 years, range 2-9 years) were retrospectively evaluated. Initial ED evaluations were by both an emergency physician and a pediatric surgeon. All 22 patients underwent an examination under anesthesia (EUA) in the operating room to evaluate the extent of the injury and to repair the injury as needed. Follow-up was obtained in all patients and averaged 18 months. The findings at EUA demonstrated a significant disagreement with the preoperative ED evaluation. In only five patients was there agreement between the preoperative ED assessment and the findings during the EUA (24% concurrence). Thus, 16 patients (76%) had injuries of greater extent than was appreciated during the preoperative examination in the ED. Partial or complete disruption of the perianal sphincters occurred in six patients (27%) and was unrecognized preoperatively in each. Twenty-one of the 22 patients required suture repair of lacerations, the remaining patient did not require surgical therapy. Three patients had contusions or lacerations to the urethral area requiring repair and/or prolonged bladder catheter drainage for two to 14 days (average seven days). The average hospital stay was 19.3 hours. There were three minor wound complications following surgery: two required repeat EUA with suturing or cauterization, and one required no further therapy. This study clearly demonstrates that the ED examination, by both emergency physicians and pediatric surgeons, of young girls who have suffered blunt

  2. Isolated rupture of bicuspid aortic valve following blunt chest trauma: a case report and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajid; Luni, Faraz Khan; Hashmi, Fayyaz; Taleb, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma to chest cause injury to various cardiac structures. Isolated rupture of aortic valve without aortic dissection is rare complication of blunt chest trauma and can be caused by a tear or avulsion of the valve. We report a case of a 35-year-old male who presented with severe aortic insufficiency due to rupture of a non-infected congenital bicuspid aortic valve following non-penetrating chest trauma. The diagnosis was suggested by echocardiography and was confirmed by intra-operative and histological findings. The patient was successfully treated with surgical valve replacement with uneventful postoperative course and recovery. We describe patho-physiology, clinical manifestations, management and the literature review of traumatic rupture of bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:28164016

  3. Delayed recurrent pericarditis complicated by pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade in a blunt trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Khidir, Hazar H.; Bloom, Jordan P.; Hawkins, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old male suffered orthopedic fractures, blunt solid organ injury and pneumopericardium after a fall from 40 feet. With the exception of an external fixation device, he was managed non-operatively and discharged to a rehabilitation unit after 8 days. He was readmitted 4 days later with chest pain and clinical evidence of pericardititis that resolved with the initiation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. He returned to the rehabilitation hospital, but was readmitted once again for chest pain and hypotension. Echocardiogram revealed cardiac tamponade that required emergent drainage. He tolerated the procedure well and was discharged home from the hospital to continue treatment for his pericarditis. He is doing well at 3 months of follow-up. PMID:25709254

  4. A 10-year review of blunt renal artery injuries at an urban level I trauma centre.

    PubMed

    Chow, Stuart J D; Thompson, Keith J; Hartman, Jodi F; Wright, Michelle L

    2009-08-01

    Little consensus exists over the management of high-grade renal injuries, with continued debate over observation versus invasive surgery. Blunt renal artery injury (BRAI) is a high-grade injury that may result in renal dysfunction, hypertension, or failure. Management of BRAI at a level I trauma centre during a decade was retrospectively reviewed to determine incidence, assess management strategy, and evaluate hospital outcomes. Data collected included demographics, injury details, standardised scoring, renal injury grade, haemodynamic stability, diagnostic modalities, medical interventions, mortality, and hospitalisation length. Thirty-eight BRAI patients (21 Grade IV and 17 Grade V injuries) were admitted, representing 0.16% of trauma admissions, and consisting primarily of young males. Ultrasonography and CT was performed in 92.1% and 76.3% of patients, respectively. Primary management included exploratory laparotomy in 42.9%, angiography and embolisation in 34.3%, and observation in 22.9%. Six nephrectomies and one revascularisation were performed. The incidence of BRAI and use of angiography are higher than those reported in previous studies. Over the past decade, increased use of CT as a diagnostic tool for confirming renal injury in haemodynamically stable patients at our institution may have contributed to the increase in BRAI detection. Higher utilisation of angiography has enabled a more conservative approach. In this series, angiography had a success rate of 94.4%. Angiography and embolisation or observation with careful monitoring are viable management options in haemodynamically stable patients with isolated BRAI.

  5. [Characteristics of duodenal ruptures depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal rupture depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal rupture, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. Transverse ruptures are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal ruptures more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal rupture.

  6. Nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injury: an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guideline.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Nicole A; Bhullar, Indermeet; Cheng, Julius D; Crandall, Marie; Friese, Randall; Guillamondegui, Oscar; Jawa, Randeep; Maung, Adrian; Rohs, Thomas J; Sangosanya, Ayodele; Schuster, Kevin; Seamon, Mark; Tchorz, Kathryn M; Zarzuar, Ben L; Kerwin, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    During the last century, the management of blunt force trauma to the liver has changed from observation and expectant management in the early part of the 1900s to mainly operative intervention, to the current practice of selective operative and nonoperative management. These issues were first addressed by the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma in the Practice Management Guidelines for Nonoperative Management of Blunt Injury to the Liver and Spleen published online in 2003. Since that time, a large volume of literature on these topics has been published requiring a reevaluation of the previous Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma guideline. The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health MEDLINE database were searched using PubMed (http://www.pubmed.gov). The search was designed to identify English-language citations published after 1996 (the last year included in the previous guideline) using the keywords liver injury and blunt abdominal trauma. One hundred seventy-six articles were reviewed, of which 94 were used to create the current practice management guideline for the selective nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injury. Most original hepatic guidelines remained valid and were incorporated into the greatly expanded current guidelines as appropriate. Nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injuries currently is the treatment modality of choice in hemodynamically stable patients, irrespective of the grade of injury or patient age. Nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injuries should only be considered in an environment that provides capabilities for monitoring, serial clinical evaluations, and an operating room available for urgent laparotomy. Patients presenting with hemodynamic instability and peritonitis still warrant emergent operative intervention. Intravenous contrast enhanced computed tomographic scan is the diagnostic modality of choice for evaluating blunt hepatic injuries. Repeated imaging should be

  7. Diffuse Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Secondary to a Minor Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Eric P.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2017-01-01

    Full medical evaluation is paramount for all trauma patients. Minor traumas are often overlooked, as they are thought to bear low injury potential. In this case report, we describe the case of a 48-year-old man presenting to our Emergency Department with mild to moderate right-sided shoulder and scapular pain following a fall from his own height ten days previously. Clinical and paraclinical investigations (CT) revealed diffuse right shoulder pain, with crepitations on palpation of the neck, right shoulder, and right lateral chest wall. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated right-sided costal fractures (ribs 7 to 9), with diffuse subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to laceration of the visceral and parietal pleura and the adjacent lung parenchyma. In addition, a small ipsilateral pneumothorax was found. Surprisingly, the clinical status was only minimally affected by mild to moderate pain and minor functional impairment. PMID:28392950

  8. Evaluation of dimethyl sulfoxide and dexamethasone on pulmonary contusion in experimental blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Boybeyi, Ozlem; Bakar, Bulent; Aslan, Mustafa Kemal; Atasoy, Pinar; Kisa, Ucler; Soyer, Tutku

    2014-12-01

    A thoracic trauma model was designed to evaluate the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dexamethasone (DX) on histopathologic and oxidative changes in lung parenchyma seen after pulmonary contusion. Twenty-four Wistar albino rats were included in the study. They were allocated into control (CG, n=6), sham (SG, n=6), DX (DXG, n=6), and DMSO (DMG, n=6) groups. Only a lung biopsy was performed in CG. In the experimental groups, blunt thoracic trauma was induced by dropping a cylindrical metal weight (0.5 kg) through a stainless steel tube onto the right hemithorax from a height of 0.4 m (E=1.96 J). In the SG, 1 mL of physiologic saline was injected intraperitoneally, in the DXG 10 mg/kg of DX was injected intraperitoneally, and in the DMG 1.2 g/mL of DMSO was injected intraperitoneally 15 minutes after trauma. After 6 hours, lung biopsy was performed for histopathologic and oxidative injury markers. Histopathologically, congestion, hemorrhage, neutrophil infiltration, endothelial-nitric oxide synthase (E-NoS), and total pathologic score were significantly higher in SG, DXG, and DMG when compared with CG (p<0.05). Neutrophil infiltration, total pathologic score, and E-NoS were significantly decreased in DMG when compared with SG and DXG (p<0.05). Biochemically, superoxide dismutase (SOD) level was significantly higher in SG, DXG, and DMG than in CG. SOD level was significantly lower in DXG and DMG than in SG (p<0.05). DMSO prevents further injury by decreasing neutrophil infiltration and endothelial injury in lung contusions. DX may have a role in the progression of inflammation but not in preventing the pathologic disruption of pulmonary parenchyma. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Predicting Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury in Pediatric Trauma: Validation of the "Utah Score".

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Bollo, Robert J; Sivakumar, Walavan; Akbari, Hassan; Naftel, Robert P; Limbrick, David D; Jea, Andrew; Gannon, Stephen; Shannon, Chevis; Birkas, Yekaterina; Yang, George L; Prather, Colin T; Kestle, John R; Riva-Cambrin, Jay

    2017-01-15

    Risk factors for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) may differ between children and adults, suggesting that children at low risk for BCVI after trauma receive unnecessary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and high-dose radiation. We previously developed a score for predicting pediatric BCVI based on retrospective cohort analysis. Our objective is to externally validate this prediction score with a retrospective multi-institutional cohort. We included patients who underwent CTA for traumatic cranial injury at four pediatric Level I trauma centers. Each patient in the validation cohort was scored using the "Utah Score" and classified as high or low risk. Before analysis, we defined a misclassification rate <25% as validating the Utah Score. Six hundred forty-five patients (mean age 8.6 ± 5.4 years; 63.4% males) underwent screening for BCVI via CTA. The validation cohort was 411 patients from three sites compared with the training cohort of 234 patients. Twenty-two BCVIs (5.4%) were identified in the validation cohort. The Utah Score was significantly associated with BCVIs in the validation cohort (odds ratio 8.1 [3.3, 19.8], p < 0.001) and discriminated well in the validation cohort (area under the curve 72%). When the Utah Score was applied to the validation cohort, the sensitivity was 59%, specificity was 85%, positive predictive value was 18%, and negative predictive value was 97%. The Utah Score misclassified 16.6% of patients in the validation cohort. The Utah Score for predicting BCVI in pediatric trauma patients was validated with a low misclassification rate using a large, independent, multicenter cohort. Its implementation in the clinical setting may reduce the use of CTA in low-risk patients.

  10. Pediatric FAST and elevated liver transaminases: An effective screening tool in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Sola, Juan E; Cheung, Michael C; Yang, Relin; Koslow, Starr; Lanuti, Emma; Seaver, Chris; Neville, Holly L; Schulman, Carl I

    2009-11-01

    The current standard for the evaluation of children with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) consists of physical examination, screening lab values, and computed tomography (CT) scan. We sought to determine if the focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) combined with elevated liver transaminases (AST/ALT) could be used as a screening tool for intra-abdominal injury (IAI) in pediatric patients with BAT. Registry data at a level 1 trauma center was retrospectively reviewed from 1991-2007. Data collected on BAT patients under the age of 16 y included demographics, injury mechanism, ISS, GCS, imaging studies, serum ALT and AST levels, and disposition. AST and ALT were considered positive if either one was >100 IU/L. Overall, 3171 cases were identified. A total of 1008 (31.8%) patients received CT scan, 1148 (36.2%) had FAST, and 497 (15.7%) patients received both. Of the 497 patients, 400 (87.1%) also had AST and ALT measured. FAST was 50% sensitive, 91% specific, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 68%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 83%, and accuracy of 80%. Combining FAST with elevated AST or ALT resulted in a statistically significant increase in all measures (sensitivity 88%, specificity 98%, PPV 94%, NPV 96%, accuracy 96%). FAST combined with AST or ALT > 100 IU/L is an effective screening tool for IAI in children following BAT. Pediatric patients with a negative FAST and liver transaminases < 100 IU/L should be observed rather than subjected to the radiation risk of CT.

  11. Selective nonoperative management of blunt splenic injury: an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guideline.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Nicole A; Bhullar, Indermeet; Cheng, Julius D; Crandall, Marie L; Friese, Randall S; Guillamondegui, Oscar D; Jawa, Randeep S; Maung, Adrian A; Rohs, Thomas J; Sangosanya, Ayodele; Schuster, Kevin M; Seamon, Mark J; Tchorz, Kathryn M; Zarzuar, Ben L; Kerwin, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    During the last century, the management of blunt force trauma to the spleen has changed from observation and expectant management in the early part of the 1900s to mainly operative intervention, to the current practice of selective operative and nonoperative management. These issues were first addressed by the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) in the Practice Management Guidelines for Non-operative Management of Blunt Injury to the Liver and Spleen published online in 2003. Since that time, a large volume of literature on these topics has been published requiring a reevaluation of the current EAST guideline. The National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Health MEDLINE database was searched using Pub Med (www.pubmed.gov). The search was designed to identify English-language citations published after 1996 (the last year included in the previous guideline) using the keywords splenic injury and blunt abdominal trauma. One hundred seventy-six articles were reviewed, of which 125 were used to create the current practice management guideline for the selective nonoperative management of blunt splenic injury. There has been a plethora of literature regarding nonoperative management of blunt splenic injuries published since the original EAST practice management guideline was written. Nonoperative management of blunt splenic injuries is now the treatment modality of choice in hemodynamically stable patients, irrespective of the grade of injury, patient age, or the presence of associated injuries. Its use is associated with a low overall morbidity and mortality when applied to an appropriate patient population. Nonoperative management of blunt splenic injuries should only be considered in an environment that provides capabilities for monitoring, serial clinical evaluations, and has an operating room available for urgent laparotomy. Patients presenting with hemodynamic instability and peritonitis still warrant emergent operative intervention

  12. Neurological, functional, and biomechanical characteristics after high-velocity behind armor blunt trauma of the spine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Yifeng; Su, Zhenglin; Wang, Shuangping; Wang, Shu; Wang, Jianmin; Wang, Aimin; Lai, Xinan

    2011-12-01

    Behind armor blunt trauma (BABT) describes a nonpenetrating injury to the organs of an individual wearing body armor. The aim of this study was to investigate the neurologic and functional changes that occur in the central nervous system after high-velocity BABT of the spine as well as its biomechanical characteristics. This study evaluated 28 healthy adult white pigs. Animals were randomly divided into three experimental groups: (1) 15 animals (9 in the exposed group and 6 in the control group) were tested for neurologic changes; (2) 10 animals (5 in the exposed group and 5 in the control group) were used for studies of cognitive function; (3) and 3 animals were used for examination of biomechanics. In the group tested for neurologic changes, 9 anesthetized pigs wearing body armor (including a ceramic plate and polyethylene body armor) on the back were shot on the eighth thoracic vertebrae (T8) with a 5.56-mm rifle bullet (velocity appropriately 910 m/s). As a control, six pigs were shot with blank ammunition. Ultrastructural changes of the spinal cord and brain tissue were observed with light and electron microscopy. Expression levels of myelin basic protein, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and glial cytoplasmic protein (S-100B) were investigated in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were monitored before and 10 minutes after the shot. Pressures in the spine, common carotid artery, and brain were detected. Acceleration of the 10th vertebrae (T10) was tested. Finally, cognitive outcomes between exposed and control groups were compared. Neuronal degeneration and nerve fiber demyelination were seen in the spinal cord. The concentrations of neuron-specific enolase, myelin basic protein, and S-100B were significantly increased in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid 3 hours after trauma (p < 0.05). The electroencephalogram was suppressed within 3 to 6 minutes after trauma. The pressure detected in the

  13. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    PubMed

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  14. Quality of life after major trauma with multiple rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Silvana; Lee, Geraldine; Summerhayes, Robyn; Fitzgerald, Mark; Bailey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Rib fractures are a common injury presenting to major trauma centres and community hospitals. Aside from the acute impact of rib fracture injury, longer-term morbidity of pain, disability and deformity have been described. Despite this, the mainstay of management for the vast majority of rib fracture injuries remains supportive only with analgesia and where required respiratory support. This study aimed to document the long-term quality of life in a cohort of major trauma patients with rib fracture injury over 24 months. Retrospective review (July 2006-July 2011) of 397 major trauma patients admitted to The Alfred Hospital with rib fractures and not treated with operative rib fixation. The main outcome measures were quality of life over 24 months post injury assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended and SF12 health assessment forms and a pain questionnaire. Assessment over 24 months of major trauma patients with multiple rib fractures demonstrated significantly lower quality of life compared with published Australian norms at all time points measured. Return to work rates were poor with only 71% of those who were working prior to their accident, returning to any work. This study demonstrates a significant reduction in quality of life for rib fracture patients requiring admission to hospital, which does not return to the level of Australian norms for at least two years. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker of blunt cardiac contusion in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Halil; Sarikaya, Sezgin; Neijmann, Sebnem Tekin; Uysal, Emin; Yucel, Neslihan; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Solak, Suleyman; Sever, Nurten; Ayan, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and, although it is potentially a life-threatening condition, the diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage. Cardiac enzymes, such as creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTn-I), and cardiac troponin T (cTn-T) were used in previous studies to demonstrate the blunt cardiac contusion (BCC). Each of these diagnostic tests alone is not effective for diagnosis of BCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels as a marker of BCC in blunt chest trauma in rats. The eighteen Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to two groups; group I (control) (n=8) and group II (blunt chest trauma) (n=10). Isolated BCC was induced by the method described by Raghavendran et al. (2005). All rats were observed in their cages and blood samples were collected after five hours of trauma for the analysis of serum h-FABP, NT-pro BNP, CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels. The mean serum NT-pro BNP was significantly different between group I and II (10.3±2.10 ng/L versus 15.4±3.68 ng/L, respectively; P=0.0001). NT-pro BNP level >13 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87.5% for predicting blunt chest trauma (area under curve was 0.794 and P=0.037). There was no significant difference between two groups in serum h-FABP, CK, CK-MB and c Tn-I levels. A relation between NT-Pro BNP and BCC was shown in this study. Serum NT-proBNP levels significantly increased with BCC after 5 hours of the blunt chest trauma. The use of NT-proBNP as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests, such as troponins, electrocardiography (ECG), chest x-ray and echocardiogram may be beneficial for diagnosis of BCC

  16. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker of blunt cardiac contusion in trauma.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Halil; Sarikaya, Sezgin; Neijmann, Sebnem Tekin; Uysal, Emin; Yucel, Neslihan; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Solak, Suleyman; Sever, Nurten; Ayan, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and, although it is potentially a life-threatening condition, the diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage. Cardiac enzymes, such as creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTn-I), and cardiac troponin T (cTn-T) were used in previous studies to demonstrate the blunt cardiac contusion (BCC). Each of these diagnostic tests alone is not effective for diagnosis of BCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels as a marker of BCC in blunt chest trauma in rats. The eighteen Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to two groups; group I (control) (n=8) and group II (blunt chest trauma) (n=10). Isolated BCC was induced by the method described by Raghavendran et al. (2005). All rats were observed in their cages and blood samples were collected after five hours of trauma for the analysis of serum h-FABP, NT-pro BNP, CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels. The mean serum NT-pro BNP was significantly different between group I and II (10.3 ± 2.10 ng/L versus 15.4 ± 3.68 ng/L, respectively; P=0.0001). NT-pro BNP level >13 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87.5% for predicting blunt chest trauma (area under curve was 0.794 and P=0.037). There was no significant difference between two groups in serum h-FABP, CK, CK-MB and c Tn-I levels. A relation between NT-Pro BNP and BCC was shown in this study. Serum NT-proBNP levels significantly increased with BCC after 5 hours of the blunt chest trauma. The use of NT-proBNP as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests, such as troponins, electrocardiography (ECG), chest x-ray and echocardiogram may be beneficial for diagnosis of

  17. Should blunt segmental vascular renal injuries be considered an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Grade 4 renal injury?

    PubMed

    Malaeb, Bahaa; Figler, Brad; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2014-02-01

    Renal segmental vascular injury (SVI) following blunt abdominal trauma is not part of the original American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) renal injury grading system. Recent recommendations support classifying SVI as an AAST Grade 4 (G4) injury. Our primary aim was to compare outcomes following blunt renal SVI and blunt renal collecting system lacerations (CSLs). We hypothesize that renal SVI fare well with conservative management alone and should be relegated a less severe renal AAST grade. We retrospectively identified patients with SVI and G4 CSL admitted to a Level 1 trauma center between 2003 and 2010. Penetrating trauma was excluded. Need for surgical intervention, length of stay, kidney salvage (>25% renal preservation on renography 6-12 weeks after injury), and delayed complication rates were compared between the SVI and CSL injuries. Statistical analysis used χ, Fisher's exact, and t tests. A total of 56 patients with SVI and 88 patients with G4 CSL sustained blunt trauma. Age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and length of stay were similar for the two groups. Five patients in each group died of concomitant, nonrenal injuries. In the G4 CSL group, 15 patients underwent major interventions, and 32 patients underwent minor interventions. Only one patient in the SVI group underwent a major intervention. The renal salvage rate was 85.7% following SVI versus 62.5% following CSL (p = 0.107). Overall, surgical interventions are significantly lower among the SVI cohort than the G4 CSL cohort. Further analysis using a larger cohort of patients is recommended before revising the current renal grading system. Adding SVI as a G4 injury could potentially increase the heterogeneity of G4 injuries and decrease the ability of the AAST renal injury grading system to predict outcomes, such as nephrectomy rate. Epidemiologic study, level IV.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of CEUS-guided haemostatic injection for blunt splenic trauma: an animal experiment.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Tang, J; Lv, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; An, L

    2010-10-01

    complications occurred during the 3 weeks of follow-up. This study indicates that CEUS-guided percutaneous injection may provide a safe, feasible and effective therapy for blunt splenic trauma.

  19. Diagnostic Value of Clinical Findings in Evaluation of Thoracolumbar Blunt Traumas.

    PubMed

    Shahrami, Ali; Shojaee, Majid; Tabatabaee, Seyed Mohammadreza; Mianehsaz, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Necessity of imaging for symptom-free conscious patients presented to emergency department (ED) following traumatic thoracolumbar spine injuries has been a matter of debate. The present study was aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of clinical findings in prediction of traumatic thoracolumbar injuries compared tocomputed tomography (CT) scan. The present diagnostic value study was carried out using non-random convenience sampling during the time between October 2013 and March 2014. All trauma patients > 15 years old underwent thoracolumbar CT scan were included. Correlation between clinical and CT findings was measured using SPSS 21.0 and screening performance characteristics of clinical findings in prediction of thoracolumbar fracture were calculated. 169 patients with mean age of 37.8 ± 17.3 years (rage: 15-86) were evaluated (69.8% male). All fracture patients had at least 1 positive finding in history and physical examination. The fracture was confirmed in only 24.6% of the patients with positive findings in history or physical examination. In 37.5% of patients the location of fracture, matched the area of positive physical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, PLR, and NLR of clinical findings in comparison to thoracolumbar CT scan were 100 (95% CI: 89 - 100), 1.5 (95% CI: 0.2-6), 24.5 (95% CI: 18.3-31.9), 100 (95% CI: 19.7-100), 32.5 (95% CI: 24.6-43.03), and infinite, respectively. The results of the present study, show the excellent screening performance characteristics of clinical findings in prediction of traumatic thoracolumbar fracture (100% sensitivity). It could be concluded that in conscious patients with stable hemodynamic, who have no distracting pain and are not intoxicated, probability of thoracolumbar fracture is very low and near to zero in case of no positive clinical finding.

  20. Natural history of splenic vascular abnormalities after blunt injury: A Western Trauma Association multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Zarzaur, Ben L; Dunn, Julie A; Leininger, Brian; Lauerman, Margaret; Shanmuganathan, K; Kaups, Krista; Zamary, Kirellos; Hartwell, Jennifer L; Bhakta, Ankur; Myers, John; Gordy, Stephanie; Todd, Samuel R; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Teicher, Erik; Sperry, Jason; Privette, Alicia; Allawi, Ahmed; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Maung, Adrian A; Davis, Kimberly A; Cogbill, Thomas; Bonne, Stephanie; Livingston, David H; Coimbra, Raul; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2017-05-30

    Following blunt splenic injury (BSI) there is conflicting evidence regarding the natural history and appropriate management of patients with vascular injuries of the spleen such as pseudoaneurysms or blushes. The purpose of this study was to describe the current management and outcomes of patients with PSA or BLUSH. Data was collected on adult (≥18) patients with BSI and a splenic vascular injury from 17 trauma centers. Demographic, physiologic, radiographic, and injury characteristics were gathered. Management and outcomes were collected. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine factors associated with splenectomy. Two hundred patients with a vascular abnormality on CT scan were enrolled. Of those, 14.5% were managed with early splenectomy. Of the remaining, 59% underwent angiography and embolization (ANGIO) and 26.5% were observed. Of those who underwent ANGIO, 5.9% had a repeat ANGIO and 6.8% had splenectomy. Of those observed, 9.4% had a delayed ANGIO and 7.6% underwent splenectomy. There were no statistically significant differences between those observed and those who underwent ANGIO. There were 111 CT scans with splenic vascular injuries available for review by an expert trauma radiologist. The concordance between the original classification of the type of vascular abnormality and the expert radiologist's interpretation was 56.3%. Based on expert review the presence of an actively bleeding vascular injury was associated with a 40.9% risk of splenectomy. This was significantly higher than those with a non-bleeding vascular injury. In this series, the vast majority of patients are managed with ANGIO and usually embolization while splenectomy remains a rare event. However, patients with a bleeding vascular injury of the spleen are at high risk of non-operative failure no matter the strategy used for management. This group may warrant closer observation or an alternative management strategy. Prognostic Level III.

  1. Angioembolization is necessary with any volume of contrast extravasation in blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Ankur; Magee, David S.; Peterson, Matthew S.; O'Mara, Michael Shay

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Reduction of nonessential angiogram and embolization for patients sustaining blunt abdominal and pelvic trauma would allow improved utilization and decreased morbidity related to nontherapeutic embolization. We hypothesized that the nature of intravenous contrast extravasation (IVCE) on computed tomography (CT) would be directly related to the finding of extravasation on angiogram and need for embolization. Methods: A 5-year retrospective evaluation of trauma patients with IVCE on CT. Demographics, hemodynamics, and IVCE location and maximal dimension/volume were examined for relationship to IVCE on angiography and need for embolization. Primary complications were defined as nephropathy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Results: A total of 128 patients were identified with IVCE on CT. Ninety-seven (75.8%) also had IVCE identified on angiography requiring some form of embolization. The size of IVCE on CT was not related to IVCE on angiogram (P = 0.69). Location of IVCE was related to need for embolization, with spleen embolization (85.4%) being much more frequent than liver (51.5%, P = 0.006). Complication rate was 8.7% in all patients, and was not different between patients undergoing embolization and those who did not (P = 0.40). Conclusion: IVCE volume was not predictive of continued bleeding and need for embolization. However, splenic injuries with IVCE required embolization more frequently. In contrast, liver injuries were found to have infrequent on-going IVCE on angiography. Complications associated with angiogram with or without embolization are infrequent, and CT findings may not be predictive of ongoing bleeding. We do not recommend selective exclusion of patients from angiographic evaluation when a blush is present.

  2. Blunt trauma of the aging eye: injury mechanisms and increasing lens stiffness.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, Joel D; Hansen, Gail A; Herring, Ian P; Duma, Stefan M

    2005-06-01

    To investigate possible injury mechanisms in the eyes of elderly individuals and the effects of lens stiffness on model outputs indicative of injury as a function of age. Three separate frontal impact scenarios, a foam particle (30 m/s), steering wheel (15 m/s), and air bag (67 m/s), were simulated with a validated finite-element model to determine the effects of changing lens stiffness on the eye when subjected to blunt trauma. The lens stiffness of the model was increased with increasing age using stiffness values determined from the literature for 3 age groups. The computational eye model demonstrated increasing peak stress in the posterior portion of the ciliary body and decreasing peak stress in the posterior portion of the zonules with increasing lens stiffness for the 2 most severe impact types, the air bag and steering wheel. Peak deformation of the lens decreased with increasing lens stiffness. On the basis of the computational modeling analysis, the risk of eye injury increases with age; as a result, the eyes of elderly patients may be more susceptible to ciliary body-related eye injuries in traumatic-impact situations. Clinical Relevance These data support the contention that trauma-induced damage to the lens, ciliary body, and zonules may be related to increased stiffness of the lens. The data indicate that all people, especially elderly individuals, should use safety systems while driving an automobile and sit as far from the air bag as is comfortable. Those in sports or work environments requiring protective lenses should wear them. Designers of air bags and automobile companies should continue to work to reduce the potential that the air bag will contact the eye.

  3. Cervical spine immobilization following blunt trauma: a systematic review of recent literature and proposed treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Timothy R; Ferch, Richard; Balogh, Zsolt J; Hansen, Mitchell A

    2015-12-01

    Management of the cervical spine following blunt trauma is commonplace. In 2013, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) published practice guidelines drawn from evidence dating to 2011. Since then, further publications have emerged that are reviewed, and a simple management algorithm produced to assist practitioners in Australian trauma centres. These publications attempt to shed light on two controversial scenarios, those being the management of symptomatic patients with negative computed tomography (CT) and management of the obtunded patient. The search strategy mirrored that of the AANS/CNS guidelines. A search of the National Library of Medicine (PubMed) database for manuscripts published between January 2011 and October 2014 was conducted. One reviewer extracted data from studies assessing the performance of various imaging modalities in identifying traumatic cervical spine injuries. In clinical scenarios where little evidence has emerged since the AANS/CNS guidelines, key manuscripts published prior to 2011 were identified from bibliographies. Awake, asymptomatic patients may be 'cleared' without further imaging. Awake, symptomatic patients without pathology on CT and without neurological deficit can safely be 'cleared' without magnetic resonance imaging. There is no longer a role for flexion-extension films. In the obtunded patient, findings remain conflicting. Several of these findings represent a departure from previous practices, including clearance of patients with non-neurological symptoms on the basis of CT and the exclusion of flexion-extension film in detecting injury. Management of the obtunded patient remains controversial. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Blood flow velocity and thickness of the choroid in a patient with chorioretinopathy associated with ocular blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuri; Hashimoto, Yuki; Saito, Wataru; Ando, Ryo; Ishida, Susumu

    2017-06-08

    Choroidal circulation hemodynamics in eyes with ocular blunt trauma has not been quantitatively examined yet. We quantitatively examined changes in choroidal blood flow velocity and thickness at the lesion site using laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) in a patient with chorioretinopathy associated with ocular blunt trauma. A 13-year-old boy developed a chorioretinal lesion with pigmentation extending from the optic disc to the superotemporal side in the right eye after ocular blunt trauma. The patient's best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.2 in the right eye. Indocyanine green angiography showed hypofluorescence from the initial phase, with a decrease of mean blur rate (MBR) on LSFG color map, which corresponded to the chorioretinal lesion. The BCVA and foveal outer retinal morphologic abnormality spontaneously improved during follow-up. MBR and choroidal thickness increased by 23-31% and 13-17 μm at the lesion site and by 11-22% and 33-42 μm at the fovea, respectively, during the 6-month follow-up period after baseline measurements in the affected eye. In contrast, these parameters showed little or no changes at the normal retinal site in the affected eye and the fovea in the fellow eye. Current data revealed that both blood flow velocity and thickness in the choroid at the lesion site decreased in the acute stage and subsequently increased together with improvements in visual function and outer retinal morphology. These results suggest that LSFG and EDI-OCT may be useful indices that can noninvasively evaluate activity of choroidal involvement in ocular blunt trauma-associated chorioretinopathy.

  5. The Role of Computed Tomography in the Diagnostics of Diaphragmatic Injury After Blunt Thoraco-Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gmachowska, Agata; Pacho, Ryszard; Anysz-Grodzicka, Agnieszka; Bakoń, Leopold; Gorycka, Maria; Jakuczun, Wawrzyniec; Patkowski, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Diaphragmatic injuries occur in 0.8–8% of patients with blunt trauma. The clinical diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture is difficult and may be overshadowed by associated injuries. Diaphragmatic rupture does not resolve spontaneously and may cause life-threatening complications. The aim of this study was to present radiological findings in patients with diaphragmatic injury. Material/Methods The analysis of computed tomography examinations performed between 2007 and 2012 revealed 200 patients after blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma. Diaphragmatic rupture was diagnosed in 13 patients. Twelve of these patients had suffered traumatic injuries and underwent a surgical procedure that confirmed the rupture of the diaphragm. Most of diaphragmatic ruptures were left-sided (10) while only 2 of them were right-sided. In addition to those 12 patients there, another patient was admitted to the emergency department with left-sided abdominal and chest pain. That patient had undergone a blunt thoracoabdominal trauma 5 years earlier and complained of recurring pain. During surgery there was only partial relaxation of the diaphragm, without rupture. The most important signs of the diaphragmatic rupture in computed tomography include: segmental discontinuity of the diaphragm with herniation through the rupture, dependent viscera sign, collar sign and other signs (sinus cut-off sign, hump sign, band sign). Results In our study blunt diaphragmatic rupture occurred in 6% of cases as confirmed intraoperatively. In all patients, coronal and sagittal reformatted images showed herniation through the diaphragmatic rupture. In left-sided ruptures, herniation was accompanied by segmental discontinuity of the diaphragm and collar sign. In right-sided ruptures, predominance of hump sign and band sign was observed. Other signs were less common. Conclusions The knowledge of the CT findings suggesting diaphragmatic rupture improves the detection of injuries in thoraco

  6. Diaphragmatic rupture precipitated by intercostal chest tube drainage in a patient of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ashok Kumar; Feroz, Asif; Dawar, Sachet; Kumar, Prem; Singh, Anupam; Khublani, Trilok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma in collision injuries in road traffic accident (RTA) occasionally results in diaphragmatic injury and rupture besides other serious multisystem injuries. These diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently go undetected specially when occur on the right side. DI associated with hemothorax need insertion of intercostal tube drainage (ICTD). ICTD has never been reported to precipitate diaphragmatic rupture and hernia. We are reporting such a rare case for the first time in medical literature. PMID:26933316

  7. Characterization and Comparison of Injuries Caused by Accidental and Non-accidental Blunt Force Trauma in Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Intarapanich, Nida P; McCobb, Emily C; Reisman, Robert W; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Intarapanich, Pichai P

    2016-07-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) are often difficult to distinguish from non-accidental injury (NAI). This retrospective case-control study compared animals with known MVA trauma against those with known NAI. Medical records of 426 dogs and cats treated after MVA and 50 after NAI were evaluated. Injuries significantly associated with MVA were pelvic fractures, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusion, abrasions, and degloving wounds. Injuries associated with NAI were fractures of the skull, teeth, vertebrae, and ribs, scleral hemorrhage, damage to claws, and evidence of older fractures. Odds ratios are reported for these injuries. MVA rib fractures were found to occur in clusters on one side of the body, with cranial ribs more likely to fracture, while NAI rib fractures were found to occur bilaterally with no cranial-caudal pattern. Establishing evidence-based patterns of injury may help clinicians differentiate causes of trauma and may aid in the documentation and prosecution of animal abuse. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Evaluation of diagnostic utility of multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in blunt pancreatic trauma: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ananya; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Kumar, Subodh; Mishra, Biplab

    2015-04-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury with high morbidity and mortality. Retrospective analyses of computed tomography (CT) performance report CT to have variable sensitivity in diagnosing pancreatic injury. Both a prospective analysis of multidetector CT (MDCT) performance and diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute blunt pancreatic injury remain unexplored. To prospectively evaluate the utility of MDCT with MRI correlation in patients with blunt pancreatic trauma using intraoperative findings as the gold standard for analysis. The contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) scans of patients admitted with blunt abdominal trauma were prospectively evaluated for CT signs of pancreatic injury. Patients detected to have pancreatic injury on CT were assigned a CT grade of injury according to American Association for Surgery of Trauma classification. MRI was performed in patients not undergoing immediate laparotomy and MRI grade independent of CT grade was assigned. Surgical grade was taken as gold standard and accuracy of CT and MRI for grading pancreatic injury and pancreatic ductal injury (PDI) was calculated. A quantitative and qualitative comparison of MRI was also done with CT to determine the performance of MRI in acute pancreatic injury. Thirty out of 1198 patients with blunt trauma abdomen were detected to have pancreatic injury on CT, which was surgically confirmed in 24 patients. Seventeen underwent MRI and surgical correlation was available in 14 patients. CT and MRI correctly identified the grade of pancreatic injury in 91.7% (22/24) and 92.86% (13/14) patients, respectively. Both CT and MRI correctly identified PDI in 18/19 and 11/12 patients, respectively, with good inter-modality agreement of 88.9% (kappa value of 0.78). MRI also qualitatively added to the information provided by CT and increased diagnostic confidence in 58.8% of patients. MDCT performs well in grading pancreatic injury and evaluating pancreatic ductal injury. MRI is

  9. Electroencephalogram, circulation, and lung function after high-velocity behind armor blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Drobin, Dan; Gryth, Dan; Persson, Jonas K E; Rocksén, David; Arborelius, Ulf P; Olsson, Lars-Gunnar; Bursell, Jenny; Kjellström, B Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Behind armor blunt trauma (BABT) is defined as the nonpenetrating injury resulting from a ballistic impact on personal body armor. The protective vest may impede the projectile, but some of the kinetic energy is transferred to the body, causing internal injuries and occasionally death. The aim in this study was to investigate changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) and physiologic parameters after high-velocity BABT. Eight anesthetized pigs, wearing body armor (including a ceramic plate) on the right side of their thorax, were shot with a 7.62-mm assault rifle (velocity approximately 800 m/s). The shots did not penetrate the armor and these animals were compared with control animals (n = 4), shot with blank ammunition. EEG and several physiologic parameters were thereafter monitored during a 2-hour period after the shot. All animals survived during the experimental period. Five of the exposed animals showed a temporary effect on EEG. Furthermore, exposed animals displayed decreased cardiac capacity and an impaired oxygenation of the blood. Postmortem examination revealed subcutaneous hematomas and crush injuries to the right lung. The results in our animal model indicate that high-velocity BABT induce circulatory and respiratory dysfunction, and in some cases even transient cerebral functional disturbances.

  10. Place of Arterial Embolization in Severe Blunt Hepatic Trauma: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Monnin, Valerie Sengel, Christian; Thony, Frederic; Bricault, Ivan; Voirin, David; Letoublon, Christian; Broux, Christophe; Ferretti, Gilbert

    2008-09-15

    This study evaluates the efficacy of arterial embolization (AE) for blunt hepatic traumas (BHT) as part of a combined management strategy based on the hemodynamic status of patients and CT findings. From 2000 to 2005, 84 patients were admitted to our hospital for BHT. Of these, 14 patients who had high-grade injuries (grade III [n = 2], grade IV [n = 9], grade V [n = 3]) underwent AE because of arterial bleeding and were included in the study. They were classified into three groups according to their hemodynamic status: (1) unresponsive shock, (2) shock improved with resuscitation, and (3) hemodynamic stability. Four patients (group 1) underwent, first, laparotomy with packing and, then, AE for persistent bleeding. Ten patients who were hemodynamically stable (group 1) or even unstable (group 2) underwent AE first, based on CT findings. AE was successful in all cases. The mortality rate was 7% (1/14). Only two angiography-related complications (gallbladder infarction) were reported. Liver-related complications (abdominal compartment syndrome and biliary complications) were frequent and often required secondary interventions. Our multidisciplinary approach for the management of BHT gives a main role to embolization, even for hemodynamically unstable patients. In this strategy AE is very efficient and has a low complication rate.

  11. The old man and the C-spine fracture: Impact of halo vest stabilization in patients with blunt cervical spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, John P; Magnotti, Louis J; Weinberg, Jordan A; Schroeppel, Thomas J; Fabian, Timothy C; Croce, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Placement of a halo vest for cervical spine fractures is presumed to be less morbid than operative fixation. However, restrictions imposed by the halo vest can be detrimental, especially in older patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of halo vest placement on outcomes by age in patients with cervical spine fractures without spinal cord injury. All patients with blunt cervical spine fractures managed over an 18-year period were identified. Those with spinal cord injury and severe traumatic brain injury were excluded. Patients were stratified by age, sex, halo vest, injury severity, and severity of shock. Outcomes included intensive care unit length of stay, ventilator days, ventilator-associated pneumonia, functional status, and mortality. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine whether halo vest was an independent predictor of mortality in older patients. A total of 3,457 patients were identified: 69% were male, with a mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 19 and 13, respectively. Overall mortality was 5.3%. One hundred seventy-nine patients were managed with a halo vest, 133 of those 54 years and older and 46 of those younger than 54 years. Both mortality (13% vs. 0%, p < 0.001) and intensive care unit length of stay (4 days vs. 2 days, p = 0.02) were significantly increased in older patients despite less severe injury (admission GCS score of 15 vs. 14 and ISS of 14 vs. 17, p = 0.03). Multivariable logistic regression identified halo vest as an independent predictor of mortality after adjusting for injury severity and severity of shock (odds ratio, 2.629; 95% confidence interval, 1.056-6.543) in older patients. The potential risk of operative stabilization must be weighed against that of halo vest placement for older patients with cervical spine fractures following blunt trauma. Patient age should be strongly considered before placement of a halo vest for cervical spine stabilization

  12. Electroencephalographic evaluation of the effectiveness of blunt trauma to induce loss of consciousness for on-farm killing of chickens and turkeys.

    PubMed

    Cors, J-C; Gruber, A D; Günther, R; Meyer-Kühling, B; Esser, K-H; Rautenschlein, S

    2015-02-01

    Euthanasia of small numbers of birds in case of injury or other illness directly on the farm may be necessary for welfare reasons. This should be done without transportation of the moribund animals in order to minimize pain and distress. Blood loss has to be avoided to minimize the risk of contaminating the environment. Cervical dislocation in combination with a blunt trauma may be an appropriate way to achieve this aim but the bird's age and body weight may influence the practicability of this method in the field. In this study, we evaluated broilers, broiler breeders, and turkeys of different age groups and weights up to nearly 16 kg for the efficacy of blunt trauma to induce unconsciousness, allowing subsequent killing of the bird without pain. The effect of blunt trauma on the brain was determined by electroencephalography (EEG). Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded for each animal. Convulsions or tonic seizures were observed in all investigated animals after blunt trauma, including strong wing movements, torticollis, and stretching of legs. The EEG results demonstrate that the blunt trauma induced by a single, sufficiently strong hit placed in the frontoparietal region of the head led to a reduction or loss of the AEP in all groups of birds. These results clearly indicate a loss of sensibility and induction of unconsciousness, which would allow painless killing of the birds immediately after the induction of the blunt trauma.

  13. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis caused by blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Treuth, Gregory M; Baibars, Motaz; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-04-25

    A 65-year-old man presented to the emergency department following an anterior chest trauma. He had significant chest pain and chest X-ray was significant for revealed multiple rib fractures and negative. CT scan of the chest ruled out pulmonary embolism or aortic dissection. However, few hours later he developed hypotension requiring admission to medical intensive care unit and intravenous vasopressors. Further workup showed ST elevation myocardial infarction involving the anterior ECG leads. Emergent coronary angiography was performed with intervention to the mid-left anterior descending occlusion. Cardiogenic shock resolved and patient was discharged few days later. One-year follow-up with echocardiogram showed stable ischaemic cardiomyopathy with improved left ventricular ejection fraction to 50%.

  14. Hybrid Repair of Complex Left Subclavian Artery Injury with Partial Transection and Complete Thrombosis in an Unstable Patient following Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Gutierrez, Ilitch; Rana, Muhammad A; Ali, Barkat; Marek, John M; Langsfeld, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Blunt subclavian artery injuries are rare and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Several case reports have suggested that endovascular repair is safe with short operative times and minimal blood loss. We report a case of a 20-year-old male patient involved in a high-speed motor vehicle collision that resulted in partial transection of left subclavian artery with complete luminal thrombosis. Patient also had a left main-stem bronchus avulsion along with major intra-abdominal injuries and multiple spine and long bone fractures. He underwent emergent abdominal exploration due to multisystem trauma and hemodynamic instability. Following laparotomy and resuscitation, the subclavian artery injury was repaired using a hybrid technique geared at protecting the patent vertebral and axillary arteries from embolization. We used supraclavicular dissection and arterial control with endovascular stent-graft placement in retrograde fashion to repair the left subclavian artery injury. At 6-month follow-up, computed tomography scan confirmed patency of the left subclavian artery stent and there was no evidence of vertebrobasilar insufficiency or left upper extremity ischemia. In conclusion, stent-graft repair of blunt subclavian artery injuries is expedient and safe. Supraclavicular vascular dissection and control are effective in preventing distal embolization in rare cases complicated with luminal thrombosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future. This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications. A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis highlighted duration of intercostal drain insertion (OR 1.377, P = 0.001) and premorbid cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P < 0.001) as significant predictors of developing pneumonia in this patient group. Examining the different analgesic modes, this study failed to identify a particular analgesic mode that was more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different

  16. [Atlas fracture due to aneurysmal bone cyst after minor trauma].

    PubMed

    Topp, T; Krüger, A; Zettl, R; Figiel, J; Ruchholtz, S; Frangen, T M

    2014-05-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts predominantly occur in young adults and the long bones, the lumbar spine and the pelvis are mainly affected. This article presents the case of a 22-year-old woman with the very rare localization of an aneurysmal bone cyst of the atlas and an atlas fracture after a minor trauma. The initial radiological diagnosis was a suspicted aneurysmal bone cyst which was confirmed histologically. Due to the unstable fracture it was decided to carry out surgical treatment with occipitocervical stabilization in combination with a transoral bone graft. After a period of 11 months the fracture had completely healed and the implants were removed without any complications.

  17. [Emergency ultrasound for blunt abdominal trauma--meta-analysis update 2003].

    PubMed

    Stengel, D; Bauwens, K; Porzsolt, F; Rademacher, G; Mutze, S; Ekkernkamp, A

    2003-12-01

    Emergency ultrasound has established itself as a key procedure of primary diagnostic work-up for blunt abdominal and multiple trauma. However, in a systematic review published in 2001 ultrasonography turned out to provide an unexpectedly low sensitivity. We conducted an update of this analysis to investigate if test characteristics will be maintained including recent studies. Prospective trials published between January 1957 and January 2003 were identified using the Medline/Oldmedline, Embase and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register databases. The searching strategy comprised a manual search as well as a search along the world-wide web. Qualitative rating was carried out by two investigators using criteria proposed by the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford. We investigated a composite endpoint (i. e., free fluid and/or organ laceration) as well as the single criteria organ injury and free intraabdominal fluid collections. After calculation of two-by-two-tables, Summary Receiver Operating Characteristics (SROC) and Q* values were determined together with their 95% confidence intervals. The Q* value was proposed as the point of intersection where sensitivity equals specificity. In addition, a random effects model was employed to compute common positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR). By assessing the title and/or abstract, 349 of 957 papers contained potentially valid information for the purpose of this review. A total of 67 studies were deemed eligible, nine of which had to be excluded from meta-analysis because of dual publication. This left 58 trials allocating 16,361 subjects for statistical analysis. Despite a trend towards improved study designs observed during the past decade, the included trials were of average methodological quality. Two-thirds of all investigations fulfilled two or less of the six possible quality criteria. The diagnostic reference standard was applied independently in only 40% of all protocols. With regard to the composite

  18. Effect of physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service on blunt trauma patient survival and prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Iirola, Timo T; Laaksonen, Mikko I; Vahlberg, Tero J; Pälve, Heikki K

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the immediate and long-term effect of a helicopter emergency physician giving advanced life support on-scene compared with conventional load and go principle in urban and rural settings in treating blunt trauma patients. In a retrospective study, 81 blunt trauma patients treated prehospitally by a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service were compared with 77 patients treated before the era of the helicopter emergency medical service. The data were collected in the prehospital and hospital files and a questionnaire was sent to the survivors 3 years after the trauma. The physicians treated the patients more aggressively (gave drugs, intubated and cannulated) and had the patients transported directly to a university hospital. The given treatment did not delay arrival at the hospital. No statistically significant difference was found, but a trend (P = 0.065) to lower survival in the helicopter emergency medical service group. Almost half of the deaths in the helicopter emergency medical service group and none in the control group, however, occurred in the emergency department. No difference was found 3 years later between the groups in the health-related quality of life or decrease in the income owing to the accident. The physicians treated the patients more aggressively, but it did not delay the arrival at the hospital. A beneficial effect of this aggressive treatment or direct transport to a university hospital could not be seen in the immediate physiological parameters or later health-related quality of life. The physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service was not beneficial to blunt trauma patients in this setting.

  19. Treatment of blunt thoracic aortic injury in Germany—Assessment of the TraumaRegister DGU®

    PubMed Central

    Gombert, Alexander; Barbati, Mohammad E.; Storck, Martin; Kotelis, Drosos; Keschenau, Paula; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Andruszkow, Hagen; Lefering, Rolf; Hildebrand, Frank; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J.; Grommes, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using the data delivered by the German Trauma Register DGU® from 2002 till 2013, the value of different therapies of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) in Germany was analyzed. Methods Prospectively collected data of patients suffering from BTAI were retrospectively analyzed with focus on the different treatment modalities for grade I–IV injuries. Results 821 patients suffering from BTAI were identified: 51.6% (424) grade I injury, 35.4% (291) grade II or III injury and 12.9% (106) grade IV injury (77.5% men [44.94 ± 20.6 years]). The main patterns of injury were high- speed accidents and falls (78.0% [n = 640], 21.8% [n = 171] respectively). Significant differences between grade I and grade II/III as well as IV injuries could be assessed for the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a Glasgow Coma Scale score below 8 and a systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg (p-value: <0.001). In the primary admission subgroup, 44.1% (197/447) of the patients received best medical treatment, 55.9% received surgical intervention (250/447): Thereof 37.2% (93/250) received open surgery and 62.8% (147/250) had been treated by endovascular means. Significantly lower 24-h- and in-hospital-mortality rates were encountered after endovascular treatment for all gradings of BTAI (p-value: <0.001). Yet this subgroup of patients showed the lowest incidence of further severe injuries and cardiac arrest. Conclusion Endovascular therapy became the treatment of choice for BTAI in Germany. Patients who have been treated by surgical means showed the highest survival rate, especially endovascular therapy showed a favorable low mortality rate. PMID:28346475

  20. Blunt eye trauma: empirical histopathologic paintball impact thresholds in fresh mounted porcine eyes.

    PubMed

    Sponsel, William E; Gray, Walt; Scribbick, Frank W; Stern, Amber R; Weiss, Carl E; Groth, Sylvia L; Walker, James D

    2011-07-15

    Ballistic studies were conducted using gelatin-embedded abattoir-fresh porcine eyes suspended within clear acrylic orbits to discern the energy required to produce specific ocular injuries. Paintball impact provides a robust ballistic model for isolating and quantifying the role of direct blunt force in ocular trauma. Fifty-nine porcine orbital preparations received direct blows from 0.68 caliber (16-18 mm diameter/3.8 g) paintballs fired at impact velocities ranging from 26 to 97 meters per second (2-13.5 J). Five additional eyes not subjected to ballistic impact were also evaluated as controls. Impact energies were correlated with histopathologic damage. Minimum impact energies consistently producing damage in experimental eyes unobserved in control specimens were: 2 joules--posterior lens dislocation, zonulysis, capsular rupture, and choroidal detachment; 3.5 joules--moderate angle recession; 4 joules--anterior lens dislocation; 4.8 joules--peripapillary retinal detachment; 7 joules--severe angle recession, iridodialysis, and cyclodialysis; 7.5 joules--corneal stromal distraction; 9.3 joules--choroidal segmentation; and 10 joules--globe rupture. Impact thresholds correlating traumatic ocular pathology with impact energy followed a positive stepwise progression in severity with impact energies between 2 and 10 joules. Moderate angle recession commensurate with typical clinical traumatic glaucoma was not observed among control eyes, but occurred at relatively low impact energy of 3.5 joules among test eyes. Extensive disruption in and around the angle (iridodialysis/cyclodialysis) consistently occurred at energies >7 joules. Globe rupture required a minimum energy of 10 joules.

  1. Detection of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma by PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Hofer, A; Kratochwill, H; Pentsch, A; Gabriel, M

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose provides functional and anatomic information by visualising the uptake of radiolabelled glucose in tumour and inflammatory cells. We report delayed diagnosis of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma in a 73-year-old man. After a car accident with head-on collision, the patient was stabilised in our emergency room. His femur was treated by internal fixation, his ellbow was stabilised by a fixateur externe. During surgery his status deteriorated. The patient was in need of high dosage of inotrops during the following days. He had a biventricular pacemaker implanted because of ischemic myocardiopathy, and he suffered from renal insufficiency. Over the next days, his haemodynamics improved. A central venous line had to be removed because of ensuing septic fever. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain and nausea. A sonography and computer tomography without contrast medium were performed with negative result. Because of contamination of the central venous line with Staphylococcus epidermidis the pacemaker was evaluated for infection by transoesophageal echocardiography, again without any findings. Because of ongoing fever and positive inflammatory markers a positron emission tomography was indicated, as a contrast examination and a magnetic resonance examination were not feasible because of the renal insufficiency and the pacemaker, respectively. Prophylactic removal of the pacemaker would have been a substantial risk for the patient due to his underlying myocardiopathy. Positron emission tomography showed an increased tracer uptake in the gastric fundus, which turned out to be necrotic by endoscopy. A laparoscopic resection followed, and drainage of an abscess, which had evolved subsequently between stomach and spleen stopped the inflammatory process. This case report demonstrates that positron emission tomography may be an alternative to computer tomography with contrast medium

  2. Isolated scapula fracture: Ice hockey player without trauma

    PubMed Central

    Memişoğlu, Serdar; Yılmaz, Barış; Aktaş, Erdem; Kömür, Baran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Scapular fractures are generally occur from in high-energy traumas and are associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Presentation of case We present an unusual scapular fracture that occurred with a rare mechanism. A 23-year-old male patient who led an active sports life for 10 years and played ice hockey for the last 5 years. In a competition, he felt a sudden pain in his right scapula after hit the puck. He did not experience any direct trauma to his shoulder and there was no evidence of any pathological fracture. The fracture was isolated in the scapular body and it was classified as type 4, according to Hardegger classification. The was patient immobilized with a Velpau bandage for three weeks and then treated with physiotherapy for shoulder rehabilitation. Discussion The fracture mechanism was likely a disharmonius contracture of the agonist and antagonist muscles of the shoulder joint while hitting the puck. Conclusion Scapular fractures are generally seen along with other injuries, but in this case we wanted to emphasize that care has to been taken to diagnose an isolated scapular fracture while assessing shoulder pain. PMID:26587232

  3. A rare case of splenic pseudoaneurysm in pediatric splenic blunt trauma patient: Review of diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Roger Chen; Kurbatov, Vadim; Leung, Patricia; Sugiyama, Gainosuke; Roudnitsky, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Splenic pseudoaneurysms (SPA) are a rare but serious sequela of blunt traumatic injury to the spleen. Management of adult blunt splenic trauma is well-studied, however, in children, the management is much less well-defined. Presentation of case A 15 year-old male presented with severe abdominal pain of acute onset after sustaining injury to his left side while playing football. FAST was positive for free fluid in the abdomen. Initial abdomen CT demonstrated a grade III/IV left splenic laceration with moderate to large hemoperitoneum with no active extravasation or injury to the splenic vessels noted. A follow-up CT angiography of the abdomen demonstrated a splenic hypervascular structure suspicious for a small pseudoaneurysm. Splenic arteriogram which demonstrated multiple pseudoaneurysms arising from the second order splenic artery branches which was angioembolized and treated. Discussion & conclusion Questions still remain regarding the timing of repeat imaging for diagnosis of SPA following non-operative blunt splenic trauma, which patients should be imaged, and how to manage SPA upon diagnosis. More clinical study and basic science research is warranted to study the disease process of SPA in pediatric patient. We believe that our proposed management algorithm timely detect formation of delayed SPA formation and addresses the possible fatal disease course of pediatric SPA. PMID:26117449

  4. Occult Congenital Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction in Two Adults Presenting with Collecting System Rupture After Blunt Renal Trauma: A Case Report Series

    PubMed Central

    Hoffner, Haley E.; Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Pais, Vernon M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report two adult cases of congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction detected incidentally in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma. CT images are provided to describe the presentation, while review of the literature and management of renal trauma are discussed. PMID:27579396

  5. Long-Term Survival on Medical Therapy Alone after Blunt-Trauma Aortic Regurgitation: Report of a New Case with Summary of 95 Others

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mitsushige; Mahara, Keitaro; Iwanaga, Shiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Aortic regurgitation resulting from blunt chest trauma has been reported only 95 times, to our knowledge. The noncoronary and right coronary cusps are the cardiac structures most often injured. Although the aortic leaflets can appear to be undamaged after nonpenetrating trauma, they can have pathologic abnormalities and insufficient function. Some cases of posttraumatic aortic regurgitation progress slowly. Aortic valve replacement is the optimal treatment. We present the case of a then-62-year-old man who has lived more than 5 years after blunt-trauma aortic regurgitation. His is the only case of long-term survival on medical therapy alone among the 96 cases summarized in this report. PMID:27777534

  6. Hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding in a trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Laeeq, K.; Cheung, S.; Phillips, B.

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma resulting in rib fractures can be associated with hemothorax, pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions or less frequently chest and abdominal wall hematomas. Our case describes the first report of hemoperitoneum secondary to intercostal arterial bleeding from blunt trauma in a patient on anticoagulation. PMID:28108633

  7. Venous air embolism: An under-recognised entity in blunt-force trauma and the importance of radiology.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Marna; du Toit-Prinsloo, Lorraine

    2017-04-01

    Air embolism (AE) is considered a rare event and can be either iatrogenic or traumatic. Various post-mortem methods to detect AE exist, of which radiology is preferred. The presence of air in the heart can be demonstrated using special dissection techniques where the heart is opened under water or by needle puncture from a water-filled syringe. Three cases of blunt-force head injury are presented herein, with AE being diagnosed by conventional radiography using a Lodox Statscan® full-body digital X-ray machine in all cases. This case series demonstrates that AE due to blunt-force trauma to the head and sinuses might be under-recognised in the forensic post-mortem setting. It also highlights the importance of radiology in diagnosing AE post-mortem, especially where the results of post-mortem techniques might be unsatisfactory.

  8. Low-trauma fractures indicate increased risk of hip fracture in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Sheng; Cameron, Ian D; Simpson, Judy M; Seibel, Markus J; March, Lyn M; Cumming, Robert G; Lord, Stephen R; Sambrook, Philip N

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the risk of subsequent fractures after low-trauma fracture in frail older people. A total of 1412 elderly residents (mean age 86.2 years, SD 7.0 years, female 77%) were recruited from aged care facilities in Australia. Residents were assessed and then followed for any fracture for 2 years and hip fractures for at least 5 years. Residents with and without a newly acquired fracture in the first 2 years were compared for risk of subsequent hip fracture. Residents with a nonhip fracture in the first 2 years had an increased risk of subsequent hip fracture for about 2.5 years, whereas those with a hip fracture had a similar risk over the whole period compared with those with no fracture. During these 2.5 years, 60, 28, and 6 subsequent hip fractures occurred in the nonfracture group (n = 953), the nonhip fracture group (n = 194), and the hip fracture group (n = 101), respectively, resulting in the probability of subsequent hip fracture of 8.0%, 19.9%, and 10.4%, respectively. Compared with the nonfracture group, the hazard ratio (HR) was 2.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.73-4.59; p < .001] for the nonhip fracture group and 1.48 (95% CI 0.63-3.49, p = .37) for the hip fracture group after adjusting for age, sex, residence type, calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation, fracture history, weight, lower leg length, immobility, cognitive function, and medications. Frail institutionalized older people with newly acquired fractures are at increased risk of subsequent hip fracture for the next few years. Accordingly, despite their advanced age, they are a high-priority target group to investigate interventions that might reduce the risk of hip fracture.

  9. High plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 is associated with the risk of sepsis in severe blunt chest trauma patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a late mediator of systemic inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 play a central pathogenic role in critical illness. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between plasma HMGB1 concentrations and the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Methods The plasma concentrations of HMGB1 in patients with severe blunt chest trauma (AIS ≥ 3) were measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at four time points during seven days after admission, and the dynamic release patterns were monitored. The biomarker levels were compared between patients with sepsis and non-sepsis, and between patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and non-MODS. The related factors of prognosis were analyzed by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The short-form 36 was used to evaluate the quality of life of patients at 12 months after injury. Results Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher both in sepsis and MODS group on post-trauma day 3, 5, and 7 compared with the non-sepsis and non-MODS groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that HMGB1 levels and ISS were independent risk factors for sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Conclusions Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. HMGB1 levels were associated with the risk of poor outcome in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Daily HMGB1 levels measurements is a potential useful tool in the early identification of post-trauma complications. Further studies are needed to determine whether HMGB1 intervention could prevent the development of sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. PMID:25085006

  10. Physical examination is a poor screening test for abdominal-pelvic injury in adult blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Michetti, Christopher P; Sakran, Joseph V; Grabowski, Jurek G; Thompson, Earl V; Bennett, Kristen; Fakhry, Samir M

    2010-03-01

    To determine if physical examination can reliably detect or exclude abdominal or pelvic injury in adult trauma activation patients. Trauma registry and medical record data were retrospectively reviewed for all adult blunt trauma patients with Glasgow coma scale score>8, from 6/30/05 to 12/31/06. Attending surgeons' dictated admission history and physical examination reports were individually reviewed. Patients' subjective reports of abdominal pain were recorded as present or absent. Exam findings of the lower ribs, abdomen, and pelvis were each separately recorded as positive or negative, and were compared with findings on a subsequent objective evaluation of the abdomen (OEA). "Clinically significant" injuries were defined as those that would change patient management. One thousand six hundred sixty-three patients were studied. Of patients with a negative abdominal exam, 10% had a positive OEA. When abdominal pain was absent, and exam of the lower ribs, abdomen, and pelvis was normal, OEA was positive in 7.6%, and 5.7% had a clinically significant injury. While a positive abdominal exam was predictive of a positive OEA (P<0.01), a negative exam, even when broadened (pain, lower ribs, abdomen, pelvis) did not exclude significant injuries. Ten percent of trauma activation patients with a negative abdominal exam have occult abdominal/pelvic injuries. Even when exam of the lower ribs, abdomen, and pelvis are all negative and abdominal pain is absent, 5.7% have occult injuries that would change management. OEA should be used liberally for adult blunt trauma activation patients regardless of physical exam findings, to avoid missing clinically significant injuries. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The clinical outcome of occult pulmonary contusion on multidetector-row computed tomography in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Deunk, Jaap; Poels, Tielke C; Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M; Kool, Digna R; Blickman, Johan G; van Vugt, Arie B; Edwards, Michael John Richard

    2010-02-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is a more sensitive modality as compared with conventional radiography (CR) in detecting pulmonary injuries. MDCT often detects pulmonary contusion that is not visualized by CR, defined as occult pulmonary contusion (OPC). The aim of this study was to investigate whether OPC on MDCT has implications for the outcome in blunt trauma patients. We used prospectively collected data from 1,040 adult high-energy blunt trauma patients who were primarily presented at our emergency department and who underwent CR and MDCT of the chest. All patients with pulmonary contusion were identified and divided into two groups: The "CR/computed tomography (CT) group" consisted of patients with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT. The "CT-only" group consisted of patients with OPC, visible exclusively on MDCT. The control group consisted of blunt trauma patients without pulmonary contusion. These groups were compared with respect to difference in mortality and other outcome measures. In addition, a multivariate analysis was performed. Two hundred fifty-five patients suffered pulmonary contusion: The CT-only group consisted of 157 and the CR/CT group of 98 patients. The CT-only group did not differ from the control group with respect to mortality rate and other outcome measures. However, compared with the CR/CT group, mortality rate was significantly lower (8% versus 16%, p = 0.039) and most other outcome measures were significantly better in the CT-only group. OPC on MDCT is not associated with a worse outcome as compared with patients without pulmonary contusion. OPC has a better outcome as compared with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT.

  12. Examining the relationship between preinjury health and injury-related factors to discharge location and risk for injury-associated complications in patients after blunt thoracic trauma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Senn-Reeves, Julia N; Jenkins, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether preinjury health and injury-related factors were associated with posthospitalization discharge location and injury-associated complications for patients with blunt thoracic trauma. A retrospective analysis using registry data from a level 1 trauma center was conducted. A random sample of 200 patients admitted between 2009 and 2012 was included. Relationships between variables were assessed through cross-tabulation with the chi-square analysis; a P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Alcohol/drug use was related to hospital discharge location. Most patients with alcohol involved injuries discharged to locations other than home or long-term care facilities. Of the 59 patients who required intensive care, their length of stay was less than 3 days, and 24 required mechanical ventilation for short periods. Most blunt thoracic trauma patients were hospitalized less than 7 days. A relationship was identified between discharge location and the presence of any of the National Trauma Databank comorbid conditions and the comorbid condition of bleeding. A relationship between rib fractures and injury-associated complications was not found. The complication of pneumonia was related to length of stay and primary payment method. Comorbid medical conditions and injury-related factors were associated with injury-related complications and discharge location for select variables. Further exploration with is needed to elucidate the associations more fully.

  13. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  14. Comparison of the trauma and injury severity score and modified early warning score with rapid lactate level (the ViEWS-L score) in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sion; Lee, Jae Baek; Jin, Young Ho; Jeong, Taeoh; Yoon, Jaechol; Choi, Seok Jin; Park, Boyoung

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the predictive value of the VitalPAC Early Warning Score-lactate (ViEWS-L) score with that of the trauma and injury severity score (TRISS), which is a pre-existing risk scoring system used in trauma patients. The patients were blunt trauma victims admitted consecutively to the study hospital between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2011, who were 15 years or older and had an injury severity score of 9 or higher. The lactate level, the ViEWS and revised trauma score upon arrival at the emergency department, and the injury severity score and TRISS were evaluated. The ViEWS-L score was calculated according to the formula: ViEWS-L=ViEWS+lactate (mmol/l). The ability to predict mortality was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis and calibration analysis. A total of 299 patients were available for analysis, of whom 33 died (11.0%). The median ViEWS-L score was 3.7 (interquartile range:1.8-6.4) and the median TRISS was 96.8 (interquartile range: 93.4-98.6). The ViEWS-L score was better than TRISS at predicting hospital mortality (AUC, 0.838; 95% confidence interval, 0.771-0.906 vs. AUC, 0.734; 95% confidence interval, 0.635-0.833, P=0.031). Calibration of the ViEWS-L score (χ=11.13, P=0.194) was good but that of TRISS was not (χ=16.97, P=0.018). The prognostic value of the ViEWS-L score in terms of discrimination was better than that of TRISS in the blunt trauma patients admitted to the emergency department with an injury severity score of 9 or higher, and the ViEWS-L score showed good calibration.

  15. The incidence of thromboembolism formation following the use of recombinant factor VIIa in patients suffering from blunt force trauma compared with penetrating trauma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Raymond; Bonanno, Laura; Badeaux, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Rapid replacement of blood loss is critical in patients suffering from traumatic hemorrhage. When the availability of blood products is limited, certain interventions have shown promise in conserving blood supplies. Recombinant factor (rF) VIIa has been administered, as an off-label use, to assist in controlling hemorrhage in trauma patients. Although rFVIIa has a tendency to remain localized to areas of vascular insult, there may be an increase in thromboembolism formation when patients suffer multiple sites of injury as seen in blunt force trauma. This review aimed to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the incidence of thromboembolism formation after receiving rFVIIa as an adjunct to hemorrhage control measures (standard resuscitation efforts consisting of varying amounts of packed red blood cells [PRBCs], fresh frozen plasma [FFP], platelets and crystalloid solutions) in patients suffering from traumatic injuries (blunt force and penetrating trauma). Civilian and combat trauma patients who were 15 years and older suffering from blunt force and penetrating traumatic injuries. Use of rFVIIa as an adjunct to hemorrhage control measures (standard resuscitation efforts consisting of varying amounts of PRBCs, FFP, platelets and crystalloid solutions). This review considered both experimental and epidemiological study designs. Confirmed formation of thromboembolism (confirmation based on specific diagnostic tests such as ultrasound, ventilation-perfusion scan or angiography). The databases searched included CINAHL, Ovid MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE and the Cochrane Control Register of Clinical Trials. Studies published after June 1986 were considered for inclusion in this review. Search for unpublished studies was performed. Studies selected for inclusion were critically appraised by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). Data was extracted from articles using standardized

  16. Intraparenchymal Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Arteriovenous Fistula on a Solitary Kidney Occurring 38 Years after Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Frank; Tombal, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistulae of the renal artery are rare complications of kidney trauma. They commonly result from open traumas and occur within days after the injury. Common symptoms include acute haematuria, pain, or hypertension. We report the case of a fifty-three-year-old man presenting with symptomatic complex chronic high flow kidney arteriovenous fistula with interposition of a pseudoaneurysmal pouch and arterial aneurysmal dilatation in a solitary left kidney 38 years after a blunt trauma. Those conditions were successfully treated by endovascular embolization followed by regular radiologic, biological, and clinical follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, few similar cases were reported more than 20 years after trauma. However, no case combining an arteriovenous fistula and a pseudoaneurysm revealing as late as 38 years after trauma was found. In addition, management of those conditions on a solitary kidney and outcomes has not been described. We believe that our case depicts the clinical presentation and management of this rare entity that should not be unrecognized due to its potential lethal implications. PMID:28386510

  17. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in a Case of Colonic Intramural Hematoma After Mild Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ulysses S; Cesar, Daniel Nicoletti; DʼIppolito, Giuseppe

    Intramural hematomas can occur along any part of the gastrointestinal tract, being more common in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. Intramural colonic hematomas are very rare, and their main causes include abdominal trauma, anticoagulation, and coagulopathies. We report on a 27-year-old man with right lower quadrant pain for 1 day after a mild blunt trauma sustained during a soccer match. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation revealed an intramural hematoma of the right colon, subsequently confirmed and drained through laparoscopic surgery. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in such a context are scarce in the radiological literature, imaging has an important role in the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of the extent of bowel hematomas to assist in treatment planning.

  18. A prospective study of 91 patients undergoing both computed tomography and peritoneal lavage following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Fabian, T C; Mangiante, E C; White, T J; Patterson, C R; Boldreghini, S; Britt, L G

    1986-07-01

    Recent reports comparing computed tomography of the abdomen (CTA) and diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) following trauma have been contradictory. A 10-month prospective study was conducted at our trauma center comparing both methods. Criteria for entry into the study included suspected blunt abdominal trauma without indication for immediate laparotomy, with either equivocal abdominal examination, diminished sensorium, or neurologic deficit. Ninety-one patients meeting these criteria underwent CTA followed by DPL. CTA was performed using both oral and intravenous contrast; DPL was performed by the open technique with RBC greater than 100,000 mm3 or WBC greater than 500 mm3 as criteria for a positive examination. CTA was interpreted initially by available radiology staff and residents and retrospectively reviewed by an experienced tomographer blind to DPL and surgical results. Twenty patients in whom either test was positive underwent laparotomy; all others were admitted for observation and/or extra-abdominal surgery. Laparotomy revealed 26 organs injured in the 20 patients explored at admission; none of the observed patients required delayed laparotomy. The results of CTA and DPL were compared to the findings at laparotomy or the clinical course of those not explored. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for initial CTA were 60%, 100%, and 91%; for review CTA 85%, 100%, and 97%; for DPL 90%, 100%, and 98%. We conclude that: even with experienced examiners, CTA offers no diagnostic advantage over DPL in blunt trauma; because of relative costs, we do not recommend the routine application of CTA; CTA is a reliable alternative when circumstances prevent the performance of DPL.

  19. [Complications in Le Fort facial fractures combined with craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Dimov, Zh; Abramov, G; Dimov, K; Kr'stev, N; Kr'stev, D

    1999-01-01

    The present research is based on the most frequent traumas and fractures in the middle zone of the face (second and third type by Rene le Fort) and the proceeded from them complications for a period of four years in the clinic of Neurosurgery in NIUMN "Pirogov". From the 280 patients that were studied the complications were observed in 54 of them. We worked up the received results statistically and presented them in drawing.

  20. Military penetrating spine injuries compared with blunt.

    PubMed

    Blair, James A; Possley, Daniel R; Petfield, Joseph L; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Lehman, Ronald A; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-09-01

    The nature of blunt and penetrating injuries to the spine and spinal column in a military combat setting has been poorly documented in the literature. To date, no study has attempted to characterize and compare blunt and penetrating spine injuries sustained by American servicemembers. The purpose of this study was to compare the military penetrating spine injuries with blunt spine injuries in the current military conflicts. Retrospective study. All American military servicemembers who have been injured while deployed in Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom) whose medical data have been entered into the Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR). The JTTR was queried for all American servicemembers sustaining an injury to the spinal column or spinal cord while deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. These data were manually reviewed for relevant information regarding demographics, mechanism of injury, surgical intervention, and neurologic injury. A total of 598 servicemembers sustained injuries to the spine or spinal cord. Isolated blunt injuries were recorded in 396 (66%) servicemembers and 165 (28%) sustained isolating penetrating injuries. Thirty servicemembers (5%) sustained combined blunt and penetrating injuries to the spine. The most commonly documented injuries were transverse process fractures, compression fractures, and burst fractures in the blunt-injured servicemembers versus transverse process fractures, lamina fractures, and spinous process fractures in those injured with a penetrating injury. One hundred four (17%) servicemembers sustained spinal cord injuries, comprising 10% of blunt injuries and 38% of penetrating injuries (p<.0001). Twenty-eight percent (28%) of blunt-injured servicemembers underwent a surgical procedure compared with 41% of those injured by penetrating mechanisms (p=.4). Sixty percent (n=12/20) of blunt-injured servicemembers experienced a neurologic improvement after surgical intervention at follow

  1. Recent trends in 30-day mortality in patients with blunt splenic injury: A nationwide trauma database study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Chie; Tagami, Takashi; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Matsuda, Kiyoshi; Kim, Shiei; Moroe, Yuta; Fukuda, Reo; Unemoto, Kyoko; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Splenic injury frequently occurs after blunt abdominal trauma; however, limited epidemiological data regarding mortality are available. We aimed to investigate mortality rate trends after blunt splenic injury in Japan. We retrospectively identified 1,721 adults with blunt splenic injury (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma splenic injury scale grades III-V) from the 2004-2014 Japan Trauma Data Bank. We grouped the records of these patients into 3 time phases: phase I (2004-2008), phase II (2009-2012), and phase III (2013-2014). Over the 3 phases, we analysed 30-day mortality rates and investigated their association with the prevalence of certain initial interventions (Mantel-Haenszel trend test). We further performed multiple imputation and multivariable analyses for comparing the characteristics and outcomes of patients who underwent TAE or splenectomy/splenorrhaphy, adjusting for known potential confounders and for within-hospital clustering using generalised estimating equation. Over time, there was a significant decrease in 30-day mortality after splenic injury (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality significantly decreased over time (from phase I to phase II, odds ratio: 0.39, 95% confidence interval: 0.22-0.67; from phase I to phase III, odds ratio: 0.34, 95% confidence interval: 0.19-0.62) for the overall cohort. While the 30-day mortality for splenectomy/splenorrhaphy diminished significantly over time (p = 0.01), there were no significant differences regarding mortality for non-operative management, with or without transcatheter arterial embolisation (p = 0.43, p = 0.29, respectively). In Japan, in-hospital 30-day mortality rates decreased significantly after splenic injury between 2004 and 2014, even after adjustment for within-hospital clustering and other factors independently associated with mortality. Over time, mortality rates decreased significantly after splenectomy/splenorrhaphy, but not after non

  2. Catastrophic necrotizing fasciitis after blunt abdominal trauma with delayed recognition of the coecal rupture--case report.

    PubMed

    Pecic, Vanja; Nestorovic, Milica; Kovacevic, Predrag; Tasic, Dragan; Stanojevic, Goran

    2014-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare bacterial infection with dramatic course, characterized by widespread necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and superficial fascia which can often lead to death. We present a case of a 27-year-old male with NF. One day after experiencing blunt abdominal trauma caused by falling over bike handlebars, the patient was admitted to a regional hospital and treated for diffuse abdominal pain and large hematoma of the anterior abdominal wall. Due to worsening of general condition, he was referred to our hospital the following day and operated on urgently. Surgery revealed rupture of the coecum with peritonitis and abdominal wall infection. After surgery, fulminant necrotizing fasciitis developed. Antibiotics were prescribed according to wound cultures and subsequent necrectomies were performed. After 25 days, reconstruction of the abdominal wall with skin grafts was obtained. Despite all resuscitation measures including fluids, blood transfusions, and parenteral nutrition, lung infection and MODS caused death 42 days after initial operation. Blunt abdominal trauma can cause the rupture of intestine, and if early signs of peritoneal irritation should present, emergency laparotomy should be performed. Disastrous complication are rare but lethal.

  3. A cost-effectiveness analysis comparing a clinical decision rule versus usual care to risk stratify children for intraabdominal injury after blunt torso trauma.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Yang, Zhuo; Clark, John A; Kuppermann, Nathan; Holmes, James F; Melnikow, Joy

    2013-11-01

    Recently a clinical decision rule (CDR) to identify children at very low risk for intraabdominal injury needing acute intervention (IAI) following blunt torso trauma was developed. Potential benefits of a CDR include more appropriate abdominal computed tomography (CT) use and decreased hospital costs. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of implementing the CDR compared to usual care for the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma. The hypothesis was that compared to usual care, implementation of the CDR would result in lower CT use and hospital costs. A cost-effectiveness decision analytic model was constructed comparing the costs and outcomes of implementation of the CDR to usual care in the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma. Probabilities from a multicenter cohort study of children with blunt torso trauma were derived; estimated costs were based on those at the study coordinating site. Outcome measures included missed IAI, number of abdominal CT scans, total costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Sensitivity analyses varying imputed probabilities, costs, and scenarios were conducted. Using a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 children with blunt torso trauma, the base case model projected that the implementation of the CDR would result in 0.50 additional missed IAIs, a total cost savings of $54,527, and 104 fewer abdominal CT scans compared to usual care. The usual care strategy would cost $108,110 to prevent missing one additional IAI. Findings were robust under multiple sensitivity analyses. Compared to usual care, implementation of the CDR in the evaluation of children with blunt torso trauma would reduce hospital costs and abdominal CT imaging, with a slight increase in the risk of missed intraabdominal IAI. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. "Osteoporosis and orthopods" incidences of osteoporosis in distal radius fracture from low energy trauma.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Syah; Morris, Seamus; Lenehan, Brian; McElwain, John P

    2007-07-01

    Fracture of the distal radius from low energy trauma is a common presentation to orthopaedic trauma services. This fragility type fracture is associated with underlying osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a 'silent disease' where fragility fracture is a common presentation. Orthopaedic surgeons may be the only physician that these patients encounter. We found a high percentage of female patients who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius have an underlying osteoporosis. Further management of osteoporosis is important to prevent future fragility fractures.

  5. Does MRI of the Thoracolumbar Spine Change Management in Blunt Trauma Patients with Stable Thoracolumbar Spinal Injuries Without Neurologic Deficits?

    PubMed

    Deramo, Paul; Agrawal, Vaidehi; Amos, Joseph; Patel, Nimesh; Jefferson, Henry

    2017-04-01

    In blunt trauma patients with computed tomography (CT) findings of stable thoracolumbar (TL) spinal injury without neurologic deficits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are commonly obtained, though the impact on overall management remains unclear. The indication for MRI in patients with TL injury without neurologic deficits continues to remain unclear. Here, we evaluate the role of MRI on clinical management of patients presenting with this diagnosis. After IRB approval, all registry patients from December 2005 to December 2015 with all blunt TL injuries without defects were extracted. General demographics, injury parameters, hospital and ICU length of stay (ILOS/HLOS), CT/MRI findings, and intervention were collected. Impact of variant ISS in the four groups was corrected by dividing HLOS and ILOS by ISS. The Student's t test was conducted for statistical analysis. Of 613 patients, 236 met the inclusion criteria with average age of 52 ± 23 y, ISS (7 ± 4), HLOS (5 ± 3 days), and ILOS (1 ± 2 days). One hundred and thirty-three patients underwent MRI, and 103 patients underwent CT only. Patients who underwent MRI were no more likely to attain intervention (p < 0.06) but had longer length of stay relative to ISS (p < 0.006). MRI did not affect rate of intervention though increased HLOS accounting for ISS. CT findings of stability were concordant with MRI findings. Our results suggest that MRI may not affect intervention decisions in blunt trauma patients with CT findings of stable thoracolumbar spinal injury without neurological deficits.

  6. Safe cervical spine clearance in adult obtunded blunt trauma patients on the basis of a normal multidetector CT scan--a meta-analysis and cohort study.

    PubMed

    Raza, Mushahid; Elkhodair, Samer; Zaheer, Asif; Yousaf, Sohail

    2013-11-01

    A true gold standard to rule out a significant cervical spine injury in subset of blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium is still to be agreed upon. The objective of this study is to determine whether in obtunded adult patients with blunt trauma, a clinically significant injury to the cervical spine be ruled out on the basis of a normal multidetector cervical spine computed tomography. Comprehensive database search was conducted to include all the prospective and retrospective studies on blunt trauma patients with altered sensorium undergoing cervical spine multidetector CT scan as core imaging modality to "clear" the cervical spine. The studies used two main gold standards, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and/or prolonged clinical follow-up. The data was extracted to report true positive, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. Meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values was performed using Meta Analyst Beta 3.13 software. We also performed a retrospective investigation comparing a robust clinical follow-up and/or cervical spine MR findings in 53 obtunded blunt trauma patients, who previously had undergone a normal multidetector CT scan of the cervical spine reported by a radiologist. A total of 10 studies involving 1850 obtunded blunt trauma patients with initial cervical spine CT scan reported as normal were included in the final meta-analysis. The cumulative negative predictive value and specificity of cervical spine CT of the ten studies was 99.7% (99.4-99.9%, 95% confidence interval). The positive predictive value and sensitivity was 93.7% (84.0-97.7%, 95% confidence interval). In the retrospective review of our obtunded blunt trauma patients, none was later diagnosed to have significant cervical spine injury that required a change in clinical management. In a blunt trauma patient with altered sensorium, a normal cervical spine CT scan is conclusive to safely rule out a clinically

  7. Ruptured chordae tendineae of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve as a cause of tricuspid regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, J; de Marchi, C H; Bestetti, R B; Corbucci, H A; Pavarino, P R

    2001-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy suffered a blunt chest trauma. Some hours later, a pulsatile bilateral jugular venous distension, a holosystolic murmur heard at the low parasternal border and hepatomegaly were observed. On echocardiography, ruptured chordae tendineae of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve, as well as tricuspid regurgitation were detected. He remained asymptomatic during hospital stay and was discharged home in good condition. Thus, isolated ruptured chordae tendineae of the posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve is another cause of tricuspid regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

  8. Effect of trauma system maturation on mortality rates in patients with blunt injuries in the Finger Lakes Region of New York State.

    PubMed

    Barquist, E; Pizzutiello, M; Tian, L; Cox, C; Bessey, P Q

    2000-07-01

    New York State instituted a statewide trauma system beginning in 1990. By 1993, that system included uniform emergency medical system triage guidelines, designated trauma centers, transfer agreements between trauma centers and noncenters, and a trauma registry containing data on seriously injured patients in each region and the state as a whole. We reviewed the first 4 years of registry data for the Finger Lakes Region to determine what effects the institution of a trauma system has had on the outcome of trauma care in this region. Retrospective review of a regional trauma database. All qualifying injured patients in the region were entered into the registry beginning in 1993. Data from 1993 through 1996 for patients with blunt injuries were analyzed by both Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology and logistic regression analysis. For comparison, two time periods were defined: 1993-1994 and 1995-1996. Outcomes for the two time periods were stratified by Revised Trauma Score and the presence or absence of head and/or cervical spine injury, and then compared by hospital type (regional trauma center, area trauma center, and noncenters). In the later time period, there was a statistically significant decrease in the region-wide mortality rate. This was associated with a marked improvement in performance of the noncenters and with an increase in the proportion of patients who received definitive care at a trauma center. Improved outcomes for patients with blunt trauma can occur early in the implementation of a trauma system. This improvement may be attributable in part to changes in field triage and early transport to trauma centers.

  9. N-Acetylcysteine counteracts oxidative stress and protects alveolar epithelial cells from lung contusion-induced apoptosis in rats with blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Tarladacalisir, Taner; Sapmaz-Metin, Melike; Karamustafaoglu, Altemur; Uz, Yesim Hulya; Akpolat, Meryem; Cerkezkayabekir, Aysegul; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on peroxidative and apoptotic changes in the contused lungs of rats following blunt chest trauma. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, contusion, and contusion + NAC. All the rats, apart from those in the control group, performed moderate lung contusion. A daily intramuscular NAC injection (150 mg/kg) was given immediately following the blunt chest trauma and was continued for two additional days following cessation of the trauma. Samples of lung tissue were taken in order to evaluate the tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) level, histopathology, and epithelial cell apoptosis using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and active caspase-3 immunostaining. In addition, we immunohistochemically evaluated the expression of surfactant protein D (SP-D) in the lung tissue. The blunt chest trauma-induced lung contusion resulted in severe histopathological injury, as well as an increase in the MDA level and in the number of cells identified on TUNEL assay together with active caspase-3 positive epithelial cells, but a decrease in the number of SP-D positive alveolar type 2 (AT-2) cells. NAC treatment effectively attenuated histopathologic, peroxidative, and apoptotic changes, as well as reducing alterations in SP-D expression in the lung tissue. These findings indicate that the beneficial effects of NAC administrated following blunt chest trauma is related to the regulation of oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  10. The evolution of isolated bilateral lung contusion from blunt chest trauma in rats: cellular and cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A; Woytash, James A; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Marschke, Cristi J; Manderscheid, Patricia A; Notter, Robert H; Knight, Paul R

    2005-08-01

    Lung contusion is the leading cause of death from blunt thoracic trauma in adults, but its mechanistic pathophysiology remains unclear. This study uses a recently developed rat model to investigate the evolution of inflammation and injury in isolated lung contusion. Bilateral lung contusion with minimal cardiac trauma was induced in 54 anesthetized rats by dropping a 0.3-kg hollow cylindrical weight onto a precordial shield (impact energy, 2.45 Joules). Arterial oxygenation, pressure-volume (P-V) mechanics, histology, and levels of erythrocytes, leukocytes, albumin, and inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed at 8 min, at 4, 12, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days after injury. The role of neutrophils in the evolution of inflammatory injury was also specifically studied by depleting these cells with intravenous vinblastine before lung contusion. Arterial oxygenation was severely reduced at 8 min to 24 h postcontusion, but became almost normal by 48 h. Levels of erythrocytes, leukocytes, and albumin in BAL were increased at blunt trauma, and includes a component of neutrophil-dependent pathology.

  11. THE EVOLUTION OF ISOLATED BILATERAL LUNG CONTUSION FROM BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA IN RATS: CELLULAR AND CYTOKINE RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A.; Woytash, James A.; Helinski, Jadwiga D.; Marschke, Cristi J.; Manderscheid, Patricia A.; Notter, Robert H.; Knight, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Lung contusion is the leading cause of death from blunt thoracic trauma in adults, but its mechanistic pathophysiology remains unclear. This study uses a recently developed rat model to investigate the evolution of inflammation and injury in isolated lung contusion. Bilateral lung contusion with minimal cardiac trauma was induced in 54 anesthetized rats by dropping a 0.3-kg hollow cylindrical weight onto a precordial shield (impact energy, 2.45 Joules). Arterial oxygenation, pressure-volume (P-V) mechanics, histology, and levels of erythrocytes, leukocytes, albumin, and inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed at 8 min, at 4, 12, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days after injury. The role of neutrophils in the evolution of inflammatory injury was also specifically studied by depleting these cells with intravenous vinblastine before lung contusion. Arterial oxygenation was severely reduced at 8 min to 24 h postcontusion, but became almost normal by 48 h. Levels of erythrocytes, leukocytes, and albumin in BAL were increased at ≤24 h, and returned toward normal by 48 h. Deficits in P-V mechanics were most apparent at 24 h postcontusion. Levels of macrophage inflammatory polypeptide-2, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and interleukin 6 in BAL peaked at 24 h, whereas monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin 1β peaked at 24 to 48 h postcontusion. Histology showed early hemorrhagic injury (8 min-12 h), with neutrophilic infiltration at 24 h and areas of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia-associated fibrosis at 7 days. Vinblastine-treated neutropenic rats had significantly reduced lung injury based on total lung volume at 4 h and on BAL albumin levels at 24 h postcontusion. Inflammatory injury from isolated bilateral lung contusion in rats is most severe in the acute period (8 min-24 h) after initial blunt trauma, and includes a component of neutrophil-dependent pathology. PMID:16044083

  12. Neurodegeneration and Vision Loss after Mild Blunt Trauma in the C57Bl/6 and DBA/2J Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bricker-Anthony, Courtney; Rex, Tonia S.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the eye from blast exposure can occur as a result of the overpressure air-wave (primary injury), flying debris (secondary injury), blunt force trauma (tertiary injury), and/or chemical/thermal burns (quaternary injury). In this study, we investigated damage in the contralateral eye after a blast directed at the ipsilateral eye in the C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J mouse. Assessments of ocular health (gross pathology, electroretinogram recordings, optokinetic tracking, optical coherence tomography and histology) were performed at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days post-trauma. Olfactory epithelium and optic nerves were also examined. Anterior pathologies were more common in the DBA/2J than in the C57Bl/6 and could be prevented with non-medicated viscous eye drops. Visual acuity decreased over time in both strains, but was more rapid and severe in the DBA/2J. Retinal cell death was present in approximately 10% of the retina at 7 and 28 days post-blast in both strains. Approximately 60% of the cell death occurred in photoreceptors. Increased oxidative stress and microglial reactivity was detected in both strains, beginning at 3 days post-injury. However, there was no sign of injury to the olfactory epithelium or optic nerve in either strain. Although our model directs an overpressure air-wave at the left eye in a restrained and otherwise protected mouse, retinal damage was detected in the contralateral eye. The lack of damage to the olfactory epithelium and optic nerve, as well as the different timing of cell death as compared to the blast-exposed eye, suggests that the injuries were due to physical contact between the contralateral eye and the housing chamber of the blast device and not propagation of the blast wave through the head. Thus we describe a model of mild blunt eye trauma. PMID:26148200

  13. Trauma patient adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden and severity of lung, head, and abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Dunham, C Michael; Hileman, Barbara M; Ransom, Kenneth J; Malik, Rema J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that lung injury and rib cage fracture quantification would be associated with adverse outcomes. Consecutive admissions to a trauma center with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9, age 18-75, and blunt trauma. CT scans were reviewed to score rib and sternal fractures and lung infiltrates. Sternum and each anterior, lateral, and posterior rib fracture was scored 1 = non-displaced and 2 = displaced. Rib cage fracture score (RCFS) = total rib fracture score + sternal fracture score + thoracic spine Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Four lung regions (right upper/middle, right lower, left upper, and left lower lobes) were each scored for % of infiltrate: 0% = 0; ≤ 20% = 1, ≤ 50% = 2, > 50% = 3; total of 4 scores = lung infiltrate score (LIS). Of 599 patients, 193 (32%) had 854 rib fractures. Rib fracture patients had more abdominal injuries (p < 0.001), hemo/pneumothorax (p < 0.001), lung infiltrates (p < 0.001), thoracic spine injuries (p = 0.001), sternal fractures (p = 0.0028) and death or need for mechanical ventilation ≥ 3 days (Death/Vdays ≥ 3) (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 was independently associated with RCFS (p < 0.001), LIS (p < 0.001), head AIS (p < 0.001) and abdominal AIS (p < 0.001). Of the 193 rib fracture patients, Glasgow Coma Score 3-12 or head AIS ≥ 2 occurred in 43%. A lung infiltrate or hemo/pneumothorax occurred in 55%. Thoracic spine injury occurred in 23%. RCFS was 6.3 ± 4.4 and Death/Vdays ≥ 3 occurred in 31%. Death/Vdays ≥ 3 rates correlated with RCFS values: 19% for 1-3; 24% for 4-6; 42% for 7-12 and 65% for ≥ 13 (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 was independently associated with RCFS (p = 0.02), LIS (p = 0.001), head AIS (p < 0.001) and abdominal AIS (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 association was better for RCFS (p = 0.005) than rib fracture score (p = 0.08) or number of fractured ribs (p = 0.80). Rib fracture patients have increased risk for truncal injuries and adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes are independently

  14. Trauma patient adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden and severity of lung, head, and abdominal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, C Michael; Hileman, Barbara M; Ransom, Kenneth J; Malik, Rema J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that lung injury and rib cage fracture quantification would be associated with adverse outcomes. Subjects and methods: Consecutive admissions to a trauma center with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9, age 18-75, and blunt trauma. CT scans were reviewed to score rib and sternal fractures and lung infiltrates. Sternum and each anterior, lateral, and posterior rib fracture was scored 1 = non-displaced and 2 = displaced. Rib cage fracture score (RCFS) = total rib fracture score + sternal fracture score + thoracic spine Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Four lung regions (right upper/middle, right lower, left upper, and left lower lobes) were each scored for % of infiltrate: 0% = 0; ≤ 20% = 1, ≤ 50% = 2, > 50% = 3; total of 4 scores = lung infiltrate score (LIS). Results: Of 599 patients, 193 (32%) had 854 rib fractures. Rib fracture patients had more abdominal injuries (p < 0.001), hemo/pneumothorax (p < 0.001), lung infiltrates (p < 0.001), thoracic spine injuries (p = 0.001), sternal fractures (p = 0.0028) and death or need for mechanical ventilation ≥ 3 days (Death/Vdays ≥ 3) (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 was independently associated with RCFS (p < 0.001), LIS (p < 0.001), head AIS (p < 0.001) and abdominal AIS (p < 0.001). Of the 193 rib fracture patients, Glasgow Coma Score 3-12 or head AIS ≥ 2 occurred in 43%. A lung infiltrate or hemo/pneumothorax occurred in 55%. Thoracic spine injury occurred in 23%. RCFS was 6.3 ± 4.4 and Death/Vdays ≥ 3 occurred in 31%. Death/Vdays ≥ 3 rates correlated with RCFS values: 19% for 1-3; 24% for 4-6; 42% for 7-12 and 65% for ≥ 13 (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 was independently associated with RCFS (p = 0.02), LIS (p = 0.001), head AIS (p < 0.001) and abdominal AIS (p < 0.001). Death/Vdays ≥ 3 association was better for RCFS (p = 0.005) than rib fracture score (p = 0.08) or number of fractured ribs (p = 0.80). Conclusion: Rib fracture patients have increased risk for truncal injuries and

  15. [The forensic medical diagnosis of closed injuries to the heart in blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A V

    1997-01-01

    Describes the morphological changes of cardiomyocytes in contusions and concussions of the heart and reflective heart arrest resulting in rapid sudden death after blunt injury to the chest. Presents the principles and criteria of forensic medical diagnosis of death from heart concussions in such cases.

  16. Characteristics and time-dependence of cut marks and blunt force fractures on costal cartilages: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, Laura; Amadasi, Alberto; Frustaci, Michela; Mazzarelli, Debora; Porta, Davide; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The distinction between cut marks and blunt force injuries on costal cartilages is a crucial issue in the forensic field. Moreover, a correct distinction may further be complicated by decomposition, so the need arises to investigate the distinctive features of lesions on cartilage and their changes over time. This study aimed to assess the stereomicroscopic features of cut marks (performed with six different knives) and blunt fractures (performed with a hammer and by means of manual bending) on 48 fragments of human costal cartilages. Moreover, in order to simulate decomposition, the cut and fractured surfaces were checked with stereomicroscopy and through casts after 1 and 2 days, 1 week, and 1, 2 and 4 months of drying in ambient air. In fresh samples, for single and unique cuts, striations were observed in between 44 and 88% of cases when non-serrated blades were used, and between 77 and 88% for serrated blades; in the case of "repeated" (back and forth movement) cuts, striations were detected in between 56 and 89% of cases for non-serrated blades, and between 66 and 100% for serrated blades. After only 1 week of decomposition the detection rates fell to percentages of between 28 and 39% for serrated blades and between 17 and 33% for non-serrated blades. Blunt force injuries showed non-specific characteristics, which, if properly assessed, may lead to a reliable distinction between different cut marks in fresh samples. The most evident alterations of the structure of the cartilage occurred in the first week of decomposition in ambient air. After one week of drying, the characteristics of cut marks were almost undetectable, thereby making it extremely challenging to distinguish between cut marks, blunt force fractures and taphonomic effects. The study represents a contribution to the correct assessment and distinction of cut marks and blunt force injuries on cartilages, providing a glimpse on the modifications such lesions may undergo with decomposition.

  17. Temporal Patterns of Circulating Inflammation Biomarker Networks Differentiate Susceptibility to Nosocomial Infection Following Blunt Trauma in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Namas, Rami A.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Almahmoud, Khalid; Abdul-Malak, Othman; Zaaqoq, Akram; Namas, Rajaie; Mi, Qi; Barclay, Derek; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic injury can lead to immune dysfunction that renders trauma patients susceptible to nosocomial infections (NI) and prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stays. We hypothesized that early circulating biomarker patterns following trauma would correlate with sustained immune dysregulation associated with NI and remote organ failure. Methods In a cohort of 472 blunt trauma survivors studied over an 8-year period, 127 patients (27%) were diagnosed with NI versus 345 trauma patients without NI. To perform a pairwise, case-control study with 1:1 matching, 44 of the NI patients were compared with 44 no-NI trauma patients selected by matching patient demographics and injury characteristics. Plasma obtained upon admission and over time were assayed for 26 inflammatory mediators and analyzed for the presence of dynamic networks. Results Significant differences in ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and days on mechanical ventilation were observed in the NI patients versus no-NI patients. Although NI was not detected until day 7, multiple mediators were significantly elevated within the first 24 hours in patients who developed NI. Circulating inflammation biomarkers exhibited 4 distinct dynamic patterns, of which 2 clearly distinguish patients destined to develop NI from those who did not. Mediator network connectivity analysis revealed a higher, coordinated degree of activation of both innate and lymphoid pathways in the NI patients over the initial 24 hours. Conclusions These studies implicate unique dynamic immune responses, reflected in circulating biomarkers that differentiate patients prone to persistent critical illness and infections following injury, independent of mechanism of injury, injury severity, age, or sex. PMID:25371118

  18. The characteristics and pre-hospital management of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Oosterwold, J T; Sagel, D C; van Grunsven, P M; Holla, M; de Man-van Ginkel, J; Berben, S

    2017-08-01

    Pre-hospital spinal immobilisation by emergency medical services (EMS) staff is currently the standard of care in cases of suspected spinal column injuries. There is, however, a lack of data on the characteristics of patients who received spinal immobilisation during the pre-hospital phase and on the adverse effects of immobilisation. The objectives of this study were threefold. First, we determined the pre-hospital characteristics of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries who were immobilised by EMS staff. Second, we assessed the choices made by EMS staff regarding spinal immobilisation techniques and reasons for immobilisation. Third, we researched the possible adverse effects of immobilisation. A retrospective observational study in a cohort of blunt trauma patients. Data of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries were collected from one EMS organisation between January 2008 and January 2013. Coded data and free text notes were analysed. A total of 1082 patients were included in this study. Spinal immobilisation was applied in 96.3 % of the patients based on valid pre-hospital criteria. In 2.1 % of the patients immobilisation was not based on valid criteria. Data of 1.6 % patients were missing. Main reasons for spinal immobilisation were posterior midline spinal tenderness (37.2 % of patients) and painful distracting injuries (13.5 % of patients). Spinal cord injury (SCI) was suspected in 5.7 % of the patients with posterior midline spinal tenderness. A total of 15.8 % patients were immobilised using non-standard methods. The reason for departure from the standard method was explained for 3 % of these patients. Reported adverse effects included pain (n = 10, 0.9 %,); shortness of breath (n = 3, 0.3 %); combativeness or anxiety (n = 6, 0.6 %); and worsening of pain when supine (n = 1, 0.1 %). Spinal immobilisation was applied in 96.3 % of all included patients based on pre-hospital criteria. We found

  19. Educational Review of Predictive Value and Findings of Computed Tomography Scan in Diagnosing Bowel and Mesenteric Injuries After Blunt Trauma: Correlation With Trauma Surgery Findings in 163 Patients.

    PubMed

    Cinquantini, Francesco; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Piccinini, Alice; Coniglio, Carlo; Mannone, Sergio; Biscardi, Andrea; Gordini, Giovanni; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2017-08-01

    Laparotomy can detect bowel and mesenteric injuries in 1.2%-5% of patients following blunt abdominal trauma. Delayed diagnosis in such cases is strongly related to increased risk of ongoing sepsis, with subsequent higher morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is the gold standard in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma, being accurate in the diagnosis of bowel and mesenteric injuries in case of hemodynamically stable trauma patients. Aims of the present study are to 1) review the correlation between CT signs and intraoperative findings in case of bowel and mesenteric injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, analysing the correlation between radiological features and intraoperative findings from our experience on 25 trauma patients with small bowel and mesenteric injuries (SBMI); 2) identify the diagnostic specificity of those signs found at CT with practical considerations on the following clinical management; and 3) distinguish the bowel and mesenteric injuries requiring immediate surgical intervention from those amenable to initial nonoperative management. Between January 1, 2008, and May 31, 2010, 163 patients required laparotomy following blunt abdominal trauma. Among them, 25 patients presented bowel or mesenteric injuries. Data were analysed retrospectively, correlating operative surgical reports with the preoperative CT findings. We are presenting a pictorial review of significant and frequent findings of bowel and mesenteric lesions at CT scan, confirmed intraoperatively at laparotomy. Moreover, the predictive value of CT scan for SBMI is assessed. Multidetector CT scan is the gold standard in the assessment of intra-abdominal blunt abdominal trauma for not only parenchymal organs injuries but also detecting SBMI; in the presence of specific signs it provides an accurate assessment of hollow viscus injuries, helping the trauma surgeons to choose the correct initial clinical management. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of

  20. Utility of extended FAST in blunt chest trauma: is it the time to be used in the ATLS algorithm?

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Yassir; Musthafa, Shameel; Hakim, Suhail Y; Nabir, Syed; Qanbar, Ahad; Mahmood, Ismail; Siddiqui, Tariq; Hussein, Wafaa A; Ali, Hazim H; Afifi, Ibrahim; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (EFAST) for diagnosis of pneumothorax is not well defined. To investigate the utility of EFAST in blunt chest trauma (BCT) patients. A single blinded, prospective study. All patients admitted with BCT (2011-2013). Level 1 trauma center in Qatar. Patients were screened by EFAST and results were compared to the clinical examination (CE) and chest X-ray (CXR). Chest-computed tomography (CT) scoring system was used to confirm and measure the pneumothorax. Diagnostic accuracy of diagnostic modalities of pneumothorax was measured using sensitivity, specificity, predictive values (PVs), and likelihood ratio. A total of 305 BCT patients were included with median age of 34 (18-75). Chest CT was positive for pneumothorax in 75 (24.6 %) cases; of which 11 % had bilateral pneumothorax. Chest CT confirmed the diagnosis of pneumothorax in 43, 41, and 11 % of those who were initially diagnosed by EFAST, CE, and CXR, respectively. EFAST was positive in 42 hemithoraces and its sensitivity (43 %) was higher in comparison to CXR (11 %). Positive and negative PVs of EFAST were 76 and 92 %, respectively. The frequency of missed cases by CXR was higher in comparison to EFAST and CE. The lowest median score of missed pneumothorax was observed by EFAST. EFAST can be used as an efficient triaging tool in BCT patients to rule out pneumothorax. Based on our analysis, we would recommend EFAST as an adjunct in ATLS algorithm.

  1. Cervical spine collar clearance in the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient: a systematic review and practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur B; Humble, Stephen S; Cullinane, Daniel C; Day, Matthew A; Jawa, Randeep S; Devin, Clinton J; Delozier, Margaret S; Smith, Lou M; Smith, Miya A; Capella, Jeannette M; Long, Andrea M; Cheng, Joseph S; Leath, Taylor C; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Haut, Elliott R; Como, John J

    2015-02-01

    With the use of the framework advocated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group, our aims were to perform a systematic review and to develop evidence-based recommendations that may be used to answer the following PICO [Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes] question:In the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient, should cervical collar removal be performed after a negative high-quality cervical spine (C-spine) computed tomography (CT) result alone or after a negative high-quality C-spine CT result combined with adjunct imaging, to reduce peri-clearance events, such as new neurologic change, unstable C-spine injury, stable C-spine injury, need for post-clearance imaging, false-negative CT imaging result on re-review, pressure ulcers, and time to cervical collar clearance? Our protocol was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews on August 23, 2013 (REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42013005461). Eligibility criteria consisted of adult blunt trauma patients 16 years or older, who underwent C-spine CT with axial thickness of less than 3 mm and who were obtunded using any definition.Quantitative synthesis via meta-analysis was not possible because of pre-post, partial-cohort, quasi-experimental study design limitations and the consequential incomplete diagnostic accuracy data. Of five articles with a total follow-up of 1,017 included subjects, none reported new neurologic changes (paraplegia or quadriplegia) after cervical collar removal. There is a worst-case 9% (161 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of stable injuries and a 91% negative predictive value of no injury, after coupling a negative high-quality C-spine CT result with 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, upright x-rays, flexion-extension CT, and/or clinical follow-up. Similarly, there is a best-case 0% (0 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of unstable

  2. Cervical spine collar clearance in the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient: A systematic review and practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayur B.; Humble, Stephen S.; Cullinane, Daniel C.; Day, Matthew A.; Jawa, Randeep S.; Devin, Clinton J.; Delozier, Margaret S.; Smith, Lou M.; Smith, Miya A.; Capella, Jeannette M.; Long, Andrea M.; Cheng, Joseph S.; Leath, Taylor C.; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Haut, Elliott R.; Como, John J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND With the use of the framework advocated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group, our aims were to perform a systematic review and to develop evidence-based recommendations that may be used to answer the following PICO [Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes] question: In the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient, should cervical collar removal be performed after a negative high-quality cervical spine (C-spine) computed tomography (CT) result alone or after a negative high-quality C-spine CT result combined with adjunct imaging, to reduce peri-clearance events, such as new neurologic change, unstable C-spine injury, stable C-spine injury, need for post-clearance imaging, false-negative CT imaging result on re-review, pressure ulcers, and time to cervical collar clearance? METHODS Our protocol was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews on August 23, 2013 (Registration Number: CRD42013005461). Eligibility criteria consisted of adult blunt trauma patients 16 years or older, who underwent C-spine CT with axial thickness of less than 3 mm and who were obtunded using any definition. Quantitative synthesis via meta-analysis was not possible because of pre-post, partial-cohort, quasi-experimental study design limitations and the consequential incomplete diagnostic accuracy data. RESULTS Of five articles with a total follow-up of 1,017 included subjects, none reported new neurologic changes (paraplegia or quadriplegia) after cervical collar removal. There is a worst-case 9% (161 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of stable injuries and a 91% negative predictive value of no injury, after coupling a negative high-quality C-spine CT result with 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, upright x-rays, flexion-extension CT, and/or clinical follow-up. Similarly, there is a best-case 0% (0 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative

  3. Mortality risk associated with low-trauma osteoporotic fracture and subsequent fracture in men and women.

    PubMed

    Bliuc, Dana; Nguyen, Nguyen D; Milch, Vivienne E; Nguyen, Tuan V; Eisman, John A; Center, Jacqueline R

    2009-02-04

    There are few data on long-term mortality following osteoporotic fracture and fewer following subsequent fracture. To examine long-term mortality risk in women and men following all osteoporotic fractures and to assess the association of subsequent fracture with that risk. Prospective cohort from the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study of community-dwelling women and men aged 60 years and older from Dubbo, Australia, who sustained a fracture between April 1989 and May 2007. Age- and sex-specific standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) compared with the overall Dubbo population for hip, vertebral, major, and minor fractures. In women, there were 952 low-trauma fractures followed by 461 deaths, and in men, 343 fractures were followed by 197 deaths. Age-adjusted SMRs were increased following hip fractures (SMRs, 2.43 [95% confidence interval [CI], 2.02-2.93] and 3.51 [95% CI, 2.65-4.66]), vertebral fractures (SMRs, 1.82 [95% CI, 1.52-2.17] and 2.12 [95% CI, 1.66-2.72]), major fractures (SMRs, 1.65 [95% CI, 1.31-2.08] and 1.70 [95% CI, 1.23-2.36]), and minor fractures (SMRs, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.19-1.70] and 1.33 [95% CI, 0.99-1.80]) for both women and men, respectively. Mortality was increased for all ages for all fractures except minor fractures for which increased mortality was only apparent for those older than 75 years. Increased mortality risk persisted for 5 years for all fractures and up to 10 years for hip fractures. Increases in absolute mortality that were above expected, for 5 years after fracture, ranged from 1.3 to 13.2 per 100 person-years in women and from 2.7 to 22.3 per 100 person-years in men, depending on fracture type. Subsequent fracture was associated with an increased mortality hazard ratio of 1.91 (95% CI, 1.54-2.37) in women and 2.99 (95% CI, 2.11-4.24) in men. Mortality risk following a subsequent fracture then declined but beyond 5 years still remained higher than in the general population (SMR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.01-1.97] and SMR, 1.78 [95% CI, 0

  4. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Ai; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Shibagaki, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT) scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures. PMID:26693366

  5. Small bowel intussusception after blunt abdominal trauma in a 6-year-old boy: case report and review of 6 cases reported in the literature.

    PubMed

    Erichsen, Daniel; Sellström, Håkan; Andersson, Henry

    2006-11-01

    Although intussusception is a well-known cause of acute abdomen in the pediatric population, traumatic intussusception is exceedingly rare and has been reported previously only 6 times in a preadolescent child. We present a case of ileoileal intussusception in a previously healthy 6-year-old boy after blunt trauma to the abdomen and review the English language literature on the subject.

  6. [A case of postcardiac injury syndrome with repeated pleuritis after blunt chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Namba, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Nawa, Takeshi; Endo, Katuyuki

    2009-12-01

    A 59-year-old man suffered blunt injury to the left chest during a fall in August 2004. He had 5 repeated episodes of back and left chest pain in three years since August 2005. Since these symptoms were accompanied by left pleural effusion and serum inflammatory reaction, the tentative diagnosis was pleuritis. Although examinations of pleural effusion showed exudation with marked augmentation of inflammatory cells, there were no findings that suggested the cause of repetitive pleuritis. All symptoms were relieved within one or two weeks following administration of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs. Surgical thoracoscopy was carried out to investigate the cause of repeated pleuritis, and an acquired deficit of the left pericardium was noted. We considered this case to be postcardiac injury syndrome causing repeated pleuritis following blunt chest injury.

  7. Delayed Stroke following Blunt Neck Trauma: A Case Illustration with Recommendations for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Anyama, Best; Wessell, Jeffery; Solomon, Rachele

    2017-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) to the carotid artery is a relatively rare injury that is difficult to identify even with imaging. Any symptoms or neurological deficits following blunt neck injury mandate evaluation and consideration of BCVI. In an effort to highlight this issue, we report the case of a 31-year-old male patient who presented with left-sided weakness consistent with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and concussion. The patient's symptoms occurred within 24 hours of a blunt neck injury sustained by a knee strike during a basketball game. An initial computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain was normal; a CT angiogram (CTA) of the neck and carotids did not reveal obstruction, dissection, stenosis, or abnormalities of the carotid or vertebral vessels and the patient was subsequently discharged. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain obtained four days after the initial injury demonstrated an acute infarct in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Thus, despite initial negative imaging, neurological deficits must be aggressively pursued in order to prevent stroke in BCVI cases. PMID:28280639

  8. Delayed Stroke following Blunt Neck Trauma: A Case Illustration with Recommendations for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anyama, Best; Treitl, Daniela; Wessell, Jeffery; Solomon, Rachele; Rosenthal, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) to the carotid artery is a relatively rare injury that is difficult to identify even with imaging. Any symptoms or neurological deficits following blunt neck injury mandate evaluation and consideration of BCVI. In an effort to highlight this issue, we report the case of a 31-year-old male patient who presented with left-sided weakness consistent with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and concussion. The patient's symptoms occurred within 24 hours of a blunt neck injury sustained by a knee strike during a basketball game. An initial computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain was normal; a CT angiogram (CTA) of the neck and carotids did not reveal obstruction, dissection, stenosis, or abnormalities of the carotid or vertebral vessels and the patient was subsequently discharged. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain obtained four days after the initial injury demonstrated an acute infarct in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Thus, despite initial negative imaging, neurological deficits must be aggressively pursued in order to prevent stroke in BCVI cases.

  9. An unusual case of the right subclavian artery aneurysm resulting from long-term repetitive blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yukihiro; Ishida, Narihiro; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Takemura, Hirofumi

    2012-07-01

    This case report describes a right subclavian artery aneurysm secondary to long-term repetitive blunt trauma. A 62-year-old man with a right subclavian artery aneurysm had had a history of bird hunting using a shotgun that impacted substantially against his right clavicula and shoulder weekly for >20 years. The patient underwent open repair with partial sternotomy and distal balloon control. The aneurysmal sac was resected, and the right subclavian artery was reconstructed with a primary end-to-end anastomosis. Histopathologic examination of the resected aneurysmal wall revealed that all three layers of the arterial wall were comparatively intact, with fibrosis and lipid deposition in the intima and in various degrees of degeneration in the media, suggesting a true aneurysm.

  10. Diagnostic imaging of cervical spine injuries following blunt trauma: a review of the literature and practical guideline.

    PubMed

    Saltzherr, T P; Fung Kon Jin, P H P; Beenen, L F M; Vandertop, W P; Goslings, J C

    2009-08-01

    Patients with a (potential) cervical spine injury can be subdivided into low-risk and high-risk patients. With a detailed history and physical examination the cervical spine of patients in the "low-risk" group can be "cleared" without further radiographic examinations. X-ray imaging (3-view series) is currently the primary choice of imaging for patients in the "low-risk" group with a suspected cervical spine injury after blunt trauma. For patients in the "high-risk"group because of its higher sensitivity a computed tomography scan is primarily advised or, alternatively, the cervical spine is immobilised until the patient can be reliably questioned and examined again. For the imaging of traumatic soft tissue injuries of the cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging is the technique of choice.

  11. Sphenoid Sinus and Sphenoid Bone Fractures in Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cantini Ardila, Jorge Ernesto; Mendoza, Miguel Ángel Rivera; Ortega, Viviana Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphenoid bone fractures and sphenoid sinus fractures have a high morbidity due to its association with high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to describe individuals with traumatic injuries from different mechanisms and attempt to determine if there is any relationship between various isolated or combined fractures of facial skeleton and sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus fractures. Methods We retrospectively studied hospital charts of all patients who reported to the trauma center at Hospital de San José with facial fractures from December 2009 to August 2011. All patients were evaluated by computed tomography scan and classified into low-, medium-, and high-energy trauma fractures, according to the classification described by Manson. Design This is a retrospective descriptive study. Results The study data were collected as part of retrospective analysis. A total of 250 patients reported to the trauma center of the study hospital with facial trauma. Thirty-eight patients were excluded. A total of 212 patients had facial fractures; 33 had a combination of sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures, and facial fractures were identified within this group (15.5%). Gender predilection was seen to favor males (77.3%) more than females (22.7%). The mean age of the patients was 37 years. Orbital fractures (78.8%) and maxillary fractures (57.5%) were found more commonly associated with sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. Conclusions High-energy trauma is more frequently associated with sphenoid fractures when compared with medium- and low-energy trauma. There is a correlation between facial fractures and sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. A more exhaustive multicentric case-control study with a larger sample and additional parameters will be essential to reach definite conclusions regarding the spectrum of fractures of the sphenoid bone associated with facial fractures. PMID:24436756

  12. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100 % O2

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32) with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100 % O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4) and 2X7 (P2XR7) expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure aggravated post

  13. Aggressive Early Crystalloid Resuscitation adversely affects Outcomes in Adult Blunt Trauma Patients: An Analysis of the Glue Grant Database

    PubMed Central

    Kasotakis, George; Sideris, Antonis; Yang, Yuchiao; de Moya, Marc; Alam, Hasan; King, David R; Tompkins, Ronald; Velmahos, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that aggressive crystalloid resuscitation is associated with significant morbidity in various clinical settings. We wanted to assess whether aggressive early crystalloid resuscitation adversely affects outcomes in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods Data were derived from the Glue Grant database. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included days on mechanical ventilation; intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS); inflammatory - (acute lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome [ALI/ARDS], multiple organ failure [MOF]) and resuscitation-related morbidity (abdominal and extremity compartment syndromes, acute renal failure) and nosocomial infections (ventilator associated pneumonia [VAP], bloodstream [BSI], urinary tract [UTI] and surgical site infections [SSI]). Results In our sample of 1,754 patients, in-hospital mortality was not affected, but ventilator days (p<0.001), as well as ICU (p=0.009) and hospital (p=0.002) LOS correlated strongly with the amount of crystalloids infused in the first 24 hours post-injury. Amount of crystalloid resuscitation was also associated with development of ARDS (p<0.001), MOF (p<0.001), bloodstream (p=0.001) and SSI (p<0.001), as well as abdominal (p<0.001) and extremity compartment syndromes (p=0.028) in a dose-dependent fashion, when age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) severity of injury and acute physiologic derangement, comorbidities, and colloid & blood product transfusions were controlled for. Conclusion Crystalloid resuscitation is associated with a substantial increase in morbidity, as well as ICU and hospital LOS in adult blunt trauma patients. Level of Evidence 2b PMID:23609270

  14. Cost-effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cervical Spine Clearance of Neurologically Intact Patients With Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Malhotra, Ajay; Geng, Bertie; Liu, Renu; Abbed, Khalid; Forman, Howard P; Sanelli, Pina

    2017-08-18

    Use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for cervical clearance after a negative cervical computed tomography (CT) scan result in alert patients with blunt trauma who are neurologically intact is not infrequent, despite poor evidence in regard to its utility. The objective of this study is to evaluate the utility and cost-effectiveness of using MRI versus no follow-up in this patient population. A modeling-based decision analysis was performed during the lifetime of a 40-year-old individual from a societal perspective. The 2 strategies compared were no follow-up and MRI. A Markov model with a 3% discount rate was used with parameters from the literature. Base cases and probabilistic and sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the strategies. The cost of MRI follow-up was $11,477, with a health benefit of 24.03 quality-adjusted life-years; the cost of no follow-up was $6,432, with a health benefit of 24.08 quality-adjusted life-years. No follow-up was the dominant strategy, with a lower cost and a higher utility. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed no follow-up to be the better strategy in all 10,000 iterations. No follow-up was the better strategy irrespective of the negative predictive value of initial CT result, and it remained the better strategy when the incidence of missed unstable injury resulting in permanent neurologic deficits was less than 64.2% and the incidence of patients immobilized with a hard collar who still received cord injury was greater than 19.7%. Multiple 3-way sensitivity analyses were performed. MRI is not cost-effective for further evaluation of unstable injury in neurologically intact patients with blunt trauma after a negative cervical spine CT result. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injuries in children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated severe injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nigrovic, Lise E; Lee, Lois K; Hoyle, John; Stanley, Rachel M; Gorelick, Marc H; Miskin, Michelle; Atabaki, Shireen M; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2012-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) with severe injury mechanisms in children with minor blunt head trauma but with no other risk factors from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) TBI prediction rules (defined as isolated severe injury mechanisms). Secondary analysis of a large prospective observational cohort study. Twenty-five emergency departments participating in the PECARN. Children with minor blunt head trauma and Glasgow Coma Scale scores of at least 14. Treating clinicians completed a structured data form that included injury mechanism (severity categories defined a priori). Clinically important TBIs were defined as intracranial injuries resulting in death, neurosurgical intervention, intubation for more than 24 hours, or hospital admission for at least 2 nights. We investigated the rate of clinically important TBIs in children with either severe injury mechanisms or isolated severe injury mechanisms. Of the 42,412 patients enrolled in the overall study, 42,099 (99%) had injury mechanisms recorded, and their data were included for analysis. Of all study patients, 5869 (14%) had severe injury mechanisms, and 3302 (8%) had isolated severe injury mechanisms. Overall, 367 children had clinically important TBIs (0.9%; 95% CI, 0.8%-1.0%). Of the 1327 children younger than 2 years with isolated severe injury mechanisms, 4 (0.3%; 95% CI, 0.1%-0.8%) had clinically important TBIs, as did 12 of the 1975 children 2 years or older (0.6%; 95% CI, 0.3%-1.1%). Children with isolated severe injury mechanisms are at low risk of clinically important TBI, and many do not require emergent neuroimaging.

  16. Detection of alveolar epithelial injury by 99mTC-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Han, Serdar; Baldemir, Makbule; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2004-10-01

    DTPA clearance rate is a reliable index of alveolar epithelial permeability, and is a highly sensitive marker of pulmonary epithelial damage, even of mild degree. In this study, 99mTc-DTPA aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was used to assesss the pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability and to investigate the possible application of this permeability value as an indicator of early alveolar or interstitial changes in patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 26 patients was chest trauma (4 female, 22 male, 31-80 yrs, mean age; 53+/-13 yrs) who were referred to the emergency department in our hospital participated in this tsudy. Technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was performed on the first and thirtieth days after trauma. Clearance half times (T1/2) were calculated by placing a mono-exponential fit on the curves. Penetration index (PI) was calculated on the first-minute image. On the first day, mean T1/2 value of the whole lung was 63+/-19 minutes (min), and thirtieth day mean T1/2 value was 67+/-21 min. On the first day, mean PI values of the lung and 30th day mean PI value were 0.60+/-0.05, and 0.63+/-0.05, respectively. Significant changes were observed in radioaerosol clearance and penetration indices. Following chest trauma, clearance of 99mTc-DTPA increased owing to breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier. This increase in the epithelial permeability of the lung appears to be an early manifestation of lung disease that may lead to efficient therapy in the early phase.

  17. Spinal cord injury after blunt cervical spine trauma: correlation of soft-tissue damage and extension of lesion.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Cepeda, S; Ramos, A; Castaño-León, A M; García-Fuentes, C; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2014-05-01

    In patients with spinal cord injury after blunt trauma, several studies have observed a correlation between neurologic impairment and radiologic findings. Few studies have been performed to correlate spinal cord injury with ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate whether ligamentous injury or disk disruption after spinal cord injury correlates with lesion length. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients diagnosed with traumatic spinal cord injury after cervical trauma between 1990-2011. Plain films, CT, and MR imaging were performed on patients and then reviewed for this study. MR imaging was performed within 96 hours after cervical trauma for all patients. Data regarding ligamentous injury, disk injury, and the extent of the spinal cord injury were collected from an adequate number of MR images. We evaluated anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and the ligamentum flavum. Length of lesion, disk disruption, and ligamentous injury association, as well as the extent of the spinal cord injury were statistically assessed by means of univariate analysis, with the use of nonparametric tests and multivariate analysis along with linear regression. There were significant differences in lesion length on T2-weighted images for anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum in the univariate analysis; however, when this was adjusted by age, level of injury, sex, and disruption of the soft tissue evaluated (disk, anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum) in a multivariable analysis, only ligamentum flavum showed a statistically significant association with lesion length. Furthermore, the number of ligaments affected had a positive correlation with the extension of the lesion. In cervical spine trauma, a specific pattern of ligamentous injury correlates with the length of the spinal cord lesion in MR imaging studies

  18. Variation in the management of adolescent patients with blunt abdominal solid organ injury between adult versus pediatric trauma centers: an analysis of a statewide trauma database.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Kulaylat, Afif N; Won, Eugene J; Stokes, Audrey L; Schaefer, Eric W; Frankel, Heidi L

    2013-08-01

    Optimal management of adolescent trauma patients with blunt abdominal solid organ injury (SOI) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to identify management differences in adolescents with SOI treated at adult trauma centers (ATC) versus pediatric trauma centers (PTC). We hypothesized that adolescents with SOI would undergo different treatment at ATC and PTC. Retrospective review of the Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation database from 2005-2010 was performed. Adolescent patients (13-18 y old) with SOI (spleen, liver, and kidney injury) were included. Patient baseline characteristics and care processes for each injury were compared between ATC and PTC. A total of 1532 patients with at least one SOI were identified: 946 patients had a splenic injury, 505 had a liver injury, and 424 had a kidney injury. Spleen and liver procedures were performed more often at ATC than at PTC irrespective of injury grade (respectively, 16.1% versus 3.2%, 5.9% versus 0%; P < 0.01). Transarterial embolization for splenic injury was more frequently performed at ATC (2.8% versus 0.6%; P = 0.02). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, care at PTC was significantly associated with lower odds of splenic procedure for patients with splenic injury (OR: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.08-0.36, P < 0.001). In a subgroup analysis of nontransfer patients, care at PTC remained significantly associated with lower odds of splenic procedure (OR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.10-0.59, P = 0.002) despite higher median injury severity score than ATC. Significant differences in the management of adolescents with SOI were identified in Pennsylvania. Operative intervention for SOI was more often performed at ATC than at PTC. Further study will be needed to address the impact of these disparities on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Charles E. Bauer, Jason R.; Cothren, C. Clay; Turner, James H.; Moore, Ernest E.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous.

  20. Screening via CT angiogram after traumatic cervical spine fractures: narrowing imaging to improve cost effectiveness. Experience of a Level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Megan M; Smith, Gabriel A; Tanenbaum, Joseph; Lubelski, Daniel; Seicean, Andreea; Pace, Jonathan; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Screening for vertebral artery injury (VAI) following cervical spine fractures is routinely performed across trauma centers in North America. From 2002 to 2007, the total number of neck CT angiography (CTA) studies performed in the Medicare population after trauma increased from 9796 to 115,021. In the era of cost-effective medical care, the authors aimed to evaluate the utility of CTA screening in detecting VAI and reduce chances of posterior circulation strokes after traumatic cervical spine fractures. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with cervical spine fractures to Northeast Ohio's Level I trauma institution from 2002 to 2012 was performed. There was a total of 1717 cervical spine fractures in patients presenting to Northeast Ohio's Level I trauma institution between 2002 and 2012. CTA screening was performed in 732 patients, and 51 patients (0.7%) were found to have a VAI. Fracture patterns with increased odds of VAI were C-1 and C-2 combined fractures, transverse foramen fractures, and subluxation of adjacent vertebral levels. Ten posterior circulation strokes were identified in this patient population (0.6%) and found in only 4 of 51 cases of VAI (7.8%). High-risk fractures defined by Denver Criteria, VAI, and antiplatelet treatment of VAI were not independent predictors of stroke. Cost-effective screening must be reevaluated in the setting of blunt cervical spine fractures on a case-by-case basis. Further prospective studies must be performed to elucidate the utility of screening for VAI and posterior circulation stroke prevention, if identified.

  1. Screening via CT angiogram after traumatic cervical spine fractures: narrowing imaging to improve cost effectiveness. Experience of a Level I trauma center

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Megan M.; Smith, Gabriel A.; Tanenbaum, Joseph; Lubelski, Daniel; Seicean, Andreea; Pace, Jonathan; Benzel, Edward C.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Steinmetz, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECT Screening for vertebral artery injury (VAI) following cervical spine fractures is routinely performed across trauma centers in North America. From 2002 to 2007, the total number of neck CT angiography (CTA) studies performed in the Medicare population after trauma increased from 9796 to 115,021. In the era of cost-effective medical care, the authors aimed to evaluate the utility of CTA screening in detecting VAI and reduce chances of posterior circulation strokes after traumatic cervical spine fractures. METHODS A retrospective review of all patients presenting with cervical spine fractures to Northeast Ohio’s Level I trauma institution from 2002 to 2012 was performed. RESULTS There was a total of 1717 cervical spine fractures in patients presenting to Northeast Ohio’s Level I trauma institution between 2002 and 2012. CTA screening was performed in 732 patients, and 51 patients (0.7%) were found to have a VAI. Fracture patterns with increased odds of VAI were C-1 and C-2 combined fractures, transverse foramen fractures, and subluxation of adjacent vertebral levels. Ten posterior circulation strokes were identified in this patient population (0.6%) and found in only 4 of 51 cases of VAI (7.8%). High-risk fractures defined by Denver Criteria, VAI, and antiplatelet treatment of VAI were not independent predictors of stroke. CONCLUSIONS Cost-effective screening must be reevaluated in the setting of blunt cervical spine fractures on a case-by-case basis. Further prospective studies must be performed to elucidate the utility of screening for VAI and posterior circulation stroke prevention, if identified. PMID:26613284

  2. Single center experience with application of the ALARA concept to serial imaging studies after blunt renal trauma in children--is ultrasound enough?

    PubMed

    Eeg, Kurt R; Khoury, Antoine E; Halachmi, Sarel; Braga, Luis H P; Farhat, Walid A; Bägli, Darius J; Pippi Salle, Joao L; Lorenzo, Armando J

    2009-04-01

    After properly staged renal injury many children will undergo radiological reevaluation with computerized tomography, the modality frequently favored for its widespread availability and anatomical detail. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept attempts to balance the potential future risk of radiation induced malignancy with the added information obtained by the study. At our institution ultrasound has been increasingly adopted as the followup imaging technique of choice. We sought to evaluate this practice in pediatric blunt renal trauma management. We retrospectively analyzed the trauma database of a pediatric referral center for patients treated between 1997 and 2007. A total of 73 children with blunt renal trauma were identified. Associated injuries, mechanism of trauma, type of management, imaging studies, complications and delayed/missed injuries were evaluated. Mean patient age was 10.5 years and the male-to-female ratio was 3:2. In all patients the mechanism was blunt trauma. Average grade of injury at hospitalization was 2.4, with high grade injury observed in 32% of patients. Repeat computerized tomography was obtained in 11 patients (9 for nonurological injuries). Three nephrectomies were done in the setting of hemodynamic instability and 1 pseudoaneurysm was embolized. Four enlarging symptomatic urinomas were suspected by ultrasound. No clinically important injuries or complications due to delayed diagnosis were detected in patients followed with ultrasound. Our experience suggests that after initial computerized tomography for accurate staging of pediatric blunt renal trauma monitoring can be performed with ultrasound in most patients (excluding those with hemodynamic instability or deemed to require computerized tomography for associated injuries). Selective reevaluation with computerized tomography can be reserved for those with serial or ambiguous abnormalities detected on ultrasound, thus decreasing exposure to radiation.

  3. Emergency Ultrasound Predicting the Need for Therapeutic Laparotomy among Blunt Abdominal Trauma Patients in a Sub-Saharan African Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Musiitwa, P. C. M.; Galukande, M.; Bugeza, S.; Wanzira, H.; Wangoda, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The trauma burden globally accounts for high levels of mortality and morbidity. Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) contributes significantly to this burden. Patient's evaluation for BAT remains a diagnostic challenge for emergency physicians. SSORTT gives a score that can predict the need for laparotomy. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of SSORTT score in predicting the need for a therapeutic laparotomy after BAT. Method. A prospective observational study. Eligible patients were evaluated for shock and the presence of haemoperitoneum using a portable ultrasound machine. Further evaluation of patients following the standard of care (SOC) protocol was done. The accuracy of SSORTT score in predicting therapeutic laparotomy was compared to SOC. Results. In total, 195 patients were evaluated; M : F ratio was 6 : 1. The commonest injuries were to the head 80 (42%) and the abdomen 54 (28%). A SSORTT score of >2 appropriately identified patients that needed a therapeutic laparotomy (with sensitivity 90%, specificity 90%, PPV 53%, and NPV 98%). The overall mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion. Patients with a SSORTT score of 2 and above had a high likelihood of requiring a therapeutic laparotomy. SSORTT scoring should be adopted for routine practice in low technology settings. PMID:24688794

  4. Functional and survival outcomes in traumatic blunt thoracic aortic injuries: An analysis of the National Trauma Databank.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Zachary M; Starnes, Benjamin W; Sohn, Vance Y; Singh, Niten; Martin, Matthew J; Andersen, Charles A

    2009-04-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BAI) remains a leading cause of trauma deaths, and off-label use of endovascular devices has been increasingly utilized in an effort to reduce the morbidity and mortality in this population. Utilizing a nationwide database, we determined the incidence of BAI, and analyzed both functional and survival outcomes at discharge compared with matched controls. Patients with BAI were identified by International Classification of Disease-9 codes from the National Trauma Data Bank (Version 6.2), 2000-2005. Patients were analyzed based on aortic repair, associated physiologic burden, and coexisting injuries. Control groups were matched by age, mechanism, major thoracic Abbreviated Injury Scale score (AIS >/= 3), major head AIS, and major abdominal AIS. Outcomes were assessed using the functional independence measure (FIM) score and overall mortality. FIM scores were scored from 1 (full assistance required) to 4 (fully independent) for three categories: feeding, locomotion, and expression. During the study period, 3,114 patients with BAI were identified among 1.1 million trauma admissions for an overall incidence of 0.3%. One hundred thirteen (4%) were dead on arrival, and 599 (19%) died during triage. Of the patients surviving transport and triage (n = 2402), 29% had a concomitant major abdominal injury and 31% had a major head injury. Sixty-eight percent (1,642) underwent no repair, 28% (665) open aortic repair, and 4% (95) endovascular repair with associated mortality rates of 65%, 19%, and 18%, respectively (P < .05). Aortic repair independently improved survival when controlling for associated injuries and physiologic burden (odds ratio (OR) = 0.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.24-0.54, P < .05). Compared with matched controls, BAI resulted in a higher mortality (55% vs. 15%, P < .05), and independently contributed to mortality (OR = 4.04; 95% CI, 3.53-4.63, P < .05). In addition, BAI patients were less likely to be fully independent for

  5. Efficacy of P188 on lapine meniscus preservation following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Coatney, Garrett A; Abraham, Adam C; Fischenich, Kristine M; Button, Keith D; Haut, Roger C; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic injury to the knee leads to the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of a single intra-articular injection of a non-ionic surfactant, Poloxamer 188 (P188), in preservation of meniscal tissue following trauma through maintenance of meniscal glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and mechanical properties. Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a closed knee joint, traumatic compressive impact with the joint constrained to prevent anterior tibial translation. The contralateral limb served as an un-impacted control. Six animals (treated) received an injection of P188 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) post trauma, and another six animals (sham) received a single injection of PBS to the impacted limb. Histological analyses for GAG was determined 6 weeks post trauma, and functional outcomes were assessed using stress relaxation micro-indentation. The impacted limbs of the sham group demonstrated a significant decrease in meniscal GAG coverage compared to non-impacted limbs (p<0.05). GAG coverage of the impacted P188 treated limbs was not significantly different than contralateral non-impacted limbs in all regions except the medial anterior (p<0.05). No significant changes were documented in mechanics for either the sham or treated groups compared to their respective control limbs. This suggests that a single intra-articular injection of P188 shows promise in prevention of trauma induced GAG loss.

  6. Blunt abdominal trauma: does the use of a second-generation sonographic contrast agent help to detect solid organ injuries?

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Mentha, Gilles; Vermeulen, Bernard; Buhler, Léo H; Terrier, François

    2004-11-01

    The objective of our study was to prospectively evaluate whether a second-generation sonography contrast agent (SonoVue) can improve the conspicuity of solid organ injuries (liver; spleen; or kidney, including adrenal glands) in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Two hundred ten consecutive hemodynamically stable trauma patients underwent both abdominal sonography and CT at admission. The presence of solid organ injuries and the quality of sonography examinations were recorded. Patients with false-negative sonography findings for solid organ injuries in comparison with CT results underwent control sonography. If a solid organ injury was still undetectable, contrast-enhanced sonography was performed. Findings of admission, control, and contrast-enhanced sonograms were compared with CT results for their ability to depict solid organ injuries. Contrast-enhanced sonography was also performed in patients in whom a vascular injury (pseudoaneurysm) was shown on admission or control CT. CT findings were positive for 88 solid organ injuries in 71 (34%) of the 210 patients. Admission, control, and contrast-enhanced sonograms had a detection rate for solid organ injury of 40% (35/88), 57% (50/88), and 80% (70/88), respectively. The improvement in the detection rate between control and contrast-enhanced sonography was statistically significant (p = 0.001). After exclusion of low-quality examinations, contrast-enhanced sonography still missed 18% of solid organ injuries. Five vascular liver (n = 1) and spleen (n = 4) injuries (pseudoaneurysms) were detected on CT; all were visible on contrast-enhanced sonography. Contrast-enhanced sonography misses a large percentage of solid organ injuries and cannot be recommended to replace CT in the triage of hemodynamically stable trauma patients. However, contrast-enhanced sonography could play a role in the detection of pseudoaneurysms.

  7. Validation of thoracic injury rule out criteria as a decision instrument for screening of chest radiography in blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Safari, Saeed; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Baikpour, Masoud; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Abiri, Samaneh; Falaki, Masoomeh; Mohammadi, Neda; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Jafari, Ali Moghadas; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic injury rule out criteria (TIRC) were first introduced as a decision instrument for selective chest radiography in blunt thoracic trauma in 2014. However, the validity of this model has not been assessed in other studies. In this regard, the present survey evaluates the validity of TIRC model in a multi-center setting. In this cross-sectional study, clinical presentations and chest radiograms of multiple trauma patients referring to 6 educational hospitals in Iran were evaluated. Data were gathered prospectively during 2015. In each center, data collection and interpretation of radiograms were conducted by two different emergency medicine specialists. Measures were then taken for assessment of discriminatory power and calibration of the model. Data from 2905 patients were gathered (73.17% were male; the mean age was 33.53 ± 15.42 years). Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the TIRC model for detection of thoracic traumatic injuries was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.93-0.94). Sensitivity and specificity of the model were 100 (98.91-100) and 67.65 (65.76-69.45), respectively. The intercept of TIRC calibration plot was 0.08 (95%CI: 0.07-0.09), and its slope was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.15-1.24), which are indicative of the model being perfect in detecting presence or absence of lesions in chest radiograms. The findings are corroborative of external validation, good discrimination, and proper calibration of TIRC model in screening of multiple trauma patients for obtaining chest radiograms.

  8. Cumulative effective radiation dose received by blunt trauma patients arriving to a military level I trauma center from point of injury and interhospital transfers.

    PubMed

    Van Arnem, Kerri A; Supinski, David P; Tucker, Jonathan E; Varney, Shawn

    2016-12-01

    Trauma patients sustaining blunt injuries are exposed to multiple radiologic studies. Evidence indicates that the risk of cancer from exposure to ionizing radiation rises in direct proportion to the cumulative effective dose (CED) received. The purpose of this study is to quantify the amount of ionizing radiation accumulated when arriving directly from point of injury to San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC), a level I trauma center, compared with those transferred from other facilities. A retrospective record review was conducted from 1st January 2010 through 31st December 2012. The SAMMC trauma registry, electronic medical records, and the digital radiology imaging system were searched for possible candidates. The medical records were then analyzed for sex, age, mechanism of injury, received directly from point of injury (direct group), transfer from another medical facility (transfer group), computed tomographic scans received, dose-length product, CED of radiation, and injury severity score. A diagnostic imaging physicist then calculated the estimated CED each subject received based on the dose-length product of each computed tomographic scan. A total of 300 patients were analyzed, with 150 patients in the direct group and 150 patients in the transfer group. Both groups were similar in age and sex. Patients in the transfer group received a significantly greater CED of radiation compared with the direct group (mean, 37.6 mSv vs 28 mSv; P=.001). The radiation received in the direct group correlates with a lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of 1 in 357 compared with the transfer group with an increase in LAR to 1 in 266. Patients transferred to our facility received a 34% increase in ionizing radiation compared with patients brought directly from the injury scene. This increased dose of ionizing radiation contributes to the LAR of cancer and needs to be considered before repeating imaging studies. III. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Admission base excess as a predictor of transfusion requirement and mortality in dogs with blunt trauma: 52 cases (2007-2009).

    PubMed

    Stillion, Jenefer R; Fletcher, Daniel J

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of admission base excess (ABE) to predict blood transfusion requirement and mortality in dogs following blunt trauma. Retrospective study 2007-2009. University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Fifty-two dogs admitted to the intensive care unit for treatment following blunt trauma. Animals requiring red blood cell transfusion (N = 8) had significantly lower ABE than those not requiring transfusion (N = 44; median base excess [BE] = -8.4 versus -4.7, P = .0034), while there was no difference in admission packed cell volume (PCV) or age. Animals that died or were euthanized due to progression of signs (N = 5) had lower median ABE than those that survived (N = 47; median BE = -7.3 versus -4.9, P = 0.018). Admission PCV and age were not significantly different between survivors and nonsurvivors. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed an ABE cutoff of -6.6 was 88% sensitive and 73% specific for transfusion requirement (P < 0.001), and a cutoff of -7.3 was 81% sensitive and 80% specific for survival (P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ABE was a predictor of transfusion requirement that was independent of overall severity of injury as measured by the Animal Triage Trauma (ATT) score, but a similar analysis showed that only ATT was an independent predictor of survival. The ABE in dogs with blunt trauma was a predictor of mortality and blood transfusion requirement within 24 hours. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  10. The role of negative CT of the abdomen and pelvis in the decision to admit adults from the emergency department after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Heilbrun, Marta E; Chew, Felix S; Tansavatdi, Katharine R; Tooze, Janet A

    2005-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is widely used in the initial evaluation of blunt trauma patients and is associated with a high rate of negative imaging. A described benefit of negative imaging is prompt discharge. This study examined a single level 1 trauma center to determine whether adult blunt trauma patients are discharged from the emergency department (ED) after negative CT of the abdomen and pelvis (CT AP). The authors retrospectively created a data set of adult blunt trauma patients who received CT AP in the ED from August to November 2003. Statistical analysis of admission rates on the basis of positivity or negativity on CT AP was performed to determine if the test influenced admission rates. Additional subgroup analysis was made between the patients admitted with negative CT AP and those who were discharged from the ED. Two thirds (316/469) had negative CT AP. Whereas 80.4% of the patients (254/316) with negative CT AP were admitted, 98.0% (148/151) with positive CT AP were admitted, a statistically significant difference in admission rate (P < .0001). The vast majority (208/254, 81.9%) of patients with negative CT AP were admitted for extra-abdominal injuries. There was no statistical difference in the characteristics of a subgroup of 45 patients who were admitted without any documented injuries from the group discharged from the ED in terms of age, gender, comorbidity, Glasgow Coma Scale score, or intoxication. Under current practice, negative CT AP after blunt trauma results in a statistically significant decrease in admissions.

  11. [Relation between cytokine IL-6 levels and the occurrence of systemic complications in patients with multiple injuries and blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Gregorić, Pavle D; Bajec, Djordje D; Sijacki, Ana D; Karadzić, Borivoje A

    2003-01-01

    Severe trauma is the third cause of death and the first one in the most vital and young population. In USA more children die of trauma then of all other causes. Blunt abdominal trauma takes 56% cases of multiple traumas of all etiologies. Among multiple injured patients, near to 50% have some system-complications, more of 60% in the group of critically injured (ISS > 35). Cytokines play the main role in the inflammatory reaction during the early phase response on trauma. Their secretion predicts system-complications as ARDS, SIRS, even MODS. Hypothetically, level of concentration of Interleukin-6 (IL 6) can improve methods of early diagnostic procedures for detecting SIRS and MODS, when scores are still low (preclinical level), at which stages therapy is more powerful and also cheaper. This prospective study includes 35 multiple injured persons with blunt abdominal trauma (75 > ISS > 18). We have used standard diagnostic procedures. Concentration of IL 6 was detected with ELISA-test. Levels of IL 6 were significantly higher in correlation with SIRS score groups. Correlation with MODS score was not significant for the lowest scores, but IL 6 showed significant higher levels in the second and the third MODS score group.

  12. A pig model for blunt chest trauma: no pulmonary edema in the early phase.

    PubMed

    Couret, David; de Bourmont, Sophie; Prat, Nicolas; Cordier, Pierre-Yves; Soureau, Jean-Baptiste; Lambert, Dominique; Prunet, Bertrand; Michelet, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Chest trauma remains a leading cause of trauma-death. Since lung contusion is one of the most important lesions implicated, the aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the cardiorespiratory consequences of an isolated lung contusion model. Twenty-eight anesthetized pigs were studied during four hours. We induced a right lung contusion with five bolt shots (70 joules each) using a 22-caliber charge in twenty of them. Eight others pigs constituted the control group. The trauma consequences were assessed by histology, measurements of arterial oxygenation, plasma cytokines, pressure-volume mechanics, hemodynamic monitoring using the PiCCO system and a pulmonary artery catheter. The extra-vascular lung water was measured using the gravimetric method. Histology confirmed an isolated right lung contusion without cardiac injury. Compared to baseline values, the trauma group was characterized by a decrease in cardiac index (3.3 ± 0.8 vs 3.9 ± 1.2 l/min/m(2); P < .05) and mean arterial pressure (80 ± 21 vs 95 ± 16 mmHg; P < .05) without preload or afterload modification. Oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2: 349 ± 87 vs 440 ± 75; P < .05) and static compliance (26.3 ± 7.4 vs 30.3 ± 7.8 ml/cmH2O; P < .05) were also impaired during two hours compared to baseline. No edema was noticed in either group whatever the lung considered. All measured cytokines were below the detection threshold. An isolated right lung contusion is associated with rapid but transient cardiorespiratory impairments. Despite the large extent of the lung contusion, no pulmonary edema appeared during the period studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical Treatment of Facial Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Blunt Trauma: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Payami, Ali; Montazem, Andre H

    2017-02-01

    There are few reports of pseudoaneurysm of the facial artery in the literature and very little attention has been paid to their surgical management. Practitioners should be aware of this unusual complication of facial trauma and of the alternatives for treatment of pseudoaneurysms. Surgical resection of selective head and neck pseudoaneurysms provides a safe and effective method for the treatment of these vascular lesions. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent Research in Behind-Armor Blunt Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    injury to the brain can be a product of explosive blast TBI, due to increase in intracranial pressure from pressure loading, and coup-contrecoup... intracranial pressure at the trauma point and decreased (contrecoup) pressure at the opposite side of the cerebrum. In addition to the brain striking the...difficult to detect, these injuries include DAI, ischemic brain injury, and swelling that can lead to increased intracranial pressure . DAI can result

  15. Performance of the Pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale Score in the Evaluation of Children With Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Borgialli, Dominic A; Mahajan, Prashant; Hoyle, John D; Powell, Elizabeth C; Nadel, Frances M; Tunik, Michael G; Foerster, Adele; Dong, Lydia; Miskin, Michelle; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2016-08-01

    The objective was to compare the accuracy of the pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score in preverbal children to the standard GCS score in older children for identifying those with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) after blunt head trauma. This was a planned secondary analysis of a large prospective observational multicenter cohort study of children with blunt head trauma. Clinical data were recorded onto case report forms before computed tomography (CT) results or clinical outcomes were known. The total and component GCS scores were assigned by the physician at initial emergency department evaluation. The pediatric GCS was used for children <2 years old and the standard GCS for those ≥2 years old. Outcomes were TBI visible on CT and clinically important TBI (ciTBI), defined as death from TBI, neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours for the head injury, or hospitalization for 2 or more nights for the head injury in association with TBI on CT. We compared the areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves between age cohorts for the association of GCS and the TBI outcomes. We enrolled 42,041 patients, of whom 10,499 (25.0%) were <2 years old. Among patients <2 years, 313/3,329 (9.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.4% to 10.4%) of those imaged had TBIs on CT and 146/10,499 (1.4%, 95% CI = 1.2% to 1.6%) had ciTBIs. In patients ≥2 years, 773/11,977 (6.5%, 95% CI = 6.0% to 6.9%) of those imaged had TBIs on CT and 572/31,542 (1.8%, 95% CI = 1.7% to 2.0%) had ciTBIs. For the pediatric GCS in children <2 years old, the area under the ROC curve was 0.61 (95% CI = 0.59 to 0.64) for TBI on CT and 0.77 (95% CI = 0.73 to 0.81) for ciTBI. For the standard GCS in older children, the area under the ROC curve was 0.71 (95% CI = 0.70 to 0.73) for TBI on CT scan and 0.81 (95% CI = 0.79 to 0.83) for ciTBI. The pediatric GCS for preverbal children was somewhat less accurate than the standard GCS for older children in identifying those with TBI on CT

  16. Sarcopenia as a predictor of mortality in elderly blunt trauma patients: Comparing the masseter to the psoas using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wallace, James D; Calvo, Richard Y; Lewis, Paul R; Brill, Jason B; Shackford, Steven R; Sise, Michael J; Sise, C Beth; Bansal, Vishal

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia, or age-related loss of muscle mass, is measurable by computed tomography (CT). In elderly trauma patients, increased mortality is associated with decreased psoas muscle cross-sectional area (P-Area) on abdominal CT. Fall is the leading cause of injury in the elderly, and head CT is more often obtained. Masseter muscle cross-sectional area (M-Area) is readily measured on head CT. Hypothesizing that M-Area is a satisfactory surrogate for P-Area, we compared the two as markers of sarcopenia and increased mortality in elderly trauma patients. All blunt-injured patients aged 65 years or older admitted to our trauma center during 2010 were included. Two-year postdischarge mortality was identified by matching records to county, state, and national death indices. Bilateral M-Area was measured on admission head CT at 2 cm below the zygomatic arch. Bilateral P-Area was measured on abdominal CT at the fourth vertebral body. Average M-Area and P-Area values were calculated for each patient. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the relationship of M-Area and P-Area with mortality. Model predictive performance was calculated using concordance statistics. Among 487 patients, 357 with M-Area and 226 with P-Area were identified. Females had smaller M-Area (3.43 cm vs 4.18 cm; p < 0.050) and P-Area (6.50 cm vs 10.9 cm; p < 0.050) than males. Masseter muscle cross-sectional area correlated with P-Area (rho, 0.38; p < 0.001). Adjusted Cox regression models revealed decreased survival associated with declining M-Area (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.96) and P-Area (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-1.00). Masseter muscle cross-sectional area and P-Area discriminated equally well in best-fit models. In elderly trauma patients, M-Area is an equally valid and more readily available marker of sarcopenia and 2-year mortality than P-Area. Future study should validate M-Area as a metric to identify at-risk patients who may benefit from

  17. MULTICENTER COMPARISON OF EMERGENCY RELEASE GROUP A VERSUS AB PLASMA IN BLUNT INJURED TRAUMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Martin D.; Schrager, Jason J.; Johnson, Pamela; Stubbs, James R.; Polites, Stephanie; Zietlow, Scott P.; Jenkins, Donald H.; Robinson, Bryce RH

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Group AB plasma, the traditional universal donor plasma product, is a limited resource. We compared outcomes of Group A plasma transfusion in comparison to AB. METHODS Analysis of blunt-injured patients who received emergency release plasma from was performed. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to identify associations with morbidity and mortality. RESULTS There were 191 patients; 115 Group A and 76 Group AB. No differences were seen in age, sex, plasma transfusions, uncrossmatched red blood cells (RBCs), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Patients who received Group A plasma had significantly lower Injury Severity Score, chest Abbreviated Injury Scale, and scene transfer rate but not head AIS, or abdomen AIS. In addition, significant differences were noted in terms of blood products transfused within 24 hours in those receiving Group A over AB. Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but not mortality, was higher within the AB cohort. No hemolytic or transfusion associated-ARDS reactions were noted in either group. ARDS; RBC transfusion volumes and head AIS were independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION Utilization of Group A plasma for emergency blood resuscitation is a safe option which may alleviate potential shortages of AB plasma. PMID:25200933

  18. 3D reconstruction of emergency cranial computed tomography scans as a tool in clinical forensic radiology after survived blunt head trauma--report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, M; Gehl, A; Püschel, K; Turk, E E

    2011-04-15

    When requested to evaluate surviving victims of blunt head trauma the forensic expert has to draw mainly on medical documentation from the time of hospital admission. In many cases these consist of written clinical records, radiographs and in some cases photographic documentation of the injuries. We report two cases of survived severe blunt head trauma where CT images, which had primarily been obtained for clinical diagnostic purposes, were used for forensic assessment. 3D reconstructions of the clinical CT-images yielded valuable information regarding the sequence, number and direction of the impacts to the head, their gross morphology and the inflicting weapon. We conclude that computed tomography and related imaging methods, along with their 3D reconstruction capabilities, provide a useful tool to approach questions in clinical forensic casework.

  19. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Demir, F.; Güzel, A.; Katı, C.; Karadeniz, C.; Akdemir, U.; Okuyucu, A.; Gacar, A.; Özdemir, S.; Güvenç, T.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg−1·day−1), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectiv