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Sample records for blunt traumatic thoracic

  1. Endovascular graft repair for blunt traumatic disruption of the thoracic aorta: experience at a nonuniversity hospital.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Hanna, Erin M; Christmas, A Britton; Huynh, Toan T; Etson, Kristina E; Fair, Brett A; Green, John M; Madjarov, Jeko; Sing, Ronald F

    2013-06-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BAI) represents the second leading cause of death from blunt trauma. Admission rates for BAI are extremely low because instant fatality occurs in nearly 75 per cent of patients. Management strategies have transitioned from the more invasive immediate thoracotomy to delayed endograft repair with strict hemodynamic management. In this study, we assess outcomes and complications of open versus endograft repair for BAI at a nonuniversity hospital. Retrospective chart review was conducted on 49 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center who incurred BAI from 2004 to 2011. Collected data points included demographics, mortality, complication rates, and intensive care unit and hospital length of stay (LOS). Twenty-one patients underwent open thoracotomy (OPEN), whereas 28 patients were managed with thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The overall 30-day mortality rate was significantly lower comparing TEVAR to OPEN (7.1 vs 50%, P = 0.028); seven deaths occurred in the OPEN group versus two with TEVAR. Overall complications, including mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal failure, pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, and cardiac arrest, were fewer after TEVAR (32.1 vs 81.0%, P < 0.001) despite similar injury severity. Survivor hospital LOS (26.0 ± 15.3 vs 27.7 ± 18.7 days, P = 0.79), intensive care unit LOS (13.5 ± 10.9 vs 12.7 ± 8.8 days, P = 0.94), and ventilator days (11.4 ± 13.4 vs 16.4 ± 14.5 days, P = 0.25) were similar. Early nonoperative management with TEVAR for BAIs is a feasible and effective management strategy. Improved patient outcomes over traditional open thoracotomy in the presence of similar injury severity can be seen after TEVAR in the nonuniversity hospital setting.

  2. Traumatic pseudocyst due to blunt trauma: Case report.

    PubMed

    Becel, Sinan; Oztok, Beliz; Kurtoglu Celik, Gulhan; Icme, Ferhat; Sener, Alp; Pamukcu Gunaydin, Gul

    2015-09-01

    Damage to lung parenchyma due to blunt thoracic trauma often appears as contusion or hematoma. Cavitary lung lesions or pseudocyst formation due to trauma is a rare phenomenon. In the literature traumatic pseudocysts are also known as pseudocystic hematomas, traumatic lung cavity and traumatic pneumotocel. Traumatic pseudocysts usually have good clinical prognosis, recover spontaneously with supportive treatment and do not require surgery. In this article, we present the case of 52 year old male who was brought to the emergency department after a fall from height and was diagnosed with lung contusions and traumatic cyst. PMID:27239612

  3. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter H; Huynh, Tam T; Kougias, Panagiotis; Wall, Mathew J; Coselli, Joseph S; Mattox, Kenneth L

    2008-08-01

    Blunt trauma to the thoracic aorta is life-threatening, with instant fatality in at least 75% of victims. If left untreated, nearly half of those who survive the initial injury will die within the first 24 hours. Surgical repair has been the standard treatment of blunt aortic injury, but immediate operative intervention is frequently difficult due to concomitant injuries. Although endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic disruption is less invasive than conventional repair via thoracotomy, this strategy remains controversial in young patients due to anatomical considerations and device limitations. This article reviews the likely advantages of endovascular interventions for blunt thoracic aortic injuries. Potential limitations and clinical outcomes of this minimally invasive technique are also discussed.

  4. Long-term sequelae following blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Yeo, T P

    2001-01-01

    People experiencing blunt thoracic trauma may sustain multiple rib fractures, flail chest, cardiac or pulmonary contusions, injury to the great vessels, sternal fractures, clavicular fractures, neck injuries, and lacerations of the liver and/or spleen. Long-term sequelae from blunt chest trauma include chest wall deformities, persistent dyspnea, and cardiac, neurologic, or esophageal complications. Chronic pain, depression, and loss of functional status are also frequent components of recovery from trauma. PMID:12025303

  5. [The treatment of pulmonary bleedings and its' complicsations by the blunt thoracic trauma].

    PubMed

    Danielian, Sh N; Abakumov, M M; Saprin, A A; Chernen'kaia, T V

    2012-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 224 patients with pulmonary bleeding after the blunt thoracic trauma were analyzed. All patients were diagnosed with lung contusion, of them 134 had traumatic cavities (hematomas) in the lung. The complete regression of contusion foci was observed within 13.7±4.2 days, whereas only 65.4% of patients demonstrated the regression of lung hematomas after 3 months of follow-up. 5.36% of pulmonary bleeding required the urgent thoracotomy on the reason of the continuous bleeding. The thorough analysis of etiology of posttraumatic infectious pulmonary complications after the blunt thoracic trauma is submitted. The drainage of septic foci allowed the fast recovery of the majority of patients. 7,4% of lung abscesses and pleural empyem required thoracotomy.

  6. Indications for angiography in blunt thoracic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Barcia, T.C.; Livoni, J.P.

    1983-04-01

    The clinical charts and radiographs of 113 patients who underwent aortography for suspected blunt injury to the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels were reviewed to identify the most useful indications for angiography. Eight previously described clinical criteria and 14 previously described radiographic criteria were evaluated in each of these patients, 27 of whom had either an aortic or brachiocephalic injury. Contrary to previous reports, our data indicate that no single clinical or radiographic sign is highly specific for vascular injury. An abnormal aortic outline and mediastinal widening remain the most sensitive criteria, although these were also present in a large number of patients without vascular injury. Displaced paraspinous lines and nasogastric tubes are also useful signs.

  7. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies.

  8. Coil embolization of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of right internal thoracic artery.

    PubMed

    Tourmousoglou, Christos; Zambakis, Peter; Koletsis, Efstratios; Prokakis, Christos; Charoulis, Nikolaos; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic injury to the chest and internal thoracic artery is a perplexing problem that is difficult to diagnose and open to different treatment options. Internal thoracic artery pseudoaneurysms are an extremely rare vascular abnormality. We report the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the musculophrenic artery, a branch of right internal thoracic artery, caused by a penetrating injury of the chest.

  9. Advances in the treatment of blunt thoracic aortic injuries.

    PubMed

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2015-08-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injuries, even though rare in incidence, carry significant mortality rates and their management still remains challenging. There have been major shifts in diagnosing and treating these injuries in the last 5 decades, which proved to be beneficial in terms of mortality and complications. Endovascular repair has been increasingly used for definitive treatment and its outcomes appear to be at least equally safe and effective as those of open repair. We present a balanced review of the relevant literature regarding the most appropriate approach and definitive treatment of these pathological entities. Based on the studies analyzed, endovascular repair is increasingly being established as the choice of treatment, however, the conventional open surgical approach still remains a safe method for severe injuries; the mortality, complication rates and proven longterm results of the latter are continuously improving. Additionally, delayed repair, where appropriate, seems to be a safe option with very low mortality rates. Despite the encouraging short and midterm outcomes reported, endovascular treatment needs to be assessed in the longterm for more accurate conclusions to be drawn about its durability and safety.

  10. Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, Nikolaos A. Saratzis, Athanasios N.; Melas, Nikolaos; Ginis, Georgios; Lioupis, Athanasios; Lykopoulos, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, John; Dimitrios, Kiskinis

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta secondary to blunt chest trauma is a life-threatening emergency and a common cause of death, usually following violent collisions. The objective of this retrospective report was to evaluate the efficacy of endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions with a single commercially available stent-graft. Methods. Nine men (mean age 29.5 years) were admitted to our institution between January 2003 and January 2006 due to blunt aortic trauma following violent motor vehicle collisions. Plain chest radiography, spiral computed tomography, aortography, and transesophageal echocardiography were used for diagnostic purposes in all cases. All patients were diagnosed with contained extramural thoracic aortic hematomas, secondary to aortic disruption. One patient was also diagnosed with a traumatic thoracic aortic dissection, secondary to blunt trauma. All subjects were poor surgical candidates, due to major injuries such as multiple bone fractures, abdominal hematomas, and pulmonary contusions. All repairs were performed using the EndoFit (LeMaitre Vascular) stent-graft. Results. Complete exclusion of the traumatic aortic disruption and pseudoaneurysm was achieved and verified at intraoperative arteriography and on CT scans, within 10 days of the repair in all patients. In 1 case the deployment of a second cuff was necessary due to a secondary endoleak. In 2 cases the left subclavian artery was occluded to achieve adequate graft fixation. No procedure-related deaths have occurred and no cardiac or peripheral vascular complications were observed within the 12 months (range 8-16 months) follow-up. Conclusions. This is the first time the EndoFit graft has been utilized in the treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions secondary to chest trauma. The repair of such pathologies is technically feasible and early follow-up results are promising.

  11. A case of a traumatic chyle leak following an acute thoracic spine injury: successful resolution with strict dietary manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chylothorax is a rare form of pleural effusion that can be associated with both traumatic and non-traumatic causes. Thoracic duct ligation is often the treatment of choice in postsurgical patients; however the optimal treatment of this disease process after traumatic injury remains unclear [1]. We present a rare case of a thoracic duct injury secondary to a blunt thoracic spine fracture and subluxation which was successfully treated non-operatively. Case Presentation A 51 year old male presented as a tier one trauma code due to an automobile versus bicycle collision. His examination and radiographic work-up revealed fractures and a subluxation at the third and fourth thoracic spine levels resulting in paraplegia. He also sustained bilateral hemothoraces secondary to multiple rib fractures. Drainage of the left hemothorax led to the diagnosis of a traumatic chylothorax. The thoracic spine fractures were addressed with surgical stabilization and the chylothorax was successfully treated with drainage and dietary manipulation. Conclusions This unusual and complex blunt thoracic duct injury required a multidisciplinary approach. Although the spine injury required surgical fixation, successful resolution of the chyle leak was achieved without surgical intervention. PMID:21443785

  12. A Retrospective Observational Study Examining the Effect of Thoracic Epidural and Patient Controlled Analgesia on Short-term Outcomes in Blunt Thoracic Trauma Injuries.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward James; Lee, Geraldine Ann

    2016-01-01

    Effective analgesia in the early stages after any major traumatic event remains pivotal to optimal trauma management. For patients with significant thoracic injuries, this is paramount to ensure ongoing efficient respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of analgesic modes in the management of patients with a primary thoracic injury and blunt mechanism of injury. By understanding variables that influence the use of varying analgesic modes and influence the development of pulmonary complications, there should be more uniform evidence-based prescription in the future.This retrospective study considered analgesic use in patients admitted after blunt thoracic injuries at one major trauma center over a 2-year period. Pulmonary complications measured included both infective and ventilator-associated failure. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify patient and injury severity characteristics and their association with respiratory complications.A total of 401 cases were reviewed and analyzed: 159 received Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA), 32 received PCA and epidural analgesia (EA), 6 received EA alone, and 204 received interval-administered analgesia. There were no significant differences in the rates of complication when compared between analgesic modes. Patients who developed pneumonia had significantly increased number of thoracic fractures and underlying organ injury (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis highlighted duration of intercostal drain insertion (OR 1.377, P = 0.001) and premorbid cardiac disease (OR 2.624, P = 0.042) and ICU length of stay (OR: 1.146, P < 0.001) as significant predictors of developing pneumonia in this patient group.Examining the different analgesic modes, this study failed to identify a particular analgesic mode that was more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in blunt thoracic injuries. However, variables that may influence usage of different analgesic modes

  13. Traumatic eye injuries as a result of blunt impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Chiara; Esposito, Luca; Bonora, Nicola; Limido, Jerome; Lacome, Jean-Luc; Rossi, Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    The detachment or tearing of the retina in the human eye as a result of a collision is a phenomenon that occurs very often. This research is aimed at identifying and understanding the actual dynamic physical mechanisms responsible for traumatic eye injuries accompanying blunt impact, with particular attention to the damage processes that take place at the retina. To this purpose, a numerical and experimental investigation of the dynamic response of the eye during an impact event was performed. Numerical simulation of both tests was performed with IMPETUS-FEA, a general non-linear finite element software which offers NURBS finite element technology for the simulation of large deformation and fracture in materials. Computational results were compared with the experimental results on fresh enucleated porcine eyes impacted with airsoft pellets. The eyes were placed in a container filled with 10 percent ballistic gelatin simulating the fatty tissue surrounding the eye. A miniature pressure transducer was inserted into the eye bulb through the optic nerve in order to measure the pressure of the eye during blunt-projectile impacts. Each test was recorded using a high speed video camera. The ocular injuries observed in the impacted eyes were assessed by an ophthalmologist in order to evaluate the correlation between the pressure measures and the risk of retinal damage.

  14. Traumatic aortic regurgitation combined with descending aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siho; Park, Joon Suk; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Kyung Ho; Yang, Woo-In; Sung, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang-Wook; Cha, Dong-Hun; Moon, Jae-Youn

    2014-09-23

    Rupture of the aorta is a relatively rare complication of blunt chest trauma, and traumatic rupture of the aortic valve is even rarer. Even though both result from blunt chest trauma, the causative mechanisms of aortic valve injury differ from those of descending aortic rupture. There are no previous reports in the literature of simultaneous injuries to both the descending aorta and the aortic valve. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with traumatic aortic regurgitation combined with traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the aortic isthmus following blunt chest trauma, and its successful repair with a hybrid surgical strategy.

  15. Traumatic internal carotid artery dissections caused by blunt softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Schievink, W I; Atkinson, J L; Bartleson, J D; Whisnant, J P

    1998-03-01

    This report describes recently treated patients with carotid artery dissection caused by blunt softball injuries, as well as the results of a study of carotid artery trauma in a community. Data obtained through the medical records linkage system used for epidemiologic studies in Olmsted County, MN were used to identify all cases of traumatic internal carotid artery dissection diagnosed from 1987 through 1994. Four patients with traumatic internal carotid artery dissections were identified during the 8-year period under study. In two patients (50%) the carotid dissection was a result of the direct impact of a softball. A 39-year-old-man, who developed transient cerebral ischemic symptoms, and a 35-year-old woman, who developed a painful Horner's syndrome, were struck by a softball on the anterolateral aspect of the neck. Both patients had a low carotid bifurcation. These data suggest that internal carotid artery dissections may be underrecognized sequelae of direct softball injuries to the anterolateral neck. A low carotid bifurcation may be a risk factor for such injuries.

  16. [25 cases of traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta: current diagnostic elements].

    PubMed

    Verdant, A; Mercier, C; Cossette, R; Dontigny, L; Pagé, A; Bernard, C

    1980-09-01

    Traumatic rupture of the descending thoracic aorta is lethal within 3 weeks in 95% of patients who do not undergo operation. In this series of 25 patients who were operated on, 84% have survived for 6 years and there have been no cases of paraplegia. The mechanism of injury is most important in the investigation of patients with traumatic injuries and must be sought either from the patient or from witnesses. A history of rapid deceleration (more than 60 km/h) following a highway collision was present in all our cases. Failure to wear seat-belts resulted in 70% of patients being ejected from a vehicle. A side-on collision resulting in lateral deceleration caused trauma to the intrathoracic aorta in 45% of cases. Vertical deceleration resulted from falls from great heights (bridge, overpass) in 25% of cases. Clinical signs of diagnostic importance were: arterial hypertension (60%), systolic murmur (35%) and the pseudocoarctation syndrome (25%). Pertinent signs on chest roentgenograms were present in 95% of cases and included widening of the mediastinum and blunting of the aortic knob. The authors conclude thoracic aortography should be carried out in trauma patients when two or more of the following are present: (a) history of rapid deceleration, ejection from a vehicle or lateral collision, (b) hypertension and (c) blunting or modification of the aortic knob. The presence of a pseudocoarctation syndrome is an absolute indication for aortography. PMID:7437955

  17. Stent-graft repair for acute traumatic thoracic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, B; Czermak, B; Jaschke, W; Waldenberger, P; Fraedrich, G; Perkmann, R

    2004-12-01

    Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta is potentially life-threatening and leads to death in 75 to 90 per cent of cases at the time of injury. In high-risk patients, as traumatic injuries of the aorta combine with multiple associated injuries, endoluminal repair is now reported as a promising therapeutic strategy with encouraging results. This study determined the outcome of patients with traumatic thoracic aortic injury treated endovascularly during the past 7 years at our institution. Thirteen patients, 11 males and 2 females (mean age, 39 years; range, 19-82), with traumatic rupture of the otherwise unremarkable descending aorta (10 acute, 3 chronic), out of a series of 64 endovascular thoracic stent-graft procedures, were treated by implantation of Talent (n = 8), Vanguard (n = 5), and Excluder (n = 2) self-expanding devices between January 1996 and August 2003. The immediate technical success rate was 92 per cent (12/13). One patient showed a proximal endoleak type I, which was treated successfully by an additional stent-graft procedure. Secondary success rate was 100 per cent. The mortality rate was 0 per cent. Two additional stent-graft procedures were performed due to type I endoleaks after 18 and 28 months. There was no other intervention-related morbidity or mortality during the mean follow-up time of 26.4 months' (range, 6-86). Endovascular stent-graft repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries is a safe, effective, and low-morbidity alternative to open thoracic surgery and has promising midterm results.

  18. Blunt traumatic injury in the Arab Middle Eastern populations

    PubMed Central

    Asim, Mohammad; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Abdelrahman, Husham; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma represents a global public health concern with an estimated 5 million deaths annually. Moreover, the incidence of blunt traumatic injuries (BTI) particularly road traffic accidents (RTAs) and workplace-related injuries are rising throughout the world-wide. Objectives: We aimed to review the epidemiology and prevention of BTI, in the Arab Middle East. Materials and Methods: A traditional narrative literature review was carried out using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. We used the keywords “traumatic injuries”, “blunt” “epidemiology”, “Arab Middle East” between December 1972 and March 2013. Results: The most common mechanisms of BTI in our region are RTAs, falls from height, struck by heavy objects and pedestrian motor vehicle trauma crashes. The rate of RTA and occupational injuries are markedly increased in the region due to rapid industrial development, extreme climatic conditions and unfamiliar working environment. However, lack of reliable information on these unintentional injuries is mainly responsible for the underestimation of this trauma burden. This knowledge deficit shields the extent of the problem from policy makers, leading to continued fatalities. These preventable injuries in turn add to the overall financial burden on the society through loss of productivity and greater need of medical and welfare services. Conclusion: In the Arab Middle East, population-based studies on the incidence, mechanism of injury, prevention and outcome of BTI are not well-documented. Therefore, region-specific BTI studies would strengthen surveillance to better understand the burden of these injuries in the region. PMID:24812453

  19. Blunt traumatic infrarenal aortic intimal flap progressing to pseudoaneurysm over 3 months

    PubMed Central

    Carr, John Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Blunt traumatic infrarenal aortic injuries are unusual, and the formation of a delayed pseudoaneurysm of the aorta is even more rare. In this report, a young woman developed a small intimal flap of the infrarenal aorta after a motor vehicle accident which progressed into a 3 cm pseudoaneurysm after 3 months. Operative repair was successful and the patient recovered. This case illustrates the importance of repeat imaging of small blunt aortic injuries since progression can occur. PMID:27252519

  20. Outcomes in the emergency endovascular repair of blunt thoracic aortic injuries.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ombretta; Malaj, Alban; Gossetti, Bruno; Bertoletti, Giovanni; Bresadola, Luciano; Irace, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    Thoracic aorta blunt injury (BAI) is a highly lethal lesion. A large number of victims die before obtaining emergency care. Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) is a less invasive method compared with open surgery and may change protocols for BAI treatment. This retrospective study was developed to evaluate the potential issues about thoracic endografting in the management of these patients. Twenty-seven patients with a BAI underwent aortic stent grafting. Intervention was preceded by the treatment of more urgent associated lesions in nine cases. In-hospital mortality was 7.4%. No paraplegia or ischemic complications developed because of the coverage of the left subclavian artery. In one case (3.2%), a type I endoleak was detected, proximal endograft infolding in two cases (7.4%) and endograft distal migration in further two cases were detected during follow-up (6-110 months). Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair of BAI showed encouraging results in terms of perioperative mortality and morbidity. Concerns still remain about the potential mid- and long-term complications in younger patients.

  1. Experimental study of the coupling parameters influencing the terminal effects of thoracic blunt ballistic impacts.

    PubMed

    Pavier, Julien; Langlet, André; Eches, Nicolas; Prat, Nicolas; Bailly, Patrice; Jacquet, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study is to better understand how blunt projectile ballistic parameters and material properties influence the events leading to injuries. The present work focuses on lateral thoracic impacts and follows an experimental approach. The projectiles are made with a soft foam nose assembled with a rigid rear plastic part. The dynamic properties of the foams were first determined using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system. The impact forces on a rigid wall were then measured to provide reference load data. Lastly, shots were made on isolated thoraxes of porcine cadavers to investigate the response in the vicinity of the impact (wall displacements, rib accelerations and strains, rib fractures). Results show that the severity of the response appears to be mainly correlated with the impulse and with the pre-impact momentum.

  2. Experimental study of the coupling parameters influencing the terminal effects of thoracic blunt ballistic impacts.

    PubMed

    Pavier, Julien; Langlet, André; Eches, Nicolas; Prat, Nicolas; Bailly, Patrice; Jacquet, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study is to better understand how blunt projectile ballistic parameters and material properties influence the events leading to injuries. The present work focuses on lateral thoracic impacts and follows an experimental approach. The projectiles are made with a soft foam nose assembled with a rigid rear plastic part. The dynamic properties of the foams were first determined using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system. The impact forces on a rigid wall were then measured to provide reference load data. Lastly, shots were made on isolated thoraxes of porcine cadavers to investigate the response in the vicinity of the impact (wall displacements, rib accelerations and strains, rib fractures). Results show that the severity of the response appears to be mainly correlated with the impulse and with the pre-impact momentum. PMID:25951500

  3. Blunt Traumatic Aortic Injury of Right Aortic Arch in a Patient with an Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Daryl Li-Tian; Haider, Sajjad; Zhen, Claire Alexandra Chew

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital developmental variant present in about 0.1 percent of the population. This anatomical anomaly is commonly associated with congenital heart disease and complications from compression of mediastinal structures. However, it is unknown if patients are at a higher risk of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI). We report a case of a 20-year-old man admitted to the hospital after being hit by an automobile. Computed tomographic scan revealed an RAA with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell’s diverticulum. A pseudo-aneurysm was also seen along the aortic arch. A diagnosis of blunt traumatic aortic injury was made. The patient was successfully treated with a 26mm Vascutek hybrid stentgraft using the frozen elephant trunk technique. A literature review of the pathophysiology of BTAI was performed to investigate if patients with right-sided aortic arch are at a higher risk of suffering from BTAI. Results from the review suggest that although theoretically there may be a higher risk of BTAI in RAA patients, the rarity of this condition has prevented large studies to be conducted. Previously reported cases of BTAI in RAA have highlighted the possibility that the aortic isthmus may be anatomically weak and therefore prone to injury. We have explored this possibility by reviewing current literature of the embryological origins of the aortic arch and descending aorta. PMID:25745378

  4. Blunt traumatic aortic injury of right aortic arch in a patient with an aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Daryl Li-Tian; Haider, Sajjad; Zhen, Claire Alexandra Chew

    2015-03-01

    Right-sided aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital developmental variant present in about 0.1 percent of the population. This anatomical anomaly is commonly associated with congenital heart disease and complications from compression of mediastinal structures. However, it is unknown if patients are at a higher risk of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI). We report a case of a 20-year-old man admitted to the hospital after being hit by an automobile. Computed tomographic scan revealed an RAA with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell's diverticulum. A pseudo-aneurysm was also seen along the aortic arch. A diagnosis of blunt traumatic aortic injury was made. The patient was successfully treated with a 26mm Vascutek hybrid stentgraft using the frozen elephant trunk technique. A literature review of the pathophysiology of BTAI was performed to investigate if patients with right-sided aortic arch are at a higher risk of suffering from BTAI. Results from the review suggest that although theoretically there may be a higher risk of BTAI in RAA patients, the rarity of this condition has prevented large studies to be conducted. Previously reported cases of BTAI in RAA have highlighted the possibility that the aortic isthmus may be anatomically weak and therefore prone to injury. We have explored this possibility by reviewing current literature of the embryological origins of the aortic arch and descending aorta.

  5. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Michael W; Courtney, Amy C

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting war fighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wave may result in brain injury have been proposed-a thoracic mechanism, head acceleration, and direct cranial transmission. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive. In this study, likely regions of interest for the first two mechanisms based on blast characteristics (positive pulse duration and peak effective overpressure) are developed using available data from blast experiments and related studies, including behind-armor blunt trauma and ballistic pressure wave studies. These related studies are appropriate to include because blast-like pressure waves are produced that result in neurological effects like those caused by blast. Results suggest that injury thresholds for each mechanism are dependent on blast conditions, and that under some conditions, more than one mechanism may contribute. There is a subset of blast conditions likely to result in TBI due to head acceleration and/or a thoracic mechanism without concomitant lung injury. These results can be used to guide experimental designs and compare additional data as they become available. Additional data are needed before actual probabilities or severity of TBI for a given exposure can be described. PMID:20483376

  6. Mechanism of traumatic retinal detachment in blunt impact: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Lizhen; Wang, Chao; Sun, Ganyun; Liu, Songyang; Fan, Yubo

    2013-04-26

    Retinal detachment typically occurs when the retina is pulled away from its normal position by blunt trauma. It has been estimated that traumatic retinal detachments account for 10-20% of all detachments. Understanding the mechanism of traumatic retinal detachment is helpful for ophthalmologists to make a more accurate diagnosis before the symptoms develop. A finite element eye model, validated through published data, was used to simulate traumatic retinal detachment. Retinal adhesive force was incorporated into the model using breakable bonded contact. Under BB impact, global deformation was divided into four stages: compression, decompression, overshooting and oscillation. Shockwave propagation in the retina produced high strain in the retina. For an impact speed of 50 m/s, the peak strain of 0.138 in ora serrata exceeded the specified threshold for retinal break. When the eye was decompressed, negative pressure occurred around and anterior to the equator, with a minimum of -663 kPa, leading to retinal detachment. The following relative inertia motions between the retina and its supporting tissue extended the detachment. In addition, the simulations of lower shear modulus of vitreous and increased retinal adhesive force also confirm that the extent of retinal detachment is determined by negative pressure and inertial motion. In conclusion, shockwave and negative pressure contribute to retinal detachment. Shockwave propagation in the retina leads to retinal break, while negative pressure and relative inertial motion could pull the retina away from the supporting tissue. The current work would help understand the basic mechanisms underlying blunt trauma.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Idoguchi, Koji Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  8. Endovascular intervention in thoracic arterial trauma.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Eric K

    2008-11-01

    The management of thoracic vascular injury has improved dramatically over the past two decades. The availability of multi-row detector CT has facilitated early diagnosis and incorporation of minimally invasive endograft repair for traumatic aortic injury has improved mortality and paraplegia rates. This review evaluates the available data on stent-graft repair of acute blunt traumatic aortic injury and traumatic great vessel injury with regard to safety and efficacy in comparison with conventional open surgical repair. PMID:18842261

  9. Blunt traumatic superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as gluteal hematoma without bony injury: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Annu; Gupta, Amit; Sharma, Pawan; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Atin

    2016-08-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries to the superior gluteal artery are rare in clinic. A majority of injuries present as aneurysms following penetrating trauma, fracture pelvis or posterior dislocation of the hip joint. We reported a rare case of superior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt trauma presenting as large expanding right gluteal hematoma without any bony injury. The gluteal hematoma was suspected clinically, confirmed by ultrasound and the arterial injury was diagnosed by CT angiography that revealed a large right gluteal hematoma with a focal contrast leakage forming a pseudoaneurysm within the hematoma. Pseudoaneurysm arose from the superior gluteal branch of right internal iliac artery, which was successfully angioembolized. The patient was discharged on day 4 of hospitalization with resolving gluteal hematoma. This report highlighted the importance of considering an arterial injury following blunt trauma to the buttocks with subsequent painful swelling. Acknowledgment of this rare injury pattern was necessary to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:27578385

  10. Ventricular tachycardia from intracardiac hematoma in the setting of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Solhpour, Amirreza; Ananaba-Ekeruo, Ijeoma; Memon, Nada B; Kantharia, Bharat K

    2014-01-01

    In the victims of motor vehicle accidents, unrecognized myocardial injuries may pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Herein, we present a case of a 17-year-old man who developed multiple ventricular premature complexes and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the setting of blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. We discuss significance of the electrocardiographic abnormalities in making an accurate diagnosis of cardiac hematoma and its management. PMID:24581106

  11. Non-surgical treatment of massive traumatic corpus callosum hematoma after blunt head injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, A; Elgamal, E; Elsayed, A A; Wasserberg, J; Kuncz, A

    2016-01-01

    Massive hematoma of the corpus callosum caused by blunt head trauma is an extremely rare lesion. Most frequent traumatic lesions involve the corpus callosum are diffuse axonal injuries. They might be associated with small hemorrhagic foci in the hemispheric and brain stem white matter, intraventricular hemorrhages, subarachnoid hemorrhages, traumatic lesions of the septum pellucidum and fornix. Many cases of corpus callosum injury present with permanent disconnection syndrome. We present a case of a 32-year-old female suffered blunt head trauma resulted in massive corpus callosum hematoma which was managed non-surgically. The patient initially had a reduced conscious level and symptoms of disconnection syndrome, and significant recovery was observed at 6 months follow up. PMID:27375150

  12. Non-surgical treatment of massive traumatic corpus callosum hematoma after blunt head injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, A; Elgamal, E; Elsayed, A A; Wasserberg, J; Kuncz, A

    2016-01-01

    Massive hematoma of the corpus callosum caused by blunt head trauma is an extremely rare lesion. Most frequent traumatic lesions involve the corpus callosum are diffuse axonal injuries. They might be associated with small hemorrhagic foci in the hemispheric and brain stem white matter, intraventricular hemorrhages, subarachnoid hemorrhages, traumatic lesions of the septum pellucidum and fornix. Many cases of corpus callosum injury present with permanent disconnection syndrome. We present a case of a 32-year-old female suffered blunt head trauma resulted in massive corpus callosum hematoma which was managed non-surgically. The patient initially had a reduced conscious level and symptoms of disconnection syndrome, and significant recovery was observed at 6 months follow up.

  13. Missed Traumatic Thoracic Spondyloptosis With no Neurological Deficit: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic thoracic spondyloptosis is caused by high energy trauma and is usually associated with severe neurological deficit. Cases presenting without any neurological deficit can be difficult to diagnose and manage. Case Presentation We reported a four-week spondyloptosis of the ninth thoracic vertebra over the tenth thoracic vertebra, in a 20-year-old male without any neurological deficit. The patient had associated chest injuries. The spine injury was managed surgically with in-situ posterior instrumentation and fusion. The patient tolerated the operation well and postoperatively there was no neurological deterioration or surgical complication. Conclusions Patients presenting with spondyloptosis with no neurological deficit can be managed with in-situ fusion via pedicle screws, especially when presenting late and with minimal kyphosis. PMID:27218044

  14. Non-traumatic compression fractures of the thoracic spine following a seizure -- treatment by percutaneous kyphoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gnanalingham, K; Macanovic, M; Joshi, S; Afshar, F; Yeh, J

    2004-08-01

    A 26-year-old male presented with acute mid-thoracic back pain following a witnessed grand mal seizure. There was no trauma and the patient was on steroids for systemic lupus erythematosus. X-rays and CT scans of the thoracic spine revealed compression fractures at T5 and T6, with 50 % loss of vertebral height and kyphosis. He underwent percutaneous kyphoplasty of both vertebrae, with symptomatic improvement. Non-traumatic compression fractures of the thoracic spine following seizures are a rare injury. This may be related to the compressive forces exerted on the vertebral column by the contractions of the truncal muscles, during a seizure. These compression fractures are suitable for treatment by minimally invasive techniques, such as kyphoplasty.

  15. Centrifugal pump support for distal aortic perfusion during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Walls, Joseph T; Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Schmaltz, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Paraplegia from ischemic injury of the spinal cord and renal failure from inadequate perfusion of the kidneys may occur from aortic cross-clamping during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. After Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 26 patients surgically treated for traumatic transection of the descending thoracic aorta during a 14 year period (1987-2001), using centrifugal pump (Sarns) support for distal aortic perfusion. The study group comprised 19 males and 7 females, whose ages ranged from 15 to 69 years. For all but 1 patient, who fell from a flagpole, the injuries were incurred in motor vehicle accidents. Aortic cross-clamp time lasted between 5 to 78 min (median = 40 min). Mean arterial pressure ranged from 50 to 80 mm Hg (median = 70 mm Hg). All patients survived operation without developing paraplegia or renal failure. Distal centrifugal pump perfusion during repair of traumatic injury of the descending thoracic aorta is a valuable adjunct during surgical treatment and aids in preservation of spinal cord and renal function.

  16. Early coagulation events induce acute lung injury in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Donahue, Deborah L; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic coagulopathy are serious complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that frequently lead to poor clinical outcomes. Although the release of tissue factor (TF), a potent initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, from the injured brain is thought to play a key role in coagulopathy after TBI, its function in ALI following TBI remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the systemic appearance of TF correlated with the ensuing coagulopathy that follows TBI in ALI using an anesthetized rat blunt trauma TBI model. Blood and lung samples were obtained after TBI. Compared with controls, pulmonary edema and increased pulmonary permeability were observed as early as 5 min after TBI without evidence of norepinephrine involvement. Systemic TF increased at 5 min and then diminished 60 min after TBI. Lung injury and alveolar hemorrhaging were also observed as early as 5 min after TBI. A biphasic elevation of TF was observed in the lungs after TBI, and TF-positive microparticles (MPs) were detected in the alveolar spaces. Fibrin(ogen) deposition was also observed in the lungs within 60 min after TBI. Additionally, preadministration of a direct thrombin inhibitor, Refludan, attenuated lung injuries, thus implicating thrombin as a direct participant in ALI after TBI. The results from this study demonstrated that enhanced systemic TF may be an initiator of coagulation activation that contributes to ALI after TBI. PMID:27190065

  17. Traumatic eye injuries as a result of blunt impact: computational issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, C.; Esposito, L.; Bonora, N.; Limido, J.; Lacome, J. L.; Rossi, T.

    2014-05-01

    The detachment or tearing of the retina in the human eye as a result of a collision is a phenomenon that occurs very often. Reliable numerical simulations of eye impact can be very useful tools to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for traumatic eye injuries accompanying blunt impact. The complexity and variability of the physical and mechanical properties of the biological materials, the lack of agreement on their related experimental data as well as the unsuitability of specific numerical codes and models are only some of the difficulties when dealing with this matter. All these challenging issues must be solved to obtain accurate numerical analyses involving dynamic behavior of biological soft tissues. To this purpose, a numerical and experimental investigation of the dynamic response of the eye during an impact event was performed. Numerical simulations were performed with IMPETUS-AFEA, a new general non-linear finite element (FE) software which offers non uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) FE technology for the simulation of large deformation and fracture in materials. IMPETUS code was selected in order to solve hourglass and locking problems typical of nearly incompressible materials like eye tissues. Computational results were compared with the experimental results on fresh enucleated porcine eyes impacted with airsoft pellets.

  18. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Milanchi, S; Makey, I; McKenna, R; Margulies, D R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. CONCLUSION: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications. PMID:20040799

  19. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Casandra A; Palmer, Cassandra A; Ney, Arthur L; Becker, Brian; Schaffel, Steven D; Quickel, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN), was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN). The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit). Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment. PMID:18837992

  20. A thoracic mechanism of mild traumatic brain injury due to blast pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Courtney, M W

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. An experiment is proposed which isolates the thoracic mechanism from cranial mechanisms of mTBI due to blast wave exposure. Results have implications for evaluating risk of mTBI due to blast exposure and for developing effective protection. PMID:18829180

  1. Endovascular Repair of a Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury Resulting in Late Aortic Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kumi; Matsui, Osamu; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Go; anada, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual complication following endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury using a homemade stent-graft. Although an initial technical success was apparently obtained, the aorta showed remarkable dilatation without shortening or migration of the stent skeleton in late follow-up period. The possible cause of the dilatation was considered to be the expansion and gathering of the crimped, loosely attached, graft fabric in addition to the incomplete exclusion due to the insufficient landing zone and the limited radial force. Thus, the specific feature of stent-graft, considered to provide an advantage to treatment, has adversely affected the native aorta. PMID:24436598

  2. Diagnosis of traumatic thoracic aortic rupture: a 10-year retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kram, H B; Appel, P L; Wohlmuth, D A; Shoemaker, W C

    1989-02-01

    A 10-year retrospective analysis of 82 patients with suspected thoracic aortic rupture (TAR) due to blunt chest trauma was performed to define which symptoms and signs were helpful in making an early diagnosis. Symptoms and signs associated with TAR included midscapular back pain (in the absence of thoracic spine fracture), unexplained hypotension, upper extremity hypertension, bilateral femoral pulse deficits, and initial chest tube output in excess of 750 mL. Chest roentgenographic signs seen with significantly greater frequency in the 12 patients with TAR than in 70 patients without such rupture included a widened paratracheal stripe (7 patients), deviation of the nasogastric tube or central venous pressure line (5 patients), blurring of the aortic knob (9 patients), abnormal paraspinous stripe (6 patients), and rightward tracheal deviation (5 patients). Mediastinal widening of greater than 8 cm occurred in 11 of the 12 patients with TAR (sensitivity, 92%); its specificity, however, was only 10% (11 true-positive and 63 false-positive results). In patients in hemodynamically stable condition who display these findings, immediate aortography should be considered. The presence of myocardial contusions, intraabdominal injuries, and pelvic fractures also occurred more frequently in patients with TAR. We conclude that a detailed history, physical examination, and chest roentgenography, with rapid progression to aortography in suspicious cases, represent the safest and most reliable approach to patients with TAR.

  3. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. PMID:27316567

  4. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma.

  5. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. PMID:27381403

  6. Blunt traumatic liver injury associated with clostridial infection of early onset.

    PubMed

    Hemming, A W; Scudamore, C H; McGregor, G I; Owen, D

    1993-12-01

    Hepatic clostridial infections associated with blunt abdominal trauma are rare. Generally they occur from 2 weeks to 3 months after injury and are thought to result from the growth of normal enteric organisms, which are carried to the liver by the portal venous system and infect devitalized tissue. The authors describe two patients in whom the hepatic infection became established in less than 24 hours after injury and was due to Clostridium spp. The patients were successfully treated by hepatic resection and combination antimicrobial therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen was used as an adjunct in one case. PMID:8258133

  7. [Traumatic injury of the proximal aortic arch after blunt chest trauma;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kato, Masanori; Sugimura, Yukiharu

    2015-02-01

    We report a rare case of an proximal aortic arch injury caused by blunt chest trauma. A 48-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital because of traffic accident. Computed tomography (CT) showed a small ulcer-like projection (ULP) at the proximal part of the aortic arch. An elective surgery for aortic repair was performed because of significant enlargement of the ULP in the aortic arch revealed by follow-up CT. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged on the 14th postoperative day.

  8. AB 67. Successful endovascular management of massive hemoptysis secondary to aortobronchial fistula, ten years after thoracic aorta traumatic rupture

    PubMed Central

    Serasli, Evangelia; Michailidis, Vasilis; Aggelos, Megalopoulos; Siopi, Dimitra; Chloros, Dimitrios; Pelekas, Dimitrios; Christoforatou, Konstantinos; Tsara, Venetia

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemoptysis, secondary to aortobronchial fistula, is a rare and potentially fatal condition. We present a case report of noninvasive endovascular treatment of hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula, in a patient with a history of thoracic aorta traumatic rupture. Patients and methods A 55-year-old man presented with massive hemoptysis and a 2-month history of recurrent hemoptysis. Ten years previously, the patient had undergone thoracic aortic interposition of Dacron graft as a surgical repair of thoracic aorta traumatic rupture. Despite the severity of bleeding, the patient was haemodynamically stable. Spiral computed tomography angiography of the thorax revealed a saccular pseudoaneurysm of thoracic aorta of about 4.2 cm in diameter at the level of the previous aortic repair. The computed tomography examination also revealed alveolar infiltrations and a ground-glass appearance in the adjacent left upper lobe, indicative of extravasation to the lung parenchyma. Results Under the impression of aortobronchial fistula, a digital angiography was immediately performed. It confirmed the diagnosis and an endovascular tubular graft Gore TAG was interposed via femoral approach. The bleeding ceased gradually and the patient was discharged free of symptoms. At the 1-month and 2-month follow up, the CT revealed an improvement of the infiltrations and a decrease of the pseudoaneurysm size. Conclusions Aortobronchial fistula should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with hemoptysis and even a long history of thoracic aorta traumatic rupture. Endovascular stenting seems to represent a safe, non invasive therapeutical option. Early diagnosis, prompt management and long term follow up maybe proved lifesaving.

  9. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  10. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  11. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  12. Cervical esophageal rupture after blunt trauma resulting from a car accident

    PubMed Central

    Jabłoński, Sławomir; Terlecki, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic perforation of the cervical esophagus due to blunt trauma is a very rare condition which continues to be associated with significant mortality rates. The symptoms and signs of this injury are often masked by or ascribed to more common blunt thoracic injuries. This paper presents a case of cervical esophageal perforation secondary to blunt trauma resulting from a car accident. The injury was diagnosed early by computed tomography examination, and the patient underwent prompt and successful surgical repair performed to prevent the development of descending mediastinitis. PMID:27785145

  13. [Non-surgical management after blunt traumatic liver injuries: A review article].

    PubMed

    Noyola-Villalobos, Héctor Faustino; Loera-Torres, Marco Antonio; Jiménez-Chavarría, Enrique; Núñez-Cantú, Olliver; García-Núñez, Luis Manuel; Arcaute-Velázquez, Fernando Federico

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic trauma is a common cause for admissions in the Emergency Room. Currently, non-surgical management is the standard treatment in haemodynamically stable patients with a success rate of around 85 to 98%. This haemodynamic stability is the most important factor in selecting the appropriate patient. Adjuncts in non-surgical management are angioembolisation, image-guided drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Failure in non-surgical management is relatively rare but potentially fatal, and needs to be recognised and aggressively treated as early as possible. The main cause of failure in non-surgical management is persistent haemorrhage. The aim of this paper is to describe current evidence and guidelines that support non-surgical management of liver injuries in blunt trauma.

  14. Traumatic rupture of the coronary sinus following blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, Kyo Seon; Na, Kook Joo; Oh, Sang Gi; Jung, Yong Hun; Jeong, In Seok

    2014-11-20

    Cardiac rupture is rare but potentially life-threatening complication after chest trauma. We present the case of a 57-year-old male who developed cardiac arrest because of extensive pericardial tamponade after a falling injury. We decided to perform an exploratory sternotomy in the operating room (OR). The patient was transported to the OR on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. We found a rupture of the coronary sinus after evacuation of an extensive hematoma in the pericardium and primarily repaired the injured site. After 2 days, the patient died due to refractory cardiogenic shock. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of rupture of the coronary sinus after blunt chest trauma.

  15. Traumatic chest injury in children: A single thoracic surgeon's experience in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Kelechi Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was to determine the extent and outcome of childhood chest injury in Nigeria, and to compare results with that of other literatures. Patients and Methods: A Prospective study of all children under 18 years of age with chest trauma in two tertiary hospitals in Southern Nigeria from January 2012 to December 2014 was reviewed. The aetiology, type, associated injury, mechanism, treatment and outcome were evaluated. The patients were followed up in the clinic. The data were analysed using SPSS version 20.0 with a significant P < 0.05. Results: Thirty-one patients (12.1%) under 18 years of age of 256 chest trauma patients were managed in the thoracic units. The mean age was 9.78 ± 6.77 years and 27 (87.1%) were male. The aetiology in 13 was from falls, 10 from automobile crashes, 3 from gunshots, 4 from stabbing and 1 from abuse. The highest peak of chest injury was on Saturday of the week and April of the year. The pleural collections are as follows: 15 (71.4%) was haemothorax, 4 (19.1%) pneumothorax, 2 (9.5%) haemopneumothorax and 18 patients had lung contusion in combination or alone with the pleural collections. Seven patients who presented >12-h versus 2 who presented <12-h and 6 of children between 0 and 9 years versus 3 at 10-18 years of age had empyema thoracis (P value not significant). One death was recorded. Conclusion: Chest trauma in children is still not common, and blunt chest injury from falls and automobile accidents are more common than penetrating chest injury. Treatment with tube thoracostomy is the major management modality with empyema thoracis as the most common complication. PMID:26612123

  16. Blunt traumatic internal carotid artery dissection with delayed stroke in a young skydiver

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, Michael; Hussain, Kosar; Ali, Mohammad Baqer Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a 33-year-old skydiver who presented to the emergency department after a traumatic landing following a parachuting episode. He initially presented with right knee pain secondary to a tibial plateau fracture. There were no neurological symptoms or signs at the initial assessment. While he was still in the emergency department, he suddenly developed headache and left-sided hemiplegia. An urgent work-up showed right middle cerebral artery thrombosis with right internal carotid thrombosis and dissection. We have discussed some possible mechanism of injury in skydiving that may have predisposed to the occurrence of cervical dissection in our patient. PMID:23559649

  17. Post-traumatic disorder symptoms and blunted diurnal cortisol production in partners of prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kamala S; Bower, Julienne E; Williamson, Timothy J; Hoyt, Michael A; Wellisch, David; Stanton, Annette L; Irwin, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer diagnosed in men, and research suggests that coping with this illness can cause significant distress in patients as well as their partners. This study examined the relationship of caregiving for a partner with PC with diurnal cortisol output in women between the ages of 42 and 75 years old. Participants were women whose partners had PC (n = 19) and women who were in relationships with men with no diagnosed medical illness (n = 26). Women provided saliva samples (4 times per day over 3 days) in their natural environment. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I Disorders was also conducted to assess for the presence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. Partners of men with PC had lower daily cortisol output across the three days than controls, F(1,444.08) = 20.72, p<.001). They were also more likely to report PTSD symptoms with 68.4% of PC partners fulfilling criteria for sub-threshold PTSD as compared to 23.1% of controls (χ(2) = 11.30, p = .01). Mixed model analyses revealed that the presence of sub-threshold PTSD symptoms significantly predicted cortisol production, F(1,419.64) = 5.10, p<.01). Regardless of caregiver status, women who reported at least sub-threshold PTSD symptoms had lower cortisol production than those with no PTSD symptoms. Major depression did not explain differences in cortisol production between partners of PC patients and controls. Although these findings are preliminary, they highlight the importance of developing interventions aimed at reducing risk of psychopathology in partners of men with PC.

  18. Risk factors for traumatic blunt cerebrovascular injury diagnosed by computed tomography angiography in the pediatric population: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Sivakumar, Walavan; Metzger, Ryan R; Bollo, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is frequently used to examine patients for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) after cranial trauma, but the pediatric population at risk for BCVI is poorly defined. Although CTA is effective for BCVI screening in adults, the increased lifetime risk for malignant tumors associated with this screening modality warrants efforts to reduce its use in children. The authors' objective was to evaluate the incidence of BCVI diagnosed by CTA in a pediatric patient cohort and to create a prediction model to identify children at high risk for BCVI. METHODS Demographic, clinical, and radiographic data were collected retrospectively for pediatric patients who underwent CTA during examination for traumatic cranial injury from 2003 through 2013. The primary outcome was injury to the carotid or vertebral artery diagnosed by CTA. RESULTS The authors identified 234 patients (mean age 8.3 years, range 0.04-17 years, 150 [64%] boys) who underwent CTA screening for BCVI. Of these, 24 (10.3%) had a focal neurological deficit, and 153 (65.4%) had intracranial hemorrhage on a head CTA. Thirty-seven BCVIs were observed in 36 patients (15.4%), and 16 patients (6.8%) died. Multivariate regression analysis identified fracture through the carotid canal, petrous temporal bone fracture, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of < 8, focal neurological deficit, and stroke on initial CT scan as independent risk factors for BCVI. A prediction model for identifying children at high risk for BCVI was created. A score of ≤ 2 yielded a 7.9% probability of BCVI and a score of ≥ 3 a risk of 39.3% for BCVI. CONCLUSIONS For cranial trauma in children, fracture of the petrous temporal bone or through the carotid canal, focal neurological deficit, stroke, and a GCS score of < 8 are independent risk factors for BCVI.

  19. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column. Part I: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-01-01

    The Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) has now been in existence for more than a decade. Its main objective is the evaluation and optimization of the operative treatment for traumatic spinal injuries. The authors present the results of the second prospective internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) of the AG WS in three consecutive parts: epidemiology, surgical treatment and radiologic findings and follow-up results. The aim of the study was to update and review the state-of-the art for treatment of spinal fractures for thoracic and lumbar spine (T1-L5) injuries in German-speaking countries: which lesions will be treated with which procedure and what differences can be found in the course of treatment and the clinical and radiological outcome? This present first part of the study outlines the new study design and concept of an internet-based data collection system. The epidemiologic findings and characteristics of the three major treatment subgroups of the study collective will be presented: operative treatment (OP), non-operative treatment (KONS), and patients receiving a kyphoplasty and/or vertebroplasty without additional instrumentation (PLASTIE). A total of 865 patients (OP n=733, KONS n=52, PLASTIE n=69, other n=7) from 8 German and Austrian trauma centers were included. The main causes of accidents in the OP subgroup were motor vehicle accidents 27.1% and trivial falls 15.8% (KONS 55.8%, PLASTIE 66.7%). The Magerl/AO classification scheme was used and 548 (63.3%) compression fractures (type A), 181 (20.9%) distraction injuries (type B), and 136 (15.7%) rotational injuries (type C) were diagnosed. Of the fractures 68.8% were located at the thoracolumbar junction (T11-L2). Type B and type C injuries carried a higher risk for concomitant injuries, neurological deficits and additional vertebral fractures. The average initial VAS spine score, representing the status before the trauma, varied between treatment subgroups (OP 80, KONS

  20. Coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Fahad; Tai, Javed Majid; Bokhari, Saira

    2014-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma may result in cardiac injuries ranging from simple arrhythmias to fatal cardiac rupture. Coronary artery dissection culminating in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rare after blunt chest trauma. Here we report a case of a 37-year-old man who had an AMI secondary to coronary dissection resulting from blunt chest trauma after involvement in a physical fight. PMID:25246456

  1. Traumatic rupture of gastric pull-up after apparent mild thoracic trauma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Valle, Joaquin; Srinivasrao, Hanumantha; Snow, David; Asbitt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    While elderly patients account for only 10-12% of all trauma victims, they consume 25% of trauma-related health care resources, with higher rates of mortality and complication. Presently described is the case of an elderly patient who presented to the emergency department (ED) following mild thoracic trauma, with previous history of gastric pull-up surgery. The patient had consulted another facility 48 hours earlier and was prescribed analgesia and x-ray follow-up for a mechanical fall and pain in the lower rib cage. At arrival, the patient complained of increasing dyspnea and pain at the right hemithorax. X-ray showed right hemithorax effusion, and contrast computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a large amount of contrast filling the pleural space and a relatively small point of gastric pull-up rupture in the stomach. The patient was referred to the cardiothoracic unit, but was unresponsive upon arrival and died. The aim of the present report was to raise the index of clinical suspicion of traumatic rupture of the gastric pull-up following traumatic chest injury, and to affirm that contrast CT should be the gold standard for diagnosis. PMID:27598597

  2. Fatal rupture of an unsuspected post-traumatic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Townend, J N; Davies, M K; Jones, E L

    1991-01-01

    A 27 year old woman presented during the third trimester of her second pregnancy complaining of chest pain. A chest radiograph showed a large aneurysm arising from the distal part of the aortic arch. She was transferred to the regional cardiothoracic centre but died suddenly on arrival. Necropsy confirmed a ruptured saccular aortic aneurysm arising just distal to the left subclavian artery. A history of a road traffic accident at the age of 12 was obtained from relatives after the patient's death. Vascular and haemodynamic changes in pregnancy may have caused the rupture of this previously silent post-traumatic aortic aneurysm. Images PMID:1931355

  3. Treatment of thoracic hemorrhage due to rupture of traumatic mediastinal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Fang; Cao, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Patients in traffic accidents are usually presented with pain and bleeding due to fractures or soft tissue injury. On some occasions, more severe complications may be triggered by the trauma. A review of the published English language literature reveals no survival case once the traumatic mediastinal hematoma is ruptured. In our case, a 54-year-old man suffering motorcycle accident was admitted to emergency department. Computed tomography scan revealed subdural hematoma combined with posterior mediastinal hematoma. The patient was saved and discharged with a satisfactory outcome. Here we hope to share our treatment experience in dealing with the patient with severe multiple trauma. PMID:27033275

  4. Efficiency Analysis of Direct Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Elderly Patients with Blunt Traumatic Hemothorax without an Initial Thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Lu, I-Yin; Yang, Chyan; Chou, Yi-Pin; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hemothorax is common in elderly patients following blunt chest trauma. Traditionally, tube thoracostomy is the first choice for managing this complication. The goal of this study was to determine the benefits of this approach in elderly patients with and without an initial tube thoracostomy. Seventy-eight patients aged >65 years with blunt chest trauma and stable vital signs were included. All of them had more than 300 mL of hemothorax, indicating that a tube thoracostomy was necessary. The basic demographic data and clinical outcomes of patients with hemothorax who underwent direct video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without a tube thoracostomy were compared with those who received an initial tube thoracostomy. Patients who did not receive a thoracostomy had lower posttrauma infection rates (28.6% versus 56.3%, P = 0.061) and a significantly shorter length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.13 versus 8.27, P = 0.029) and in the hospital (15.93 versus 23.17, P = 0.01) compared with those who received a thoracostomy. The clinical outcomes in the patients who received direct VATS were more favorable compared with those of the patients who did not receive direct VATS. PMID:27190987

  5. Role of the trauma-room chest x-ray film in assessing the patient with severe blunt traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Barry A.; Ali, Jameel; Towers, Mark J.; Sharkey, P. William

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To examine the accuracy of standard trauma-room chest x-ray films in assessing blunt abdominal trauma and to determine the significance of missed injuries under these circumstances. Design A retrospective review. Setting A regional trauma unit in a tertiary-care institution. Patients Multiply injured trauma patients admitted between January 1988 and December 1990 who died within 24 hours of injury and in whom an autopsy was done. Intervention Standard radiography of the chest. Main Outcome Measures Chest injuries diagnosed and recorded by the trauma room team from standard anteroposterior x-ray films compared with the findings at autopsy and with review of the films by a staff radiologist initially having no knowledge of the injuries and later, if injuries remained undetected, having knowledge of the autopsy findings. Results Thirty-seven patients met the study criteria, and their cases were reviewed. In 11 cases, significant injuries were noted at autopsy and not by the trauma-room team, and in 7 cases these injuries were also missed by the reviewing radiologist. Injuries missed by the team were: multiple rib fractures (11 cases), sternal fractures (3 cases), diaphragmatic tear (2 cases) and intimal aortic tear (1 case). In five cases, chest tubes were not inserted despite the presence (undiagnosed) of multiple rib fractures and need for intubation and positive-pressure ventilation. Conclusions Significant blunt abdominal trauma, potentially requiring operative management or chest-tube insertion, may be missed on the initial anteroposterior chest x-ray film. Caution must therefore be exercised in interpreting these films in the trauma resuscitation room. PMID:8599789

  6. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Pedicle Screw Fixation for Traumatic Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;05:CD009073].

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniela; Neves, Nuno; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel; Almeida Fonseca, João

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are common causes of spine surgery. Pedicle screw fixation is usually chosen, using monosegmentar, short or long segment instrumentations, with or without bone graft. This review aims to evaluate the effect of transpedicular fixation in traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. A systematic search on controlled, randomized or quasi-randomized trials comparing different methods of surgical treatment of this fractures was performed, followed by a process of article selection, data extraction and bias assessment by 3 independent authors. Eight articles were included in a total of 5 comparisons, between different transpedicular fixation techniques. No significant differences on function or quality of life, neurologic status or limitation of motion were found. Only instrumentation with fracture level screw incorporation showed significant decrease of pain when compared with instrumentation alone. Several techniques resulted in significant improvements of different radiological parameters. Significantly, surgeries with smaller duration were associated with lesser blood loss. Bone graft use caused a significant raise in post-operative complications, namely donor site pain. So, this paper showed that significative improvements in radiological parameters do not associate with correspondent clinical benefits, and only instrumentation with level screw incorporation is associated with a clear benefit on pain. Moreover, the need for bone graft is questioned, since it leads to no clinic-radiological improvement with a raise of complications. However, a small number of controlled studies is available on this topic. PMID:27649012

  7. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Pedicle Screw Fixation for Traumatic Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;05:CD009073].

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniela; Neves, Nuno; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel; Almeida Fonseca, João

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are common causes of spine surgery. Pedicle screw fixation is usually chosen, using monosegmentar, short or long segment instrumentations, with or without bone graft. This review aims to evaluate the effect of transpedicular fixation in traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. A systematic search on controlled, randomized or quasi-randomized trials comparing different methods of surgical treatment of this fractures was performed, followed by a process of article selection, data extraction and bias assessment by 3 independent authors. Eight articles were included in a total of 5 comparisons, between different transpedicular fixation techniques. No significant differences on function or quality of life, neurologic status or limitation of motion were found. Only instrumentation with fracture level screw incorporation showed significant decrease of pain when compared with instrumentation alone. Several techniques resulted in significant improvements of different radiological parameters. Significantly, surgeries with smaller duration were associated with lesser blood loss. Bone graft use caused a significant raise in post-operative complications, namely donor site pain. So, this paper showed that significative improvements in radiological parameters do not associate with correspondent clinical benefits, and only instrumentation with level screw incorporation is associated with a clear benefit on pain. Moreover, the need for bone graft is questioned, since it leads to no clinic-radiological improvement with a raise of complications. However, a small number of controlled studies is available on this topic.

  8. Blunted flow-mediated responses and diminished nitric oxide synthase expression in lymphatic thoracic ducts of a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zawieja, Scott D; Gasheva, Olga; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2016-02-01

    Shear-dependent inhibition of lymphatic thoracic duct (TD) contractility is principally mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Endothelial dysfunction and poor NO bioavailability are hallmarks of vasculature dysfunction in states of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). We tested the hypothesis that flow-dependent regulation of lymphatic contractility is impaired under conditions of MetSyn. We utilized a 7-wk high-fructose-fed male Sprague-Dawley rat model of MetSyn and determined the stretch- and flow-dependent contractile responses in an isobaric ex vivo TD preparation. TD diameters were tracked and contractile parameters were determined in response to different transmural pressures, imposed flow, exogenous NO stimulation by S-nitro-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) by l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging molecule 4-hydroxy-tempo (tempol). Expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in TD was determined using Western blot. Approximately 25% of the normal flow-mediated inhibition of contraction frequency was lost in TDs isolated from MetSyn rats despite a comparable SNAP response. Inhibition of NOS with l-NAME abolished the differences in the shear-dependent contraction frequency regulation between control and MetSyn TDs, whereas tempol did not restore the flow responses in MetSyn TDs. We found a significant reduction in eNOS expression in MetSyn TDs suggesting that diminished NO production is partially responsible for impaired flow response. Thus our data provide the first evidence that MetSyn conditions diminish eNOS expression in TD endothelium, thereby affecting the flow-mediated changes in TD lymphatic function.

  9. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  10. Late presentation of a shrapnel wound-induced traumatic intra-thoracic abdominal evisceration, as colon perforation with left faecopneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Popentiu, A I; Weber-Lauer, C; Nieman, C; Kauvar, D S; Sabau, D

    2010-01-01

    The diaphragmatic hernia is a well recognized and common complication of both the penetrating and blunt thoracoabdominal trauma.The clinical presentation is eather in the acute phase, or later, when it features the symptoms of obstructive complications. The aim of the study is to report a case of delayed presentation of a blast wound with diaphragmatic hernia, complicated by herniation and perforation of the left colonic angle in the pleural cavity. The report highlights the multiple complications following the initial event and the staged management of the case.

  11. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  12. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of an Acute Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta Complicated by a Distal Low-Flow Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bruninx, Guy; Wery, Didier; Dubois, Eric; El Nakadi, Badih; Dueren, Eric van; Verhelst, Guy; Delcour, Christian

    1999-11-15

    We report the case of a patient who suffered major trauma following a motorcycle accident that resulted in multiple fractures, bilateral hemopneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, and an isthmic rupture of the aorta with a pseudoaneurysm compressing the descending aorta. This compression was responsible for distal hypotension and low flow, leading to acute renal insufficiency and massive rhabdomyolysis. Due to the critical clinical status of the patient, which prevented any type of open thoracic surgery, endovascular treatment was performed. An initial stent-graft permitted alleviation of the compression and the re-establishment of normal hemodynamic conditions, but its low position did not allow sufficient coverage of the rupture. A second stent-graft permitted total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm while preserving the patency of the left subclavian artery.

  13. Through-and-through wire technique for endovascular damage control in traumatic proximal axillary artery transection.

    PubMed

    Rohlffs, Fiona; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel Antonio; Petersen, Jan Philipp; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Kölbel, Tilo

    2015-02-01

    Repair of blunt shoulder trauma with transection of the subclavian or proximal axillary artery poses a surgical challenge, especially in instable patients. Endovascular treatment for initial damage control in arterial transection has evolved as a promising technique to improve outcome, but technical success can be limited in cases of complete transection as the lesion cannot be passed by a guidewire. This report describes an endovascular approach using a through-and-through brachial-femoral wire to control complete traumatic transection of the proximal axillary artery in a hemodynamically unstable patient. Endovascular therapy is used as a bridging method for open surgical repair three days later under optimized conditions with an interdisciplinary team. The brachial-femoral guidewire technique helps to overcome limitations in endovascular therapy in patients with blunt traumatic transection of thoracic outlet arteries.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  15. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    PubMed

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  16. Acute Myocardial Infarction Following Blunt Chest Trauma and Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahimi, Safar Ali; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Heris, Saeed Oni; Maadani, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Blunt chest traumatic coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Injuries of the coronary artery after blunt chest trauma are caused by different mechanisms such as vascular spasm, dissection and intimal tear or rupture of an existing thrombus formation. Chest pain might be masked by other injuries in patients with multiple traumas in car accident. Present case report is on a 37-year-old male without any specific past medical history who reported to the emergency department of a hospital with chest discomfort and was discharged with the impression of chest wall pain. After three days he experienced severe chest pain and he was admitted with the impression of acute coronary syndrome and underwent coronary angiography which showed Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery dissection. The possibility of injury of the coronary artery should be kept in mind after blunt trauma to the chest. This condition is sometimes underdiagnosed. Its diagnosis may be difficult because chest pain can be interpreted as being secondary to chest wall contusion or it may be overshadowed by other injuries. Coronary dissection diagnosis after chest trauma requires clinical suspicion and systematic evaluation. Electrocardiography (ECG) should be done for every patient with thoracic trauma as the clinical findings may be misleading. PMID:27504338

  17. Contemporary management of blunt aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Dubose, J J; Azizzadeh, A; Estrera, A L; Safi, H J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a common cause of death following blunt mechanisms of trauma. Among patients who survive to reach hospital care, significant advances in diagnosis and treatment afford previously unattainable survival. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) guidelines provide current best-evidence suggestions for treatment of BTAI. However, several key areas of controversy regarding optimal BTAI care remain. These include the refinement of selection criteria, timing for treatment and the need for long-term follow-up data. In addition, the advent of the Aortic Trauma Foundation (ATF) represents an important development in collaborative research in this field.

  18. [Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst: 2 case reports].

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Mesut; Karapolat, Sami; Gezer, Suat; Sezen, Gülbin; Ateş, Hakan

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts (TPP) are cavitary lesions that are rarely seen after blunt thoracic traumas. Two male patients who were diagnosed with cystic lesions in the left lung after trauma were followed in our clinic with the diagnosis of TPP. Due to increase in cyst dimensions and wall tension, which were seen on the follow-up thorax tomography, surgical intervention was decided for both cases. The first case underwent cystotomy and capitonnage via thoracotomy, and was discharged without any complication. However, the second case was lost due to cardiac arrest during the operative preparations. Thorax tomography is an important method in the diagnosis and radiological follow-up of TPP. The surgery option should always be remembered for patients who show progression during the follow-up. PMID:23588916

  19. Thoracic radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ryan C; Andary, Michael T; Russo, Randolph B; DeLano, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of spinal pain syndromes. Degenerative disc disease and diabetes mellitus may frequently cause radiculopathy at the thoracic level. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the evaluation of radiculopathy and thoracic spinal pain syndromes. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a procedure that may be used in the treatment of thoracic spinal pain syndromes. Surgical intervention for thoracic radiculopathy usually is reserved for patients with progressive myelopathy and neurologic compromise.

  20. Vascular injuries after blunt chest trauma: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, James V; Byrne, Christopher; Scalea, Thomas M; Griffith, Bartley P; Neschis, David G

    2009-01-01

    Background Although relatively rare, blunt injury to thoracic great vessels is the second most common cause of trauma related death after head injury. Over the last twenty years, the paradigm for management of these devastating injuries has changed drastically. The goal of this review is to update the reader on current concepts of diagnosis and management of blunt thoracic vascular trauma. Methods A review of the medical literature was performed to obtain articles pertaining to both blunt injuries of the thoracic aorta and of the non-aortic great vessels in the chest. Articles were chosen based on authors' preference and clinical expertise. Discussion Blunt thoracic vascular injury remains highly lethal, with most victims dying prior to reaching a hospital. Those arriving in extremis require immediate intervention, which may include treatment of other associated life threatening injuries. More stable injuries can often be medically temporized in order to optimize definitive management. Endovascular techniques are being employed with increasing frequency and can often significantly simplify management in otherwise very complex patient scenarios. PMID:19751511

  1. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  2. MAIN CONTROVERSIES IN THE NONOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF BLUNT SPLENIC INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; COLLEONI-NETO, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : The nonoperative management of traumatic spleen injuries is the modality of choice in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. However, there are still questions about the treatment indication in some groups of patients, as well as its follow-up. Aim: Update knowledge about the spleen injury. Method : Was performed review of the literature on the nonoperative management of blunt injuries of the spleen in databases: Cochrane Library, Medline and SciELO. Were evaluated articles in English and Portuguese, between 1955 and 2014, using the headings "splenic injury, nonoperative management and blunt abdominal trauma". Results : Were selected 35 articles. Most of them were recommendation grade B and C. Conclusion : The spleen traumatic injuries are frequent and its nonoperative management is a worldwide trend. The available literature does not explain all aspects on treatment. The authors developed a systematization of care based on the best available scientific evidence to better treat this condition. PMID:27120744

  3. Blunt trauma of thorax with subclavian and axillary artery lesion--case report.

    PubMed

    Fudurić, Jurica; Erdeljac, Željko; Frketić, Ivan; Miletić, Matija; Zadro, Ana Soštarić; Bacić, Ivan; Rašić, Zarko; Zadro, Zvonko; Martinac, Miran; Missoni, Eduard

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case of blunt trauma of the axillary artery in a 20-year-old man who was injured as a motorcycle rider and received severe body injuries. Injuries included severe trauma of the left lower leg with contusion and extensive soft tissue and bone trauma of these regions with poor general condition and with the presence of clinical signs of traumatic shock. Upon arrival, we found that in addition to earlier clearly visible trauma to the leg, there was a hematoma of the medial side of the left supraclavicular region and the absence of the radial artery pulse with paralysis of the left arm. Given the clinical findings, emergency radiological examination was made to the patient (X-ray, US, CDFI, MSCT-angiography) and we found out that there was trauma of axillary artery with clear signs of thrombosis of extra thoracic part of subclavian artery due to its transition into the axillary artery. After hemodynamic stabilization, above knee amputation of the left leg was performed and emergency exploration of earlier mentioned arteries. Bypass of the damaged arteries with synthetic graft 6 mm in diameter was made. Control MSCT angiography showed normal flow in the arterial tree of the whole left hand and the MRI of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle did not found lesions of the brachial plexus. SSEP demonstrated the absence of pulses on the left hand. Patient on regular check-ups showed normal general condition, with adequate passable graft and pronounced paralysis on the left hand. In the process of rehabilitation physiotherapy was also included. Blunt trauma to the axillary artery is an extremely rare example of trauma of blood vessels which makes only 0.03% of all vascular injuries.

  4. Limitation of imaging in identifying iatrogenic aortic coarctation following thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Rajiv N; Thomaier, Lauren; Qazi, Umair; Verde, Franco; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2015-04-01

    A 21-year-old male suffered blunt trauma from a motor vehicle accident causing thoracic aorta tear. The smallest available stent graft was deployed. Definitive repair was later performed using a 22 × 22 × 116 mm Talent Thoracic Stent Graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. Seventeen months later, he presented with dizziness, chest pain, acute renal failure, malignant hypertension, and troponin elevation. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram did not reveal any dissection, stent stenosis or collapse. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronary arteries but a 117 mm Hg gradient across the stent graft. Iatrogenic coarctation of the aorta was confirmed with a second measurement during arch angiogram. A Palmaz stent was deployed over the distal end of the previous stent graft with complete resolution of symptoms and gradual normalization of kidney function. This case report demonstrates a need for wider availability and selecting appropriate stent graft in treating traumatic aortic injuries in young patients. It is the first case report of the inability of current imaging modalities in confirming stent collapse. Pressure gradient is a useful tool in confirming stent collapse when clinical scenario does not match CT findings.

  5. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions.

  6. Biomechanical implications of excessive endograft protrusion into the aortic arch after thoracic endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Rinaudo, Antonino; Raffa, Giuseppe Maria; Scardulla, Francesco; Pilato, Michele; Scardulla, Cesare; Pasta, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    Endografts placed in the aorta for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) may determine malappositioning to the lesser curvature of the aortic wall, thus resulting in a devastating complication known as endograft collapse. This premature device failure commonly occurs in young individuals after TEVAR for traumatic aortic injuries as a result of applications outside the physical conditions for which the endograft was designed. In this study, an experimentally-calibrated fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model was developed to assess the hemodynamic and stress/strain distributions acting on the excessive protrusion extension (PE) of endografts deployed in four young patients underwent TEVAR. Endograft infolding was experimentally measured for different hemodynamic scenarios by perfusion testing and then used to numerically calibrate the mechanical behavior of endograft PE. Results evinced that the extent of endograft can severely alter the hemodynamic and structural loads exerted on the endograft PE. Specifically, PE determined a physiological aortic coarctation into the aortic arch characterized by a helical flow in the distal descending aorta. High device displacement and transmural pressure across the stent-graft wall were found for a PE longer than 21 mm. Finally, marked intramural stress and principal strain distributions on the protruded segment of the endograft wall may suggest failure due to material fatigue. These critical parameters may contribute to the endograft collapse observed clinically and can be used to design new devices more suitable for young individuals to be treated with an endoprosthesis for TEVAR of blunt traumatic aortic injuries.

  7. Thoracic actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Slade, P. R.; Slesser, B. V.; Southgate, J.

    1973-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary infection with Actinomyces Israeli and one case of infection with Nocardia asteroides are described. The incidence of thoracic actinomycosis has declined recently and the classical presentation with chronic discharging sinuses is now uncommon. The cases described illustrate some of the forms which the disease may take. Actinomycotic infection has been noted, not infrequently, to co-exist with bronchial carcinoma and a case illustrating this association is described. Sputum cytology as practised for the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma has helped to identify the fungi in the sputum. Treatment is discussed, particularly the possible use of oral antibiotics rather than penicillin by injection. Images PMID:4568119

  8. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  9. Traumatic Gallbladder Rupture Treated by Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Noriyuki; Ueda, Junji; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Ide, Takao; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal injury is rare. There are few reports of traumatic gallbladder injury, and it is commonly associated with other concomitant visceral injuries. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose traumatic gallbladder rupture preoperatively when it is caused by blunt abdominal injury. We report a patient who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy after an exact preoperative diagnosis of traumatic gallbladder rupture. A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to blunt abdominal trauma. The day after admission, abdominal pain and ascites increased and a muscular defense sign appeared. Percutaneous drainage of the ascites was performed, and the aspirated fluid was bloody and almost pure bile. He was diagnosed with gallbladder rupture by the cholangiography using the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography technique. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed safely, and he promptly recovered. If accumulated fluids contain bile, endoscopic cholangiography is useful not only to diagnose gallbladder injury but also to determine the therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462188

  10. Case of the month: Right coronary artery dissection following sports-related blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Hobelmann, A; Pham, J C; Hsu, E B

    2006-07-01

    Coronary artery dissection is a rare life-threatening complication resulting from blunt traumatic injury. Most cases of coronary artery injury, including dissection, involve the left anterior descending artery given its anatomical location relative to the impact. Right coronary artery (RCA) dissection secondary to blunt trauma is a particularly unusual occurrence, and has not previously been reported in the emergency medicine literature. We present a case of RCA dissection following low impact sport-related blunt chest trauma and discuss the pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis and current treatment options.

  11. Management of Patients with Traumatic Rupture of the Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sang-Won; Byun, Jung Hun

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic rupture of the diaphragm is an unusual type of trauma. In addition, it is difficult to diagnose because it can be accompanied by injuries to other organs. If it is not detected early, the mortality rate can increase due to serious complications. Diaphragmatic rupture is an important indicator of the severity of the trauma. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the incidence of complications and mortality in patients who had surgery to treat traumatic rupture of the diaphragm. Materials and Methods The subjects were patients who had undergone a diaphragmatic rupture by blunt trauma or stab wounds except patients who were transferred to other hospitals within 3 days of hospitalization, from January 2000 to December 2007. This study was a retrospective study. 43 patients were hospitalized, and 40 patients were included during the study period. Among them, 28 were male, 12 were female, and the average age was 42 (from 18 to 80). Outcome predictive factors including hypoxia, ventilator application days, revised trauma score (RTS), injury severity score (ISS), age, herniated organs, complications, and the mortality rate were investigated. Results Causes of trauma included motor vehicle crashes for 20 patients (50%), falls for 10 (25%), stab wounds for 8 (20%), and agricultural machinery accidents for 2 (5%). Most of the patients (36 patients; 90%) had wound sites on the left. Diagnosis was performed within 12 hours for most patients. The diaphragmatic rupture was diagnosed preoperatively in 27 patients (70%) and in 12 patients (30%) during other surgeries. For surgical treatment, thoracotomy was performed in 14 patients (35%), laparotomy in 11 (27.5%), and a surgery combining thoracotomy and laparotomy in 15 patients (37.5%). Herniated organs in the thoracic cavity included the stomach for 23 patients (57.5%), the omentum for 15 patients (37.5%), the colon for 10 patients (25%), and the spleen for 6 patients (15

  12. [Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta].

    PubMed

    Glock, Y; Roux, D; Soula, P; Cerene, A; Fournial, G

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 50 postraumatic aortic rupture (1968-1996, 39 males, mean age: 34.5). Group A is composed of 35 patients with an acute aortic rupture and a prompt diagnosis. Group B includes 13 patients with a chronic rupture. All patients from group A had a severe politraumatism with abdominal, cranial, extremities or hip fractures. Mediastinal thickening with or without hemothorax indicated an angiography or a transesophageal echocardiography lately. In group A, 36 patients have been operated on urgently (12-24 hours); cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 20 patients; an aorto-aortical bypass was done in 27 cases and a direct suture in the remaining 9. In group B, cardiopulmonary bypass was performed on 9 patients; a aorto-aortical bypass was done in 11 cases and a direct suture in 2. Overall hospital mortality was 16%; 19% in group A and 7.6% in group B. Ischemic paraplejia appeared in 5 patients (10%), all from group A. No false aneurysm developed after 4.5 years of follow-up (3-135 months) in the 38 survivors. The usefulness of transesophageal echocardiography, the importance of medular protection and the utility of several interventionist radiologic techniques are discussed. PMID:9053930

  13. Thoracic amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, S M; Hashiguchi, Y

    2002-06-01

    Pleuropulmonary amebiasis is the common and pericardial amebiasis the rare form of thoracic amebiasis. Low socioeconomic conditions, malnutrition, chronic alcoholism, and ASD with left to right shunt are contributing factors to the development of pulmonary amebiasis. Although no age is exempt, it commonly occurs in patients aged 20 to 40 years, with an adult male to female ratio of 10:1. Children rarely develop thoracic amebiasis: when it does occur there is an equal sex distribution. The infection usually spreads to the lungs by extension of an amebic liver abscess. Infection may pass to the thorax directly from the primary intestinal lesion through hematogenous spread, however. Lymphatic spread is one possible route. Inhalation of dust containing cysts and aspiration of cysts or trophozoites of E histolytica in the lungs are some other hypothetical routes. The lung is the second most common extraintestinal site of amebic involvement after the liver. Usually the lower lobe, and sometimes the middle lobe of the right lung, are affected, but it may affect any lobe of the lungs. The patient develops fever and right upper quadrant pain that is referred to the tip of the right shoulder or in between the scapula. Hemophtysis is common. The diagnosis of thoracic amebiasis is suggested by the combination of an elevated hemidiaphragm (usually right), hepatomegaly, pleural effusion, and involvement of the right lung base in the form of haziness and obliteration of costophrenic and costodiaphragmatic angles. Infection is usually extended to the thorax by perforation of a hepatic abscess through the diaphragm and across an obliterated pleural space, producing pulmonary consolidation, abscesses, or broncho-hepatic fistula. Empyema develops when a liver abscess ruptures into the pleural space. Rarely, a posterior amebic liver abscess can burst into the inferior vena cava and develop an embolism of the inferior vena cava and thromboembolic disease of the lungs with congestive

  14. Thoracic amebiasis.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, S M; Hashiguchi, Y

    2002-06-01

    Pleuropulmonary amebiasis is the common and pericardial amebiasis the rare form of thoracic amebiasis. Low socioeconomic conditions, malnutrition, chronic alcoholism, and ASD with left to right shunt are contributing factors to the development of pulmonary amebiasis. Although no age is exempt, it commonly occurs in patients aged 20 to 40 years, with an adult male to female ratio of 10:1. Children rarely develop thoracic amebiasis: when it does occur there is an equal sex distribution. The infection usually spreads to the lungs by extension of an amebic liver abscess. Infection may pass to the thorax directly from the primary intestinal lesion through hematogenous spread, however. Lymphatic spread is one possible route. Inhalation of dust containing cysts and aspiration of cysts or trophozoites of E histolytica in the lungs are some other hypothetical routes. The lung is the second most common extraintestinal site of amebic involvement after the liver. Usually the lower lobe, and sometimes the middle lobe of the right lung, are affected, but it may affect any lobe of the lungs. The patient develops fever and right upper quadrant pain that is referred to the tip of the right shoulder or in between the scapula. Hemophtysis is common. The diagnosis of thoracic amebiasis is suggested by the combination of an elevated hemidiaphragm (usually right), hepatomegaly, pleural effusion, and involvement of the right lung base in the form of haziness and obliteration of costophrenic and costodiaphragmatic angles. Infection is usually extended to the thorax by perforation of a hepatic abscess through the diaphragm and across an obliterated pleural space, producing pulmonary consolidation, abscesses, or broncho-hepatic fistula. Empyema develops when a liver abscess ruptures into the pleural space. Rarely, a posterior amebic liver abscess can burst into the inferior vena cava and develop an embolism of the inferior vena cava and thromboembolic disease of the lungs with congestive

  15. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but its definition has been disputed. TOS is differentiated into five distinct disorders: arterial vascular, venous vascular, traumatic neurovascular, true neurologic (TN-TOS), and nonspecific TOS. TN-TOS is caused by compression of the lower plexus (T1>C8 roots and/or lower trunk) by a fibrous band. The most frequent presenting symptoms are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digital flexors. Numbness and sensory loss are usually present, mainly in the ulnar forearm, although severe pain or pain/paresthesia proximal to the elbow can occur; however, sensory symptoms or signs can be absent in some patients. Nerve conduction studies are pathognomonic and show the loss or severe attenuation of the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Additionally, they show a severely depressed median compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and, subsequently, a depressed ulnar CMAP and SNAP. TN-TOS is a rare disorder, although its incidence may be higher than previously believed. Hirayama disease is an important differential diagnosis. Nonspecific TOS, which is mainly diagnosed by provocative maneuvers, corresponds to the classical concept of TOS. However, this concept is now challenged and the existence of nonspecific TOS is doubted. PMID:25475030

  16. Epidemiology of blunt head trauma in children in U.S. emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Quayle, Kimberly S; Powell, Elizabeth C; Mahajan, Prashant; Hoyle, John D; Nadel, Frances M; Badawy, Mohamed K; Schunk, Jeff E; Stanley, Rachel M; Miskin, Michelle; Atabaki, Shireen M; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2014-11-13

    Among more than 43,000 children treated in 25 emergency departments for blunt head trauma, traumatic brain injury was identified on CT scan in 7% of the patients. Falls were the most frequent injury mechanism for children under the age of 12 years. PMID:25390756

  17. Pulmonary Vein Pseudoaneurysm Secondary to Blunt Trauma: A Novel Management Strategy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Mui Heng; Teo, Li Tserng; Pua, Uei

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic pulmonary vein pseudoaneurysm is an extremely rare condition that is challenging to manage. We present a unique case of a pulmonary vein pseudoaneurysm from blunt trauma in a patient with previous ipsilateral decortication. The patient was treated with percutaneous transparenchymal access to the pulmonary vein pseudoaneurysm.

  18. Marijuana May Blunt Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161575.html Marijuana May Blunt Bone Health Study finds heavy users ... 19, 2016 WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana may be bad to the bone, a new ...

  19. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Its Intense Demands New Website from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Puts the Power of Information ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. All rights reserved. Expanded Proprietary ...

  20. Repair of an acute blunt popliteal artery trauma via endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Sciarretta, Jason D; Salsamendi, Jason; Karmacharya, Jagajan; Romano, Andrea; Namias, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Popliteal vascular trauma remains a challenging entity and carries the greatest risk of limb loss among the lower extremity vascular injuries. Operative management of patients presenting with traumatic popliteal vascular injuries continues to evolve. We present a case of successful endovascular repair with stent grafting of an acute blunt popliteal artery injury. Endovascular repair of traumatic popliteal vascular injuries appears as an attractive alternative to surgical repair in a very selective group of patients. Further investigation is still needed to define the safety and feasibility of endovascular approach in the management of traumatic popliteal vascular injuries.

  1. Initial experience in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysmal disease with a thoracic aortic endograft at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Apple, Jeffrey; McQuade, Karen L.; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Shutze, William P.

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent endovascular repair of thoracic aneurysms and of other thoracic aortic pathology with the thoracic aortic endograft (Gore Medical, Flagstaff, AZ) from June 2005 to July 2007 was performed. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months (range, 2–25 months). Indications for thoracic endografting included descending thoracic aneurysms (n = 18), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (n = 3), traumatic aortic injuries (n = 3), penetrating aortic ulcers (n = 2), and contained rupture of a type B dissection (n = 1). One patient died during the procedure, for an overall mortality rate of 3.7%. The average length of stay was 8.1 days, with an average stay in the intensive care unit of 4.2 days. If patients with traumatic aortic injuries were excluded, the average overall and intensive care unit length of stay were 5.6 and 1.8 days, respectively. There was one incident of spinal cord ischemia (3.7%). There were five type I or type III endoleaks, three of which required revision (11.1%). In conclusion, thoracic endografting is a safe and viable option for the repair of descending thoracic aneurysms and other aortic pathologies. We have found it to be less invasive, even in conjunction with preoperative debranching procedures, with a shorter recovery time, decreased perioperative morbidity and blood loss, and decreased peri-operative mortality compared with standard open repair. PMID:18382748

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic and non-traumatic brachial plexopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yiru Lorna; Othman, Mohamad Isham Bin; Dubey, Niraj; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset brachial plexopathy can be classified into traumatic and non-traumatic aetiologies. Traumatic brachial plexopathies can affect the pre- or postganglionic segments of the plexus. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies may be due to neoplasia, radiotherapy, thoracic outlet syndrome and idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to localise the area of injury or disease, and identify the likely cause. This review discusses some of the common causes of adult-onset brachial plexopathy and their imaging features on MRI. We also present a series of cases to illustrate some of these causes and their MRI findings. PMID:27779278

  3. Oxygen Saturation in Closed-Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chongde; Wen, Xin; Gao, Qianying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels in patients after closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Design. Retrospective observational case series. Methods. Retinal oximetry was performed in both eyes of 29 patients with unilateral closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation (SO2), arteriolar diameter, venular diameter, and arteriovenous difference in diameter were measured. Association parameters including age, finger pulse oximetry, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and heart rate were analyzed. Results. The mean SaO2 in traumatic eyes (98.1% ± 6.8%) was not significantly different from SaO2 in unaffected ones (95.3% ± 7.2%) (p = 0.136). Mean SvO2 in traumatic eyes (57.1% ± 10.6%) was significantly lower than in unaffected ones (62.3% ± 8.4%) (p = 0.044). The arteriovenous difference in SO2 in traumatic eyes (41.0% ± 11.2%) was significantly larger than in unaffected ones (33.0% ± 6.9%) (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed between traumatic eyes and unaffected ones in arteriolar (p = 0.249) and venular diameter (p = 0.972) as well as arteriovenous difference in diameter (p = 0.275). Conclusions. Oxygen consumption is increased in eyes after cgBOT, associated with lower SvO2 and enlarged arteriovenous difference in SO2 but not with changes in diameter of retinal vessels. PMID:27699174

  4. Oxygen Saturation in Closed-Globe Blunt Ocular Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chongde; Wen, Xin; Gao, Qianying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels in patients after closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Design. Retrospective observational case series. Methods. Retinal oximetry was performed in both eyes of 29 patients with unilateral closed-globe blunt ocular trauma. Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), arteriovenous difference in oxygen saturation (SO2), arteriolar diameter, venular diameter, and arteriovenous difference in diameter were measured. Association parameters including age, finger pulse oximetry, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and heart rate were analyzed. Results. The mean SaO2 in traumatic eyes (98.1% ± 6.8%) was not significantly different from SaO2 in unaffected ones (95.3% ± 7.2%) (p = 0.136). Mean SvO2 in traumatic eyes (57.1% ± 10.6%) was significantly lower than in unaffected ones (62.3% ± 8.4%) (p = 0.044). The arteriovenous difference in SO2 in traumatic eyes (41.0% ± 11.2%) was significantly larger than in unaffected ones (33.0% ± 6.9%) (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed between traumatic eyes and unaffected ones in arteriolar (p = 0.249) and venular diameter (p = 0.972) as well as arteriovenous difference in diameter (p = 0.275). Conclusions. Oxygen consumption is increased in eyes after cgBOT, associated with lower SvO2 and enlarged arteriovenous difference in SO2 but not with changes in diameter of retinal vessels.

  5. Right pulmonary hilar pedicle injury secondary to blunt chest trauma in a child.

    PubMed

    Muthialu, Nagarajan; Hoskote, Aparna; Deshpande, Ranjit; Lister, Paula

    2013-04-01

    Combined tracheobronchial and thoracic vascular injury in children following blunt trauma to the chest is potentially life-threatening and almost certain to be fatal unless managed promptly. We report one such incident where prompt identification and early aggressive surgical management prevented an almost certain fatal outcome in a 5-year-old girl with complete disruption of the right main bronchus just distal to the carina, and a tear in the right pulmonary artery.

  6. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. PMID:25808686

  7. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment.

  8. A rare case of traumatic posterior phacocele with retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Sindal, Manavi D; Mourya, Deepesh

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation of crystalline lens into the anterior subconjunctival or subtenon's space is a rare but known complication of blunt trauma. Dislocation into the posterior subtenon's space is even rarer and can be associated with a complication such as occult scleral tear and retinal detachment. We report a case of traumatic posterior subtenon's dislocation of crystalline lens after blunt trauma and its successful surgical management. PMID:26953031

  9. Traumatic asphyxial deaths due to an uncontrolled crowd.

    PubMed

    Gill, James R; Landi, Kristen

    2004-12-01

    Nine people died of traumatic asphyxia due to an uncontrolled crowd at a community basketball game in New York City in 1991. We reviewed the circumstances, postmortem findings, and the causes of death. The majority of people had petechiae of the conjunctivae and face consistent with chest compression. There were minimal superficial blunt injuries and no fractures or acute intoxications. These deaths are often incorrectly attributed to blunt force injuries, while the cause typically is asphyxia due to chest compression.

  10. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    PubMed

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  11. Post-traumatic (haemorrhagic)liver cyst.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunal Krishna; Nizarudeen, A; Sulfikar, M S; Maheshwaran, A; George, Deepak

    2013-06-01

    Traumatic cysts of liver are amongst the less frequently known sequelae of liver trauma. The incidence of this entity is very low. We report a case of large posttraumatic liver cyst in a young adult female, who sustained blunt abdominal trauma 2 months back. The cyst was diagnosed by CECT Abdomen and was treated by hepatic resection(left lobe). The aim of presentation of this report is to highlight the fact that blunt trauma abdomen can result in such rare presentations which can lead to hepatic resection.

  12. Minimal aortic injury of the thoracic aorta: imaging appearances and outcome.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Martin L D; Lehnert, Bruce E; Lungren, Rachel S; Narparla, Chitti Babu; Mitsumori, Lee; Gross, Joel A; Starnes, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the frequency, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) imaging appearance, management, and outcome of patients who present with minimal thoracic aortic injury. This retrospective study was Institutional Review Board-approved. Eighty-one patients with blunt traumatic aortic injuries (BTAI) were identified between 2004 and 2008, comprising 23 patients with minimal aortic injury (MAI) (mean age, 43.2 years ±18.2 years; 12 males and 11 females) and 58 patients with non-minimal aortic injury (mean age, 42.6 years ±22.7 years). CTA imaging was reviewed for each patient to differentiate those with MAI from those with non-MAI BTAI. Inclusion criteria for MAI on CTA were: post-traumatic abnormality of the internal contour of the aorta wall projecting into the lumen, intimal flap, intraluminal filling defect, intramural hematoma, and no evidence of an abnormality to the external contour of the aorta. Relevant follow-up imaging for MAI patients was also reviewed for resolution, stability, or progression of the vascular injury. The electronic medical record of each patient was reviewed and mechanism of injury, injury severity score, associated injuries, type and date of management, outcome, and days from injury to last medical consultation. Minimal aortic injury represented 28.4 % of all BTAI over the study period. Mean injury severity score (37.1), age (43.2 years), and gender did not differ significantly between MAI and non-MAI types of BTAI. Most MAI occurred in the descending thoracic aorta (16/23, 69 %). Without operative or endovascular repair, there was no death or complication due to MAI. One death occurred secondary to MAI (4.4 %) in a patient who underwent endovascular repair and surgical bypass, compared with an overall mortality rate of 8.6 % in the non-MAI BTAI group (p = 0.508). The most common CT appearance of MAI was a rounded or triangular intra-luminal aortic filling detect (18/23 patients, 78 %). In a mean of 466 days of

  13. Acquired post-traumatic aortic coarctation presenting as new-onset congestive heart failure: treatment with endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Norris B; Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Ballard, David H; Rao, Vyas R; Samra, Navdeep S

    2015-01-01

    Acquired coarctation of the thoracic aorta is a rare phenomenon in adults. The etiology is often idiopathic, but severe stenosis can develop from prior surgery, blunt thoracic aortic injuries, or severe atherosclerotic/atheroembolic disease. Common symptomatic presentations include refractory upper extremity hypertension and new-onset congestive heart failure. We present the case of a 52-year-old man who developed acquired thoracic aortic coarctation 30 years after a blunt trauma and deceleration injuries to the aorta requiring open surgical aortic repair. He presented with poorly controlled hypertension and new-onset heart failure and was treated surgically with endovascular repair.

  14. Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singman, Eric L; Daphalapurkar, Nitin; White, Helen; Nguyen, Thao D; Panghat, Lijo; Chang, Jessica; McCulley, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (ITON) refers to optic nerve injury resulting from impact remote to the optic nerve. The mechanism of injury is not understood, and there are no confirmed protocols for prevention, mitigation or treatment. Most data concerning this condition comes from case series of civilian patients suffering blunt injury, such as from sports- or motor vehicle-related concussion, rather than military-related ballistic or blast damage. Research in this field will likely require the development of robust databases to identify patients with ITON and follow related outcomes, in addition to both in-vivo animal and virtual human models to study the mechanisms of damage and potential therapies. PMID:26759722

  15. Left main dissection complicating blunt chest trauma: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Federico; Zuffi, Andrea; Lupi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery injury after blunt chest trauma is rare, but can be life-threatening, resulting in severe myocardial ischaemia and acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented a few days after a blunt chest trauma with crescendo unstable angina. Coronary angiography demonstrated left main coronary artery dissection that was fixed with stent implantation. After a blunt chest trauma symptoms and electrocardiographic findings of a coronary dissection can be nonspecific and confounded by the chest tenderness. In such cases careful evaluation to rule out traumatic coronary injuries is warranted and early intervention should not be delayed in the presence of clear evidence of myocardial ischemia.

  16. A case of ventricular septal defect and mitral insufficiency after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Ayumu; Kimura, Naritaka; Katogi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Takaaki

    2014-09-01

    Few reports have described traumatic heart injury in children. We describe a case of acute mitral regurgitation associated with papillary muscle rupture, traumatic ventricular septal defect, and impending left ventricular free wall rupture due to blunt trauma in a 2-year-old girl. The papillary muscle was sutured to the left ventricular free wall. The septal defect and surrounding ruptured muscle were covered with a pericardial patch, and a Hemashield patch was used to close the ventriculotomy. A residual defect caused by dehiscence of the pericardial patch necessitated reoperation 10 months later. The patient is currently being observed on an outpatient basis. PMID:24887820

  17. Air reduction of intussusception after abdominal blunt trauma and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, So Ra; Ha, Sang Ook; Oh, Young Taeck; Sohn, You Dong

    2016-01-01

    The typical presentation of intussusception includes intermittent severe abdominal pain, vomiting, rectal bleeding, and the presence of an abdominal mass. We present a case of intussusception after abdominal blunt trauma along with a literature review. A 4-year-old girl was admitted to the emergency department after a bicycle accident. She complained of progressively worsening abdominal pain, but there was no vomiting, fever, bloody stool, or abdominal mass. She was finally diagnosed with traumatic intussusception by ultrasonography and treated with air reduction. Because the typical symptoms are unusual in traumatic intussusception, close attention must be paid to avoid a delayed diagnosis. PMID:27752618

  18. Fatal case of cervical blunt vascular injury with cervical vertebral fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Okura, Toshiaki; Yoshihara, Hisatake; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Ukai, Junichi; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Muramoto, Akio; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) is usually caused by neck trauma that predominantly occurs in high-impact injuries. BCVI may occur due to damage to both the vertebral and carotid arteries, and may be fatal in the absence of appropriate treatment and early diagnosis. Here, we describe a case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery by a direct blunt external force in a 52-year-old man. Initially, there was no effect on consciousness, but 6 hours later loss of consciousness occurred due to traumatic dissection of the carotid artery that resulted in a cerebral infarction. Brain edema was so extensive that decompression by emergency craniectomy and internal decompression were performed by a neurosurgeon, but with no effect, and the patient died on day 7. This is a rare case of cerebral infarction caused by a combination of a lower cervical spinal fracture and traumatic injury to the carotid artery. The case suggests that cervical vascular injury should be considered in a patient with a blunt neck trauma and that additional imaging should be performed. PMID:26412898

  19. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  20. Thoracic intrathymic thyroid.

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, R J; Moore, K L; Gottfried, M R; Lowe, J E; Sabiston, D C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors introduce thoracic intrathymic thyroid as a clinical entity. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although accessory aberrant thyroid has not been found in other tissues in the mediastinum, a thoracic intrathymic location has not been described previously. It is believed that mediastinal thyroid tissue represents accessory ectopic tissue from the median thyroid anlage. Moreover, the close association of the thymus and thyroid supports the theory that mediastinal ectopic thyroid tissue develops from abnormal descent of these structures during embryogenesis. METHODS: Benign thoracic intrathymic thyroid lesions are described in patients with mediastinal masses. CONCLUSION: Thoracic intrathymic thyroid is a distinct entity. Its occurrence is supported both clinically and embryologically. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8024364

  1. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) causes pain in the shoulder, arm, and neck. It happens when the nerves or blood vessels just below your ... vein is compressed, your hand might be sensitive to cold, or turn pale or bluish. Your arm ...

  2. Traumatic hyphema and iridocyclitis in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gelatt, K N

    1975-07-01

    Traumatic iridocyclitis and hyphema in the horse usually follow blunt blows to the orbit and eye. The condition is characterized by miosis, ocular hypotony, ciliary flush, swelling of the iris, and hemorrhage with excessive fibrin in the anterior chamber which permits from 2 to 6 weeks. Vigorous treatment with mydriatics, topical and systemic corticosteroids is recommended. Possible complications include anterior and posterior synechiae, cataracts, and fibropupillary membranes. PMID:124815

  3. [Blunt chest trauma with total rupture of the right main stem bronchus--a case report].

    PubMed

    Moerer, O; Heuer, J; Benken, I; Roessler, M; Klockgether-Radke, A

    2004-01-01

    Tracheo-bronchial lesions in blunt chest trauma are rare--the incidence is about 1%--but potentially life-threatening events. Indirect signs such as pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema or an insufficient expansion of the lungs after drainage of a pneumothorax are ominous. The fastest and most reliable method to assess the definite diagnosis of tracheo-bronchial lesion is fibre-optic tracheobronchoscopy. Early surgical treatment is mandatory to prevent major pulmonary resection. This case shows that computer tomography might fail to provide the right diagnosis. Independent lung ventilation is an option to protect the bronchial anastomosis during the early postoperative period. Reported here is the case of a young man who sustained a total traumatic rupture of the right main stem bronchus after being thrown from the passenger seat through the windshield of a motor vehicle. When the emergency doctor arrived on the scene, he found the patient with dyspnoea and massive thoracic subcutaneous emphysema. Reduced breath sounds on the left and no breath sounds on the right side led to an immediate placement of two chest tubes and controlled mechanical ventilation. After primary care in a district hospital, the patient was transferred to our university hospital for further treatment of his head injury. On admission, the patient was making breath sounds on both sides and a CT scan showed no clear sign of a tracheo-bronchial lesion. After neurosurgical intervention, the diagnosis of a rupture of the right main stem bronchus was made with delay by fibre-optic bronchoscopy. The patient was intubated with a left-sided double lumen endotracheal tube followed by surgical end-to-end anastomosis of the lesion. The initial postoperative ventilator support consisted of BIPAP-mode ventilation of the left lung, while the right lung was kept open with positive airway pressure. Forty-eight hours later, synchronised independent lung ventilation with two ventilators was

  4. Sarns centrifugal pump for repair of thoracic aortic injury: case reports.

    PubMed

    Walls, J T; Curtis, J J; Boley, T

    1989-09-01

    A new centrifugal pump (Sarns), originally designed for ventricular assist, was successfully used in two patients during repair of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. The distal thoracic aorta was perfused without heparinization to avoid spinal cord and visceral ischemia, reduce afterload on the heart, and avoid clamp injury to the aorta. Distal mean aortic pressure was maintained above 50 mm Hg with a mean pump flow of 1.75 liter/minute. Proposed structural advantages of the Sarns centrifugal pump for perfusion of the distal thoracic aorta without heparin are resistance to thrombus formation, air embolus, and hemolysis.

  5. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José Maria

    2005-01-01

    The thoracic outlet syndrome is a polymorphic clinical entity, whose nature is essentially anatomic, caused by the chronic compression of the neurovascular structures that are originated in the chest or neck and course to the upper extremity. According to the most affected structure, they can be classified as neurologic, arterial or venous syndromes, that may cause discomfort, pain and disability, sometimes definite and irreparable. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to recognize in clinical practice and it is important to emphasize some peculiar symptoms or signs that each syndrome may present, through specific maneuvers or adequate complementary studies. The great majority of patients may improve with physical therapy or postural correction, and a minority is indicated for surgical therapy. The main features of the diverse thoracic outlet syndromes, their clinical presentation, diagnosis, conventional and surgical management, surgical access, complications and prognosis are described and discussed in this paper dedicated to a complete review of the entity. PMID:16234911

  6. Management of blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Letoublon, C; Amariutei, A; Taton, N; Lacaze, L; Abba, J; Risse, O; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    For the last 20 years, nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt hepatic trauma (BHT) has been the initial policy whenever this is possible (80% of cases), i.e., in all cases where the hemodynamic status does not demand emergency laparotomy. NOM relies upon the coexistence of three highly effective treatment modalities: radiology with contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and hepatic arterial embolization, intensive care surveillance, and finally delayed surgery (DS). DS is not a failure of NOM management but rather an integral part of the surgical strategy. When imposed by hemodynamic instability, the immediate surgical option has seen its effectiveness transformed by development of the concept of abbreviated (damage control) laparotomy and wide application of the method of perihepatic packing (PHP). The effectiveness of these two conservative and cautious strategies for initial management is evidenced by current experience, but the management of secondary events that may arise with the most severe grades of injury must be both rapid and effective. PMID:27519150

  7. Traumatic supraglottitis.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Ellen S

    2004-06-01

    Traumatic supraglottitis may occur after mechanical, thermal, chemical, or other airway injury. It can be managed following the principles used for managing the airways of patients with infectious supraglottitis. A protocol for evaluation and management is described.

  8. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  9. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  10. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  11. Pediatric isolated thoracic and/or lumbar transverse and spinous process fractures.

    PubMed

    Akinpelu, Babatunde J; Zuckerman, Scott L; Gannon, Stephen R; Westrick, Ashly; Shannon, Chevis; Naftel, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Isolated transverse and spinous process fractures (TPFx and SPFx) in the thoracic and/or lumbar region have been deemed clinically insignificant in the adult population. This same rule is often applied to the pediatric population; however, little evidence exists in this younger group. The goal of this study was to describe the clinical, radiographic, and long-term data on isolated TPFx and SPFx in an exclusively pediatric population. METHODS A retrospective chart review at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University identified 82 pediatric patients with isolated TPFx and/or SPFx following a traumatic event between January 2000 and December 2013. Patient demographic information, presenting symptoms, radiographic characteristics, and follow-up data were collected. Follow-up was used to determine the outcome (presence of neurological deficits) of such injuries via complete physical examination and, when available, radiographic evidence. RESULTS In the 82 identified patients, the mean age was 15.5 ± 3.1 years (mean is expressed ± SD throughout), with 72 injuries (87.8%) resulting from a motor vehicle, motorcycle, or all-terrain vehicle accident. There was a mean of 1.7 ± 1.0 fractured vertebral levels involved and a mean of 1.8 ± 1.1 fractures was identified per patient. Seventy-one patients (86.6%) needed bedside pain control, 7 (8.5%) were prescribed a brace, and 4 patients (4.9%) received a collar. Physical therapy was recommended for 12 patients (14.6%). A total of 84.1% had follow-up, and the mean length of follow-up was 19 ± 37 months. No patients had true neurological deficits at presentation or follow-up as a result of their isolated fractures, whereas 95.1% had other associated system injuries. CONCLUSIONS These data shows that there is no appreciable long-term complication associated with isolated thoracic and/or lumbar TPFx and/or SPFx in an exclusively pediatric population. Because these fractures are, however, associated

  12. Thoracic outlet syndrome: anatomy.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Erdoğan

    2004-02-01

    The thoracic outlet region contains three important structures: the brachial plexus, the subclavian artery, and the subclavian vein. As they travel from the upper mediastinum to the upper extremity, these structures run through three important spaces: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space, and the subpectoral space. Compression can occur in any of these three spaces because of structural anomalies or trauma.

  13. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrom, Daniel H.; Rahman, Aleef; Tschabrunn, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis) and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma. PMID:26981308

  14. Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159438.html Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits But, that's no excuse for seniors to ... News) -- Aging may dampen some beneficial effects of exercise, a new study suggests. But, that's no reason ...

  15. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery: two cases.

    PubMed

    Weller, C B; Reeder, C

    2001-05-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the superficial temporal artery are a rare and potentially critical cause of facial masses. Most pseudoaneurysms form as a result of blunt trauma and present as painless, pulsatile tumors that may be associated with neuropathic findings and enlarged size. Without careful evaluation in the primary care setting, pseudoaneurysms can be easily misdiagnosed and improperly managed. They can, however, be accurately diagnosed through physical examination alone and subsequently treated with surgical ligation. The authors present two cases of traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the superficial temporal artery caused by blunt injury and discuss pertinent diagnosis and treatment options, as well as provide a brief review of the anatomy and histopathology of pseudoaneurysms.

  16. Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hussein, Bassem; Khammas, Ali; Kaiyasah, Hadiel; Swaleh, Abeer; Al Rifai, Nazim; Al-Mazrouei, Alya; Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (TDR) occurs in 0–5% of patients with major blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, in most of them on the left side, and an early correct diagnosis is made in less than half of the cases (Meyers and McCabe, 1993; Ball et al., 1982). Presentation of the case We report a case of a forty-eight years old man who had a pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture after a high-velocity blunt abdominal trauma that was diagnosed and treated successfully. Discussion Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture (PDR) is an uncommon problem that poses a diagnostic challenge to surgeons. The incidence of PDR is between 0.2% and 3.3% of cases with TDR (Sharma, 1999 [3]). Conclusion PDR should be suspected in any patient with high velocity thoraco-abdominal trauma. Early diagnosis is essential and needs a high index of suspicion. Early Management is important in decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26773877

  17. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  18. Mediastinal thoracic duct cyst.

    PubMed Central

    Gowar, F J

    1978-01-01

    A case of mediastinal thoracic duct cyst is described; it is believed to be the first to be reported in Britain. Five surgically treated cases have been reported but in none was the diagnosis made before operation. Symptoms are caused by pressure of the cyst on the trachea and oesophagus and my be aggravted by eating a fatty meal. Differential diagnosis from other mediastinal tumours, especially bronchogenic cyst and neurofibroma, could perhaps be established before operation by lymphangiography. Images PMID:746509

  19. Traumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S R; Bhagwat, R A; Shahane, A G; Cheema, B S

    1990-09-01

    Five cases of traumatic heart disease (THD) who sustained blunt chest injury in road accidents are reported. In addition to fracture of the ribs (observed in all the cases), there was fracture of the sternum and rupture of the liver and spleen in one case each. Two patients had flail chest. One presented with recurrent ventricular tachycardia lasting for 72 hours followed by changes suggestive of subendocardial infarction. The second case also had changes like subendocardial infarction and it was preceded by junctional tachycardia with aberrant conduction during the first 48 hours. Ventricular premature beats (VPB) were the only abnormality noted in one case and the remaining two had ST-T wave changes suggestive of inferolateral ischaemia without any arrhythmias. The patient with VPB developed pericardial rub without effusion. There was one death and postmortem revealed ruptured liver and spleen in addition to laceration of the right ventricle and haemopericardium. The electrocardiographic changes persisted for two to eight weeks. All four cases were symptom-free at 12 weeks and treadmill exercise test done after 12 to 18 weeks was normal. PMID:2266073

  20. Abdominal wall hernia and aortic injury secondary to blunt trauma: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, David H.; Kaskas, Nadine M.; Hamidian Jahromi, Alireza; Skweres, Justin; Youssef, Asser M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) and traumatic abdominal aortic injury (TAAI) are two uncommon complications secondary to blunt trauma. In both TAWH and TAAI, reported cases are often associated with poly-trauma. TAWH may be initially missed if more pressing issues are identified during the patient's primary survey. TAAI may be an incidental finding on imaging or, if severe, a cause of an acute abdomen and hemodynamic abnormality. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 54-year-old white male suffered a TAWH and TAAI (pseudoaneurysm) due to severe blunt trauma. TAWH was apparent on physical exam and the TAAI was suspected on computed tomography (CT). The patient's TAWH was managed with a series of abdominal explorations and the TAAI was repaired with endovascular stenting. DISCUSSION TAWH and TAAI are commonly due to severe blunt trauma from motor vehicle collisions. Diagnosis is made through physical exam, imaging studies, or surgical exploration. A variety of surgical techniques achieve technical success. CONCLUSION The patient with blunt trauma to the abdomen is at risk for TAWH and TAAI, which are often associated with other injuries. Investigations should include thorough clinical exam through secondary survey and radiologic imaging in the hemodynamically normal patient. PMID:25437685

  1. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery.

  2. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases. PMID:17978739

  3. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism.

  4. The Complexity of Biomechanics Causing Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration) is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs, which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs, which isolate a single injury mechanism. PMID:26539158

  5. [Paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Arnal, D; Garutti, I; Olmedilla, L

    2004-10-01

    Managing postoperative pain from thoracotomy is one of the greatest challenges anesthesiologists face in daily practice. Proper management is assumed to improve the patient's prognosis. The thoracic paravertebral block, following its rediscovery, is being used with increasing frequency and success for both surgery and recovery from thoracotomy, challenging the supremacy of thoracic epidural analgesia, which to date has been considered the gold standard. We describe the history, anatomy, techniques and complications of the thoracic paravertebral block and review published randomized controlled trials comparing the thoracic paravertebral block to placebo and to epidural analgesia. In view of published evidence, it seems that the thoracic paravertebral block may replace the thoracic epidural technique as the gold standard for providing analgesia for patients undergoing thoracotomy.

  6. Nonmalignant Adult Thoracic Lymphatic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Maxim; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-09-01

    The thoracic lymphatic disorders are a heterogeneous group of uncommon conditions that are associated with thoracic masses, interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and chylous complications. Accurate diagnosis of the thoracic lymphatic disorders has important implications for the newest approaches to management, including embolization and treatment with antilymphangiogenic drugs. New imaging techniques to characterize lymphatic flow, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiogram, are redefining approaches to disease classification and therapy. PMID:27514588

  7. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  8. Pathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Finnie, John W

    2014-12-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently encountered in veterinary practice in companion animals, livestock and horses, inflicted head injury is a common method of euthanasia in domestic livestock, and malicious head trauma can lead to forensic investigation, the pathology of TBI has generally received little attention in the veterinary literature. This review highlights the pathology and pathogenesis of cerebral lesions produced by blunt, non-missile and penetrating, missile head injuries as an aid to the more accurate diagnosis of neurotrauma cases. If more cases of TBI in animals that result in fatality or euthanasia are subjected to rigorous neuropathological examination, this will lead to a better understanding of the nature and development of brain lesions in these species, rather than extrapolating data from human studies. PMID:25178417

  9. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VI

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C.

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  10. Blunt aortic trauma in a patient with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Yung, Marco Yat Hang; Murray, Jennifer; Thompson, Errington C

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VI (ocular scoliotic) who was kicked in the abdomen presented to the emergency room (ER) with abdominal pain. He was found to have a blunt traumatic aortic injury. The patient was treated nonoperatively. He was stable and discharged home on the eighth day. The patient returned to the ER several days later hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient was taken immediately to the operating room, but vascular repair was not possible. The patient expired. We discuss the challenges of taking care of a patient with EDS and offer suggestions that might improve future patient's outcome. PMID:26956239

  11. Characterization of indeterminate spleen lesions in primary CT after blunt abdominal trauma: potential role of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordic, Sonja; Alkadhi, Hatem; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Wanner, Guido; Cadosch, Dieter

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of indeterminate spleen lesions in primary computed tomography (CT) of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Twenty-five consecutive patients (8 female, 17 male, mean age 51.6 ± 22.4 years) with an indeterminate spleen lesion diagnosed at CT after blunt abdominal trauma underwent MRI with T2- and T1-weighted images pre- and post-contrast material administration. MRI studies were reviewed by two radiologists. Age, gender, injury mechanism, injury severity score (ISS), management of patients, time interval between CT and MRI, and length of hospital stay were included into the analysis. Patient history, clinical history, imaging, and 2-month clinical outcome including review of medical records and telephone interviews served as reference standard. From the 25 indeterminate spleen lesions in CT, 11 (44 %) were traumatic; nine (36 %) were non-traumatic (pseudocysts, n=5; hemangioma, n=4) and five proven to represent artifacts in CT. The ISS (P<0.001) and the length of hospital stay (P=0.03) were significantly higher in patients with spleen lesions as compared with those without. All other parameters were similar among groups (all, P>0.05). The MRI features ill-defined lesion borders, variable signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images depending on the age of the hematoma, focal contrast enhancement indicating traumatic pseudoaneurysm, perilesional contrast enhancement, and edema were most indicative for traumatic spleen lesions. As compared with CT (2/25), MRI (5/25) better depicted thin subcapsular hematomas as indicator of traumatic spleen injury. In conclusion, MRI shows value for characterizing indeterminate spleen lesions in primary CT after blunt abdominal trauma.

  12. Shock tunnel measurements of hypervelocity blunted cone drag

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, L.M.; Paull, A.; Mee, D.J.; Simmons, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    Presented here are results obtained from an investigation into the effects of nose bluntness on slender cone drag in the hypervelocity flight regime. The results indicate that, for small cone angles, the drag of a blunt cone is reasonably well predicted by the Newtonian sine-square law modified for blunt bodies. This suggests the absence of any real gas effects on the total drag. The effect of nose bluntness at the smaller bluntness ratios is relatively small. This is encouraging for the design of a hypervelocity space plane or a centerbody for an axisymmetric scramjet where a slightly blunted nose is required to reduce stagnation point heating. 7 refs.

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  14. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  15. Traumatic lumbar hernia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Torer, Nurkan; Yildirim, Sedat; Tarim, Akin; Colakoglu, Tamer; Moray, Gokhan

    2008-12-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernias are very rare. Here, we present a case of secondary lumbar hernia. A 44-year-old man sustained a crushing injury. On admission, ecchymotic, fluctuating swelling was present on his left flank with normal vital signs. Subcutaneous intestinal segments were revealed at his left flank on abdominal CT. Emergency laparotomy revealed a 10-cm defect on the left postero-lateral abdominal wall. The splenic flexure was herniated through the defect. Herniated segments was reduced, the defect was repaired with a polypropylene mesh graft. There was also a serosal tear and an ischemic area 3mm wide on the splenic flexure and was repaired primarily. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Most traumatic lumbar hernias are caused by blunt trauma. Trauma that causes abdominal wall disruption also may cause intraabdominal organ injury. Abdominal CT is useful in the diagnosis and allows for diagnosis of coexisting organ injury. Emergency laparotomy should be performed to repair possible coexisting injuries.

  16. [MR investigation of spinal cord herniation in the thoracic spine].

    PubMed

    Kenéz, József; Barsi, Péter; Várallyay, György; Bobest, Mátyás; Veres, Róbert

    2002-05-20

    Transdural herniation of the spinal cord is thought to be previously extremely rare and very often misdiagnosed. Possible reasons may be iatrogenic and traumatic or in about one third of cases it may be unknown, where the probable origin might be a congenital dural defect. The pathology may show characteristic and misleading MR patterns of the thoracic spine, emphasising the importance of these patterns. This anomaly can lead to progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. Surgical intervention, consisting the repair of the dural defect may result in improvement or even complete regression of the neurologic deficits.

  17. Pediatric blunt trauma resulting in major arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Milas, Zvonimir L; Dodson, Thomas F; Ricketts, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Ten children, aged 4 to 14 years, sustaining blunt arterial trauma from motor vehicle collisions (6), bicycle accidents (2), and falls (2) were identified over a 10-year period. The arteries injured included the common iliac (3), abdominal aorta (2), carotid (2), brachial (2), and the subclavian, renal, and femoral artery (1 each). One patient had three arterial injuries. Six patients had associated injuries including a pelvic and lumbar spine fracture, Horner's syndrome, liver laceration, skull fracture, open humerus fracture, small bowel serosal tear, and a brachial plexus injury. Definitive diagnosis was made using arteriography (6), computed tomography (CT) scan (2), and physical examination (2). The types of arterial injuries found included incomplete transection, complete transection with pseudo-aneurysm formation, traumatic arteriovenous (AV) fistulas, complete occlusion, and dissection. Repair was accomplished by hypogastric artery interposition or bypass grafting, synthetic grafting with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), reverse saphenous vein grafting, or primary repair, depending on the circumstances. An AV fistula between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus was embolized. All grafts remained patent with exception of the aorto-renal bypass graft at follow-up ranging from 1 month to 3 years. The principles for repairing vascular injuries in children are slightly different than those in adults. Every effort should be made to use autogenous tissue such as the hypogastric artery or saphenous vein for repair if possible. If not, PTFE grafts can be used, although the long-term patency of these grafts in growing children is not known. PMID:15156954

  18. Transpiration Cooling Of Hypersonic Blunt Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Results on analytical approximation and numerical simulation compared. Report presents theoretical study of degree to which transpiration blocks heating of blunt, axisymmetric body by use of injected air. Transpiration cooling proposed to reduce operating temperatures on nose cones of proposed hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Analyses important in design of thermal protection for such vehicles.

  19. Traumatic amputations

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Arul

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic amputations remain one of the most emotionally disturbing wounds of conflict, as demonstrated by their frequent use in films to illustrate the horrors of war. Unfortunately, they remain common injuries, particularly following explosions, and, in addition, many survivors require primary amputation for unsalvageable injuries or to save their life. A third group, late amputations, is being increasingly recognised, often as a result of the sequelae of complex foot injuries. This article will look at the epidemiology of these injuries and their acute management, complications and outcome. PMID:26516502

  20. Mechanism of lens capsular rupture following blunt trauma: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Lizhen; Du, Chengfei; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo

    2015-01-01

    Blunt impact on the eye could results in lens capsular rupture that allows foreign substances to enter into the lens and leads to cataract formation. This paper aimed to investigate the mechanism of lens capsular rupture using finite element (FE) method. A FE model of the human eye was developed to simulate dynamic response of the lens capsule to a BB (a standard 4.5-mm-diameter pellet) impact. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of the parameters on capsular rupture, including the impact velocity, the elastic modulus of the lens, the thickness and the elastic modulus of the lens capsule. The results indicated that the lens was subjected to anterior compression and posterior intension when the eye was stricken by a BB pellet. The strain on the posterior capsule (0.392) was almost twice as much as that on the anterior capsule (0.207) at an impact velocity of 20 m/s. The strain on the capsule was proportional to the impact velocity, while the capsular strain showed no significant change when the lens modulus elastic varied with age. The findings confirmed that blunt traumatic capsular rupture is the result of shockwave propagation throughout the eye. The posterior capsule is subjected to greater tension in blunt trauma, which is the main cause that ruptures are more commonly found on the posterior capsule than the anterior capsule. Also, thinner thickness and lower elastic modulus would contribute to the posterior capsular rupture.

  1. Management of traumatic macular holes: case report.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Oswaldo Ferreira Moura; Brasil, Oswaldo Moura

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic macular hole is a disease whose pathogenesis is not fully understood and the best treatment guideline is controversial. We report 2 cases of traumatic macular hole with different treatment approaches. In the first case, a 9-year-old boy presented with a traumatic macular hole secondary to blunt ocular trauma with a stone, and initial vision of 20/300. He underwent surgical repair and his final vision was 20/70 with hole closure after a 1 year follow-up. In the second case, a 20-year-old woman suffered a penetrating bullet wound on the left side of her forehead. The injury caused optic nerve head avulsion in the left eye with loss of light perception. The right eye had a traumatic macular hole and signs suggestive of sclopetaria chorioretinitis, with 20/60 vision. This case was initially observed and vision improved to 20/30 with reduction of the hole diameter. Vision and hole diameter remained stable after 8 months.

  2. A successful treatment for concomitant injury of the coronary artery and tricuspid valve after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Chizuo; Motohashi, Shinya; Takahashi, Yoshiki; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman involved in an automobile accident was brought to our hospital with thoracic injury sustained by the impact of her vehicle's steering wheel. Cardiac auscultation revealed a grade III/VI systolic murmur and the electrocardiogram showed ST elevation in leads 2, 3 and aVF. A 2D echocardiogram revealed severe tricuspid regurgitation and a hypokinetic right ventricle. Coronary angiography revealed dissection of the proximal right coronary artery (RCA) with 90 % stenosis. Urgent CABG for the RCA and tricuspid valvuloplasty were performed, as the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve had prolapsed as a result of chordal rupture. Blunt thoracic trauma causing both tricuspid insufficiency and coronary artery dissection is a very rare and life-threatening situation. Prompt diagnosis and timely surgery enabled us to save this patient's life.

  3. A penetrating dorsal thoracic injury that is lucky from every aspect: A case report

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Mehmet; Gök, Ali Fuat Kaan; Öner, Gizem; Günay, Kayıhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Penetrating thoracic trauma management represents a major problem for emergency department staff. In these cases, we reported a patient, who can be deemed very lucky, because of both the trauma mechanism and the provided first aid at scene. Presentation of case A 30-year-old man was transported to the emergency surgery outpatient clinic after being stabbed from his back. A knife entered thorax from the dorsal region paravertebrally between two scapulae. No vascular and thoracic injuries were detected in the CT. The knife was then pulled and removed, and pressure dressing was applied on the wound. He was discharged with full recovery on the second day of admission. Discussion Thoracic traumas may present as blunt or penetrating traumas. Trauma with penetrating dorsal thoracic injuries is usually in the form of stabbing, sharp penetrating object injuries, or firearm injuries. The aim of a successful trauma management is to determine whether a life-threatening condition exists. The general rules of penetrating trauma management are to avoid in-depth exploration for wound site assessment, to avoid removal of penetrating object without accurate diagnosis, and to keep in mind the possibility of intubation for airway security in every moment. Conclusion During the initial care of patients with penetrating trauma, the object should not be removed from its place. Our patient was lucky enough in that no thoracic pathology developed during the accident and he was not subjected to any secondary trauma during ambulance transport. PMID:27100954

  4. Instruments measuring blunted affect in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Sanja; Asmal, Laila; Goosen, Anneke; Chiliza, Bonginkosi; Phahladira, Lebogang; Emsley, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Blunted affect, also referred to as emotional blunting, is a prominent symptom of schizophrenia. Patients with blunted affect have difficulty in expressing their emotions. The work of Abrams and Taylor and their development of the Rating Scale for Emotional Blunting in the late 1970's was an early indicator that blunted affect could indeed be assessed reliably. Since then, several new instruments assessing negative symptoms with subscales measuring blunted affect have been developed. In light of this, we aim to provide researchers and clinicians with a systematic review of the different instruments used to assess blunted affect by providing a comparison of the type, characteristics, administration and psychometric properties of these instruments. Studies reporting on the psychometric properties of instruments assessing blunted affect in patients with schizophrenia were included. Reviews and case studies were excluded. We reviewed 30 full-text articles and included 15 articles and 10 instruments in this systematic review. On average the instruments take 15-30 minutes to administer. We found that blunted affect items common across all instruments assess: gestures, facial expressions and vocal expressions. The CAINS Self-report Expression Subscale, had a low internal consistency score. This suggests that this sub-scale does not reliably assess patients' self-reported blunted affect symptoms and is likely due to the nature of blunted affect. Instruments correlated minimally with instruments measuring positive symptoms and more importantly with depression suggesting that the instruments distinguish between seemingly similar symptoms.

  5. Chondroblastoma of the thoracic vertebra.

    PubMed

    Attar, A; Ugur, H C; Caglar, Y S; Erdogan, A; Ozdemir, N

    2001-01-01

    A 48-year-old patient with interscapular pain was admitted to our clinic. MRI revealed a mass infiltrating the second thoracic vertebra and adjacent structures. No other clinical manifestations were observed in general examination. The patient underwent surgery and subtotal removal was achieved while anterior and posterior stabilisations were performed. Diagnosis was pathologically confirmed. As thoracic chondroblastoma cases are not frequent, we decided to present this case. PMID:11148083

  6. Blunt impacts to the back: Biomechanical response for model development.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jason; Perry, Brandon; Henderson, Kyvory; Gjolaj, Joseph P; Heltzel, Sara; Lessley, David; Riley, Patrick; Salzar, Robert; Walilko, Tim

    2015-09-18

    The development of advanced injury prediction models requires biomechanical and injury tolerance information for all regions of the body. While numerous studies have investigated injury mechanics of the thorax under frontal impact, there remains a dearth of information on the injury mechanics of the torso under blunt impact to the back. A series of hub-impact tests were performed to the back surface of the mid-thorax of four mid-size male cadavers. Repeated tests were performed to characterize the biomechanical and injury response of the thorax under various impact speeds (1.5m/s, 3m/s and 5.5m/s). Deformation of the chest was recorded with a 59-gage chestband. Subject kinematics were also recorded with a high-speed optoelectronic 3D motion capture system. In the highest-severity tests, peak impact forces ranged from 6.9 to 10.5 kN. The peak change in extension angle measured between the 1st thoracic vertebra and the lumbar spine ranged from 39 to 62°. The most commonly observed injuries were strains of the costovertebral/costotransverse joint complexes, rib fractures, and strains of the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The majority of the rib fractures occurred in the rib neck between the costovertebral and costotransverse joints. The prevalence of rib-neck fractures suggests a novel, indirect loading mechanism resulting from bending moments generated in the rib necks caused by motion of the spine. In addition to the injury information, the biomechanical responses quantified here will facilitate the future development and validation of human body models for predicting injury risk during impact to the back.

  7. Adolescent traumatic stress experience results in less robust conditioned fear and post-extinction fear cue responses in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nicole L T; Gauchan, Sangeeta; Genovese, Raymond F

    2014-05-01

    Early exposure to a traumatic event may produce lasting effects throughout the lifespan. Traumatic stress during adolescence may deliver a distinct developmental insult compared with more-often studied neonatal or juvenile traumatic stress paradigms. The present study describes the lasting effects of adolescent traumatic stress upon adulthood fear conditioning. Adolescent rats were exposed to a traumatic stressor (underwater trauma, UWT), then underwent fear conditioning during adulthood. Fear extinction was tested over five conditioned suppression extinction sessions three weeks later. The efficacies of two potential extinction-enhancing compounds, endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor AM404 (10mg/kg) and M1 muscarinic positive allosteric modulator BQCA (10mg/kg), were also assessed. Finally, post-extinction fear responses were examined using a fear cue (light) as a prepulse stimulus. Rats traumatically stressed during adolescence showed blunted conditioned suppression on day 1 of extinction training, and AM404 reversed this effect. Post-extinction startle testing showed that fear conditioning eliminates prepulse inhibition to the light cue. Startle potentiation was observed only in rats without adolescent UWT exposure. AM404 and BQCA both ameliorated this startle potentiation, while BQCA increased startle in the UWT group. These results suggest that exposure to a traumatic stressor during adolescence alters developmental outcomes related to stress response and fear extinction compared to rats without adolescent traumatic stress exposure, blunting the adulthood fear response and reducing residual post-extinction fear expression. Efficacy of pharmacological interventions may also vary as a factor of developmental traumatic stress exposure.

  8. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  9. Ultrasound of epigastric injuries after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Foley, L C; Teele, R L

    1979-04-01

    Blunt trauma to the epigastrum may result in a retroperitoneal hematoma involving the head of the pancreas and descending duodenum. Secondary effects include obstruction of the gastric outlet, obstruction of the biliary tree, and extrinsic compression of the inferior vena cava. Four patients with epigastric trauma were reviewed who had been examined by ultrasound of the abdomen. Ultrasound showed the extent of the retroperitoneal hematoma, its effect on contiguous organs, and was helpful in clinical management.

  10. [Hemodynamic repercussion of epidural bupivacaine in thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Pérez Gallardo, A; Lajara Montell, A M; Manzanos Luna, A M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic and pulmonary hemodynamic effects of 8 to 10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine containing 1:200,000 adrenaline administered at the midthoracic level were prospectively assessed in 20 patients (aged 45 +/- 16 years) with thoracic trauma presenting 6 +/- 2 rib fractures and pulmonary contusion of different extent and radiologic density. The study was carried out at comparable evolving times, 24 h after trauma, during the second or third day of treatment, and when the hemodynamic stability of the patient was achieved. Hemodynamic measurements were performed before and 30 min after administration of the analgesic agent using a Swan-Ganz catheter. The results indicate that administration of moderate doses of epidural bupivacaine at the middle thoracic level in patients with normovolemic thoracic traumatism were not followed by alterations in the hemodynamic function except for a slight decrease in systemic arterial and pulmonary pressure. The mean arterial pressure decreased by 8% (p less than 0.05), the cardiac index showed a 4% reduction (p = 0.05), and the mean pulmonary pressure experienced a 14% decrease (p less than 0.05).

  11. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  12. Effects of nose bluntness and shock-shock interactions on blunt bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the effects of blunt leading edges on the viscous flow field around a hypersonic vehicle such as the proposed National Aero-Space Plane. Attention is focused on two specific regions of the flow field. In the first region, effects of nose bluntness on the forebody flow field are investigated. The second region of the flow considered is around the leading edges of the scramjet inlet. In this region, the interaction of the forebody shock with the shock produced by the blunt leading edges of the inlet compression surfaces is analyzed. Analysis of these flow regions is required to accurately predict the overall flow field as well as to get necessary information on localized zones of high pressure and intense heating. The results for the forebody flow field are discussed first, followed by the results for the shock interaction in the inlet leading edge region.

  13. Mini Transsternal Approach to the Anterior High Thoracic Spine (T1–T4 Vertebrae)

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Bhaskar; Tsoti, Sandra Maria; Anichini, Giulio; Vergani, Francesco; Malik, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The anterior high thoracic spine is one of the most complex segments to be accessed surgically due to anatomical constraints and transitional characteristics. We describe in detail the mini transsternal approach to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies of T1 to T4 vertebral bodies. We analyse our surgical series, indications, and outcomes. Methods. Over a 5-year period 18 consecutive patients with thoracic myelopathy due to metastatic, infective, traumatic, and degenerative pathologies with T1 to T4 vertebral bodies involvement received a mini transsternal approach with intraoperative monitoring. Frankel scoring system was used to grade the neurological status. Results. Mean follow-up was 40 months. 78% patients improved in Frankel grade after surgery and 22% patients remained unchanged. Average operation time was 210 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications. One patient developed postoperative pneumonia successfully treated with antibiotics. Conclusion. The mini transsternal is a safe approach for infective, metastatic, traumatic, and degenerative lesions affecting the anterior high thoracic spine and the only one allowing an early and direct visualisation of the anterior theca. This approach overcomes the anatomical constraints of this region and provides adequate room for optimal reconstruction and preservation of spinal alignment in the cervicothoracic transition zone with good functional patient outcomes. PMID:27218104

  14. Blunt liver injury with intact ribs under impacts on the abdomen: a biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Zou, Donghua; Li, Zhengdong; Wan, Lei; Qin, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ningguo; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhong, Liangwei; Huang, Ping; Chen, Yijiu

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal trauma accounts for nearly 20% of all severe traffic injuries and can often result from intentional physical violence, from which blunt liver injury is regarded as the most common result and is associated with a high mortality rate. Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s). Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance.

  15. Blunt Liver Injury with Intact Ribs under Impacts on the Abdomen: A Biomechanical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengdong; Wan, Lei; Qin, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ningguo; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhong, Liangwei; Huang, Ping; Chen, Yijiu

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal trauma accounts for nearly 20% of all severe traffic injuries and can often result from intentional physical violence, from which blunt liver injury is regarded as the most common result and is associated with a high mortality rate. Liver injury may be caused by a direct impact with a certain velocity and energy on the abdomen, which may result in a lacerated liver by penetration of fractured ribs. However, liver ruptures without rib cage fractures were found in autopsies in a series of cases. All the victims sustained punches on the abdomen by fist. Many studies have been dedicated to determining the mechanism underlying hepatic injury following abdominal trauma, but most have been empirical. The actual process and biomechanism of liver injury induced by blunt impact on the abdomen, especially with intact ribs remained, are still inexhaustive. In order to investigate this, finite element methods and numerical simulation technology were used. A finite element human torso model was developed from high resolution CT data. The model consists of geometrically-detailed liver and rib cage models and simplified models of soft tissues, thoracic and abdominal organs. Then, the torso model was used in simulations in which the right hypochondrium was punched by a fist from the frontal, lateral, and rear directions, and in each direction with several impact velocities. Overall, the results showed that liver rupture was primarily caused by a direct strike of the ribs induced by blunt impact to the abdomen. Among three impact directions, a lateral impact was most likely to cause liver injury with a minimum punch speed of 5 m/s (the momentum was about 2.447 kg.m/s). Liver injuries could occur in isolation and were not accompanied by rib fractures due to different material characteristics and injury tolerance. PMID:23308111

  16. Endovascular Repair of Blunt Popliteal Arterial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin; Qi, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Results Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Conclusion Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair. PMID:27587969

  17. Morbid obesity impacts mortality in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, A Britton; Reynolds, Jennifer; Wilson, Ashley K; Franklin, Glen A; Miller, Frank B; Richardson, J David; Rodriguez, Jorge L

    2007-11-01

    Twenty-six per cent of adults in the Unites States are obese and trauma remains a major cause of death. We assessed the impact of morbid obesity on mortality in patients with blunt trauma. We reviewed the records of patients with a body mass index 40 kg/m2 or greater injured by blunt trauma from 1993 to 2003 and compared them with a 4:1 control population with a normal body mass index and matched for sex and constellation of injuries. For comparison, patients were categorized by Injury Severity Score 9 or less or Injury Severity Score 10 or greater. Student t test and chi2 were used for statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was considered significant. One hundred seven morbidly obese patients were identified and compared with 458 control subjects with a normal body mass index and matched for sex and constellation of injuries. Although the morbidly obese patients were found to be significantly younger, those who incurred multiorgan injury experienced a significantly longer hospital length of stay and displayed a greater than fourfold increase in mortality when compared with the control subjects. Furthermore, the number of morbidly obese patients admitted over the 10-year period significantly increased by fourfold (0.4% to 1.5%). Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in morbidly obese patients cared for in our trauma center. Although these patients were significantly younger with a similar Glasgow Coma Score as that of the control population, morbid obesity significantly increased mortality when the injury from blunt trauma transitioned from a single to a multiorgan injury.

  18. Transdiaphragmatic Intercostal Herniation following Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debkumar; Warta, Melissa; Solomon, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Intercostal herniation is very rarely and sporadically reported in the literature. Intercostal hernia can occur following blunt trauma and may be associated with rib fractures. We present a case of a patient who presented with rib fractures, diaphragmatic rupture, and intrathoracic herniation of abdominal contents with subsequent herniation of both lung and abdominal contents through an intercostal defect. The patient was successfully treated with primary surgical repair of the diaphragm and intercostal hernia. The presentation, pathophysiology, and management of this rare clinical entity are discussed. PMID:23198242

  19. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma. PMID:27175338

  20. Rarefied Transitional Bridging of Blunt Body Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.; Blanchard, R. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    The bridging procedures discussed provide an accurate engineering method for predicting rarefied transitional aerodynamics of spherically-blunted cone entry vehicles. The single-point procedure offers a way to improve the bridging procedures while minimizing the computational effort. However, the accuracy of these procedures ultimately depends on accurate knowledge of the aerodynamics in the free-molecular and continuum limits. The excellent agreement shown for DSMC predictions and bridging relations with the Viking flight data in transitional regime enhance the coincidence in these procedures.

  1. Blunt trauma-induced pacemaker failure.

    PubMed

    Brown, K R; Carter, W; Lombardi, G E

    1991-08-01

    A 54-year-old man with an artificial pacemaker sustained blunt trauma to his chest when he was struck with a baseball bat. Within 15 minutes after the injury, the patient experienced cardiovascular collapse. His pacemaker failed, and he required insertion of a temporary transvenous pacemaker. At surgery, the defect was traced to failure of the pulse generator, a rare cause of pacemaker failure. Emergency department evaluation should include prompt and continuous ECG monitoring, an overpenetrated chest radiograph, and telemetry evaluation after discharge.

  2. Segmental Renal Infarction due to Blunt Trauma.

    PubMed

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Hamilton, Lauren; Stratu, Natalia; Rix, Gerald

    2016-05-01

    Segmental renal infarction is a rare situation which has been reported so far in the form of case reports. It's caused usually by cardiac conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, and systemic diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematous). We are presenting a case of a 31 year old healthy male, who sustained a left segmental renal infarction, following a motorbike accident. We report his presentation, management and outcome. We also review the literature in search of the optimal diagnostic and treatment pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of segmental renal infarction due to blunt trauma.

  3. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  4. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  5. Real Gas/Blunt Cone. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Eitelberg, Georg

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter recent activity in real-gas database definition and code validation will be summarized. In the Phase I report of the Working Group (WG) 181, aerothermodynamic problems were classified, for purpose of discussion, into seven types: aerodynamic parameters, viscous/shock interaction, boundary-layer transition, forebody-heating/heat-transfer, radiation and ablation, lee and base-region flow, and low-density flow. Several of these problem types were the subject of various chapters of the Phase 1 report describing real-gas effects and ground test facility issues. In this chapter some background and objectives outlined in the real-Gas effects Chapter V of the Phase 1 report will be reviewed. The results of the blunt cone test campaign developed under the auspices of the WG18 activity to study real-gas phenomena will be summarized, including the experimental and computational programs, issues and questions, and recommendations. Further, recent progress in other real-gas areas beyond the blunt cone test campaign will be discussed. Finally, a summary in which the present status of our understanding of real-gas issues will be presented.

  6. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?

    PubMed

    Potoka, D A; Gaines, B A; Leppäniemi, A; Peitzman, A B

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic injuries are relatively uncommon but present a major challenge to the surgeon in terms of both diagnosis and management. Pancreatic injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to associated injuries, and pancreas-specific morbidity, especially in cases of delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is a key for optimal management, but remains a challenge even with more advanced imaging modalities. For both penetrating and blunt pancreatic injuries, the presence of main pancreatic ductal injury is the major determinant of morbidity and the major factor guiding management decisions. For main pancreatic ductal injury, surgery remains the preferred approach with distal pancreatectomy for most injuries and more conservative surgical management for proximal ductal injuries involving the head of the pancreas. More recently, nonoperative management has been utilized, especially in the pediatric population, with the potential for increased rates of pseudocyst and pancreatic fistulae and the potential for the need for further intervention and increased hospital stay. This review presents recent data focusing on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of blunt pancreatic injury.

  7. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  8. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung Chul

    2012-08-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea. PMID:22880189

  9. [A case of thoracic actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Denisova, O A; Cherniavskaia, G M; Beloborodova, É I; Topol'nitskiĭ, E B; Iakimenko, Iu V; Chernogoriuk, G É; Beloborodova, E V; Strezh, Iu A; Vil'danova, L R

    2014-01-01

    A case of thoracic actinomycosis manifest as round shadow in the lung is described. Diagnosis was based on the presence of actinomycetes in a transthoracic lung biopsy sample. Treatment for 3 months resulted in recovery. No relapse was documented during 1 year follow-up period. PMID:25265662

  10. Gender-related traumatic deaths in Transkei: incidence and causes.

    PubMed

    Meel, B L

    2003-07-01

    This study is unique in that it strives to unfold, perhaps for the first time, the problem of female mortality due to trauma in the Transkei region of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. This study was carried out in the Umtata and Ngqeleni magisterial districts which have a combined population of about 400,000. Most of the people have very few resources and have historically relied on money repatriated by migrant workers. The objective was to establish the incidence and the causes of deaths due to gender-related trauma and to formulate recommendations which could probably help prevent or reduce these deaths. The study reviewed cases of female traumatic death during the period January 1993 to December 1999 that were brought to the mortuary in Umtata General Hospital (UGH). There were 1,054 (23%) traumatic deaths recorded in females between 1993 and 1999. Of these 486 (28%) were related to motor vehicle collisions, 219 (18%) due to gunshot injuries, 152 (19%) due to stab wounds and 139 (21%) as a result of blunt trauma. The male to female ratio was 3.3:1 in traumatic deaths. In homicides the male:female ratio was 4.4:1, gunshot 4.5:1, stab 4.2:1 and blunt injuries 3.7:1. In motor vehicle collisions (MVC's) the ratio was 2.5:1. There is an increasing incidence of traumatic deaths in women. Gun shot injuries are the commonest among traumatic deaths in females. This article recommends stricter measures to protect women in the form of legislation. Social uplifting and economic support should be carried out as part of the process of social change. In this case educating the entire community is necessary to safeguard women and their future survival.

  11. Traumatic abdominal wall hernia with concealed colonic perforation.

    PubMed

    Pathak, D; Mukherjee, R; Das, P; Pathak, D; Gangopadhyay, A; Das, S

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH) is a rare clinical entity in terms of aetiology. It occurs following a blunt abdominal injury with energy high enough to cause disruption of the musculoaponeurotic layer but not the elastic skin layer. It is often associated with underlying intra-abdominal injuries, which can be diagnosed either clinically or radiologically. We report a case of TAWH in a young man with associated large bowel transection, which remained undiagnosed in the preoperative period owing to its masked features. He was managed surgically, with no recurrence to date. Considering the high volume of blunt abdominal trauma cases that present to the accident and emergency department, only few cases of TAWH have been reported in the literature. Confusion still exists regarding the timing and mode of management of this condition. PMID:27241601

  12. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  13. Clinical Predictors of Recovery after Blunt Spinal Cord Trauma: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habib, Amro F.; Attabib, Najmedden; Ball, Jonathon; Bajammal, Sohail; Casha, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Several clinical, imaging, and therapeutic factors affecting recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been described. A systematic review of the topic is still lacking. Our primary aim was to systematically review clinical factors that may predict neurological and functional recovery following blunt traumatic SCI in adults. Such work would help guide clinical care and direct future research. Both Medline and Embase (to April 2008) were searched using index terms for various forms of SCI, paraplegia, or quadri/tetraplegia, and functional and neurological recovery. The search was limited to published articles that were in English and included human subjects. Article selection included class I and II evidence, blunt traumatic SCI, injury level above L1-2, baseline assessment within 72 h of injury, use of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system for clinical assessment, and functional and neurological outcome. A total of 1526 and 1912 citations were located from Medline and Embase, respectively. Two surgeons reviewed the titles, abstracts, and full text articles for each database. Ten articles were identified, only one of which was level 1 evidence. Age and gender were identified as two patient-related predictors. While motor and functional recovery decreased with advancing age for complete SCI, there was no correlation considering incomplete ones. Therefore, treatment should not be restructured based on age in incomplete SCI. Among injury-related predictors, severity of SCI was the most significant. Complete injuries correlated with increased mortality and worse neurological and functional outcomes. Other predictors included SCI level, energy transmitted by the injury, and baseline electrophysiological testing. PMID:19831845

  14. Complications following repair of extrahepatic bile duct injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Montes, J A; Rojo, E; Martín, L G

    2001-10-01

    Extrahepatic bile duct traumatic injuries are extremely rare and their treatment is difficult and with several controversies. The aim of this study was to offer some more clinical information on their surgical repair and outcome. We present seven patients with extrahepatic biliary tract lesions after blunt abdominal trauma, (isolated gallbladder lesions were excluded) four males and three females from 23 to 51 years of age (mean age 35.1 years). All patients had suffered high-energy blunt abdominal trauma and presented associated injuries, mostly liver trauma and lung contusions. Six gallbladder lesions and six common bile duct injures were identified; a right hepatic duct laceration and a left hepatic duct transection were also present. Injuries were treated either with primary repair or with duct-jejunal anastomoses with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Principal complications were postoperative anastomotic leakage (1 case) and recurrent cholangitis (3 cases) with or without stricture. Not-diagnosed injuries caused substantial morbidity. We prefer and recommend the use of primary repair in partial ruptures with no significant tissue loss and biliary-enteric anastomoses in large injuries and complete transections because they offer the best long-term drainage with less risk of stricture formation than end-to-end anastomoses. We defend the use of long duration (6 to 9 months) transanastomotic stents. PMID:11596896

  15. An unusual complication of blunt ocular trauma: A horseshoe-shaped macular tear with spontaneous closure

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Umut; Durukan, Hakan A; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Erdurman, Cuneyt; Hurmeric, Volkan

    2014-01-01

    A case of horseshoe-shaped macular tear after blunt trauma with the course of the tear and the relevant findings obtained by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is described. A 21-year-old man who had suffered blunt trauma 5 days previously visited our clinic complaining of vision loss in his left eye. Ophthalmic examination and SD-OCT images revealed a horseshoe-shaped macular tear. A month later at the second visit, the macular tear was found to have spontaneously closed. There have been many cases reported previously of the spontaneous closure of traumatic macular holes. A horseshoe-shaped macular tear is an atypical clinical presentation. However, the mechanism of spontaneous closure is hypothetically as same as that for a macular hole. High-resolution images and three-dimensional maps taken with SD-OCT can provide more details on macular diseases and are more useful than time-domain OCT images. PMID:24817754

  16. Blunt colon injury sustained during a kickboxing match.

    PubMed

    Rood, Loren K

    2007-02-01

    Emergency physicians routinely evaluate patients for injury from blunt abdominal trauma. Most serious injuries result from high energy mechanisms such as motor vehicle collisions. This case report describes a patient who sustained blunt trauma to the descending colon during a martial arts match, necessitating a hemicolectomy.

  17. An overview of the state of the art of noninvasive FES for independent ambulation by thoracic level paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Graupe, Daniel

    2002-07-01

    This paper is an overview of the status of transcutaneous noninvasive (unbraced) functional electrical stimulation (FES) for independent standing and for independent ambulation by traumatic spinal-cord injured (SCI) paraplegics with complete spinal cord lesions at the thoracic level. The paper discusses aspects of patient selection, patient training, system performance, ambulation range, medical benefits and psychological benefits. It also considers problems relating to system adoption and long term system use. Furthermore, the paper discusses the various aspects of transcutaneous noninvasive FES as compared with implanted FES systems for ambulation by thoracic level SCI patients.

  18. Nonoperative management of pediatric blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Leone, R J; Hammond, J S

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of operative versus nonoperative management of blunt hepatic trauma in children including transfusion practices. We reviewed the experience at our American College of Surgeons-verified Level I trauma center with pediatric commitment over a 5-year period. Children < or = 16 years of age suffering blunt liver injury as documented on admission CT scan were included in the study. Liver injuries identified on CT scan were classified according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma's Organ Injury Scaling system. All data are presented as mean +/- standard error. One case of pediatric liver trauma not identified on CT was excluded (prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Twenty-seven patients were included [age 9.3 +/- 1.0 years (range 3-16)]. Mechanisms of injury included motor vehicle crash (14), pedestrian struck by motor vehicle (7), bicycle crash (4), fall from height (1), and pedestrian struck by falling object (1). Trauma Score was 11.5 +/- 0.3. Distribution of Liver Injury Grade was as follows: grade I, 13; grade II, 9; grade III, 3; grade IV, 2; and grade V, 0. All five patients who underwent operative management had multiple organ injuries; three had concomitant splenic injury requiring operative repair; the remaining two had small bowel injury requiring repair. Hepatorrhaphy did not correlate with severity of liver injury: grade I, n = 1; II, n = 2; III, n = 1; and IV, n = 1. Three operated patients received blood transfusions. Twenty-two patients were managed with nonoperative treatment, of these only one required blood transfusion. No patients in the study died, three were transferred to subacute rehabilitation, one was transferred to another hospital, and 23 were discharged home. Our findings indicate that a majority of children with blunt hepatic injury as documented on CT scan can be managed with nonoperative treatment, and few require blood transfusions. Patients with multiple organ

  19. Acute renal failure due to traumatic rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, R; Akhtar, F; Yazdani, I; Hafiz, S; Zafar, N; Naqvi, A; Rizvi, A

    1995-03-01

    Trauma and non-traumatic insults can cause muscle damage to such an extent that serious sequelae to other organs may result. Myoglobinuria and subsequent acute renal failure (ARF) is a well known and widely studied fact of such sequelae. Twelve cases of ARF (between 1990-1993) who have developed renal dysfunction after prolonged muscular exercise e.g., squat jumping, sit-ups and blunt trauma from sticks or leather belts mainly given by law enforcing personnel for certain issues were studied. None of them had previous history of myopathy, neuropathy or renal disease. All were critically ill on presentation and required renal support in the form of dialysis. Although morbidity was high in all, eleven of them recovered and one expired due to sepsis.

  20. Tracheobronchial injury due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchial avulsion resulting from blunt trauma is a very rare and serious condition, mostly due to high-speed traffic crashes. In this article, we briefly report the case of an 18-year-old man who was injured in a car accident and because of massive persistent air leakage (despite appropriate chest tube drainage), deemed to have a deep tracheobronchial injury. Due to a rapid drop in the patient's O2 saturation, he underwent an anterolateral thoracotomy. Endotracheal intubation was performed under direct visualization. The right mainstem bronchus was disrupted from the carina with a 1.5-cm stump remaining on the carina, and the remainder was crushed to the origin of the right superior lobe bronchus. Hence, a right superior lobectomy was performed and the postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:26157657

  1. Paintball-related traumatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Luck, Joshua; Bell, Daniel; Bashir, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Paintball is a popular recreational sport played at both amateur and professional level. Ocular injuries are well recognised, although there is a growing body of literature documenting superficial vascular as well as deep solid organ injuries. An 18-year-old man presented with signs and symptoms consistent with acute appendicitis. Intraoperatively, a grade III liver injury was identified and packed before a relook at 48 h. No further active bleeding was identified; however, follow-up ultrasound at 3 weeks demonstrated non-resolution of a large subcapsular haematoma. The patient was readmitted for a short period of observation and discharged with repeat ultrasound scheduled for 3 months. This represents the first report of paintball-related blunt traumatic injury to the liver. Solid organ injuries of this nature have only been reported three times previously-all in the urological setting. This case also highlights issues surrounding the use of routine follow-up imaging in blunt liver trauma and provides a concise discussion of the relevant literature. PMID:27122206

  2. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Andrew J.; Dimarikis, Iannis; Pai, Madhava; Jiao, Long R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required. PMID:21490833

  3. A rare case of splenic pseudoaneurysm in pediatric splenic blunt trauma patient: Review of diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Roger Chen; Kurbatov, Vadim; Leung, Patricia; Sugiyama, Gainosuke; Roudnitsky, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Splenic pseudoaneurysms (SPA) are a rare but serious sequela of blunt traumatic injury to the spleen. Management of adult blunt splenic trauma is well-studied, however, in children, the management is much less well-defined. Presentation of case A 15 year-old male presented with severe abdominal pain of acute onset after sustaining injury to his left side while playing football. FAST was positive for free fluid in the abdomen. Initial abdomen CT demonstrated a grade III/IV left splenic laceration with moderate to large hemoperitoneum with no active extravasation or injury to the splenic vessels noted. A follow-up CT angiography of the abdomen demonstrated a splenic hypervascular structure suspicious for a small pseudoaneurysm. Splenic arteriogram which demonstrated multiple pseudoaneurysms arising from the second order splenic artery branches which was angioembolized and treated. Discussion & conclusion Questions still remain regarding the timing of repeat imaging for diagnosis of SPA following non-operative blunt splenic trauma, which patients should be imaged, and how to manage SPA upon diagnosis. More clinical study and basic science research is warranted to study the disease process of SPA in pediatric patient. We believe that our proposed management algorithm timely detect formation of delayed SPA formation and addresses the possible fatal disease course of pediatric SPA. PMID:26117449

  4. [Post-traumatic amnesia and post-trauma quality of life].

    PubMed

    e Silva, Silvia Cristina Fürbringer; Settervall, Cristina Helena Constanti; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2012-10-01

    The present study aims to compare quality of life of victims with long and short term post-traumatic amnesia and to analyze the relation between quality of life and length of amnesia, including or not the comatose period. This prospective cohort study, gathered data during the hospital stay and 3 and 6 months post- trauma. Blunt traumatic brain injury patients, over 14 years old, with no prior diagnosis of dementia or brain injury, admitted to a trauma center 12 hours post-trauma were included. The results were unfavorable among patients with long term amnesia. Correlation between length of post-traumatic amnesia and quality of life domains were more expressive when excluded comatose period, indicating that it must not be computed in the length of post-traumatic amnesia.

  5. Differentiation of traumatic and heat-induced dental tissue fractures via SEM analysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Miranda N; Fairgrieve, Scott I

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have examined the effects of heating on teeth; however, none have identified characteristics that allow analysts to differentiate traumatic from heat-induced fractures. This study examined our ability to discern notable differences in preincineration traumatic fractures and heat-induced fractures in postincineration dentition. Twelve anterior dental specimens were subjected to blunt force trauma while a second set were not. All 24 samples were then incinerated in a muffle furnace at a peak temperature (900°C) consistent with house fires. The specimens were subsequently examined with a scanning electron microscope to identify and compare heat-induced and traumatic fractures. The results obtained during examination yielded no differences between the features displayed by specimens that had been inflicted with preincineration trauma and those that did not. Unlike bone, distinguishing features for the differentiation of traumatic and heat-induced fractures could not be compiled. PMID:21521217

  6. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon’s hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor. PMID:26822625

  7. Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistula After Kickboxing Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) after repetitive blunt trauma has not been described previously. In a 34-year-old male, the first reported case of such an injury after repetitive blunt trauma is described. Case Presentation: A 34-year-old gentleman presented with a non-healing ulcer near his medial malleolus. A bone scan was performed and then treated for presumed osteomyelitis. An arteriogram confirmed an AVF, and coil embolization was performed with complete occlusion of the AVF. Subsequently, the ulcer healed rapidly with no complication. Along with the cause of AVF, this case is notable for symptom presentation. Conclusions: Arteriovenous fistula after blunt trauma can present as a non-healing venous stasis ulcer, which could be treated non-invasively. PMID:25032168

  8. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. PMID:26843431

  9. Conservative management of a case of traumatic pancreatitis in childhood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dixit, P; Sharma, V; Singh, K R; Thapa, B R; Rathore, M

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is relatively uncommon in pediatric age group. Traumatic injury is an important cause of AP in children. Ductal disruption resulting from pancreatic trauma usually needs surgical intervention. A three-and-a-half year old child presented with complaints of abdominal pain and distension following blunt trauma abdomen. Computed tomography of abdomen revealed presence of grade III pancreatic injury with fluid collection in lesser sac. The patient was managed with antibiotics and pigtail drainage and he improved. Therapy for traumatic pancreatitis in paediatric patients must be individualised. Even high grade injuries can be managed non-operatively. PMID:24992606

  10. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Maarten Philip; van Buijtenen, Jesse; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Bloemers, Frank; Geeraedts Jr., Leo

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option. PMID:27331068

  11. Differences in outcome between obese and nonobese patients following severe blunt trauma are not consistent with an early inflammatory genomic response

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Robert D.; Delano, Matthew J.; Dixon, David J.; Schierding, William S.; Cendan, Juan C.; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Cobb, J. Perren; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Maier, Ronald V.; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obesity has been demonstrated to alter a number of acute and chronic medical conditions. The effect of obesity on severely injured patients, however, remains incompletely defined. We sought to unravel potential physiologic and genomic alterations induced by obesity in severely injured blunt trauma patients. Design A retrospective review of clinical and genomic information contained in the Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury multicenter trauma-related database examining the relationship between body mass index and the early genomic response from peripheral blood leukocytes to patient outcome following severe blunt trauma was performed. Setting Multicenter collaboration between university-based academic trauma centers. Patients Severely injured blunt trauma patients enrolled in the database. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Univariate analysis of 455 severely injured trauma patients using the National Institutes of Health/World Health Organization body mass index classification system revealed significant increases in morbidity, including longer intensive care unit stays and a greater number of ventilator days, cardiac arrests, episodes of acute renal failure, and patients developing multiple organ failure. Regression modeling identified body mass index class as being independently associated with adverse outcomes and increased morbidity but an inverse relationship with mortality in patients who suffered severe blunt traumatic injury. Initial leukocyte genomic expression patterns between 163 patients in the four different body mass index groupings did not differ; however, analysis of gene differences between body mass index classes occurring over time demonstrated significant changes in 513 probe sets with significant pathway differences being related to cellular metabolism. Conclusions Increasing body mass index is associated with increased morbidity following severe blunt trauma. The initial blood leukocyte inflammatory response

  12. Thoracic spine sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Menzer, Heather; Gill, G Keith; Paterson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although sports-related injuries to the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon, they are among the most feared due to the potential for catastrophic neurologic injury. The increased biomechanical support of the thoracic spine makes injuries in this region particularly rare compared with the cervical and lumbar spine. As a result, thoracic spine injuries can be missed easily, difficult to diagnose, and problematic to treat. Recognition of mechanism and awareness of injury patterns help physicians determine a diagnosis and create an index of suspicion for unstable thoracic spine injuries. Aggressive full-contact sports receive the most attention for spinal injury; however several sports with repetitive loading of the spine can cause severe injuries, including rowing, gymnastics, and golf. The goal of this article was to provide an overview of the unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the thoracic spine and to discuss some of the more common thoracic injuries that can affect athletes. PMID:25574880

  13. Assessment and treatment of common persistent sequelae following blast induced mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Billie A; Cifu, David X; McNamee, Shane; Nichols, Michelle; Carne, William

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and terrorist activity worldwide have been associated with an increased incidence of blast injuries. While blast injuries share similarities with blunt or penetrating traumatic injuries, there are unique mechanistic elements of blast injury that create increased vulnerability to damage of specific organs. This review highlights the mechanism of blast-related injury, describes the common sequelae of blast exposure that may impact rehabilitation care, and summarizes the intervention strategies for these blast-related sequelae.

  14. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm and Arteriovenous Fistula Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Naughton, P. A.; Leahy, A. L.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-07-15

    We present a case of blunt trauma to the buttock resulting in an inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula. The characteristic diagnostic features on CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), along with the emergency percutaneous management of this traumatic vascular injury, are described. A review of the literature demonstrates inferior gluteal artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition, while successful treatment with glue embolization is previously unreported.

  15. TEVAR: Endovascular Repair of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Nation, David A.; Wang, Grace J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has allowed a minimally invasive approach for management of an array of thoracic aortic pathologies. Initially developed specifically for exclusion of thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is now used as an alternative to open surgery for a variety of disease pathologies due to the lower morbidity of this approach. Advances in endograft technology continue to broaden the applications of this technique. PMID:26327745

  16. Thrombosis of a descending thoracic aortic endovascular stent graft in a patient with factor V Leiden: case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 14 year old Caucasian male who underwent initially successful endovascular repair of a traumatic injury to the descending thoracic aorta. The patient had undiagnosed Factor V Leiden at the time of the endovascular repair. He later presented with thrombosis of the endovascular stent graft, necessitating open removal of the stent graft and replacement of the involved aorta with a Dacron graft. PMID:24618347

  17. Traumatic events and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... a one-time traumatic event or a repeated trauma that happens over and over again. Examples of one-time traumatic events are: Natural disasters, such as a tornado, hurricane, fire, or flood Rape Witness shooting or stabbing of a person Sudden ...

  18. Black-white disparities in blunt trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Rodriguez, A.; Dunham, C. M.; Shankar, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    To uncover causes of increased mortality rates in black accident victims, patterns of injury and access to trauma care were compared between black and white patients. Over a 41-month period (February 1985 to June 1988), 2120 white and 468 black patients, each with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 14 as a result of blunt trauma, were admitted to a Level I regional trauma center, part of a statewide trauma system. Blacks were significantly older and more of them had premorbid illnesses. Although vehicular crashes accounted for the majority of injuries in both groups, blacks had significantly more injuries resulting from falls, pedestrian accidents, and assaults. Whereas 70.6% of whites were transported from the scene and 73% were transported by helicopter, 52.7% of blacks were transported from the scene and 44% by helicopter. Blacks made up 18% of the study group and accounted for 20% of deaths (mortality rate 17.3% for blacks and 14.9% for whites). Mortality was significantly increased for black patients admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score > or = 13. Private medical insurance, available for 46.3% of black patients, accounted for 78% of payments for all trauma admissions. Increased mortality of black trauma patients may be related to risk factors (age, premorbid illness), increased rates of pedestrian accidents and falls, and disparities in access to Level I trauma centers. PMID:8371282

  19. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  20. Duodenal perforation as result of blunt abdominal trauma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hartholt, Klaas Albert; Dekker, Jan Willem T

    2015-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma may cause severe intra-abdominal injuries, while clinical findings could be mild or absent directly after the trauma. The absence of clinical findings could mislead physicians into underestimating the severity of the injury at the primary survey, and inevitably leads to a delay in the diagnosis. The Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score may help to identify children who are at a high risk for intra-abdominal injuries in an early stage and requires additional tests directly. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is presented. A delay in diagnosis may lead to an increased morbidity and mortality rate. A low admission threshold for children with abdominal pain after a blunt trauma is recommended. PMID:26698210

  1. Duodenal perforation as result of blunt abdominal trauma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hartholt, Klaas Albert; Dekker, Jan Willem T

    2015-12-23

    Blunt abdominal trauma may cause severe intra-abdominal injuries, while clinical findings could be mild or absent directly after the trauma. The absence of clinical findings could mislead physicians into underestimating the severity of the injury at the primary survey, and inevitably leads to a delay in the diagnosis. The Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children (BATiC) score may help to identify children who are at a high risk for intra-abdominal injuries in an early stage and requires additional tests directly. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is presented. A delay in diagnosis may lead to an increased morbidity and mortality rate. A low admission threshold for children with abdominal pain after a blunt trauma is recommended.

  2. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  3. Combined Gastric and Duodenal Perforation Through Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Adarshpal; Singla, Archan Lal; Kumar, Ashwani; Yadav, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Blunt abdominal traumas are uncommonly encountered despite their high prevalence, and injuries to the organ like duodenum are relatively uncommon (occurring in only 3%-5% of abdominal injuries) because of its retroperitoneal location. Duodenal injury combined with gastric perforation from a single abdominal trauma impact is rarely heard. The aim of this case report is to present a rare case of blunt abdominal trauma with combined gastric and duodenal injuries. PMID:25738037

  4. Bongs and blunts: notes from a suburban marijuana subculture.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian C

    2005-01-01

    Bongs and blunts constitute significant elements of marijuana consumption in the United States, especially among youth. The author draws upon ethnographic methods to provide rich descriptions of these practices amongst a network of suburban marijuana users. The author first provides a description of bong use in a suburban home prior to detailing the same youth network engaging in the process of rolling and smoking a blunt in a public environment. Ultimately, the author examines and contrasts these two features of American marijuana consumption.

  5. Traumatic chylothorax: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Sendama, Wezi; Shipley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chylothorax is a rare entity characterised by leakage of lymphatic fluid into the pleural cavity from the thoracic duct. We present a case of traumatic chylothorax following a traumatic fracture of the L1 vertebra. An 84-year-old lady presented to the emergency department after being found collapsed at home. She gave a preceding history of one day of diarrhoea. Chest X-ray showed a rightsided effusion. Drainage of the effusion yielded a cloudy, off-white fluid that settled in layers in the drainage container. Pleural fluid examination revealed a lymphocyte-rich transudate with high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. CT imaging of the chest, abdomen and pelvis revealed an acute left sided pulmonary embolus, and a multisegment burst fracture of the L1 vertebra. The patient was anticoagulated for the pulmonary embolus. Conservative fracture management was advised. Chylous drainage of 1l/24hr was observed. Due to ongoing chylous leak the patient was commenced on a medium-chain fatty acid diet and octreotide. Whilst chylous drainage ceased the patient died from infected pressure sores, malnutrition and acute kidney injury. Spinal trauma can rarely cause disruption of the thoracic duct and chylothorax. Diagnosis of chylothorax hinges on the typically high triglyceride content of chylous fluid and the detection of chylomicrons where the triglyceride concentration is equivocal. Management options for persistently draining chylothorax are varied and range from non-invasive medical measures to radiological and surgical interventions (although the patient in the case we present was an unsuitable candidate for surgery). We discuss pertinent diagnostic testing and put forward possible medical management strategies for chylothorax. PMID:26029578

  6. Fast track endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João Bosco Vieira; Kux, Peter; Castro, Carlos H V; Cruvinel, Marcos G C; Costa, José R R

    2003-12-01

    The length of hospital stay is an important factor of cost and psychological discomfort in the treatment of hyperhidrosis by endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy (ETS). Our experience enrolls 1587 patients operated on an outpatient basis in the last 10 years and seven months. This study aimed to confirm that ETS can be performed on an outpatient basis. Fifty-two consecutive patients (30 males and 22 females) were submitted to ETS under general anesthesia using a single lumen endotracheal tube, with lung collapse by intrapleural injection of CO(2). The sympathetic chain and the communicating rami were severed at different levels according to hyperhidrosis location. Patients were physical state American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 and 2. Age varied between 13 and 55 years (27.3 +/- 10.2 years). They were monitored with ECG, SPO2, NIBP, expired CO(2), sevoflurane analyzer, and airway pressure. Normal saline (40.0 +/- 2.7 ml/kg) was infused intravenously. The drugs used were propofol, alfentanil, rocuronium, ondansetron, dexamethasone, dipyrone, cetoprofene and sevoflurane. Anesthesia and post-operative data were analyzed. Post-operative thoracic X-rays were taken in 20 patients before discharge. Anesthesia lasted 67.2 +/- 20.8 minutes, and the surgical procedure took 46.3 +/- 20.9 minutes. The patients stayed 18.0 +/- 11.0 minutes in the post-anaesthetic care unit and were discharged from hospital after 150.3 +/- 43.1 minutes. The only abnormal post-operative event observed was insignificant residual carbothorax, found in 2 (10%) of the thoracic X-rays taken. In conclusion, this study confirmed that ETS can be performed safely on an outpatient basis. PMID:14673677

  7. Analgesia in thoracic surgery: review.

    PubMed

    De Cosmo, G; Aceto, P; Gualtieri, E; Congedo, E

    2009-06-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is one of the most severe types of postoperative pain. It can last up to 2 months and can become chronic in 30% of patients. Pain relief after thoracic surgery is of particular significance, not only for ethical considerations but also for reduction of postoperative pulmonary and cardiac complications. Because of the difficulty in pain control, many approaches have been suggested, but a multimodal therapeutic strategy that provides a central or peripheral block associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) and adjuvant drugs is now the cornerstone of treatment, offering the possibility of reducing opioid requirements and side effects. Thoracic epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is regarded as the gold standard treatment for post-thoracotomy pain management because it results in early extubation, better ventilatory mechanisms and gas exchange, decreased incidence of atelectasis, pneumonia and chronic postoperative pain. When epidural analgesia is contraindicated or cannot be performed, other regional techniques of analgesia can be used. An alternative method of providing adequate pain relief is a thoracic paravertebral block: continuous paravertebral infusion of local anesthetic via a catheter placed percutaneously or under direct vision during thoracotomy. This is effective in controlling postoperative pain and in preserving pulmonary function. Other techniques, such as intercostal and interpleural blocks, are rarely utilized, whereas a single shot of intrathecal injection of a hydrophilic opioid, such as morphine, appears to be effective. Cryoanalgesia, which is successful in the immediate postoperative period, has been abandoned for its brief duration and increased incidence of chronic pain. PMID:18953284

  8. [Prevention and treatment of post-traumatic pancreatic necrosis in patients with blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Cherdantsev, D V; Pervova, O V; Vinnik, Yu S; Kurbanov, D Sh

    2016-01-01

    Введение. Особенностью острого панкреатита травматического генеза является высокий удельный вес некротических и гнойно-некротических форм осложнений. Тяжелая травма поджелудочной железы и развившийся посттравматический панкреатит приводят к разгерметизации протоковой системы органа, что обязывает хирурга адекватно дренировать зону повреждения и забрюшинную клетчатку. Материал и методы. Пациенты 1-й группы (95 больных) получали стандартизированную терапию. Пострадавшим 2-й группы (44 больных) в ранние сроки проводили иммуноактивную (ронколейкин) и секретолитическую терапию (октреотид - доза зависела от тяжести панкреатита). Эффективность лечения оценивали по клинико-лабораторным и инструментальным показателям. Методы статистической обработки. Статистическая обработка результатов исследования проводилась с помощью пакета прикладных программ Microsoft Excel 2007 и Statistica 6.0. Результаты. Без учета тяжести травмы поджелудочной железы общая летальность в 1-й группе составила 41%, во 2-й группе на фоне применения малоинвазивных хирургических технологий в сочетании со специфической медикаментозной терапией этот показатель был равен 20,5%. Основные причины неблагоприятных исходов - тяжелый деструктивный панкреатит, постнекротические гнойные осложнения. Выводы. При выборе способа операции у пострадавшего с закрытым повреждением поджелудочной железы следует стремиться не к радикальности, а к адекватности операции, шире использовать малоинвазивные хирургические технологии и новые методы биологического гемостаза. Своевременное применение секретолитической и иммуноактивной терапии позволяет уменьшить риск развития тяжелого посттравматического панкреатита, гнойно-некротических осложнений и улучшить результаты лечения пострадавших с закрытой травмой поджелудочной железы.

  9. [Adrenal injury in blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Abakumov, M M; Smoliar, A N; Barmina, T G; Boĭko, A V; Shalimova, I G

    2009-01-01

    10 patients with adrenal damage were observed during 2.5 years. It amounted 0.93% of all patients with closed abdominal injuries. The right adrenal gland was traumatized in all cases evidently due to it's compression between right lobe of liver and vertebral column. Adrenal damage is observed quite often in combination with injuries of right liver lobe, right kidney and retroperitoneal hematoma formation. 5 patients underwent laparotomy on account of intra-abdominal bleeding, but adrenal damage was never revealed. Ultrasound and tomographic semiotics of adrenal damage was worked out, which allowed ascertaining diagnosis in 80% on application of ultrasound study and in 100% at computer tomography. Injury of one adrenal gland was not accompanied by adrenal failure and did not require hormonal replacement therapy.

  10. [A review on thoracic ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Lanza, Mario; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2016-07-01

    The use of thoracic ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in the emergency department, intensive care unit or in patients with pulmonary diseases is increasing steadily. It is used to guide percutaneous tracheostomies, to assess pleural effusions, to rule out pneumothorax, and to guide the placement of endovascular and pleural catheters. It is also useful in the assessment of patients with dyspnea. The aim of this review is to provide the practical and technical basics for the use of this diagnostic tool among internists and specialists in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27661554

  11. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary layer flows over a 5-degree straight cone at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radii of 0.001, 0.05 and 0.10 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the nose radii ranging from 650 to 130,000. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of axisymmetric boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a cone with the nose Reynolds number of 65,000 is increased by a factor of 1.82 compared to that for a sharp cone. The receptivity coefficient for a sharp cone is about 4.23 and it is very small, approx.10(exp -3), for large bluntness.

  12. Traumatic avulsion of the tricuspid valve after gas bottle explosion

    PubMed Central

    Krisper, Maximilian; Köhncke, Clemens; Pieske, Burkert

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a very rare example of chronic right heart failure caused by torrent tricuspid regurgitation. Massive right heart dilatation and severe tricuspid regurgitation due to avulsion of the tricuspid valve apparatus occurred as a result of a blunt chest trauma following the explosion of a gas bottle 20 years before admission, when the patient was a young man in Vietnam. After this incident, the patient went through a phase of severe illness, which can retrospectively be identified as an acute right heart decompensation with malaise, ankle edema, and dyspnea. Blunt chest trauma caused by explosives leading to valvular dysfunction has not been reported in the literature so far. It is remarkable that the patient not only survived this trauma, but had been managing his chronic heart failure well without medication for over 20 years. Learning points Thorough clinical and physical examination remains the key to identifying patients with relevant valvulopathies.With good acoustic windows, TTE is superior to TEE in visualizing the right heart.Traumatic avulsion of valve apparatus is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt chest trauma and must be actively sought for. Transthoracic echocardiography remains the method of choice in these patients. PMID:27249554

  13. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  14. Traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Steinsapir, K D; Goldberg, R A

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the pathophysiologic mechanisms of traumatic optic neuropathy is limited. The optic nerve is a tract of the brain. Therefore, the cellular and biochemical pathophysiology of brain and spinal cord trauma and ischemia provide insight into mechanisms that may operate in traumatic optic neuropathy. The dosage of methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg/6 hours) which was successful in the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study 2 (NASCIS 2) evolved from the unique pharmacology of corticosteroids as antioxidants. The management of traumatic optic neuropathy rests on an accurate diagnosis which begins with a comprehensive clinical assessment and appropriate neuroimaging. The results of medical and surgical strategies for treating this injury have not been demonstrated to be better than those achieved without treatment. The spinal cord is a mixed grey and white matter tract of the brain in contrast to the optic nerve which is a pure white matter tract. The treatment success seen with methylprednisolone in the NASCIS 2 study may not generalize to the treatment of traumatic optic neuropathy. Conversely, if the treatment does generalize to the optic nerve, NASCIS 2 data suggests that treatment must be started within eight hours of injury, making traumatic optic neuropathy one of the true ophthalmic emergencies. Given the uncertainties in the treatment, ophthalmologists involved in the management of traumatic optic neuropathy are encouraged to participate in the collaborative study of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  15. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  16. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), ... barrier. NIH Patient Recruitment for Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. ...

  19. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  20. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  1. Thoracic Extraosseous Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Ceylan, Davut; Erdem, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas were first reported in 1929 by Globus and Doshay, and are defined as benign vascular structures developed between the neural tissues occurring in the central nervous system, consisting of a dilated vascular bed. Cavernous hemangiomas comprise nearly 5-12% of all spinal vascular malformations; however, existence in the epidural space without bone involvement is rare. Only 4% of all cavernous hemangiomas (0.22/1.000.000) are purely epidural cavernous hemangiomas. In this case report, we removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass presenting with progressive neurological deficits in a 55-year-old male patient. We found this case to be appropriate for presentation due to the rare occurrence of this type of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:25674348

  2. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  3. Visual Outcome of Traumatic Cataract at a Tertiary Eye Care Centre in North India: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Srivastava, Jai Prakash; Iqbal, Jawed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most common presentations of blunt and penetrating ocular trauma is traumatic cataract. It remains a significant cause of visual impairment and physical disability among adults and children. It is associated with various ocular injuries. Aim To evaluate the associated ocular injuries and final outcome of patients with traumatic cataract along with their demographic features and modes of trauma. Materials and Methods A prospective study done in Department of Ophthalmology in M.L.B. Medical college, Jhansi from February 2010 to July 2011. A total of 48 patients diagnosed as a case of traumatic cataract were subjected to a detailed history, systemic and local examination with relevant investigations. Medical or surgical managements were done accordingly. Patients were subsequently followed-up and visual acuity was recorded. Appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results A 54.2% patients sustained penetrating trauma while 45.8% got blunt injury. Out of total, 79% patients were males while 50% were less than 15 years of age. Causative agents were stone, wood items, stick, metal objects etc. Among blunt trauma cases, 64% of the patients had visual acuity <6/60 while among penetrating trauma cases nobody had acuity >6/18. Anterior segment was more involved as compared to posterior segment. A 38.5% patients had corneal opacity among penetrating injury patients. The interval between trauma and surgery was less than one month among 75% of patients. After three months of surgery, 43.7% patients had visual acuity of >6/18. Conclusion This study provides recent data of patients hospitalized after ocular trauma and diagnosed as a case of traumatic cataract. Traumatic cataract occurs mostly in younger males. Surgical intervention is necessary to improve visual outcome. Good visual outcome was obtained in nearly half of the patients. Traumatic cataract patients can have good visual outcome depending upon proper management. PMID:26894101

  4. Traumatic Alterations in Consciousness: Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Brian J.; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) refers to the clinical condition of transient alteration of consciousness as a result of traumatic injury to the brain. The priority of emergency care is to identify and facilitate the treatment of rare but potentially life threatening intra-cranial injuries associated with mTBI through the judicious application of appropriate imaging studies and neurosurgical consultation. Although post-mTBI symptoms quickly and completely resolve in the vast majority of cases, a significant number of patients will complain of lasting problems that may cause significant disability. Simple and early interventions such as patient education and appropriate referral can reduce the likelihood of chronic symptoms. Although definitive evidence is lacking, mTBI is likely to be related to significant long-term sequelae such as Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20709244

  5. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  6. Thoracic ranula: an extremely rare case.

    PubMed

    Pang, Claudine Elizabeth; Lee, Tee Sin; Pang, Kenny Peter; Pang, Yoke Teen

    2005-03-01

    We present the first case of a thoracic ranula which originated from the left submandibular area extending into the subcutaneous tissue planes of the anterior chest wall. The patient had a history of surgery for a previous benign left salivary gland cyst, and presented with an enlarging mass in the anterior chest wall. This was a recurrence of a ranula, with an extension into the anterior thoracic wall. The thoracic ranula was excised, together with ipsilateral sublingual and submandibular glands, via a transcervical approach. No recurrence was detected over a 3-year post-operative follow up.

  7. Subsonic Static and Dynamic Aerodynamics of Blunt Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Fremaux, Charles M.; Yates, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    The incompressible subsonic aerodynamics of four entry-vehicle shapes with variable c.g. locations are examined in the Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. The shapes examined are spherically-blunted cones with half-cone angles of 30, 45, and 60 deg. The nose bluntness varies between 0.25 and 0.5 times the base diameter. The Reynolds number based on model diameter for these tests is near 500,000. Quantitative data on attitude and location are collected using a video-based data acquisition system and reduced with a six deg-of-freedom inverse method. All of the shapes examined suffered from strong dynamic instabilities which could produced limit cycles with sufficient amplitudes to overcome static stability of the configuration. Increasing cone half-angle or nose bluntness increases drag but decreases static and dynamic stability.

  8. Bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Iaselli, Francesco; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Firetto, Cristina; D'Elia, Domenico; Squitieri, Nevada Cioffi; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The bowel and the mesentery represent the third most frequently involved structures in blunt abdominal trauma after the liver and the spleen. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal and/or mesenteric injury from blunt abdominal trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. Multi-detector computed tomography, thanks to its high spatial, time and contrast resolutions, allows a prompt identification and proper classification of such conditions. The radiologist, in fact, is asked not only to identify the signs of trauma but also to provide an indication of their clinical significance, suggesting the chance of conservative treatment in the cases of mild and moderate, non-complicated or self-limiting injuries and focusing on life-threatening conditions which may benefit from immediate surgical or interventional procedures. Specific and non-specific CT signs of bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed in this paper.

  9. A demographic profile of 7273 traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injured patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Vahid; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: To evaluate demographic profile of traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. Methods: Mobile rehabilitation teams gathered data in 20 out of 30 provinces in Iran. Of 8104 traumatic and non-traumatic SCI patients under coverage of the State Welfare Organization of Iran registered in the database, 7273 were included in the analysis. The aggregate data on SCIs, including age, gender, place of residence, education level, marital status, etiology of injury, age at the time of injury, time passed since injury, level of injury, type of cord injury, having caregiver, and occupation were recorded. Results: Of 7273 patients, 5175 (71.1%) were male. At the time of the study, 46% were in the age group 20-40 years old, 34% were more than 40, and 20% were less than 20 years old. The residential place of 26% was in villages. 23.9% were illiterate, 6.9% had high school diploma or higher. The distribution of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels of injury was 17.7, 24.4, and 57.9%, respectively. Overall, there were 49% married and 45.8% never married, while 1.4% patients were single because their partners had left them, 1.7% of partners had died, 1.9% had divorced, and 0.3% had remarried. At the time of the presentation of patients, 33% were 21-30 years-old, 17% were 31-40, and 16% were less than 20 years. About the type of cord injury, the paraplegia, paraparesia, quadriplegia, quadriparesia, and hemiparesia were present in 72.1, 12.5, 10.2, 4.0, and 1.1% of patients, respectively. Unemployment was reported in 55.6% of patients. However, 17% were unable to work, 7.1% had a job, and 3.4% were retired. Caregiver was not provided for 7.5% of them. The most prevalent causes of the injury were: trauma (57.4%), congenital (14.4%), tumors (4.4%), spinal degenerative disorder such as canal stenosis (2.2%), genetic (2.0%), infection (1.9%), scoliosis (1.1%), and miscellaneous (10.6%). Conclusions: These data will provide the information to guide

  10. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bandorski, Dirk Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 {+-} 25 years vs. 67 {+-} 16 years; P < 0.05) and showed more oversizing (proximal, 36 {+-} 19.8% vs. 29 {+-} 20.7% [P > 0.05]; distal, 45 {+-} 23.5% vs. 38 {+-} 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  11. [Endovascular repair for an acute traumatic aortic transection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sanioğlu, Soner; Sahin, Sinan; Aydoğan, Hakki; Barutça, Hakan; Eren, Ergin

    2012-03-01

    A thirty-eight-year-old male patient who suffered from 10th and 11th thoracal vertebrae fractures, paraplegia and acute traumatic aortic transection because of accidental fall was referred to our hospital. Open surgical repair carried a very high risk due to severe coexisting injuries. Transection was treated with 30x100 mm Valiant thoracic endograft, which was deployed just distal to the ostium of the left carotid artery. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery clinic for treatment of paraplegia after an uneventful recovery. Endovascular repair of acute transection confers substantial advantages in mortality and morbidity compared to surgical repair. However, the long-term durability of thoracic endografts remains unknown. If the long-term results are as satisfactory as the promising mid-term results, this technique may become the gold standard approach for the treatment of acute transection. PMID:22792827

  12. Thoracic Duct Embolization with Lipiodol for Chylothorax due to Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair with Debranching Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Hyoung; Jung, Jae Seung; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Ho Sung

    2015-01-01

    Chylothorax is a rare postoperative complication of a thoracic surgical procedure. Here, we report a case of chylothorax after thoracic endovascular aortic repair with debranching for the distal arch aneurysm of the aorta. First, the patient was treated by a medical method (nil per os, fat-free diet, and octreotide), but this method failed. The patient strongly refused surgical treatment. Therefore, we tried to occlude the thoracic duct by lymphangiography Lipiodol, and this line of treatment was successful. PMID:25705604

  13. A Nonpolar Blueberry Fraction Blunts NADPH Oxidase Activation in Neuronal Cells Exposed to Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sally J.; Dunlap, Kriya L.; McGill, Colin M.; Kuhn, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are key to the progressive neuronal degeneration common to chronic pathologies, traumatic injuries, and aging processes in the CNS. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) orchestrates cellular stress by stimulating the production and release of neurotoxic mediators including reactive oxygen species (ROS). NADPH oxidases (NOX), ubiquitously expressed in all cells, have recently emerged as pivotal ROS sources in aging and disease. We demonstrated the presence of potent NOX inhibitors in wild Alaska bog blueberries partitioning discretely into a nonpolar fraction with minimal antioxidant capacity and largely devoid of polyphenols. Incubation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with nonpolar blueberry fractions obstructed the coalescing of lipid rafts into large domains disrupting NOX assembly therein and abolishing ROS production characteristic for TNF-α exposure. These findings illuminate nutrition-derived lipid raft modulation as a novel therapeutic approach to blunt inflammatory and oxidative stress in the aging or diseased CNS. PMID:22530077

  14. Occult Mediastinal Great Vessel Trauma: The Value of Aortography Performed During Angiographic Screening for Blunt Cervical Vascular Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Charles E. Bauer, Jason R.; Cothren, C. Clay; Turner, James H.; Moore, Ernest E.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the value of aortography in the assessment of occult aortic and great vessel injuries when routinely performed during screening angiography for blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI). Methods. One hundred and one consecutive patients who received both aortography and screening four-vessel angiography over 4 years were identified retrospectively. Angiograms for these patients were evaluated, and the incidence of occult mediastinal vascular injury was determined. Results. Of the 101 patients, 6 (6%) had angiographically documented traumatic aortic injuries. Of these 6 patients, one injury (17%) was unsuspected prior to angiography. Four of the 6 (67%) also had BCVI. One additional patient also had an injury to a branch of the subclavian artery. Conclusion. Routine aortography during screening angiography for BCVI is not warranted due to the low incidence (1%) of occult mediastinal arterial injury. However, in the setting of a BCVI screening study and no CT scan of the chest, aortography may be advantageous.

  15. Late outcome of very severe blunt head trauma: a 10-15 year second follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, I V

    1984-01-01

    Forty patients with very severe blunt head trauma (post-traumatic amnesia greater than or equal to 1 month) were initially examined at an average of 4.5 months after the injury. The patients were visited in their homes 2.5 years and 10-15 years after the accident and questionnaires were presented to patients, relatives and/or staff. Though physical impairment, dysarthria and defects of memory remained severe in many cases, the psychosocial sequelae presented the most serious problems. Permanent changes in personality and emotion were reported in two thirds and were especially frequent among the youngest patients. The worse overall outcome was seen in cases with severe brainstem involvement or anterior lesions or both. In spite of the great frequency of deficits long-term improvement of functional state was common and several regained at least some work capacity. PMID:6707671

  16. Aerothermodynamics of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Borrelli, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the aerothermodynamic phenomena of blunt body entry vehicles are discussed. Four topics will be considered that present challenges to current computational modeling techniques for blunt body environments: turbulent flow, non-equilibrium flow, rarefied flow, and radiation transport. Examples of comparisons between computational tools to ground and flight-test data will be presented in order to illustrate the challenges existing in the numerical modeling of each of these phenomena and to provide test cases for evaluation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code predictions.

  17. Usefulness of transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography in recognition and management of cardiovascular injuries after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Chirillo, F.; Totis, O.; Cavarzerani, A.; Bruni, A.; Farnia, A.; Sarpellon, M.; Ius, P.; Valfrè, C.; Stritoni, P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic potential of transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography for the detection of traumatic cardiovascular injuries in patients suffering from severe blunt chest trauma. DESIGN: Prospective study over a three year period. SETTING: A regional cardiothoracic centre. PATIENTS: 134 consecutive patients (94 M/40 F; mean age 38 (SD 14) years) suffering from severe blunt chest trauma (injury severity score 33.5 (18.2)). Most patients (89%) were victims of motor vehicle accidents. EVALUATION: All patients underwent transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography within 8 h of admission. Aortography was performed in the first 20 patients and in a further five equivocal cases. RESULTS: Transthoracic echocardiography provided suboptimal images in 83 patients, detecting three aortic ruptures, 28 pericardial effusions (one cardiac tamponade), 35 left pleural effusions, and 15 myocardial contusions. Transoesophageal echocardiography was feasible in 131 patients and detected 14 aortic ruptures (13 at the isthmus), 40 pericardial effusions, 51 left pleural effusions, 34 periaortic haematomas, 45 myocardial contusions, right atrial laceration in one patient with cardiac tamponade, one tricuspid valve rupture, and one severe mitral regurgitation caused by annular disruption. For the detection of aortic rupture transoesophageal echocardiography showed 93% sensitivity, 98% specificity, and 98% accuracy. Time to surgery was significantly shorter (30 (12) v 71 (21) min; P < 0.05) for patients operated on only on the basis of transoesophageal echocardiographic findings. CONCLUSIONS: Transthoracic echocardiography has low diagnostic yield in severe blunt chest trauma, while transoesophageal echocardiography provides accurate diagnosis in a short time at the bedside, is inexpensive, minimally invasive, and does not interfere with other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Images PMID:8800997

  18. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  19. Traumatic Rupture of A Posterior Mediastinal Teratoma following Motor-Vehicle Accident.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher; Domingo, Fernando; Miller, Ashley D; Smith, Jeremiah S; Headrick, James R

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a posterior mediastinal mature cystic teratoma with rupture secondary to blunt chest trauma in a 20-year-old male involved in a motor-vehicle accident. Initial treatment was guided by Advanced Trauma Life Support and a tube thoracostomy was performed for presumed hemothorax. The heterogeneous collection within the thoracic cavity was discovered to be the result of a ruptured cystic mass. Pathologic findings confirmed the mass consistent with a mature cystic teratoma. As mediastinal teratomas are most commonly described arising from the anterior mediastinum, the posterior location of the teratoma described in this report is exceedingly rare. PMID:27660731

  20. Traumatic Rupture of A Posterior Mediastinal Teratoma following Motor-Vehicle Accident

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christopher; Domingo, Fernando; Smith, Jeremiah S.; Headrick, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a posterior mediastinal mature cystic teratoma with rupture secondary to blunt chest trauma in a 20-year-old male involved in a motor-vehicle accident. Initial treatment was guided by Advanced Trauma Life Support and a tube thoracostomy was performed for presumed hemothorax. The heterogeneous collection within the thoracic cavity was discovered to be the result of a ruptured cystic mass. Pathologic findings confirmed the mass consistent with a mature cystic teratoma. As mediastinal teratomas are most commonly described arising from the anterior mediastinum, the posterior location of the teratoma described in this report is exceedingly rare. PMID:27660731

  1. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, de Sales; Cox, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth. PMID:15248894

  2. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    PTSD ... providers do not know why traumatic events cause PTSD in some people, but not in others. Your ... Past emotional trauma may increase your risk of PTSD after a recent traumatic event. With PTSD, the ...

  4. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines.

  5. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Danguilan, Jose Luis J

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases-first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  6. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Danguilan, Jose Luis J

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases-first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines.

  7. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  8. Intravitreal ranibizumab in treating extensive traumatic submacular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Salim, Ismail; Embong, Zunaina; Khairy-Shamel, Sonny-Teo; Raja-Azmi, Mohd-Noor

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report our experience in treating extensive traumatic submacular hemorrhage with a single dose of intravitreal ranibizumab. A 23-year-old healthy Malay man presented with a progressive reduction of central vision in the left eye of 2 days’ duration following a history of blunt trauma. Visual acuity was reduced to counting fingers. Examination revealed infero-temporal subconjunctival hemorrhage, traumatic anterior uveitis, and an extensive sub-macular hemorrhage with suspicion of a choroidal rupture in the affected eye. He was initially treated conservatively with topical prednisolone acetate 1%. The subconjunctival hemorrhage and anterior uveitis resolved but his vision remained poor with minimal resolution of the submacular hemorrhage at 1 week follow-up (day 12 post-trauma). In view of the poor resolution of submacular hemorrhage, he was treated with a single dose of 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab at day 20 post-trauma. At 4 weeks post-intravitreal ranibizumab, there was an improvement in visual acuity (from counting fingers to 6/45) and complete resolution of the submacular hemorrhage with presence of a choroidal rupture scar temporal to the fovea, which was not seen clearly at presentation due to obscuration by blood. His visual acuity further improved to 6/18 at 3 months post-trauma. Although this single case had a favorable outcome, a large population cohort study is needed to establish the effectiveness of intravitreal ranibizumab in treating extensive traumatic submacular hemorrhage. PMID:23589678

  9. [Traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, K; Unterberg, A

    2016-02-01

    Since traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of long-term disability and death among young adults, it represents an enormous socio-economic and healthcare burden. As a consequence of the primary lesion, a perifocal brain edema develops causing an elevation of the intracranial pressure due to the limited intracranial space. This entails a reduction of the cerebral perfusion pressure and the cerebral blood flow. A cerebral perfusion deficit below the threshold for ischemia leads to further ischemic lesions and to a progression of the contusion. As the irreversible primary lesion can only be inhibited by primary prevention, the therapy of traumatic brain injury focuses on the secondary injuries. The treatment consists of surgical therapy evacuating the space-occupying intracranial lesion and conservative intensive medical care. Due to the complex pathophysiology the therapy of traumatic brain injury should be rapidly performed in a neurosurgical unit. PMID:26810405

  10. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Trajan A; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Moore, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12(th) century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI. PMID:24872841

  11. Blunt cerebrovascular injury in rugby and other contact sports: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Contact sports have long been a part of human existence. The two earliest recorded organized contact games, both of which still exist, include Royal Shrovetide Football played since the 12th century in England and Caid played since 1308 AD in Ireland. Rugby is the premier contact sport played throughout the world with the very popular derivative American football being the premier contact sport of the North American continent. American football in the USA has on average 1,205,037 players at the high school and collegiate level per year while rugby in the USA boasts a playing enrollment of 457,983 at all levels. Recent media have highlighted injury in the context of competitive contact sports including their long-term sequelae such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) that had previously been underappreciated. Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) has become a recognized injury pattern for trauma; however, a paucity of data regarding this injury can be found in the sports trauma literature. We present a case of an international level scrum-half playing Rugby Union at club level for a local non-professional team, in which a player sustained a fatal BCVI followed by a discussion of the literature surrounding sport related BCVI. PMID:24872841

  12. Sonic-boom minimization with nose-bluntness relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure which provides sonic-boom-minimizing equivalent area distributions for supersonic cruise conditions is described. This work extends previous analyses to permit relaxation of the extreme bluntness required by conventional low-boom shapes and includes propagation in a real atmosphere. The procedure provides area distributions which minimize either shock strength or overpressure.

  13. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  14. [Traumatic and occupational deafness].

    PubMed

    Poncet, J L; Kossowski, M; Verdaille, P

    2000-01-15

    The frequency of accidental, traumatic hearing loss is increasing due to a sometimes violently noisy environment and to the development of sports as leisure activities. The diagnosis is based on knowledge of the circumstances of the trauma and on otoscopic examination. Total audiometry localises the damage. Occupational hearing loss forms a special subset of traumatic deafness. This trauma is usually due to intense noise occurring at the work-place. It is of insidious onset, irreversibly progressive and without treatment once under way; Prevention is based on knowledge of the deleterious effects of noise and on the individual factors of the subject at risk.

  15. [Video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and mediastinitis: major issues in thoracic surgery in 2010].

    PubMed

    Borro, José M; Moreno, Ramón; Gómez, Ana; Duque, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the major issues in thoracic surgery relating to the advances made in our specialty in 2010. To do this, the 43(rd) Congress of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery held in La Coruña and the articles published in the Society's journal, Archivos de Bronconeumología, were reviewed. The main areas of interest were related to the development of video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and descending mediastinitis. The new tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification (7(th) edition), presented last year, was still a topical issue this year. The First Forum of Thoracic Surgeons and the Update in Thoracic Surgery together with the Nurses' Area have constituted an excellent teaching program. PMID:21300211

  16. Biophysical mechanisms of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Young, Lee Ann; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Burns, Jennie M

    2015-02-01

    Despite years of effort to prevent traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), the occurrence of TBI in the United States alone has reached epidemic proportions. When an external force is applied to the head, it is converted into stresses that must be absorbed into the brain or redirected by a helmet or other protective equipment. Complex interactions of the head, neck, and jaw kinematics result in strains in the brain. Even relatively mild mechanical trauma to these tissues can initiate a neurochemical cascade that leads to TBI. Civilians and warfighters can experience head injuries in both combat and noncombat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic and blunt impact, acceleration, and blast. It is critical to understand the physics created by these threats to develop meaningful improvements to clinical care, injury prevention, and mitigation. Here the authors review the current state of understanding of the complex loading conditions that lead to TBI and characterize how these loads are transmitted through soft tissue, the skull and into the brain, resulting in TBI. In addition, gaps in knowledge and injury thresholds are reviewed, as these must be addressed to better design strategies that reduce TBI incidence and severity. PMID:25714862

  17. Biophysical mechanisms of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Young, Lee Ann; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Burns, Jennie M

    2015-02-01

    Despite years of effort to prevent traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), the occurrence of TBI in the United States alone has reached epidemic proportions. When an external force is applied to the head, it is converted into stresses that must be absorbed into the brain or redirected by a helmet or other protective equipment. Complex interactions of the head, neck, and jaw kinematics result in strains in the brain. Even relatively mild mechanical trauma to these tissues can initiate a neurochemical cascade that leads to TBI. Civilians and warfighters can experience head injuries in both combat and noncombat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic and blunt impact, acceleration, and blast. It is critical to understand the physics created by these threats to develop meaningful improvements to clinical care, injury prevention, and mitigation. Here the authors review the current state of understanding of the complex loading conditions that lead to TBI and characterize how these loads are transmitted through soft tissue, the skull and into the brain, resulting in TBI. In addition, gaps in knowledge and injury thresholds are reviewed, as these must be addressed to better design strategies that reduce TBI incidence and severity.

  18. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future.

  19. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turna, Akif

    2016-08-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future.

  20. Transition after Traumatic Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuban, Caelan

    2011-01-01

    Children experience grief when they suffer the loss of a close relationship. When that loss also traumatizes children, they experience additional emotional reactions. It is important that adults educate themselves and others who deal with children about typical, healthy grief reactions. Following a non-violent loss, the initial reactions of…

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A. (2008). Mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq. New England Journal of Medicine, 358, 453–463. ... and Spotlights U.S. hospitals miss followup for suspected child abuse Q&A with NICHD Acting Director Catherine ...

  2. Post-traumatic brachymetatarsia.

    PubMed

    Marcinko, D E; Rappaport, M J; Gordon, S

    1984-01-01

    A case report of post-traumatic brachymetatarsia of the fourth right metatarsal is presented. The literature is reviewed and surgical alternatives are discussed. Treatment consisted of a step-up elongational osteotomy with good results and rapid patient recovery. PMID:6520345

  3. Coping with Traumatic Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    This workshop seeks to train persons interested in counseling those who have suffered traumatic loss. The training comes about in part by the participants' introspection into their own past trauma reactions and the coping strategies they used. They also learn from the shared experiences of other participants. The goals of this workshop are to 1)…

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... a concussion may feel dazed and may lose vision or balance for a while after the injury A brain contusion is a bruise of the brain. This ... consciousness Headache Confusion Feeling dizzy or lightheaded Blurry vision ... or severe traumatic brain injury include all of the symptoms listed above ...

  5. Patterns of Blunt Use Among Rural Young Adult African-American Men

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Catherine F.; Foushee, Herman R.; Pevear, Jesse S.; Scarinci, Isabel C.; Carroll, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Blunts are hollowed-out cigars or leaf tobacco filled with marijuana. Use of blunts has increased since the 1990s and, in 2005, 3.5% of all American youth were estimated to have used blunts in the past month. Blunt smokers may have greater odds of cannabis and tobacco dependency and are at risk of smoking-related diseases. Previous studies have suggested that blunt use is more common among blacks, older teens, and men. However, data pertaining to blunt use in non-adolescent African-American populations are scarce. Purpose (1) To assess patterns of blunt use among young adult African-American men aged 19–30 years residing in five rural Black Belt counties in Alabama; (2) To compare these data with those from tobacco cigarette smokers within the same study population. Methods Verbal, face-to-face interviewer-administered survey of 415 participants collected and analyzed between December 2008 and February 2011. Results 159 respondents (38.3%) smoked cigarettes and 45 smoked blunts (10.8%). Of blunt smokers, 33 also smoked cigarettes (73.3%). Use of blunts was prevalent among unemployed, single men, and occupational blunt use was uncommon. Factors important in the initiation, maintenance and cessation of product use were similar for blunt and cigarette smokers, especially product use and acceptance by friends. Legal concerns were an important factor facilitating blunt cessation. Conclusions Blunt use is relatively common among male African Americans aged 19–30 years and is frequently associated with concomitant cigarette use. Tobacco control efforts in this male African-American population should also address blunt usage. PMID:22176848

  6. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus. PMID:27449463

  7. [Combined anesthesia (epidural-general) in thoracic surgery: the cardiocirculatory response to induction. Propofol vs midazolam plus alfentanil].

    PubMed

    Arena, L; Bitossi, U; Di Filippo, A; Di Sebastiano, N

    1993-06-01

    Thoracic epidural block may unpredictably blunt the physiological sympathetic response to anaesthetic agents and profound hypotension could result at induction time. The authors evaluate two different induction regimens in 16 patients scheduled for major thoracic surgery in order to assess which of them would produce less hemodynamic changes. After the institution of high thoracic epidural block (6 ml lidocaine-CO2 2% + epinephrine 1/200,000 level: th.2-3), patients were randomly allocated in two induction groups: P and M. Group P received 2 mg/kg of propofol over 30 seconds; group M received midazolam 0.2 mg/kg plus alfentanil 30 mcg/kg. In Both groups induction was followed by a significant drop in blood pressure (-18% in group M and -37% i group P. In P group the fall in blood pressure is more pronounced than M group (p < 0.05). Noteworthy in both groups cardiac frequency do not increase and in M group significantly lowers. In the authors view the midazolam plus alfentanil induction technique compare well with propofol alone and would recommend its use in poor risk patients.

  8. Thoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Julia; Grimberg, Alexandre; Thompson, Bruna M; Antunes, Viviane B; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Meirelles, Gustavo S P

    2012-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are a diverse group of immunologically mediated systemic disorders that often lead to thoracic changes. The collagen vascular diseases that most commonly involve the lung are rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, and Sjögren syndrome. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension are the main causes of mortality and morbidity among patients with collagen vascular diseases. Given the broad spectrum of possible thoracic manifestations and the varying frequency with which different interstitial lung diseases occur, the interpretation of thoracic images obtained in patients with collagen vascular diseases can be challenging. The task may be more difficult in the presence of treatment-related complications such as drug toxicity and infections, which are common in this group of patients. Although chest radiography is most often used for screening and monitoring of thoracic alterations, high-resolution computed tomography can provide additional information about lung involvement in collagen vascular diseases and may be especially helpful for differentiating specific disease patterns in the lung. General knowledge about the manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases allows radiologists to provide better guidance for treatment and follow-up of these patients.

  9. Early Results of Endovascular Treatment of the Thoracic Aorta Using the Valiant Endograft

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Matt Ivaz, Stella; Cheshire, Nicholas; Fattori, Rosella; Rousseau, Herve; Heijmen, Robin; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Thony, Frederic; Horne, Gillian; Morgan, Robert; Loftus, Ian

    2007-11-15

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta has been adopted as the first-line therapy for much pathology. Initial results from the early-generation endografts have highlighted the potential of this technique. Newer-generation endografts have now been introduced into clinical practice and careful assessment of their performance should be mandatory. This study describes the initial experience with the Valiant endograft and makes comparisons with similar series documenting previous-generation endografts. Data were retrospectively collected on 180 patients treated with the Valiant endograft at seven European centers between March 2005 and October 2006. The patient cohort consisted of 66 patients with thoracic aneurysms, 22 with thoracoabdominal aneurysms, 19 with an acute aortic syndrome, 52 with aneurysmal degeneration of a chronic dissection, and 21 patients with traumatic aortic transection. The overall 30-day mortality for the series was 7.2%, with a stroke rate of 3.8% and a paraplegia rate of 3.3%. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality differed significantly between different indications; thoracic aneurysms (6.1%), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (27.3%), acute aortic syndrome (10.5%), chronic dissections (1.9%), and acute transections (0%). Adjunctive surgical procedures were required in 63 patients, and 51% of patients had grafts deployed proximal to the left subclavian artery. Comparison with a series of earlier-generation grafts demonstrated a significant increase in complexity of procedure as assessed by graft implantation site, number of grafts and patient comorbidity. The data demonstrate acceptable results for a new-generation endograft in series of patients with diverse thoracic aortic pathology. Comparison of clinical outcomes between different endografts poses considerable challenges due to differing case complexity.

  10. Endovascular Repair of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    , and kinking; and Those due to the intervention, either surgical or endovascular. These include paraplegia, stroke, cardiovascular events, respiratory failure, real insufficiency, and intestinal ischemia. Inclusion Criteria Studies comparing the clinical outcomes of ESG treatment with surgical approaches Studies reporting on the safety and effectiveness of the ESG procedure for the treatment of descending TAAs Exclusion Criteria Studies investigating the clinical effectiveness of ESG placement for other conditions such as aortic dissection, aortic ulcer, and traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta Studies investigating the aneurysms of the ascending and the arch of the aorta Studies using custom-made grafts Literature Search The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for health technology assessments. It also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, and Cochrane CENTRAL from January 1, 2000 to July 11, 2005 for studies on ESG procedures. The search was limited to English-language articles and human studies. One health technology assessment from the United Kingdom was identified. This systematic review included all pathologies of the thoracic aorta; therefore, it did not match the inclusion criteria. The search yielded 435 citations; of these, 9 studies met inclusion criteria. Summary of Findings Mortality The results of a comparative study found that in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between ESG placement and surgery patients (2 [4.8%] for ESG vs. 6 [11.3%] for surgery). Pooled data from case series with a mean follow-up ranging from 12 to 38 months showed a 30-day mortality and late mortality rate of 3.9% and 5.5%, respectively. These rates are lower than are those reported in the literature for surgical repair of TAA. Case series showed that the most common cause of early death in patients

  11. A traumatic superficial temporal artery aneurysm after a bicycle accident.

    PubMed

    Veen, Egbert J D; Poelmann, Floris B; IJpma, Frank F A

    2014-01-01

    A male cyclist presented with a swelling on the forehead. Six weeks before, he fell of his bike and smashed his head on the ground while wearing a helmet. A smooth lump of 1 cm had evolved on the temporal side of his forehead in a few weeks. Duplex ultrasonography demonstrated a dilated vessel with a minor defect in the luminal wall. Surgical exploration revealed an aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (STA). The aneurysm was surgically removed and the patient recovered uneventfully. Owing to its superficial course, the STA is vulnerable to blunt head trauma. Traumatic aneurysms of the STA should be a differential diagnostic consideration in patients with a history of trauma and a swelling on their head. PMID:25352578

  12. A traumatic superficial temporal artery aneurysm after a bicycle accident

    PubMed Central

    Veen, Egbert J.D.; Poelmann, Floris B.; IJpma, Frank F.A.

    2014-01-01

    A male cyclist presented with a swelling on the forehead. Six weeks before, he fell of his bike and smashed his head on the ground while wearing a helmet. A smooth lump of 1 cm had evolved on the temporal side of his forehead in a few weeks. Duplex ultrasonography demonstrated a dilated vessel with a minor defect in the luminal wall. Surgical exploration revealed an aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (STA). The aneurysm was surgically removed and the patient recovered uneventfully. Owing to its superficial course, the STA is vulnerable to blunt head trauma. Traumatic aneurysms of the STA should be a differential diagnostic consideration in patients with a history of trauma and a swelling on their head. PMID:25352578

  13. Acute Shingles after Resection of Thoracic Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Muesse, Jason L.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Harris, Richard L.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is relatively uncommon after surgery in immunocompetent patients. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of herpes zoster after the resection of a thoracic schwannoma. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman in whom acute shingles developed after the video-assisted thoracic surgical resection of a posterior mediastinal schwannoma adjacent to the 4th thoracic vertebral body. The patient recovered after receiving timely antiviral therapy. Rash and pain are common in patients who have wound infections and contact dermatitis after surgery, so the possible reactivation of varicella virus might not be prominent in the surgeon's mind. This case serves as a reminder that viral infections such as shingles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative erythema and pain. PMID:22740749

  14. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  15. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  16. Investigation of shock-induced combustion past blunt projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixtures at various free-stream conditions and parameters. Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A seven-species, seven reactions finite rate hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism is used combined with a finite-difference, shock-fitting method to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. The study has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model.

  17. Long thoracic neuropathy from athletic activity.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J S; Leonard, J A

    1992-01-01

    Four cases of long thoracic mononeuropathy associated with sports participation are presented. Each patient developed shoulder pain or dysfunction after an acute event or vigorous activity, and demonstrated scapular winging consistent with serratus anterior weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed with electromyography in each case. It is suggested that the athletic activity caused a stretch injury to the long thoracic nerve. Conservative management, consisting of range of motion exercises for the shoulder and strengthening of the serratus anterior muscle, resulted in a favorable outcome in all patients.

  18. Arterial Injuries Associated with Blunt Fractures in the Lower Extremity.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jamie J; Tavoosi, Saharnaz; Zarzaur, Ben L; Brewer, Brian L; Rozycki, Grace S; Feliciano, David V

    2016-09-01

    Problems related to the combination of an arterial injury and a blunt fracture in the lower extremity are well known-delayed diagnosis, damaged soft tissue, and high amputation rate. The actual incidence of this injury pattern is, however, unknown. The purposes of this study were to determine the current incidence of named arterial injuries in patients with blunt fractures in the lower extremities and assess potential associated risk factors. This was a 7-year (2007-2013) retrospective review of patients ≥18 years with blunt lower extremity fractures at a Level I trauma center. Fracture location and concomitant arterial injury were determined and patients stratified by age, gender, and injury velocity. Low injury velocity was defined as falls or assaults, whereas an injury secondary to a motorized vehicle was defined as high velocity. A total of 4413 patients (mean age 52.2 years, 54.3% male, mean Injury Severity Score 13.1) were identified. Forty-six patients (1.04%) had arterial injuries (20.4% common femoral, 8.2% superficial femoral, 44.9% popliteal, and 26.5% shank). After stratifying by age and injury velocity, younger age was associated with a significantly higher rate of vascular injury. For high-velocity injuries, there was no difference based on age. In conclusion, the prevalence of arterial injury after blunt lower extremity fractures is 1.04 per cent in our study. A significant paradoxical relationship exists between age and associated arterial injuries in patients with low-velocity injuries. If these data are confirmed in future studies, a low index of suspicion in patients >55 years after falls is appropriate. PMID:27670570

  19. Hyphema due to blunt injury: a review of 118 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ulagantheran, V; Ahmad Fauzi, M S; Reddy, S C

    2010-01-01

    AIM To determine the causes, associated ocular findings and visual acuity on presentation, complications and visual outcome following treatment in patients of hyphema due to blunt injury METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 118 patients with hyphema due to blunt injury admitted in University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The gender, age, race, cause of blunt injury resulting in hyphema, eye involved, vision at admission, other associated ophthalmological findings, complications and visual outcome were noted from the case records of patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS programme. RESULTS Males were more predominantly affected (93.2%). Two-thirds of patients (67.8%) were aged below 30 years. Sports related injury (38.1%) was the most common cause for hyphema. Hyphema disappeared within 5 days in 66.9% of patients. Iris injuries were very commonly associated in the form of mydriasis, sphincter tear and iridodialysis. Associated vitreous haemorrhage was noted in 11.9% of patients. During the hospital stay, secondary haemorrhage was observed in 3.4% of patients. The best corrected vision of 6/18 or better was noted in 85.4% of patients at the last follow-up. The follow-up of these subjects was very poor and thus the incidence of secondary glaucoma could not be established. Moderate blood staining of cornea occurred in 0.8% of patients. CONCLUSION Sports related injury is the most common cause of hyphema in Malaysia. Good visual recovery, without serious complications, is possible with appropriate and in-time treatment in hyphema patients due to blunt injury. PMID:22553571

  20. Blunt chest trauma: evaluation of the augmented breast.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A L; Cowley, R A; Hoopes, J E

    1980-11-01

    Breast augmentation is being done increasingly, not only for women who consider their breasts too small but also for those with breast asymmetry, and post-mastectomy patients with reconstruction. It appears inevitable that traumatologists will have to evaluate injury to an augmented breast in a patient who has sustained blunt chest trauma. This paper discusses the differential diagnosis and treatment of implant rupture, hematoma, and spherical capsular contracture as a result of trauma.

  1. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery. PMID:26811041

  2. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery.

  3. Massive rectal bleeding distant from a blunt car trauma.

    PubMed

    Gruden, E; Ragot, E; Arienzo, R; Revaux, A; Magri, M; Grossin, M; Leroy, C; Msika, S; Kianmanesh, R

    2010-09-01

    Mesenteric trauma is one of the possible injuries caused by the use of seat belts in case of motor vehicle crash. We report here a rare case of rectal bleeding by rupture of a mesosigmoid haematoma. An emergent laparotomy revealed a mesosigmoid haematoma with a centimetric rectal perforation. The wearing of safety belts added some specific blunt abdominal trauma, which directly depends on lap-and-sash belts. Mesenteric injuries are found out up to 5% of blunt abdominal traumas. "Seat belt mark" leads the surgical team to strongly suspect an intra-abdominal trauma. When "seat belt mark" sign is found, in patients with mild to severe blunt car injuries, CT-scan has to be realised to eliminate intra-abdominal complications, including mesenteric and mesosigmoid ones. In case of proved mesenteric haematoma associated to intestinal bleeding, a surgical treatment must be considered as first choice. Conservative approach remains possible in stable patients but surgical exploration remains necessary in unstable patients with active bleeding. PMID:20638207

  4. Closure models for transitional blunt-body flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, Robert Paul

    1998-12-01

    A mean-flow modeling approach is proposed for the prediction of high-speed blunt-body wake flows undergoing transition to turbulence. This method couples the k- /zeta (Enstrophy) compressible turbulence model with a procedure for characterizing non-turbulent fluctuations upstream of transition. Two different instability mechanisms are examined in this study. In the first model, transition is brought about by streamwise disturbance modes, whereas the second mechanism considers instabilities in the free shear layer associated with the wake flow. An important feature of this combined approach is the ability to specify or predict the location of transition onset. Solutions obtained using the new approach are presented for a variety of perfect-gas hypersonic flows over blunt- cone configurations. These results are shown to provide better agreement with experimental heating data than earlier laminar predictions by other researchers. In addition, it is demonstrated that the free-shear-layer instability mechanism is superior to the streamwise mechanism in terms of comparisons with heating measurements. The favorable comparisons are a strong indication that transition to turbulence is indeed present in the flowfields considered. They also show that the present method is a useful predictive tool for transitional blunt-body wake flows.

  5. Right coronary artery dissection following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Ander; Alvarez-Contreras, Luis; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Kasa, Gizem; Sabaté, Manel

    2012-04-01

    Chest trauma is a major health problem with a high mortality. Myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection following blunt chest trauma is a rare entity. We describe the case of an inferior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 61-year-old male without any relevant medical history was transported to a hospital after a low-velocity motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient developed severe chest pain and an ECG revealed inferior ST segment elevation. After ruling out aortic dissection with angio-CT, a coronary angiograph depicted a proximal occlusion of the right coronary artery. After thrombectomy, a typical image of coronary artery dissection was observed; the image persisted after several runs of thrombectomy and for that reason a bare metal stent was implanted with a good final angiographic result. Five days after admission the patient was discharged home. Cardiac contusion is not uncommon; however acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma. Thorough evaluation with clinical suspicion can lead to optimal medical care. PMID:24062888

  6. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children.

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta sustained during exposure to a tornado diagnosed with ECG-synchronized CT aortography.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amit; von Herrmann, Paul F; Embertson, Ryan E; Landwehr, Kevin P; Winkler, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    A case of a tornado victim with a delayed presentation of injury to the aortic isthmus is discussed. Tornado forces resemble the forces of high energy explosions, and the injuries that can occur as a result of these forces can be bizarre. The patient presented with the unique computed tomography (CT) findings of isolated pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta in the absence of other traumatic injury to the thorax. Equivocal results of the initial CT aortogram (CTA) were confirmed with ECG-synchronized CTA (ECG-CTA), demonstrating the superiority of ECG-CTA as compared to standard CTA. PMID:27317209

  8. Pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta sustained during exposure to a tornado diagnosed with ECG-synchronized CT aortography.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amit; von Herrmann, Paul F; Embertson, Ryan E; Landwehr, Kevin P; Winkler, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    A case of a tornado victim with a delayed presentation of injury to the aortic isthmus is discussed. Tornado forces resemble the forces of high energy explosions, and the injuries that can occur as a result of these forces can be bizarre. The patient presented with the unique computed tomography (CT) findings of isolated pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta in the absence of other traumatic injury to the thorax. Equivocal results of the initial CT aortogram (CTA) were confirmed with ECG-synchronized CTA (ECG-CTA), demonstrating the superiority of ECG-CTA as compared to standard CTA.

  9. Percutaneous approach to the upper thoracic spine: optimal patient positioning.

    PubMed

    Bayley, Edward; Clamp, Jonathan; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2009-12-01

    Percutaneous access to the upper thoracic vertebrae under fluoroscopic guidance is challenging. We describe our positioning technique facilitating optimal visualisation of the high thoracic vertebrae in the prone position. This allows safe practice of kyphoplasty, vertebroplasty and biopsy throughout the upper thoracic spine.

  10. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages. PMID:24160423

  11. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages.

  12. Surgical stabilisation in a 13-year-old boy with traumatic flail chest.

    PubMed

    Leenstra, Bernard Simon; Stolwijk, Antoinette; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Flail chest after blunt trauma to the chest has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Traumatic flail chest in children rarely occurs due to flexibility of the ribcage. We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy sustaining a flail chest after a high-energy trauma. Conservative treatment with proper mechanical ventilation and pain management was unsuccessful, and was followed by operative rib fixation. The patient was discharged home 17 days after surgery and, at 4 months follow-up, had fully recovered. This case report shows the possibility of operative rib fixation as treatment for flail chest in children. PMID:26370635

  13. Laparoscopic drainage of a post-traumatic intramural duodenal hematoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Banieghbal, Behrouz; Vermaak, Cobus; Beale, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Duodenal intramural hematoma owing to blunt abdominal trauma is a relatively rare condition and is normally managed non-operatively. In this paper, we present the case of an 11-year-old boy with a post-traumatic duodenal hematoma, who after failing conservative management, underwent laparoscopic drainage. A four-port approach in a similar position to the laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used. After disentangling the inflammatory mass, the duodenal serosa was opened by simple hook diathermy and the hematoma evacuated. The child recovered uneventfully and was discharged home 48 hours later. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this condition has been successfully treated laparoscopically.

  14. Traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Risdall, Jane E.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of military traumatic brain injury (TBI), and similar injuries are seen in civilians in war zones or terrorist incidents. Indeed, blast-induced mild TBI has been referred to as the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Assessment involves schemes that are common in civilcian practice but, in common with civilian TBI, takes little account of information available from modern imaging (particularly diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging) and emerging biomarkers. The efficient logistics of clinical care delivery in the field may have a role in optimizing outcome. Clinical care has much in common with civilian TBI, but intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available, and protocols need to be modified to take account of this. In addition, severe early oedema has led to increasing use of decompressive craniectomy, and blast TBI may be associated with a higher incidence of vasospasm and pseudoaneurysm formation. Visual and/or auditory deficits are common, and there is a significant risk of post-traumatic epilepsy. TBI is rarely an isolated finding in this setting, and persistent post-concussive symptoms are commonly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic pain, a constellation of findings that has been called the polytrauma clinical triad. PMID:21149359

  15. [Effects of traumatic stress].

    PubMed

    Herbst, Gesa; Jaeger, Ulrich; Leichsenring, Falk; Streeck-Fischer, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis PTSD does not adequately describe the impact of exposure to childhood trauma of the developing child. The objective of the study was to examine the prevalence of different interpersonal trauma types and to describe the long-term effects of maltreatment and neglect in a clinical sample of 34 adolescents. The majority (62%) of the sample was exposed to two different types of trauma during childhood. Emotional abuse and emotional neglect have been the most common trauma types (59%; 53%). 71% of the traumatized adolescents did not meet the criteria for PTSD. The most common diagnosis in the sample was Borderline Personality Disorder. All average scores at SCL-90-Symptom-Scale were clinical significant. Half of the sample reported suicide attempts and self destructive behavior. One third reported substance abuse and aggressive behavior against others respectively. None of the traumatized adolescents had a positive Self-concept. Altogether the results show that abused children and adolescents have a range of psychological sequelae that are not captured in the PTSD diagnostic criteria. Therefore the results support the necessity for a new and more precise diagnosis for chronically traumatized children and adolescents. PMID:19961125

  16. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  17. Functional chiral asymmetry in descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Lanza, G; Vonesh, M; Khasho, F; Spitzzeri, C; McGee, S; Mehlman, D; Chandran, K B; Talano, J; McPherson, D

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether rotational blood flow or chiral asymmetry exists in the human descending thoracic aorta, we established the ability of color Doppler ultrasound to detect rotational flow in a tornado tube model of a vortex descending fluid column. In a model of the human aortic arch with a pulse duplicator, color Doppler was then used to demonstrate that rotational flow occurs first in the transverse arch and then in the proximal descending thoracic aorta. With the use of color Doppler esophageal echocardiography, 53 patients (age range, 25-78 years; mean age, 56.4 years) were prospectively examined for rotational flow in the descending thoracic aorta. At 10 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 22 of 38 patients (58%) revealed rotational flow with obvious diastolic counterclockwise rotation but less obvious systolic clockwise rotation. At 5 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 29 of 46 patients (63%) revealed rotational flow with a tendency toward systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise rotation. At the retro-left ventricular position, 47 of 53 patients (89%) revealed rotational flow, usually of a clockwise direction, occurring in systole. Our data suggest that aortic flow is not purely pulsatile and axial but has a rotational component. Rotational flow begins in the aortic arch and is carried through to the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is chirally asymmetric with systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise components. These data demonstrate an aortic rotational flow component that may have physiological implications for organ perfusion. PMID:2242523

  18. Retrograde replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D A

    1995-01-01

    A technique is described for replacement of the entire thoracic aorta. In this "pull-through" technique, which utilizes hypothermic circulatory arrest, the graft is implanted in a retrograde fashion, thus providing protection for the spinal cord and brain and avoiding injury to the vagus and phrenic nerves. PMID:7647599

  19. Thoracic BB injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, L G; Radhakrishnan, J; Gordon, R T; Shah, M R; Lain, K Y; Messersmith, R N; Roettger, R H; Norwood, S H

    1995-03-01

    Penetrating thoracic injury from BB shot remains an innocuous event in most patients, but factors including location, proximity, gun type, and patient weight may identify groups at risk. The following cases demonstrate morbidity and mortality in two patients, and this experience may suggest the need for reassessment of this injury.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  1. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  2. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  3. Dislocation of the penis: a rare complication after traumatic pelvic injury.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mei Chin; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Teh, Hui Seong; Teh, Chang Peng Colin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the male external genitalia is frequently encountered, but acute traumatic dislocation of the penile structure is extremely rare, with only a few reports found in the literature. We herein report the case of a 21-year-old man who sustained blunt trauma to the pelvis following a motor vehicle accident, and had features suspicious of penile dislocation. With the use of computed tomography and bedside ultrasonography, a diagnosis of penile dislocation was made, which was subsequently confirmed intraoperatively. Immediate surgical intervention via gentle manipulation of the penile tissue back to its native position was performed in order to restore normal anatomy. The exact mechanism of penile dislocation is not known. However, circumferential laceration around the foreskin causing degloving injury of the penis is suggested in our patient.

  4. [Specific features of wounds with a self-defense traumatic weapon "Osa"].

    PubMed

    Khodov, A M; Zolotov, A S; Filipchenkov, L S

    2012-01-01

    Specific features and outcomes of wounds with a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" were analyzed in 24 patients. Mean age of the wounded was from 21 to76 years. In 20 patients there was a single wound, in 4 patients it was multiple, in 7--blunt, in 12--perforating and 5 patients had gutter wounds. All the patients were treated according to the principles of field military surgery. Five patients had severe wounds: penetrating fracture of the skull (2 of them died), fracture of the shoulder (1 case), injury of the main artery (1 case), of the pleura (1 case). The wounds were closed up by primary intention in 19 patients, by second intention in 4 patients. The authors' experience shows that a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" rather often caused permanent harm to health and can be mortal. Active surgical strategy in treatment of such patients prevents the development of serious infectious complications.

  5. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  6. Iso-C3D navigation assisted pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vinod V; Kamath, Vijay; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Rajasekaran, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation of the deformed cervical and thoracic spine is challenging to even the most experienced surgeon and associated with increased incidence of screw misplacement. Iso-C3D based navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement, however, there are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. We conducted a study to evaluate the accuracy of Iso-C3D based navigation in pedicle screw fixation in the deformed cervical and thoracic spine. Materials and Methods: We inserted 98 cervical pedicle screws (18 patients) and 242 thoracic pedicle screws (17 patients) using Iso-C3D based navigation for deformities of spine due to scoliosis, ankylosing spondylitis, post traumatic and degenerative disorders. Two independent observers determined and graded the accuracy of screw placement from postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Results: Postoperative CT scans of the cervical spine showed 90.8% perfectly placed screws with 7 (7%) grade I pedicle breaches, 2 (2%) grade II pedicle breaches and one anterior cortex penetration (< 2mm). Five lateral pedicle breaches violated the vertebral artery foramen and three medial pedicle breaches penetrated the spinal canal; however, no patient had any neurovascular complications. In the thoracic spine there were 92.2% perfectly placed screws with only six (2%) grade II pedicle breaches, eight (3%) grade I pedicle breaches and five screws (2%) penetrating the anterior or lateral cortex. No neuro-vascular complications were encountered. Conclusion: Iso-C3D based navigation improves the accuracy of pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine. The low incidence of pedicle breach implies increased safety for the patient. PMID:20419003

  7. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  8. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  9. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars.

  10. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  11. Treatment of Childhood Traumatic Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.

    2004-01-01

    Childhood traumatic grief (CTG) is a condition in which trauma symptoms impinge on children's ability to negotiate the normal grieving process. Clinical characteristics of CTG and their implications for treatment are discussed, and data from a small number of open-treatment studies of traumatically bereaved children are reviewed. An empirically…

  12. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, sexual assault, physical abuse, or a bad accident. PTSD makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and ...

  13. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  14. Transition and Turbulence Modeling for Blunt-Body Wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Robert P.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hassan, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobraking has been proposed as an efficient means of decelerating spacecraft for planetary missions. Most current aerobrake designs feature a blunt forebody shielding the payload from the intense heat generated during atmospheric entry. Although this forebody will absorb the largest portion of the heat pulse, accurate prediction of heating in the near wake is of great importance, since large local heating values can occur at points of shear-layer impingement. In order to address the various issues associated with these blunt-body wake flowfields, the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) formed Working Group 18 in 1992. One of the objectives of this activity was to examine real-gas effects in high-speed flow fields around a 70 deg. blunted cone. To date, many researchers have conducted experiments using this geometry in various facilities, such as the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel at Cubric/Calspan and the HEG shock tunnel at DLR-Goettingen. Several computational studies have also been conducted in concert with these tests. Many of the experimental results have indicated the possible presence of a transitional shear layer through a large increase in heat transfer downstream of the reattachment point. The presence of transition could in fact lead to much higher peak heating than if the separated flow is entirely laminar or turbulent. In the shock-tunnel tests, however, it is difficult to separate such viscous-flow phenomena from real-gas effects. In order to help make this distinction, Horvath et al. recently conducted a set of experiments in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel, and compared the results to laminar Navier-Stokes calculations. They found heat-transfer distributions similar to those obtained in the high-enthalpy facilities, with the measured peak heating along the sting support markedly greater than that predicted by the laminar computations. These trends point to the need to find transitional and turbulent

  15. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described. PMID:11307682

  16. Traumatic manubriosternal joint subluxations in two basketball players.

    PubMed

    Woo, C C

    1988-10-01

    Two cases of traumatic manubriosternal joint subluxation without rib fractures in basketball players are illustrated. The incidence of this sport injury is rare. Accidental or intentional violent blows of the elbow to the body of the sternum is the mechanism of this injury. Radiographic analysis of the manubriosternal joint is discussed. Radiographically, the body of the sternum in each case has subluxated posteriorly. The athletes present pain directly at the manubriosternal joint; this may be aggravated by active thoracic hyperflexion or hyperextension. Ordinary or deep breathing does not cause discomfort. Palpation may reveal local tenderness that will be accentuated by ballottement against the manubrium. Conservative treatment consists of manipulative hyperflexion reduction supplemented with antiinflammatory or analgesic cream, cryotherapy, taping or with pad, strapping and rest.

  17. Is there a role for gabapentin in preventing or treating pain following thoracic surgery?

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Frazer, Stephanie; Hunt, Ian

    2013-10-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether gabapentin, a commonly prescribed neuropathic analgesic and anticonvulsant, is safe and beneficial in patients with post-thoracotomy pain following thoracic surgery. Seventeen papers were identified using the search described below, and five papers presented the best evidence to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. Side effects and complications as well as evidence of benefit, typically using various pain-scoring systems, were included in the assessment. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of the papers are tabulated. The systematic review of two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) demonstrated that the use of a single dose gabapentin does not reduce pain scores or the need for epidural or morphine immediately in hospital following thoracic surgery. One double-blinded RCT used multiple doses of gabapentin perioperatively and showed that oral gabapentin administered preoperatively and during the first 2 days postoperatively, in conjunction with patient controlled analgesia morphine, provides effective analgesia in thoracic surgery with a consequent improvement in postoperative pulmonary function and less morphine consumption. One prospective clinical study comparing a 2-month course of gabapentin with naproxen sodium for chronic post thoracotomy pain following surgery showed significant improvement in both the visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) at 60 days in the gabapentin (P = 0.001). One prospective study of out-patients with chronic pain (>4 weeks since thoracotomy performed) suggested that gabapentin is effective, safe and well tolerated when used for persistent postoperative and post-traumatic pain in thoracic surgery patients. We conclude that

  18. Mothers' unresolved trauma blunts amygdala response to infant distress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the neurobiology of post-traumatic stress disorder has been extensively researched, much less attention has been paid to the neural mechanisms underlying more covert but pervasive types of trauma (e.g., those involving disrupted relationships and insecure attachment). Here, we report on a neur...

  19. Spontaneous closure of macular hole following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Freitas-Neto, Clovis Arcoverde; Pigosso, Douglas; Pacheco, Katia Delalíbera; Pereira, Viviane Oliveira; Patel, Pranav; Freitas, Luiz Guilherme; Ávila, Marcos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Ocular trauma can result in macular hole and it can lead to complete loss of central vision. We are reporting a case of traumatic macular hole associated with retinal hemorrhages and choroidal ruptures with spontaneous resolution and total vision recovery. PMID:27433039

  20. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  1. Optimum shape of a blunt forebody in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1989-01-01

    The optimum shape of a blunt forebody attached to a symmetric wedge or cone is determined. The length of the forebody, its semi-thickness or base radius, the nose radius and the radius of the fillet joining the forebody to the wedge or cone are specified. The optimum shape is composed of simple curves. Thus experimental models can be built readily to investigate the utilization of aerodynamic heating for boundary layer control. The optimum shape based on the modified Newtonian theory can also serve as the preliminary shape for the numerical solution of the optimum shape using the governing equations for a compressible inviscid or viscous flow.

  2. Abdominal aortic rupture from an impaling osteophyte following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Seth A; Murphy, William R C; Murphy, Todd W; Haan, James M

    2014-04-01

    Blunt injury of the abdominal aorta is highly fatal. We present an unusual case of an osteophyte impaling the abdominal aorta treated by endovascular repair. A 77-year-old man sustained a thoracolumbar fracture-dislocation with posterior aortic rupture between his celiac and superior mesenteric artery origins. His aortic injury was treated with a stent graft, excluding the celiac origin. He was dismissed on postoperative day 6. At 6 months, he had returned to most preinjury activities, and at 2-year follow-up, he continues to have good functional outcome. Endovascular repair may be successfully employed in select aortic injuries in hemodynamically stable patients.

  3. Brown-Sequard syndrome due to isolated blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Henderson, S O; Hoffner, R J

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma without associated fracture or ligamentous injury is a rare cause of Brown-Sequard syndrome. We report a case of Brown-Sequard syndrome after a direct blow to the cervical spine that did not cause injury to adjacent bone or ligaments. Characteristic neurologic findings, including a unilateral hemiparesis with associated contralateral sensory findings, were noted at the time of presentation. High-dose steroids were instituted after recognition of the patient's injury, and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed a unilateral cord contusion with no associated fractures. After 1 month, the patient had recovered much of his function and was able to ambulate unassisted.

  4. A role for epinephrine in post-traumatic hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Beal, Alan L; Deuser, William E; Beilman, Greg J

    2007-04-01

    We have previously described a high incidence of admission hypokalemia in trauma patients at our institution. We subsequently performed a prospective study of 112 trauma patients to examine the possible etiologies of post-traumatic hypokalemia. Trauma patients >or=5 years old were evaluated within 6 h of injury with a variety of studies including catecholamines, cortisol, and insulin levels, with studies repeated 24 to 36 h after admission. No potassium replacement was given during this time. Demographic factors such as age, types of injury, and severity of injuries were collected. We found that the mean age of those with post-traumatic hypokalemia (traumatic hypokalemia was predictive of injury severity score, 4 trauma admission groups were compared with regard to potassium levels and injury severity score. Those trauma patients with both high injury severity and hypokalemia had significantly higher admission epinephrine levels (1222 vs. 290 pg/mL; P = 0.005), glucose levels (174 vs. 126 mg/dL; P = 0.001), and lower carbon dioxide levels (21.3 vs. 24.6 mEq/L; P < 0.03) than those trauma patients with less severe injury and normokalemia. We conclude that post-traumatic hypokalemia seems to be related to a rise in epinephrine levels, that this rise in epinephrine levels seems to be blunted in older patients, and that post-traumatic hypokalemia is rapidly reversible without specific therapy.

  5. Post-traumatic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Marshman, Laurence A G; Jakabek, David; Hennessy, Maria; Quirk, Frances; Guazzo, Eric P

    2013-11-01

    Of patients hospitalised for traumatic brain injury (TBI), most pass through a state of altered consciousness known as "post-traumatic amnesia" (PTA). Despite the lack of a consistent definition, PTA is widely used as a construct in neurosurgical practice to guide decision-making and prognosis. Accurate PTA assessment is important, because over-evaluation leads to excess social, financial and opportunity costs, whilst under-evaluation risks patient welfare. Whilst anterograde memory is certainly disrupted in PTA, PTA in fact involves a far more extensive memory disturbance. More instructively, the complete "post-TBI syndrome" also comprises an extensive cognitive deficit which includes a confusional state, as well as a behavioural disturbance characterised by acute agitation. Recently, impairments in attention and executive functioning have also been emphasised; indeed, some consider these the primary disturbance with PTA. Although all of these features were fully described (or implied) by the earliest pioneers, most current PTA scores do not assess the complete "post-TBI syndrome". Currently, the Westmead PTA scale (WPTAS) directs most in-hospital TBI management throughout Australasia: however, in addition to general defects, specific limitations have been identified in the levels of evidence for WPTAS validity. We review the literature regarding PTA and, in particular, the continued role of the WPTAS in directing neurosurgical practice.

  6. Traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Popoola, D; Lou, M A; Sims, E H

    1983-05-01

    At the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital in Los Angeles, during the period from June 1972 to April 1981, seven patients underwent surgery for traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts. The overall average age was 28 and the average hospital stay was 31 days. Ultrasound was the most useful test for diagnosis and follow-up. Preoperatively, serum amylases were not consistently elevated. Overall recurrences and complications totaled 57 percent. There were no deaths. The authors consider a large cystogastrostomy the treatment of choice for mature cysts that are satisfactorily adherent to the stomach. The second preference is a Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy. External drainage was employed for acute cysts that required drainage. A distal pancreatectomy was performed for patients with small pancreatic tail pseudocysts. Patients who underwent acute drainage were usually drained externally and had a poorer outcome than patients who were operated on later with internal drainage. When compared with another group of 15 alcoholic patients who were operated on for pancreatic pseudocysts, patients with traumatic pseudocysts had a poorer outcome.

  7. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  8. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora's Box.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sobha S; Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities-catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones.

  9. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing. PMID:11567193

  10. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  11. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Kische, Stephan; Rehders, Tim C.; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Rauchhaus, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition with structural weakness of the aortic wall, which can progress to arterial dilatation and rupture. Today, both an increasing awareness of vascular disease and the access to tomographic imaging facilitate the diagnosis of TAA even in an asymptomatic stage. The risk of rupture for untreated aneurysms beyond a diameter of 5.6 cm ranges from 46% to 74% and the two-year mortality rate is greater than 70%, with most deaths resulting from rupture. Treatment options include surgical and non-surgical repair to prevent aneurysm enlargement and rupture. While most cases of ascending aortic involvement are subject to surgical repair (partially with valve-preserving techniques), aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta are amenable to emerging endovascular techniques as an alternative to classic open repair or to a hybrid approach (combining debranching surgery with stent grafting) in an attempt to improve outcomes. PMID:22419919

  12. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world’s second most populous country.

  13. Chondromyxoid fibroma of two thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Bruder, E; Zanetti, M; Boos, N; von Hochstetter, A R

    1999-05-01

    We report on a case of chondromyxoid fibroma involving two adjacent thoracic vertebrae with features of aggressive behaviour on radiographs, CT and MRI. Histology revealed typical chondromyxoid fibroma with unusually coarse calcifications. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the spine is rare, and only 30 of these tumours have been reported so far. Involvement of two contiguous vertebral bodies by chondromyxoid fibroma, as reported here, appears exceptional. PMID:10424337

  14. [Septic arthritis of thoracic facet joint].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, K; Gérard-Dran, D; Combe, B

    2009-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the facet joint is a rare condition. We report a case of septic arthritis of both a thoracic facet joint and a wrist. Clinical manifestations were consistent with a spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated infection of facet joints of T1 and T2. A surgical biopsy of the wrist isolated a type B streptococcus. The same organism was found in urine culture. The patient had an uneventful recovery on antibiotics.

  15. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002, registered in 89 population-based cancer registries (CRs) and followed-up to 31st December 2003. Over 17,688 cases of rare thoracic cancers were selected based on the list of the RACECARE project. Mesothelioma was the most common tumour (19 per million per year) followed by epithelial tumours of the trachea and thymus (1.3 and 1.7, respectively). The age standardised incidence rates of epithelial tumours of the trachea was double in Eastern and Southern Europe versus the other European regions: 2 per million per year. Epithelial tumours of the thymus had the lowest incidence in Northern and Eastern Europe and UK and Ireland(1) and somewhat higher incidence in Central and Southern Europe.(2) Highest incidence in mesothelioma was seen in UK and Ireland(23) and lowest in Eastern Europe.(4) Patients with tumours of the thymus had the best prognosis (1-year survival 85%, 66% at 5 years). Five year survival was lowest for the mesothelioma 5% compared to 14% of patients with tumours of the trachea. Mesothelioma was the most prevalent rare cancer (12,000 cases), followed by thymus (7000) and trachea (1400). Cancer Registry (CR) data play an important role in revealing the burden of rare thoracic cancers and monitoring the effect of regulations on asbestos use and smoking related policies.

  16. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world’s second most populous country. PMID:27651933

  17. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yendamuri, Sai

    2016-08-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world's second most populous country.

  18. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yendamuri, Sai

    2016-08-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world's second most populous country. PMID:27651933

  19. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  20. Leading-edge receptivity for blunt-nose bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This research program investigates boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region for bodies with blunt leading edges. Receptivity theory provides the link between the unsteady distrubance environment in the free stream and the initial amplitudes of the instability waves in the boundary layer. This is a critical problem which must be addressed in order to develop more accurate prediction methods for boundary-layer transition. The first phase of this project examines the effects of leading-edge bluntness and aerodynamic loading for low Mach number flows. In the second phase of the project, the investigation is extended to supersonic Mach numbers. Singular perturbation techniques are utilized to develop an asymptotic theory for high Reynolds numbers. In the first year, the asymptotic theory was developed for leading-edge receptivity in low Mach number flows. The case of a parabolic nose is considered. Substantial progress was made on the Navier-Sotkes computations. Analytical solutions for the steady and unsteady potential flow fields were incorporated into the code, greatly expanding the types of free-stream disturbances that can be considered while also significantly reducing the the computational requirements. The time-stepping algorithm was modified so that the potential flow perturbations induced by the unsteady pressure field are directly introduced throughout the computational domain, avoiding an artificial 'numerical diffusion' of these from the outer boundary. In addition, the start-up process was modified by introducing the transient Stokes wave solution into the downstream boundary conditions.

  1. PBNR: Percutaneous Blunt Needle Reduction of Bony Mallet Injuries.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Murugesan, Logendra; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O; Jemec, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Mallet finger injuries are common; treatment goals include achieving joint stability, preventing extensor lag, and subsequent swan-neck deformity. We describe a simple technique for improving intraoperative bony mallet reduction, which may avoid the requirement for closed Ishiguro extension blocking wires or open fixation, and present a prospective case series (n=12). Intraoperative percutaneous blunt needle reduction (PBNR) is achieved under image intensifier guidance. Using artery forceps, a blunt fill needle tip is manipulated onto the proximal avulsed fragment; this is then guided into a reduced position and maintained using a well-formed Zimmer splint across the distal interphalangeal joint in 15- to 30-degree extension. There were 5 injuries involving >1/3 of the articular surface (Doyle's classification IVb) and 7 injuries involving >1/2 of the articular surface (Doyle's classification IVc). Mean hand therapy follow-up was 10.6±1.0 weeks, extensor lag was 4.6±1.7 degrees, and all patients achieved full functional recovery with return to normal daily activity. No complications were reported. Closed techniques, for example, Ishiguro extension blocking wires, may reduce the risks associated with open reduction, but do not avoid further articular surface damage. PBNR offers the surgeon a useful adjunct to the treatment options for bony mallet injuries, without excluding progression to surgical fixation if required. PBNR represents a less-invasive management option for bony mallet injures where surgical fixation may also be indicated. PMID:25989396

  2. Direct simulation of hypersonic flows over blunt slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Cuda, V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a numerical study of low-density hypersonic flow about cylindrically blunted wedges and spherically blunted cones with body half angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg are presented. Most of the transitional flow regime encountered during entry between the free molecule and continuum regimes is simulated for a reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s by including freestream conditions of 70 to 100 km. The bodies are at zero angle of incidence and have diffuse and finite catalytic surfaces. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical simulations show that noncontinuum effects such as surface temperature jump, and velocity slip are evident for all cases considered. The onset of chemical dissociation occurs at a simulated altitude of 96 km for the two-dimensional configurations. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum viscous shock-layer calculations highlight the significant difference in flowfield structure predicted by the two methods.

  3. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe.

  4. [Thoracic surgery for patients with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Iyoda, A; Satoh, Y

    2012-07-01

    Thoracic surgery poses a risk for complications in the respiratory system. In particular, for patients with bronchial asthma, we need to care for perioperative complications because it is well known that these patients frequently have respiratory complications after surgery, and they may have bronchial spasms during surgery. If we can get good control of their bronchial asthma, we can usually perform surgery for these patients without limitations. For safe postoperative care, it is desirable that these patients have stable asthma conditions that are well-controlled before surgery, as thoracic surgery requires intrabronchial intubation for anesthesia and sometimes bronchial resection. These stimulations to the bronchus do not provide for good conditions because of the risk of bronchial spasm. Therefore, we should use the same agents that are used to control bronchial asthma if it is already well controlled. If it is not, we have to administer a β₂ stimulator, aminophylline, or steroidal agents for good control. Isoflurane or sevoflurane are effective for the safe control of anesthesia during surgery, and we should use a β₂ stimulator, with or without inhalation, or steroidal agents after surgery. It is important to understand that we can perform thoracic surgery for asthma patients if we can provide perioperative control of bronchial asthma, although these patients still have severe risks. PMID:22868432

  5. Cannabis Problem Experiences Among Users of the Tobacco-Cannabis Combination Known As Blunts

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In most of the world, cannabis smokers mix loose tobacco inside a joint, pipe, spliff, or cone. More recently, a ‘blunt’ formulation combines these two drugs by inserting cannabis into a hollowed-out cigar. Epidemiological research linking simultaneous use of these two drugs and the development of cannabis use disorders (CUD) remains unclear. This study estimates associations linking blunt smoking with levels and subtypes of cannabis problems. Methods Cross-sectional data on 27,767 past-year cannabis users were analyzed from the US National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) conducted from 2009–2012. Ten self-reported items of DSM-IV CUD features elicited a single latent trait of cannabis problem (CP) severity, which was then regressed on past-year blunt smoking and past-month blunt frequency measures within the context of a conceptual model. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis evaluated potential bias in CP feature response by blunt smoking history. Results Past-year blunt smoking was associated with higher CP severity compared to cannabis users who did not smoke blunts. Days of blunt smoking in the past month also predicted higher CP severity than less frequent blunt use. Those smoking blunts experienced more subjectively felt tolerance and having spent more time obtaining or using cannabis, but were less likely to experience other problems, even at the same level of CP severity. Conclusions These findings suggest smoking blunts might promote the development of problematic cannabis use. Responses to cannabis problems differed by history of blunt smoking, possibly implicating an influence of tobacco on measurement of cannabis use disorders. PMID:25746234

  6. The artificially blunted leading edge concept for aerothermodynamic performance enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anurag

    An innovative aerothermodynamic performance enhancement concept for blunted geometries in hypervelocity flight is described. An Artificially Blunted Leading Edge (ABLE) is sought to be created by the use of a flow-through channel sized to choke at supersonic (in the normal direction) conditions. As a result, a normal shock stands off the channel but the high post-shock pressures have no wall to act on, leading to a reduction in wave drag. The effective blunt body flow structure can be effective at preventing the rise in heat transfer rates at channel entrance lips. In lifting flight, the flow in the channel creates suction at the lip, significantly enhancing lift for non-slender shapes. CFD studies using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations provide proof-of- concept for drag reduction for blunted slender geometries and L/D enhancements for sphere-cones. The ABLE flow mechanism's robustness and its effectiveness at off- design conditions is demonstrated. The computed sphere- cone L/D enhancements are also validated with experimental results from Aeroballistic Range tests. As opposed to straight channels, ABLE variants with curved channels that provide for better volumetric efficiency, reduced viscous drag penalties and better performance were designed and investigated. The channels curve outward and exhaust the flow close to the leading edge. Even while exhausting tangentially, the exhaust-mean flow interactions were shown to enhance or create lift. The force amplification due to such interactions can also be leveraged with the channel flow exhausting nearly normal to the surface. The potential of such thrust vectoring to reduce trim drag and augment directional control in the high-speed regime was demonstrated numerically. To evaluate the concept's effectiveness at improving cd or L/D values without paying any penalties in lift, enclosed volume and peak heating rates, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization techniques are used to characterize the design space

  7. Traumatic subclavian arterial rupture: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Subclavian artery injuries represent an uncommon complication of blunt chest trauma, this structure being protected by subclavius muscle, the clavicle, the first rib, and the deep cervical fascia as well as the costo-coracoid ligament, a clavi-coraco-axillary fascia portion. Subclavian artery injury appears early after trauma, and arterial rupture may cause life-treatening haemorrages, pseudo-aneurysm formation and compression of brachial plexus. These clinical eveniences must be carefully worked out by accurate physical examination of the upper limb: skin color, temperature, sensation as well as radial pulse and hand motility represent the key points of physical examination in this setting. The presence of large hematomas and pulsatile palpable mass in supraclavicular region should raise the suspicion of serious vascular injury. Since the first reports of endovascular treatment for traumatic vascular injuries in the 90’s, an increasing number of vascular lesions have been treated this way. We report a case of traumatic subclavian arterial rupture after blunt chest trauma due to a 4 meters fall, treated by endovascular stent grafting, providing a complete review of the past twenty years’ literature. PMID:22710070

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias the first month after acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Kim; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Malmqvist, Lasse; Ballegaard, Martin; Krassioukov, Andrei; Hansen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Kruse, Anders; Welling, Karen-Lise; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular complications including cardiac arrest and arrhythmias remain a clinical challenge in the management of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the characteristics of arrhythmias in patients with acute traumatic SCI. The aim of this prospective observational study was to investigate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrests in patients with acute traumatic SCI. Methods As early as possible after SCI 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed. Additional Holter recordings were performed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained shortly after SCI and at 4 weeks. Results Thirty patients were included. Bradycardia (heart rate (HR) <50 b.p.m.) was present in 17–35% of the patients with cervical (C1–C8) SCI (n = 24) within the first 14 days. In the following 14 days, the occurrence was 22–32%. Bradycardia in the thoracic (Th1–Th12) SCI group (n = 6) was present in 17–33% during the observation period. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. The mean minimum HR was significantly lower in the cervical group compared with the thoracic group both on 12-lead ECGs obtained shortly after SCI (P = 0.030) and at 4 weeks (P = 0.041). Conclusion Many patients with cervical SCI experience arrhythmias such as bradycardia, sinus node arrest, supraventricular tachycardia, and more rarely cardiac arrest the first month after SCI. Apart from sinus node arrests and limited bradycardia, no arrhythmias were seen in patients with thoracic SCI. Standard 12-lead ECGs will often miss the high prevalence these arrhythmias have. PMID:24559419

  9. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  10. Mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katz, Douglas I; Cohen, Sara I; Alexander, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common but accurate diagnosis and defining criteria for mild TBI and its clinical consequences have been problematic. Mild TBI causes transient neurophysiologic brain dysfunction, sometimes with structural axonal and neuronal damage. Biomarkers, such as newer imaging technologies and protein markers, are promising indicators of brain injury but are not ready for clinical use. Diagnosis relies on clinical criteria regarding depth and duration of impaired consciousness and amnesia. These criteria are particularly difficult to confirm at the least severe end of the mild TBI continuum, especially when relying on subjective, retrospective accounts. The postconcussive syndrome is a controversial concept because of varying criteria, inconsistent symptom clusters and the evidence that similar symptom profiles occur with other disorders, and even in a proportion of healthy individuals. The clinical consequences of mild TBI can be conceptualized as two multidimensional disorders: (1) a constellation of acute symptoms that might be termed early phase post-traumatic disorder (e.g., headache, dizziness, imbalance, fatigue, sleep disruption, impaired cognition), that typically resolve in days to weeks and are largely related to brain trauma and concomitant injuries; (2) a later set of symptoms, a late phase post-traumatic disorder, evolving out of the early phase in a minority of patients, with a more prolonged (months to years), sometimes worsening set of somatic, emotional, and cognitive symptoms. The later phase disorder is highly influenced by a variety of psychosocial factors and has little specificity for brain injury, although a history of multiple concussions seems to increase the risk of more severe and longer duration symptoms. Effective early phase management may prevent or limit the later phase disorder and should include education about symptoms and expectations for recovery, as well as recommendations for activity modifications

  11. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turna, Akif

    2016-08-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future. PMID:27651934

  12. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future. PMID:27651934

  13. Delayed Traumatic Diaphragm Hernia after Thoracolumbar Fracture in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoun-Ho; Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragm hernia can occur in rare cases and generally accompanies thoracic or abdominal injuries. When suffering from ankylosing spondylitis, a small force can develop into vertebral fracture and an adjacent structural injury, and lead to diaphragm hernia without accompanying concomitant thoracoabdominal injury. A high level of suspicion may be a most reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of a diaphragm injury, and we need to keep in mind a possibility in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis and a thoracolumbar fracture, even in the case of minor trauma. PMID:25733996

  14. Use of Marijuana and Blunts among Adolescents: 2005. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report focuses on past month marijuana and blunt use among youths aged 12 to 17.7 Data are presented by demographic and academic characteristics. All findings are based on data from the 2005 NSDUH. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) includes questions on the use of marijuana and blunts. Respondents who reported lifetime use of…

  15. Hepatic Enzyme Decline after Pediatric Blunt Trauma: A Tool for Timing Child Abuse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Amy L.; Lindberg, Daniel M.; Burke, Bonnie L.; Shults, Justine; Holmes, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research in adult patients with blunt hepatic injuries has suggested a pattern of serum hepatic transaminase concentration decline. Evaluating this decline after pediatric blunt hepatic trauma could establish parameters for estimating the time of inflicted injuries. Deviation from a consistent transaminase resolution pattern…

  16. Availability of Tobacco Products Associated with Use of Marijuana Cigars (Blunts)

    PubMed Central

    Juliet, P. Lee; Morrison, Chris; Bridget, Freisthler

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study examines factors associated with availability of tobacco products for marijuana cigars (i.e., blunts) in 50 non-contiguous mid-sized California communities. Methods The study is based on data collected in 943 tobacco outlets. Neighborhood demographics, community adult marijuana prevalence, medical marijuana policy and access to medical marijuana dispensaries and delivery services were included. Results Multilevel logistic regression analyses indicated that compared with small markets, availability of tobacco products associated with use of blunts was significantly higher in convenience stores, smoke/tobacco shops and liquor stores. None of the neighborhood demographics were associated with availability of blunt wrappers and only a small percent of Whites was positively associated with availability of blunt cigars, small cigars or cigarillos at the store. Controlling for outlet type and neighborhood demographics, higher city prevalence of adult marijuana use was associated with greater availability of blunt wrappers. Also, policy that permits medical marijuana dispensaries or private cultivation was positively associated with availability of tobacco products for blunts. Density of medical marijuana dispensaries and delivery services, however, was negatively associated with greater availability of these products at tobacco outlets. Conclusions Results suggest that availability of tobacco products associated with blunts is similar in neighborhoods with different socioeconomic status and racial and ethnic composition. Results also suggest the important role that community norms that support marijuana use or legalization of medical marijuana and medical marijuana policy may play in increasing availability of tobacco products associated with blunts. PMID:24290366

  17. Laboratory simulation of rocket-borne D-region blunt probe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, L. B.

    1977-01-01

    The flow of weakly ionized plasmas that is similar to the flow that occurs over rocket-borne blunt probes as they pass through the lower ionosphere has been simulated in a scaled laboratory environment, and electron collection D region blunt probe theories have been evaluated.

  18. Outcomes of traumatic exposure.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Frederick J

    2014-04-01

    There is a great need to recognize, prevent, reduce, or treat the immediate and long-term effects of childhood trauma. Most children affected by trauma will not develop long-term posttraumatic sequelae due to their resilience, but comorbid psychopathological outcomes occur and are more common after exposure to severe traumatic events. Factors influencing posttraumatic outcomes are numerous. Young dependent children tend to be more susceptible than older children; children with pain or injury are also more susceptible. Psychopathological effects may not be evident until adulthood. Awareness of the range of adverse outcomes underscores the importance of preventive interventions, accurate assessment, diagnosis and where possible, treatment. Advocacy and public policy initiatives are essential to improving outcomes.

  19. Post-traumatic vertigo.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jules M

    2004-10-01

    The vestibular-like symptoms that commonly follow head injury are most often due to one of a number of specific pathologies affecting vestibular, CNS or cervical structures. These pathologies can be readily identified in the majority of cases by appropriate testing in the examining room, and in vestibular function or neurodiagnosic laboratories. Whereas vestibular suppressants have a roll, they often delay recovery and have been supplanted as the mainstay of treatment in most cases by vestibular rehabilitation techniques. Given the large number of patients requiring outpatient management following head injury, it is appropriate that most generalists and many subspecialists should be aware of the differential diagnosis, workup and treatment options for post-traumatic vertigo.

  20. Thoracic Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Taek; Lee, Mina; Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Baek, Wan Ki

    2016-09-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare disease defined as a segmental narrowing of the distal descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. A thoracoabdominal bypass or endovascular treatment is the choice of treatment. Endovascular therapy consists of a balloon dilatation and stent implantation. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has been widely used in a variety of aortic diseases. We report a case of middle aortic syndrome treated with a thoracic endovascular stent graft. PMID:27549552

  1. Thoracic Kidney: Extremely Rare State of Aberrant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Khoshchehreh, Mahdi; Paknejad, Omalbanin; Bakhshayesh-Karam, Mehrdad; Pazoki, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    The thorax is the rarest place among all forms of renal ectopia. We report a rare case of an unacquired thoracic kidney. Only about 200 cases of the thoracic kidney have ever been reported in medical literature worldwide. In this paper we present the rarest form of nontraumatic nonhernia associated, truly ectopic thoracic kidney. The differential diagnosis and management options and classification of this rare form of aberrant kidney are discussed. PMID:26301113

  2. IL-5 in post-traumatic eosinophilic pleural effusion.

    PubMed Central

    Schandené, L; Namias, B; Crusiaux, A; Lybin, M; Devos, R; Velu, T; Capel, P; Bellens, R; Goldman, M

    1993-01-01

    Thoracic trauma or pneumothorax can result in pleural fluid eosinophilia. In this study we investigated the role of the eosinophilopoietic cytokine IL-5 in three cases of post-traumatic eosinophilic pleural effusions (EPE). Using a specific immunoenzymatic assay, significant levels of IL-5 were found in EPE (range 100-3000 pg/ml), while IL-5 was undetectable (< 25 pg/ml) in corresponding serum samples and in non-eosinophilic pleural fluids. IL-5 present in pleural fluids was found bioactive in a proliferative assay using a mouse CTLL-2 cell line transfected with the cDNA corresponding to the alpha chain of the human IL-5 receptor. Using a reverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, we found IL-5 mRNA expression within pleural mononuclear cells from patients with EPE, but not in corresponding peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), confirming that IL-5 is synthesized locally in the pleural cavity. In the two cases in which pleural CD4+ cells were purified, these cells were identified as the major source of IL-5. Taken together, these data indicate that the development of post-traumatic EPE is related to a local secretion of IL-5 by CD4+ cells present in the pleural cavity. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8100745

  3. Burnei’s anterior transthoracic retropleural approach of the thoracic spine: a new operative technique in the treatment of spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gavriliu, TS; Japie, EM; Ghiță, RA; Hamei, Ș; Dughilă, C; Țiripa, IL; Elnayef, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Up to the middle of the last century, the thoracic spine, especially in its upper part, has been considered an unapproachable site, a no-man’s land, but the constant evolution of medicine imposed techniques of the spine at these levels in order to solve a large area of pathology (infectious, tumoral, traumatic, and last but not least, deformative). This way, a series of anterior approaches allowed surgeons to gain access to the anterior part of the spine and the posterior mediastinum. The approaches described by Hodgson, Mirbaha or transthoracic transpleural approach (T4-T11), are enumerated. The idea to allow a more visible and extensive approach, but to avoid respiratory issues due to the lesion of the pleura, led to the description of a new anterior approach by Burnei in 2000. Material and method: Burnei’s approach represents an anterior approach to the thoracic spine, being a transthoracic and retropleural one. This approach allows a large area of spinal pathology due to infectious, traumatic, tumoral and degenerative (idiopathic or congenital scoliosis) causes. Statistically, this approach has been performed more frequently in cases of spinal instrumentation after diskectomy, in order to perform a partial correction of severe, rigid idiopathic scoliosis with more than 70 degrees Cobb and in cases of congenital scoliosis for hemivertebra resection and somatic synthesis to correct the scoliotic curve. Results: This kind of anterior approach allows the surgeon a large visibility of the anterior thoracic spine, diskectomies of up to 5 levels to tender the curve of the deformity and to ensure somatic or/ and transpedicular synthesis of up to 6 thoracic vertebrae. By performing a thoracotomy involving the resection of the posterior arches of the ribs, a thoracoplasty is also ensured with functional and aesthetic effects, by ameliorating the thoracic hump due to the scoliotic deformity. Conclusions: Burnei’s approach joins all the other anterior

  4. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician September 01, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1035.html) Post-traumatic Stress Reactions Following ... Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/990800ap/524.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  5. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  6. Injury biomechanics, neuropathology, and simplified physics of explosive blast and impact mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bandak, F A; Ling, G; Bandak, A; De Lanerolle, N C

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact to the head are two types of loading shown to result in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). While mTBI from these two causes shares some common features behaviorally, there are distinct differences in the pathophysiology of the underlying injury mechanisms. Various elucidations have been offered in the literature to explain the organic damage associated with mTBI resulting from both types of loading. The current state of understanding in this field is somewhat limited by the degree of appreciation of the physics and biomechanics governing the effects of explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact on the head, which has resulted in the various approaches to the investigation of the operative brain injury "wounding mechanisms". In this chapter we provide a simplified description of terminology associated with forces on the head from explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact, to assist readers in the field in evaluating interpretations of brain injury "wounding" processes. Remarkably, mTBI from either loading is shown generally to result in only a small loss of neurons, with hippocampal neurons appearing to be particularly vulnerable to explosive blast shock waves. Explosive blast studies in large animal models show a unique pattern of periventricular injury, which is different from the classic diffuse axonal injury. Both astrocyte and microglial activation are also seen in explosive blast as well as impact trauma, but this may be a general secondary brain injury response, nonspecific to explosive blast or blunt trauma. Additionally, while moderate to severe impact closed head injuries sometimes result in petechial hemorrhages or hematomas, they do not appear to be associated with explosive blast mTBI even with repeated exposure to blasts.

  7. Injury biomechanics, neuropathology, and simplified physics of explosive blast and impact mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bandak, F A; Ling, G; Bandak, A; De Lanerolle, N C

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact to the head are two types of loading shown to result in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). While mTBI from these two causes shares some common features behaviorally, there are distinct differences in the pathophysiology of the underlying injury mechanisms. Various elucidations have been offered in the literature to explain the organic damage associated with mTBI resulting from both types of loading. The current state of understanding in this field is somewhat limited by the degree of appreciation of the physics and biomechanics governing the effects of explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact on the head, which has resulted in the various approaches to the investigation of the operative brain injury "wounding mechanisms". In this chapter we provide a simplified description of terminology associated with forces on the head from explosive blast shock waves and blunt impact, to assist readers in the field in evaluating interpretations of brain injury "wounding" processes. Remarkably, mTBI from either loading is shown generally to result in only a small loss of neurons, with hippocampal neurons appearing to be particularly vulnerable to explosive blast shock waves. Explosive blast studies in large animal models show a unique pattern of periventricular injury, which is different from the classic diffuse axonal injury. Both astrocyte and microglial activation are also seen in explosive blast as well as impact trauma, but this may be a general secondary brain injury response, nonspecific to explosive blast or blunt trauma. Additionally, while moderate to severe impact closed head injuries sometimes result in petechial hemorrhages or hematomas, they do not appear to be associated with explosive blast mTBI even with repeated exposure to blasts. PMID:25702211

  8. When physics meets biology: low and high-velocity penetration, blunt impact, and blast injuries to the brain.

    PubMed

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Walilko, Timothy J; Burns, Jennie M; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  9. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High-Velocity Penetration, Blunt Impact, and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T.; Bocchieri, Robert T.; Walilko, Timothy J.; Burns, Jennie M.; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  10. When physics meets biology: low and high-velocity penetration, blunt impact, and blast injuries to the brain.

    PubMed

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Walilko, Timothy J; Burns, Jennie M; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems.

  11. Vorticity interaction effects on blunt bodies. [hypersonic viscous shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous shock layer equations governing laminar and turbulent flows of a perfect gas and radiating and nonradiating mixtures of perfect gases in chemical equilibrium are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cones and hyperboloids. Turbulent properties are described in terms of the classical mixing length. Results are compared with boundary layer and inviscid flowfield solutions; agreement with inviscid flowfield data is satisfactory. Agreement with boundary layer solutions is good except in regions of strong vorticity interaction; in these flow regions, the viscous shock layer solutions appear to be more satisfactory than the boundary layer solutions. Boundary conditions suitable for hypersonic viscous shock layers are devised for an advanced turbulence theory.

  12. An inviscid model of flow separation around blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristov, C. I.; Todorov, M. D.

    The theoretical model developed by Christov and Todorov (1984) to describe separation in inviscid flows around blunt bodies is extended and refined, with an emphasis on the numerical implementation of the model. The two-dimensional steady flow around an infinite cylinder of starlike cross section is analyzed in polar coordinates, assuming the flow to be symmetric with respect to a plane containing the central axis of the cylinder, and the stagnation zones are treated using parabolic coordinates. Consideration is given to the coordinate transformation and the difference schemes for the Laplace equation and the equation for stagnation-zone shape. Numerical results are presented graphically and briefly characterized. It is found that separation is essentially an inviscid phenomenon, but triggered by viscosity; except for the skin friction, the resistance can be accurately assessed using the inviscid model.

  13. Wind tunnel experiments on two blunt cones at Ma6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchi; Li, Cunbiao; State Key LaboratoryTurbulence; Complex Systems Team

    2015-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments are performed on two 5° half-angle blunt cones over Mach 6 flow for 0° and 10° angle of attack. The temperature distributions on both windward and leeward sides are obtained by temperature sensitive painting (TSP) technique and the fluctuation pressure is measured by PCB pressure sensors for 7 meridian lines between the central meridian lines of the windward and the leeward by 30° step. Boundary layer transition is implied by the temperature distribution and power spectral evolution of the fluctuation pressure. It is found there exists a streamwise high-temperature strip near the central meridian line of the leeward side and transition is most likely to occur along the strip (earlier than the windward side and 0° angle of attack). Besides, the radius of the cone tip has an effective influence on the transition location. Transition is more likely to occur on the cone with the sharper tip.

  14. Heating distribution comparison between asymmetric and symmetric blunt cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Kolodziej, P.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was performed to compare the heating distribution between symmetric and asymmetric large-angle blunt cones, with cone angles of 100, 120, and 140 deg. These hot-wall data were obtained from models made from typical thermal protection insulation for proposed aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. Experimental data are compared with predictions using a boundary-layer integral matrix procedure with kinetics to determine how well the heating distribution over an asymmetric cone could be approximated using axisymmetric solutions for a cone and spherical segment. In addition, a relationship between the stagnation-point heat-transfer rate and the bow-shock standoff distance for these cones is discussed. The heat-distribution data from the symmetric and asymmetric cones were very similar. Numerical results compared well with the measured wall temperatures at the stagnation point but slightly underpredicted them over the conical portion of the models.

  15. Rupture of anterior lens capsule from blunt ocular injury.

    PubMed

    Banitt, Michael R; Malta, João B; Mian, Shahzad I; Soong, H Kaz

    2009-05-01

    We report 3 cases of blunt trauma causing rupture of the anterior lens capsule with cataract formation. The injuries were caused by a paintball gun, a ball-bearing air pistol, and an aluminum rivet. In all 3 cases, the anterior capsule tears were central and the posterior capsules and zonules intact; uneventful cataract extraction with implantation of an intraocular lens was performed. The postoperative visual acuities was 20/40 in 1 case and 20/20 in the other 2 cases. We propose that the anterior lens capsule may have been torn by direct contusion from rapid focal indentation of the cornea onto the lens (coup injury) or by a fluid-mechanical, anteriorly directed rebound of the vitreous, bursting open the anterior capsule (contrecoup injury).

  16. [Rupture of hepatic echinococcal cyst by minimal blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Shapira, O; Simon, D; Rothstein, H; Pfeffermann, R

    1992-01-15

    Hepatic echinococcosis is endemic in Israel, with about 90 new cases diagnosed each year. Although many are asymptomatic for years, 40% develop complications. We describe a man of 37 and women aged 22 and 35, respectively, in whom rupture of an echinococcal cyst followed minimal, blunt abdominal trauma. In each patient the rupture led to complications consisting of massive intra-abdominal bleeding in 1, diffuse peritonitis in another and cystocutaneous fistula with ureteral obstruction due to reactive retroperitoneal fibrosis in the third. All 3 underwent surgery to resolve the immediate complication, with no mortality. A striking feature was the disproportion between the stormy clinical presentation and the relatively innocent nature of the trauma. In only 1 of our cases was the correct preoperative diagnosis made, which in this condition depends primarily on a high index of suspicion.

  17. Drug-Intake Methods and Social Identity: The Use of Marijuana in Blunts among Southeast Asian Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soller, Brian; Lee, Juliet P.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines why Southeast Asian American adolescents and emerging adults in two urban settings prefer to use "blunts," or hollowed-out cigars filled with marijuana, over other methods of drug intake. Rationales for preferring blunts were both instrumental and social. Blunts allowed users to more easily share marijuana, the preferred drug…

  18. Video-Assisted Thoracic Sympathectomy for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Milanez de Campos, Jose Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Gomes, Oswaldo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    By the 1980s, endoscopy was in use by some groups in sympathetic denervation of the upper limbs with vascular indications. Low morbidity, cosmetic results, reduction in the incidence of Horner syndrome, and the shortened time in hospital made video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy (VATS) better accepted by those undergoing treatment for hyperhidrosis. Over the last 25 years, this surgical procedure has become routine in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, leading to a significant increase in the number of papers on the subject in the literature. PMID:27427529

  19. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  20. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  1. Thoracic outlet syndrome following breast implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Raakhi; Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  2. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  3. Rib fracture patterns predict thoracic chest wall and abdominal solid organ injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Hassani, Ammar; Abdulrahman, Husham; Afifi, Ibrahim; Almadani, Ammar; Al-Den, Ahmed; Al-Kuwari, Abdulaziz; Recicar, John; Nabir, Syed; Maull, Kimball I

    2010-08-01

    Blunt trauma patients with rib fractures were studied to determine whether the number of rib fractures or their patterns were more predictive of abdominal solid organ injury and/or other thoracic trauma. Rib fractures were characterized as upper zone (ribs 1 to 4), midzone (ribs 5 to 8), and lower zone (ribs 9 to 12). Findings of sternal and scapular fractures, pulmonary contusions, and solid organ injures (liver, spleen, kidney) were characterized by the total number and predominant zone of ribs fractured. There were 296 men and 14 women. There were 38 patients with scapular fracture and 19 patients with sternal fractures. There were 90 patients with 116 solid organ injuries: liver (n = 42), kidney (n = 27), and spleen (n = 47). Lower rib fractures, whether zone-limited or overlapping, were highly predictive of solid organ injury when compared with upper and midzones. Scapular and sternal fractures were more common with upper zone fractures and pulmonary contusions increased with the number of fractured ribs. Multiple rib fractures involving the lower ribs have a high association with solid organ injury, 51 per cent in this series. The increasing number of rib fractures enhanced the likelihood of other chest wall and pulmonary injuries but did not affect the incidence of solid organ injury. PMID:20726423

  4. Door velocity and occupant distance affect lateral thoracic injury mitigation with side airbag.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Jason J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between thoracic injury risk and parameters of door velocity and occupant distance was delineated in blunt lateral impact with side airbag deployment. A sled impact model was exercised with the validated MADYMO fiftieth percentile facet occupant model and a generalized finite element torso side airbag. Impact velocity was incremented from 4.0 to 9.0m/s; occupant-airbag distance (at time of airbag activation) was incremented from 2.0 to 24.0 cm; simulations without airbag were also examined. Using compression, deflection rate, and the Viscous Criterion, airbag performance was characterized with respect to occupant injury risk at three points of interest: occupant distance of most protection, distance of greatest injury risk, and the newly defined critical distance. The occupant distance which demonstrated the most airbag protection, i.e., lowest injury risk, increased with increasing impact velocity. Greatest injury risk resulted when the occupant was nearest the airbag regardless of impact velocity. The critical distance was defined as the farthest distance at which airbag deployment exacerbated injury risk. This critical distance only varied considering chest compression, between 3 and 10 cm from the airbag, but did not vary when the Viscous Criterion was evaluated. At impact velocities less than or equal to 6m/s, the most protective occupant location was within 2 cm of the critical distance at which the airbag became harmful. Therefore, injury mitigation with torso airbag may be more difficult to achieve at lower ΔV.

  5. [Extra-thoracic solitary fibrous tumor. Report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Amel; Mestiri, Sarra; Mokni, Moncef; Stita, Wided; Ikram, Bellara; Sriha, Badreddine; Korbi, Sadok

    2006-09-01

    The solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), is an unusual entity, first described in the pleura, but can involve other serosal surfaces and viscera. We report two cases of extra-thoracic SFT involving the retro-peritoneum and the upper arm. Extra-thoracic TFS is a rarily wide morphologic and evolutive spectrum.

  6. Thoracic-pelvic dysostosis: a 'new' autosomal dominant form.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; Danks, D M

    1983-01-01

    A form of thoracic and pelvic dysostosis is reported in a mother and her son. The short ribs caused respiratory distress in the baby and raised the possibility of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD). The radiological features, however, distinguish this benign condition from ATD and other described skeletal dysplasias. Images PMID:6620328

  7. Comparison of subjective, pharmacokinetic, and physiological effects of marijuana smoked as joints and blunts.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2009-08-01

    Recent increases in marijuana smoking among the young adult population have been accompanied by the popularization of smoking marijuana as blunts instead of as joints. Blunts consist of marijuana wrapped in tobacco leaves, whereas joints consist of marijuana wrapped in cigarette paper. To date, the effects of marijuana smoked as joints and blunts have not been systematically compared. The current within-subject, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study sought to directly compare the subjective, physiological, and pharmacokinetic effects of marijuana smoked by these two methods. Marijuana blunt smokers (12 women and 12 men) were recruited and participated in a 6-session outpatient study. Participants were blindfolded and smoked three puffs from either a blunt or a joint containing marijuana with varying Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations (0.0, 1.8, and 3.6%). Subjective, physiological (heart rate, blood pressure, and carbon monoxide levels) and pharmacokinetic effects (plasma THC concentration) were monitored before and at specified time points for 3h after smoking. Joints produced greater increases in plasma THC and subjective ratings of marijuana intoxication, strength, and quality compared to blunts, and these effects were more pronounced in women compared to men. However, blunts produced equivalent increases in heart rate and higher carbon monoxide levels than joints, despite producing lower levels of plasma THC. These findings demonstrate that smoking marijuana in a tobacco leaf may increase the risks of marijuana use by enhancing carbon monoxide exposure and increasing heart rate compared to joints. PMID:19443132

  8. Minimal traumatic aortic injuries: meaning and natural history.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Gulías, Daniel; Cao, Ignacio; Muñiz, Javier; Herrera-Noreña, José Manuel; López-Pérez, José Manuel; Cuenca, José Joaquin

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal aortic injuries (MAIs) are being recognized more frequently due to the increasing use of high-resolution diagnostic techniques. The objective of this case series review was to report the clinical and radiological characteristics and outcomes of a series of patients with MAI. METHODS From January 2000 to December 2011, 54 major blunt trauma patients were admitted to our institution with traumatic aortic injuries. Nine of them presented with MAI, whereas the remaining 45 patients suffered a significant aortic injury (SAI). RESULTS MAIs accounted for 17% of the overall traumatic aortic injuries in our series. Major trauma patients with MAI and SAI were similar regarding the presence of severe associated non-aortic injuries and the expected mortality calculated by injury severity score, revised trauma score and trauma injury severity score. There were no statistically significant differences in in-hospital mortality between MAI (22.2%) and SAI (30.2%). No death in the MAI group was aortic related, whereas five deaths in the SAI group were caused by an aortic complication. The survival of MAI patients was 77.8% at 1 and 5 years. There was no late mortality among MAI patients. The survival of SAI patients was 69.7% at 1 year and 63.6% at 5 and 10 years. None of the seven surviving patients with MAI presented a progression of the aortic injury. In six patients, the intimal tear completely healed in imaging controls, whereas one patient developed a small saccular pseudoaneurysm. CONCLUSIONS Blunt traumas presenting MAI are as severe as traumas that associate SAI and present similar in-hospital mortality. In contrast to SAI traumas, in-hospital mortality due to MAI is not usually related to the aortic injury, so these injuries are more amenable to a conservative management. It is mandatory to perform a close imaging surveillance to detect early any potential adverse evolution of an MAI. Nevertheless, a balance must be struck between a close serial imaging

  9. [Acute post-traumatic aortic insufficiency: transesophageal echocardiography in the diagnosis and therapy of the lesions].

    PubMed

    Brandstätt, P; Carlioz, R; Fontaine, B; Hémery, Y; Pats, B; Chapuis, O; Lang-Lazdunsky, L; Jancovici, R; Burlaton, J P; Hvass, U

    1998-10-01

    A 58-year-old car driver suffered a road accident responsible for severe blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma. Transoephageal echocardiography, performed following the secondary development of a diastolic murmur, confirmed the presence of aortic incompetence due to commissural avulsion and guided the surgical treatment, which consisted of commissural suspension under cardiopulmonary bypass via a mini transverse trans-sternal incision. The rarity of acute aortic valve incompetence following non-penetrating thoracic trauma is illustrated by the data of the literature. This lesion is due to either avulsion of a sigmoid cusp or commissure, or laceration of the valvular tissue. Transthoracic echocardiography confirms the reality of aortic incompetence suggested clinically by appearance of a diastolic murmur, but confirmation of the mechanism of the lesions is based on transoesophageal echocardiography which allows perfectly safe and rapid visualization of the mechanism of the valvular lesion, investigation of associated lesions and guidance of therapeutic management.

  10. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  11. Delayed traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baratham, Gopal; Dennyson, William G.

    1972-01-01

    Twenty-one out of 7,866 head injuries were complicated by the development of delayed intracerebral haematomata. The age distribution of patients with this condition closely resembled that of patients with subdural haematomata and differed sharply from patients with extradural haemorrhage. This finding, combined with the fact that the two conditions often coexisted, suggests the possibility of similar aetiological factors operating in their production. The injury producing the lesion was often minor and the larger haematomata appeared to be associated with longer `asymptomatic' intervals. The neurological deterioration was in most instances clearly the result of an increase in intracranial pressure. When possible, angiography followed by definitive craniotomy was the most satisfactory method of management and multiple burr holes even when combined with needling of the hemisphere yielded unsatisfactory results. The distribution of lesions tended to confirm their traumatic origin. On no occasion was there a vascular abnormality to account for the haemorrhage and, despite the fact that the ages of most patients were in the seventh and eighth decades, the incidence of degenerative vascular disease was small. Contusional injury causes a local failure of the mechanisms that regulate cerebral blood flow. Hypoxia, hypercapnia, and venous congestion produce cerebral hyperaemia which encourages gradual haematoma formation particularly at the sites of injury. This explains not only the situation of the lesions but also the latency between the trauma and their development. PMID:5084138

  12. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  13. Thoracic aortopathies in the military patient.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, David; White, S; Wilson, D; Haworth, K; Williams, A

    2015-09-01

    Thoracic aortic disease is an important contributor to arterial disease and therefore, mortality in the UK. It has close associations with hypertension, atherosclerosis and genetic conditions such as Marfan syndrome. The cardiovascular consequences of acute aortic dissection or the rupture of a thoracic aneurysm are life threatening with a 1% increase in mortality per hour with a type A aortic dissection and a high 30-day mortality rate. The clinical diagnosis can be difficult for the general physician as the symptoms can mimic more common conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism or acute abdomen. The investigations that carry the highest sensitivity and specificity, CT, transoesophageal echocardiography and MRI are not usually first-line investigations in most patients so a high index of clinical suspicion is key. The management of acute aortic syndromes involves good initial resuscitation and early discussion with the cardiothoracic surgeons. Given the serious consequences of acute aortic syndromes, it is important for all military doctors to be aware of these presentations and to appreciate the difficulties that can be encountered when trying to accurately diagnose them. Routine medicals, particularly entrance medicals, present a unique clinical opportunity to recognise the clinical features that would warrant further investigation and specialist advice. PMID:26243806

  14. Thoracic aortopathies in the military patient.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, David; White, S; Wilson, D; Haworth, K; Williams, A

    2015-09-01

    Thoracic aortic disease is an important contributor to arterial disease and therefore, mortality in the UK. It has close associations with hypertension, atherosclerosis and genetic conditions such as Marfan syndrome. The cardiovascular consequences of acute aortic dissection or the rupture of a thoracic aneurysm are life threatening with a 1% increase in mortality per hour with a type A aortic dissection and a high 30-day mortality rate. The clinical diagnosis can be difficult for the general physician as the symptoms can mimic more common conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism or acute abdomen. The investigations that carry the highest sensitivity and specificity, CT, transoesophageal echocardiography and MRI are not usually first-line investigations in most patients so a high index of clinical suspicion is key. The management of acute aortic syndromes involves good initial resuscitation and early discussion with the cardiothoracic surgeons. Given the serious consequences of acute aortic syndromes, it is important for all military doctors to be aware of these presentations and to appreciate the difficulties that can be encountered when trying to accurately diagnose them. Routine medicals, particularly entrance medicals, present a unique clinical opportunity to recognise the clinical features that would warrant further investigation and specialist advice.

  15. Basic thoracic ultrasound for the respiratory physician.

    PubMed

    Jimborean, Gabriela; Ianoşi, Edith Simona; Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Toma, Tudor P

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic ultrasound (TUS) evolved in the last ten years as the method of choice for evaluating pleural abnormalities and for guiding lung procedures. TUS can "see" almost all structures in the chest, including thoracic wall, pleura, pleural space, the heart, the great vessels and the peripheral layers of the lungs. However, there is still a great need to develop TUS services in respiratory departments in Romania. To facilitate this development we reviewed the literature and selected what we considered to be essential practical information for the beginner in TUS, including technique, normal findings, and common abnormalities. Moreover, we describe here a step-by-step scanning technique for chest physicians. Our aim is to raise awareness of TUS. Because TUS is rapid, accurate, noninvasive and can be applied in any ward, we recommend facilitating the training of all junior respiratory doctors in this technique, as it is likely to improve patient experience, clinical effectiveness and to reduce costs with chest radiographs or CT scans in the future. PMID:26738366

  16. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  17. Women in Thoracic Surgery: 30 Years of History.

    PubMed

    Antonoff, Mara B; David, Elizabeth A; Donington, Jessica S; Colson, Yolonda L; Litle, Virginia R; Lawton, Jennifer S; Burgess, Nora L

    2016-01-01

    Women in Thoracic Surgery was founded in 1986, with 2016 marking its 30th anniversary. Reflecting back on the last 3 decades of history, accomplishments, and enormous strides in our field, we review the past, present, and future of this organization. Although women still constitute a small minority of practicing surgeons in our field today, opportunities currently abound for women in thoracic surgery. Owing much to the early female pioneers in the field and to the support of male sponsors and our national societies, Women in Thoracic Surgery has grown and prospered, as have its members and the global community of female thoracic surgeons as a whole. In celebration of our 30th anniversary, we share with the readership the rich history of Women in Thoracic Surgery and its goals for the future.

  18. Pathology specific secondary aortic interventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore T.; Beck, Adam W.; Butler, Khayree; Feezor, Robert J.; Martin, Tomas D.; Hess, Philip J.; Huber, Thomas S.; Chang, Catherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Despite improved short-term outcomes, concerns remain regarding durability of thoracic endovascular aortic repair(TEVAR). The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the pathology-specific incidence of secondary aortic interventions(SAI) after TEVAR and their impact on survival. Methods: Retrospective review was performed of all TEVAR procedures and SAI at one institution from 2004-2011. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate survival. Results: Of 585 patients, 72(12%) required SAI at a median of 5.6 months(interquartile range(IQR):1.4-14.2) with 22(3.7%) requiring multiple SAI. SAI incidence differed significantly by pathology(P=.002): acute dissection(21.3%), post-surgical(20.0%), chronic dissection(16.7%), degenerative aneurysm(10.8%), traumatic transection(8.1%), penetrating ulcer(1.5%), and other etiologies(14.8%). Most common indications after dissection were persistent false lumen flow and proximal/distal extension of disease. For degenerative aneurysms, SAI was performed primarily to treat type I/III endoleaks. SAI patients had a greater mean number of comorbidities(P<.0005), stents placed(P=.0002), and postoperative complications after the index TEVAR(P<.0005) compared to those without SAI. Freedom from SAI at 1 and 5 years(95% CI) was estimated to be 86%(82-90%) and 68%(57-76%), respectively. There were no differences in survival(95% CI) between patients requiring SAI and those who did not: SAI 1-year: 88%(77-93%), 5-year: 51%(37-63%) and no SAI 1-year: 82%(79-85%), 5-year: 67%(62-71%)(Log-rank P=0.2). Conclusion: SAI after TEVAR is not uncommon, particularly in patients with dissection, but does not affect long-term survival. Aortic pathology is the most important variable impacting survival and dictated need, timing and mode of SAI. The varying incidence of SAI by indication underscores the need for diligent surveillance protocols that should be pathology-specific. PMID:24571937

  19. Post-traumatic stress disorder vs traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) often coexist because brain injuries are often sustained in traumatic experiences. This review outlines the significant overlap between PTSD and TBI by commencing with a critical outline of the overlapping symptoms and problems of differential diagnosis. The impact of TBI on PTSD is then described, with increasing evidence suggesting that mild TBI can increase risk for PTSD. Several explanations are offered for this enhanced risk. Recent evidence suggests that impairment secondary to mild TBI is largely attributable to stress reactions after TBI, which challenges the long-held belief that postconcussive symptoms are a function of neurological insult This recent evidence is pointing to new directions for treatment of postconcussive symptoms that acknowledge that treating stress factors following TBI may be the optimal means to manage the effects of many TBIs, PMID:22034252

  20. Active flow control for a blunt trailing edge profiled body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghib Lahouti, Arash

    Flow in the wake of nominally two-dimensional bluff bodies is dominated by vortex shedding, beyond a very small threshold Reynolds number. Vortex shedding poses challenges in the design of structures, due to its adverse effects such as cyclic aerodynamic loads and fatigue. The wake vortices are often accompanied by large- and small-scale secondary instabilities, which manifest as dislocations in the primary wake vortices, and/or pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, depending on the dominant instability mode(s), which in turn depends on the profile geometry and Reynolds number. The secondary instabilities interact with the wake vortices through several mechanisms. Therefore, manipulation of the secondary instabilities can be used as a means to alter the wake vortices, in order to reduce their adverse effects. In the present study, flow in the wake of a blunt trailing edge profiled body, composed of an elliptical leading edge and a rectangular trailing edge, has been studied at Reynolds numbers ranging from Re(d) = 500 to 2150 where d is thickness of the body, to identify the secondary instabilities. Various tools, including numerical simulations, Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) have been used for this study. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) has been applied to analyze the velocity field data. The results indicate the existence of small-scale instabilities with a spanwise wavelength of 2.0d to 2.5d in the near wake. The mechanism of the instability is similar to the Mode-A instability of a circular cylinder; however, it displays features that are specific to the blunt trailing edge profiled body. An active three-dimensional flow control mechanism based on the small-scale instabilities has been designed and evaluated. The mechanism comprises a series of trailing edge injection ports, with a spanwise spacing equal to the wavelength of the small-scale instabilities. Following preliminary evaluation of the control

  1. Cardiac injury complicating traumatic asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Rosato, R M; Shapiro, M J; Keegan, M J; Connors, R H; Minor, C B

    1991-10-01

    During a 3-year period (1986-1989), 8 patients were seen at St. Louis University Medical Center exhibiting the stigmata of traumatic asphyxia. Fewer than 200 cases of traumatic asphyxia have been reported and there is only a single report of a cardiac injury. In this series, 3 of 8 (37.5%) patients were found to have an injury to the heart: two cardiac contusions and a ventricular rupture. Five patients were crushed in motor vehicle collisions, one by an elevator counterweight, and two patients by river barges. Injuries associated with these patients include pulmonary contusion, hemopneumothorax, traumatic pneumatocele, traumatic retinopathy, bone fractures, mental confusion, and liver contusion. There was one death in the series, a patient with rupture of the right ventricle and severe splenic and liver injuries. The cardiac status of the patients was evaluated by serial serum cardiac enzyme determinations, electrocardiograms, and echocardiography. This report illustrates the importance of complete cardiac evaluation in patients with traumatic asphyxia. PMID:1942148

  2. The management of traumatic dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Roberta; Dumsha, Thomas C

    2003-01-01

    Traumatic injuries require a vast and complex treatment methodology. This manuscript although in a "cookbook" format will still require from the practitioner sound clinical judgment prior to treating a traumatized tooth.

  3. Post-traumatic extrapyramidal syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, S; Mazzini, L

    1990-02-01

    We report the case of a young man with possible post-traumatic extrapyramidal syndrome. Some features of this case have a bearing on the controversy surrounding the existence of post-traumatic Parkinson disease.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions Share Tweet Linkedin ... top What to Do if You Suspect Traumatic Brain Injury Anyone with signs of moderate or severe ...

  5. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with post-traumatic stress need early treatment with methods that are used to treat other trauma victims. ... symptoms of post-traumatic stress. The crisis intervention method aims to relieve distress and help the patient ...

  6. Derivation and Validation of Two Decision Instruments for Selective Chest CT in Blunt Trauma: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study (NEXUS Chest CT)

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Robert M.; Langdorf, Mark I.; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M.; Hendey, Gregory W.; Medak, Anthony J.; Raja, Ali S.; Allen, Isabel E.; Mower, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods and Findings From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients—6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%–100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%–22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%–100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%–96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%–27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%–95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity

  7. Blunt body near wake flow field at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Hannemann, Klaus

    1996-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a Mach 6 flow to examine the reattachment process of an axisymmetric free shear layer associated with the near wake of a 70 deg. half angle, spherically blunted cone with a cylindrical after body. Model angle of incidence was fixed at 0 deg. and free-stream Reynolds numbers based on body diameter ranged from 0.5 x 10(exp 6) to 4 x 10(exp 6). The sensitivity of wake shear layer transition on reattachment heating was investigated. The present perfect gas study was designed to compliment results obtained previously in facilities capable of producing real gas effects. The instrumented blunted cone model was designed primarily for testing in high enthalpy hypervelocity shock tunnels in both this country and abroad but was amenable for testing in conventional hypersonic blowdown wind tunnels as well. Surface heating rates were inferred from temperature - time histories from coaxial surface thermocouples on the model forebody and thin film resistance gages along the model base and cylindrical after body. General flow feature (bow shock, wake shear layer, and recompression shock) locations were visually identified by schlieren photography. Mean shear layer position and growth were determined from intrusive pitot pressure surveys. In addition, wake surveys with a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer were utilized to qualitatively characterize the state of the shear layer prior to reattachment. Experimental results were compared to laminar perfect gas predictions provided by a 3-D Navier Stokes code (NSHYP). Shear layer impingement on the instrumented cylindrical after body resulted in a localized heating maximum that was 21 to 29 percent of the forebody stagnation point heating. Peak heating resulting from the reattaching shear layer was found to be a factor of 2 higher than laminar predictions, which suggested a transitional shear layer. Schlieren flow visualization and fluctuating voltage time histories and spectra from the hot wire surveys

  8. Evaluating blunt abdominal trauma with sonography: a cost analysis.

    PubMed

    McKenney, M G; McKenney, K L; Hong, J J; Compton, R; Cohn, S M; Kirton, O C; Shatz, D V; Sleeman, D; Byers, P M; Ginzburg, E; Augenstein, J

    2001-10-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is becoming increasingly utilized in the United States for the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). The objective of this study was to assess the cost impact of utilizing US in the evaluation of patients with BAT in a major trauma center. All patients sustaining BAT during a 6-month period before US was used at our institution (Jan-Jun 1993) were compared to BAT patients from a recent period in which US has been utilized (Jan-Jun 1995). The numbers of US, computed tomography (CT), and diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) were tabulated for each group. Financial cost for each of these procedures as determined by our finance department were as follows: US $96, CT $494, DPL $137. These numbers are representative of actual hospital expenditures exclusive of physician fees as calculated in 1994 U.S. dollars. Cost analysis was performed with t test and chi squared test, and significance was defined as P < 0.05. There were 890 BAT admissions in the 1993 study period and 1033 admissions in the 1995 study period. During the 1993 period, 642 procedures were performed on the 890 patients to evaluate the abdomen: 0 US, 466 CT, and 176 DPL (see table) [table: see text]. This compares to 801 procedures on the 1,033 patients in 1995: 552 US, 228 CT, and 21 DPL. Total cost was $254,316 for the 1993 group and $168,501 for the 1995 group. Extrapolated to a 1-year period, a significant (P < 0.05) cost savings of $171,630 would be realized. Cost per patient evaluated was significantly reduced from $285.75 in 1993 to $163.12 in 1995 (P < 0.05). This represents a 43 per cent reduction in per patient expenditure for evaluating the abdomen. By effectively utilizing ultrasonography in the evaluation of patients with blunt abdominal trauma, a significant cost savings can be realized. This effect results chiefly from an eight-fold reduction in the use of DPL, and a two-fold reduction in the use of CT. PMID:11603547

  9. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  10. Memory for Traumatic Experiences in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Ingrid M.; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Sayfan, Liat; Melinder, Annika; Goodman, Gail S.

    2004-01-01

    Traumatic experiences in early childhood raise important questions about memory development in general and about the durability and accessibility of memories for traumatic events in particular. We discuss memory for early childhood traumatic events, from a developmental perspective, focusing on those factors that may equally influence memories for…

  11. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  12. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  13. Blunting post-meal glucose surges in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Elsamma

    2016-06-10

    Worldwide, the morbidity and mortality associated with non-communicable diseases have been climbing steadily - with costs aggressively keeping pace. This letter highlights a decidedly low-cost way to address the challenges posed by diabetes. High levels of postprandial blood glucose are disproportionately linked to much of the microvascular damage which, in the end, leads to macrovascular complications and organ failures. Systematically controlling post-meal glucose surges is a critical element of overall glycemic management in diabetes. Diet, exercise and medications form a triad of variables that individuals engaged in diabetes self-management may manipulate to achieve their targeted glucose levels. As a rule, diabetes patients in developing countries as well as those living in the pockets of poverty in the western world cannot afford special diets, medications, glucometers and supplies, lab tests and office visits. Exercise is the one option that is readily accessible to all. Decades of research in laboratory settings, viewed holistically, have established that light to moderate aerobic exercise for up to 60 min starting 30 min after the first bite into a meal can blunt the ensuing glucose surge effectively. Moderate resistance exercise, moderate endurance exercise or a combination of the two, practiced post-meal has also been found to improve many cardio-metabolic markers: Glucose, high density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and markers of oxidative stress. On the other hand, pre-breakfast exercise and high-intensity exercise in general have been decidedly counterproductive. PMID:27326346

  14. Direct numerical simulation of the sea flows around blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushin, Pavel V.; Gushchin, Valentin A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is the demonstration of the opportunities of the mathematical modeling of the separated flows of the sea water around blunt bodies on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the Boussinesq approximation. The 3D density stratified incompressible viscous fluid flows around a sphere have been investigated by means of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) on supercomputers and the visualization of the 3D vortex structures in the wake. For solving of NSE the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, capable for work in wide range of the Reynolds (Re) and the internal Froude (Fr) numbers and monotonous) has been developed and successfully applied. The different transitions in sphere wakes with increasing of Re (10 < Re < 500) and decreasing of Fr (0.005 < Fr < 100) have been investigated in details. Thus the classifications of the viscous fluid flow regimes around a sphere have been refined.

  15. Passive drag control of a blunt trailing edge cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiria, B.; Cadot, O.; Beaudoin, J.-F.

    2009-07-01

    The turbulent drag of a 2-D bluff body with a blunt trailing edge is investigated for Reynolds numbers in the range 5×10

  16. Blunt-body drag reduction through base cavity shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite-Díez, Manuel; Jiménez-González, José Ignacio; Gutiérrez-Montes, Cándido; Martínez-Bazán, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical study on the drag reduction of a turbulent incompressible flow around two different blunt bodies, of height H and length L, at a Reynolds number Re = ρU∞ H / μ = 2000 , where U∞ is the turbulent incompressible free-stream velocity, ρ is their density and μ their viscosity. The study is based on the optimization of the geometry of a cavity placed at the rear part of the body with the aim of increasing the base pressure. Thus, we have used an optimization algorithm, which implements the adjoint method, to compute the two-dimensional incompressible turbulent steady flow sensitivity field of axial forces on both bodies, and consequently modify the shape of the cavity to reduce the induced drag force. In addition, we have performed three dimensional numerical simulations using an IDDES model in order to analyze the drag reduction effect of the optimized cavities at higher Reynolds numbers.The results show average drag reductions of 17 and 25 % for Re=2000, as well as more regularized and less chaotic wake flows in both bodies. Supported by the Spanish MINECO, Junta de Andalucía and EU Funds under projects DPI2014-59292-C3-3-P and P11-TEP7495.

  17. High Energy Wide Area Blunt Impact on Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFrancisci, Gabriela K.

    The largest source of damage to commercial aircraft is caused by accidental contact with ground service equipment (GSE). The cylindrical bumper typically found on GSE distributes the impact load over a large contact area, possibly spanning multiple internal structural elements (frame bays) of a stiffened-skin fuselage. This type of impact can lead to damage that is widespread and difficult to detect visually. To address this problem, monolithic composite panels of various size and complexity have been modeled and tested quasi-statically and dynamically. The experimental observations have established that detectability is dependent on the impact location and immediately-adjacent internal structure of the panel, as well as the impactor geometry and total deformation of the panel. A methodology to model and predict damage caused by wide area blunt impact events was established, which was then applied to more general cases that were not tested in order to better understand the nature of this type of impact event and how it relates to the final damage state and visual detectability.

  18. Blunt splenic injury in Sikkimese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Pradip Kumar; Ghosh, Amrita; Pal, Ranabir; Pal, Shrayan

    2011-01-01

    Background: The contemplation for the salvage operations and the nonoperative treatment for the pediatric splenic injuries had increasingly been suggested as the standard case management. Objectives: The study was carried out to identify the risk factors, the presentations, the severities and outcome of the interventions of blunt splenic injuries in the children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Sikkim on the children and adolescents admitted with splenic injury from January 2005 to December 2009. Splenic injuries were graded with the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Splenic Injury Scale followed by the operative and nonoperative managements (NOM). Results: Overall 147 cases with the abdominal trauma were diagnosed with splenic injury. Of them, males reported in higher numbers; three-fourths were adolescents with preponderance above 16 years of age. Majority of the cases [n=91(61.90%)] were due to fall from heights and others from road traffic accidents. Immediate surgical interventions was instituted in the hemodynamically unstable cases (n=87) NOM failed in 27 patients; of them eight cases underwent splenectomy, and 19 underwent surgical salvage; 33 were closely followed up by conservative approach with both clinical and CT criteria. Total number of cases in grade III and above was significantly higher than with lower grades of injury. Conclusions: In total 95(64.63%) of the cases were managed with total splenectomy; 19 cases in the initial nonsurgical group underwent salvage operation and 33 cases received NOM. PMID:21769209

  19. Effects of Chemistry on Blunt-Body Wake Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dogra, Virendra K.; Moss, James N.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Hassan, H. A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of a numerical study are presented for hypersonic low-density flow about a 70-deg blunt cone using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes calculations. Particular emphasis is given to the effects of chemistry on the near-wake structure and on the surface quantities and the comparison of the DSMC results with the Navier-Stokes calculations. The flow conditions simulated are those experienced by a space vehicle at an altitude of 85 km and a velocity of 7 km/s during Earth entry. A steady vortex forms in the near wake for these freestream conditions for both chemically reactive and nonreactive air gas models. The size (axial length) of the vortex for the reactive air calculations is 25% larger than that of the nonreactive air calculations. The forebody surface quantities are less sensitive to the chemistry than the base surface quantities. The presence of the afterbody has no effect on the forebody flow structure or the surface quantities. The comparisons of DSMC and Navier-Stokes calculations show good agreement for the wake structure and the forebody surface quantities.

  20. Blunt Body Near-Wake Flow Field at Mach 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Hannemann, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a Mach 10 air flow to examine the reattachment process of a free shear layer associated with the near wake of a 70 deg half angle, spherically blunted cone having a cylindrical after body. The nominal free-stream Reynolds number based on model diameter ranged from 0.25 x l0(exp 6) to 1 x l0(exp 6) and the angle of incidence set at 0 and +/- 20 deg. The present study was designed to complement previously reported Mach 6 perfect air tests as well as results obtained in several hypervelocity facilities capable of producing real gas effects. Surface heating rates were inferred from temperature time histories from coaxial surface thermocouples on the model forebody and thin film resistance gages along the model base and cylindrical after body. Limited forebody, base, and support sting surface pressures were obtained with piezoresistive Experimental results are compared to laminar perfect gas predictions provided by a 3-0 Navier Stokes code (NSHYP). Shear layer impingement on the instrumented cylindrical after body resulted in a localized heating maximum that was 16 to 18percent of the forebody stagnation point and a factor of 2 higher than laminar predictions, suggesting a transitional or turbulent shear layer. transducers.

  1. Adiponectin Receptor Signaling on Dendritic Cells Blunts Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Peng H.; Tyrrell, Helen E.J.; Gao, Liquan; Xu, Danmei; Quan, Jianchao; Gill, Dipender; Rai, Lena; Ding, Yunchuan; Plant, Gareth; Chen, Yuan; Xue, John Z.; Handa, Ashok I.; Greenall, Michael J.; Walsh, Kenneth; Xue, Shao-An

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape is a fundamental trait of cancer. Dendritic cells (DC) that interact with T cells represent a crucial site for the development of tolerance to tumor antigens, but there remains incomplete knowledge about how DC-tolerizing signals evolve during tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that DCs isolated from patients with metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer express high levels of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, which are sufficient to blunt antitumor immunity. Mechanistic investigations of ligand–receptor interactions on DCs revealed novel signaling pathways for each receptor. AdipoR1 stimulated IL10 production by activating the AMPK and MAPKp38 pathways, whereas AdipoR2 modified inflammatory processes by activating the COX-2 and PPARγ pathways. Stimulation of these pathways was sufficient to block activation of NF-κB in DC, thereby attenuating their ability to stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Together, our findings reveal novel insights into how DC-tolerizing signals evolve in cancer to promote immune escape. Furthermore, by defining a critical role for adiponectin signaling in this process, our work suggests new and broadly applicable strategies for immunometabolic therapy in patients with cancer. PMID:25261236

  2. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity.

  3. Blunting post-meal glucose surges in people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Elsamma

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the morbidity and mortality associated with non-communicable diseases have been climbing steadily - with costs aggressively keeping pace. This letter highlights a decidedly low-cost way to address the challenges posed by diabetes. High levels of postprandial blood glucose are disproportionately linked to much of the microvascular damage which, in the end, leads to macrovascular complications and organ failures. Systematically controlling post-meal glucose surges is a critical element of overall glycemic management in diabetes. Diet, exercise and medications form a triad of variables that individuals engaged in diabetes self-management may manipulate to achieve their targeted glucose levels. As a rule, diabetes patients in developing countries as well as those living in the pockets of poverty in the western world cannot afford special diets, medications, glucometers and supplies, lab tests and office visits. Exercise is the one option that is readily accessible to all. Decades of research in laboratory settings, viewed holistically, have established that light to moderate aerobic exercise for up to 60 min starting 30 min after the first bite into a meal can blunt the ensuing glucose surge effectively. Moderate resistance exercise, moderate endurance exercise or a combination of the two, practiced post-meal has also been found to improve many cardio-metabolic markers: Glucose, high density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and markers of oxidative stress. On the other hand, pre-breakfast exercise and high-intensity exercise in general have been decidedly counterproductive. PMID:27326346

  4. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity. PMID:25462217

  5. Blunt atrial transseptal puncture using excimer laser in swine

    PubMed Central

    Elagha, Abdalla A.; Kim, Ann H.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We describe a new approach that may enhance safety of atrial transseptal puncture, using a commercially available laser catheter that is capable of perforation only when energized. We test this approach in swine. Background Despite wide application, conventional needle transseptal puncture continues to risk inadvertent non-target perforation and its consequences. Methods We used a commercial excimer laser catheter (0.9mm Clirpath, Spectranetics). Perforation force was compared in vitro with a conventional Brockenbrough needle. Eight swine underwent laser transseptal puncture under X-ray fluoroscopy steered using a variety of delivery catheters. Results The 0.9mm laser catheter traversed in vitro targets with reduced force compared with a Brockenbrough needle. In vitro, the laser catheter created holes that were 25–30% larger than the Brockenbrough needle. Laser puncture of the atrial septum was successful and accurate in all animals, evidenced by oximetry, pressure, angiography, and necropsy. The laser catheter was steered effectively using a modified Mullins introducer sheath and using two different deflectable guiding catheters. The mean procedure time was 15 ± 6 minutes, with an average 3.0 ± 0.8 seconds of laser activation. There were no adverse sequelae after prolonged observation. Necropsy revealed discrete 0.9mm holes in all septae. Conclusion Laser puncture of the interatrial septum is feasible and safe in swine, using a blunt laser catheter that perforates tissues in a controlled fashion. PMID:17896413

  6. Environmental and Pharmacological Manipulations Blunt the Stress Response of Zebrafish in a Similar Manner

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V. V.; Abreu, Murilo S.; Zanandrea, Rodrigo; Saibt, Natália; Friedrich, Maria Tereza; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; Piato, Angelo L.; Barcellos, Leonardo J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide evidence that both pharmacological and environmental manipulations similarly blunt the cortisol release in response to an acute stressor in adult zebrafish. Different groups of fish were maintained isolated or group-housed in barren or enriched tanks, and then exposed or not to diazepam or fluoxetine. Acute stress increased cortisol levels in group-housed zebrafish maintained in barren environment. Single-housed zebrafish displayed a blunted cortisol response to stress. Environmental enrichment also blunted the stress response and this was observed in both isolated and group-housed fish. The same blunting effect was observed in zebrafish exposed to diazepam or fluoxetine. We highlighted environmental enrichment as an alternative and/or complimentary therapeutic for reducing stress and as a promoter of animal welfare. PMID:27351465

  7. Environmental and Pharmacological Manipulations Blunt the Stress Response of Zebrafish in a Similar Manner.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Zanandrea, Rodrigo; Saibt, Natália; Friedrich, Maria Tereza; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide evidence that both pharmacological and environmental manipulations similarly blunt the cortisol release in response to an acute stressor in adult zebrafish. Different groups of fish were maintained isolated or group-housed in barren or enriched tanks, and then exposed or not to diazepam or fluoxetine. Acute stress increased cortisol levels in group-housed zebrafish maintained in barren environment. Single-housed zebrafish displayed a blunted cortisol response to stress. Environmental enrichment also blunted the stress response and this was observed in both isolated and group-housed fish. The same blunting effect was observed in zebrafish exposed to diazepam or fluoxetine. We highlighted environmental enrichment as an alternative and/or complimentary therapeutic for reducing stress and as a promoter of animal welfare. PMID:27351465

  8. Respiratory Displacement of the Thoracic Aorta: Physiological Phenomenon With Potential Implications for Thoracic Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Tim Frederik; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Rengier, Fabian; Geisbuesch, Philipp; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Boeckler, Dittmar; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude and direction of respiratory displacement of the ascending and descending thoracic aorta during breathing maneuvers. In 11 healthy nonsmokers, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was performed in transverse orientation at the tracheal bifurcation during maximum expiration and inspiration as well as tidal breathing. The magnitude and direction of aortic displacement was determined relatively to resting respiratory position for the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta. To estimate a respiratory threshold for occurrence of distinct respiratory aortic motion, the latter was related to the underlying change in anterior-posterior thorax diameter. Compound displacement between maximum expiration and inspiration was 24.3 {+-} 6.0 mm for the AA in the left anterior direction and 18.2 {+-} 5.5 mm for the DA in the right anterior direction. The mean respiratory thorax excursion during tidal breathing was 8.9 {+-} 2.8 mm. The respiratory threshold, i.e., the increase in thorax diameter necessary to result in respiratory aortic displacement, was estimated to be 15.7 mm. The data suggest that after a threshold of respiratory thorax excursion is exceeded, respiration is accompanied by significant displacement of the thoracic aorta. Although this threshold may not be reached during tidal breathing in the majority of individuals, segmental differences during forced respiration impact on aortic geometry, may result in additional extrinsic forces on the aortic wall, and may be of significance for aortic prostheses designed for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  9. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Conzo, Giovanni; Gambardella, Claudio; Pasquali, Daniela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Avenia, Nicola; Pietra, Cristina Della; Napolitano, Salvatore; Palazzo, Antonietta; Mauriello, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Pettinato, Guido; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Santini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms. PMID:24125991

  10. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus.

  11. Tophaceous pseudogout of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vasisht; Kesler, Henry; Johnson, Mahlon; Dorfman, Howard; Walter, Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPDD, tophaceous pseudogout) is a rare crystal arthropathy characterized by pyrophosphate crystal deposition in joints, synovitis and chondrocalcinosis on imaging. We present the case of a 72-year-old man with 6 months of left chest pain; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a T9/T10 herniated disc. Intraoperatively, the material was sent for pathological analysis revealing pseudogout. Axial calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is rare but reported in the literature and found at the craniocervical junction and skull. Spinal calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is rare in the thoracic spine. It is often asymptompatic and can involve the disc or ligaments. This case demonstrates a unique presentation of CPDD.

  12. Current status of thoracic dorsal sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Welch, E; Geary, J

    1984-01-01

    This article summarizes over 20 years of experience (1962 to 1982) with cervical sympathectomy (thoracic dorsal sympathectomy) in 46 patients undergoing 68 sympathectomies. All operations were performed through an anterior supraclavicular approach. Indications for surgery were intractable Raynaud's disease (26 patients), atherosclerotic obliterative arterial disease (five), causalgia (five), posttraumatic sympathetic dystrophy (seven), collagen vascular disorders (eight), hyperhidrosis (12), occupational-related digital thrombosis (four), and thrombosis secondary to intra-arterial injection (one). The incidence of complications and side effects, both temporary and permanent, including Horner's syndrome, is reviewed in detail. Particular reference is made to the various surgical techniques of managing the stellate ganglion; four patients had two-third to three-fourth resection of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 thoracic ganglion, two had preservation of the stellate ganglion and resection of the T-2 through T-4 ganglia, seven had excision of the entire stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, seven had resection of the lower third of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, and 48 had removal of the lower half of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 ganglion. The study reviews the literature germane to anatomic considerations and suggests revisions in current texts and atlases. By retrospective analysis of the records and a follow-up questionnaire, which provided an 86% follow-up (average 8.4 years), the paper points to the distinctive clinical characteristics of the different groups within the population undergoing the operation and provides guidelines for patient selection and conclusions on the place for this operation in the management of vascular diseases involving the upper extremity. PMID:6481864

  13. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus.

  14. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus. PMID:10211221

  15. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  16. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    PubMed

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  17. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  18. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  19. Thoracic and lumbar extradural structure examined by extraduroscope.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Shimizu, R; Saitoh, K; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    We examined the extradural space using a flexible extraduroscope in 113 patients undergoing extradural anaesthesia. Patients were classified into two groups to receive either thoracic or lumbar extradural anaesthesia as needed for perioperative analgesia. The extraduroscopy showed that the thoracic extradural space becomes widely patent after injecting a given amount of air and that the amount of fatty and fibrous connective tissue is less in the thoracic extradural space compared with the lumbar extradural space. We suggest that differences between the structure of these two vertebral regions may affect the spread of local anaesthetics in the extradural space. PMID:9813508

  20. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J; Berkowitz, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae; however, this topic has been understudied. This review considers the rationale for examining traumatic events and related symptomology in individuals with ASD and summarizes the limited research on this topic. A conceptual framework for understanding the interplay of ASD, trauma and traumatic sequelae is proposed and recommendations for future research presented.

  1. Expert consensus document on the treatment of descending thoracic aortic disease using endovascular stent-grafts.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lars G; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T; Miller, D Craig; Bavaria, Joseph E; Coselli, Joseph S; Curi, Michael A; Eggebrecht, Holger; Elefteriades, John A; Erbel, Raimund; Gleason, Thomas G; Lytle, Bruce W; Mitchell, R Scott; Nienaber, Christoph A; Roselli, Eric E; Safi, Hazim J; Shemin, Richard J; Sicard, Gregorio A; Sundt, Thoralf M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Wheatley, Grayson H

    2008-01-01

    Between 43,000 and 47,000 people die annually in the United States from diseases of the aorta and its branches and continues to increase. For the thoracic aorta, these diseases are increasingly treated by stent-grafting. No prospective randomized study exists comparing stent-grafting and open surgical treatment, including for disease subgroups. Currently, one stent-graft device is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms although two new devices are expected to obtain FDA approval in 2008. Stent-graft devices are used "off label" or under physician Investigational Device Exemption studies for other indications such as traumatic rupture of the aorta and aortic dissection. Early first-generation devices suffered from problems such as stroke with insertion, ascending aortic dissection or aortic penetration from struts, vascular injury, graft collapse, endovascular leaks, graft material failure, continued aneurysm expansion or rupture, and migration or kinking; however, the newer iterations coming to market have been considerably improved. Although the devices have been tested in pulse duplicators out to 10 years, long-term durability is not known, particularly in young patients. The long-term consequences of repeated computed tomography scans for checking device integrity and positioning on the risk of irradiation-induced cancer remains of concern in young patients. This document (1) reviews the natural history of aortic disease, indications for repair, outcomes after conventional open surgery, currently available devices, and insights from outcomes of randomized studies using stent-grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, the latter having been treated for a longer time by stent-grafts; and (2) offers suggestions for treatment. PMID:18083364

  2. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  4. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  5. Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassuk, Ellen L.; Konnath, Kristina; Volk, Katherine T.

    2006-01-01

    The unexpected loss of a loved one, a car accident, or exposure to a violent experience is familiar to many. Everyone reacts to such events, but the responses vary widely, ranging from numbness and withdrawal, to crying, nervousness, and agitation. Because traumatic events are prevalent, cause profound suffering, and may lead to life altering…

  6. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  7. Children's Memory for Traumatic Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carole; Bell, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Three- through 13-year olds were interviewed a few days after a hospital stay for traumatic injury, and again six months later. Children provided considerable information about the injury and hospital stay and made few commission errors; children's distress at the time of injury did not affect their recall of the event, but distress during the…

  8. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Young Patient with Descending Aortic Injury;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    No, Hironari; Nishida, Satoru; Takagi, Takeshi; Mohri, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy was referred to our emergency room due to a penetrating injury of the back. Computed tomography( CT) demonstrated a descending aortic injury at the Th9/10 level, bilateral hemothorax, and spinal cord injury. Although surgical treatment was indicated, multiple organ injury complicated open surgical repair, which required cardiopulmonary bypass with full heparinization. Therefore, the patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A 23×33-mm Excluder aortic extension cuff was chosen for the small, 15-mm diameter aorta. The aortic extension was delivered and deployed in the descending aorta. Postoperative CT demonstrated neither endoleak nor collapse of the stent-graft. TEVAR for traumatic aortic aneurysm appears to be safe and effective, and an aortic extension for an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be utilized as an alternative device if the patient is young and the aorta is small. PMID:27476569

  9. Low Velocity Blunt Impact on Lightweight Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Monica Kar

    There is an increased desire to incorporate more composite sandwich structures into modern aircrafts. Because in-service aircrafts routinely experience impact damage during maintenance due to ground vehicle collision, dropped equipment, or foreign object damage (FOD) impact, it is necessary to understand their impact characteristics, particularly when blunt impact sources create internal damage with little or no external visibility. The objective of this investigation is to explore damage formation in lightweight composite sandwich panels due to low-velocity impacts of variable tip radius and energy level. The correlation between barely visible external dent formation and internal core damage was explored as a function of impact tip radius. A pendulum impactor was used to impact composite sandwich panels having honeycomb core while held in a 165 mm square window fixture. The panels were impacted by hardened steel tips with radii of 12.7, 25.4, 50.8, and 76.2 mm at energy levels ranging from 2 to 14 J. Experimental data showed little dependence of external dent depth on tip radius at very low energies of 2 to 6 J, and thus, there was also little variation in visibility due to tip radius. Four modes of internal core damage were identified. Internal damage span and depth were dependent on impact tip radius. Damage depth was also radius-dependent, but stabilized at constant depth independent of kinetic energy. Internal damage span increased with increasing impact energy, but not with increasing tip radius, suggesting a relationship between maximum damage tip radius with core density/size.

  10. Does combined antioxidant vitamin supplementation blunt repeated bout effect?

    PubMed

    He, F; Hockemeyer, J A K; Sedlock, D

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the effect of antioxidant supplementation on markers of muscle damage, antioxidant status, and delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) after repeated downhill runs. Moderately-trained males (n=22) were randomly assigned to a supplement (S) or placebo (P) group. Capsules (vitamin C:1 000 mg/d; vitamin E: 400 IU/d) were ingested daily for 2 weeks. before the first (1D) and second (2D) downhill runs, and for 2 additional days following each run. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) were measured pre-exercise and at 0 (immediately), 6, 24 and 48 h post-exercise (POST). DOMS was rated for quadriceps, hamstring, gluteus, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h POST. CK at 48 h following 1D remained elevated above pre-exercise only in P (P<0.01). Overall, DOMS of the quadriceps was lower in S (1.1±0.3) than P (2.2±0.5) (P<0.05). At 24 h POST in S, CK was lower (P<0.01) and ORAC was higher (P<0.05) following 2D than 1D. CK and ORAC following 2D were blunted and augmented, respectively, in response to 1D and antioxidant supplementation enhanced this protective effect as indicated by an attenuation of biomarkers of muscle damage and a greater antioxidant capacity observed 24 h POST 2D.

  11. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p <0.05). Conclusions The present study demonstrates that clinically significant symptoms of traumatic stress are common in acute leukemia and are linked to the degree of physical suffering, to satisfaction with relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  12. The immediate effects of spinal thoracic manipulation on respiratory functions

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Doo Chul; Lee, Yong Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thoracic spinal manipulation therapy on respiratory function including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second in young healthy individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty young healthy subjects recruited from a local university participated in this study. Subjects were randomly allocated into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group received thoracic spinal manipulation and the control group received placebo thoracic spinal manipulation. Respiratory function tests, including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second, were measured before and after intervention. [Results] The values for both tests were significantly higher in the experimental group. The control group showed no changes after the intervention. Differences in pre- and post-intervention values for both tests were significantly different between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Spinal manipulation therapy applied to the thoracic region improved respiratory function test results of participants in this study. PMID:27799691

  13. An improved retractor for cardiac and thoracic operations.

    PubMed

    McEnany, M T

    1980-10-01

    Several standard abdominal wall retractors have been modified to improve exposure at the extremes of thoracic and groin incisions and to enhance the efficiency and comfort of the assistant in supplying adequate visibility in these areas.

  14. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  15. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm for postoperative care for thoracic surgical patients in the United States has shifted with efforts to reduce hospital length of stay and improve quality of life. The increasing usage of minimally invasive techniques in thoracic surgery has been an important part of this. In this review we will examine our standard practices as well as the evidence behind both general contemporary postoperative care principles and those specific to certain operations. PMID:26941967

  16. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  17. Critical decisions in trauma of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Degiannis, E; Boffard, K

    2002-05-01

    Trauma to the thoracic aorta is a significant injury with a high mortality. This mortality is partly due to the delayed recognition of the condition. The increase of motor vehicle accidents and the use of firearms worldwide has resulted in an increase of the incidence of trauma to the thoracic aorta. Certain new developments in diagnosis and management have resulted in traditional methods being questioned. This review analyses current literature and data which we attempt to evaluate.

  18. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury.

  19. Transpupillary Argon Laser Cyclophotocoagulation in a Refractory Traumatic Glaucoma Patient with Aphakia and Aniridia

    PubMed Central

    Uzunel, Umut Duygu; Yüce, Berna; Küsbeci, Tuncay; Ateş, Halil

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of transpupillary argon laser cyclophotocoagulation (TALC) in a patient with traumatic aniridia and aphakia secondary to blunt trauma who had previous bilateral trabeculectomy. Four months after the trauma the patient’s intraocular pressure (IOP) rose to 35 mmHg despite topical antiglaucomatous medication. Inferior 180 degrees cyclophotocoagulation was performed with transpupillary argon laser in the first session and his IOP fell to values of 12-17 mmHg. Twelve weeks after TALC, his IOP rose to 22 mmHg and we had to apply TALC to the residual ciliary processes. Seven months later his IOP was 13 mmHg with topical dorzolamide/timolol and latanoprost administration. TALC may be an effective treatment alternative for lowering IOP in patients with visible ciliary processes who do not respond to conventional medical or laser treatment. PMID:27800256

  20. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhiannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. Methods This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Results: Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. Conclusions LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation.

  1. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  2. Sudden death due to traumatic ascending aortic pseudoaneurysms ruptured into the esophagus: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    He, Shixia; Chen, Xiaorui; Zhou, Xiaowei; Hu, Qingqing; Ananda, Sunnassee; Zhu, Shaohua

    2015-04-01

    We present 2 rare cases of patients with uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock induced by traumatic ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm rupture into the esophagus. Two men were presented to the hospital after traffic accidents. Their chest radiograph showed no obvious signs of aortic damage or aortic pseudoaneurysms but only a small amount of high-density shadow in the mediastinum and no specific clinical signs besides chest tightness or chest tenderness. The first case was misdiagnosed as pulmonary contusion and pleural effusion, and the second case was misdiagnosed as mediastinal lesions in the mediastina. They were given symptomatic and supportive treatment. Unfortunately, they died suddenly after >1 month of traumatic accident. At autopsy, ascending aortic pseudoaneurysms that broke into the esophagus and multiple organ hematocele were detected by gross examination. In histopathological examination, inflammatory cells and proliferated fibrous connective tissue were detected in the ascending aortic pseudoaneurysms, and the pathological gastrointestinal bleeding was not seen. The drugs and poisons were not found on toxicological analysis. The 2 patients died as a result of hemorrhagic shock from traumatic ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm rupture into the esophagus. We suggest that thoracic surgeon should be aware of the possibility of aortic injury after chest trauma to reduce misdiagnosis and prevent similar accidents.

  3. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  4. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  5. The neuropathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mckee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, is divided into three grades of severity: mild, moderate, and severe, based on the Glasgow Coma Scale, the loss of consciousness, and the development of post-traumatic amnesia. Although mild traumatic brain injury, including concussion and subconcussion, is by far the most common, it is also the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. Proper recognition, management, and treatment of acute concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are the fundamentals of an emerging clinical discipline. It is also becoming increasingly clear that some mild traumatic brain injuries have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Evidence indicates that a single traumatic brain injury can precipitate or accelerate multiple age-related neurodegenerations, increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease, and that repetitive mild traumatic brain injuries can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus, septal abnormalities, and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (τ) as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy frequently occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, and motor neuron disease. Currently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy can be diagnosed only at

  6. Comparison between Thoracic Epidural Block and Thoracic Paravertebral Block for Post Thoracotomy Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soniya; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Girish; Prakash, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative pain after thoracotomy is being considered one of the most severe pain and if not treated well, can result in various respiratory and other complications. Aim Present study was conducted with the aim to compare continuous thoracic epidural infusion with continuous paravertebral infusion for postoperative pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and four point observer ranking. The secondary outcomes measured were pulmonary functions and any complication like hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, urinary retention and neurological complications if any. Materials and Methods Sixty patients of age group 18-60 years posted for anterolateral thoracotomy surgery for lung resection were randomised either to epidural or paravertebral group in this randomised prospective double blind study. In Epidural group 7.5ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl and in Paravertebral group 15ml bolus of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 50μg Fentanyl was given 30 minutes before the anticipated end of surgery. Bolus dose was followed by infusion of 0.125% Bupivacaine with 2μg/ml Fentanyl at the rate of 5 ml/hr in both groups. Parameters noted were Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Heart Rate (HR), Oxygen Saturation (SpO2), Arterial Blood Gas (PaCO2, P/F ratio), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Four Point Observer Ranking Scale (FPORS) for pain, number of sensory segments blocked (by checking for pinprick sensation), requirement of infusion top ups and rescue analgesia (Tramadol), pre and postoperative pulmonary function test {(Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV)1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR)} and complications from start of infusion till 24 hours in the postoperative period. Results Both the techniques were effective in relieving pain but pain relief was significantly better with epidural. Postoperatively, HR, SpO2, P/F ratio and PaCO2 were comparable between group E and P. There was significant decline in FeV1

  7. Post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Motzkin, Julian C; Koenigs, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Disentangling the effects of "organic" neurologic damage and psychological distress after a traumatic brain injury poses a significant challenge to researchers and clinicians. Establishing a link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been particularly contentious, reflecting difficulties in establishing a unique diagnosis for conditions with overlapping and sometimes contradictory symptom profiles. However, each disorder is linked to a variety of adverse health outcomes, underscoring the need to better understand how neurologic and psychiatric risk factors interact following trauma. Here, we present data showing that individuals with a TBI are more likely to develop PTSD, and that individuals with PTSD are more likely to develop persistent cognitive sequelae related to TBI. Further, we describe neurobiological models of PTSD, highlighting how patterns of neurologic damage typical in TBI may promote or protect against the development of PTSD in brain-injured populations. These data highlight the unique course of PTSD following a TBI and have important diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment implications for individuals with a dual diagnosis.

  8. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  9. Conduits for Coronary Bypass: Internal Thoracic Artery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This second report in the series on coronary artery bypass presents the authors experience and personal views on the internal thoracic artery (ITA) which date to 1966. There has been a very gradual evolution in the acceptance of this conduit which was initially compared with the saphenous vein and viewed as an improbable alternative to it. As is common with concepts and techniques which are 'outside the box' there was skepticism and criticism of this new conduit which was more difficult and time consuming to harvest for the surgeon who had to do it all. It was viewed as small, fragile, spastic and its flow capacity was questioned. Only a few surgeons employed it because of these issues and some of them would frequently graft it to the diagonal artery as it was thought not to supply adequate flow for the left anterior descending unless it was small. After a decade, angiographic data revealed superior patency to vein grafts. Even this evidence and survival benefit reported a few years later did not convince many surgeons that their concerns about limitations justified its use. Thus widespread adaption of the ITA as the conduit of choice for the anterior descending required another decade and bilateral use is only now expanding to more than 5% of patients in the US and somewhat faster in other countries. PMID:23275918

  10. Computer modeling of thoracic response to blast.

    PubMed

    Stuhmiller, J H; Chuong, C J; Phillips, Y Y; Dodd, K T

    1988-01-01

    Primary blast injury affects the gas-containing structures of the body. Damage to the lungs with resultant respiratory insufficiency and arterial embolization of air from alveolar pulmonary venous fistulae is the predominant cause of morbidity and mortality following high-level blast exposure. In an effort to generate a widely applicable damage-risk criterion for thoracic injury from blast we are developing a complex computer finite element model (FEM) of the thorax. Taking an engineering approach, a horizontal cross-section of the thorax is divided into small discrete units (finite elements) of homogeneous structure. The necessary physical properties (density, bulk modulus, etc.) are then determined for each element. Specifying the material constants and geometry of the elements, the computer can load the surface of the structure with some force-time function (blast pressure-time history) and calculate the resultant physical events such as displacement, compression, stress, strain, etc. Computer predictions of pressure wave phenomena in the lung parenchyma are compared with trans-bronchially measured pressures in blast-exposed animals. The model should prove useful in assessing the risk of blast injury in diverse overpressure environments and may give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms and strategies for protection.

  11. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  12. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Darrell; Shen, Ying H.; Russell, Ludivine; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) is a highly lethal vascular disease. In many patients with TAD, the aorta progressively dilates and ultimately ruptures. Dissection formation, progression, and rupture cannot be reliably prevented pharmacologically because the molecular mechanisms of aortic wall degeneration are poorly understood. The key histopathologic feature of TAD is medial degeneration, a process characterized by smooth muscle cell depletion and extracellular matrix degradation. These structural changes have a profound impact on the functional properties of the aortic wall and can result from excessive protease-mediated destruction of the extracellular matrix, altered signaling pathways, and altered gene expression. Review of the literature reveals differences in the processes that lead to ascending versus descending and sporadic versus hereditary TAD. These differences add to the complexity of this disease. Although tremendous progress has been made in diagnosing and treating TAD, a better understanding of the molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms that cause this disease is necessary to developing more effective preventative and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:23856125

  14. Selective lung intubation during paediatric thoracic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Rygl, M

    2016-01-01

    Selective lung intubation is a necessary prerequisite for the completion of most interventions comprising thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. In paediatric care, our site uses Univent tubes for children up to the age of three years and double-lumen tubes (DLT) for children from 6-8 years of age. In younger children, we usually use regular endotracheal intubation, with the lung being held in the hemithorax position being operated on using a surgical retractor. The article presents the analysis of 860 thoracic surgeries, of which 491 comprised selective intubation (Univent 57 cases, DLT 434 cases). The use of the aforementioned devices is connected with certain complications. Univent tube can be connected with intraoperative dislocation of the obturating balloon (29.8%) and balloon perforation (5.2%). DLT insertion may be connected with failure of tube fitting. In 84 cases we had to repeat DLT insertion (20.6%). In 8 cases we were not able to insert DLT at all (1.8%). Standard use of selective intubation methods in paediatric patients from two years of age improved the conditions for surgical interventions (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 19). PMID:27546541

  15. Hypervelocity dissociating flow over a spherically blunted cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togami, Kenji

    Recently several hypersonic vehicles are being developed in several countries. For the design of these vehicles, understanding the flow physics is necessary. Recently, the free piston driver for large shock tunnels became practical and it enables us to simulate the hypervelocity flow in the ground based facilities. Also the computing resources have grown dramatically and it enables us to compute the hypervelocity flow which is chemically and thermally nonequilibrium in a reasonable computation time. In this thesis the combined approach of experiment and computation has been applied to the hypervelocity flow on a spherically blunted cone.The experiments are conducted in the newly developed free piston shock tunnel called T5 at the Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute of Technology. Three kinds of the gases, nitrogen, air and carbon dioxide are used. The flow fields are computed by a CFD code using the two temperature model by Park. Since the flow field in the experiments is visualized with the differential interferogram, the computed density field is used to generate the differential interferogram. It can be concluded that the two temperature model CFD code can reproduce the basic flow feature such as the inflection point in the shock wave.Heat transfer at the stagnation point is then examined. It correlates well with the equation by Fay and Riddell. Subsequently, the after body heat flux can be predicted by Lees' theory very well. The heat flux on after body is well correlated with Stanton number and local Reynolds number for each gas but the difference between the gases are significant. This is partly because the recombination plays a more important role in the after body flow. The results of the experiments and the computations points to the necessity of other correlation parameters for the after body heat transfer in hypervelocity flows.Then the difference between the shock tunnel experiment and actual flight was examined. The most dominant

  16. Involvement of the mirror neuron system in blunted affect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Suk; Chun, Ji Won; Yoon, Sang Young; Park, Hae-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Blunted affect is a relatively enduring schizophrenic symptom and its presence brings about poor functioning and outcomes. Functional impairment in the mirror neuron system which is involved in both motor execution and imitation may be a neural basis of blunted affect, but it is not proved yet. Fifteen patients with schizophrenia and 16 healthy controls performed the facial expression task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The task was to reproduce facial expressions in response to the face or word stimuli for happiness, sadness, and meaningless expression. Brain activities during facial expressions in patients compared with controls and their relationship with affective flattening were analyzed. Compared to controls, patients exhibited decreased activity in the widespread dorsal frontal regions and increased activity in the ventral frontal and subcortical regions. Patients also demonstrated significant negative correlation of the severity of affective flattening with activities in the mirror neuron system, such as the premotor cortex, motor cortex, and inferior parietal lobule. Emotional expression in patients with schizophrenia may be related to hypoactivity of the dorsal system and hyperactivity of the ventral system. An imbalance of these two systems may contribute to blunted affect. Directly addressing blunted affect using emotional expression provides a new perspective that functional disturbance of the mirror neuron system may play an important role in manifestation of blunted affect in schizophrenia.

  17. Non-traumatic acute rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Taly, A B; Nair, K P; Arunodaya, G R; Das, S; Christopher, R; Mohan, C; Swamy, H S

    1999-03-01

    A boy developed sudden severe generalized muscle stiffness, bulbar weakness and passed dark coloured urine. Laboratory tests revealed marked elevation of creatinine kinase(CK) levels and myoglobinuria. Histopathology of quadriceps muscle showed features of acute rhabdomyolysis. Patient made complete clinical recovery over a period of three weeks and CK returned to normal level. The possible aetiologies of non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis are discussed and the relevant literature reviewed. PMID:10339709

  18. Hypothermia in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aminul I; Bullock, M Ross; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2016-10-01

    For over 50 years, clinicians have used hypothermia to manage traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the last two decades numerous trials have assessed whether hypothermia is of benefit in patients. Mild to moderate hypothermia reduces the intracranial pressure (ICP). Randomized control trials for short-term hypothermia indicate no benefit in outcome after severe TBI, whereas longer-term hypothermia could be of benefit by reducing ICP. This article summarises current evidence and gives recommendations based upon the conclusions. PMID:27637398

  19. Pathogenesis and Outcomes of Traumatic Injuries of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Makhani, Marc; Midani, Deena; Goldberg, Amy; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2013-01-01

    Background Traumatic injury of the esophagus is extremely uncommon. The aims of this study were to use the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study (PTOS) database to identify clinical factors predictive of esophageal trauma, and to report the morbidity and mortality of this injury. Methods A cross-sectional review of patients presenting to twenty Level I trauma centers in Pennsylvania from 2004 to 2010 was performed. We compared clinical and demographic variables between patients with and without esophageal trauma both prior to, and after arrival in the ER. Primary mechanism of injury and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results There were 231,694 patients and 327 (0.14%) had esophageal trauma. Patients with esophageal trauma were considerably younger than those without this injury. The risk of esophageal trauma was markedly increased in males [OR= 2.62 (CI 1.98–3.47)]. The risk was also increased in African Americans [OR = 4.61 (CI 3.65–5.82)]. Most cases were from penetrating gunshot and stab wounds. Only 34 (10.4%) of esophageal trauma patients underwent an upper endoscopy; diagnosis was usually made by CT, surgery, or autopsy. Esophageal trauma patients were more likely to require surgery (35.8% vs. 12.5%; p <0.001). Patients with esophageal trauma had a substantially higher mortality than those without the injury (20.5% vs. 1.4%; p <0.005). In logistic regression modeling, traumatic injury of the esophagus [OR=3.43 9 2.50–4.71)] and male gender [OR=1.52 (1.46–1.59)] were independently associated with mortality. For those patients with esophageal trauma, there was an association between trauma severity and mortality [OR = 1.10 (1.07–1.12)] but not for undergoing surgery within the first 24 hours of hospitalization (OR = 0.84; 0.39–1.83). Conclusions Our study on traumatic injury of the esophagus is in concordance with previous studies demonstrating that this injury is rare but carries considerable morbidity (~46%) and mortality (~20%). The injury has a

  20. Traumatic injuries in revue dancers.

    PubMed

    Wanke, Eileen M; Arendt, Michael; Mill, Helmgard; Koch, Franziska; Wanke, Alice; Groneberg, David A

    2014-03-01

    Revue productions are a combination of dancing and singing, musical and spoken sequences, and acrobatics, performed with or without a story line, and characterized by a versatility of dance styles and a high number of performances (over 250 in a 10-month season). The aim of this quantitative single cohort study is to evaluate work-related traumatic injuries in this dance genre. Data were obtained from work accident reports of the German Social Accident Insurance Institution for the public sector in Berlin (UKB) involving 440 revue dancers (183 males and 257 females). Analysis was conducted with Excel 2007 and PASW Statistics 18. One out of three female dancers and one out of two male dancers sustained an acute injury in the course of a theatrical season (0.22 injuries per 1,000 hours). The incidence rate was 0.44 for males and 0.31 for females, with the lower extremity as the most commonly injured body region, followed by the spine. Of all occupational accidents, 75.1% happened on stage, with 69% during performances. The dance partner and dance floor were the most common exogenous factors resulting in a traumatic injury. Of all traumatic injuries, 81.7% occurred in the first 3 hours after starting work. Gender specific differences could be observed. Due to the limited availability of comparable studies of other forms of professional dance, in this study revue dance is largely considered as an independent genre.