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Sample records for body giant cell

  1. Synthesis of sodium channels in the cell bodies of squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Brismar, T; Gilly, W F

    1987-01-01

    Giant axons in squid are formed by fusion of axons from many small cell bodies in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the stellate ganglion. Somata of GFL cells in vivo are inexcitable and do not have measurable sodium current (INa) when studied with microelectrode or patch-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. If GFL cells are separated from the giant axons and maintained in primary culture, axon-like INa can be recorded from the somata after several days. Incorporation of Na channels into GFL cell bodies requires protein synthesis, intracellular microtubule-based transport, and the lack of a morphologically defined axon to serve as a sink for channels synthesized in culture. PMID:3469679

  2. Foreign body giant cells selectively covering haptics of intraocular lens implants: indicators of poor toleration?

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R

    1983-10-01

    A Sputnik lens implant removed after five years because of bullous keratopathy exhibits a dense covering of its Supramid anterior staves with large foreign body giant cells, while its Prolene loops and Polymethylmethacrylate optics have attracted only few of these cell units. The glass-membrane-like component of the reactive membrane also shows significant differences on the different parts of this implant. The use of observation of the components of reactive membranes on lens implants as indicators of toleration in the eye is suggested. PMID:6364004

  3. Fast Inactivation of Delayed Rectifier K Conductance in Squid Giant Axon and Its Cell Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, Chris; Rosenthal, Joshua J.C.; Armstrong, Clay M.; Gilly, William F.

    1997-01-01

    Inactivation of delayed rectifier K conductance (gK) was studied in squid giant axons and in the somata of giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons. Axon measurements were made with an axial wire voltage clamp by pulsing to VK (∼−10 mV in 50–70 mM external K) for a variable time and then assaying available gK with a strong, brief test pulse. GFL cells were studied with whole-cell patch clamp using the same prepulse procedure as well as with long depolarizations. Under our experimental conditions (12–18°C, 4 mM internal MgATP) a large fraction of gK inactivates within 250 ms at −10 mV in both cell bodies and axons, although inactivation tends to be more complete in cell bodies. Inactivation in both preparations shows two kinetic components. The faster component is more temperature-sensitive and becomes very prominent above 12°C. Contribution of the fast component to inactivation shows a similar voltage dependence to that of gK, suggesting a strong coupling of this inactivation path to the open state. Omission of internal MgATP or application of internal protease reduces the amount of fast inactivation. High external K decreases the amount of rapidly inactivating IK but does not greatly alter inactivation kinetics. Neither external nor internal tetraethylammonium has a marked effect on inactivation kinetics. Squid delayed rectifier K channels in GFL cell bodies and giant axons thus share complex fast inactivation properties that do not closely resemble those associated with either C-type or N-type inactivation of cloned Kv1 channels studied in heterologous expression systems. PMID:9101403

  4. Fast inactivation of delayed rectifier K conductance in squid giant axon and its cell bodies.

    PubMed

    Mathes, C; Rosenthal, J J; Armstrong, G M; Gilly, W F

    1997-04-01

    Inactivation of delayed rectifier K conductance (gk) was studied in squid giant axons and in the somata of giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons. Axon measurements were made with an axial wire voltage clamp by pulsing to VK (approximately -10 mV in 50-70 mM external K) for a variable time and then assaying available gK with a strong, brief test pulse. GFL cells were studied with whole-cell patch clamp using the same prepulse procedure as well as with long depolarizations. Under our experimental conditions (12-18 degrees C, 4 mM internal MgATP) a large fraction of gK inactivates within 250 ms at -10 mV in both cell bodies and axons, although inactivation tends to be more complete in cell bodies. Inactivation in both preparations shows two kinetic components. The faster component is more temperature-sensitive and becomes very prominent above 12 degrees C. Contribution of the fast component to inactivation shows a similar voltage dependence to that of gK, suggesting a strong coupling of this inactivation path to the open state. Omission of internal MgATP or application of internal protease reduces the amount of fast inactivation. High external K decreases the amount of rapidly inactivating IK but does not greatly alter inactivation kinetics. Neither external nor internal tetraethylammonium has a marked effect on inactivation kinetics. Squid delayed rectifier K channels in GFL cell bodies and giant axons thus share complex fast inactivation properties that do not closely resemble those associated with either C-type or N-type inactivation of cloned Kvl channels studied in heterologous expression systems.

  5. Identification of a novel RNA giant nuclear body in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Gan, Xiaoxian; Gan, Yichao; Zheng, Weiwei; Kim, Byung-Wook; Xu, Xiaohua; Lu, Xiaoya; Dong, Qi; Zheng, Shu; Huang, Wendong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2016-01-26

    Constitutive synthesis of oncogenic mRNAs is essential for maintaining the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. However, little is known about how these mRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Here, we report the identification of a RNA giant nuclear body (RNA-GNB) that is abundant in cancer cells but rare in normal cells. The RNA-GNB contains a RNA core surrounded by a protein shell. We identify 782 proteins from cancer-associated RNA-GNBs, 40% of which are involved in the nuclear mRNA trafficking. RNA-GNB is required for cell proliferation, and its abundance is positively associated with tumor burden and outcome of therapies. Our findings suggest that the RNA-GNB is a novel nuclear RNA trafficking organelle that may contribute to the nuclear mRNA exporting and proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26678034

  6. Identification of a novel RNA giant nuclear body in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Gan, Xiaoxian; Gan, Yichao; Zheng, Weiwei; Kim, Byung-Wook; Xu, Xiaohua; Lu, Xiaoya; Dong, Qi; Zheng, Shu; Huang, Wendong; Xu, Rongzhen

    2016-01-26

    Constitutive synthesis of oncogenic mRNAs is essential for maintaining the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. However, little is known about how these mRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Here, we report the identification of a RNA giant nuclear body (RNA-GNB) that is abundant in cancer cells but rare in normal cells. The RNA-GNB contains a RNA core surrounded by a protein shell. We identify 782 proteins from cancer-associated RNA-GNBs, 40% of which are involved in the nuclear mRNA trafficking. RNA-GNB is required for cell proliferation, and its abundance is positively associated with tumor burden and outcome of therapies. Our findings suggest that the RNA-GNB is a novel nuclear RNA trafficking organelle that may contribute to the nuclear mRNA exporting and proliferation of cancer cells.

  7. Macrophage fusion, giant cell formation, and the foreign body response require matrix metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    MacLauchlan, Susan; Skokos, Eleni A.; Meznarich, Norman; Zhu, Dana H.; Raoof, Sana; Shipley, J. Michael; Senior, Robert M.; Bornstein, Paul; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells in several pathologic conditions, including the foreign body response (FBR). We detected high levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 during macrophage fusion in vitro and in foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) in vivo. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow-derived macrophages were induced to fuse with IL-4 in the presence of MMP-9 function-blocking antibodies and displayed reduced fusion. A similar defect, characterized by delayed shape change and abnormal morphology, was observed in MMP-9 null macrophages. Analysis of the FBR in MMP-9 null mice was then pursued to evaluate the significance of these findings. Specifically, mixed cellulose ester disks and polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted s.c. in MMP-9 null and WT mice and excised 2–4 weeks later. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses indicated equal macrophage recruitment between MMP-9 null and WT mice, but FBGC formation was compromised in the former. In addition, MMP-9 null mice displayed abnormalities in extracellular matrix assembly and angiogenesis. Consistent with a requirement for MMP-9 in fusion, we also observed reduced MMP-9 levels in MCP-1 null macrophages, previously shown to be defective in FBGC formation. Collectively, our studies show abnormalities in MMP-9 null mice during the FBR and suggest a role for MMP-9 in macrophage fusion. PMID:19141565

  8. Differential expression of chemokines, chemokine receptors and proteinases by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman A; Hashimi, Saeed M; Khan, Shershah; Quan, Jingjing; Bakr, Mahmoud M; Forwood, Mark R; Morrison, Nigel M

    2014-07-01

    Osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) are both derived from the fusion of macropahges. These cells are seen in close proximity during foreign body reactions, therefore it was assumed that they might interact with each other. The aim was to identify important genes that are expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs which can be used to understand peri-implantitis and predict the relationship of these cells during foreign body reactions. Bone marrow macrophages (BMM) were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) to produce osteoclasts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to identify the genes that were expressed by osteoclasts and FBGCs compared to macrophage controls. TRAP staining was used to visualise the cells while gelatine zymography and western blots were used for protein expression. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metallo proteinase 9 (MMP9), nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (CTSK) and RANK were significantly lower in FBGCs compared to osteoclasts. Inflammation specific chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP1 also called CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1α), MIP1β and MIP1γ, and their receptors CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5, were highly expressed by FBGCs. FBGCs were negative for osteoclast specific markers (RANK, NFATc1, CTSK). FBGCs expressed chemokines such as CCL2, 3, 5 and 9 while osteoclasts expressed the receptors for these chemokines i.e. CCR1, 2 and 3. Our findings show that osteoclast specific genes are not expressed by FBGCs and that FBGCs interact with osteoclasts during foreign body reaction through chemokines.

  9. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  10. Chemical and physical effects on the adhesion, maturation, and survival of monocytes, macrophages, and foreign body giant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Terry Odell, III

    Injury caused by biomedical device implantation initiates inflammatory and wound healing responses. Cells migrate to the site of injury to degrade bacteria and toxins, create new vasculature, and form new and repair injured tissue. Blood-proteins rapidly adsorb onto the implanted material surface and express adhesive ligands which mediate cell adhesion on the material surface. Monocyte-derived macrophages and multi-nucleated foreign body giant cells adhere to the surface and degrade the surface of the material. Due to the role of macrophage and foreign body giant cell on material biocompatibility and biostability, the effects of surface chemistry, surface topography and specific proteins on the maturation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and foreign body giant cells has been investigated. Novel molecularly designed materials were used to elucidate the dynamic interactions which occur between inflammatory cells, proteins and surfaces. The effect of protein and protein adhesion was investigated using adhesive protein depleted serum conditions on RGD-modified and silane modified surfaces. The effects of surface chemistry were investigated using temperature responsive surfaces of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and micropatterned surfaces of N-(2 aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane regions on an interpenetrating polymer network of polyacrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol). The physical effects were investigated using polyimide scaffold materials and polyurethane materials with surface modifying end groups. The depletion of immunoglobulin G caused decreased levels of macrophage adhesion, foreign body giant cell formation and increased levels of apoptosis. The temporal nature of macrophage adhesion was observed with changing effectiveness of adherent cell detachment with time, which correlated to increased expression of beta1 integrin receptors on detached macrophages with time. The limited ability of the micropatterned surface, polyimide scaffold and surface

  11. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  12. Foreign Body Giant Cell Formation Is Preceded by Lamellipodia Formation and Can Be Attenuated by Inhibition of Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Skokos, Eleni; Laiwalla, Farah; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2007-01-01

    Macrophages that are recruited to the site of implanted biomaterials undergo fusion to form surface-damaging foreign body giant cells. Exposure of peripheral blood monocytes to interleukin-4 can recapitulate the fusion process in vitro. In this study, we used interleukin-4 to induce multinucleation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and observed changes in cell shape, including elongation and lamellipodia formation, before fusion. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are regulated by small GTPases, we examined the effects of inhibitors of Rho kinase (Y-32885) and Rac activation (NSC23766) on fusion. Y-32885 did not prevent cytoskeletal changes or fusion but limited the extent of multinucleation. NSC23766, on the other hand, inhibited lamellipodia formation and fusion in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that in control cells, these changes were preceded by Rac1 activation. However, NSC23766 did not block the uptake of polystyrene microspheres. Likewise, short interfering RNA knockdown of Rac1 limited fusion without limiting phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis and fusion can be partially decoupled based on their susceptibility to NSC23766. Furthermore, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) scaffolds containing NSC23766 attenuated foreign body giant cell formation in vivo. These observations suggest that targeting Rac1 activation could protect biomaterials without compromising the ability of macrophages to perform beneficial phagocytic functions at implantation sites. PMID:17556592

  13. Foreign body giant cell formation is preceded by lamellipodia formation and can be attenuated by inhibition of Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jay, Steven M; Skokos, Eleni; Laiwalla, Farah; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2007-08-01

    Macrophages that are recruited to the site of implanted biomaterials undergo fusion to form surface-damaging foreign body giant cells. Exposure of peripheral blood monocytes to interleukin-4 can recapitulate the fusion process in vitro. In this study, we used interleukin-4 to induce multinucleation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and observed changes in cell shape, including elongation and lamellipodia formation, before fusion. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are regulated by small GTPases, we examined the effects of inhibitors of Rho kinase (Y-32885) and Rac activation (NSC23766) on fusion. Y-32885 did not prevent cytoskeletal changes or fusion but limited the extent of multinucleation. NSC23766, on the other hand, inhibited lamellipodia formation and fusion in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that in control cells, these changes were preceded by Rac1 activation. However, NSC23766 did not block the uptake of polystyrene microspheres. Likewise, short interfering RNA knockdown of Rac1 limited fusion without limiting phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis and fusion can be partially decoupled based on their susceptibility to NSC23766. Furthermore, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) scaffolds containing NSC23766 attenuated foreign body giant cell formation in vivo. These observations suggest that targeting Rac1 activation could protect biomaterials without compromising the ability of macrophages to perform beneficial phagocytic functions at implantation sites.

  14. Therapy-resistant foreign body giant cell granuloma at the periapex of a root-filled human tooth

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, P.N.; Sjoegren, U.K.; Krey, G.; Sundqvist, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Although the primary etiological factor of periapical lesions is microbial, there are other independent factors that can adversely affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. In this communication, we present morphological evidence in support of the role of a foreign body reaction of periapical tissue to root-filling materials. The specimen consisted of a surgical biopsy of an asymptomatic periapical lesion which persisted after a decade of postendodontic follow-up. The biopsy was processed for correlated light and electron microscopy and was analyzed by various microtechniques. The unique feature of the lesion was the presence of vast numbers of large multinucleated cells and their cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Morphologically, these multinucleated cells resembled foreign body giant cells. They contained characteristic birefringent cytoplasmic inclusions which on electron-probe x-ray microanalysis consistently revealed the presence of magnesium and silicon. The magnesium and silicon are presumably the remnants of a root-filling excess which protruded into the periapex and had been resorbed during the follow-up period. These observations strongly suggest that in the absence of microbial factors, root-filling materials which contain irritating substances can evoke a foreign body reaction at the periapex, leading to the development of asymptomatic periapical lesions that may remain refractory to endodontic therapy for long periods of time.

  15. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  16. Regulation and Biological Significance of Formation of Osteoclasts and Foreign Body Giant Cells in an Extraskeletal Implantation Model.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Gazi Jased; Tatsukawa, Eri; Morishita, Kota; Shibata, Yasuaki; Suehiro, Fumio; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Yokoi, Taishi; Koji, Takehiko; Umeda, Masahiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-06-28

    The implantation of biomaterials induces a granulomatous reaction accompanied by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). The characterization of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone substitutes implanted in bone defects is more complicated because of healing with bone admixed with residual bone substitutes and their hybrid, and the appearance of two kinds of MNGCs, osteoclasts and FBGCs. Furthermore, the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs in the healing of implanted regions remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize MNGCs around bone substitutes using an extraskeletal implantation model and evaluate the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules were implanted into rat subcutaneous tissue with or without bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMCs), which include osteogenic progenitor cells. We also compared the biological significance of plasma and purified fibrin, which were used as binders for implants. Twelve weeks after implantation, osteogenesis was only detected in specimens implanted with BMMCs. The expression of two typical osteoclast markers, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin-K (CTSK), was analyzed, and TRAP-positive and CTSK-positive osteoclasts were only detected beside bone. In contrast, most of the MNGCs in specimens without the implantation of BMMCs were FBGCs that were negative for TRAP, whereas the degradation of β-TCP was detected. In the region implanted with β-TCP granules with plasma, FBGCs tested positive for CTSK, and when β-TCP granules were implanted with purified fibrin, FBGCs tested negative for CTSK. These results showed that osteogenesis was essential to osteoclastogenesis, two kinds of FBGCs, CTSK-positive and CTSK-negative, were induced, and the expression of CTSK was plasma-dependent. In addition, the implantation of BMMCs was suggested to contribute to osteogenesis and the replacement of implanted β-TCP granules to bone. PMID

  17. Regulation and Biological Significance of Formation of Osteoclasts and Foreign Body Giant Cells in an Extraskeletal Implantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gazi Jased; Tatsukawa, Eri; Morishita, Kota; Shibata, Yasuaki; Suehiro, Fumio; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Yokoi, Taishi; Koji, Takehiko; Umeda, Masahiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of biomaterials induces a granulomatous reaction accompanied by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). The characterization of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone substitutes implanted in bone defects is more complicated because of healing with bone admixed with residual bone substitutes and their hybrid, and the appearance of two kinds of MNGCs, osteoclasts and FBGCs. Furthermore, the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs in the healing of implanted regions remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize MNGCs around bone substitutes using an extraskeletal implantation model and evaluate the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules were implanted into rat subcutaneous tissue with or without bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMCs), which include osteogenic progenitor cells. We also compared the biological significance of plasma and purified fibrin, which were used as binders for implants. Twelve weeks after implantation, osteogenesis was only detected in specimens implanted with BMMCs. The expression of two typical osteoclast markers, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin-K (CTSK), was analyzed, and TRAP-positive and CTSK-positive osteoclasts were only detected beside bone. In contrast, most of the MNGCs in specimens without the implantation of BMMCs were FBGCs that were negative for TRAP, whereas the degradation of β-TCP was detected. In the region implanted with β-TCP granules with plasma, FBGCs tested positive for CTSK, and when β-TCP granules were implanted with purified fibrin, FBGCs tested negative for CTSK. These results showed that osteogenesis was essential to osteoclastogenesis, two kinds of FBGCs, CTSK-positive and CTSK-negative, were induced, and the expression of CTSK was plasma-dependent. In addition, the implantation of BMMCs was suggested to contribute to osteogenesis and the replacement of implanted β-TCP granules to bone. PMID

  18. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  19. Russell bodies in contact-lens-associated giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, A S; Allansmith, M R

    1979-03-01

    Biopsy specimens of the upper tarsal conjunctiva in soft contact lens-associated giant papillary conjunctivitis were taken during (1) chronic exacerbation, (2) brief remission, and (3) intentional exacerbation. Inflammatory cells were quantitated and compared with inflammatory cells in normal upper tarsal conjunctivae. Specimens were evaluated by light and electron microscopy. The most remarkable feature was the presence of diamond-shaped Russell bodies in 20% of the plasma cells of the second biopsy specimen. A few round Russell bodies were seen in the first biopsy specimen and none in the third. We concluded that the brief quiescent phase (second biopsy specimen) was characterized by retention of immunoglobulin to produce Russell bodies, and that the active phases of the disease were marked by migration of mast cells into the epithelium and by the presence of eosinophils and basophils in the substantia propria. PMID:217320

  20. Review of Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Joseph G.; Chacko, J. Anthony; Salter, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic autoimmune disease affecting primarily the elderly. Giant cell arteritis can cause sudden and potentially bilateral sequential vision loss in the elderly. Therefore, it is considered a medical emergency in ophthalmology and a significant cause of morbidity in an increasingly aging population. Ophthalmologists need to be able to recognize the classic symptoms and signs of this disease, and then be able to work-up and treat these patients in an efficient manner. An in-depth review of GCA from the literature as well as personal clinical experience follows. PMID:25859139

  1. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  2. Phenotypic expression in human monocyte-derived interleukin-4-induced foreign body giant cells and macrophages in vitro: dependence on material surface properties.

    PubMed

    McNally, Amy K; Anderson, James M

    2015-04-01

    The effects of different material surfaces on phenotypic expression in macrophages and foreign body giant cells (FBGC) were addressed using our in vitro system of interleukin (IL)-4-induced macrophage fusion and FBGC formation. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-, vitronectin (VN)-, and chitosan (CH)-adsorbed cell culture polystyrene, carboxylated (C, negatively charged) polystyrene, and unmodified (PS, non-cell culture treated) polystyrene were compared for their abilities to support monocyte/macrophage adhesion and IL-4-induced macrophage fusion. Pooled whole cell lysates from four different donors were evaluated by immunoblotting for expression of selected components in monocytes, macrophages, and FBGC. In addition to RGD and VN as previously shown, we find that CH supports macrophage adhesion and FBGC formation, whereas C or PS support macrophage adhesion but do not permit macrophage fusion under otherwise identical conditions of IL-4 stimulation. Likewise, components related to macrophage fusion (CD206, CD98, CD147, CD13) are strongly expressed on RGD-, VN-, and CH-adsorbed surfaces but are greatly diminished or not detected on C or PS. Importantly, material surfaces also influence the FBGC phenotype itself, as demonstrated by strong differences in patterns of expression of HLA-DR, B7-2, B7-H1, and toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 on RGD, VN, and CH despite morphologic similarities between FBGC on these surfaces. Likewise, we observe differences in the expression of B7-2, α2-macroglobulin, TLR-2, and fascin-1 between mononuclear macrophages on C and PS. Collectively, these findings reveal the extent to which material surface chemistry influences macrophage/FBGC phenotype beyond evident morphological similarities or differences and identify CH as an FBGC-supportive substrate.

  3. Interleukin-1 Receptor-associated Kinase-4 (IRAK4) Promotes Inflammatory Osteolysis by Activating Osteoclasts and Inhibiting Formation of Foreign Body Giant Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Eri; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Kobayashi, Tami; Sato, Yuiko; Hao, Wu; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Tando, Toshimi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Niki, Yasuo; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Formation of foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) occurs following implantation of medical devices such as artificial joints and is implicated in implant failure associated with inflammation or microbial infection. Two major macrophage subpopulations, M1 and M2, play different roles in inflammation and wound healing, respectively. Therefore, M1/M2 polarization is crucial for the development of various inflammation-related diseases. Here, we show that FBGCs do not resorb bone but rather express M2 macrophage-like wound healing and inflammation-terminating molecules in vitro. We also found that FBGC formation was significantly inhibited by inflammatory cytokines or infection mimetics in vitro. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 (IRAK4) deficiency did not alter osteoclast formation in vitro, and IRAK4-deficient mice showed normal bone mineral density in vivo. However, IRAK4-deficient mice were protected from excessive osteoclastogenesis induced by IL-1β in vitro or by LPS, an infection mimetic of Gram-negative bacteria, in vivo. Furthermore, IRAK4 deficiency restored FBGC formation and expression of M2 macrophage markers inhibited by inflammatory cytokines in vitro or by LPS in vivo. Our results demonstrate that osteoclasts and FBGCs are reciprocally regulated and identify IRAK4 as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit stimulated osteoclastogenesis and rescue inhibited FBGC formation under inflammatory and infectious conditions without altering physiological bone resorption. PMID:25404736

  4. Anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wallin, G; Lundell, G; Tennvall, J

    2004-01-01

    Anaplastic (giant cell) thyroid carcinoma (ATC), is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans with a median survival time after diagnosis of 3-6 months. Death from ATC was earlier seen because of local growth and suffocation. ATC is uncommon, accounting for less than 5 % of all thyroid carcinomas. The diagnosis can be established by means of multiple fine needle aspiration biopsies, which are neither harmful nor troublesome for the patient. The cytological diagnosis of this high-grade malignant tumour is usually not difficult for a well trained cytologist. The intention to treat patients with ATC is cure, although only few of them survive. The majority of the patients are older than 60 years and treatment must be influenced by their high age. We have by using a combined modality regimen succeeded in achieving local control in most patients. Every effort should be made to control the primary tumour and thereby improve the quality of remaining life and it is important for patients, relatives and the personnel to know that cure is not impossible. Different treatment combinations have been used since 30 years including radiotherapy, cytostatic drugs and surgery, when feasible. In our latest combined regimen, 22 patients were treated with hyper fractionated radiotherapy 1.6Gy x 2 to a total target dose of 46 Gy given preoperatively, 20 mg doxorubicin was administered intravenously once weekly and surgery was carried out 2-3 weeks after the radiotherapy. 17 of these 22 patients were operated upon and none of these 17 patients got a local recurrence. In the future we are awaiting the development of new therapeutic approaches to this aggressive type of carcinoma. Inhibitors of angiogenesis might be useful. Combretastatin has displayed cytotoxicity against ATC cell lines and has had a positive effect on ATC in a patient. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) genetherapy is also being currently considered for dedifferentiated thyroid carcinomas with the ultimate aim of

  5. Giant Cell Arteritis and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Crow, R. Wade; Warner, Judith E. A.; Alder, Stephen C.; Zhang, Kang; Schulman, Susan; Digre, Kathleen B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis of elderly individuals associated with significant morbidity, including blindness, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Previous studies have investigated whether GCA is associated with increased mortality, with conflicting results. The objective of this study is to determine whether GCA, is associated with increased mortality. Methods Forty-four cases with GCA were identified from the University of Utah Health Sciences Center, the major tertiary care center for the Intermountain West. The Utah Population Database, a unique biomedical information resource, selected cases and age- and gender-matched controls. Cases were defined as patients with a temporal artery biopsy-proven diagnosis of GCA (international classification of diseases [ICD]-9 code 446.5) between 1991 and 2005. Exclusion criteria included a negative biopsy, alternative diagnoses, or insufficient clinical data. For each of the 44 cases, 100 controls were identified; thus, 4,400 controls were included in the data analysis. Median survival time and 5-year cumulative survival were measured for cases and controls. Results The median survival time for the 44 GCA cases was 1,357 days (3.71 years) after diagnosis compared with 3,044 days (8.34 years) for the 4,400 controls (p = 0.04). Five-year cumulative survival was 67% for the control group versus 35% for the cases (p < .001). Survival rates for cases and controls converged at approximately 11.12 years. Conclusions Patients with GCA were more likely than age- and gender-matched controls to die within the first 5 years following diagnosis. PMID:19196636

  6. What Are Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Arteritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles What Are Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis? PDF Version Size: 58 KB November 2014 What Are Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis? Fast ...

  7. Sunspots and Giant-Cell Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Ed J.

    2000-01-01

    From analysis of Doppler velocity images from SOHO/MDI, Hathaway et al (2000, Solar Phys., in press) have found clear evidence for giant convection cells that fill the solar surface, have diameters 3 - 10 times that typical of supergranules, and have lifetimes approx. greater than 10 days. Analogous to the superposition of the granular convection on the supergranular convection, the approx. 30,000 km diameter supergranules are superposed on these still larger giant cells. Because the giant cells make up the large-scale end of a continuous power spectrum that peaks at the size scale of supergranules, it appears that the giant cells are made by the same mode of convection as the supergranules. This suggests that the giant cells are similar to supergranules, just longer-lived, larger in diameter, and deeper. Here we point out that the range of lengths of large bipolar sunspot groups is similar to the size range of giant cells. This, along with the long lives (weeks) of large sunspots, suggests that large sunspots sit in long-lived, deep downflows at the corners of giant cells, and that the distance from leader to follower sunspots in large bipolar groups is the distance from one giant-cell corner to the next. By this line of reasoning, an unusually large and strong downdraft might pull in both legs of a rising spot-group magnetic flux loop, resulting in the formation of a delta sunspot. This leads us to suggest that a large, strong giant-cell corner downdraft should be present at the birthplaces of large delta sunspots for some time (days to weeks) before the birth. Thus, early detection of such downdrafts by local helioscismology might provide an early warning for the formation of those active regions (large delta sunspot groups) that produce the Sun's most violent flares and coronal mass ejections. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Solar Physics Branch of its Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  8. Giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the mandible with abundant spindle cells and osteoclast-like giant cells mimicking malignancy in giant cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Mei; Zhang, Qing-Fu; Tang, Na; Mi, Xiao-Yi; Qiu, Xue-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell rich osteosarcoma is a relatively unusual histological form of osteosarcoma, common lesion usually presenting in the long bones of the appendicular skeleton. The occurrence in the mandible is exceptional rare. Histologically, this tumor tends to be a highly anaplastic, pleomorphic tumor in which the tumor cells may be: plasmacytoid, fusiform, ovoid, small round cells, clear cells, mono-or multinucleated giant cells, or, spindle cells. Herein, we present a case with the sternum and first thoracic vertebra metastasis from primary giant cell rich osteosarcoma of the mandible in a 28 year-old Chinese female. The tumor was predominantly composed of abundant spindle cells with marked atypia and numerous osteoclast-like giant cells reminiscent of malignancy in giant cell tumor. The unusual histological appearance can pose a great diagnostic challenge. It may be easily misdiagnosed, especially if the specimen is limited or from fine-needle aspiration. PMID:26464744

  9. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Shaktawat, Sameer Singh; Golka, Dariusz

    2007-01-01

    This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells. PMID:18067673

  10. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells in neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Shaktawat, Sameer Singh; Golka, Dariusz

    2007-12-08

    This short report discusses a case of neurofibroma containing floret-like multinucleated giant cells. This being the second such case in the literature. Floret-like multinucleated giant cells have been reported in gynaecomastia and neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1. These cells have been reported in uncommon soft tissue tumours including pleomorphic lipoma, giant cell collagenoma, giant cell fibroblastoma and giant cell angiofibroma. We recommend these cells to be interpreted carefully keeping in mind the rare malignant change in neurofibromas. Immunohistochemistry would help in defining the nature of such cells.

  11. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  12. Sodium efflux from perfused giant algal cells.

    PubMed

    Clint, G M; Macrobbie, E A

    1987-06-01

    Internodal cells of the giant alga Chara corallina were perfused internally to replace the native cytoplasm, tonoplast and vacuole with artificial cytoplasm. Sodium efflux from perfused cells, measured by including (22)Na in the perfusion media, was increased by increasing the internal sodium concentration and by decreasing the external pH, and was inhibited by external application of the renal diuretic amiloride. The sodium efflux was markedly ATP-dependent, with a 50-fold decrease in efflux observed after perfusion with media lacking ATP. Efflux in the presence of ATP was reduced by 33% by inclusion of 10 μM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the perfusion medium. The membrane potential of the perfused cells approximated that of intact cells from the same culture. It is suggested that sodium efflux in perfused Chara cells proceeds via a secondary antiporter with protons, regulated by ATP in a catalytic role and with the proton motive force acting as the energy source.

  13. Peripheral giant cell granuloma: This enormity is a rarity

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Silvia Victor; Mitra, Dipika Kalyan; Pawar, Sudarshana Devendrasing; Vijayakar, Harshad Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is an infrequent exophytic lesion of the oral cavity, also known as giant cell epulis, osteoclastoma, giant cell reparative granuloma, or giant cell hyperplasia. Lesions vary in appearance from smooth, regularly outlined masses to irregularly shaped, multilobulated protuberances with surface indentations. Ulcerations of the margin are occasionally seen. The lesions are painless, vary in size, and may cover several teeth. It normally presents as a purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in the background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This case report describes the unusual appearance of a PGCG extending from left maxillary interdental gingiva to palatal area in 32-year-old female patient. PMID:26392701

  14. [Ocular complications of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Liozon, E; Ly, K-H; Robert, P-Y

    2013-07-01

    Permanent visual loss (PVL) is the most dreaded complication of giant cell arteritis (GCA). It results from anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or, less commonly, retinal artery occlusion. This complication still occurs in 14 to 20% of patients and is typically devastating and permanent, although it is highly preventable by an early diagnosis of giant cell arteritis and appropriate glucocorticoid treatment. Transient ischemic symptoms such as amaurosis fugax, episodes of blurred vision or diplopia may occur, either heralding visual loss or remaining isolated. In studies, the main predictors of PVL are jaw claudication, amaurosis fugax, lack of systemic "B" symptoms, a modestly increased ESR and a higher haemoglobin level. The evaluation of a GCA patient with PVL includes emergency fundoscopy completed by fluorescein angiography, immediate erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and complete blood count. Treatment is extremely urgent mainly because, if left untreated, GCA is associated with visual loss in the fellow eye within days in up to 50% of individuals. Treatment may begin with high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone, followed by oral prednisone administered at 1 mg/kg per day. Daily adjunctive aspirin orally may be added since it has been shown, in retrospective studies, to protect against stroke and visual loss. Although treatment duration of complicated GCA is not codified, an initial PVL deserves close monitoring of patient's systemic symptoms, ESR and CRP to avoid relapses due to a significant risk of late recurrence of visual loss during steroid tapering. PMID:23523078

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of giant cell glioblastomas.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Puttlitz, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Waha, A.; Rollbrocker, B.; Boström, J.; Wiestler, O. D.; Louis, D. N.; Reifenberger, G.; von Deimling, A.

    1997-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Recently, distinct molecular genetic alterations have been linked to subgroups of patients with GBM. Giant cell (gc)GBMs are a rare variant of GBM characterized by a marked preponderance of multinucleated giant cells. Several reports have associated this entity with a more favorable prognosis than the majority of GBMs. To evaluate whether gcGBM may also represent a genetically defined subgroup of GBM, we analyzed a series of 19 gcGBMs for mutations in the TP53 gene for amplification of the EGFR and CDK4 genes and for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A (p16/MTS1) gene. Seventeen of nineteen gcGBMs carried TP53 mutations whereas EGFR and CDK4 gene amplification was seen in only one tumor each and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was not observed at all. The strikingly high incidence of TP53 mutations and the relative absence of other genetic alterations groups gcGBM together with a previously recognized molecular genetic variant of GBM (type 1 GBM). It is tempting to speculate that the better prognosis of gcGBM patients may result from the low incidence of EGFR amplification and CDKN2A deletion, changes known for their growth-promoting potential. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284834

  16. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high).

  17. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high). PMID:27403516

  18. Interleukin-1 blockade in refractory giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Ly, Kim-Heang; Stirnemann, Jérôme; Liozon, Eric; Michel, Marc; Fain, Olivier; Fauchais, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a primary large-vessel vasculitis characterized by an arterial wall inflammation associated with intimal hyperplasia leading to arterial occlusion. Glucocorticoids remain the mainstay of giant cell arteritis treatment. However, relapses and glucocorticoid-related complications are frequent and therapeutic options for refractory giant cell arteritis are quite limited. Like tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, interleukin-1β is also highly expressed in inflamed arterial walls of patients with giant cell arteritis and may contribute in the pathogenesis of this disease. We report treatment of three cases of refractory giant cell arteritis successfully treated with anakinra, an interleukin-1 blockade therapy. Anakinra was effective for all patients, yielding improvement in their inflammation biomarkers and/or in their symptoms, as well as a disappearance of arterial inflammation in PET/CT for two of them.

  19. Radionuclide bone scanning in giant cell tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, D.; Madewell, J.E.; McNiesh, L.M.; Kyle, R.W.; Sweet, D.

    1986-03-01

    Radionuclide bone scan findings are described and correlated with pathology in 23 patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone. The degree of radionuclide activity was markedly increased in 20 (87%), minimally increased in three (13%), and decreased in none of the patients. Of the 23 patients with increased radioactivity, the pattern was diffuse in 11 (48%) and doughnut in 12 (52%). Extended patterns of radioactivity were present in 19 of 22 patients; however, none were associated with true tumor extension. Bone scanning did not aid in the detection of GCT, was nonspecific, and did not differentiate benign from malignant GCT. Although radioactivity extended beyond the radiographic abnormality in the majority of patients, this was most likely secondary to other bony abnormalities or local and/or regional hyperemia, and caution should be taken in ascribing this extension to either tumor or metastasis.

  20. [Neurological manifestations of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Grachev, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    The article describes clinical, including neurological manifestations, of giant cell arteritis (GCA) - granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium-sized vessels, predominantly craniofacial, including precerebral and cerebral, arteries. Histopathological features of GCA are illustrated by the schemes of panarteritis and «postarteritis» (proliferative and fibrotic changes in the intima, underlying the development of cerebrovascular disorders). The main clinical manifestations of GCA are described as 3 groups of symptoms: general constitutional symptoms; manifestations of vasculitis of craniofacial, precerebral and cerebral arteries; polymyalgia rheumaticа. The authors present their own version of the taxonomy of visual disturbances in patients with GCA. Diagnostic steps in patients with suggestive signs of GCA are described. Therapeutic regimens of use of glucocorticoids for suggestion/diagnosis of GCA are presented.

  1. Paroxysmal hemicrania as the clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Beams, Jennifer L.; Rozen, Todd D.

    2011-01-01

    Head pain is the most common complaint in patients with giant cell arteritis but the headache has no distinct diagnostic features. There have been no published reports of giant cell arteritis presenting as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. We describe a patient who developed a new onset headache in her fifties, which fit the diagnostic criteria for paroxysmal hemicrania and was completely responsive to corticosteroids. Removal of the steroid therapy brought a reemergence of her headaches. Giant cell arteritis should be considered in the evaluation of secondary causes of paroxysmal hemicrania; in addition giant cell arteritis needs to be ruled out in patients who are over the age of 50 years with a new onset trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. PMID:24765352

  2. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells.

    PubMed

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-09-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells.

  3. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells. PMID:26629304

  4. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  5. Giant cell arteritis: Current treatment and management

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana Filipa; O’Neill, Lorraine; Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of medical therapy in giant cell arteritis (GCA) and should be started immediately to prevent severe consequences of the disease, such as blindness. However, glucocorticoid therapy leads to significant toxicity in over 80% of the patients. Various steroid-sparing agents have been tried, but robust scientific evidence of their efficacy and safety is still lacking. Tocilizumab, a monoclonal IL-6 receptor blocker, has shown promising results in a number of case series and is now being tested in a multi-centre randomized controlled trial. Other targeted treatments, such as the use of abatacept, are also now under investigation in GCA. The need for surgical treatment is rare and should ideally be performed in a quiescent phase of the disease. Not all patients follow the same course, but there are no valid biomarkers to assess therapy response. Monitoring of disease progress still relies on assessing clinical features and measuring inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound) are clearly important screening tools for aortic aneurysms and assessing patients with large-vessel involvement, but may also have an important role as biomarkers of disease activity over time or in response to therapy. Although GCA is the most common form of primary vasculitis, the optimal strategies for treatment and monitoring remain uncertain. PMID:26090367

  6. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  7. Histogenetic Characterization of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Manuela; Avnet, Sofia; Alberghini, Marco; Giunti, Armando

    2008-01-01

    The unpredictable behavior of giant cell tumor (GCT) parallels its controversial histogenesis. Multinucleated giant cells, stromal cells, and CD68+ monocytes/macrophages are the three elements that interact in GCT. We compared the ability of stromal cells and normal mesenchymal stromal cells to differentiate into osteoblasts. Stromal cells and mesenchymal cells had similar proliferation rates and lifespans. Although stromal cells expressed early osteogenic markers, they were unable to differentiate into osteoblasts but they did express intracellular adhesion molecule-1, a marker of bone-lining cells. They were unable to form clones in a semisolid medium and unable to promote osteoclast differentiation, although they exerted a strong chemotactic effect on osteoclast precursors. Stromal cells may be either immature proliferating osteogenic elements or specialized osteoblast-like cells that fail to show neoplastic features but can induce the differentiation of osteoclast precursors. They might be secondarily induced to proliferate by a paracrine effect induced by monocyte-macrophages and/or giant cells. The increased number of giant cells in GCT may be secondary to an autocrine circuit mediated by the receptor activator of nuclear factor kB. PMID:18543051

  8. Timescales of Quartz Crystallization and the Longevity of the Bishop Giant Magma Body

    SciTech Connect

    Gualda, Guilherme A.R.; Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Anderson, Jr. , Alfred T.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Rivers, Mark L.

    2013-04-08

    Supereruptions violently transfer huge amounts (100 s-1000 s km{sup 3}) of magma to the surface in a matter of days and testify to the existence of giant pools of magma at depth. The longevity of these giant magma bodies is of significant scientific and societal interest. Radiometric data on whole rocks, glasses, feldspar and zircon crystals have been used to suggest that the Bishop Tuff giant magma body, which erupted {approx}760,000 years ago and created the Long Valley caldera (California), was long-lived (>100,000 years) and evolved rather slowly. In this work, we present four lines of evidence to constrain the timescales of crystallization of the Bishop magma body: (1) quartz residence times based on diffusional relaxation of Ti profiles, (2) quartz residence times based on the kinetics of faceting of melt inclusions, (3) quartz and feldspar crystallization times derived using quartz+feldspar crystal size distributions, and (4) timescales of cooling and crystallization based on thermodynamic and heat flow modeling. All of our estimates suggest quartz crystallization on timescales of <10,000 years, more typically within 500-3,000 years before eruption. We conclude that large-volume, crystal-poor magma bodies are ephemeral features that, once established, evolve on millennial timescales. We also suggest that zircon crystals, rather than recording the timescales of crystallization of a large pool of crystal-poor magma, record the extended periods of time necessary for maturation of the crust and establishment of these giant magma bodies.

  9. Timescales of quartz crystallization and the longevity of the Bishop giant magma body.

    PubMed

    Gualda, Guilherme A R; Pamukcu, Ayla S; Ghiorso, Mark S; Anderson, Alfred T; Sutton, Stephen R; Rivers, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Supereruptions violently transfer huge amounts (100 s-1000 s km(3)) of magma to the surface in a matter of days and testify to the existence of giant pools of magma at depth. The longevity of these giant magma bodies is of significant scientific and societal interest. Radiometric data on whole rocks, glasses, feldspar and zircon crystals have been used to suggest that the Bishop Tuff giant magma body, which erupted ~760,000 years ago and created the Long Valley caldera (California), was long-lived (>100,000 years) and evolved rather slowly. In this work, we present four lines of evidence to constrain the timescales of crystallization of the Bishop magma body: (1) quartz residence times based on diffusional relaxation of Ti profiles, (2) quartz residence times based on the kinetics of faceting of melt inclusions, (3) quartz and feldspar crystallization times derived using quartz+feldspar crystal size distributions, and (4) timescales of cooling and crystallization based on thermodynamic and heat flow modeling. All of our estimates suggest quartz crystallization on timescales of <10,000 years, more typically within 500-3,000 years before eruption. We conclude that large-volume, crystal-poor magma bodies are ephemeral features that, once established, evolve on millennial timescales. We also suggest that zircon crystals, rather than recording the timescales of crystallization of a large pool of crystal-poor magma, record the extended periods of time necessary for maturation of the crust and establishment of these giant magma bodies.

  10. Cell-to-cell transfer of glial proteins to the squid giant axon. The glia-neuron protein trnasfer hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lasek, R J; Gainer, H; Barker, J L

    1977-08-01

    The hypothesis that glial cells synthesize proteins which are transferred to adjacent neurons was evaluated in the giant fiber of the squid (Loligo pealei). When giant fibers are separated from their neuron cell bodies and incubated in the presence of radioactive amino acids, labeled proteins appear in the glial cells and axoplasm. Labeled axonal proteins were detected by three methods: extrusion of the axoplasm from the giant fiber, autoradiography, and perfusion of the giant fiber. This protein synthesis is completely inhibited by puromycin but is not affected by chloramphenicol. The following evidence indicates that the labeled axonal proteins are not synthesized within the axon itself. (a) The axon does not contain a significant amount of ribosomes or ribosomal RNA. (b) Isolated axoplasm did not incorporate [(3)H]leucine into proteins. (c) Injection of Rnase into the giant axon did not reduce the appearance of newly synthesized proteins in the axoplasm of the giant fiber. These findings, coupled with other evidence, have led us to conclude that the adaxonal glial cells synthesize a class of proteins which are transferred to the giant axon. Analysis of the kinetics of this phenomenon indicates that some proteins are transferred to the axon within minutes of their synthesis in the glial cells. One or more of the steps in the transfer process appear to involve Ca++, since replacement of extracellular Ca++ by either Mg++ or Co++ significantly reduces the appearance of labeled proteins in the axon. A substantial fraction of newly synthesized glial proteins, possibly as much as 40 percent, are transferred to the giant axon. These proteins are heterogeneous and range in size from 12,000 to greater than 200,000 daltons. Comparisons of the amount of amino acid incorporation in glia cells and neuron cell bodies raise the possibility that the adaxonal glial cells may provide an important source of axonal proteins which is supplemental to that provided by axonal transport

  11. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically. PMID:23013846

  12. Multifocal Central Giant Cell Granuloma - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Tamgadge; Avinash, Tamgadge; Snehal, Dhauskar; Neha, Tiwari; Uma, Mudaliar

    2016-01-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a benign, aggressive neoplasm composed of multinucleated giant cells that almost exclusively occurs in the jaws though extra- gnathic incidence is rare. Multifocal CGCGs of the jaws are very rare and suggestive of systemic diseases such as hyperparathyroidism, an inherited syndrome such as Noonan- like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome or other disorders.Very few cases of multifocal CGCGs in the jaws without any concomitant systemic disease have been reported. This paper describes an unusual case reported to the Oral Surgery Department of Dr. D.Y.Patil Dental College & Hospital, Nerul, Navi-Mumbai in 2014 in a 45-year-old male with multifocal central giant cell granuloma involving maxilla and mandible. The serum alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphorus levels were within the normal limits. After complete clinical examination hyperparathyroidism and clinical characteristic of any syndromes such as Noonan-like syndrome and neurofibromatosis were ruled out. Thus this paper reports a non-syndromic multifocal central giant cell granuloma. PMID:27799978

  13. Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Lambert, Marc; Liozon, Eric; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigné, Gwénola; Ollivier, Yann; Ly, Kim; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9–250] mg/L vs 120 [3–120] mg/L; P < 0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also

  14. Pediatric aggressive giant cell granuloma of nasal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sung Tae; Kwon, Ki Ryun; Rha, Ki-Sang; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kim, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Giant cell granuloma (GCG) is a non-neoplastic osseous proliferative lesion of unknown etiology. Although a benign disease process, GCG can be locally destructive. It is extremely rare to have a pediatric case of GCG occurring in the nasal cavity with intracranial invasion. Presentation of case We report a case of an aggressive and recurrent giant cell granuloma with intracranial invasion in a 10 years old female patient which was completely excised with endoscopic craniofacial resection. Discussion A literature review on pathogenesis, diagnosis and management is also performed. Conclusion The most common treatment for giant cell granuloma is surgery, ranging from simple curettage to resection. However, it must be completely excised in cases of aggressive and extensive lesion because of the high recurrence rate after incomplete removal. PMID:26433924

  15. Central giant cell granuloma of the mandible. A case report.

    PubMed

    Granite, E L; Aronoff, A K; Gold, L

    1982-03-01

    Although a benign lesion, the central giant cell granuloma can be locally aggressive and quite destructive. The case reported here involved a giant cell lesion occurring in the mandibular symphysis of an 11-year-old girl. The treatment required four hospital admissions over a period of 4 years. The surgical intervention was complicated by a localized infection requiring closed reduction and bone grafting. The patient was followed over a period of 8 years, during which there was no recurrence of tumor or infection subsequent to the last surgical procedure.

  16. Giant Cell Tumor within the Proximal Tibia after ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takashi; MacCormick, Lauren; Ellermann, Jutta; Clohisy, Denis; Marette, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    26-year-old female with prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction developed an enlarging lytic bone lesion around the tibial screw with sequential imaging over the course of one year demonstrating progression of this finding, which was confirmed histologically to be a giant cell tumor of bone. The lesion originated around the postoperative bed, making the diagnosis challenging during the early course of the presentation. The case demonstrates giant cell tumor which originated in the metaphysis and subsequently grew to involve the epiphysis; therefore, early course of the disease not involving the epiphysis should not exclude this diagnosis. PMID:26981302

  17. Giant Cell Tumor within the Proximal Tibia after ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takashi; MacCormick, Lauren; Ellermann, Jutta; Clohisy, Denis; Marette, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    26-year-old female with prior anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction developed an enlarging lytic bone lesion around the tibial screw with sequential imaging over the course of one year demonstrating progression of this finding, which was confirmed histologically to be a giant cell tumor of bone. The lesion originated around the postoperative bed, making the diagnosis challenging during the early course of the presentation. The case demonstrates giant cell tumor which originated in the metaphysis and subsequently grew to involve the epiphysis; therefore, early course of the disease not involving the epiphysis should not exclude this diagnosis. PMID:26981302

  18. [Visual hallucinations and giant cell arteritis: the Charles Bonnet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bloch, J; Morell-Dubois, S; Koch, E; Launay, D; Maillard-Lefebvre, H; Buchdahl, A-L; Hachulla, E; Rouland, J-F; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2011-12-01

    In patients with visual hallucinations, diagnostic strategy is unclearly codified. In patients known to have giant cell arteritis, the main diagnostic assumption is disease relapse. Indeed, this should lead to rapid corticosteroid therapy. However, the Charles Bonnet syndrome, that is a poorly known etiology of visual hallucinations usually observed in elderly people, should be part of the differential diagnosis. We report a 87-year-old woman, with a 2-year history of giant cell arteritis who was admitted with an acute onset of visual hallucinations and who met all the criteria for Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  19. Downsizing a giant: re-evaluating Dreadnoughtus body mass

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Karl T.; Falkingham, Peter L.; Macaulay, Sophie; Brassey, Charlotte; Maidment, Susannah C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of body mass often represent the founding assumption on which biomechanical and macroevolutionary hypotheses are based. Recently, a scaling equation was applied to a newly discovered titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur (Dreadnoughtus), yielding a 59 300 kg body mass estimate for this animal. Herein, we use a modelling approach to examine the plausibility of this mass estimate for Dreadnoughtus. We find that 59 300 kg for Dreadnoughtus is highly implausible and demonstrate that masses above 40 000 kg require high body densities and expansions of soft tissue volume outside the skeleton several times greater than found in living quadrupedal mammals. Similar results from a small sample of other archosaurs suggests that lower-end mass estimates derived from scaling equations are most plausible for Dreadnoughtus, based on existing volumetric and density data from extant animals. Although volumetric models appear to more tightly constrain dinosaur body mass, there remains a clear need to further support these models with more exhaustive data from living animals. The relative and absolute discrepancies in mass predictions between volumetric models and scaling equations also indicate a need to systematically compare predictions across a wide size and taxonomic range to better inform studies of dinosaur body size. PMID:26063751

  20. Taking a "Giant Tour" to Explore the Human Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Helping children to visualise what is inside them and how their bodies work can be a challenge, since teachers are often reliant on secondary sources or investigations that can only measure outward signs (such as pulse rate). Another way is to involve the children in an imaginative role-play exercise where they explore the insides of a…

  1. Reparative giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Duarte Ruiz, Blanca; Riba García, Francisco de Asís; Navarro Cuéllar, Carlos; Bucci, Tommaso; Cuesta Gil, Matías; Navarro Vila, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Reparative giant cell granulomas are benign, infrequent tumors, of non-odontogenic origin, that develop at central or peripheral level. Peripherally located lesions are frequently denominated "giant cell epulis", and never correspond to true neoplasia, but rather to inflammatory reactions secondary to another lesion (hemorrhage, etc.). It should be taken into account, that in general, head and neck tumors of infancy usually demonstrate an atypical biological behaviour. Furthermore, the anatomicopathologic diagnosis is often compromised in this type of lesion. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy, who, three weeks after suffering a slight facial trauma, developed a painless, exophytic swelling of approximately 4 cm, with bleeding on palpation, in the ipsilateral hemimaxilla. The lesion demonstrated rapid, progressive and continuous growth. The facial CT and incisional biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of reparative giant cell granuloma. The patient was surgically treated, carrying out a left marginal maxillectomy associated with the extirpation of the soft-tissue lesion. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a Bichat fat-pad providing the patient with optimal esthetic and functional results. The definitive anatomicopathologic report of the surgical piece is compatible with reparative giant cell granuloma.

  2. Granulomatous giant cell submandibular sialadenitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Écija, Alejandro; Estepa, José Carlos; Mendoza, Francisco Javier

    2012-11-01

    A 4-month-old dog was presented with a progressive swelling of the submandibular area. The history, course, cytological, and sialographic findings were consistent with an aseptic pyogranulomatous sialadenitis with concurrent duct blockage. This rare entity, responsive to medical treatment, appears to be similar to the granulomatous giant cell sialadenitis of humans.

  3. Giant gingival pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guolin; Long, Xing; Han, Qianchao; Tian, Lihua

    2012-07-01

    We here describe a case of giant primary gingival pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in a 53-year-old Chinese male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pathogenesis of the lesion and the deferential diagnosis from invasive SCC are also discussed. To our knowledge, such a hugeous primary pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the gingiva accompanied with lung SCC is unusual.

  4. The diagnosis and classification of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) involves the major branches of the aorta with predilection for the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. It occurs in individuals older than 50 years and the incidence increases with age. The signs and symptoms of giant cell arteritis can be classified into four subsets: cranial arteritis, extracranial arteritis, systemic symptoms and polymyalgia rheumatica. Patients may develop any combination of these manifestations, associated with laboratory evidence of an acute-phase reaction. The only test that confirms GCA diagnosis is a temporal artery biopsy, showing vasculitis with mononuclear cell inflammatory infiltrates, often with giant cells. Due to the focal and segmental nature of the infiltrates, areas of inflammation may be missed by the biopsy and the histological examination is normal in about 15% of the cases. Some imaging modalities may aid in the diagnosis of GCA. Among those, color duplex ultrasonography of the temporal arteries is more commonly used. There are no independent validating criteria to determine whether giant cell arteritis is present when a temporal artery biopsy is negative. The American College of Rheumatology criteria for the classification of giant cell arteritis may assist in the diagnosis. However, meeting classification criteria is not equivalent to making the diagnosis in individual patients, and the final diagnosis should be based on all clinical, laboratory, imaging and histological findings. Glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for GCA. The initial dose is 40-60 mg/day for most uncomplicated cases. Addition of low-dose aspirin (100 mg/d) has been shown to significantly decrease the rate of vision loss and stroke during the course of the disease. PMID:24461386

  5. Timescales of Quartz Crystallization and the Longevity of the Bishop Giant Magma Body

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Anderson, Alfred T.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Rivers, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Supereruptions violently transfer huge amounts (100 s–1000 s km3) of magma to the surface in a matter of days and testify to the existence of giant pools of magma at depth. The longevity of these giant magma bodies is of significant scientific and societal interest. Radiometric data on whole rocks, glasses, feldspar and zircon crystals have been used to suggest that the Bishop Tuff giant magma body, which erupted ∼760,000 years ago and created the Long Valley caldera (California), was long-lived (>100,000 years) and evolved rather slowly. In this work, we present four lines of evidence to constrain the timescales of crystallization of the Bishop magma body: (1) quartz residence times based on diffusional relaxation of Ti profiles, (2) quartz residence times based on the kinetics of faceting of melt inclusions, (3) quartz and feldspar crystallization times derived using quartz+feldspar crystal size distributions, and (4) timescales of cooling and crystallization based on thermodynamic and heat flow modeling. All of our estimates suggest quartz crystallization on timescales of <10,000 years, more typically within 500–3,000 years before eruption. We conclude that large-volume, crystal-poor magma bodies are ephemeral features that, once established, evolve on millennial timescales. We also suggest that zircon crystals, rather than recording the timescales of crystallization of a large pool of crystal-poor magma, record the extended periods of time necessary for maturation of the crust and establishment of these giant magma bodies. PMID:22666359

  6. Potential enhanced ability of giant squid to detect sperm whales is an exaptation tied to their large body size.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke; Oufiero, Christopher E; Martin, Christopher H; McGee, Matthew D; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-10-15

    It has been hypothesized that sperm whale predation is the driver of eye size evolution in giant squid. Given that the eyes of giant squid have the size expected for a squid this big, it is likely that any enhanced ability of giant squid to detect whales is an exaptation tied to their body size. Future studies should target the mechanism behind the evolution of large body size, not eye size. Reconstructions of the evolutionary history of selective regime, eye size, optical performance, and body size will improve the understanding of the evolution of large eyes in large ocean animals.

  7. Potential enhanced ability of giant squid to detect sperm whales is an exaptation tied to their large body size

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that sperm whale predation is the driver of eye size evolution in giant squid. Given that the eyes of giant squid have the size expected for a squid this big, it is likely that any enhanced ability of giant squid to detect whales is an exaptation tied to their body size. Future studies should target the mechanism behind the evolution of large body size, not eye size. Reconstructions of the evolutionary history of selective regime, eye size, optical performance, and body size will improve the understanding of the evolution of large eyes in large ocean animals. PMID:24127991

  8. Pediatric giant cell fibroma: an unusual case report.

    PubMed

    Uloopi, K S; Vinay, Chandrappa; Deepika, Alluru; Sekhar, Rayala Chandra; Raghu, Dhanapal; Ramesh, Tatapudi

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell fibroma (GCF) is a lesion of oral mucosa which is commonly found on gingiva. The prevalence of GCF is high in Caucasians in the first three decades. It represents 2% to 5% of all fibrous lesions. This report describes a case of GCF on the tongue in a 12 year old Dravidian child. The cause of the lesion could not be determined. Excisional biopsy was performed to establish definitive diagnosis. Microscopically, numerous stellate shaped multi-nucleated giant cells and dense bundles of collagen fibres with a whorled pattern were observed. These collagen fibres were positive for Massons trichrome stain. Immunohistochemical analysis showed stellate cells positive for vimentin and negative for alpha smooth muscle actin suggesting fibroblast phenotype. No recurrence was observed. Pediatric dentists must have a thorough knowledge of this uncommon lesion which can be diagnosed only based on histopathological features.

  9. Giant cell tumor of lower end of tibia.

    PubMed

    Bami, Monish; Nayak, Ashok R; Kulkarni, Shreepad; Kulkarni, Avinash; Gupta, Rupali

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Giant cell tumor of bones is an unusual neoplasm that accounts for 4% of all primary tumors of bone, and it represents about 10% of malignant primary bone tumors with its different grades from borderline to high grade malignancy. Case Report. A 35-year-old patient presented with complains of pain and swelling in left ankle since 1 year following a twisting injury to his left ankle. On examination, swelling was present over the distal and anterior part of leg and movements of ankle joint were normal. All routine blood investigations were normal. X-ray and CT ankle showed morphology of subarticular well-defined expansile lytic lesion in lower end of left tibia suggestive of giant cell tumor. Histopathology of the tissue shows multinucleated giant cells with uniform vesicular nucleus and mononuclear cells which are spindle shaped with uniform vesicular nucleus suggestive of GCT. The patient was treated by excision, curettage, and bone cement to fill the defect. Conclusion. The patient at 12-month followup is doing well and walking without any pain comfortably and with full range of motion at ankle joint with articular congruity maintained and no signs of recurrences. PMID:23844298

  10. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the hallux following enchondroma

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Khaled; Sellami, Tarak; Jlailia, Zied; Abid, Layla; Jenzri, Mourad; Bouaziz, Mouna; Zouar, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign intra osseous lytic lesion occurring especially in gnathis bone but also seen in feet and hands. It has similar clinical and radiological presentations than giant cell tumor, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and hyperparathyroidism brown tumors but with specific histological findings We report a case of a GCRG of hallux phalanx in 18 years old patient appearing many years after enchondroma curettage and grafting. Radiographs showed a multiloculated osteolytic lesions involving whole phalanx with cortical thinning and without fluid-fluid levels in CT view. Expected to be an enchondroma recurrence, second biopsy confirmed diagnosis of GCRG with specific histological findings. Although if aetiopathogeny remains unknown, GCRG is reported to be a local non neoplasic reaction to an intraosseous hemorrhage. Our exceptional case claims that this tumor can appear in reaction to cellular disturbance primary or secondary. PMID:26985281

  11. Giant cell reparative granuloma of the hallux following enchondroma.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Khaled; Sellami, Tarak; Jlailia, Zied; Abid, Layla; Jenzri, Mourad; Bouaziz, Mouna; Zouar, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare, benign intra osseous lytic lesion occurring especially in gnathis bone but also seen in feet and hands. It has similar clinical and radiological presentations than giant cell tumor, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and hyperparathyroidism brown tumors but with specific histological findings We report a case of a GCRG of hallux phalanx in 18 years old patient appearing many years after enchondroma curettage and grafting. Radiographs showed a multiloculated osteolytic lesions involving whole phalanx with cortical thinning and without fluid-fluid levels in CT view. Expected to be an enchondroma recurrence, second biopsy confirmed diagnosis of GCRG with specific histological findings. Although if aetiopathogeny remains unknown, GCRG is reported to be a local non neoplasic reaction to an intraosseous hemorrhage. Our exceptional case claims that this tumor can appear in reaction to cellular disturbance primary or secondary. PMID:26985281

  12. Recurrent giant cell fibroblastoma: Malignancy predisposition in Kabuki syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Stergidou, Dorothea; Fryssira, Helena; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by distinctive facial phenotype, mental retardation, and internal organ malformations. Mutations of the epigenetic genes KMT2D and KDM6A cause dysregulation of certain developmental genes and account for the multiple congenital anomalies of the syndrome. Eight cases of malignancies have been reported in young patients with Kabuki syndrome although a causative association to the syndrome has not been established. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with Kabuki syndrome who developed a tumor on the right side of her neck. A relapsing tumor 19 months after initial excision, proved to be giant cell fibroblastoma. Τhis is the first report of giant cell fibroblastoma -a rare tumor of childhood- in a patient with Kabuki syndrome. PMID:26898171

  13. Giant Cornu Cutaneum Superimposed on Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agirgol, S; Mansur, A T; Bozkurt, K; Azakli, H N; Babacan, A; Dikmen, A

    2015-09-01

    Cornu cutaneum (CC) is a clinical term that describes the horn-like keratotic lesions extending vertically from the skin. Benign, premalignant or malignant lesions may be present at the base of CC. Seborrhoeic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most commonly reported benign and malignant forms, respectively. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) at the base is rare. Here, we report on an 85-year old female patient having multiple CC lesions, one being giant on her face and two of the lesions diagnosed with BCC at the base. This case is of significance due to the presence of giant and multiple CC and detection of BCC at the base of more than one lesion. This present case indicates the need for the treatment of possible malignant lesions underlying CC in the elderly by total surgical excision.

  14. Giant Cornu Cutaneum Superimposed on Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Agirgol, S; Mansur, AT; Bozkurt, K; Azakli, HN; Babacan, A; Dikmen, A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cornu cutaneum (CC) is a clinical term that describes the horn-like keratotic lesions extending vertically from the skin. Benign, premalignant or malignant lesions may be present at the base of CC. Seborrhoeic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most commonly reported benign and malignant forms, respectively. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) at the base is rare. Here, we report on an 85-year old female patient having multiple CC lesions, one being giant on her face and two of the lesions diagnosed with BCC at the base. This case is of significance due to the presence of giant and multiple CC and detection of BCC at the base of more than one lesion. This present case indicates the need for the treatment of possible malignant lesions underlying CC in the elderly by total surgical excision. PMID:26624603

  15. Giant Cell Reparative Granuloma of the Petrous Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy C.; Thorell, William E.; Treves, John S.; Fidler, Mary E.; Moore, Gary F.; Leibrock, Lyal G.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is an unusual, benign bone lesion that most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible; skull involvement is rare. The etiology is uncertain but may be related to trauma. GCRG is difficult to distinguish from giant cell tumor of the bone and has a lower recurrence rate. Thirteen reports of temporal bone GCRG in 11 patients have been reported. One report of a petrous GCRG in a 3-year-old girl has been identified. A 38-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of fullness in his left ear, ipsilateral hearing loss, and intermittent cacosmia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large left-sided anterior temporal extradural mass. The patient underwent a left frontotemporal craniotomy and resection of a left temporal fossa tumor that involved the petrous and squamous parts of the temporal bone. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful, except for increased hearing loss secondary to opening of the epitympanum. Follow-up at one month revealed no other problems. Histopathology of the specimen was consistent with a giant cell reparative granuloma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2p91-aFigure 3 PMID:17171108

  16. Trophoblast stem cells differentiate in vitro into invasive trophoblast giant cells.

    PubMed

    Hemberger, Myriam; Hughes, Martha; Cross, James C

    2004-07-15

    Trophoblast cells are characterized by an invasive behavior into the surrounding uterine tissue. In rodents, an early peri-/endovascular type of invasion exerted by trophoblast giant cells can be distinguished from a late interstitial type carried out by glycogen trophoblast cells. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms of trophoblast invasion has been hampered, however, by the complex temporal and spatial patterns of invasion. We utilized trophoblast stem (TS) cell lines to study trophoblast invasion in vitro and to establish a model that facilitates investigation of this process on the molecular level. Our results showed that trophoblast giant cells that differentiate from TS cells in vitro are capable of penetrating a reconstituted basement membrane matrix. Consequently, invasion rates were increased in various giant cell differentiation-promoting conditions. We also derived TS cell lines that are homozygous for a mutation of the Hand1 transcription factor. The Hand1-/- TS cells showed reduced levels of giant cell differentiation and exhibited an approximately 50% decrease in invasion rates. In summary, trophoblast giant cells that differentiate from TS cells in vitro recapitulate the invasive capacity of normal trophoblast cells in vivo. The TS cell system is a valuable tool to identify and quantitatively study regulators of trophoblast invasion.

  17. Giant Cell Lesions of Lungs: A Histopathological and Morphometric Study of Seven Autopsy Cases

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, M.; Biligi, Dayananda S; Raghupathi, A.R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in several pathologic conditions. The exact mechanism of their generation is still unclear. MGC are a common feature of granulomas that develop during various inflammatory reactions. Aim To study the histopathological features of giant cell lesions in lungs and correlate the characteristics of giant cells with other histopathological findings. Also, to determine the utility of morphometry to differentiate foreign body and Langhans MGC. Materials and Methods Seven cases were analysed. Specimen of lungs was grossed, sectioned and processed. Routinely, tissue sections were stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Polarizing microscopy and special stains were employed in selected cases. Granulomas and MGC were counted and measured. Several other parameters like location, distribution, type and number of MGC, associated predominant inflammatory component and nature of granulomas were analysed. Results Five patterns of lesions were observed in seven cases. Aspiration pneumonia was seen in three cases (42.85%) and constituted the most common pattern. However, aspiration pneumonia as the only cause of MGC was seen in only one case (14.28%). Pulmonary tuberculosis and asteroid bodies constituted two cases (28.57%) each. Cryptococcal pneumonia and cholesterol clefts constituted one case (14.28%) each. Crypococci were demonstrated to be positively birefringent by polarized microscopy on Ziehl-Neelsen stained sections. Based on statistical analysis of morphometric data, a new index (NP index) was proposed to statistically categorize MGC into foreign body type and Langhans type. NP index value of ≤0.016 was found to be statistically significant (p<0.005) in foreign body MGC. It had high sensitivity and efficacy. Conclusion MGC may not be always associated with granulomas. The mechanisms that lead to the occurrence of MGC, independent of granuloma needs to be elucidated. Morphometry may

  18. Asymmetric cell division in polyploid giant cancer cells and low eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Yijia; Zhang, Shiwu

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is critical for generating cell diversity in low eukaryotic organisms. We previously have reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) induced by cobalt chloride demonstrate the ability to use an evolutionarily conserved process for renewal and fast reproduction, which is normally confined to simpler organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which reproduces by asymmetric cell division, has long been a model for asymmetric cell division studies. PGCCs produce daughter cells asymmetrically in a manner similar to yeast, in that both use budding for cell polarization and cytokinesis. Here, we review the results of recent studies and discuss the similarities in the budding process between yeast and PGCCs.

  19. Wheatstone bridge giant-magnetoresistance based cell counter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiun-Peng; Lai, Mei-Feng; Huang, Hao-Ting; Lin, Chi-Wen; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2014-07-15

    A Wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor was proposed here for the detection and counting of magnetic cells. The biosensor was made of a top-pinned spin-valve layer structure, and it was integrated with a microchannel possessing the function of hydrodynamic focusing that allowed the cells to flow in series one by one and ensured the accuracy of detection. Through measuring the magnetoresistance variation caused by the stray field of the magnetic cells that flowed through the microchannel above the GMR biosensor, we can not only detect and count the cells but we can also recognize cells with different magnetic moments. In addition, a magnetic field gradient was applied for the separation of different cells into different channels. PMID:24534580

  20. Secondary malignant giant-cell tumor of bone. Clinicopathological assessment of nineteen patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, M.G.; Sim, F.H.; Unni, K.K.; Witrak, G.A.; Frassica, F.J.; Schray, M.F.; Beabout, J.W.; Dahlin, D.C.

    1986-09-01

    Twenty-six patients who had a malignant giant-cell tumor of bone--a sarcoma either juxtaposed to a zone of typical benign giant-cell tumor or occurring at the site of a previously documented benign giant-cell tumor--have been seen at the Mayo Clinic. Of the twenty-six tumors, nineteen were secondary to a previous attempt at local control of a benign giant-cell tumor. All but one of these nineteen patients with a secondary tumor had received therapeutic irradiation four to thirty-nine years earlier. The nature and duration of the symptoms and the sites of predilection of the malignant giant-cell tumors were the same as for benign giant-cell tumor. Fibrosarcoma occurred three times as frequently as osteosarcoma. The best results of treatment of the secondary sarcoma were obtained with early ablation.

  1. Insight into the pathogenesis and nature of Central giant cell lesions of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Central giant cell lesions of the jaws are not uncommon. While the majority of these represent single, sporadic lesions, histologically identical lesions are seen in association with a number of other bone lesions, as well as in certain syndromes. This manuscript offers a brief update on recent developments in this area that provide new insight into the pathogenesis and nature of Central Giant Cell Lesions of the Jaws. Key words:Central giant cell lesion, RASopathy PMID:25681371

  2. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes. PMID:27013816

  3. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes. PMID:27013816

  4. Using time-dependent models to investigate body condition and growth rate of the giant gartersnake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, P.S.; Wylie, G.D.; Halstead, B.J.; Casazza, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying links between phenotypic attributes and fitness is a primary goal of reproductive ecology. Differences in within-year patterns of body condition between sexes of gartersnakes in relation to reproduction and growth are not fully understood. We conducted an 11-year field study of body condition and growth rate of the giant gartersnake Thamnophis gigas across 13 study areas in the Central Valley of California, USA. We developed a priori mixed effects models of body condition index (BCI), which included covariates of time, sex and snout-vent length and reported the best-approximating models using an information theoretic approach. Also, we developed models of growth rate index (GRI) using covariates of sex and periods based on reproductive behavior. The largest difference in BCI between sexes, as predicted by a non-linear (cubic) time model, occurred during the mating period when female body condition (0.014??0.001 se) was substantially greater than males (-0.027??0.002 se). Males likely allocated energy to search for mates, while females likely stored energy for embryonic development. We also provided evidence that males use more body energy reserves than females during hibernation, perhaps because of different body temperatures between sexes. We found GRI of male snakes was substantially lower during the mating period than during a non-mating period, which indicated that a trade-off existed between searching for mates and growth. These findings contribute to our understanding of snake ecology in a Mediterranean climate. ?? 2009 The Zoological Society of London.

  5. How large are the extinct giant insular rodents? New body mass estimations from teeth and bones.

    PubMed

    Moncunill-Solé, Blanca; Jordana, Xavier; Marín-Moratalla, Nekane; Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Köhler, Meike

    2014-03-01

    The island rule entails a modification of the body size of insular mammals, a character related with numerous biological and ecological variables. From the Miocene to human colonization (Holocene), Mediterranean and Canary Islands were unaltered natural ecosystems, with paleofaunas formed with endemic giant rodents among other mammals. Our aim is to create methods to estimate the body masses of fossil island rodents and address the nature of ecological pressures driving the island rule. We created regression equations based on extant rodent data and used these to estimate the body masses of the extinct species. Our results show strong correlations between teeth, cranial and postcranial measurements and body mass, except for the length of the long bones, the transversal diameter of the distal tibia and the anteroposterior diameter of the proximal tibia, where the equations were less reliable. The use of equations obtained from a more homogeneous group (suborder and family) is preferable when analyzing the area of the first molar. The new regressions were applied to estimate the body masses of some Mediterranean and Canarian fossil rodents (Canariomys, C. bravoi 1.5 kg and C. tamarani 1 kg; Hypnomys, H. morpheus 230 g and H. onicensis 200 g; and Muscardinus cyclopeus 100 g). Our results indicate that under absence of predation, resource availability (island area) is the key factor that determines the size of the Canariomys sp. However, under presence of specialized predators (birds of prey), body size evolution is less pronounced (Hypnomys sp.). PMID:24673763

  6. Giant cell tumor of bone in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, J C; Galloy, M A; Grignon, Y; Chastagner, P; Floquet, J; Mainard, L; Kadiri, R

    1996-10-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone rarely affects children, in whom it is usually located in a metaphysis in contrast to the predominantly epiphyseal localization in adults. Five cases are reported, two at the femur, two at the fibula and one at the tibia. Plain film radiography and computed tomography are the most informative imaging studies. The differential diagnosis is with aneurysmal bone cyst and, in metaphyseal-epiphyseal forms, with chondroblastoma. Treatment usually consists in curettage of the tumor followed by filling of the cavity; however, more extensive resection is required in some cases. PMID:8938873

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Complicated by Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemine, Hiroko; Umeda, Ryosuke; Nohda, Yasuhiro; Sakane, Emiko; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kiminari; Izumi, Mayuko; Tsuji, Goh; Kodaka, Taiichi; Itoh, Tomoo; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), a type of systemic arteritis, is rare in Japan. We herein report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) complicated by GCA that manifested during chemotherapy for AML. A 77-year-old woman with severe back pain was diagnosed with AML. She achieved complete remission with the resolution of her back pain following induction chemotherapy. However, she developed a headache and fever after consolidation chemotherapy. A diagnosis of GCA was made based on a biopsy of the temporal artery and arterial imaging. GCA should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis in AML patients complicated with a headache and fever of unknown origin. PMID:26831026

  8. [Giant cells undifferentiated parotid carcinoma. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; González Palomino, A; Trinidad Ruiz, G; Pardo Romero, G; Montero García, C; Mogollón Cano-Cortés, T; Pando Pinto, J M; Blasco Huelva, A

    2005-01-01

    Tumours of the salivary glands represent a 5% of all head and neck neoplasms. Their origin is the parotid gland in about 80% of the cases. Most of them are benign. We are reporting two cases of patients diagnosed, by our ENT Department, as undifferentiated giant cells parotid carcinoma with cervical metastasis. They were operated by total parotidectomy and radical neck disection and later recieved treatment with radiotherapy. After two years-follow-up both patients are standing alive. The tumoral size is the most important pronostic factor in this histological type.

  9. The Clinical Approach Toward Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Dijkstra, P.D. Sander; van de Sande, Michiel A.J.; Kroep, Judith R.; Nout, Remi A.; van Rijswijk, Carla S.P.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.

    2014-01-01

    We provide an overview of imaging, histopathology, genetics, and multidisciplinary treatment of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), an intermediate, locally aggressive but rarely metastasizing tumor. Overexpression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) by mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells promotes recruitment of numerous reactive multinucleated giant cells. Conventional radiographs show a typical eccentric lytic lesion, mostly located in the meta-epiphyseal area of long bones. GCTB may also arise in the axial skeleton and very occasionally in the small bones of hands and feet. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to evaluate the extent of GCTB within bone and surrounding soft tissues to plan a surgical approach. Curettage with local adjuvants is the preferred treatment. Recurrence rates after curettage with phenol and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA; 8%–27%) or cryosurgery and PMMA (0%–20%) are comparable. Resection is indicated when joint salvage is not feasible (e.g., intra-articular fracture with soft tissue component). Denosumab (RANKL inhibitor) blocks and bisphosphonates inhibit GCTB-derived osteoclast resorption. With bisphosphonates, stabilization of local and metastatic disease has been reported, although level of evidence was low. Denosumab has been studied to a larger extent and seems to be effective in facilitating intralesional surgery after therapy. Denosumab was recently registered for unresectable disease. Moderate-dose radiotherapy (40–55 Gy) is restricted to rare cases in which surgery would lead to unacceptable morbidity and RANKL inhibitors are contraindicated or unavailable. PMID:24718514

  10. Symplastic/pseudoanaplastic giant cell tumor of the bone

    PubMed Central

    Agaram, Narasimhan; Hwang, Sinchun; Lu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Healey, John; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Objective Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive primary bone tumor. Its malignant counterpart is quite rare. Rarely, a conventional GCTB shows marked nuclear atypia, referred to as symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, which can mimic sarcomatous transformation. Recently, somatic driver mutations of histone H3.3 exclusively in H3F3A have been described in GCTB. We report a series of 9 cases of GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, along with analysis of H3F3A variants. Materials and methods Nine cases of GCTB with symplastic change were identified. Clinico-radiological features, morphological features, and immunohistochemical stain for Ki-67 stain were reviewed. H3F3A variants were also analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Results Histologically, conventional giant cell tumor areas with scattered foci of markedly atypical cells were seen in all of the cases and all showed rare if any Ki-67 labeling. One patient had received denosumab treatment and another radiation therapy. Radiological features were characteristic of conventional GCTB. Mutation in H3F3A (p.Gly34Trp [G34W]) was found in 6 of the 7 cases. Clinical follow-up ranged from 6 to 208 months. Local recurrences were seen in 4 cases (44 %). Conclusions GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change is an uncommon variant of conventional GCTB, which can mimic primary sarcoma or sarcomatous transformation. These tumors possess the same missense mutation in histone H3.3 as conventional GCTB. PMID:27020452

  11. [Aortitis in giant cell arteritis and its complications].

    PubMed

    Espitia, O; Agard, C

    2013-07-01

    Aortitis is a serious complication of giant cell arteritis (GCA), because of the risk of aortic aneurism, rupture, or dissection. Aortitis is present either at presentation or, more frequently, occurs as a delayed complication, typically as an aortic aneurism of the ascending part of the aorta. An aortic aneurism may occur in up to 10% of patients. Aortitis is sometimes associated to arteritis of the supra-aortic vessels. Risk factors for aortitis remain unknown. Recent clinical studies indicate that prevalence of aortitis was initially under-estimated. Imaging studies show signs of infra-clinical aortitis in 20 to 65% of cases at diagnosis. Using ultrasonography, thickening of the vascular wall with an hypoechoic halo around the abdominal aorta is suggestive of abdominal aortitis. Positron emission tomography shows a metabolic hypersignal of the aorta in about 50% of patients with giant cell arteritis. Aortic computed tomographic (CT) scan visualizes aneurysmal dilatations, ectasia or focal or concentric parietal thickenings. When present at the time of diagnosis of GCA, these findings seem to be associated with frequent relapses and perhaps with a higher long-term vascular mortality rate. Therefore, we recommend the screening of aortitis lesions at GCA diagnosis by an aortic CT-scan and follow-up. Therapeutic trials should be conducted to try to improve the treatment of aortitis in GCA. PMID:23523343

  12. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  13. Management of Giant Cell Tumour Radius in a Three Year old Child with an Improvised Technique

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumours of immature skeleton have a very low incidence and epi-metaphyseal location. We are presenting giant cell tumour distal radius in a skeletally immature patient; an uncontained defect with a large soft tissue component which was managed by wide excision and reconstruction with an improvised technique. PMID:25654002

  14. Histological Regression of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Following RANK Ligand Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Martin F.; Cavuoti, Dominick; Landay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lung metastases are a rare complication of giant cell tumors of bone. We herein describe an interesting case of histological regression and size reduction of lung metastases originating from a primary giant cell tumor of bone in response to the RANK ligand inhibitor denosumab. PMID:26425630

  15. Case Study: Giant Cell Arteritis with Vertebral Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Daniel Chomlak, R; Ghazanfari, Farshad; Datta, Mineesh

    2016-01-01

    In giant cell arteritis (GCA), involvement of the vertebral arteries is rare with reported rates of 3%-4% for ischemic events secondary to vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion for those patients with GCA. This case study describes a patient who initially presented with acute onset of vertigo but was also found to have transient, side-alternating upper limb neurological findings. While initial imaging showed no vascular abnormalities, it was not until GCA was eventually confirmed with a temporal artery biopsy that the initial scans were shown to have bilateral narrowing of the vertebral arteries. While rare, vertebral artery involvement is an important complication to consider in the setting of GCA due to the high rate of associated mortality, despite immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27279753

  16. Pulmonary metastasis of giant cell tumor of bones.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Niu, Xiaohui

    2014-08-20

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) accounts for 5% of primary skeletal tumors. Although it is considered to be a benign lesion, there are still incidences of pulmonary metastasis. Pulmonary metastasis of GCTB may be affected by tumor grading and localization as well as the age, gender and overall health status of the patient. Patients with local recurrence are more likely to develop pulmonary metastasis of GCTB. High expression of some genes, cytokines and chemokines may also be closely related to the metastatic potential and prognosis of GCTB. The treatment of the primary GCTB is key to the final outcome of the disease, as intralesional curettage has a significantly higher local recurrence and pulmonary metastasis rate than wide resection. However, even patients with pulmonary metastasis seem to have a good prognosis after timely and appropriate surgical resection. It is hoped that with the development of novel surgical methods and drugs, pulmonary metastasis of GCTB can be prevented and treated more effectively.

  17. Multiple Giant Cell Tumours of Tendon Sheath: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pathade, Smita Charandas; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Tauheed, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumours Of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the second most frequent soft tissue tumours affecting the hand with an overall incidence of 1 in 50,000 individuals. These tumours are usually localized and solitary, with multiple GCTTS occurring rarely. Multi-centric origin is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported till date. Here, we report a rare case of a 26-year-old female who presented with multiple painless swellings on palmar aspect of little finger of right hand since six months. Clinical diagnosis of Dupuytren’s contracture was given. Intraoperative examination revealed multiple separate nodules, firmly attached to the flexor tendon synovial sheath. Histopathology showed features of GCTTS. PMID:24596760

  18. Multiple giant cell tumours of tendon sheath: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pathade, Smita Charandas; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Tauheed, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumours Of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the second most frequent soft tissue tumours affecting the hand with an overall incidence of 1 in 50,000 individuals. These tumours are usually localized and solitary, with multiple GCTTS occurring rarely. Multi-centric origin is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported till date. Here, we report a rare case of a 26-year-old female who presented with multiple painless swellings on palmar aspect of little finger of right hand since six months. Clinical diagnosis of Dupuytren's contracture was given. Intraoperative examination revealed multiple separate nodules, firmly attached to the flexor tendon synovial sheath. Histopathology showed features of GCTTS.

  19. Case Study: Giant Cell Arteritis with Vertebral Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Daniel Chomlak, R.; Ghazanfari, Farshad; Datta, Mineesh

    2016-01-01

    In giant cell arteritis (GCA), involvement of the vertebral arteries is rare with reported rates of 3%–4% for ischemic events secondary to vertebral artery stenosis or occlusion for those patients with GCA. This case study describes a patient who initially presented with acute onset of vertigo but was also found to have transient, side-alternating upper limb neurological findings. While initial imaging showed no vascular abnormalities, it was not until GCA was eventually confirmed with a temporal artery biopsy that the initial scans were shown to have bilateral narrowing of the vertebral arteries. While rare, vertebral artery involvement is an important complication to consider in the setting of GCA due to the high rate of associated mortality, despite immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27279753

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Ghnaimat, Malek; Alodat, Mohannad; Aljazazi, Mohammad; Al-Zaben, Raad; Alshwabkah, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a benign lesion which arises from the synovium of a joint, bursa or tendon sheath, with 85% of the tumors occurring in the fingers and 12% of the tumors located in large joints such as the knee and ankle. The GCTTS is usually monoarticular, slowly proliferative and rarely locally aggressive. This paper reports three cases of this rare lesion in the knee. Patients presented with painful swelling in the anterior knee, MRI showed localized soft tissue masses which were able to be excised. A follow up of the cases showed no recurrences. This case report emphasizes the importance of considering GCTTS in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue swelling and pain in large joints.

  1. A Comparative Study of Cathepsin D Expression in Peripheral and Central Giant Cell Granuloma of the Jaws by Immunohistochemistry Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zargaran, Massoumeh; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Afsharmoghadam, Noushin; Nasr Isfahani, Mohsen; Hashemi, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Peripheral and central giant cell granuloma are two common benign lesions of the oral cavity. In spite of histopathological similarities, they have different clinical behaviors. Cathepsin D is a lysosomal enzyme which has different functions on the basis of protein and applied peptide cleavage. Purpose This research aimed to evaluate and compare the expression level of Cathepsin D in these two lesions to find the reasons for the differences in clinical and biologic characteristics. Materials and Method The expression of Cathepsin D was investigated by using the immunohistochemistry method in 20 samples of peripheral giant cell granuloma and 20 samples of central giant cell granuloma. The percentage of stained giant cells (labeling index), the intensity of staining of giant cells, and staining-intensity-distribution in both groups were calculated and compared. Results The labeling indices of Cathepsin D in peripheral giant cell granuloma and central giant cell granuloma were 95.9±4.03 and 95.6±2.34, respectively. There was no significant difference in the percentages of stained giant cells between the two groups (p= 0.586). The intensity of staining of giant cells in central giant cell granuloma was stronger than that of peripheral giant cell granuloma (p> 0.001). Staining- intensity- distribution of giant cells in central giant cell granuloma was significantly greater than that of the peripheral type of lesion (p= 0.001). Conclusion The higher expression level of Cathepsin D in central giant cell granuloma compared to peripheral type of lesion can explain more aggressive behavior of central giant cell granuloma. PMID:27284554

  2. Transgenic rice seeds accumulating recombinant hypoallergenic birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 generate giant protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Kawakatsu, Taiji; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-06-01

    A versatile hypoallergenic allergen derivative against multiple allergens is an ideal tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Such a tolerogen should exhibit high efficacy, without side effects, when administered at high doses and should be applicable to several allergens. Tree pollen chimera 7 (TPC7), a hypoallergenic Bet v 1 tolerogen against birch pollen allergy, was previously selected by DNA shuffling of 14 types of Fagales tree pollen allergens. In this study, transgenic rice seed accumulating TPC7 was generated as an oral vaccine against birch pollen allergy by expressing this protein as a secretory protein using the N-terminal signal peptide and the C-terminal KDEL tag under the control of an endosperm-specific glutelin promoter. The highest level of TPC7 accumulation was approximately 207 µg grain(-1). Recombinant TPC7 is a glycoprotein with high mannose-type N-glycan, but without β1,2-xylose or α1,3-fucose, suggesting that TPC7 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). TPC7 is deposited as a novel, giant spherical ER-derived protein body, >20 µm in diameter, which is referred to as the TPC7 body. Removal of the KDEL retention signal or mutation of a cysteine residue resulted in an alteration of TPC7 body morphology, and deletion of the signal peptide prevented the accumulation of TPC7 in rice seeds. Therefore, the novel TPC7 bodies may have formed aggregates within the ER lumen, primarily due to the intrinsic physicochemical properties of the protein.

  3. Histological and clinical characteristics of malignant giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lihua; Liu, Weifeng; Sun, Xiaoqi; Sajdik, Constantin; Tian, Xinxia; Niu, Xiaohui; Huang, Xiaoyuan

    2012-03-01

    Malignant giant cell tumors of bone (MGCTB) are rare, and the diagnosis can be difficult due to the occurrence of a variety of malignant tumors containing giant cells. To better understand its clinicopathological features, we have reviewed our experience with 17 cases of MGCTB. Five cases were primary malignant giant cell tumor of bone (PMGCTB), and 12 cases were giant cell tumors of bone initially diagnosed as benign but malignant in a recurrent lesion (secondary MGCTB, SMGCTB). The patients included six women and 11 men (age ranged from 17 to 52 years; mean, 30.5 years). The tumor arose in the femur (six cases), the tibia (seven cases), the humerus (three cases), and the fibula (one case). Microscopically, PMGCTB showed both conventional giant cell tumor and malignant sarcoma features. SMGCTB were initially diagnosed as conventional giant cell tumor of bone, the recurrent lesion showing malignant features. Histologically, the malignant components included osteosarcoma (11 cases), undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma (two cases), and fibrosarcoma (four cases). SMGCTB cases showed strong expression of p53. Follow-up information revealed that four patients died of lung metastasis, two patients are alive with lung metastases, and 11 patients are alive without tumor. MGCTB should be considered as a high-grade sarcoma. It must be distinguished from GCTB and other malignant tumors containing giant cells. p53 might play a role in the malignant transformation of GCTB. PMID:22350004

  4. Symptomatic giant peritoneal loose body in the pelvic cavity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Andreas; Walensi, Mikolaj; Fuenfschilling, Maya; Rosenberg, Robert; Mechera, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Giant peritoneal loose bodies (gPLB) occur rarely and therefore only few have been described. Often they are found incidentally and have no clinical relevance, whereas symptomatic forms may require surgical removal. Presentation of case We report the case of a male patient suffering from abdominal discomfort with alternating localizations for several years, actually presenting with a proctitis. With elevated inflammatory markers, a conspicuous resistance in the lower abdomen and in order to evaluate further affection of the colon, an abdominal CT-scan was performed. It revealed a spherical mass in the lesser pelvis. A colonoscopy confirmed the proctitis, showing no further pathologies. Due to the symptoms and the uncertain entity of the mass, a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed and a boiled egg-like structure (diameter 5.2 cm) was removed. The patient recovered well and was free of symptoms. Discussion The patient had two potential reasons for his symptoms, one of them being a suspected leftover foreign body years after an appendectomy. The proctitis was treated conservatively but without complete remission of the abdominal discomfort. Therefore, a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed and the mass turned out to be a gPLB. Conclusion To obtain a fast diagnosis and to perform an adequate conservative or surgical therapy, the knowledge about the rare entity of a gPLB is necessary. An exact anamnesis, clinical examination and the knowledge about the diagnostic values of radiological and endoscopic investigations are crucial. PMID:26901087

  5. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species.

  6. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species. PMID:26035009

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  8. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor presenting as a parotid gland mass: Expanding the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions in salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Qasem, Shadi; Bergman, Simon; Salih, Ziyan T

    2014-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) are rare benign soft tissue tumors affecting mostly young adults. The most common affected sites include the knee, ankle, elbow, shoulder, and fingers. The temporomandibular joint is occasionally affected. Herein, we report a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian male who presented clinically with a parotid gland mass. The initial clinical and radiological work-up failed to reveal any involvement of the adjacent temporomandibular joint. Fine-needle aspiration revealed a cellular tumor composed of mononuclear and multinucleated giant cells with fibrosis and hemosiderin deposition. This was subsequently found to be a TGCT arising from the temporomandibular joint. Giant cell-rich lesions are uncommon in salivary glands. Herein, we describe the cytomorphology and clinico-radiographic features of this tumor with emphasis on the differential diagnosis of giant cell-rich lesions presenting in salivary glands. Despite its rare occurrence, this entity should be considered when giant cells are prominent in specimens acquired from this location.

  9. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W.; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  10. Evolution of microscopic colitis to giant cell colitis without significant intraepithelial lymphocytosis or thickened collagen plate.

    PubMed

    De Petris, Giovanni; Chen, Longwen

    2015-05-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an umbrella term that encompasses lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis (CC). Several histological variants of these 2 entities exist; among them is the uncommon giant cell colitis (GCC), in which histiocytic giant cells (GCs) are present in background of CC or LC. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman complaining of watery diarrhea for several years that was diagnosed with CC. At follow-up, she developed giant cell colitis (GCC). Nine years later, a colectomy revealed a form of microscopic colitis in which significant intraepithelial lymphocytosis and collagen plate thickening have disappeared while GCs persisted with diffuse mononuclear cells inflammation of the lamina propria. Thinning of the collagen plate in association with GCs has been described previously. The case contributes the possibility of further evolution of MC into a pure giant cell colitis in which the prototypical manifestations of MC have all but disappeared.

  11. Eruption triggering of giant magma bodies by internal versus external forcing: A rhyolite-MELTS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, T. L.; Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Miller, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    Silicic volcanism, particularly supereruptions, raises questions about the mechanisms by which magma bodies destabilize and erupt. Are external events necessary to initiate an eruption of a large silicic system, or is possible for internal processes (crystallization, volatile exsolution) to destabilize a system and drive it to erupt? If external triggers are critically important to prompting eruption, are all felsic magma bodies equally prone to erupt? To respond to these questions, we use rhyolite-MELTS (Gualda et al. 2012) to investigate the pre-eruptive chemical evolution and the resultant changes to physical properties of giant (super-eruptive) felsic magma bodies. Simulations are conducted using pumice and glass compositions from the Peach Spring (Southwestern USA) and the Bishop (California USA) Tuffs, two giant high-silica rhyolite deposits. In our simulations, we vary initial pressure (150-350 MPa in 50 MPa intervals), volatile content (initial water ranging from 1-7 wt. %), mode of crystallization (equilibrium vs. fractional), and rheology of the magma reservoir (isobaric vs. isochoric vs. transitional). We run simulations through as much of the crystallization interval as possible, but focus on the first ~50 wt. % crystallization, most relevant for volcanic systems. In all simulations, we observe near-invariant behavior when the system becomes saturated in quartz, two feldspars and a fluid phase, from which point crystallization is essentially isothermal. Prior to the near-invariant, crystallization leads to gradual changes in bulk properties (e.g., < 1% volume decrease over 50 °C), which effectively results in modest pressure changes within the magma body (i.e., ~10 MPa). Upon reaching the near-invariant, the bulk properties change abruptly (e.g., > 5% volume increase in 0.1 °C), causing significant overpressurization of the magma body. The magnitude of this overpressurization (i.e. 10s to 100s of MPa depending on system conditions) is sufficient to

  12. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  13. Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis The full report is titled “Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Early and Late ...

  14. Case report 207: Giant cell reparative granuloma of left femur arising in polyostatic fibrous dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Travers, H.; Neff, J.R.

    1982-08-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of lytic lesions in the femur are discussed. Roentgenograms, a tomogram and pathological studies of a giant cell reparative granuloma of left femur arising in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia are presented.

  15. Nonconventional papillary thyroid carcinomas with pleomorphic tumor giant cells: a diagnostic pitfall with anaplastic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hommell-Fontaine, Juliette; Borda, Angela; Ragage, Florence; Berger, Nicole; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam

    2010-06-01

    The presence of pleomorphic tumor giant cells in thyroid carcinomas of follicular cell origin is always worrisome for the pathologist as they first of all refer to anaplastic carcinoma, one of the most aggressive human malignancies. However, non-anaplastic pleomorphic giant cells are well described in other thyroid diseases, most often benign. In this paper, we describe four cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma displaying pleomorphic tumor giant cells with features that differ from those of anaplastic carcinoma. Pleomorphic giant cells were admixed with the underlying thyroid carcinoma and constituted from 5% to 25% of the tumor. Cytologically, they had an abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with large and irregular nuclei. Compared to pleomorphic giant cells of anaplastic carcinoma, they reproduced the growth pattern of the underlying carcinoma, had a low mitotic index without necrosis or inflammation, and were reactive with thyroglobulin and thyroid-specific transcription factor-1 and strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratin AE1/AE3. After 16-84 months of follow-up, patients are relapse-free and still alive. These cases show that pleomorphic tumor giant cells arising in papillary thyroid carcinomas do not always represent dedifferentiation and progression to anaplastic carcinoma. Distinction among these processes is critical as their treatment and prognosis are very different.

  16. Culture of mature trophoblastic giant cells from bovine placentomes.

    PubMed

    Landim, L P; Miglino, M A; Pfarrer, C; Ambrosio, C E; Garcia, J M

    2007-04-01

    The mostly binucleate trophoblast giant cells (TGC) found in bovine placentomes, in addition to synthesizing and releasing hormones play an important role in fetal development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. Placentomes from early gestation were collected, and for isolation of mature TGC, three cellular disaggregation methods, mechanical (MECH), enzymatic by trypsin (TRYP) or collagenase (COLL) were compared to each other. Further on, the cell survival in culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with either 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) or 10% serum replacement (SR) on culture plates free of any substrate was evaluated over a period of 90 days by trypan blue exclusion. The cells were further characterized by HOECHST 33342 nuclear staining, and immunocytochemical staining with monoclonal antibodies against vimentin and cytokeratin. A mean total rate of TGC survival of 82.56% was recorded. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher survival rates after enzymatic disaggregation with COLL (86.23%) than following MECH (80.38%) or TRYP (80.91%) treatment. Supplementation of DMEM with FCS resulted in significantly higher cellular survival rates (87.13%) when compared to the addition of SR (77.73%). Analysis of the influence of both, disaggregation method and medium supplementation on TGC survival revealed statistically significant differences between the following groups: MECH-SR (71.09%) was significantly lower than all other groups; TRYP-SR (78.03%) was significantly different from all other groups; TRYP-FCS (83.43%) and COLL-SR (84.08%) were significantly lower than MECH-FCS (89.98%) which together with COLL-FCS (88.25%) showed the highest cellular survival rate. In summary, our results show that TGC isolated from early gestation placentomes may be viable for more than 90 days of culture. However, whether these TGC produce placental lactogen throughout this period has yet to be determined.

  17. Culture of mature trophoblastic giant cells from bovine placentomes.

    PubMed

    Landim, L P; Miglino, M A; Pfarrer, C; Ambrosio, C E; Garcia, J M

    2007-04-01

    The mostly binucleate trophoblast giant cells (TGC) found in bovine placentomes, in addition to synthesizing and releasing hormones play an important role in fetal development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. Placentomes from early gestation were collected, and for isolation of mature TGC, three cellular disaggregation methods, mechanical (MECH), enzymatic by trypsin (TRYP) or collagenase (COLL) were compared to each other. Further on, the cell survival in culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with either 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) or 10% serum replacement (SR) on culture plates free of any substrate was evaluated over a period of 90 days by trypan blue exclusion. The cells were further characterized by HOECHST 33342 nuclear staining, and immunocytochemical staining with monoclonal antibodies against vimentin and cytokeratin. A mean total rate of TGC survival of 82.56% was recorded. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher survival rates after enzymatic disaggregation with COLL (86.23%) than following MECH (80.38%) or TRYP (80.91%) treatment. Supplementation of DMEM with FCS resulted in significantly higher cellular survival rates (87.13%) when compared to the addition of SR (77.73%). Analysis of the influence of both, disaggregation method and medium supplementation on TGC survival revealed statistically significant differences between the following groups: MECH-SR (71.09%) was significantly lower than all other groups; TRYP-SR (78.03%) was significantly different from all other groups; TRYP-FCS (83.43%) and COLL-SR (84.08%) were significantly lower than MECH-FCS (89.98%) which together with COLL-FCS (88.25%) showed the highest cellular survival rate. In summary, our results show that TGC isolated from early gestation placentomes may be viable for more than 90 days of culture. However, whether these TGC produce placental lactogen throughout this period has yet to be determined. PMID:16716544

  18. The Bishop Tuff giant magma body: An alternative to the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Bishop Tuff (California), which erupted at 760 ka and formed the Long Valley caldera, is the archetypical example of a thermally and compositionally stably stratified giant magma body. The deposit includes only high-silica rhyolite, but it is zoned with an early-erupted, pyroxene-free, crystal-poor (5-20 wt. % crystals) lower unit (EBT) and a late-erupted, pyroxene-bearing, more crystal-rich (5-30 wt. % crystals) upper unit (LBT). Gradients in composition and temperature within the magma body were first inferred by Hildreth (1979): Fe-Ti oxide thermometry reveals a gradient in pre-eruptive temperatures from EBT to LBT, suggesting thermal stratification; and the homogeneity of phenocryst compositions within each pumice clast suggests stable compositional stratification. This view of the Bishop magma body - the Standard Model - has remained largely unchallenged by subsequent work; we present new pre-eruptive temperature (T) and pressure (P) estimates to critically assess its viability. The pinnacle of the Standard Model is the gradient in pre-eruptive T and fO2 inferred from Fe-Ti oxides. Fe-Ti oxides also constrain TiO2 activity in the melt (Ghiorso & Gualda, CMP, in press); the positive correlation between T and aTiO2 observed in the Bishop dataset cannot be explained by magmatic crystallization, and comparison with aTiO2 from rhyolite-MELTS shows that Fe-Ti oxides were not in equilibrium with melt and do not record pre-eruptive conditions. We use zircon saturation temperatures calculated with literature glass inclusion data (Wallace et al., JGR, 1999; Anderson et al., JPet, 2000) to assess pre-eruptive temperatures; Zr contents in glass inclusions vary over a narrow interval (~70-110 ppm) for both EBT and LBT, yielding T between 720 and 755 °C for both, arguing against the inferred thermal stratification. Geobarometry should yield systematic differences between EBT and LBT. Published H2O-CO2 glass inclusion data yield overlapping P for EBT and LBT pumice

  19. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor. PMID:24499686

  20. In search of a candidate pathogen for giant cell arteritis: sequencing based characterization of the giant cell arteritis microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Ami S.; Manzo, Veronica E.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Duke, Fujiko; Cai, Diana; Bienfang, Don C.; Padera, Robert F.; Meyerson, Matthew; Docken, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the microbiome of the temporal artery in patients with giant cell arteritis and (2) to apply an unbiased and comprehensive shotgun sequencing-based approach to determine if there is an enrichment of candidate pathogens in affected tissues. Methods We performed unbiased DNA sequencing of 17 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded temporal artery biopsy specimens collected at a single institution over a period of four years. Twelve cases fulfilled clinical and histopathological criteria for GCA. Five cases served as controls. Using PathSeq software, human sequences were computationally subtracted and the remaining non-human sequences taxonomically classified using a comprehensive microbial sequence database. The relative abundance of microbes was inferred based on read counts assigned to each organism. Comparison of the microbial diversity in cases versus controls was carried out using hierarchical clustering and linear discriminant analysis effect size. Results Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli were the most abundant microorganisms in 16 of the 17 samples and Moraxella catarrhalis was the most abundant organism in one control. Pathogens previously described to be correlated with GCA were not differentially abundant in cases, compared to controls. There was not a significant burden of likely pathogenic viruses. Conclusion DNA sequencing of temporal artery biopsies from GCA cases and controls showed no evidence of previously identified candidate GCA pathogens. A single pathogen was not clearly and consistently associated with GCA in this case series. PMID:24644069

  1. Giant cell glioblastoma in the cerebrum of a Pembroke Welsh corgi.

    PubMed

    Giri, D K; Aloisio, F; Alosio, F; Ajithdoss, D K; Ambrus, A; Lidbury, J A; Hein, H E; Porter, B F

    2011-05-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered female Pembroke Welsh corgi was presented with a 1-month history of ataxia and panting. The clinical signs progressed until the dog became anorexic, obtunded and exhibited circling to the left. At necropsy examination, a mass was detected in the left forebrain, impinging on the cribriform plate. Microscopically, the mass was composed of sheets of round to pleomorphic neoplastic cells with vacuolated cytoplasm. Nuclear atypia, anisocytosis and anisokaryosis were common. Numerous bizarre, multinucleated giant cells containing 60 or more nuclei and giant mononuclear cells were present. The matrix contained abundant reticulin. Immunohistochemistry revealed the neoplastic cells uniformly to express vimentin, and a small number of neoplastic cells expressed glial fibrillary acid protein. A diagnosis of giant cell glioblastoma was made. Although well recognized in man, this tumour has been documented rarely in the veterinary literature.

  2. A hidden giant: Wallenberg syndrome and aortal wall thickening as an atypical presentation of a giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Katharina Luisa; Buchert, Ralph; Bauknecht, Hans; Sobesky, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 73-year-old woman with a brainstem stroke presenting as Wallenberg syndrome. By transoesophageal echocardiography and combined 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission and CT (18F-FDG PET/CT), the diagnosis of large artery vasculitis owing to giant cell arteritis was confirmed. In the absence of classical clinical signs, the examination of the large extracranial vessels by ultrasound and 18F-FDG PET/CT played the key role in detecting a widespread vasculitis. PMID:23456154

  3. Impaired elastic properties of ascending aorta in patients with giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Margos, P; Moyssakis, I; Tzioufas, A; Zintzaras, E; Moutsopoulos, H

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the elastic properties of the ascending aorta in untreated patients with giant cell arteritis compared with age and sex matched normal controls. Methods: Distensibility of the ascending aorta and aortic strain were measured in 22 patients with a recent diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (documented by a positive temporal artery biopsy) before initiation corticosteroid treatment, and in 44 age and sex matched healthy subjects. Aortic distensibility was calculated as 2x[pulsatile change in aortic diameter]/[(diastolic aortic diameter)x(aortic pulse pressure)], and aortic strain as [pulsatile change in aortic diameter]/[diastolic aortic diameter]. Aortic diameters were measured by echocardiography. Aortic pressures were obtained by external sphygmomanometry. Results: Distensibility of the ascending aorta and aortic strain were both lower in patients with giant cell arteritis than in the controls (p<0.01). In the patients with giant cell arteritis, aortic distensibility was inversely correlated with white blood cell count (p<0.05), but not with erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C reactive protein. Conclusions: Compared with healthy subjects, aortic distensibility and aortic strain are decreased in patients with giant cell arteritis before initiation of corticosteroid treatment. There was an association between the degree of reduction of aortic distensibility and the white blood cell count in the patient group. PMID:15231510

  4. [Denosumab may be a supplement to the surgical treatment of giant cell tumours of bone].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Anna Lynge; Hansen, Rehne Lessmann; Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg

    2016-09-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an aggressive bone tumour causing bone destruction. GCTB requires surgical treatment, and severe cases have a high risk of functional morbidity. GCTB consists of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK)-positive osteoclast-like giant cells. The formation and activity of these cells are mediated by the interaction with RANK ligand (RANKL) released from neoplastic stromal cells. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody which inhibits RANKL and impairs the growth of the GCTB. Several studies have described the ability of denosumab to downgrade the extent of surgical treatment and improve the functional outcome. PMID:27593237

  5. Biological characteristics of a novel giant cell tumor cell line derived from spine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenhua; Li, Yan; Xu, Leqin; Wang, Xudong; Chen, Su; Yang, Cheng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone(GCTB) is a special bone tumor for it consists of various cell types, and its biological characteristics is different from common benign or malignant neoplasm. In the present study, we report the biological features of a primary Asian GCTB cell line named GCTB28. We analyzed extensive properties of the GCTB28 cells including morphological observations, growth, cell cycle, karyotype, proliferation, proteins expression, surface biomarker verification, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. We found that the stromal cells of GCTB were endowed with self-renewal capacity and played dominant roles in GCTB development. Moreover, we confirmed that GCTB cells can be CD33(-)CD14(-) phenotype which was not in accord with previous study. This study provides an in vitro model system to investigate pathogenic mechanisms and molecular characteristics of GCTB and also provides a useful tool for researching the therapeutic targeting of GCTB.

  6. Eukaryotic Cells and their Cell Bodies: Cell Theory Revised

    PubMed Central

    BALUŠKA, FRANTIŠEK; VOLKMANN, DIETER; BARLOW, PETER W.

    2004-01-01

    • Background Cell Theory, also known as cell doctrine, states that all eukaryotic organisms are composed of cells, and that cells are the smallest independent units of life. This Cell Theory has been influential in shaping the biological sciences ever since, in 1838/1839, the botanist Matthias Schleiden and the zoologist Theodore Schwann stated the principle that cells represent the elements from which all plant and animal tissues are constructed. Some 20 years later, in a famous aphorism Omnis cellula e cellula, Rudolf Virchow annunciated that all cells arise only from pre‐existing cells. General acceptance of Cell Theory was finally possible only when the cellular nature of brain tissues was confirmed at the end of the 20th century. Cell Theory then rapidly turned into a more dogmatic cell doctrine, and in this form survives up to the present day. In its current version, however, the generalized Cell Theory developed for both animals and plants is unable to accommodate the supracellular nature of higher plants, which is founded upon a super‐symplasm of interconnected cells into which is woven apoplasm, symplasm and super‐apoplasm. Furthermore, there are numerous examples of multinucleate coenocytes and syncytia found throughout the eukaryote superkingdom posing serious problems for the current version of Cell Theory. • Scope To cope with these problems, we here review data which conform to the original proposal of Daniel Mazia that the eukaryotic cell is composed of an elemental Cell Body whose structure is smaller than the cell and which is endowed with all the basic attributes of a living entity. A complement to the Cell Body is the Cell Periphery Apparatus, which consists of the plasma membrane associated with other periphery structures. Importantly, boundary stuctures of the Cell Periphery Apparatus, although capable of some self‐assembly, are largely produced and maintained by Cell Body activities and can be produced from it de novo. These

  7. Primary osteoclast-like giant cell tumor of parotid gland: A rare extraskeletal presentation with diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ritika; Zaheer, Sufian; Mandal, Ashish K

    2016-01-01

    Primary osteoclast-like giant cell tumor (OC-GCT) has been rarely described in extraskeletal sites. The diagnosis primarily hinges on the detection of giant cells. However, these giant cells are also seen in many giant cell lesions, thus creating diagnostic confusion and dilemma. Here, we describe a rare case of a 24-year-old male with primary extraskeletal, OC-GCT presenting as a swelling in the right parotid region and highlight its cytological, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics with diagnostic challenges. PMID:27601838

  8. Primary osteoclast-like giant cell tumor of parotid gland: A rare extraskeletal presentation with diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ritika; Zaheer, Sufian; Mandal, Ashish K

    2016-01-01

    Primary osteoclast-like giant cell tumor (OC-GCT) has been rarely described in extraskeletal sites. The diagnosis primarily hinges on the detection of giant cells. However, these giant cells are also seen in many giant cell lesions, thus creating diagnostic confusion and dilemma. Here, we describe a rare case of a 24-year-old male with primary extraskeletal, OC-GCT presenting as a swelling in the right parotid region and highlight its cytological, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics with diagnostic challenges. PMID:27601838

  9. Syncytial giant cell hepatitis in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    GUPTA, Neil; NJEI, Basile

    2016-01-01

    While it commonly occurs in the pediatric population, syncytial giant cell hepatitis is rare in adults, which is diagnosed histologically by the presence of multinucleated cells in the liver. The literature has recorded only approximately one hundred cases in adults during the past two decades in whom malignancy is rarely associated with giant cell hepatitis. Our patient is a 66-year-old woman who was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and subsequently developed syncytial giant cell hepatitis. This disease is usually linked to virus infection, autoimmune diseases, and drug medications. The association between CLL and giant cell hepatitis is rare, with only three cases reported. In most cases viral particles on electron microscopy are reported and the patients usually have a history of chemotherapy and hypogammaglobulinemia. Unlike such cases, our patient developed giant cell hepatitis in the absence of such confounding variables. The treatment for our patient was a high-dose corticosteroid and rituxan, with improvement in liver enzymes. PMID:26147671

  10. Biophysical characterisation of electrofused giant HEK293-cells as a novel electrophysiological expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, D.; Terpitz, U.; Zhou, A.; Reuss, R.; Mueller, K.; Sukhorukov, V.L.; Gessner, P.; Nagel, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Bamberg, E. . E-mail: ernst.bamberg@mpibp-frankfurt.mpg.de

    2006-09-22

    Giant HEK293 cells of 30-65 {mu}m in diameter were produced by three-dimensional multi-cell electrofusion in 75 mOsm sorbitol media. These strong hypotonic conditions facilitated fusion because of the spherical shape and smooth membrane surface of the swollen cells. A regulatory volume decrease (RVD), as observed at higher osmolalities, did not occur at 75 mOsm. In contrast to field-treated, but unfused cells, the increase in volume induced by hypotonic shock was only partly reversible in the case of fused giant cells after their transfer into isotonic medium. The large size of the electrofused cells allowed the study of their electrophysiological properties by application of both whole-cell and giant excised patch-clamp techniques. Recordings on giant cells yielded a value of 1.1 {+-} 0.1 {mu}F/cm{sup 2} for the area-specific membrane capacitance. This value was consistent with that of the parental cells. The area-specific conductivity of giant cells (diameter > 50 {mu}m) was found to be between 12.8 and 16.1 {mu}S/cm{sup 2}, which is in the range of that of the parental cells. Measurements with patch-pipettes containing fluorescein showed uniform dye uptake in the whole-cell configuration, but not in the cell-attached configuration. The diffusion-controlled uniform uptake of the dye into the cell interior excludes internal compartmentalisation. The finding of a homogeneous fusion was also supported by expression of the yellow fluorescent protein YFP (as part of the fusion-protein ChR2-YFP) in giant cells since no plasma-membrane bound YFP-mediated fluorescence was detected in the interior of the electrofused cells. Functional expression and the electrophysiological characterisation of the light-activated cation channel Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) yielded similar results as for parental cells. Most importantly, the giant cells exhibited a comparable expression density of the channel protein in the plasma membrane as observed in parental cells. This demonstrates that

  11. Respiration characteristics of mitochondria in parental and giant transformed cells of the murine Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Horbay, Rostyslav O; Manko, Bohdan O; Manko, Volodymyr V; Lootsik, Maxim D; Stoika, Rostyslav S

    2012-01-01

    Respiration characteristics of mitochondria of the parental and giant cells of murine NK/Ly (Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma) were studied. The giant cell-enriched ascites were obtained by serial intraperitoneal injections of vinblastine in tumour-bearing mice. Ascites containing >70% giant cells were used. Their diameter of was over 17 μm (~2800 μm(3)), while the diameter of the parental cells was 12.7 μm (1100 μm(3)). The respiration rate of mitochondria in situ was measured by oxygen consumption in intact and digitonin-permeabilized NK/Ly cells. Endogenous respiration of intact giant NK/Ly cells was three times higher compared to the parental ones, roughly in agreement with the volume change. The giant NK/Ly cells were far more resistant to permeabilization with digitonin than the parental cells, as shown by Trypan Blue and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release tests. After digitonin permeabilization, oxygen consumption was reduced to a minimal level (0.06 ng atom O/(s × 106 cells) in both types of cells. Addition of α-ketoglutarate or succinate to the incubation medium increased oxygen consumption in the parental cells by 46 and 164% respectively. In the giant NK/Ly cells, the corresponding increases were 164 and 276%. Addition of ADP to α-ketoglutarate- or succinate-supplemented medium further stimulated oxygen consumption of the permeabilized NK/Ly cells; however, the effect of ADP was more pronounced in the giant cells. In addition, indices of respiratory control were significantly higher in the giant cells. Oligomycin suppressed considerably the respiration of the intact giant cells but had a much weaker effect on parental cells. Thus, giant NK/Ly cells possess much higher respiration rates and show tighter coupling between the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation compared with parental cells.

  12. Transcriptional analysis through RNA sequencing of giant cells induced by Meloidogyne graminicola in rice roots

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongli; Gheysen, Godelieve; Denil, Simon; Lindsey, Keith; Topping, Jennifer F.; Nahar, Kamrun; Haegeman, Annelies; De Vos, Winnok H.; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Kyndt, Tina

    2013-01-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in aerobic rice production is the rapid build-up of populations of the rice root knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola. These nematodes induce specialized feeding cells inside root tissue, called giant cells. By injecting effectors in and sipping metabolites out of these cells, they reprogramme normal cell development and deprive the plant of its nutrients. In this research we have studied the transcriptome of giant cells in rice, after isolation of these cells by laser-capture microdissection. The expression profiles revealed a general induction of primary metabolism inside the giant cells. Although the roots were shielded from light induction, we detected a remarkable induction of genes involved in chloroplast biogenesis and tetrapyrrole synthesis. The presence of chloroplast-like structures inside these dark-grown cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy. On the other hand, genes involved in secondary metabolism and more specifically, the majority of defence-related genes were strongly suppressed in the giant cells. In addition, significant induction of transcripts involved in epigenetic processes was detected inside these cells 7 days after infection. PMID:23881398

  13. Treatment with Doxycycline of Generalized Annular Elastolytic Giant Cell Granuloma Associated with Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tas, B; Caglar, A; Ozdemir, B

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is a case of generalized annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma (AEGCG) associated with borrelia infection and genes of p-30, p-31, p-39. A possible cross-mediated reaction from the T-cell type which might have induced the AEGCG is discussed from the concept of “heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and molecular mimicry”. PMID:26624605

  14. Central giant cell reparative granuloma of the ethmoids with bilateral proptosis and intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subhash C; Jain, Sachin; Mehrotra, Ravi; Singh, Himanshu P

    2013-02-01

    Central giant cell reparative granuloma is an infrequent, benign, proliferating lesion affecting the maxilla, mandible and, rarely, cranial bones. A 16-year-old girl presented with a 6-month history of recurrent nasal bleeding, a mass in the nose, difficulty in nasal breathing, a change in voice, and bilateral proptosis. Radiologically, an extensive ethmoidal mass was seen. Histologic examination revealed a central giant cell reparative granuloma. After endoscopic removal, the patient was symptom-free at the 12-month follow-up. The clinical picture of central giant cell reparative granuloma of the ethmoids is discussed, along with the differential diagnosis, histologic evaluation, appearance on computed tomography, and endoscopic management of this lesion. PMID:23460226

  15. The suitability of the ultrasound biomicroscope for establishing texture in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Roters, S.; Szurman, P.; Engels, B.; Brunner, R.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To establish whether ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) is a helpful tool in locating the arterial segment responsible in patients with segmental attacks in giant cell arteritis
METHODS—The superficial temporal arteries of 19 patients with suspected giant cell arteritis were examined with the UBM before biopsy.
RESULTS—20 specimens provided the histological proof of giant cell arteritis in five patients. Side differences, a dark perivascular halo, and high reflexivity of the intra-arterial space were found.
CONCLUSION—it is assumed that there are two types of arteritic inflammation: (1) the occlusion of intra-arterial space due to intimal fibrosis (UBM: high reflexive "filling"), and (2) inflammation of the perivascular zone with oedematous thickening and infiltration of the media (UBM: dark halo) and its combination. UBM is helpful in obtaining an indication of the side and segment for biopsy.

 PMID:11466252

  16. Infantile disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis presenting as sudden infant death.

    PubMed

    Kagata, Y; Matsubara, O; Ogata, S; Lie, J T; Mark, E J

    1999-03-01

    The rare clinicopathological entity 'disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis' (DVGCA) was first described in 1978. It is characterized by widespread small-vessel giant cell angitis and extravascular granulomas. A normal and healthy 7-month-old boy who presented unexpectedly with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is reported. Histological examination at autopsy revealed giant cell angitis of the aorta, common carotid, coronary, pulmonary, celiac, mesenteric and common iliac arteries. There were also granulomas in the tracheal wall and liver. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of DVGCA occurring in an infant younger than 12 months of age. A review of the literature on DVGCA is presented in this report, and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  17. Temporal bone central giant-cell granuloma presenting as a serous otitis media.

    PubMed

    Rudic, Milan; Grayeli, Alexis Bozorg; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Cyna-Gorse, Françoise; Bouccara, Didier; Sterkers, Olivier

    2008-05-01

    Central giant cell granuloma is a benign intraosseous lesion that most commonly occurs in the facial bones. Its location in the temporal bone is extremely rare and only 20 cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of an adult female patient presenting with a right serous otitis media and mastoiditis associated with a mixed hearing loss during 6 months. CT-scan and MRI revealed a temporal bone tumor involving the mastoid, and surrounding the right temporo-mandibular joint. Tumor was totally removed after a canal-wall-down mastoidectomy and middle ear exclusion. Pathology revealed a central giant cell granuloma. Seven months following the surgery there was no evidence of recurrence. Central giant cell granuloma is a rare temporal bone lesion, with non specific clinical and imaging signs but characteristic pathological features. Today, a total surgical removal and regular MRI follow-up is the best management option.

  18. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C.; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  19. Coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multilineage stroma via polyploid giant cells during immortalization and transformation of mullerian epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Sood, Anil; Bast, Robert C; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    Stromal cells are generally considered to be derived primarily from the host's normal mesenchymal stromal cells or bone marrow. However, the origins of stromal cells have been quite controversial. To determine the role of polyploidy in tumor development, we examined the fate of normal mullerian epithelial cells during the immortalization and transformation process by tracing the expression of SV40 large T antigen. Here we show that immortalized or HRAS-transformed mullerian epithelial cells contain a subpopulation of polyploid giant cells that grow as multicellular spheroids expressing hematopoietic markers in response to treatment with CoCl2. The immortalized or transformed epithelial cells can transdifferentiate into stromal cells when transplanted into nude mice. Immunofluorescent staining revealed expression of stem cell factors OCT4, Nanog, and SOX-2 in spheroid, whereas expression of embryonic stem cell marker SSEA1 was increased in HRAS-transformed cells compared with their immortalized isogenic counterparts. These results suggest that normal mullerian epithelial cells are intrinsically highly plastic, via the formation of polyploid giant cells and activation of embryonic stem-like program, which work together to promote the coevolution of neoplastic epithelial cells and multiple lineage stromal cells. PMID:27382431

  20. Bortezomib Inhibits Giant Cell Tumor of Bone through Induction of Cell Apoptosis and Inhibition of Osteoclast Recruitment, Giant Cell Formation, and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leqin; Luo, Jian; Jin, Rongrong; Yue, Zhiying; Sun, Peng; Yang, Zhengfeng; Yang, Xinghai; Wan, Wei; Zhang, Jishen; Li, Shichang; Liu, Mingyao; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare and highly osteolytic bone tumor that usually leads to an extensive bone lesion. The purpose of this study was to discover novel therapeutic targets and identify potential agents for treating GCTB. After screening the serum cytokine profiles in 52 GCTB patients and 10 normal individuals using the ELISA assay, we found that NF-κB signaling-related cytokines, including TNFα, MCP-1, IL1α, and IL17A, were significantly increased in GCTB patients. The results were confirmed by IHC that the expression and activity of p65 were significantly increased in GCTB patients. Moreover, all of the NF-κB inhibitors tested suppressed GCTB cell growth, and bortezomib (Velcade), a well-known proteasome inhibitor, was the most potent inhibitor in blocking GCTB cells growth. Our results showed that bortezomib not only induced GCTB neoplastic stromal cell (NSC) apoptosis, but also suppressed GCTB NSC-induced giant cell differentiation, formation, and resorption. Moreover, bortezomib specifically suppressed GCTB NSC-induced preosteoclast recruitment. Furthermore, bortezomib ameliorated GCTB cell-induced bone destruction in vivo As a result, bortezomib suppressed NF-κB-regulated gene expression in GCTB NSC apoptosis, monocyte migration, angiogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis. Particularly, the inhibitory effects of bortezomib were much better than zoledronic acid, a drug currently used in treating GCTB, in our in vitro experimental paradigms. Together, our results demonstrated that NF-κB signaling pathway is highly activated in GCTB, and bortezomib could suppress GCTB and osteolysis in vivo and in vitro, indicating that bortezomib is a potential agent in the treatment of GCTB. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 854-65. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Recombinant production of biologically active giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) growth hormone from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli by fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Jen; Huang, Chi-Lung; Gong, Hong-Yi; Ou, Tsung-Yin; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Hu, Shao-Yang

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) performs important roles in regulating somatic growth, reproduction, osmoregulation, metabolism and immunity in teleosts, and thus, it has attracted substantial attention in the field of aquaculture application. Herein, giant grouper GH (ggGH) cDNA was cloned into the pET28a vector and expressed in Shuffle® T7 Competent Escherichia coli. Recombinant N-terminal 6× His-tagged ggGH was produced mainly in insoluble inclusion bodies; the recombinant ggGH content reached 20% of total protein. For large-scale ggGH production, high-cell density E. coli culture was achieved via fed-batch culture with pH-stat. After 30h of cultivation, a cell concentration of 41.1g/l dry cell weight with over 95% plasmid stability was reached. Maximal ggGH production (4.0g/l; 22% total protein) was achieved via mid-log phase induction. Various centrifugal forces, buffer pHs and urea concentrations were optimized for isolation and solubilization of ggGH from inclusion bodies. Hydrophobic interactions and ionic interactions were the major forces in ggGH inclusion body formation. Complete ggGH inclusion body solubilization was obtained in PBS buffer at pH 12 containing 3M urea. Through a simple purification process including Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and refolding, 5.7mg of ggGH was obtained from 10ml of fed-batch culture (45% recovery). The sequence and secondary structure of the purified ggGH were confirmed by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry and circular dichroism analysis. The cell proliferation-promoting activity was confirmed in HepG2, ZFL and GF-1 cells with the WST-1 colorimetric bioassay.

  2. DNA sequence and expression analysis of root-knot nematode-elicited giant cell transcripts.

    PubMed

    Bird, D M; Wilson, M A

    1994-01-01

    Fifty-eight cDNA clones isolated from a library of transcripts exhibiting up regulation in tomato root giant cells induced by infection with the parasitic nematode Meloidogyne incognita were characterized. A survey of plant tissues identified 31 transcripts present in tissues other than root, including actively dividing and expanding tissues and mature leaf tissues. The identities of approximately 20% of the giant cell transcripts were inferred from DNA sequence data; they include sequences encoding a plasmalemma proton ATPase, a putative Myb-type transcription factor, and the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

  3. Extra-Articular Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath: A Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Olga D; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Sakellariou, Vasilios I; Chloros, George D; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-06-01

    Two rare cases of extra-articular diffuse variant giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath are presented, at the elbow of a 68-year-old female and the foot of a 56-year-old male. Both patients presented with a palpable masses and marginal excision was performed; histological sections confirmed the diagnosis of extra-articular giant cell tumor. No adjuvant therapy was administered. At the latest follow-up, minimum 24 months after excision both patients were disease-free. PMID:27517076

  4. Extra-Articular Diffuse Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Savvidou, Olga D.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Sakellariou, Vasilios I.; Chloros, George D.; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2016-01-01

    Two rare cases of extra-articular diffuse variant giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath are presented, at the elbow of a 68-year-old female and the foot of a 56-year-old male. Both patients presented with a palpable masses and marginal excision was performed; histological sections confirmed the diagnosis of extra-articular giant cell tumor. No adjuvant therapy was administered. At the latest follow-up, minimum 24 months after excision both patients were disease-free. PMID:27517076

  5. Locally administered zoledronic Acid therapy for giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Nishisho, Toshihiko; Hanaoka, Naoyoshi; Endo, Kenji; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Natsuo

    2011-07-07

    Giant cell tumor of bone is locally aggressive and occurs in the meta-epiphyseal region of long bones. Because of its high recurrence rate, local adjuvant therapies such as phenol or liquid nitrogen have been recommended. In the present study, zoledronic acid, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, was administered locally as an adjuvant during a biopsy. An otherwise healthy 43-year-old man presented with pain and swelling in the right knee. Plain radiographs showed an osteolytic lesion of the right proximal tibia. An open biopsy was performed and the intraoperative pathologic diagnosis was giant cell tumor of bone. Following biopsy, the defect was filled with betatricalcium phosphate, and 4 mg of zoledronic acid was locally administered into the tumor lesion. Two months after the biopsy, curettage and bone grafting were performed. Sections were obtained during the curettage for histology to evaluate the response to bisphosphonate treatment. Histologic examination revealed massive tumor cell death in the lesion in which both stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells were necrotic. Curettage was performed and the defect was filled with a commercial preshaped hydroxyapatitetricalcium phosphate bone substitute. Eighteen months after curettage, the patient had regained full range of motion and good function of the knee, and radiographs at 18 months after curettage revealed no recurrence of giant cell tumor of bone.

  6. Characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow of giant panda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Yang; Yie, Shangmian; Lan, Jingchao; Pi, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhihe; Huang, He; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Ming; Cai, Kailai; Wang, Hairui; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    In present study, we report on bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are isolated from giant pandas. Cells were collected from the BM of two stillborn giant pandas. The cells were cultured and expanded in 10% fetal bovine serum medium. Cell morphology was observed under an inverted microscopy, and the proliferation potential of the cells was evaluated by counting cell numbers for eight consecutive days. Differentiation potentials of the cells were determined by using a variety of differentiation protocols for osteocytes, adipocytes, neuron cells, and cardiomyocytes. Meanwhile, the specific gene expressions for MSCs or differentiated cells were analyzed by RT-PCR. The isolated cells exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology; expressed mesenchymal specific markers such as cluster of differentiation 73 (CD73), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX-2), guanine nucleotide-binding protein-like 3 (GNL3), and stem cell factor receptor (SCFR); and could be differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes that were characterized by Alizarin Red and Oil Red O staining. Under appropriate induction conditions, these cells were also able to differentiate into neuroglial-like or myocardial-like cells that expressed specific myocardial markers such as GATA transcription factors 4 (GATA-4), cardiac troponin T (cTnT), and myosin heavy chain 7B (MYH7B), or neural specific markers such as Nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). This study demonstrated stem cells recovery and growth from giant pandas. The findings suggest that cells isolated from the BM of giant pandas have a high proliferative capacity and multiple differentiation potential in vitro which might aid conservation efforts.

  7. Characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow of giant panda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Yang; Yie, Shangmian; Lan, Jingchao; Pi, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhihe; Huang, He; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Ming; Cai, Kailai; Wang, Hairui; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    In present study, we report on bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are isolated from giant pandas. Cells were collected from the BM of two stillborn giant pandas. The cells were cultured and expanded in 10% fetal bovine serum medium. Cell morphology was observed under an inverted microscopy, and the proliferation potential of the cells was evaluated by counting cell numbers for eight consecutive days. Differentiation potentials of the cells were determined by using a variety of differentiation protocols for osteocytes, adipocytes, neuron cells, and cardiomyocytes. Meanwhile, the specific gene expressions for MSCs or differentiated cells were analyzed by RT-PCR. The isolated cells exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology; expressed mesenchymal specific markers such as cluster of differentiation 73 (CD73), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX-2), guanine nucleotide-binding protein-like 3 (GNL3), and stem cell factor receptor (SCFR); and could be differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes that were characterized by Alizarin Red and Oil Red O staining. Under appropriate induction conditions, these cells were also able to differentiate into neuroglial-like or myocardial-like cells that expressed specific myocardial markers such as GATA transcription factors 4 (GATA-4), cardiac troponin T (cTnT), and myosin heavy chain 7B (MYH7B), or neural specific markers such as Nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). This study demonstrated stem cells recovery and growth from giant pandas. The findings suggest that cells isolated from the BM of giant pandas have a high proliferative capacity and multiple differentiation potential in vitro which might aid conservation efforts. PMID:23557186

  8. Heterogeneous vesicles in mucous epithelial cells of posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Guo, X; Zhong, S; Ge, T; Peng, S; Yu, P; Zhou, Z

    2015-08-25

    The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultrastructural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E). Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i) electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC); ii) electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC); and iii) mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC).

  9. Heterogeneous Vesicles in Mucous Epithelial Cells of Posterior Esophagus of Chinese Giant Salamander (Andrias Davidianus)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Zhong, S.; Ge, T.; Peng, S.; Yu, P.; Zhou, Z.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese giant salamander belongs to an old lineage of salamanders and endangered species. Many studies of breeding and disease regarding this amphibian had been implemented. However, the studies on the ultrastructure of this amphibian are rare. In this work, we provide a histological and ultra-structural investigation on posterior esophagus of Chinese giant salamander. The sections of amphibian esophagus were stained by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E). Moreover, the esophageal epithelium was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that esophageal epithelium was a single layer epithelium, which consisted of mucous cells and columnar cells. The esophageal glands were present in submucosa. The columnar cells were ciliated. According to the diverging ultrastructure of mucous vesicles, three types of mucous cells could be identified in the esophageal mucosa: i) electron-lucent vesicles mucous cell (ELV-MC); ii) electron-dense vesicles mucous cell (EDV-MC); and iii) mixed vesicles mucous cell (MV-MC). PMID:26428885

  10. Granulomatous slack skin T-cell lymphoma: an important differential diagnosis with giant cell tumor of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Adriano, André Ricardo; Lima, Tiago Silveira; Battistella, Maxime; Bagot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous slack skin is an indolent T-cell lymphoma, considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. Clinically it is characterized by areas of redundant skin, wrinkled, inelastic, with variable erythema and infiltration besides a poikilodermic surface. A differential diagnosis unknown to most dermatologists is the giant cell tumor of soft tissue, which is an extremely rare low-grade sarcoma. The authors report a patient who had undergone extensive surgery because of a primary diagnosis of giant cell tumor of soft tissue, but which proved to be granulomatous slack skin after a second interventional procedure with confirmatory histopathology. PMID:26734874

  11. Granulomatous slack skin T-cell lymphoma: an important differential diagnosis with giant cell tumor of soft tissue*

    PubMed Central

    Adriano, André Ricardo; Lima, Tiago Silveira; Battistella, Maxime; Bagot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous slack skin is an indolent T-cell lymphoma, considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. Clinically it is characterized by areas of redundant skin, wrinkled, inelastic, with variable erythema and infiltration besides a poikilodermic surface. A differential diagnosis unknown to most dermatologists is the giant cell tumor of soft tissue, which is an extremely rare low-grade sarcoma. The authors report a patient who had undergone extensive surgery because of a primary diagnosis of giant cell tumor of soft tissue, but which proved to be granulomatous slack skin after a second interventional procedure with confirmatory histopathology. PMID:26734874

  12. Giant cell arteritis or tension-type headache?: A differential diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Saeed, Usman; Khan, Osama A.; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M.; Paul, Dion

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) or Temporal arteritis (TA) is an autoimmune disease and the most common type of vasculitis in the elderly. It causes inflammation of the medium and large arteries in the upper part of the body. GCA is an under-recognized cause of  head aches in the elderly, especially when it presents itself with atypical features, resulting in delayed or incorrect diagnosis. Since GCA is a treatable condition, an accurate diagnosis is crucial to prevent the most serious complication of CGA, permanent vision loss. The diagnosis can be further complicated as GCA may present with features of other painful neurological conditions. The present case is an 81-year-old woman diagnosed with GCA, who initially presented with features similar to tension-type headache. Due to overlapping features of these conditions, the diagnosis of GCA was delayed, resulting in irreversible vision loss. Although previous research highlights diagnostic dilemmas featuring GCA and other disease states, this case is exclusive in describing a unique dilemma where tension-type headache mimics GCA. PMID:25288850

  13. Giant cell granuloma of the temporal bone in a mixed martial arts fighter.

    PubMed

    Maerki, Jennifer; Riddle, Nicole D; Newman, Jason; Husson, Michael A; Lee, John Y K

    2012-10-01

    Background and Importance Giant cell granuloma (GCG) is a rare, benign, non-neoplastic lesion of the head and neck. More common in the jaw bones, there have been few reports of the lesion arising in the temporal bone. Initially referred to as a "giant cell reparative granuloma," due to the previously accepted notion of its nature in attempting to repair areas of injury, the term "giant cell granuloma" is now more frequently used as this lesion has been found in patients without a history of trauma. In addition, several cases with a destructive nature, in contrast to a reparative one, have been observed. Clinical Presentation We report a case of GCG presenting as a head and neck tumor with dural attachments and extension into the middle cranial fossa in a mixed martial arts fighter. Conclusion Giant cell granulomas are typically treated surgically and have a good prognosis; however, care must be taken when they present in unusual locations. This case supports the theory of trauma and inflammation as risk factors for GCG. PMID:23946929

  14. Denosumab and giant cell tumour of bone—a review and future management considerations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S.F.; Adams, B.; Yu, X.C.; Xu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (gctb) is one type of giant-cell-rich bone lesion characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated osteoclast-type giant cells. Giant cells are known to express rankl (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) and are responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. No available treatment option is definitively effective in curing this disease, especially in surgically unsalvageable cases. In recent years, several studies of denosumab in patients with advanced or unresectable gctb have shown objective changes in tumour composition, reduced bony destruction, and clinical benefit. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets and binds with high affinity and specificity to rankl. Several large phase iii studies have shown that denosumab is more effective than bisphosphonates in reducing skeletal morbidity arising from a wide range of tumours and that it can delay bone metastasis. The relevant articles are reviewed here. The controversies related to the future use of denosumab in the treatment of gctb are discussed. PMID:24155640

  15. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor arising from the posterior cruciate ligament: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Mao, Ping; Chen, Dongyang; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The localized form of tenosynovial giant cell tumor or pigmented villonodular synovitis is rarely intraarticular in the knee. We reported a 40-year-old woman with a tenosynovial giant cell tumor arising from posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). She suffered sudden knee pain and locking without any reason for two days. A mass with a size of 1.7 × 0.8 × 0.7 cm in the fossa intercondyloidea was detected on the MRI. After one time hyperextension physical examination the patients felt sudden pain relief. During the arthroscopy examination, a loose soft tissue mass was found under the lateral meniscus. Only the synovium tissue lesion on the proximal PCL was detected. The mass had a conceivable thin pedicel and the shape matched well with the tumor bed on the PCL. The histopathology of the mass demonstrated a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. At six weeks follow-up, no clinical evidence of recurrence was noted. A Literature Review of tenosynovial giant cell tumor or pigmented villonodular synovitis arising from the PCL is present.

  16. GIANT-CELL RICH ATRIAL MYXOMA: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Hina; Mamoon, Nadira

    2016-01-01

    The cases of two middle age males are presented who were incidentally diagnosed to have atrial myxoma. Both of them underwent successful surgical interventions. Histologically, both myxomas showed abundant multinucleated giant cells, in addition to typical myxoid stroma with stellate and cord-like structures. PMID:27323595

  17. [Giant cell tumours in a pyramidal bone: a clinical case and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Santiago, M M; González-Arteaga, J; Hidalgo-Ovejero, A M

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) of the bone are benign, but locally invasive tumours. We present a new case of carpus GCT, involving the triquetrum. The diagnosis required a prior biopsy before doing the block resection. This treatment is the best option to avoid recurrences. We review the literature on this particular lesion in the carpus bone.

  18. Osteoclastic giant cell rich squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Meza, Lucía; Gómez-Macías, Gabriela Sofía; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Garza-Guajardo, Raquel; Loya-Solis, Abelardo

    2014-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and represents the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Histologically 85 to 90% of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinoma. Osteoclastic giant cell rich squamous cell carcinoma is an unusual histological variant of which only 4 cases have been reported. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a 6-month history of irregular vaginal bleeding. Examination revealed a 2.7 cm polypoid mass in the anterior lip of the uterine cervix. The patient underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Microscopically the tumor was composed of infiltrative nests of poorly differentiated nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. Interspersed in between these tumor cells were numerous osteoclastic giant cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm devoid of nuclear atypia, hyperchromatism, or mitotic activity. Immunohistochemistry was performed; CK and P63 were strongly positive in the squamous component and negative in the osteoclastic giant cells, while CD68 and Vimentin were strongly positive in the giant cell population and negative in the squamous component. The patient received chemo- and radiotherapy for recurrent disease identified 3 months later on a follow-up CT scan; 7 months after the surgical procedure the patient is clinically and radiologically disease-free.

  19. Osteoclastic Giant Cell Rich Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alemán-Meza, Lucía; Gómez-Macías, Gabriela Sofía; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Garza-Guajardo, Raquel; Loya-Solis, Abelardo

    2014-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and represents the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Histologically 85 to 90% of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinoma. Osteoclastic giant cell rich squamous cell carcinoma is an unusual histological variant of which only 4 cases have been reported. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with a 6-month history of irregular vaginal bleeding. Examination revealed a 2.7 cm polypoid mass in the anterior lip of the uterine cervix. The patient underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Microscopically the tumor was composed of infiltrative nests of poorly differentiated nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. Interspersed in between these tumor cells were numerous osteoclastic giant cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm devoid of nuclear atypia, hyperchromatism, or mitotic activity. Immunohistochemistry was performed; CK and P63 were strongly positive in the squamous component and negative in the osteoclastic giant cells, while CD68 and Vimentin were strongly positive in the giant cell population and negative in the squamous component. The patient received chemo- and radiotherapy for recurrent disease identified 3 months later on a follow-up CT scan; 7 months after the surgical procedure the patient is clinically and radiologically disease-free. PMID:25587478

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of the Uterus: A Report of 3 Cases With a Spectrum of Morphologic Features.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jennifer A; Sanada, Sakiko; Selig, Martin K; Hariri, Lida P; Nielsen, Gunnlaugur P; Oliva, Esther

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumors, a well-recognized neoplasm of bone, can rarely be found in the uterus. Such tumors are characterized by a dual population of mononuclear and osteoclast-like giant cells that lack epithelial and specific mesenchymal differentiation. In this study, the clinicopathologic features of 3 giant cell tumors of the uterus were reviewed. Immunohistochemistry for CD68, CD163, h-caldesmon, desmin, SMA, AE1/AE3, CD10, ER, PR, cyclin D1, CD1a, CD34, CD30, S100, myogenin/myoglobin, and Ki-67 was performed in all tumors, along with ultrastructural analysis in one. The patients were 47, 57, and 59 yr and the tumors measured 2.5, 7.5, and 16.0 cm. One neoplasm was confined to the endometrium, whereas the other 2 were myometrial. All 3 tumors showed a nodular growth comprised of mononuclear and osteoclast-like giant cells. The endometrial-confined tumor consisted of histologically benign mononuclear cells, whereas the others exhibited marked atypia. Mitotic activity was up to 5/10 HPF in the benign tumor and up to 22/10 HPF in the malignant. No cytologic atypia or mitoses were observed in the giant cells. CD68 and CD10 were strongly and diffusely expressed in both components of 3 and 2 neoplasms, respectively. Cyclin D1 was focal in the mononuclear cells and focal to diffuse in the giant cells. CD163 was diffuse in the mononuclear cells, but absent to focal in the giant cells. Ultrastructural analysis lacked diagnostic features of epithelial or specific mesenchymal differentiation. Both malignant tumors demonstrated an aggressive behavior. In summary, although rare, giant cell tumor of the uterus should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign or malignant tumors containing osteoclast-like giant cells. PMID:25851705

  1. A mouse model of luciferase-transfected stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Huang, Lin; Li, Gang; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    A major barrier towards the study of the effects of drugs on Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCT) has been the lack of an animal model. In this study, we created an animal model in which GCT stromal cells survived and functioned as proliferating neoplastic cells. A proliferative cell line of GCT stromal cells was used to create a stable and luciferase-transduced cell line, Luc-G33. The cell line was characterized and was found that there were no significant differences on cell proliferation rate and recruitment of monocytes when compared with the wild type GCT stromal cells. We delivered the Luc-G33 cells either subcutaneously on the back or to the tibiae of the nude mice. The presence of viable Luc-G33 cells was assessed using real-time live imaging by the IVIS 200 bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system. The tumor cells initially propagated and remained viable on site for 7 weeks in the subcutaneous tumor model. We also tested in vivo antitumor effects of Zoledronate (ZOL) and Geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) alone or their combinations in Luc-G33-transplanted nude mice. ZOL alone at 400 µg/kg and the co-treatment of ZOL at 400 µg/kg and GGTI-298 at 1.16 mg/kg reduced tumor cell viability in the model. Furthermore, the anti-tumor effects by ZOL, GGTI-298 and the co-treatment in subcutaneous tumor model were also confirmed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In conclusion, we established a nude mice model of GCT stromal cells which allows non-invasive, real-time assessments of tumor development and testing the in vivo effects of different adjuvants for treating GCT.

  2. Osteoclasts derive from hematopoietic stem cells according to marker, giant lysosomes of beige mice.

    PubMed

    Ash, P; Loutit, J F; Townsend, K M

    1981-01-01

    To ascertain the origin of multinucleated osteoclasts from hematopoietic stem cells, giant lysosomes peculiar to cells of beige mice (bg bg) were used as marker cells of that provenance. Radiation chimeras were established reciprocally between bg bg mice and osteopetrotic mi mi mice with defective osteoclasts. As a result, all the derivative cells of the hematopoietic stem cell would depend on the donor's cell line, whereas osteogenesis would remain the province of the host. It was affirmed in the chimeras mi mi/bg bg that the osteopetrosis was cured within six weeks. Thereafter the definitive osteoclasts of the chimeras contained giant lysosomes attributable to the beige cell line. However, the cure was well advanced before donor osteoclasts were prominent, for which several reasons are offered. In the mouse chimeras, bg bg/mi mi, there was a delay of some six weeks before osteopetrosis became evident, histologically before radiologically, at the major metaphyseal growth centers. During the period one to two months after establishment, osteoclasts appeared to be a mixture of two cell lines according to quantitative assessments for giant lysosomes. Assessments consisted of measurements of the percentage area of osteoclasts occupied by lysosomes over 1 micrometer diameter. The means were 0.018% +/- 0.008% for nonbeige stock and 2.09% +/- 0.58% for beige stock.

  3. Correlation of Histopathologic Features with Demographic, Gross and Radiographic Findings in Giant Cell Granulomas of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Aghbali, Amirala; Sina, Mahmood; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi; Emamverdizadeh, Parya; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Mahmoudi, Seyyed Mostafa; Janani, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. The correlation between morphology of giant cells in peripheral granulomas of the jaws and the aggressive behavior of the lesion is unknown. This study investigated the correlation between the histopathologic features with demographic, gross and radiographic findings in giant cell granulomas. Materials and methods. In this analytical study, data from 23 cases of central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) and 42 cases of peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) were analyzed, focusing on age, gender, location, and gross and radiographic features. For each patient, microscopic slides were assessed in terms of histologic features of giant cells and stroma. Results. No significant differences were found in the mean number of nuclei or the size of nuclei and giant cell distribution patterns between the jaws and genders in both lesions (P >0.05). Correlation between the mean number of nuclei and age was positively significant and correlation between the size of nuclei and age was negatively significant (P < 0.05). In addition, correlation between the mean number and size of nuclei and the size of the lesion was significant (P < 0.05). Correlation between stroma and aggressiveness of CGCGs was not statistically significant. Correlation between histopathologic features and radiographic findings was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There were correlations between the mean number of nuclei per giant cell and the size of the lesion and age, and between the size of nuclei and size of the lesion. No relation was observed between histopathologic and radiographic features. PMID:24578821

  4. The activation pattern of macrophages in giant cell (temporal) arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mihm, Bernhard; Bergmann, Markus; Brück, Wolfgang; Probst-Cousin, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    To determine if the pattern of macrophage activation reflects differences in the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system, specimens of 10 patients with giant cell arteritis and five with primary angiitis of the central nervous system were immunohistochemically studied and the expression of the macrophage activation markers 27E10, MRP14, MRP8 and 25F9 was determined in the vasculitic infiltrates. Thus, a partly different expression pattern of macrophage activation markers in giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system was observed. The group comparison revealed that giant cell arteritis cases had significantly higher numbers of acute activated MRP14-positive macrophages, whereas primary angiitis of the central nervous system is characterized by a tendency toward more MRP8-positive intermediate/late activated macrophages. Furthermore, in giant cell arteritis comparably fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were observed. These observations suggest, that despite their histopathological similarities, giant cell arteritis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system appear to represent either distinct entities within the spectrum of granulomatous vasculitides or different stages of similar disease processes. Their discrete clinical presentation is reflected by different activation patterns of macrophages, which may characterize giant cell arteritis as a more acute process and primary angiitis of the central nervous system as a more advanced inflammatory process.

  5. Emergency Diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumour (GCT) of Spine by Image Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC)

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Manish; Singh, Amitoj

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of spine is an extremely rare neoplasm accounting 0.5% to 1.5% of all cases. The patient usually presents with weakness of lower limbs. We describe a case of 25-year-old male who presented with sudden onset of paraplegia. On plain radiograph there was an osteolytic lesion in T9 vertebra. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed expansile lytic lesion in T9 vertebral body with involvement of posterior elements on right side with associated soft tissue mass in the extradural location extending into the spinal cord. Further Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan (T1 contrast) showed the enhancing extradural mass involving spinal cord from D 8-10 levels. A provisional radiological diagnosis of GCT was made. A CT guided FNAC of the mass was performed which revealed typical cytological features of Giant cell tumour. Role of image guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) of vertebral mass and its role in emergency situations with clear emphasis on differential diagnosis is highlighted. PMID:25177571

  6. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  7. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Hilary M A; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  8. Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) Buccal Mucosa Tissue as a Source of Multipotent Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Hilary M. A.; Manning, Craig; Gardner, Aaron; Ritchie, William A.; Pizzi, Romain; Girling, Simon; Valentine, Iain; Wang, Chengdong; Jahoda, Colin A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first mammal was cloned, the idea of using this technique to help endangered species has aroused considerable interest. However, several issues limit this possibility, including the relatively low success rate at every stage of the cloning process, and the dearth of usable tissues from these rare animals. iPS cells have been produced from cells from a number of rare mammalian species and this is the method of choice for strategies to improve cloning efficiency and create new gametes by directed differentiation. Nevertheless information about other stem cell/progenitor capabilities of cells from endangered species could prove important for future conservation approaches and adds to the knowledge base about cellular material that can be extremely limited. Multipotent progenitor cells, termed skin-derived precursor (SKP) cells, can be isolated directly from mammalian skin dermis, and human cheek tissue has also been shown to be a good source of SKP-like cells. Recently we showed that structures identical to SKPs termed m-SKPs could be obtained from monolayer/ two dimensional (2D) skin fibroblast cultures. Here we aimed to isolate m-SKPs from cultured cells of three endangered species; giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); red panda (Ailurus fulgens); and Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica). m-SKP-like spheres were formed from the giant panda buccal mucosa fibroblasts; whereas dermal fibroblast (DF) cells cultured from abdominal skin of the other two species were unable to generate spheres. Under specific differentiation culture conditions giant panda spheres expressed neural, Schwann, adipogenic and osteogenic cell markers. Furthermore, these buccal mucosa derived spheres were shown to maintain expression of SKP markers: nestin, versican, fibronectin, and P75 and switch on expression of the stem cell marker ABCG2. These results demonstrate that giant panda cheek skin can be a useful source of m-SKP multipotent progenitors. At present lack of sample numbers

  9. Sox15 enhances trophoblast giant cell differentiation induced by Hand1 in mouse placenta.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kayo; Kanda, Hiromi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Ito, Michihiko

    2006-06-01

    Some members of the Sry-type HMG box (Sox) protein family play important roles in embryogenesis as transcription factors. Here, we report that Sox15 transcripts were much more abundant in mouse placenta than in the fetus, the yolk sac, or several adult tissues. In situ hybridization analysis of the mouse E8.0 conceptus indicated that Sox15 mRNA was predominantly expressed in the trophoblast giant cells of the placenta. We also observed that the amount of Sox15 mRNA dramatically increased during the differentiation of mouse trophoblast stem cells. Ectopic expression of Sox15 in Rat choriocarcinoma cells enhanced the giant cell differentiation induced by a bHLH transcription factor, Hand1. Binding experiments in cotransfected 293 T cells and in vitro revealed that Sox15 interacted with Hand1. We next examined the effects of this interaction on the transcriptional activity of Hand1 and Sox15 using the luciferase reporter assay. Overexpression of Hand1 repressed the Sox15-driven reporter expression, but Sox15 enhanced the Hand1-driven transcription. This enhancement required both the Hand1-binding region and the transactivation domain of Sox15. These results may suggest that the increased transcriptional activity of Hand1 caused by Sox15 might promote the transcription of the target gene resulting in the trophoblast giant cell differentiation in the mouse placenta.

  10. From planetesimals to terrestrial planets: N-body simulations including the effects of nebular gas and giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2010-06-01

    We present results from a suite of N-body simulations that follow the formation and accretion history of the terrestrial planets using a new parallel treecode that we have developed. We initially place 2000 equal size planetesimals between 0.5 and 4.0 AU and the collisional growth is followed until the completion of planetary accretion (>100 Myr). A total of 64 simulations were carried out to explore sensitivity to the key parameters and initial conditions. All the important effect of gas in laminar disks are taken into account: the aerodynamic gas drag, the disk-planet interaction including Type I migration, and the global disk potential which causes inward migration of secular resonances as the gas dissipates. We vary the initial total mass and spatial distribution of the planetesimals, the time scale of dissipation of nebular gas (which dissipates uniformly in space and exponentially in time), and orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. We end up with 1-5 planets in the terrestrial region. In order to maintain sufficient mass in this region in the presence of Type I migration, the time scale of gas dissipation needs to be 1-2 Myr. The final configurations and collisional histories strongly depend on the orbital eccentricity of Jupiter. If today's eccentricity of Jupiter is used, then most of bodies in the asteroidal region are swept up within the terrestrial region owing to the inward migration of the secular resonance, and giant impacts between protoplanets occur most commonly around 10 Myr. If the orbital eccentricity of Jupiter is close to zero, as suggested in the Nice model, the effect of the secular resonance is negligible and a large amount of mass stays for a long period of time in the asteroidal region. With a circular orbit for Jupiter, giant impacts usually occur around 100 Myr, consistent with the accretion time scale indicated from isotope records. However, we inevitably have an Earth size planet at around 2 AU in this case. It is very difficult to obtain

  11. Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    Beyond the inner solar system's terrestrial planets, with their compact orbits and rock -metal compositions, lies the realm of the outer solar system and the giant planets. Here the distance between planets jumps by an order of magnitude relative to the spacing of the terrestrial planets, and the masses of the giants are one to two orders of magnitude greater than Venus and Earth - the largest terrestrial bodies. Composition changes as well, since the giant planets are largely gaseous, with inferred admixtures of ice, rock, and metal, while the terrestrial planets are essentially pure rock and metal. The giant planets have many more moons than do the terrestrial planets, and the range of magnetic field strengths is larger in the outer solar system. It is the giant planets that sport rings, ranging from the magnificent ones around Saturn to the variable ring arcs of Neptune. Were it not for the fact that only Earth supports abundant life (with life possibly existing, but not proved to exist, in the martian crust and liquid water regions underneath the ice of Jupiter's moon Europa), the terrestrial planets would pale in interest next to the giant planets for any extraterrestrial visitor.

  12. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  13. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  14. Omental leiomyosarcoma with unusual giant cells in a Beagle dog - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Jun; Toyoshima, Megumi; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Goryo, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    A 10-year-old castrated male Beagle dog was presented with a 2-month history of intermittent vomiting and abdominal pain. The dog was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Iwate University for further evaluation, and a splenic tumour was suspected on the basis of ultrasonography and computed tomography. Surgery identified a large, solid, light-pink mass on the greater omentum with blood-coloured ascites in the abdominal cavity, and resection was performed. Microscopically, the mass comprised spindle-shaped tumour cells and scattered osteoclast-like giant cells. Most spindle-shaped cells were positive for vimentin, desmin, and smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), whereas osteoclast-like giant cells were positive only for vimentin. On the basis of histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of leiomyosarcoma associated with osteoclast-like giant cells developing from the greater omentum in a dog. PMID:27342093

  15. Mediastinal epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with abundant spindle cells and osteoclast-like giant cells mimicking malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a relatively uncommon lesion usually presenting in soft tissues. The occurrence in the mediastinum is exceptional rare. Histologically, this tumor is characterized by epithelioid cells with intracytoplasmic vacuoles in a hyalinized or mucinous stroma. Occasionally, spindle cells or osteoclast-like giant cells can be observed. Herein, we present a case of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma in a 38 year-old Chinese male. The tumor was predominantly composed of abundant spindle cells with marked atypia and scattered osteoclast-like giant cells reminiscent of malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The unusual histological appearance can pose a great diagnostic challenge. It may be easily misdiagnosed, especially if the specimen is limited or from fine-needle aspiration. Virtual slides http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5804918529726307 PMID:23800015

  16. Signet-ring cell lymphoma of T-cell origin. An immunocytochemical and ultrastructural study relating giant vacuole formation to cytoplasmic sequestration of surface membrane.

    PubMed

    Grogan, T M; Richter, L C; Payne, C M; Rangel, C S

    1985-09-01

    In contrast to previous accounts of signet-ring lymphoma as a B-cell neoplasm, we report a case of signet-ring, large-cell lymphoma of T-cell lineage. Immunologic and ultrastructural studies were performed on a subcutaneous mass noted initially, as well as on an enlarged lymph node that developed later, in a 69-year-old man. Immunologic assessment indicated strong expression of T-helper antigen (Leu 3a + b), universal T-antigens (Leu 1, 5), and Ia. There was an absence of T-suppressor/cytotoxic antigen (Leu 2a), universal T-antigens (Leu 4, 9), and immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. Collectively, these findings indicate a mature T-cell lymphoma of T-helper type in an activated (Ia+) state. In contrast to previous reports of T-cell and Ia occurring solely as surface antigens, we demonstrated pools of cytoplasmic Leu 1, 3, 5 and Ia that displaced the nucleus. The ultrastructure of the giant cytoplasmic vacuoles was identical to the microvesicle-containing vacuoles reported in signet-ring cell lymphomas of B-cell lineage. In our case of T-cell lineage, we found substantial evidence of endocytosis by the neoplastic cells and numerous giant multivesicular bodies. The pools of cytoplasmic T and Ia antigens may result from abnormal internalization of surface T-antigens or the sequestration of T-antigen-containing Golgi-derived vesicles. Our combined immunologic and ultrastructural findings suggest that aberrant membrane recycling may be the common denominator of signet-ring formation in both B- and T-cell signet-ring lymphomas.

  17. A solitary fibrous tumor with giant cells in the lacrimal gland: a case study.

    PubMed

    Son, Da Hye; Yoo, Su Hyun; Sa, Ho-Seok; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2013-04-01

    Orbital solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) has recently been proposed as the encompassing terminology for hemangiopericytoma, giant cell angiofibroma (GCAF), and fibrous histiocytoma of the orbit. The lacrimal gland is a very rare location for both SFT and GCAF. A 39-year-old man presented with a painless left upper eyelid mass. An orbital computed tomography scan identified a 1.1 cm-sized well-defined nodule located in the left lacrimal gland. He underwent a mass excision. Histopathologic examination showed a proliferation of relatively uniform spindle cells with a patternless or focally storiform pattern. Dilated vessels were prominent, but angiectoid spaces lined with giant cells were absent. Floret-type giant cells were mostly scattered in the periphery. The tumor was immunoreactive for CD34 and CD99, but negative for smooth muscle actin and S-100 protein. This is the first Korean case of SFT of the lacrimal gland with overlapping features of GCAF, suggesting a close relationship between the two entities.

  18. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bogabathina, Hari; Olson, Peter; Rathi, Vikas K.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient's cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos. PMID:24826266

  19. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  20. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (giant cell type) associated with a malignant mixed tumor in the salivary gland of a dog.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, C; García Fernández, R A; Reyes Avila, L E; Pérez-Pérez, V; González, N; García-Iglesias, M J

    2000-07-01

    A 12-year-old male Boxer dog presented with a 5 x 5 x 7-cm partially encapsulated mass in the right mandibular salivary gland. Histologically, the mass was composed of neoplastic epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The mesenchymal component consisted of two cell populations arranged in different patterns: coalescing nodules of neoplastic mononuclear cells with rare osteoid and numerous osteoclastlike giant cells; and sheets of neoplastic spindle cells intermingled with neoplastic epithelial cells and containing osteoid and well-formed bone trabeculae lined by osteoblasts and few osteoclastlike giant cells. On the basis of these histological features, two malignant salivary tumors were diagnosed: a malignant fibrous histiocytoma (giant cell type) and a malignant mixed tumor. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated keratin 5 and 8 expression by the neoplastic epithelial cells, indicating a probable salivary ductal origin, and vimentin expression by all mesenchymal elements, suggesting a fibroblastic line of differentiation.

  1. CEMENTLESS ENDOPROSTHESIS IN THE TREATMENT OF GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE TIBIA: EIGHTEEN YEARS OF EVOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Glauco Pauka; Sonehara, Helio Ayabe; Neto, Mario Armani

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report on a giant cell tumor of the juxta-articular proximal tibia with a pathological fracture. A female patient presented pain and increased local volume after falling from her own height. She underwent clinical examination, radiographic examination and puncture biopsy. A diagnosis of giant cell tumor was made. The patient was then treated with tumor resection and use of an unconventional partial endoprosthesis of the tibia with preservation of the joint surface of the tibial plateau. The patient evolved with improvement of symptoms and maintenance of joint function of the operated limb, absence of recurrence and complications, without any need for reoperation over 18 years of follow-up. PMID:27026973

  2. Orbital solitary fibrous tumor with multinucleate giant cells: case report of an unusual finding in an uncommon tumor.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm which may occur at any site although it is more frequent in the pleura, mediastinum and lung. Orbital involvement by SFT is uncommon. Giant cells are extremely rare to be seen in a SFT and have been described to be immunoreactive for CD34. We present a case of orbital SFT with multinucleate giant cells expressing CD68 and lacking immunoreactivity for CD34. The differential diagnosis is discussed.

  3. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Chondroid Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Aiad, Hayam; Youssef Asaad, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of tendon sheath is a localized form of tenosynovial GCT, which preferentially affects the joints of hands and feet. Chondroid metaplasia is a rare phenomenon in tenosynovial GCT either in localized or diffuse types. The current case investigates the cytological and histopathological features of chondroid GCT of tendon sheath in a 22-year-old female presenting with wrist swelling. PMID:26266013

  4. Giant oral tumor in a child with malnutrition and sickle cell trait: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preet Mohinder; Borle, Anuradha; Trikha, Anjan

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric oral tumors have always been challenging for the even most skilled anesthesiologists. The conventional method of awake intubation is not realistic in this age group. The management is to chart out a plan to intubate the child post induction. We describe successful management of a case of giant of ossifying fibroma in a child with sickle cell trait where non-conventional innovate approach helped us to secure the airway pre-operatively and avoid possible medical complications. PMID:24106366

  5. Multiple giant cell lesions in a patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Henk; Schreuder, Willem Hans; Jongmans, Marjolijn; van Bommel-Slee, Danielle; Witsenburg, Bart; de Lange, Jan

    2016-08-01

    A patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) and multiple giant cell lesions (MGCL) in mandibles and maxillae is described. A mutation p.Thr468Met in the PTPN11-gene was found. This is the second reported NSML patient with MGCL. Our case adds to the assumption that, despite a different molecular pathogenesis and effect on the RAS/MEK pathway, NSML shares the development of MGCL, with other RASopathies. PMID:27238887

  6. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone in Skeletally Immature Patients - A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vipin; Sharma, Seema; Mistry, Kewal A; Awasthi, Bhanu; Verma, Lucky; Singh, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumors of skeleton are very rare in pediatric and adolescent population. Here we report two cases-one a fifteen year old child with swelling distal humerus and another a case of a thirteen year old child with pain and swelling proximal tibia. Case Report: A fifteen year old child presented to department of orthopedics of our institute with complaint of difficulty in moving upper limb and swelling distal humerus. Another patient who was a 13 years old male had painful ambulation and swelling in upper tibia. MRI followed by core needle biopsy was done in both the patients confirming the mass to be giant cell tumor which is quite rare in this age group. First patient was managed by wide excision and total elbow replacement and second one by curettage, cementation and augmentation with plate-screw construct. Conclusion: Giant cell tumour of skeleton is highly uncommon in pediatric age group. It should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis of epiphyseo metaphyseal lesions in pediatric population in spite of its rarity. PMID:27299101

  7. Giant Cell Tumor of the Patella Tendon Sheath Presenting as a Painful Locked Knee

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tsoumpos, Pantelis; Tatani, Irini; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Papachristou, Dionysios

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: Giant cell tumor of the patella tendon seath Symptoms: Efusion • locking knee • pain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Arthroscopy and open resection of the tumor Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) is a benign proliferative synovial tumor manifesting as an intra-articular solitary nodule. When it involves the infrapatellar fat pad it can present acutely as a painful locked knee. Case Report: A 26-year-old white male presented with a 2-week history of painful locking in his right knee. Clinical examination revealed lack of extension by approximately 20°. To help establish the diagnosis, an MRI scan of the right knee was performed, showing a large (5×4×2 cm), oval, well-circumscribed mass with a low-intensity homogenous signal. The size of the mass prohibited the removal by arthroscopy and we therefore proceeded with an open arthrotomy. Histological examination showed a tendosynovial giant cell tumor of the patella tendon sheath. At the latest follow-up, 2 years postoperatively, there was no local tumor recurrence. Conclusions: These rare tumorous lesions should be included in the differential diagnosis of painful locking knee, especially in the absence of definite traumatic history. PMID:26302970

  8. Two Cases of Sarcoma Arising in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Treated with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Broehm, Cory Julian; Garbrecht, Erika L.; Wood, Jeff; Bocklage, Therese

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a generally benign, but often locally aggressive, neoplasm of bone, with a propensity for recurrence. Sarcomatous transformation is rare and typically occurs with a history of recurrences and radiation treatment. Denosumab, an inhibitor of the RANK ligand involved in bone resorption in GCT, is increasingly used in treatment of recurrent or unresectable giant cell tumor of bone. We report two cases of sarcomatous transformation of GCT to osteosarcoma in patients receiving denosumab. One was a 59-year-old male with a 12-year history of GCT and multiple recurrences taking denosumab for 2.5 years. The second case was in a 56-year-old male with a seven-year history of GCT taking denosumab for six months. Review of the literature shows one case report of malignant transformation of GCT in a patient being treated with denosumab. As the use of denosumab for treatment of GCT will likely increase, larger, controlled studies are needed to ascertain whether denosumab may play a role in malignant transformation of giant cell tumor of bone. PMID:26798348

  9. A Rare Case of a Recurrent Giant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Ciliary Body of the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Singh, Shirley Sundar; Majhi, Urmila; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are uncommon spindle-cell tumors of mesenchymal origin initially described in the pleura and subsequently in other extra-pleural sites. These tumors are categorized as tumors of 'intermediate malignancy' under the World Health Organization classification of soft tissue tumors. SFT was virtually non-existent or misdiagnosed until its characteristic features, particularly the strong and diffuse immuno-reactivity to CD 34 were described. Extra-pleural manifestations of SFT, particularly in the head and neck region are rare. Although a number of isolated case reports of orbital SFTs have been described ever since its initial description in 1994, cases of recurrent SFTs have been very few. Recurrences of these tumors following surgery are considered unusual and metastasis exceptional. We describe clinical presentation and the management challenges of recurrent giant orbital SFT in a 15-year old girl along with a brief review of literature.

  10. A Rare Case of a Recurrent Giant Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Ciliary Body of the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Singh, Shirley Sundar; Majhi, Urmila; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are uncommon spindle-cell tumors of mesenchymal origin initially described in the pleura and subsequently in other extra-pleural sites. These tumors are categorized as tumors of 'intermediate malignancy' under the World Health Organization classification of soft tissue tumors. SFT was virtually non-existent or misdiagnosed until its characteristic features, particularly the strong and diffuse immuno-reactivity to CD 34 were described. Extra-pleural manifestations of SFT, particularly in the head and neck region are rare. Although a number of isolated case reports of orbital SFTs have been described ever since its initial description in 1994, cases of recurrent SFTs have been very few. Recurrences of these tumors following surgery are considered unusual and metastasis exceptional. We describe clinical presentation and the management challenges of recurrent giant orbital SFT in a 15-year old girl along with a brief review of literature. PMID:27408474

  11. Tunable many-body interactions in semiconducting graphene: Giant excitonic effect and strong optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Marc; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    Electronic and optical properties of graphene depend strongly on many-body interactions. Employing the highly accurate many-body perturbation approach based on Green's functions, we find a large renormalization over independent particle methods of the fundamental band gaps of semiconducting graphene structures with periodic defects. Additionally, their exciton binding energies are larger than 0.4 eV, suggesting significantly strengthened electron-electron and electron-hole interactions. Their absorption spectra show two strong peaks whose positions are sensitive to the defect fraction and distribution. The strong near-edge optical absorption and excellent tunability make these two-dimensional materials promising for optoelectronic applications.

  12. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  13. Differentiation of Trophoblast Giant Cells and Their Metabolic Functions Are Dependent on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ

    PubMed Central

    Nadra, Karim; Anghel, Silvia I.; Joye, Elisabeth; Tan, Nguan Soon; Basu-Modak, Sharmila; Trono, Didier; Wahli, Walter; Desvergne, Béatrice

    2006-01-01

    Mutation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) severely affects placenta development, leading to embryonic death at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) to E10.5 of most, but not all, PPARβ/δ-null mutant embryos. While very little is known at present about the pathway governed by PPARβ/δ in the developing placenta, this paper demonstrates that the main alteration of the placenta of PPARβ/δ-null embryos is found in the giant cell layer. PPARβ/δ activity is in fact essential for the differentiation of the Rcho-1 cells in giant cells, as shown by the severe inhibition of differentiation once PPARβ/δ is silenced. Conversely, exposure of Rcho-1 cells to a PPARβ/δ agonist triggers a massive differentiation via increased expression of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 and integrin-linked kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of Akt. The links between PPARβ/δ activity in giant cells and its role on Akt activity are further strengthened by the remarkable pattern of phospho-Akt expression in vivo at E9.5, specifically in the nucleus of the giant cells. In addition to this phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt main pathway, PPARβ/δ also induced giant cell differentiation via increased expression of I-mfa, an inhibitor of Mash-2 activity. Finally, giant cell differentiation at E9.5 is accompanied by a PPARβ/δ-dependent accumulation of lipid droplets and an increased expression of the adipose differentiation-related protein (also called adipophilin), which may participate to lipid metabolism and/or steroidogenesis. Altogether, this important role of PPARβ/δ in placenta development and giant cell differentiation should be considered when contemplating the potency of PPARβ/δ agonist as therapeutic agents of broad application. PMID:16581799

  14. Establishment of three cell lines from Chinese giant salamander and their sensitivities to the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiang-Di; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Huang, Xing; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-06-12

    Known as lethal pathogens, Ranaviruses have been identified in diseased fish, amphibians (including Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus, the world's largest amphibian) and reptiles, causing organ necrosis and systemic hemorrhage. Here, three Chinese giant salamander cell lines, thymus cell line (GSTC), spleen cell line (GSSC) and kidney cell line (GSKC) were initially established. Their sensitivities to ranaviruses, wild-type Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) and recombinant Rana grylio virus carrying EGFP gene (rRGV-EGFP) were tested. Temporal transcription pattern of ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP), fluorescence and electron microscopy observations showed that both the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus could replicate in the cell lines.

  15. The extinct, giant giraffid Sivatherium giganteum: skeletal reconstruction and body mass estimation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sivatherium giganteum is an extinct giraffid from the Plio–Pleistocene boundary of the Himalayan foothills. To date, there has been no rigorous skeletal reconstruction of this unusual mammal. Historical and contemporary accounts anecdotally state that Sivatherium rivalled the African elephant in terms of its body mass, but this statement has never been tested. Here, we present a three-dimensional composite skeletal reconstruction and calculate a representative body mass estimate for this species using a volumetric method. We find that the estimated adult body mass of 1246 kg (857—1812 kg range) does not approach that of an African elephant, but confirms that Sivatherium was certainly a large giraffid, and may have been the largest ruminant mammal that has ever existed. We contrast this volumetric estimate with a bivariate scaling estimate derived from Sivatherium's humeral circumference and find that there is a discrepancy between the two. The difference implies that the humeral circumference of Sivatherium is greater than expected for an animal of this size, and we speculate this may be linked to a cranial shift in centre of mass. PMID:26763212

  16. A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-20

    We describe an updated version of our hybrid N-body-coagulation code for planet formation. In addition to the features of our 2006-2008 code, our treatment now includes algorithms for the one-dimensional evolution of the viscous disk, the accretion of small particles in planetary atmospheres, gas accretion onto massive cores, and the response of N-bodies to the gravitational potential of the gaseous disk and the swarm of planetesimals. To validate the N-body portion of the algorithm, we use a battery of tests in planetary dynamics. As a first application of the complete code, we consider the evolution of Pluto-mass planetesimals in a swarm of 0.1-1 cm pebbles. In a typical evolution time of 1-3 Myr, our calculations transform 0.01-0.1 M{sub sun} disks of gas and dust into planetary systems containing super-Earths, Saturns, and Jupiters. Low-mass planets form more often than massive planets; disks with smaller {alpha} form more massive planets than disks with larger {alpha}. For Jupiter-mass planets, masses of solid cores are 10-100 M{sub +}.

  17. Apoptosis triggered by pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester-mediated photodynamic therapy in a giant cell tumor in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.-T.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Q.-Q.; Bi, Y.; Bai, D.-Q.; Ou, Y.-S.

    2014-06-01

    A giant cell tumor in bone is the common primary bone tumor with aggressive features, occurring mainly in young adults. Photodynamic therapy is a new therapeutic technique for tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of Pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester (MPPa)-mediated photodynamic therapy on the proliferation of giant cell tumor cells and its mechanism of action. Cell proliferation was evaluated using an MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was detected by Hoechst nuclear staining, and flow cytometric assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes and cytochrome c, caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression was assessed. Finally, we found that MPPa-mediated photodynamic therapy could effectively suppress the proliferation of human giant cell tumor cells and induce apoptosis. The mitochondrial pathway was involved in the MPPa-photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis.

  18. Phosphoinositides: Tiny Lipids With Giant Impact on Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) make up only a small fraction of cellular phospholipids, yet they control almost all aspects of a cell's life and death. These lipids gained tremendous research interest as plasma membrane signaling molecules when discovered in the 1970s and 1980s. Research in the last 15 years has added a wide range of biological processes regulated by PIs, turning these lipids into one of the most universal signaling entities in eukaryotic cells. PIs control organelle biology by regulating vesicular trafficking, but they also modulate lipid distribution and metabolism via their close relationship with lipid transfer proteins. PIs regulate ion channels, pumps, and transporters and control both endocytic and exocytic processes. The nuclear phosphoinositides have grown from being an epiphenomenon to a research area of its own. As expected from such pleiotropic regulators, derangements of phosphoinositide metabolism are responsible for a number of human diseases ranging from rare genetic disorders to the most common ones such as cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Moreover, it is increasingly evident that a number of infectious agents hijack the PI regulatory systems of host cells for their intracellular movements, replication, and assembly. As a result, PI converting enzymes began to be noticed by pharmaceutical companies as potential therapeutic targets. This review is an attempt to give an overview of this enormous research field focusing on major developments in diverse areas of basic science linked to cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23899561

  19. Processus and recessus adhaerentes: giant adherens cell junction systems connect and attract human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuchter, Patrick; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Straub, Beate K; Grund, Christine; Kuhn, Caecilia; Krause, Ulf; Seckinger, Anja; Peitsch, Wiebke K; Spring, Herbert; Ho, Anthony D; Franke, Werner W

    2007-06-01

    Substrate-adherent cultured cells derived from human bone marrow or umbilical cord blood ("mesenchymal stem cells") are of special interest for regenerative medicine. We report that such cells, which can display considerable heterogeneity with respect to their cytoskeletal protein complement, are often interconnected by special tentacle-like cell processes contacting one or several other cells. These processus adhaerentes, studded with many (usually small) puncta adhaerentia and varying greatly in length (up to more than 400 microm long), either contact each other in the intercellular space ("ET touches") or insert in a tight-fitting manner into deep plasma membrane invaginations (recessus adhaerentes), thus forming a novel kind of long (up to 50 microm) continuous cuff-like junction (manubria adhaerentia). The cell processes contain an actin microfilament core that is stabilized with ezrin, alpha-actinin, and myosin and accompanied by microtubules, and their adhering junctions are characterized by a molecular complement comprising the transmembrane glycoproteins N-cadherin and cadherin-11, in combination with the cytoplasmic plaque proteins alpha- and beta-catenin, together with p120(ctn), plakoglobin, and afadin. The processes are also highly dynamic and rapidly foreshorten as cell colonies approach a denser state of cell packing. These structures are obviously able to establish cell-cell connections, even over long distances, and can form deep-rooted and tight cell-cell adhesions. The possible relationship to similar cell processes in the embryonic primary mesenchyme and their potential in cell sorting and tissue formation processes in the body are discussed. PMID:17372769

  20. N-BODY SIMULATIONS OF SATELLITE FORMATION AROUND GIANT PLANETS: ORIGIN OF ORBITAL CONFIGURATION OF THE GALILEAN MOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    As the number of discovered extrasolar planets has been increasing, diversity of planetary systems requires studies of new formation scenarios. It is important to study satellite formation in circumplanetary disks, which is often viewed as analogous to formation of rocky planets in protoplanetary disks. We investigated satellite formation from satellitesimals around giant planets through N-body simulations that include gravitational interactions with a circumplanetary gas disk. Our main aim is to reproduce the observable properties of the Galilean satellites around Jupiter through numerical simulations, as previous N-body simulations have not explained the origin of the resonant configuration. We performed accretion simulations based on the work of Sasaki et al., in which an inner cavity is added to the model of Canup and Ward. We found that several satellites are formed and captured in mutual mean motion resonances outside the disk inner edge and are stable after rapid disk gas dissipation, which explains the characteristics of the Galilean satellites. In addition, owing to the existence of the disk edge, a radial compositional gradient of the Galilean satellites can also be reproduced. An additional objective of this study is to discuss orbital properties of formed satellites for a wide range of conditions by considering large uncertainties in model parameters. Through numerical experiments and semianalytical arguments, we determined that if the inner edge of a disk is introduced, a Galilean-like configuration in which several satellites are captured into a 2:1 resonance outside the disk inner cavity is almost universal. In fact, such a configuration is produced even for a massive disk {approx}> 10{sup 4} g cm{sup -2} and rapid type I migration. This result implies the inevitability of a Galilean satellite formation in addition to providing theoretical predictions for extrasolar satellites. That is, we can predict a substantial number of exomoon systems in the 2

  1. A giant cell surface protein in Synechococcus WH8102 inhibits feeding by a dinoflagellate predator.

    PubMed

    Strom, Suzanne L; Brahamsha, Bianca; Fredrickson, Kerri A; Apple, Jude K; Rodríguez, Andres Gutiérrez

    2012-03-01

    Diverse strains of the marine planktonic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. show consistent differences in their susceptibility to predation. We used mutants of Sargasso Sea strain WH8102 (clade III) to test the hypothesis that cell surface proteins play a role in defence against predation by protists. Predation rates by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina on mutants lacking the giant SwmB protein were always higher (by 1.6 to 3.9×) than those on wild-type WH8102 cells, and equalled predation rates on a clade I strain (CC9311). In contrast, absence of the SwmA protein, which comprises the S-layer (surface layer of the cell envelope that is external to the outer membrane), had no effect on predation by O. marina. Reductions in predation rate were not due to dissolved substances in Synechococcus cultures, and could not be accounted for by variations in cell hydrophobicity. We hypothesize that SwmB defends Synechococcus WH8102 by interfering with attachment of dinoflagellate prey capture organelles or cell surface receptors. Giant proteins are predicted in the genomes of multiple Synechococcus isolates, suggesting that this defence strategy may be more general. Strategies for resisting predation will contribute to the differential competitive success of different Synechococcus groups, and to the diversity of natural picophytoplankton assemblages.

  2. A giant cell surface protein in Synechococcus WH8102 inhibits feeding by a dinoflagellate predator.

    PubMed

    Strom, Suzanne L; Brahamsha, Bianca; Fredrickson, Kerri A; Apple, Jude K; Rodríguez, Andres Gutiérrez

    2012-03-01

    Diverse strains of the marine planktonic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. show consistent differences in their susceptibility to predation. We used mutants of Sargasso Sea strain WH8102 (clade III) to test the hypothesis that cell surface proteins play a role in defence against predation by protists. Predation rates by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina on mutants lacking the giant SwmB protein were always higher (by 1.6 to 3.9×) than those on wild-type WH8102 cells, and equalled predation rates on a clade I strain (CC9311). In contrast, absence of the SwmA protein, which comprises the S-layer (surface layer of the cell envelope that is external to the outer membrane), had no effect on predation by O. marina. Reductions in predation rate were not due to dissolved substances in Synechococcus cultures, and could not be accounted for by variations in cell hydrophobicity. We hypothesize that SwmB defends Synechococcus WH8102 by interfering with attachment of dinoflagellate prey capture organelles or cell surface receptors. Giant proteins are predicted in the genomes of multiple Synechococcus isolates, suggesting that this defence strategy may be more general. Strategies for resisting predation will contribute to the differential competitive success of different Synechococcus groups, and to the diversity of natural picophytoplankton assemblages. PMID:22103339

  3. Effective use of gemcitabine in the treatment of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of the pancreas with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Masato; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Go; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Nakagawa, Yasuhiko; Andoh, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2012-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman had an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCWOGC) in the body of the pancreas with massive portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT). Because the PVTT progressed so rapidly into the right portal branch, the patient first underwent distal pancreatectomy and tumor thrombectomy to prevent life-threatening portal venous obstruction. Although a recurrent PVTT had developed early postoperatively, systemic gemcitabine treatment was so effective that it induced complete remission 5 months after the initiation of chemotherapy. The patient continued to be in complete response for 12 months, and has survived for 19 months since surgery. PMID:22892493

  4. Rapidly growing giant cell tumor of bone in a skeletally immature girl.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Gensuke; Ueno, Teruko; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Motoi, Noriko; Matsueda, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) in skeletally immature patients is rare, and little is known regarding how fast GCTB can grow. We report a case of a 10-year-old skeletally immature girl with pathologically proven GCTB with obvious growth plate invasion that showed surprisingly rapid growth over only 14 days. A radiograph of the left knee revealed well-circumscribed, geographic bone destruction at the distal metaphysis of the femur with a focal cortical defect, suggesting a pathologic fracture. No abnormal mineralization or periosteal reaction was seen. A CT without contrast and an MRI demonstrated a homogeneous lesion with cortical disruption posteriorly and laterally with a slight soft tissue extension. Biopsy showed numerous multinucleated giant cells and spindle-shaped mononuclear cells without any sign of malignancy, suggesting GCTB. However, rapid lesion enlargement and destruction of the surrounding cortex were noted 14 days after biopsy. Considering the amount of bone destruction, traditional treatment of curettage and bone cement would not suffice to sustain structural strength. In addition, considering the patient's age, the tumor location, and the aggressive course, a malignant tumor, especially a giant cell-rich osteosarcoma, could not be excluded. Therefore, en bloc resection, including the growth plate and prosthetic replacement, were performed. Confirmation of GCTB was made from a pathologic evaluation, and a breach to the growth plate was identified. Since very little inflammatory reaction, degenerative change, or aneurysmal, bone, cyst-like change was found, the growth plate invasion was confirmed as due to GCTB extension, not due to the preoperative biopsy.

  5. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment.

  6. The plant cell inhibitor KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and cytokinesis disruption in giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Paulo; Engler, Janice de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The plant cell cycle inhibitor gene KRP6 has been investigated in roots infected by plant-parasitic root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Unexpectedly, KRP6 overexpressing lines revealed a distinct role for this specific KRP as an activator of the mitotic cell cycle. This function was confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures ectopically expressing KRP6. A blockage in the mitotic exit was observed in cell suspensions and in giant cells resulted in the appearance of multi-nucleated cells. KRP6 expression during nematode infection and the similarity in phenotypes among KRP6 overexpressing cell cultures and giant-cell morphology strongly suggest that KRP6 is involved in multinucleation and acytokinesis occurring in giant-cells. Once again nematodes have been shown to manipulate the plant cell cycle machinery in order to promote gall establishment. PMID:25915833

  7. Primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed after surgical ablation of a costal mass mistaken for giant-cell bone tumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels, which cause continuous osteoclastic bone resorption. Giant cell tumor of bone is an expansile osteolytic tumor that contains numerous osteoclast-like giant cells. There are many similarities in the radiological and histological features of giant cell tumor of bone and brown tumor. This is a rare benign focal osteolytic process most commonly caused by hyperparathyroidism. Case presentation We report the unusual case of a 40-year-old Caucasian woman in which primary hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed after surgical ablation of a costal mass. The mass was suspected of being neoplastic and histopathology was compatible with a giant cell tumor of bone. On the basis of the biochemical results (including serum calcium, phosphorous and intact parathyroid hormone levels) primary hyperparathyroidism was suspected and a brown tumor secondary to refractory hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed. Conclusions Since giant cell tumor is a bone neoplasm that has major implications for the patient, the standard laboratory tests in patients with bone lesions are important for a correct diagnosis. PMID:22204520

  8. Orthopedic and orthodontic treatment in central giant cell granuloma treated with calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Romero, Martín; Romance, Ana; Garcia-Recuero, José Ismael; Fernández, Álvaro

    2011-09-01

    Central giant cell granuloma of the jaw is a benign lesion of unknown etiology that occurs with very low frequency. It mainly occurs in children and young adults and is more common in the mandible. The most common treatment is surgical removal; however, alternative therapies (intralesional injections of corticosteroids, interferon alpha, and calcitonin) have been used in order to avoid undesirable damage to the jaws and teeth. The lesion may cause root resorption, tooth germ displacement, and other dental problems, as well as malocclusion that must be treated orthodontically. The orthodontic, orthopedic, and calcitonin-based treatments of one of these cases is presented.

  9. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  10. Late ipsilateral recurrence of ischemic optic neuropathy in giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nancy; Trobe, Jonathan D; Flint, Andrew; Keoleian, Gary

    2003-06-01

    A patient with arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and giant cell arteritis (GCA) treated continuously with low-dose prednisone developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) at 5 and 13 months after clinical diagnosis of GCA. At the time of late recurrent AION, there were no systemic symptoms or elevations in acute phase reactants to signal active arteritis, yet temporal artery biopsy disclosed dramatic inflammation, forcing the presumption that the infarct was arteritic. Recurrent systemic symptoms and elevation of acute phase reactants are not reliable warning signs of reactivated GCA. In patients at high risk for corticosteroid complications, late biopsy may be a reasonable guide to corticosteroid weaning.

  11. Orthopedic and orthodontic treatment in central giant cell granuloma treated with calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Romero, Martín; Romance, Ana; Garcia-Recuero, José Ismael; Fernández, Álvaro

    2011-09-01

    Central giant cell granuloma of the jaw is a benign lesion of unknown etiology that occurs with very low frequency. It mainly occurs in children and young adults and is more common in the mandible. The most common treatment is surgical removal; however, alternative therapies (intralesional injections of corticosteroids, interferon alpha, and calcitonin) have been used in order to avoid undesirable damage to the jaws and teeth. The lesion may cause root resorption, tooth germ displacement, and other dental problems, as well as malocclusion that must be treated orthodontically. The orthodontic, orthopedic, and calcitonin-based treatments of one of these cases is presented. PMID:20815718

  12. Giant cell tumor of the upper cervical spine: transmandibular-translingual access. Clinical case.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, M; Bandiera, S; Gasbarrini, A; De Iure, F; Barbanti Bròdano, G; Scimeca, G B; Presutti, L; Cocchi, R; Boriani, S

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical case of a patient aged 18 years affected with giant cell tumor (GCT) at C3 who came to the surgical unit of Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Ospedale Maggiore in Bologna after being treated by surgery elsewhere. Particular attention is paid to surgical access by means of median transmandibuloglossotomy used in order to obtain a sufficiently wide surgical field that can adequately expose the vertebral segment affected by neoplastic disease. In particular, possible complications that may be observed postsurgery can be compared to other surgical approaches to the upper cervical spine and above all that there are no permanent clinical sequelae.

  13. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  15. Fatal recurrence of fulminant giant cell myocarditis and recovery after initialisation of an alternative immunosuppressive regime

    PubMed Central

    Fluschnik, Nina; Escher, Felicitas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Westermann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We report on a challenging case of a 34-year-old male patient with giant cell myocarditis (GCM) and fulminant relapse after discontinuing immunomodulatory therapy 2 years after the initial event. Specific combined immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin (ATG), cyclosporine and high-dose glucocorticoids combined with guideline-based heart failure medication led to the recovery of GCM, improvement of systolic left ventricular function and clinical remission. This case report emphasises the importance of an immunosuppressive therapy for the prognosis and outcome and the risk of discontinuation. Most importantly, ATG seems to be one new possible potential treatment option for patients with acute GCM. PMID:25246472

  16. Peptidergic modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of the squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of a range of neuropeptides were investigated on the membrane potential of the Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the tropical squid. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produced a dose-dependent, long-lasting hyperpolarization of the Schwann-cell membrane potential. Among peptides structurally related to VIP, similar effects were produced by peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) but not by secretin and glucagon. Substance P and somatostatin also hyperpolarized the Schwann-cell membrane potential but via receptor systems distinct from those activated by VIP. Methionine enkephalin ([Met]-enkephalin) blocked the actions of all the above peptides as well as the effects of DL-octopamine and carbachol. The actions of [Met]-enkephalin upon the VIP responses were antagonized by naloxone. VIP produces its effects on the Schwann-cell membrane potential via a receptor system that is independent from those described previously which mediate the effects of carbachol and DL-octopamine. However, VIP can potentiate the effects of the latter systems. The actions of VIP on the Schwann cell are unlikely to be mediated via changes in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels and are insensitive to changes in the level of extracellular calcium in the superfusate. The actions of VIP are, however, potentiated in the presence of low concentrations of lithium ions suggesting that the VIP receptor may mediate its effects by inducing the hydrolysis of polyphosphatidylinositols in the Schwann-cell membrane. Evidence is presented for the existence of an endogenous VIP-like component in the normal hyperpolarizing action of giant-axon activity on the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. PMID:2435897

  17. Binucleate trophoblast giant cells in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) placenta.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A F; Klisch, K; Miglino, M A; Pereira, F T V; Bevilacqua, E

    2006-01-01

    The binucleate trophoblast giant cells (BNC) of the water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, placenta were studied, with emphasis on the synthesis of BNC-specific proteins. Placentomal tissues of 27 water buffalos (2-10 months of pregnancy) were processed for light and electron microscopy. The frequency of BNCs was 20% of the trophoblastic cells in 2-3-month placentas and increased to 27% in the later stages. Ultrastructurally, binucleate cells displayed a prominent granular endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, typical of cells involved with protein synthesis and exportation. The buffalo BNCs contained periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive granules and reacted with antisera against bovine placental lactogen, prolactin-related protein-I, and pregnancy-associated glycoproteins. Lectin histochemistry with Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, Vicia villosa agglutinin, and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin showed specific staining of BNCs. Different stages of BNC migration and fusion with uterine epithelial cells were observed. Trinucleate feto-maternal hybrid cells were the typical outcome of cell fusions. These cells underwent degeneration, with typical morphological features of apoptosis. The results revealed a strong homology between water buffalo and cattle BNCs concerning cell morphology, protein expression, glycosylation pattern, and characteristics of cell migration and fusion.

  18. CTCFL (BORIS) mRNA Expression in a Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano-Galván, Graciela; Reyes-Romero, Miguel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Almeda-Ojeda, Oscar Eduardo; Lemus-Rojero, Obed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a relatively common benign reactive lesion of the oral cavity which can occur at any age. CTCFL/BORIS (CTCF like/Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites) and CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) are paralogous genes with an important role in the regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and nuclear chromatin insulators regulation. BORIS expression promotes cell immortalization and growth while CTCF has tumor suppressor activity; the expression pattern may reflect the reverse transcription silencing of BORIS. The aim of this work was to describe a histopathological and molecular approach of an 8-year-old pediatric male patient with PGCG diagnosis. It was observed that the PGCG under study expressed CTCF as well as BORIS mRNAs alongside with the housekeeping gene GAPDH, which may be related to possible genetic and epigenetic changes in normal cells of oral cavity. PMID:25114808

  19. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro.

  20. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W.; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro. PMID:26375397

  1. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Stimulates the Proliferation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Yu-Liang; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Ge, Wei; Wang, Yong-Yong; Dyce, Paul W; Hou, Rong; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely known that the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most endangered species in the world. An optimized platform for maintaining the proliferation of giant panda mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is very necessary for current giant panda protection strategies. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a member of the FGF family, is widely considered as a growth factor and differentiation inducer within the stem cell research field. However, the role of bFGF on promoting the proliferation of MSCs derived from giant panda bone marrow (BM) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of bFGF on the proliferation of BM-MSCs derived from giant panda. MSCs were cultured for cell proliferation analysis at 24, 48 and 72 hrs following the addition of bFGF. With increasing concentrations of bFGF, cell numbers gradually increased. This was further demonstrated by performing 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) labeling and cell cycle testing. Furthermore, the percentage of MSCs that were OCT4 positive increased slightly following treatment with 5 ng/ml bFGF. Moreover, we demonstrated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway may play an important role in the proliferation of panda MSCs stimulated by bFGF. In conclusion, this study suggests that giant panda BM-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity with the addition of 5 ng/ml bFGF in vitro. PMID:26375397

  2. Giant cell arteritis: the importance of immediate and appropriate diagnosis and treatment for better prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Fernanda; Mazzeo, Francesco; Giorgi, Dario; Cerutti, Francesco; Impallara, David; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Soldini, Maurizio; Pacella, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the case of a 68-year-old patient suffering from giant cell arteritis (also known as Horton’s arteritis or temporal arteritis). The patient came to our attention due to a large and sudden visual loss caused by the occlusion of major retinal arteries. The patient had neuralgic pain in the face. The next day, for a thorough examination, the patient went to the day hospital with a further worsening of the visual loss which required immediate admission to the ophthalmological ward for hospitalization lasting 10 days. During the observation period it was difficult to make an instant diagnosis due to the absence of clinical signs or diagnostic tests for Horton’s arteritis. Only after the third day of hospitalization, when corticosteroid therapy was undertaken following the appearance of significant systemic symptoms, did the patient begin to show a gradual improvement in overall clinical status. The case highlights the difficulty in making a rapid diagnosis of giant cell arteritis and the efficacy of early steroid therapy in this vascular autoimmune disease that otherwise may result in irreversible functional and debilitating systemic damage. PMID:22791971

  3. Giant cell arteritis: the importance of immediate and appropriate diagnosis and treatment for better prognosis.

    PubMed

    Pacella, Fernanda; Mazzeo, Francesco; Giorgi, Dario; Cerutti, Francesco; Impallara, David; Cuozzo, Giovanni; Soldini, Maurizio; Pacella, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the case of a 68-year-old patient suffering from giant cell arteritis (also known as Horton's arteritis or temporal arteritis). The patient came to our attention due to a large and sudden visual loss caused by the occlusion of major retinal arteries. The patient had neuralgic pain in the face. The next day, for a thorough examination, the patient went to the day hospital with a further worsening of the visual loss which required immediate admission to the ophthalmological ward for hospitalization lasting 10 days. During the observation period it was difficult to make an instant diagnosis due to the absence of clinical signs or diagnostic tests for Horton's arteritis. Only after the third day of hospitalization, when corticosteroid therapy was undertaken following the appearance of significant systemic symptoms, did the patient begin to show a gradual improvement in overall clinical status. The case highlights the difficulty in making a rapid diagnosis of giant cell arteritis and the efficacy of early steroid therapy in this vascular autoimmune disease that otherwise may result in irreversible functional and debilitating systemic damage. PMID:22791971

  4. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a 15-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Mukae, Hiroshi; Nagata, Towako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kaida, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Suematsu, Takashi; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2002-11-01

    Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) is a very uncommon respiratory disease. We report a juvenile patient with GIP aged 15 years. Although he has a negative past history of direct exposure to hard metals, we could not exclude possible exposure in very small amounts through his parents. Microscopic examination of lung biopsy specimen obtained by video-assisted thoracoscopy revealed marked cellular interstitial infiltrates and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells showing cellular cannibalism. Analysis of the biopsied lung tissue for cobalt and tungsten was negative. Clinical symptoms, laboratory, and radiological findings improved markedly after treatment with corticosteroids. To our knowledge, only eleven cases of GIP have been reported in Japan. Although possible exposure to hard metals was identified in 9 of the 11 reported cases, there is no clear dose-dependent relationship with onset and prognosis. The average age at onset was 46.2+/-15.0 years. Our patient is the youngest case of GIP reported in the world. PMID:12487179

  5. [Failure of initial surgical treatment of a giant cell tumor of the capitate and its salvage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Moreel, P; Le Viet, D

    2006-12-01

    Giant Cell Tumors are rare tumors in the young adult and localisation in the hand is even more exceptional. In the absence of adjuvant treatment, the literature reports a strong potential for local recurrence of between 75 and 86%. These tumours also have a risk of sarcomatosis degeneration and pulmonary metastasis. The case report concerns a 24-year-old patient, with a Giant Cell Tumour of the capitate initially diagnosed on simple curettage, and we describe her treatment together with the treatment of a subsequent reccurrence. A literature review will also highlight the current knowledge of this disease.

  6. Multiple Giant Cell Tumors of Tendon Sheath Found within a Single Digit of a 9-Year-Old

    PubMed Central

    Fitzhugh, Valerie A.; Gibson, Peter D.; Didesch, Jacob; Ahmed, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is one of the most common soft tissue tumors of the hand. These tumors typically occur in the third or fourth decade of life and present as solitary nodules on a single digit. Currently, the greatest reported number of lesions found within a single digit is five. Although uncommon, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath does occur in the pediatric population. Herein we present a report of a rare case of GCTTS in a child in which seven lesions were identified within a single digit—the greatest number of lesions within a single digit reported to date. PMID:27595029

  7. Roe Protein Hydrolysates of Giant Grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) Inhibit Cell Proliferation of Oral Cancer Cells Involving Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Tang, Jen-Yang; Liu, Ya-Sin; Wang, Hui-Ru; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Yen, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Roe protein hydrolysates were reported to have antioxidant property but the anticancer effects were less addressed, especially for oral cancer. In this study, we firstly used the ultrafiltrated roe hydrolysates (URH) derived from giant grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus) to evaluate the impact of URH on proliferation against oral cancer cells. We found that URH dose-responsively reduced cell viability of two oral cancer cells (Ca9-22 and CAL 27) in terms of ATP assay. Using flow cytometry, URH-induced apoptosis of Ca9-22 cells was validated by morphological features of apoptosis, sub-G1 accumulation, and annexin V staining in dose-responsive manners. URH also induced oxidative stress in Ca9-22 cells in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/superoxide generations and mitochondrial depolarization. Taken together, these data suggest that URH is a potential natural product for antioral cancer therapy. PMID:27195297

  8. Early transcriptomic events in microdissected Arabidopsis nematode-induced giant cells.

    PubMed

    Barcala, Marta; García, Alejandra; Cabrera, Javier; Casson, Stuart; Lindsey, Keith; Favery, Bruno; García-Casado, Gloria; Solano, Roberto; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2010-02-01

    Root-knot nematodes differentiate highly specialized feeding cells in roots (giant cells, GCs), through poorly characterized mechanisms that include extensive transcriptional changes. While global transcriptome analyses have used galls, which are complex root structures that include GCs and surrounding tissues, no global gene expression changes specific to GCs have been described. We report on the differential transcriptome of GCs versus root vascular cells, induced in Arabidopsis by Meloidogyne javanica at a very early stage of their development, 3 days after infection (d.p.i.). Laser microdissection was used to capture GCs and root vascular cells for microarray analysis, which was validated through qPCR and by a promoter-GUS fusion study. Results show that by 3 d.p.i., GCs exhibit major gene repression. Although some genes showed similar regulation in both galls and GCs, the majority had different expression patterns, confirming the molecular distinctiveness of the GCs within the gall. Most of the differentially regulated genes in GCs have no previously assigned function. Comparisons with other transcriptome analyses revealed similarities between GCs and cell suspensions differentiating into xylem cells. This suggests a molecular link between GCs and developing vascular cells, which represent putative GC stem cells. Gene expression in GCs at 3 d.p.i. was also found to be similar to crown galls induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a specialized root biotroph. PMID:20003167

  9. Giant-cell interstitial pneumonia and hard-metal pneumoconiosis. A clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, N.P.; Sciurba, F.C.; Owens, G.R.; Hodgson, M.J.; Yousem, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    We report four cases of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia that occurred in association with exposure to hard metals. All patients presented with chronic interstitial lung disease and had open-lung biopsies that revealed marked interstitial fibrosis, cellular interstitial infiltrates, and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells displaying cellular cannibalism. We also review the literature to determine the sensitivity and specificity of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia for hard-metal pneumoconiosis. Although hard-metal pneumoconiosis may take the form of usual interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and giant-cell interstitial pneumonia, the finding of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia is almost pathognomonic of hard-metal disease and should provoke an investigation of occupational exposure. 25 references.

  10. Giant Host Red Blood Cell Membrane Mimicking Polymersomes Bind Parasite Proteins and Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Thamboo, Sagana; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that needs to be addressed using innovative approaches to counteract spread of drug resistance and to establish or optimize vaccination strategies. With our approach, we aim for a dual action with drug- and 'vaccine-like' activity against malaria. By inhibiting entry of malaria parasites into host red blood cells (RBCs) - using polymer vesicle-based (polymersome) nanomimics of RBC membranes - the life cycle of the parasite is interrupted and the exposed parasites are accessible to the host immune system. Here, we describe how host cell-sized RBC membrane mimics, formed with the same block copolymers as nanomimics, also bind the corresponding malaria parasite ligand and whole malaria parasites, similar to nanomimics. This was demonstrated using fluorescence imaging techniques and confirms the suitability of giant polymersomes (GUVs) as simple mimics for RBC membranes.

  11. A Giant Intra Abdominal Mass Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Presentation of Renal Angiomyolipoma.

    PubMed

    Haque, M E; Rahman, M A; Kaisar, I; Islam, M F; Salam, M A

    2016-07-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign tumor commonly found in kidney than extra renal sites. Most of the small renal angiomyolipomas are diagnosed incidentally on ultrasound and other imaging studies. Some renal AMLs present clinically when become very big, giant renal angiomyolipoma. Although almost all cases are benign, a relatively rare variant of epitheloid angiomyolipoma has got malignant potential and can even metastasize. Ultrasonography, CT and MRI scan are usually used for diagnosis of angiomyolipoma with high level of accuracy; even though some lesions may be confused as renal cell carcinoma on imaging studies. Here, a 48 year old man presented with a large intra-abdominal mass preoperatively diagnosed as a case of right renal cell carcinoma and radical nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology revealed epitheloid angiomyolipoma (EAML). PMID:27612907

  12. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  13. Protein Expression Profiling of Giant Cell Tumors of Bone Treated with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Mukaihara, Kenta; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Kohsaka, Shinji; Akaike, Keisuke; Tanabe, Yu; Kubota, Daisuke; Ishii, Midori; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Okubo, Taketo; Takagi, Tatsuya; Yao, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are locally aggressive osteolytic bone tumors. Recently, some clinical trials have shown that denosumab is a novel and effective therapeutic option for aggressive and recurrent GCTB. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of denosumab. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed using GCTB samples which were taken before and after denosumab treatment. Each expression profile was analyzed using the software program to further understand the affected biological network. One of identified proteins was further evaluated by gelatin zymography and an immunohistochemical analysis. We identified 13 consistently upregulated proteins and 19 consistently downregulated proteins in the pre- and post-denosumab samples. Using these profiles, the software program identified molecular interactions between the differentially expressed proteins that were indirectly involved in the RANK/RANKL pathway and in several non-canonical subpathways including the Matrix metalloproteinase pathway. The data analysis also suggested that the identified proteins play a critical functional role in the osteolytic process of GCTB. Among the most downregulated proteins, the activity of MMP-9 was significantly decreased in the denosumab-treated samples, although the residual stromal cells were found to express MMP-9 by an immunohistochemical analysis. The expression level of MMP-9 in the primary GCTB samples was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors, including patient outcomes. Although the replacement of tumors by fibro-osseous tissue or the diminishment of osteoclast-like giant cells have been shown as therapeutic effects of denosumab, the residual tumor after denosumab treatment, which is composed of only stromal cells, might be capable of causing bone destruction; thus the therapeutic application of denosumab would be still necessary for these lesions. We believe that the protein expression

  14. Lethal (2) giant larvae: an indispensable regulator of cell polarity and cancer development.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Miao, Yi; Xu, Kedong; Liu, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Cell polarity is one of the most basic properties of all normal cells and is essential for regulating numerous biological processes. Loss of polarity is considered a hallmark for cancer. Multiple polarity proteins are implicated in maintenance of cell polarity. Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl) is one of polarity proteins that plays an important role in regulating cell polarity, asymmetric division as well as tumorigenesis. Lgl proteins in different species have similar structures and conserved functions. Lgl acts as an indispensable regulator of cell biological function, including cell polarity and asymmetric division, through interplaying with other polarity proteins, regulating exocytosis, mediating cytoskeleton and being involved in signaling pathways. Furthermore, Lgl plays a role of a tumor suppressor, and the aberrant expression of Hugl, a human homologue of Lgl, contributes to multiple cancers. However, the exact functions of Lgl and the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. In this review, we will give an overview of the Lgl functions in cell polarity and cancer development, discuss the potential mechanisms underlying these functions, and raise our conclusion of previous studies and points of view about the future studies.

  15. Differentiation of trophoblast stem cells into giant cells is triggered by p57/Kip2 inhibition of CDK1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Zakir; Kohn, Matthew J.; Yagi, Rieko; Vassilev, Lyubomir T.; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2008-01-01

    Genome endoreduplication during mammalian development is a rare event for which the mechanism is unknown. It first appears when fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) deprivation induces differentiation of trophoblast stem (TS) cells into the nonproliferating trophoblast giant (TG) cells required for embryo implantation. Here we show that RO3306 inhibition of cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1), the enzyme required to enter mitosis, induced differentiation of TS cells into TG cells. In contrast, RO3306 induced abortive endoreduplication and apoptosis in embryonic stem cells, revealing that inactivation of CDK1 triggers endoreduplication only in cells programmed to differentiate into polyploid cells. Similarly, FGF4 deprivation resulted in CDK1 inhibition by overexpressing two CDK-specific inhibitors, p57/KIP2 and p21/CIP1. TS cell mutants revealed that p57 was required to trigger endoreduplication by inhibiting CDK1, while p21 suppressed expression of the checkpoint protein kinase CHK1, thereby preventing induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, Cdk2−/− TS cells revealed that CDK2 is required for endoreduplication when CDK1 is inhibited. Expression of p57 in TG cells was restricted to G-phase nuclei to allow CDK activation of S phase. Thus, endoreduplication in TS cells is triggered by p57 inhibition of CDK1 with concomitant suppression of the DNA damage response by p21. PMID:18981479

  16. Inactivation of the MAPK signaling pathway by Listeria monocytogenes infection promotes trophoblast giant cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hashino, Masanori; Tachibana, Masato; Nishida, Takashi; Hara, Hideki; Tsuchiya, Kohsuke; Mitsuyama, Masao; Watanabe, Kenta; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has a well-characterized ability to cross the placental barrier, resulting in spontaneous abortion and fetal infections. However, the mechanisms resulting in infection-associated abortion are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the dephosphorylation of MAPK family proteins caused by L. monocytogenes infection of trophoblast giant (TG) cells, which are placental immune cells, contributes to infectious abortion. Dephosphorylation of c-Jun, p38, and ERK1/2 was observed in infected TG cells, causing the downregulation of cytoprotective heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Blocking the dephosphorylation of proteins, including MAPK family proteins, inhibited the decrease in HO-1 expression. Treatment with MAPK inhibitors inhibited bacterial internalization into TG cells. Moreover, Toll-like receptor 2 involved in the expression of MAPK family proteins. Infection with a listeriolysin O-deleted mutant impaired dephosphorylation of MAPK family proteins in TG cells and did not induce infectious abortion in a mouse model. These results suggest that inactivation of the MAPK pathway by L. monocytogenes induces TG cell death and causes infectious abortion. PMID:26528279

  17. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base.

  18. Metacarpal resection with a contoured iliac bone graft and silicone rubber implant for metacarpal giant cell tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carlow, S B; Khuri, S M

    1985-03-01

    A definitive surgical procedure for a giant cell tumor that combines metacarpal resection with an iliac bone graft and arthroplasty with a silicone rubber implant is proposed for the elderly patient. The results were encouraging in one patient who had a cosmetically and functionally acceptable hand and no evidence of recurrence.

  19. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  20. Surgical treatment of multifocal giant cell tumor of carpal bones with preservation of wrist function: case report.

    PubMed

    Tarng, Yih-Wen; Yang, Shan-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Jen

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of multifocal giant cell tumor of bone involving the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and scaphoid with soft tissue extension. Following intralesional resection, an autogenous corticocancellous iliac crest bone graft was used to fill the resultant defect and preserve carpal height and radiocarpal motion. Successful union with no recurrence was noted at 1-year follow-up.

  1. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a hard-metal worker. Cytologic, histologic and analytical electron microscopic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatowski, K.; Roggli, V.L.; Fulkerson, W.J.; Langley, R.L.; Benning, T.; Johnston, W.W.

    1988-03-01

    A case of biopsy-proven giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a patient with occupational exposure to hard-metal dust is reported. Bronchial washings performed several days prior to open-lung biopsy yielded an almost exclusive population of nonpigmented alveolar macrophages and pleomorphic, phagocytic multinucleated giant cells. Microorganisms, viral inclusions in the giant cells, epithelioid histiocytes and well-formed granulomas were not seen. This cytologic picture strongly suggests the presence of giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a patient with restrictive lung disease, particularly when exposure to hard-metal dust is known or suspected. A specific diagnosis early in the course of the disease may facilitate removal of the individual from the workplace and forestall the development of end-stage interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, the working environment may be modified to minimize inhalational exposure. Recognition of this entity by the cytopathologist may direct diagnostic efforts toward accurate histologic evaluation and the identification of particulates by microprobe analysis of either cellular or biopsy material.

  2. Introducing micrometer-sized artificial objects into live cells: a method for cell-giant unilamellar vesicle electrofusion.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira C; Ogura, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Kei; Murata, Satoshi; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC) field to induce a linear cell-GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC) pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami) into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines) in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation.

  3. The role of functional variability in a whole body co-ordinated movement - Application to high bar giant circles.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Michael J; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2016-10-01

    When performing a giant circle on high bar a gymnast flexes at the hips in the lower part of the circle, increasing the kinetic energy, and extends in the upper part of the circle, decreasing the kinetic energy. In order to perform a sequence of giant circles at even tempo, any variation in angular velocity at the end of the flexion phase needs to be reduced by the end of the extension phase. The aim of this study was to determine the nature and contribution of such adjustments. A computer simulation model of a gymnast performing giant circles on high bar was used to investigate strategies of (a) fixed timing of the extension phase (feedforward control) and (b) stretched timing in order to extend at the same point of the giant circle (feedforward with additional feedback control). For three elite gymnasts fixed timing reduced the angular velocity variation on average by 36% whereas stretched timing reduced the variation by 63%. The mean reduction for the actual gymnast techniques was 61%. It was concluded that both feedforward and feedback control strategies are used by gymnasts for controlling such movements.

  4. The role of cyclic nucleotides in modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1985-01-01

    The role of cyclic nucleotides in mediating the effects of nicotine cholinergic receptors has been investigated in Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the squid. Elevation of cyclic AMP levels in this preparation by means of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, by the diterpene adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and by cyclic nucleotide analogues mimics the action of activating the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in producing a long-lasting hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. Theophylline and forskolin also potentiate the effects of carbachol and of neural stimulation on the Schwann cell. The results suggest that the nicotinic receptor of the squid Schwann cell is likely to mediate its effects via a mechanism that activates adenylate cyclase. The results are discussed in terms of the role of cyclic AMP in the complex multistep interaction between the giant axon of the squid and its surrounding Schwann-cell layer. PMID:2991504

  5. The role of cyclic nucleotides in modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1985-06-01

    The role of cyclic nucleotides in mediating the effects of nicotine cholinergic receptors has been investigated in Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the squid. Elevation of cyclic AMP levels in this preparation by means of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, by the diterpene adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and by cyclic nucleotide analogues mimics the action of activating the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in producing a long-lasting hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. Theophylline and forskolin also potentiate the effects of carbachol and of neural stimulation on the Schwann cell. The results suggest that the nicotinic receptor of the squid Schwann cell is likely to mediate its effects via a mechanism that activates adenylate cyclase. The results are discussed in terms of the role of cyclic AMP in the complex multistep interaction between the giant axon of the squid and its surrounding Schwann-cell layer.

  6. Modern Interpretation of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Predominantly Osteoclastogenic Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Nizami, Saqib; Goto, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Owing to striking features of numerous multinucleated cells and bone destruction, giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone, often called as osteoclastoma, has drawn major attractions from orthopaedic surgeons, pathologists, and radiologists. The name GCT or osteoclastoma gives a false impression of a tumor comprising of proliferating osteoclasts or osteoclast precursors. The underlying mechanisms for excessive osteoclastogenesis are intriguing and GCT has served as an exciting disease model representing a paradigm of osteoclastogenesis for bone biologists. The modern interpretation of GCT is predominantly osteoclastogenic stromal cell tumors of mesenchymal origin. A diverse array of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines disrupts osteoblastic differentiation and promotes the formation of excessive multi-nucleated osteoclastic cells. Pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines such as receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as well as monocyte-recruiting chemokines such as stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 participate in unfavorable osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction. This model represents a self-sufficient osteoclastogenic paracrine loop in a localized area. Consistent with this paradigm, a recombinant RANK-Fc protein and bisphosphonates are currently being tried for GCT treatment in addition to surgical excision and conventional topical adjuvant therapies. PMID:22662295

  7. Cytoplasmic localization of p21 protects trophoblast giant cells from DNA damage induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    de Renty, Christelle; DePamphilis, Melvin L; Ullah, Zakir

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) can differentiate into nonproliferating but viable trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) that are resistant to DNA damage induced apoptosis. Differentiation is associated with selective up-regulation of the Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p57 and p21; expression of p27 remains constant. Previous studies showed that p57 localizes to the nucleus in TGCs where it is essential for endoreplication. Here we show that p27 also remains localized to the nucleus during TSC differentiation where it complements the role of p57. Unexpectedly, p21 localized to the cytoplasm where it was maintained throughout both the G- and S-phases of endocycles, and where it prevented DNA damage induced apoptosis. This unusual status for a Cip/Kip protein was dependent on site-specific phosphorylation of p21 by the Akt1 kinase that is also up-regulated in TGCs. Although cytoplasmic p21 is widespread among cancer cells, among normal cells it has been observed only in monocytes. The fact that it also occurs in TGCs reveals that p57 and p21 serve nonredundant functions, and suggests that the role of p21 in suppressing apoptosis is restricted to terminally differentiated cells.

  8. The use of giant cell tumor conditioned media in cytogenetic studies of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wason, D; Richkind, K E

    1992-07-15

    The use of conditioned media produced from solid tumor cell lines has been beneficial in the study of hematologic malignancies. Conditioned media from giant cell tumors (GCT), human lung adenocarcinoma, and human bladder carcinoma express growth factors that have been used to stimulate growth of bone marrow cells and improve the quality of the preparations. It has been reported that addition of Lu-CSF1-conditioned media from a lung adenocarcinoma cell line masks abnormalities in cases of acute leukemia [1.] Because we routinely use GCT-CM in bone marrow and leukemic blood cultures for chromosome analysis in our lab, we investigated this potential effect on our case analysis. We have performed a serial study of a 100 cases of hematologic malignancies received for analysis in our lab to determine the effect of the addition of GCT-CM to our culture media with respect to 1) mitotic index, 2) quality of preparation, and 3) differential selection of either chromosomally normal or abnormal cell lines. Our results indicate that the mitotic index and quality of metaphases is enhanced with the addition of GCT media and that there is no difference in the rate of abnormality detection with or without the addition of GCT media.

  9. Denosumab for Treatment of a Recurrent Cervical Giant-Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Daisuke; Yonemoto, Tsukasa; Iwata, Shintaro; Ishii, Takeshi; Tsukanishi, Toshinori; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with C5 giant cell tumor (GCT) underwent tumor resection and anterior bone fusion of C4–C6. The tumor recurred locally 9 months after surgery with the patient complaining of neck and shoulder pain similar to his preoperative symptoms. Denosumab was administered and his pain disappeared after a two-month administration, with a sclerotic rim formation seen at the tumor site on computed tomography. He has been followed for 18 months with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Complete resection is generally recommended, but is not easy for many patients with cervical GCT because of the existence of neurovascular structures. Some patients suffer from recurrence and treatment becomes more difficult. As such, denosumab may be an efficacious option for treatment of recurrent GCT of the cervical spine, although long-term follow-up is required to monitor for presence or absence of recurrence. PMID:27340537

  10. Central Giant Cell Granuloma of the Mandible Requiring Multiple Treatment Modalities: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jerkins, David; Malotky, Maximilian; Miremadi, Reza; Dole, Mukund

    2016-08-01

    Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a relatively rare non-neoplastic, intraosseous lesion that exhibits a wide spectrum of clinical behavior, and its management can be particularly challenging even for experienced clinicians. The etiopathogenesis of this disease process remains unclear, although factors such as trauma, inflammatory foci, and a genetic predisposition have been implicated. Although multiple treatment modalities have been used with varying degrees of success, there is no accepted algorithm for therapeutic intervention and little is known about the reasons for success or failure of a given treatment. This article reviews the epidemiology, presentation, classification, and currently used therapies for CGCG while describing the clinical course and successful therapeutic outcome of a young female patient with an aggressive CGCG of the mandible.

  11. Spinal giant cell tumor in tuberous sclerosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Fraioli, Mario Francesco; Lecce, Mario; Fraioli, Chiara; Paolo, Curatolo

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients affected by tuberous sclerosis (TS) have a greater incidence of tumors than the healthy population. Spinal tumours in TS are reported very rarely and consist mainly of sacrococcygeal and cervical chordomas. Method Case report. Findings A 21-year-old man, affected by TS, presented a spinal dorsal T2 tumor that caused medullary compression. He underwent decompressive laminectomy and microsurgical excision of a giant cell tumor and an associated aneurysmal bone cyst. Postoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy was performed on the surgical field. At 2.4 years of follow-up the patient reported total recovery of neurological deficits and was free from tumor recurrence. Conclusion Considering this association, which is the first reported in the literature, spinal magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium should be performed at the onset of spinal pain in patients affected by TS. PMID:23809532

  12. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S

    2016-03-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures. PMID:27069267

  13. Giant Cell Arteritis: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed with the Use of MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in western countries in individuals over the age of 50. It is typically characterised by the granulomatous involvement of large and medium sized blood vessels branching of the aorta with particular tendencies for involving the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. Generally the diagnosis is straightforward when characteristic symptoms such as headache, jaw claudication, or other ischemic complications are present. Atypical presentations of GCA without “overt” cranial ischemic manifestations have become increasingly recognised but we report for the first time a case of GCA presenting as mild upper abdominal pain and generalized weakness in the context of hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of vasculitis that was subsequently diagnosed by MRI scanning. This case adds to the literature and emphasises the importance of MRI in the evaluation of GCA patients without “classic” cranial ischemic symptoms. PMID:27493825

  14. A Rare Giant Cell Tumor of the Distal Fibula and its Management

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Kapoor, Chirag; Golwala, Paresh; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumour (GCT) of the distal fibula is extremely rare and poses challenges in the surgical management. Wide excision or intralesional curettage, along with adjuvant chemical cauterisation can prevent the recurrence of GCT. The excised bone gap needs reconstruction using tricortical iliac autograft and supportive plate fixation. In addition to wide excision, preservation of ankle mortise is advisable in locally aggressive and large lesions of the distal fibula. We report a GCT of the distal fibula in a young female patient. As part of the treatment, en bloc resection, chemical cauterisation with phenol, and distal fibula reconstruction with a tricortical iliac crest bone graft was done. Eighteen months after the treatment, the patient has no recurrence and her ankle is stable with full range of movement. We suggest this method to be worthwhile for the treatment of this uncommon lesion in quantifying recurrence and functional outcome. PMID:27493848

  15. Subtotal tongue necrosis in delayed diagnosed giant-cell arteritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biebl, Matthias Oliver; Hugl, Beate; Posch, Lydia; Tzankov, Alexandar; Weber, Florian; Perkmann, Reinhold; Fraedrich, Gustav

    2004-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis of large- and medium-sized vessels, mainly affecting elderly patients. Headache, vision impairment, jaw claudication, and scalp tenderness are common symptoms. However, diagnosis can be difficult because GCA can affect almost every vascular pathway and lead to a variety of possible manifestations. We report the case of a belated diagnosed GCA, resulting in nearly complete necrosis of the mobile part of the tongue, visual impairment, and neurologic as well as intestinal ischemic symptoms. Aggressive immunosuppressive treatment resolved the symptoms, but the patient remained severely morbid because of bilateral necrosis of the mobile part of the tongue. In any case of unclear ischemic symptoms in an elderly patient, one must keep GCA in mind as the possible culprit disease.

  16. Current status and unanswered questions on the use of Denosumab in giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Czar Louie; Grimer, Robert J; Parry, Michael; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Gelderblom, Hans; Ferrari, Stefano; Baldi, Giacomo G; Jones, Robin L; Chawla, Sant; Casali, Paolo; LeCesne, Axel; Blay, Jean-Yves; Dijkstra, Sander P D; Thomas, David M; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody to RANK ligand approved for use in giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone. Due to its efficacy, Denosumab is recommended as the first option in inoperable or metastatic GCT. Denosumab has also been used pre-operatively to downstage tumours with large soft tissue extension to allow for less morbid surgery. The role of Denosumab for conventional limb GCT of bone is yet to be defined. Further studies are required to determine whether local recurrence rates will be decreased with the adjuvant use of Denosumab along with surgery. The long term use and toxicity of this agent is unknown as is the proportion of patients with primary or secondary resistance. It is advised that complicated cases of GCT requiring Denosumab treatment should be referred and followed up at expert centres. Collaborative studies involving further clinical trials and rigorous data collection are strongly recommended to identify the optimum use of this drug. PMID:27651889

  17. GIANT CELL TUMOR IN THE PROXIMAL PHALANX WITH PULMONARY METASTASIS: CASE REPORT AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Frederico Carvalho; de Medeiros, Fernando Carvalho; de Campos Carvalho Lopes, Izabella; de Medeiros, Guilherme Carvalho; de Medeiros, Eduardo Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report on a giant cell tumor (GCT) in the proximal phalanx of the third finger of the left hand, with pulmonary metastasis. The patient presented pain in the finger without any previous history of trauma. Clinical examination, radiographic imaging and magnetic resonance imaging were carried out. A histological evaluation was carried out from an incisional biopsy, taking the hypothesis of GCT. The patient underwent amputation of the finger and the diagnosis was confirmed by means of microscopy on the specimen. The patient was followed up because of the risk of lung metastasis, which was shown by radiographic examination and computed tomography on the chest, and thoracotomy was performed. Since then, there has been an improvement in the symptoms that had been reported preoperatively, and no local recurrence or new metastasis has been found. PMID:27027012

  18. AL amyloidosis with temporal artery involvement simulates giant-cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Audemard, Alexandra; Boutemy, Jonathan; Galateau-Salle, Françoise; Macro, Margaret; Bienvenu, Boris

    2012-03-01

    Light-chain (AL) amyloidosis may present with features suggesting vasculitis, including giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We describe a case of an 80-year-old man, who initially presented with bilateral jaw claudication, bi-temporal headache and arthralgia, however a temporal-artery biopsy then revealed AL amyloidosis. A diagnosis of AL amyloidosis complicating multiple myelome simulates GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica was established. The patient was successfully treated with melphalan and dexamethasone: the free kappa light chains decreased, the patient's jaw claudication and headache disappeared. Then we discuss similarities between GCA and AL amyloidosis and potential confusion in diagnosis. We suggest that, in patients with clinical features of GCA without any temporal-artery typical findings, specimens are stained with Congo red, which then results in a different diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Spinal cord infarction in giant cell arteritis associated with scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Khader N; Hadidy, Azmy; Joudeh, Anwar; Obeidat, Fatima Nouri; Abdulfattah, Khalid W

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). There are only four case reports in the literature. We describe a 65-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia and back pain of 4-days duration with sensory loss below the umbilicus and bilateral scalp necrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging finding was consistent with dorsal spinal cord infarction. Biopsy of the temporal artery confirmed the diagnosis of GCA. The patient was treated with high dose of corticosteroids, which resulted in healing of the scalp ulcerations in 3 weeks, but the paraplegia was irreversible. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal cord infarction and simultaneous occurrence of bilateral scalp necrosis in a histopathologically proven GCA. Although literature about spinal cord involvement in GCA is very limited, cord infarction is associated with high mortality and therapeutic challenges since little is understood regarding the pathogenesis that leads to infarction.

  20. Osmometrically determined characteristics of the cell membrane of squid and lobster giant axons.

    PubMed

    Freeman, A R; Reuben, J P; Brandt, P W; Grundfest, H

    1966-11-01

    Lobster and squid giant nerve fibers respond differently when subjected to osmotic challenges. The axons proper, as distinct from the total (fiber) complex formed by the axon and connective sheath, both behave as "fast" osmometers for changes in the concentration of NaCl, but the maximum degree of swelling in hyposmotic media is by about 60% in lobster and only by 20% in squid. The relative volume intercepts of the van't Hoff relation are about 0.2 for lobster and 0.4 for squid. The sheaths of both axons undergo only small, apparently passive changes in volume. Lobster axons are permeable to Cl, but squid axons are impermeable to this anion. Lobster axons are also permeable to glycerol. The implications of the data as to the nature of volume regulation of cells are discussed.

  1. Denosumab for Treatment of a Recurrent Cervical Giant-Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Daisuke; Kamoda, Hiroto; Yonemoto, Tsukasa; Iwata, Shintaro; Ishii, Takeshi; Tsukanishi, Toshinori; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko

    2016-06-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with C5 giant cell tumor (GCT) underwent tumor resection and anterior bone fusion of C4-C6. The tumor recurred locally 9 months after surgery with the patient complaining of neck and shoulder pain similar to his preoperative symptoms. Denosumab was administered and his pain disappeared after a two-month administration, with a sclerotic rim formation seen at the tumor site on computed tomography. He has been followed for 18 months with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Complete resection is generally recommended, but is not easy for many patients with cervical GCT because of the existence of neurovascular structures. Some patients suffer from recurrence and treatment becomes more difficult. As such, denosumab may be an efficacious option for treatment of recurrent GCT of the cervical spine, although long-term follow-up is required to monitor for presence or absence of recurrence. PMID:27340537

  2. Large vessel vasculitis without temporal artery involvement: isolated form of giant cell arteritis?

    PubMed

    Lambert, M; Weber, A; Boland, B; De Plaen, J F; Donckier, J

    1996-03-01

    Diffuse arterial involvement in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is well recognized. By contrast, GCA clinically isolated to large vessels without cephalic, rheumatologic or systemic symptoms represents a much rarer manifestation of the disease. We report the cases of 4 elderly women presenting with a diffuse and symptomatic occlusive disease without the typical signs of temporal arteritis, in whom biological, angiographic or pathological findings were suggestive of GCA. Medium to high dose oral corticosteroids were given to the 4 patients, in combination with various revascularization procedures, allowing a fair clinical response. Large vessel arteritis should be considered in elderly women with diffuse non-atherosclerotic occlusive disease and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, even if typical features of GCA are lacking. In those cases, a long-term treatment with corticosteroids is mandatory, but surgical or angioplastic revascularization is often required. PMID:8777852

  3. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S.

    2016-01-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures. PMID:27069267

  4. A Rare Giant Cell Tumor of the Distal Fibula and its Management.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Kapoor, Chirag; Golwala, Paresh; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumour (GCT) of the distal fibula is extremely rare and poses challenges in the surgical management. Wide excision or intralesional curettage, along with adjuvant chemical cauterisation can prevent the recurrence of GCT. The excised bone gap needs reconstruction using tricortical iliac autograft and supportive plate fixation. In addition to wide excision, preservation of ankle mortise is advisable in locally aggressive and large lesions of the distal fibula. We report a GCT of the distal fibula in a young female patient. As part of the treatment, en bloc resection, chemical cauterisation with phenol, and distal fibula reconstruction with a tricortical iliac crest bone graft was done. Eighteen months after the treatment, the patient has no recurrence and her ankle is stable with full range of movement. We suggest this method to be worthwhile for the treatment of this uncommon lesion in quantifying recurrence and functional outcome. PMID:27493848

  5. Giant cell myocarditis: a life-threatening disorder heralded by orbital myositis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Sajawal; Mba, Benjamin I; Husain, Aliya Noor; Ciftci, Farah Diba

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with a history of orbital myositis (OM) presented to the emergency department with ventricular tachycardia requiring electrical cardioversion. Postcardioversion ECG showed right bundle branch block, while an echocardiogram revealed an ejection fraction of 20% and a dilated right ventricle. Cardiac MRI produced suboptimal images because the patient was having frequent arrhythmias. The rest of the work up, including coronary angiography, was unremarkable. Given the dilated right ventricle, we suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and discharged the patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. 1 week later, he was readmitted with cardiogenic shock; endomyocardial biopsy revealed giant cell myocarditis (GCM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the seventh case report of GCM described in a patient with OM. We recommend that clinicians maintain a high degree of suspicion for GCM in patients with OM presenting with cardiac problems. PMID:27009192

  6. p63 as a prognostic marker for giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    kakizaki, Hiroshi; Okada, Kyoji; Torigoe, Tomoaki; Kusumi, Tomomi

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is sometimes difficult to distinguish from other giant-cell-rich tumors such as chondroblastoma (CHB) and aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). The usefulness of p63 as a diagnostic marker for GCT is controversial. While there have been no reports about p63 as a prognostic marker for local recurrence, various p63-positive rates in GCT have been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively whether p63 is useful as a diagnostic marker and/or a prognostic marker for local recurrence of GCT. Methods This study included 36 patients diagnosed with either GCT (n = 16), CHB (n = 9), ABC (n = 7), or non-ossifying fibroma (NOF) (n = 4). p63 immunostaining was performed for all specimens. The mean p63-positive rate was compared with the four diseases and between the recurrent and non-recurrent cases of GCT. Results Although the mean p63-positive rate for GCT (36.3%) was statistically higher than that of all other diseases examined (CHB: 15.2%; ABC: 5.8%; NOF: 3.4%), p63 was not specific for GCT. The mean p63-positive rate for recurrent GCT cases (73.6%) was statistically higher than that for non-recurrent cases (29.1%). Conclusion In the diagnosis of GCT, p63 is a useful but not a conclusive marker. However, p63 did appear to indicate the biological aggressiveness of GCT. Therefore, p63 may help surgeons to estimate the risk of recurrence after surgery and help them to choose the best treatment for each GCT case. PMID:23033898

  7. Selective Amplification of the Genome Surrounding Key Placental Genes in Trophoblast Giant Cells.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Baker, Julie C

    2016-01-25

    While most cells maintain a diploid state, polyploid cells exist in many organisms and are particularly prevalent within the mammalian placenta [1], where they can generate more than 900 copies of the genome [2]. Polyploidy is thought to be an efficient method of increasing the content of the genome by avoiding the costly and slow process of cytokinesis [1, 3, 4]. Polyploidy can also affect gene regulation by amplifying a subset of genomic regions required for specific cellular function [1, 3, 4]. This mechanism is found in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where polyploid ovarian follicle cells amplify genomic regions containing chorion genes, which facilitate secretion of eggshell proteins [5]. Here, we report that genomic amplification also occurs in mammals at selective regions of the genome in parietal trophoblast giant cells (p-TGCs) of the mouse placenta. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) of mouse p-TGCs, we identified five amplified regions, each containing a gene family known to be involved in mammalian placentation: the prolactins (two clusters), serpins, cathepsins, and the natural killer (NK)/C-type lectin (CLEC) complex [6-12]. We report here the first description of amplification at selective genomic regions in mammals and present evidence that this is an important mode of genome regulation in placental TGCs.

  8. Proteins of morula-like cells in hemolymph of the giant clam, Tridacna derasa.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Ishikura, M; Maruyama, T

    1997-10-01

    The morula-like cell, a hemocyte packed with many large (about 3 microns in diameter) electron-dense granules, is found only in the hemolymph of giant clams belonging to the Tridacnidae. To clarify the function of the morula-like cell, we investigated its proteins, especially those found in the large granules. Proteins with molecular weights of 64 kDa, 17 kDa and 7.4 kDa were found to be specific to this type of hemocyte. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the 17-kDa and 7.4-kDa proteins were novel proteins rich in aromatic amino acids. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide of the 7.4-kDa protein reacted not only with that protein but also with a larger molecular weight (about 16-kDa) protein in the morula-like cell. Examination of the N-terminal amino acid sequences showed that the 16-kDa protein is distinct from the 17-kDa protein, and Western blot analysis suggested that it is a precursor of the 7.4-kDa protein. The zooxanthellate portion of clam mantle and kidney contained proteins immunoreactive to the antibody, but the azooxanthellate portion of the mantle did not contain any immunoreactive protein. These results suggest that the morula-like cells interact with the zooxanthellae.

  9. Huge undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sungho

    2014-03-14

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) is very rare, less than 1% of all pancreatic malignancies, and shows worse prognosis than that of invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We present a case of en bloc resection for a huge undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs that invaded the stomach and transverse mesocolon. A 67-year female was admitted for left upper quadrant pain and computed tomography demonstrated a mass occupying the lesser sac and abutting the stomach and pancreas. There were no distant metastases and the patient underwent subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, total gastrectomy, and segmental resection of the transverse colon. Histopathological examination confirmed an 11 cm-sized undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with OGCs. Immunohistochemical staining revealed reactivity with pan-cytokeratin in adenocarcinoma component, with vimentin in neoplastic multi-nucleated cells, with CD45/CD68 in OGCs, and with p53 in tumor cells, respectively. The patient had suffered from multiple bone metastases and survived 9 mo after surgery. This case supports the ductal epithelial origin of undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs and early diagnosis could result in favorable surgical outcomes. Investigations on the surgical role and prognostic factors need to be warranted in this tumor.

  10. Enrichment of c-Met+ tumorigenic stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone and targeting by cabozantinib.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Aleksandrowicz, E; Fan, P; Schönsiegel, F; Zhang, Y; Sähr, H; Gladkich, J; Mattern, J; Depeweg, D; Lehner, B; Fellenberg, J; Herr, I

    2014-10-16

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a very rare tumor entity, which is little examined owing to the lack of established cell lines and mouse models and the restriction of available primary cell lines. The stromal cells of GCTB have been made responsible for the aggressive growth and metastasis, emphasizing the presence of a cancer stem cell population. To identify and target such tumor-initiating cells, stromal cells were isolated from eight freshly resected GCTB tissues. Tumorigenic properties were examined by colony and spheroid formation, differentiation, migration, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, immunohistochemistry, antibody protein array, Alu in situ hybridization, FACS analysis and xenotransplantation into fertilized chicken eggs and mice. A sub-population of the neoplastic stromal cells formed spheroids and colonies, differentiated to osteoblasts, migrated to wounded regions and expressed the metastasis marker CXC-chemokine receptor type 4, indicating self-renewal, invasion and differentiation potential. Compared with adherent-growing cells, markers for pluripotency, stemness and cancer progression, including the CSC surface marker c-Met, were enhanced in spheroidal cells. This c-Met-enriched sub-population formed xenograft tumors in fertilized chicken eggs and mice. Cabozantinib, an inhibitor of c-Met in phase II trials, eliminated CSC features with a higher therapeutic effect than standard chemotherapy. This study identifies a c-Met(+) tumorigenic sub-population within stromal GCTB cells and suggests the c-Met inhibitor cabozantinib as a new therapeutic option for targeted elimination of unresectable or recurrent GCTB.

  11. Regulable neural progenitor-specific Tsc1 loss yields giant cells with organellar dysfunction in a model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Goto, June; Talos, Delia M; Klein, Peter; Qin, Wei; Chekaluk, Yvonne I; Anderl, Stefanie; Malinowska, Izabela A; Di Nardo, Alessia; Bronson, Roderick T; Chan, Jennifer A; Vinters, Harry V; Kernie, Steven G; Jensen, Frances E; Sahin, Mustafa; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2011-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan genetic disease in which brain involvement causes epilepsy, intellectual disability, and autism. The hallmark pathological finding in TSC is the cerebral cortical tuber and its unique constituent, giant cells. However, an animal model that replicates giant cells has not yet been described. Here, we report that mosaic induction of Tsc1 loss in neural progenitor cells in Tsc1(cc) Nestin-rtTA(+) TetOp-cre(+) embryos by doxycycline leads to multiple neurological symptoms, including severe epilepsy and premature death. Strikingly, Tsc1-null neural progenitor cells develop into highly enlarged giant cells with enlarged vacuoles. We found that the vacuolated giant cells had multiple signs of organelle dysfunction, including markedly increased mitochondria, aberrant lysosomes, and elevated cellular stress. We found similar vacuolated giant cells in human tuber specimens. Postnatal rapamycin treatment completely reversed these phenotypes and rescued the mutants from epilepsy and premature death, despite prenatal onset of Tsc1 loss and mTOR complex 1 activation in the developing brain. This TSC brain model provides insights into the pathogenesis and organelle dysfunction of giant cells, as well as epilepsy control in patients with TSC.

  12. PTPN22 R620W minor allele is a genetic risk factor for giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Susan; Hewitt, Alex W; Ruediger, Carlee D; Bradbury, Linda; De Smit, Elisabeth; Wiese, Michael D; Black, Rachel; Harrison, Andrew; Jones, Graeme; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Merriman, Tony R; Shenstone, Bain; Smith, Malcolm D; Rischmueller, Maureen; Brown, Matthew A; Hill, Catherine L

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is one of the commonest forms of vasculitis in the elderly, and may result in blindness and stroke. The pathogenesis of GCA is not understood, although environmental, infectious and genetic risk factors are implicated. One gene of interest is PTPN22, encoding lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), expressed exclusively in immune cells, which is proposed to be an ‘archetypal non-HLA autoimmunity gene’. The minor allele of a functional PTPN22 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2476601, R620W), which disrupts an interaction motif in the protein, was originally reported to be associated with biopsy-proven GCA in Spanish patients, with supporting data from three replicate Northern European studies. Recently, this observation was extended with additional patients and controls, and studies encompassing European, Scandinavian, UK and American patients. The aim of our study was to determine the association between PTPN22 rs2476601 (R620W) and biopsy-proven GCA in an Australian case cohort. PMID:27110387

  13. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  14. Giant repeater F-wave in patients with anterior horn cell disorders. Role of motor unit size.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A

    1997-01-01

    Conventional F-wave responses as well as single motor unit F-wave responses together with the volitionally recruited motor unit action potentials (MUAP) were studied in hand and feet muscles of 10 healthy subjects and 32 patients with anterior horn cell disorders. The amplitude of the largest F-wave (Fl) was significantly greater in the affected patients compared with healthy subjects. Giant repeater F-wave responses "up to 4 mV" were recorded in muscles having volitionally recruited giant MUAPs. Although, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs was significantly decreased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, the group mean percentage of motor unit F-wave responses per stimulation in all tested orthodromic MUAPs that gave motor unit F-wave response was significantly increased compared with healthy subjects. The responding orthodromic MUAP gave identical motor unit F-wave response, even for complex polyphasic units. Enhanced monosynaptic (H-) reflex, proximal axon reflex (A-wave), and repetitive muscle response as possible explanations for the giant F-wave responses could be discounted. The electrophysiologic behavior of the giant late responses described here fits well with the criteria of F-waves modulated by newly formed distal (and or proximal) axonal branching.

  15. Advantages of Pressurized-Spray Cryosurgery in Giant Cell Tumors of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Dabak, Nevzat; Göçer, Hasan; Çıraklı, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Background: Giant Cell Tumor is considered a benign, local and aggressive tumor. Although considered a benign bone tumor, it is still the subject of discussion and research because of the associated local bone destruction, as well as high rates of recurrence and distant metastases. Options are being developed for both surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies. Aims: The present study evaluated the administration of cryotherapy via a pressurized-spray technique in giant cell tumors of the bone. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The study included 40 patients who were treated with extensive curettage and cryotherapy at various locations during the period from February 2006 to December 2013. Informed consent forms were obtained from the participants and ethics committee approval was taken from the local ethics committee of Ondokuz Mayıs University. The pressurized-spray technique was performed using liquid nitrogen. The patients were evaluated with respect to age, gender, radiological appearance, treatment modality, duration of follow-up, skin problems and recurrence. Results: Twenty-one patients were female; 19 were male. The average age of the patients was 33 years (range: 16–72 years), and the average duration of follow-up was 43 months (range: 12–80 months). The average time from the onset of the complaints to the diagnosis was 6 months (range: 2–12 months). Based on the Campanacci classification: 9 patients were Grade I; 25 patients were Grade II; six patients were Grade III. The lesion was located in the femur in 14 patients, in the tibia in 11 patients, in the radius in 5 patients, in the pelvis in 4 patients, in the fibula in 3 patients, in the metatarsal in 2 patients and in the phalanges of the hand in one patient. One patient had postoperative early fracture. None of the patients had skin problems and infection. Three (7.5%) of the patients had recurrence. Conclusion: It was found that cryotherapy was highly effective in the lesions

  16. EXCISION OF GIANT CELL TUMOR OF TENDON SHEATH WITH BONE INVOLVEMENT BY MEANS OF DOUBLE ACCESS APPROACH: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marcelo de Pinho Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath are common lesions and are the second most frequent tumors in the hand, after synovial cysts. They are diagnosed by means of clinical examination and complementary examinations (simple radiography and magnetic resonance). Erosion and invasion of the phalangeal bone affected may be seen on radiological examination. Magnetic resonance may show a “fluorescent or radiant effect” may be observed, caused by the high quantity of hemosiderin inside the tumor. Surgical treatment is the commonest practice, and complete excision is important for avoiding recurrence of the tumor, especially when bone invasion is observed on imaging examinations, which is generally related to greater tumor recurrence. In this paper, a case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in the middle phalanx of the third finger of a 45-year-old female patient is presented. This was successfully treated by means of surgery using a double access approach (dorsal and volar). PMID:27026996

  17. Tenosynovial, Diffuse Type Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporomandibular Joint, Diagnosis and Management of a Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Schucknecht, Bernhard; Bode-Lesniewska, Baete

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe a rare unusual case of primary mandibular condylar tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type with predominantly intraosseous growth and its management by resection and functional reconstruction with a vascularized costochondral graft. Clinical presentation was swelling in the right condylar area and limited mouth opening with radiological evidence of central bone destruction and magnetic resonance imaging showed central hemosiderin deposition. Fine needle aspiration did not lead to a diagnosis and an open biopsy had to be performed. Management consisted of tumor resection and reconstruction with a free vascularized costochondral graft. Tenosynovial diffuse type giant cell tumor of the temporomandibular joint is very rare. Complete resection leads to a low recurrence rate and reconstruction with a costochondral free vascularized flap leads to an excellent functional outcome. PMID:25699124

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of giant cell arteritis: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gračanin, Ana Gudelj; Ćurić, Josip; Lončarević, Jelena; Morović-Vergles, Jadranka

    2015-01-01

    A female patient with giant cell vasculitis of the abdominal aorta and its branches and strongly suspected of having extrapulmonary tuberculosis is presented. The diagnoses were based on the clinical picture, laboratory findings, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MRI is highly useful in cases where echosonography and/or vascular biopsy for histopathological analyses are not possible. A combination of giant cell vasculitis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis is extremely rare, and therefore, choosing the right treatment presents a considerable challenge. MRI performed after 6-month antituberculous therapy and 1-year glucocorticoid plus methotrexate therapy showed normal wall of the aorta and its branches, which was consistent with clinical and laboratory remission. Patients with large vessel vasculitis require regular follow-up by MRI.

  19. Development of poorly differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma in giant Bowen’s disease: a case report with dermatoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Bengu Nisa; Maden, Aysenur; Kocak, Oguzhan; Bostanci, Seher; Boyvat, Ayşe; Kocyigit, Pelin; Heper, Aylin Okcu

    2016-01-01

    Bowen’s disease (BD) is an in situ form of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), often occurring in the chronically UV-damaged skin of elderly people. The risk of progression of BD to invasive SCC varies between 3% and 5%, and one-third of invasive tumors may metastasize. Herein we discuss the dermatoscopic findings of a case of giant Bowen’s disease, which progressed to poorly differentiated invasive SCC. PMID:27222765

  20. A case of thoracic giant cell tumor of bone and discussion of radiological features and current management practices.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Deirdre; Mc Erlean, Sarah; Byrne, Danielle; Mahon, Peter Mac; Mc Caffrey, John

    2016-09-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare condition with distinct radiological features that aid diagnosis. We present the case of an adult female patient, with locally invasive GCTB and review important radiological and management principles. Specific radiological features include locally aggressive, lytic radiolucent lesions, which can demonstrate cortical thinning and expansile remodeling of bone and typically involve the epiphysis and metaphysis. Management is primarily surgical, and denosumab has a role in the advanced setting. PMID:27594954

  1. SOS1 and PTPN11 mutations in five cases of Noonan syndrome with multiple giant cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Beneteau, Claire; Cavé, Hélène; Moncla, Anne; Dorison, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Verloes, Alain; Leheup, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We report five cases of multiple giant cell lesions in patients with typical Noonan syndrome. Such association has frequently been referred to as Noonan-like/multiple giant cell (NL/MGCL) syndrome before the molecular definition of Noonan syndrome. Two patients show mutations in PTPN11 (p.Tyr62Asp and p.Asn308Asp) and three in SOS1 (p.Arg552Ser and p.Arg552Thr). The latter are the first SOS1 mutations reported outside PTPN11 in NL/MGCL syndrome. MGCL lesions were observed in jaws (‘cherubism') and joints (‘pigmented villonodular synovitis'). We show through those patients that both types of MGCL are not PTPN11-specific, but rather represent a low penetrant (or perhaps overlooked) complication of the dysregulated RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. We recommend discarding NL/MGCL syndrome from the nosology, as this presentation is neither gene-nor allele-specific of Noonan syndrome; these patients should be described as Noonan syndrome with MGCL (of the mandible, the long bone…). The term cherubism should be used only when multiple giant cell lesions occur without any other clinical and molecular evidence of Noonan syndrome, with or without mutations of the SH3BP2 gene. PMID:19352411

  2. The interdisciplinary approach of an aggressive giant cell tumor of bone complicated with a fracture of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Vîlcioiu, Iulian Daniel; Zamfirescu, Dragoş George; Cristescu, Ioan; Ursache, Andrei; Popescu, Şerban Arghir; Creangă, Cosmin Antoniu; Lascăr, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) represents one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon. The giant-cell tumor is generally classified as benign but the fast growing rhythm and the aggressive soft-tissue invasion may in some cases demonstrate a malign potential of the tumor. We present the case of an aggressive giant cell tumor in a young patient that was first diagnosed in our emergency department with a fracture of the distal femur after a low energy trauma. With further examinations, we discovered that the tumor was invading the both femoral condyles and was vascularized by three major arterial pedicles. The onset of his problems was the femoral fracture and the changes on the major vessels, muscles and nerves. After an interdisciplinary approach of the patient and a meticulous preoperative planning, we decided to make an extensive total resection of the tumor followed by a complex reconstruction surgery for the bone. A very stable fixation of a vascularized graft allowed the bone to heal even if the surrounded soft-tissue was almost completely invaded by the tumor and removed during the excision. The follow-up of this case demonstrated that using an interdisciplinary approach of the patient with the Plastic Surgery team, we manage to remove the tumor within oncological limits and achieved bone healing with good stability of the distal femur. PMID:27516036

  3. High-pressure paint-gun injury of the finger simulating giant cell tumor of tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Stefanato, Catherine M; Turner, Matthew S; Bhawan, Jag

    2005-02-01

    High-pressure paint guns deliver paint at approximately 3000 pounds per square inch. At this pressure, paint will penetrate the skin and spread quickly through fascial planes and tendon sheaths. The present case is that of a lesion from the finger of a 35-year-old white male in whom a history was initially unavailable. Histologic examination revealed diffuse fibrohistiocytic proliferation and giant cells, with numerous darkly pigmented, uniformly small-sized particles throughout the lesion. The initial impression was that of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. However, the pigment particles were negative for Perls stain, and polariscopic examination revealed clear refractile fragments. These findings raised the possibility that the lesion was the result of a traumatic event. On further inquiry, it was revealed that the patient had sustained a high-pressure paint-gun injury 1 year earlier. The simulation, histopathologically, of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath by a high-pressure paint-gun injury has not, to our knowledge, been reported previously, nor has the histologic finding of small, uniformly sized pigment particles and polarizable refractile fragments in this particular type of injury.

  4. Modified kraske procedure with mid-sacrectomy and coccygectomy for en bloc excision of sacral giant cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Vítor M; Lima, Alvaro; Gíria, João; Carvalho, Nuno; Parreira, José; Cunha E Sá, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Sacral giant cell tumors are rare neoplasms, histologically benign but potentially very aggressive due to the difficulty in achieving a complete resection, their high recurrence rate, and metastization capability. Although many treatment options have been proposed, en bloc excision with tumor-free margins seems to be the most effective, being associated with long term tumor control, improved outcome, and potential cure. An exemplifying case of a 29-year-old female with progressive complaints of pain and paresthesias in the sacral and perianal regions, constipation, and weight loss for 6 months is presented. The surgical technique for en bloc excision of a large sacral giant cell tumor through a modified Kraske procedure with mid-sacrectomy and coccygectomy is described. Complete resection with wide tumor-free margins was achieved. At 5 years of follow-up the patient is neurologically intact, without evidence of local recurrence on imaging studies. A multidisciplinary surgical procedure is mandatory to completely remove sacral tumors. In the particular case of giant cell tumors, it allows minimizing local recurrence preserving neurovascular function, through a single dorsal and definitive approach. PMID:25386379

  5. Lethal giant larvae-1 deficiency enhances the CD8(+) effector T-cell response to antigen challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Hawkins, Edwin D; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Van Ham, Vanessa; Haynes, Nicole M; Durrant, Michael J; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-03-01

    Lethal giant larvae-1 (Lgl-1) is an evolutionary conserved protein that regulates cell polarity in diverse lineages; however, the role of Lgl-1 in the polarity and function of immune cells remains to be elucidated. To assess the role of Lgl-1 in T cells, we generated chimeric mice with a hematopoietic system deficient for Lgl-1. Lgl-1 deficiency did not impair the activation or function of peripheral CD8(+) T cells in response to antigen presentation in vitro, but did skew effector and memory T-cell differentiation. When challenged with antigen-expressing virus or tumor, Lgl-1-deficient mice displayed altered T-cell responses. This manifested in a stronger antiviral and antitumor effector CD8(+) T-cell response, the latter resulting in enhanced control of MC38-OVA tumors. These results reveal a novel role for Lgl-1 in the regulation of virus-specific T-cell responses and antitumor immunity.

  6. Lethal giant larvae-1 deficiency enhances the CD8(+) effector T-cell response to antigen challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Hawkins, Edwin D; Kallies, Axel; Belz, Gabrielle T; Van Ham, Vanessa; Haynes, Nicole M; Durrant, Michael J; Humbert, Patrick O; Russell, Sarah M; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-03-01

    Lethal giant larvae-1 (Lgl-1) is an evolutionary conserved protein that regulates cell polarity in diverse lineages; however, the role of Lgl-1 in the polarity and function of immune cells remains to be elucidated. To assess the role of Lgl-1 in T cells, we generated chimeric mice with a hematopoietic system deficient for Lgl-1. Lgl-1 deficiency did not impair the activation or function of peripheral CD8(+) T cells in response to antigen presentation in vitro, but did skew effector and memory T-cell differentiation. When challenged with antigen-expressing virus or tumor, Lgl-1-deficient mice displayed altered T-cell responses. This manifested in a stronger antiviral and antitumor effector CD8(+) T-cell response, the latter resulting in enhanced control of MC38-OVA tumors. These results reveal a novel role for Lgl-1 in the regulation of virus-specific T-cell responses and antitumor immunity. PMID:26391810

  7. Maternal nutrition modifies trophoblast giant cell phenotype and fetal growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Adam J; Lucas, Emma S; Marfy-Smith, Stephanie; Bates, Nicola; Kimber, Susan J; Fleming, Tom P

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian placentation is dependent upon the action of trophoblast cells at the time of implantation. Appropriate fetal growth, regulated by maternal nutrition and nutrient transport across the placenta, is a critical factor for adult offspring long-term health. We have demonstrated that a mouse maternal low-protein diet (LPD) fed exclusively during preimplantation development (Emb-LPD) increases offspring growth but programmes adult cardiovascular and metabolic disease. In this study, we investigate the impact of maternal nutrition on post-implantation trophoblast phenotype and fetal growth. Ectoplacental cone explants were isolated at day 8 of gestation from female mice fed either normal protein diet (NPD: 18% casein), LPD (9% casein) or Emb-LPD and cultured in vitro. We observed enhanced spreading and cell division within proliferative and secondary trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) emerging from explants isolated from LPD-fed females when compared with NPD and Emb-LPD explants after 24 and 48 h. Moreover, both LPD and Emb-LPD explants showed substantial expansion of TGC area during 24–48 h, not observed in NPD. No difference in invasive capacity was observed between treatments using Matrigel transwell migration assays. At day 17 of gestation, LPD- and Emb-LPD-fed conceptuses displayed smaller placentas and larger fetuses respectively, resulting in increased fetal:placental ratios in both groups compared with NPD conceptuses. Analysis of placental and yolk sac nutrient signalling within the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway revealed similar levels of total and phosphorylated downstream targets across groups. These data demonstrate that early post-implantation embryos modify trophoblast phenotype to regulate fetal growth under conditions of poor maternal nutrition. PMID:25755287

  8. Cell size versus body size in geophilomorph centipedes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Marco; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Variation in animal body size is the result of a complex interplay between variation in cell number and cell size, but the latter has seldom been considered in wide-ranging comparative studies, although distinct patterns of variation have been described in the evolution of different lineages. We investigated the correlation between epidermal cell size and body size in a sample of 29 geophilomorph centipede species, representative of a wide range of body sizes, from 6 mm dwarf species to gigantic species more than 200 mm long, exploiting the marks of epidermal cells on the overlying cuticle in the form of micro-sculptures called scutes. We found conspicuous and significant variation in average scute area, both between suprageneric taxa and between genera, while the within-species range of variation is comparatively small. This supports the view that the average epidermal cell size is to some extent taxon specific. However, regression analyses show that neither body size nor the number of leg-bearing segments explain this variation, which suggests that cell size is not an usual target of change for body size evolution in this group of arthropods, although there is evidence of its correlation with other morphological variables, like cuticle thickness. Scute sizes of miniaturized geophilomorph species are well within the range of the lineage to which the species belong, suggesting recent evolutionary transitions to smaller body size.

  9. Cell size versus body size in geophilomorph centipedes.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Marco; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Variation in animal body size is the result of a complex interplay between variation in cell number and cell size, but the latter has seldom been considered in wide-ranging comparative studies, although distinct patterns of variation have been described in the evolution of different lineages. We investigated the correlation between epidermal cell size and body size in a sample of 29 geophilomorph centipede species, representative of a wide range of body sizes, from 6 mm dwarf species to gigantic species more than 200 mm long, exploiting the marks of epidermal cells on the overlying cuticle in the form of micro-sculptures called scutes. We found conspicuous and significant variation in average scute area, both between suprageneric taxa and between genera, while the within-species range of variation is comparatively small. This supports the view that the average epidermal cell size is to some extent taxon specific. However, regression analyses show that neither body size nor the number of leg-bearing segments explain this variation, which suggests that cell size is not an usual target of change for body size evolution in this group of arthropods, although there is evidence of its correlation with other morphological variables, like cuticle thickness. Scute sizes of miniaturized geophilomorph species are well within the range of the lineage to which the species belong, suggesting recent evolutionary transitions to smaller body size. PMID:25809818

  10. Long-term efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in giant cell arteritis and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jobie; Steel, Lauren; Borg, Frances; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis affecting large-sized and medium-sized vessels. Glucocorticoids are currently the mainstay of treatment for GCA and associated large vessel vasculitis (LVV) but are associated with frequent adverse events. Methotrexate has only demonstrated a modest benefit while anti-TNF biological agents (infliximab and etanercept) have been inefficacious. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been associated with GCA. Tocilizumab (TCZ), a humanised antihuman IL-6 receptor antibody, has been used successfully in several reports as a treatment for GCA and LVV. We report the potentially long-term successful use of TCZ in 8 cases of refractory LVV. All of our patients achieved a good clinical response to TCZ and C reactive protein reduced from an average of 70.3 to 2.5. In all cases, the glucocorticoid dose was reduced, from an average of 24.6 mg prednisolone prior to TCZ treatment to 4.7 mg, indicating that TCZ may enable a reduction in glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. However, regular TCZ administration was needed for disease control in most cases. TCZ was discontinued in one case due to the development of an empyema indicating the need for careful monitoring of infection when using this treatment. PMID:26819753

  11. The Thromboembolic Risk in Giant Cell Arteritis: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Guida, A.; Tufano, A.; Perna, P.; Moscato, P.; De Donato, M. T.; Finelli, R.; Caputo, D.; Di Minno, M. N. D.

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a systemic vasculitis characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the aorta and its main vessels. Cardiovascular risk, both for arterial and venous thromboembolism, is increased in these patients, but the role of thromboprophylaxis is still debated. It should be suspected in elderly patients suffering from sudden onset severe headaches, jaw claudication, and visual disease. Early diagnosis is necessary because prognosis depends on the timeliness of treatment: this kind of arteritis can be complicated by vision loss and cerebrovascular strokes. Corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of the pharmacological treatment of GCA. Aspirin seems to be effective in cardiovascular prevention, while the use of anticoagulant therapy is controversial. Association with other rheumatological disease, particularly with polymyalgia rheumatica is well known, while possible association with antiphospholipid syndrome is not established. Large future trials may provide information about the optimal therapy. Other approaches with new drugs, such as TNF-alpha blockades, Il-6 and IL-1 blockade agents, need to be tested in larger trials. PMID:24963300

  12. Giant-cell tumor: analysis on the importance of early diagnosis and the epidemiological profile☆

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Diniz Ferraz, Diego Firmino; Torres dos Santos, César Augusto; Farias Costa, Victor Hugo; Gonçalves Souza, Antônio Marcelo; Gomes Lima, Paulo Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to ascertain the relationship between early diagnosis of giant-cell tumors (GCT) and their prognosis, by correlating the time of symptom onset with the staging of the injury (through the Campanacci classification at the time of diagnosis), and with the type of treatment. The secondary objective of the study was to outline the epidemiological profile of patients with GCT in the region where the data were gathered, and to compare them with data in the literature. Methods The authors present an evaluation on 61 patients diagnosed with bone GCT, with regard to the site of involvement, age, initial symptoms, time of symptom onset, classification and type of treatment, among patients attended between May 1994 and August 2009. Results The threshold indicated as the limit for Campanacci stage I tumors to be the commonest diagnosis, with a 98.2% chance that the treatment would be non-aggressive, was 2 months after symptom onset. This finding was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Every additional month increased the chance that a patient would be diagnosed with an advanced-stage tumor by 10.94%, in relation to the chances of having the other two stages of the tumor. Conclusion The study result not only suggests that the alternative hypothesis that the earlier the diagnosis of GCT is, the less severe the lesion will be, has been confirmed; but also especially predicts the relationship between the time of symptom appearance and the severity of the tumor. PMID:26962501

  13. Acute vision loss and choroidal filling delay in the absence of giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Ling; Lee, Iris; Lee, Michael S; Van Stavern, Greg P; McClelland, Collin M

    2016-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a visually devastating disease that often progresses to severe bilateral vision loss if untreated. Diagnosis of GCA is made challenging by the protean nature of the disease and the lack of a simple test that is both highly sensitive and specific. Choroidal filling delay on fluorescein angiography (FA) has been touted as a highly characteristic feature of GCA-related vision loss, although knowledge of both the sensitivity and specificity of this finding remains unproven. We report our experience of delayed choroidal filling on FA in a series of seven patients referred to an academic neuro-ophthalmology practice due to concern for GCA. Despite the FA findings, our examination, diagnostic testing, and long-term follow-up excluded the diagnosis of GCA in all cases, suggesting that choroidal perfusion abnormalities may occur in the absence of GCA. When evaluating a patient for acute vision loss, the astute clinician must remain cognizant of the limitations of FA in the diagnosis of GCA.

  14. Epidemiologic and immunogenetic aspects of polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P; Zizzi, F; Mantovani, W; Rossi, F; Castri, C; Capozzoli, N; Baricchi, R; Boiardi, L; Chiaravalloti, F

    1991-03-01

    We studied the epidemiology of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) in a Mediterranean population. Ninety-nine patients with PMR and/or GCA were identified over a 9-year period (1980-1988) in Reggio Emilia, Italy. The average annual incidence of PMR and GCA was 12.7/100,000 and 6.9/100,000, respectively, in a population aged 50 years or older. Frequencies of HLA antigens were determined in 49 patients with PMR and/or GCA who were followed by staff at our rheumatology unit during the 1980-1988 period. When compared with HLA findings in 242 healthy controls, DR4 was not found to be significantly associated with PMR (24% in PMR patients versus 14% in controls). Patients with GCA also showed an increased frequency of DR4 compared with controls (36% versus 14%), but this difference was also not statistically significant. The immunogenetic features of PMR and GCA and the relationship between the immunogenetic and epidemiologic patterns in different populations are discussed.

  15. Aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to a giant cell tumor of the patella: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAOLONG; GUO, RUNSHENG; FAN, CONGLIANG; LIU, HUCHENG; ZHANG, BIN; NIE, TAO; TU, YI; DAI, MIN

    2016-01-01

    The patella is an unusual location for primary and metastatic bone tumors to develop. The most frequently encountered primary osteolytic lesions at the patella include giant cell tumors of the bone (GCT), chondroblastoma and aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC). However, the presentation of an ABC originating secondary to a GCT at the patella is rare. The present study describes such a case in a 46-year-old female. The differential diagnosis of the condition was extensive. The patient underwent curettage and the addition of bone cement to fill the defect. Pathological analysis of the resected tissue demonstrated that the lesion was consistent with an ABC forming secondary to a GCT. A 3-month follow-up was completed subsequent to the surgery, with a computed tomography scan demonstrating no evidence of recurrence. However, frequent and continuous observations of the patient following diagnosis are planned in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the surgical treatment. To the best of our knowledge, the present study describes the third reported case in the literature of this rare, double synchronous, benign tumor located at the patella. PMID:26893764

  16. Giant cell tumor of the patella with a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SONG, MINGZHI; DAI, WEI; SUN, RAN; LIANG, HONGFENG; LIU, BINGWU; WU, YUXUAN; MA, KAI; LU, MING

    2016-01-01

    The substance of the patella is an uncommon location for tumor occurrence and development. The present study reports a case of giant cell tumor (GCT) of the patella, combined with an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of GCT with ABC published in English. GCT is the most common type of benign tumor. Secondary ABC is frequently associated with GCT, but this symbiotic tumor rarely occurs in the patella. A 27-year-old male patient was examined at the outpatient clinic, and clinicopathological characteristics of the tumor were observed. X-ray and computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a lytic lesion located in the center of the right patella. Curettage, followed by autogenic and allograft bone grafting, was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as a GCT with secondary ABC. No recurrence or metastasis was identified during the 1-year follow-up period. The present study reports a case of GCT with secondary ABC, and discusses the rare location and histopathological type of this tumor, in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of patellar tumors in general. PMID:27313738

  17. Treating giant cell tumours with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-SooS S; Moon, Jeong-Lim; Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Hanlim

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To report on 23 patients with giant cell tumour (GCT) of the femur or tibia treated with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation. METHODS. Records of these 14 men and 9 women aged 22 to 38 (mean, 31) years were reviewed. The most common site involved was the distal femur (n=13), followed by proximal tibia (n=8), proximal femur (n=1), and distal tibia (n=1). The lesions were classified as grade I (n=3), grade II (n=18), and grade III (n=2). Based on histology, the tumour stage was classified as grade I (n=5) and grade II (n=18). Two of these patients had recurrences, which were initially treated with simple curettage and bone grafting of the distal femur and distal tibia. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 5.7 (range, 2.5-10.1) years. 14 of the 23 patients were followed up for over 10 years. No patient developed any local recurrence, remote metastasis, or complication related to surgery or adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSION. Combined treatment entailing curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation was effective in treating GCT of bone.

  18. ZNF687 Mutations in Severe Paget Disease of Bone Associated with Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Divisato, Giuseppina; Formicola, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Merlotti, Daniela; Pazzaglia, Laura; Del Fattore, Andrea; Siris, Ethel; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P.; Nuti, Ranuccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Benassi, Maria Serena; Cancela, M. Leonor; Michou, Laetitia; Rendina, Domenico; Gennari, Luigi; Gianfrancesco, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Paget disease of bone (PDB) is a skeletal disorder characterized by focal abnormalities of bone remodeling, which result in enlarged and deformed bones in one or more regions of the skeleton. In some cases, the pagetic tissue undergoes neoplastic transformation, resulting in osteosarcoma and, less frequently, in giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). We performed whole-exome sequencing in a large family with 14 PDB-affected members, four of whom developed GCT at multiple pagetic skeletal sites, and we identified the c.2810C>G (p.Pro937Arg) missense mutation in the zinc finger protein 687 gene (ZNF687). The mutation precisely co-segregated with the clinical phenotype in all affected family members. The sequencing of seven unrelated individuals with GCT associated with PDB (GCT/PDB) identified the same mutation in all individuals, unravelling a founder effect. ZNF687 is highly expressed during osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and is dramatically upregulated in the tumor tissue of individuals with GCT/PDB. Interestingly, our preliminary findings showed that ZNF687, indicated as a target gene of the NFkB transcription factor by ChIP-seq analysis, is also upregulated in the peripheral blood of PDB-affected individuals with (n = 5) or without (n = 6) mutations in SQSTM1, encouraging additional studies to investigate its potential role as a biomarker of PDB risk. PMID:26849110

  19. Acute vision loss and choroidal filling delay in the absence of giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Ling; Lee, Iris; Lee, Michael S; Van Stavern, Greg P; McClelland, Collin M

    2016-01-01

    Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a visually devastating disease that often progresses to severe bilateral vision loss if untreated. Diagnosis of GCA is made challenging by the protean nature of the disease and the lack of a simple test that is both highly sensitive and specific. Choroidal filling delay on fluorescein angiography (FA) has been touted as a highly characteristic feature of GCA-related vision loss, although knowledge of both the sensitivity and specificity of this finding remains unproven. We report our experience of delayed choroidal filling on FA in a series of seven patients referred to an academic neuro-ophthalmology practice due to concern for GCA. Despite the FA findings, our examination, diagnostic testing, and long-term follow-up excluded the diagnosis of GCA in all cases, suggesting that choroidal perfusion abnormalities may occur in the absence of GCA. When evaluating a patient for acute vision loss, the astute clinician must remain cognizant of the limitations of FA in the diagnosis of GCA. PMID:27695279

  20. Complete response of giant desmoplastic small round cell tumor treated with chemoradiotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHUO; ZHANG, YONG; YU, YONG-HUA; LI, JIA

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare tumor that mainly affects adolescents, and typically involves the abdominal and pelvic peritoneum. The present study reports one case of giant DSRCT, treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and reviews the available medical literature. A 38-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of pain in the left lower abdomen and nausea, associated with decreased appetite and weight loss. Computed tomography (CT) showed a 12.3×7.9 cm confluent solid mass in the lower abdomen and pelvic cavity. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and the final pathological diagnosis was DSRCT. Following laparotomy, the patient was treated with external beam radiotherapy to the whole abdomen and pelvis to a dose of 40 Gy plus a 20 Gy boost to the residual disease. The results indicated that synchronous chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and cisplatin combined with radiotherapy significantly improved locoregional control of DSRCT and a complete response, as measured by CT assessment 2 months subsequent to radiotherapy. In conclusion, DSRCT is a rare malignancy requiring multidisciplinary treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The results of the present study confirm that radiotherapy has a significant role in the treatment of advanced abdominal DSRCT and may contribute to durable remission. PMID:26893693

  1. Obstructive hydrocephalus as a result of giant cell tumor of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WEI, CHENG-YU; CHEN, SHUO-TSUNG; TAI, HSU-CHIH; WANG, WEN-BING; CHANG, CHI-CHU; WANG, YAO-CHIN; WEI, LI; KUNG, WOON-MAN

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are rare bone tumors that account for ~5% of all primary bone tumors. When GCTs occur in the spine, patients usually present with localized pain and neurological symptoms, such as radiating pain or hyperesthesia. In the current report, an unusual case of a GCT of the thoracic spine associated with hydrocephalus is described. A 48-year-old male presented with urinary retention, loss of sensation in the lower limbs and inability to walk. The patient eventually developed hydrocephalus combined with altered consciousness, indicated by an inability to follow simple commands. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated the presence of a soft tissue mass at the T2 level, and biopsy examination of the tissue confirmed that it was a GCT. The patient experienced a sudden loss of consciousness due to an acute episode of obstructive hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal shunting procedure was performed to treat the hydrocephalus, and the patient regained normal consciousness, although the paraplegia persisted. An MR examination performed 30 months following surgery demonstrated that the tumor size was stable, consistent with the slow growth that is characteristic of GCTs. Diagnosis of GCTs may be challenging, and relies on radiographic and histopathologic findings. Although rare, acute hydrocephalus as a result of GCTs should not be excluded from a differential diagnosis. PMID:26870164

  2. Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (pigmented villonodular synovitis-)-like changes in periprosthetic interface membranes.

    PubMed

    Söder, Stephan; Sesselmann, Stefan; Aigner, Thomas; Oehler, Stephan; Agaimy, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TSGCT; synonym, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)) is a rare low-grade mesenchymal neoplasm of either intra-articular or extra-articular origin. The etiopathogenesis of TSGCT is still uncertain, but recent studies showed a translocation involving colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) gene in a subset of cases. Histological features mimicking TSGCT can sometimes be encountered in periprosthetic interface membranes. To investigate the frequency and morphologic spectrum of this phenomenon, we conducted a systematic analysis of 477 periprosthetic interface membranes and performed immunohistochemical analysis on a subset of lesions compared to genuine TSGCT. In 26 of 477 periprosthetic membrane samples (5 %), at least some TSGCT-like features were found and 18 cases (4 %) strongly resembled it. Wear particles were detected in 100 % of the TSGCT-like lesions but only in 63.3 % of the whole cohort of periprosthetic membranes (p value <0.001). Immunohistochemistry comparing true TSGCT and TSGCT-like membranes showed similar inflammatory infiltrates with slightly elevated CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and a slightly higher proliferation index in TSGCT samples. In conclusion, TSGCT-like changes in periprosthetic membranes likely represent exuberant fibrohistiocytic inflammatory response induced by wear particles and should be distinguished from genuine (neoplastic) TSGCT. Although TSGCT and TSGCT-like periprosthetic membranes represent different entities, their comparable morphology might reflect analogous morphogenesis.

  3. Malignant giant cell tumor in the carpal tunnel: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Carla I J M; Bras, Johannes; Lienden, Krijn P van; Obdeijn, Miryam C

    2013-08-01

    Background Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumors (GCTs) are extremely rare, and their etiology is unknown. However, this type of malignancy is associated with high metastasis and mortality rates. Therefore, the treatment of choice is wide excision. Case Description A 66-year-old man complained of tingling and loss of sensation in the left hand, caused by a tumor that compressed the median nerve. The tumor was excised. Histopathologic examination revealed a ganglion cyst. Two years later, the patient visited our clinic with recurrent and similar complaints of the left hand. This time, however, the lesion turned out to be a malignant tenosynovial GCT and was treated by amputation of the forearm. Literature Review Since 1979, only 37 malignant tenosynovial GCTs have been reported in literature. Follow-up of these patients showed that 11 patients died of the disease, 4 patients were still living with the disease, and 14 patients had no evidence of disease after treatment. The other seven patients were lost to follow-up, and one patient died of other causes. In these 37 patients, a high incidence of lymph node metastasis (41%) and a high mortality rate (30%) were seen. Clinical Relevance Although this malignant tenosynovial GCT is very rare, high mortality rates have been observed because of the high incidence of lymph node metastases. Therefore, more awareness has to be created, to recognize and treat this tumor timely. PMID:24436827

  4. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  5. Acute upper limb ischemia, a rare presentation of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Morais, Luís; Galego, Sofia; Marques, Nélia; Pack, Tiago; Rodrigues, Hugo; Abreu, Rodolfo; Vasconcelos, Leonor; Marques, Hugo; Sousa Guerreiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic large vessel vasculitis, with extracranial arterial involvement described in 10-15% of cases, usually affecting the aorta and its branches. Patients with GCA are more likely to develop aortic aneurysms, but these are rarely present at the time of the diagnosis. We report the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian woman, who reported proximal muscle pain in the arms with morning stiffness of the shoulders for eight months. In the previous two months, she had developed worsening bilateral arm claudication, severe pain, cold extremities and digital necrosis. She had no palpable radial pulses and no measurable blood pressure. The patient had normochromic anemia, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 120 mm/h, and a negative infectious and autoimmune workup. Computed tomography angiography revealed concentric wall thickening of the aorta extending to the aortic arch branches, particularly the subclavian and axillary arteries, which were severely stenotic, with areas of bilateral occlusion and an aneurysm of the ascending aorta (47 mm). Despite corticosteroid therapy there was progression to acute critical ischemia. She accordingly underwent surgical revascularization using a bilateral carotid-humeral bypass. After surgery, corticosteroid therapy was maintained and at six-month follow-up she was clinically stable with reduced inflammatory markers. GCA, usually a chronic benign vasculitis, presented exceptionally in this case as acute critical upper limb ischemia, resulting from a massive inflammatory process of the subclavian and axillary arteries, treated with salvage surgical revascularization. PMID:27006059

  6. Bilateral scalp necrosis as a rare but devastating complication of giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Q; Knight, S; Saravanan, R

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a medium to large vessel vasculitis of unknown aetiology. Commonly, it affects the temporal arteries and is known as temporal arteritis. It has an association with polymyalgia rheumatica and can result in severe complications such as loss of vision and rarely scalp necrosis. There are approximately 100 cases of scalp necrosis in patients with GCA published in the literature to date. We report a case of a man who presented with a 4-week history of bilateral scalp necrosis associated with headache, jaw claudication, temporal artery tenderness, and raised inflammatory markers. He did not have any visual loss. A diagnosis of GCA was made and he was started on high-dose steroids immediately. The scalp lesions did improve and his symptoms resolved without any visual loss but, sadly he died due to severe sepsis. This case report is important as it describes a rare but severe complication of a common large vessel vasculitis seen by both primary care physicians and rheumatologists. Prompt recognition and early treatment by the physician are crucial to the patient to prevent visual loss or a fatal stroke. It also highlights complications associated with steroids which are the mainstay of treatment for this condition. PMID:25318611

  7. Pyogenic Granuloma/Peripheral Giant-Cell Granuloma Associated with Implants.

    PubMed

    Jané-Salas, Enric; Albuquerque, Rui; Font-Muñoz, Aura; González-Navarro, Beatríz; Estrugo Devesa, Albert; López-López, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pyogenic granuloma (PG) and peripheral giant-cell granuloma (PGCG) are two of the most common inflammatory lesions associated with implants; however, there is no established pathway for treatment of these conditions. This paper aims to illustrate the successful treatment of PG and PGCG and also report a systematic review of the literature regarding the various treatments proposed. Methods. To collect relevant information about previous treatments for PG and PGCG involving implants we carried out electronic searches of publications with the key words "granuloma", "oral", and "implants" from the last 15 years on the databases Pubmed, National Library of Medicine's Medline, Scielo, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Results. From the electronic search 16 case reports were found showing excision and curettage as the main successful treatment. As no clinical trials or observational studies were identified the authors agreed to present results from a review perspective. Conclusion. This is the largest analysis of PG and PGCG associated with implants published to date. Our review would suggest that PGCG associated with implants appears to have a more aggressive nature; however the level of evidence is very limited. Further cohort studies with representative sample sizes and standard outcome measures are necessary for better understanding of these conditions. PMID:26697068

  8. Endovascular embolization of a recurrent cervical giant cell neoplasm using N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Mindea, Stefan A; Eddleman, Christopher S; Hage, Ziad A; Batjer, H Hunt; Ondra, Stephen L; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-03-01

    Pre-operative endovascular embolization of spinal giant cell tumors (GCTs) has been an effective strategy to reduce blood loss during surgical resection. Traditionally, spinal GCTs have been embolized with polyvinyl acetate (PVA) particles. We present the pre-operative embolization of a recurrent cervical GCT with N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) rather than PVA. The patient was a 17-year-old female who, 3 months prior, had undergone a surgical resection of a cervical GCT without pre-operative embolization. She returned with tumor recurrence in the approximate location. Resection was recommended, and pre-operative embolization was requested. The tumor was embolized with NBCA. Post-embolization angiography demonstrated significantly decreased tumor "blush" and a significant reduction of the vascular supply. This is the first reported use of NBCA for the pre-operative embolization of a cervical GCT. The benefits of NBCA over PVA particles include superior penetration, permanent tumor embolization and lower exposure to radiation due to shorter procedure time.

  9. HLA class II genes polymorphism in DR4 giant cell arteritis patients.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Ferec, C; Barrier, J; Pennec, Y; Verlingue, C; Cheneau, M L; Lucas, V; Muller, J Y; Saleun, J P

    1988-11-01

    We have previously reported a significant increase of HLA-DR4 antigen frequency in giant cell arteritis (GCA). This finding suggested an important role of immunogenetic factors in this syndrome. Recent data suggest that inherited susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases was associated with specific DR4 associated DQ beta alleles. DNAs from 27 DR4 positive patients with GCA were digested with Taq I and Bam HI, analysed on 0.7% agarose gel and hybridized with DR beta, DQ alpha and DQ beta probes. DR beta hybridization produced no variant detectable within DR4. DQ beta probe confirmed two clusters among DR4 associated DQW3 alleles: DQW 3.1 (Bam HI 360 Kb) and DQw 3.2 (Taq I 1.9 Kb and Bam HI 11 Kb). Among our 27 DR4 positive patients, 34% were DQW 3.1 and 66% were DQW 3.2. These frequencies are the same as those observed in healthy controls. PMID:2906182

  10. Pyogenic Granuloma/Peripheral Giant-Cell Granuloma Associated with Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jané-Salas, Enric; Albuquerque, Rui; Font-Muñoz, Aura; González-Navarro, Beatríz; Estrugo Devesa, Albert; López-López, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pyogenic granuloma (PG) and peripheral giant-cell granuloma (PGCG) are two of the most common inflammatory lesions associated with implants; however, there is no established pathway for treatment of these conditions. This paper aims to illustrate the successful treatment of PG and PGCG and also report a systematic review of the literature regarding the various treatments proposed. Methods. To collect relevant information about previous treatments for PG and PGCG involving implants we carried out electronic searches of publications with the key words “granuloma”, “oral”, and “implants” from the last 15 years on the databases Pubmed, National Library of Medicine's Medline, Scielo, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. Results. From the electronic search 16 case reports were found showing excision and curettage as the main successful treatment. As no clinical trials or observational studies were identified the authors agreed to present results from a review perspective. Conclusion. This is the largest analysis of PG and PGCG associated with implants published to date. Our review would suggest that PGCG associated with implants appears to have a more aggressive nature; however the level of evidence is very limited. Further cohort studies with representative sample sizes and standard outcome measures are necessary for better understanding of these conditions. PMID:26697068

  11. Plant lipid bodies and cell-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    van der Schoot, Christiaan; Paul, Laju K.; Paul, Sheetal Babu; Rinne, Päivi L.H.

    2011-01-01

    Plant lipid droplets are found in seeds and in post-embryonic tissues. Lipid droplets in seeds have been intensively studied, but those in post-embryonic tissues are less well characterised. Although known by a variety of names, here we will refer to all of them as lipid bodies (LBs). LBs are unique spherical organelles which bud off from the endoplasmic reticulum, and are composed of a single phospholipid (PL) layer enclosing a core of triacylglycerides. The PL monolayer is coated with oleosin, a structural protein that stabilizes the LB, restricts its size, and prevents fusion with adjacent LBs. Oleosin is uniquely present at LBs and is regarded as a LB marker. Although initially viewed as simple stores for energy and carbon, the emerging view is that LBs also function in cytoplasmic signalling, with the minor LB proteins caleosin and steroleosin in a prominent role. Apart from seeds, a variety of vegetative and floral structures contain LBs. Recently, it was found that numerous LBs emerge in the shoot apex of perennial plants during seasonal growth arrest and bud formation. They appear to function in dormancy release by reconstituting cell-cell signalling paths in the apex. As apices and orthodox seeds proceed through comparable cycles of dormancy and dehydration, the question arises to what degree LBs in apices share functions with those in seeds. We here review what is known about LBs, particularly in seeds, and speculate about possible unique functions of LBs in post-embryonic tissues in general and in apices in particular. PMID:22057325

  12. Helical motion of the cell body enhances Caulobacter crescentus motility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Gulino, Marco; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay X; Powers, Thomas R; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    We resolve the 3D trajectory and the orientation of individual cells for extended times, using a digital tracking technique combined with 3D reconstructions. We have used this technique to study the motility of the uniflagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and have found that each cell displays two distinct modes of motility, depending on the sense of rotation of the flagellar motor. In the forward mode, when the flagellum pushes the cell, the cell body is tilted with respect to the direction of motion, and it precesses, tracing out a helical trajectory. In the reverse mode, when the flagellum pulls the cell, the precession is smaller and the cell has a lower translation distance per rotation period and thus a lower motility. Using resistive force theory, we show how the helical motion of the cell body generates thrust and can explain the direction-dependent changes in swimming motility. The source of the cell body precession is believed to be associated with the flexibility of the hook that connects the flagellum to the cell body.

  13. Sensitivity of the Giant LOop Binary LEsion (GLOBLE) cell survival model on parameters characterising dose rate effects.

    PubMed

    Herr, L; Friedrich, T; Durante, M; Scholz, M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity of the Giant LOop Binary LEsion model for cell survival probabilities after arbitrary photon irradiation schedules on its parameters is presented. Since these parameters are closely linked to observable features of cell repair, the modelled influence of the parameters on cell survival gives indications about the relation between cell line-specific repair characteristics and the radiation response. To visualise the general findings about the impact of parameter changes on cell survival probabilities, survival curves for an exemplary cell line are shown. Furthermore, the relative change in the effect of radiation after a change in parameter values is investigated over the range of doses and dose rates usually applied in cell survival experiments.

  14. Caulobacter crescentus exploits its helical cell body to swim efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Mendoza, Marcos; Valenzuela, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    How an organism gets its shape remains an open question of fundamental science. In this study, we measure the 3D shape of a bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, using a computational graphic technique for free-swimming microorganisms to analyze thousands of image frames of the same individual bacterium. Rather than having a crescent shape, the cell body of the organism is found to be twisted with a helical pitch angle around 45 degrees. Moreover, the detailed size and geometry of the cell body, matches the optimized cell body obtained by the slender body theory for swimming at fixed power. This result sheds new light on the shape evolution of microorganisms, and suggests that C. crescentus has adapted to its natural habitat of fresh-water lakes and streams, lacking nutrients.

  15. Giant cell tumors of the spine: has denosumab changed the treatment paradigm?

    PubMed

    Goldschlager, Tony; Dea, Nicolas; Boyd, Michael; Reynolds, Jeremy; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Rhines, Laurence D; Mendel, Ehud; Pacheco, Marina; Ramos, Edwin; Mattei, Tobias A; Fisher, Charles G

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the spine are rare and complex to treat. They have a propensity for local recurrence and the potential to metastasize. Treatment is currently surgical and presents unique challenges due to the proximity of neural structures and the need for reconstruction. Denosumab has been shown in clinical trials to be an effective treatment for GCT, but has not yet been studied specifically in GCT of the spine or as a surgical adjunct. To the authors' knowledge this is the first such reported series. METHODS A multicenter, prospective series of 5 patients with GCT of the spine treated with denosumab were included. Patient demographic data, oncological history, neurological status, tumor staging, treatment details and adverse events, surgical procedure, complications, radiological and histological responses, and patient outcome were analyzed. RESULTS All patients were women, with a mean age of 38 years, and presented with pain; 2 patients had additional neurological signs and symptoms. The mean duration of symptoms was 62 weeks. No patient had a prior tumor or metastatic disease at presentation. All patients had Enneking Stage III tumors and were treated with monthly cycles of 120 mg of denosumab, with initial additional loading doses on Days 8 and 15. Patients were given daily supplements of calcium (500 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). There were no denosumab-related adverse events. All patients had a radiological response to denosumab. One patient failed to have a histological response to denosumab, with > 90% of tumor cells found to be viable on histological investigation. CONCLUSIONS This study reports the early experience of using denosumab in the treatment of spinal GCT. The results demonstrate a clinically beneficial radiological response and an impressive histological response in most but not all patients. Further experience with denosumab and longer patient follow-up is required. Denosumab has the potential to change the treatment paradigm

  16. Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour: Current treatment concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Staals, Eric L; Ferrari, Stefano; Donati, Davide M; Palmerini, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    At present, the optimal treatment strategy in patients with diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour (D-TGCT) is unclear. The purpose of this review was to describe current treatment options, and to highlight recent developments in the knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of D-TGCT as well as related therapeutic implications. Epidemiology, clinical features, and the pathogenesis of D-TGCT and the most widely used treatment modalities are described. D-TGCT is a benign clonal neoplastic proliferation arising from the synovium. Patients are often symptomatic and require multiple surgical procedures during their lifetime. Currently, surgery is the main treatment for patients with D-TGCT, with relapse rates ranging from 14% to 55%. Radiosynovectomy and external beam radiotherapy have been used in combination with surgical excision or as single modalities. The finding that D-TGCT cells overexpress colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), resulting in recruitment of CSF1 receptor (CSF1R)-bearing macrophages that are polyclonal and make up the bulk of the tumour, has led to clinical trials with CSF1R inhibitors. These inhibitors include small molecules such as imatinib, nilotinib, PLX3397, and the monoclonal antibody RG7155. In conclusion, D-TGCT impairs patients' quality of life significantly. The evidence that the pathogenetic loop of D-TGCT can be inhibited could potentially change the therapeutic armamentarium for this condition. Clinical trials of agents that target D-TGCT are currently ongoing. In the meantime, international registries should be activated in order to provide useful information on this relatively rare tumour. PMID:27267143

  17. Giant cell tumor of cervicothoracic region treated by triple corpectomy from posterior only approach: A case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Rajat; Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Tandon, Vikas; Venkatesh, Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign aggressive tumor, which affects axial as well as a peripheral skeleton. It affects epiphysis of long bones and can result in pathological fractures. GCT affects cervical spine rarely and has been known to affect almost all vertebra in the human body. It has a predilection for fixed spine, that is, sacrum though it can affect mobile spine as well. GCT of cervicothoracic region poses a challenge for the surgeon because of the difficulty in approaching this region anteriorly. This situation is further compounded when GCT involves multiple contiguous vertebral bodies in this region and has already spread beyond the confines of its capsule. We report a case of GCT involving three vertebral bodies C7, D1, and D2 at cervicothoracic region who presented to us and was treated with triple corpectomy from the posterior only approach. This is the first ever case report of triple corpectomy and anterior reconstruction by a posterior only approach for GCT at the cervicothoracic junction to the best of author's knowledge.

  18. Whole-mount confocal imaging of nuclei in giant feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paulo; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2012-07-01

    • Excellent visualization of nuclei was obtained here using a whole-mount procedure adapted to provide high-resolution images of large, irregularly shaped nuclei. The procedure is based on tissue clearing, and fluorescent staining of nuclear DNA with the dye propidium iodide. • The method developed for standard confocal imaging was applied to large multicellular root swellings, named galls, induced in plant hosts by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. • Here, we performed a functional analysis, and examined the nuclear structure in giant feeding cells overexpressing the cell cycle inhibitor Kip-related protein 4 (KRP4). Ectopic KRP4 expression in galls led to aberrant nuclear structure, disturbing giant cell expansion and nematode reproduction. In vivo live-cell imaging of GFP-KRP4 demonstrated that this protein co-localizes to chromosomes from prophase to late anaphase during cell cycle progression. • The data presented here suggest the involvement of KRP4 during mitotic progression in plant cells. The detailed results obtained using confocal analysis also demonstrate the potential utility of a rapid, easy-to-use clearing method for the analysis of the nuclei of certain Arabidopsis mutants and other complex plant nuclei.

  19. Flares in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Restuccia, Giovanna; Boiardi, Luigi; Cavazza, Alberto; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Muratore, Francesco; Cimino, Luca; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Crescentini, Filippo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the frequency, timing, and characteristics of flares in a large cohort of Italian patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to identify factors at diagnosis able to predict the occurrence of flares. We evaluated 157 patients with biopsy-proven transmural GCA diagnosed and followed at the Rheumatology Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital (Italy) for whom sufficient information was available from the time of diagnosis until at least 4 years of follow-up. Fifty-seven patients (36.5%) experienced ≥1 flares. Fifty-one (46.4%) of the 110 total flares (88 relapses and 22 recurrences) were experienced during the first 2 years after diagnosis. The majority of relapses occurred with doses of prednisone ≤ 10 mg/day (82.9%), whereas only 3.4% of relapses occurred for doses ≥ 25 mg/day. Polymyalgia rheumatica (46.5%) and cranial symptoms (41.9%) were the most frequent manifestations at the time of the first relapse. Cumulative prednisone dose during the first year and total cumulative prednisone dose were significantly higher in flaring patients compared with those without flares (7.8 ± 2.4 vs 6.7 ± 2.4 g, P = 0.02; 15.5 ± 8.9 vs 10.0 ± 9.2 g, P = 0.0001, respectively). The total duration of prednisone treatment was longer in flaring patients (58 ± 44 vs 30 ± 30 months, P = 0.0001). Patients with disease flares had at diagnosis more frequently systemic manifestations (P = 0.02) and fever ≥ 38°C (P = 0.02), significantly lower hemoglobin levels (P = 0.05), more frequent presence at temporal artery biopsy (TAB) specimens of giant cells (P = 0.04) and intraluminal acute thrombosis (P = 0.007), and more moderate/severe arterial inflammation (P = 0.009) compared with those without flares. In the multivariate model fever ≥ 38 °C (hazard ratio 2.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.32, P = 0.03) and the severity of inflammatory infiltrate

  20. Giant cell tumor of bone arising in long bones possibly originates from the metaphyseal region

    PubMed Central

    FUTAMURA, NAOHISA; URAKAWA, HIROSHI; TSUKUSHI, SATOSHI; ARAI, EISUKE; KOZAWA, EIJI; ISHIGURO, NAOKI; NISHIDA, YOSHIHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a primary benign bone tumor with a locally aggressive character. Definitive descriptions of the site of origin for this type of tumor are not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the site of origin of GCTB of long bones with regards to epiphyseal lines by means of radiographic examination. For that purpose, plain X-ray scans of 71 GCTBs arising in long bones were retrospectively reviewed. The tumor locations were the distal femur in 31 cases, proximal femur in 11 cases, proximal tibia in 13 cases, distal radius in 6 cases, proximal humerus in 5 cases and proximal fibula in 5 cases. The vertical center (VC) of the tumor was determined with X-ray anteroposterior view, and the correlation between the VC and the epiphyseal line, and between the distance from the epiphyseal line to the VC and tumor area or volume were analyzed using a regression model equation based on scatter plot diagrams. The VC of the tumor was located in the metaphyseal region in 57 cases, in the epiphyseal line in 11 cases and in the epiphyseal region in 3 cases. In cases of GCTB located in the distal femur or proximal tibia, significant correlations between the distance from the VC to the epiphyseal line and tumor area or volume were identified. The site of origin of GCTB was estimated to be located in the metaphyseal region. GCTB often occurs in mature patients, which renders it challenging to estimate the true site of origin of this lesion, since the metaphyseal line has disappeared in mature patients. The results of the present study suggest that GCTB possibly originates in the metaphyseal region. PMID:27073530

  1. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high.

  2. A Retrospective Study of Chinese Patients With Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; Ma, Sha; Zheng, Wenjie; Tian, Xinping; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective study was performed on 70 giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients in Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH). The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features of these Chinese GCA patients and explore the possible associated factors for severe ischemic manifestations. Medical charts of all patients were reviewed, and the demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were analyzed. The mean age at disease onset was 65.2 years old, and the ratio of male to female was 1:1. Fever and headache were most prominent symptoms at onset, which occurred in 51.4% and 30.0% of patients, respectively. Common manifestations at diagnosis were constitutional symptoms (85.7%), headache (68.8%), visual impairment (38.6%), jaw claudication (30%), scalp tenderness (30%), and concurrent polymyalgia rheumatic (27.1%). No significant difference in clinical manifestations between genders was observed. Comparisons between patients with and without severe ischemic manifestations including jaw claudication, permanent visual loss, or cerebrovascular accident had shown that fever and asthenia were significantly less frequent in patients with severe ischemic manifestations (P = 0.006 and 0.023, respectively), and the mean value of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was significantly lower in patients with severe ischemic manifestations than patients without (P = 0.001). History of smoking was more frequent in patients with severe ischemic manifestations (P = 0.038). This is the largest group of GCA patients from China so far. When compared our data with patients reported in the literature, this series of GCA patients were younger and without female predominance. The clinical manifestations of patients in this report were similar to other studies except for a higher prevalence of constitutional symptoms. The results of this study indicated that lower systemic inflammatory response and the history of smoking might be associated with severe ischemic

  3. Prevalence and distribution of VZV in temporal arteries of patients with giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    White, Teresa; Khmeleva, Nelly; Heintzman, Anna; Choe, Alexander; Boyer, Philip J.; Grose, Charles; Carpenter, John E.; Rempel, April; Bos, Nathan; Kandasamy, Balasubramaniyam; Lear-Kaul, Kelly; Holmes, Dawn B.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mandava, Naresh; Eberhart, Charles G.; Bockelman, Brian; Poppiti, Robert J.; Tamhankar, Madhura A.; Fogt, Franz; Amato, Malena; Wood, Edward; Durairaj, Vikram; Rasmussen, Steve; Petursdottir, Vigdis; Pollak, Lea; Mendlovic, Sonia; Chatelain, Denis; Keyvani, Kathy; Brueck, Wolfgang; Nagel, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection may trigger the inflammatory cascade that characterizes giant cell arteritis (GCA). Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded GCA-positive temporal artery (TA) biopsies (50 sections/TA) including adjacent skeletal muscle and normal TAs obtained postmortem from subjects >50 years of age were examined by immunohistochemistry for presence and distribution of VZV antigen and by ultrastructural examination for virions. Adjacent regions were examined by hematoxylin & eosin staining. VZV antigen–positive slides were analyzed by PCR for VZV DNA. Results: VZV antigen was found in 61/82 (74%) GCA-positive TAs compared with 1/13 (8%) normal TAs (p < 0.0001, relative risk 9.67, 95% confidence interval 1.46, 63.69). Most GCA-positive TAs contained viral antigen in skip areas. VZV antigen was present mostly in adventitia, followed by media and intima. VZV antigen was found in 12/32 (38%) skeletal muscles adjacent to VZV antigen–positive TAs. Despite formalin fixation, VZV DNA was detected in 18/45 (40%) GCA-positive VZV antigen–positive TAs, in 6/10 (60%) VZV antigen–positive skeletal muscles, and in one VZV antigen–positive normal TA. Varicella-zoster virions were found in a GCA-positive TA. In sections adjacent to those containing VZV, GCA pathology was seen in 89% of GCA-positive TAs but in none of 18 adjacent sections from normal TAs. Conclusions: Most GCA-positive TAs contained VZV in skip areas that correlated with adjacent GCA pathology, supporting the hypothesis that VZV triggers GCA immunopathology. Antiviral treatment may confer additional benefit to patients with GCA treated with corticosteroids, although the optimal antiviral regimen remains to be determined. PMID:25695965

  4. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high. PMID:26009620

  5. Everolimus for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: 5‐year final analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agricola, Karen; Mays, Maxwell; Tudor, Cindy; Care, Marguerite M.; Holland‐Bouley, Katherine; Berkowitz, Noah; Miao, Sara; Peyrard, Séverine; Krueger, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cumulative efficacy and safety of everolimus in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGA) associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) from an open‐label phase II study (NCT00411619). Updated data became available from the conclusion of the extension phase and are presented in this ≥5‐year analysis. Methods Patients aged ≥ 3 years with a definite diagnosis of TSC and increasing SEGA lesion size (≥2 magnetic resonance imaging scans) received everolimus starting at 3mg/m2/day (titrated to target blood trough levels of 5–15ng/ml). The primary efficacy endpoint was reduction from baseline in primary SEGA volume. Results As of the study completion date (January 28, 2014), 22 of 28 (78.6%) initially enrolled patients finished the study per protocol. Median (range) duration of exposure to everolimus was 67.8 (4.7–83.2) months; 12 (52.2%) and 14 (60.9%) of 23 patients experienced SEGA volume reductions of ≥50% and ≥30% relative to baseline, respectively, after 60 months of treatment. The proportion of patients experiencing daily seizures was reduced from 7 of 26 (26.9%) patients at baseline to 2 of 18 (11.1%) patients at month 60. Most commonly reported adverse events (AEs) were upper respiratory tract infection and stomatitis of mostly grade 1 or 2 severity. No patient discontinued treatment due to AEs. The frequency of emergence of most AEs decreased over the course of the study. Interpretation Everolimus continues to demonstrate a sustained effect on SEGA tumor reduction over ≥5 years of treatment. Everolimus remained well‐tolerated, and no new safety concerns were noted. Ann Neurol 2015;78:929–938 PMID:26381530

  6. Surgical Outcomes in Patients with High Spinal Instability Neoplasm Score Secondary to Spinal Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Sankey, Eric W.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Lo, Sheng-Fu L.; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To describe the surgical outcomes in patients with high preoperative Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) secondary to spinal giant cell tumors (GCT) and evaluate the impact of en bloc versus intralesional resection and preoperative embolization on postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 14 patients with GCTs of the spine who underwent surgical treatment prior to the use of denosumab. A univariate analysis was performed comparing the patient demographics, perioperative characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients who underwent en bloc marginal (n = 6) compared with those who had intralesional (n = 8) resection. Results Six patients underwent en bloc resections and eight underwent intralesional resection. Preoperative embolization was performed in eight patients. All patients were alive at last follow-up, with a mean follow-up length of 43 months. Patients who underwent en bloc resection had longer average operative times (p = 0.0251), higher rates of early (p = 0.0182) and late (p = 0.0389) complications, and a higher rate of surgical revision (p = 0.0120). There was a 25% (2/8 patients) local recurrence rate for intralesional resection and a 0% (0/6 patients) local recurrence rate for en bloc resection (p = 0.0929). Conclusions Surgical excision of spinal GCTs causing significant instability, assessed by SINS, is associated with high intraoperative blood loss despite embolization and independent of resection method. En bloc resection requires a longer operative duration and is associated with a higher risk of complications when compared with intralesional resection. However, the increased morbidity associated with en bloc resection may be justified as it may minimize the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26835198

  7. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G.; Johnson, Jay R.; Miller, Federick W.; Matteson, Eric L.; Crowson, C. S.; Gabriel, S. E.

    2015-05-15

    Our objective was to examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We used data from patients with GCA (1950-2004) and RA (1955-2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results: The correlation of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0-1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5-7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4-5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8-11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions: AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4-5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. Lastly, the link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases.

  8. Usefulness of Rabbit Anti-thymocyte Globulin in Patients With Giant Cell Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Barrientos, Aida; Wong, Joyce; Bell, Alexander; Lyster, Haifa; Karagiannis, Georgios; Banner, Nicholas R

    2015-08-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is an aggressive inflammatory myocardial disease. Immunosuppression is an effective treatment for some cases. However, the duration of action of agents such as muromonab CD3 is short and others such as the calcineurin inhibitors may lead to renal failure. Here we describe the outcome of a novel approach to treatment using rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (RATG). A retrospective analysis of 6 patients treated with RATG for GCM was performed. Diagnosis was confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy, and RATG was administered with a high dose of corticosteroids. None of the patients had cytokine release syndrome or leukopenia, and 5 had thrombocytopenia (2 of them severe). Only 1 had a serious bleeding event that occurred after implantation of mechanical circulatory support. None developed impaired renal function after the treatment. Five were successfully discharged home with an increase in global left ventricular ejection fraction of 29%. Four are currently alive without recurrent disease, 1 of them after heart transplantation, with a mean follow-up of 970 days (423 to 1,875 days), left ventricular ejection fraction of 53%, and all in current New York Heart Association Classification class ≤II. Only 1 case had GCM recurrence. There were 2 deaths: one because of intracranial bleeding after mechanical circulatory support implantation and the other caused by primary graft dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with GCM can be successfully immunosuppressed with RATG and corticosteroids, thereby avoiding renal impairment. Early thrombocytopenia is the main adverse event. Larger cohorts of patients are necessary to compare the different immunosuppressant strategies available for GCM in a randomized fashion. PMID:26048854

  9. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B

    2016-03-29

    Tyrannosaurids--the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus--were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80-66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90-92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size. PMID:26976562

  10. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusatte, Stephen L.; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-03-01

    Tyrannosaurids-the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus-were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80-66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90-92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size.

  11. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B

    2016-03-29

    Tyrannosaurids--the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus--were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80-66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90-92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size.

  12. New tyrannosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of Uzbekistan clarifies evolution of giant body sizes and advanced senses in tyrant dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Brusatte, Stephen L.; Averianov, Alexander; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Muir, Amy; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrannosaurids—the familiar group of carnivorous dinosaurs including Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus—were the apex predators in continental ecosystems in Asia and North America during the latest Cretaceous (ca. 80–66 million years ago). Their colossal sizes and keen senses are considered key to their evolutionary and ecological success, but little is known about how these features developed as tyrannosaurids evolved from smaller basal tyrannosauroids that first appeared in the fossil record in the Middle Jurassic (ca. 170 million years ago). This is largely because of a frustrating 20+ million-year gap in the mid-Cretaceous fossil record, when tyrannosauroids transitioned from small-bodied hunters to gigantic apex predators but from which no diagnostic specimens are known. We describe the first distinct tyrannosauroid species from this gap, based on a highly derived braincase and a variety of other skeletal elements from the Turonian (ca. 90–92 million years ago) of Uzbekistan. This taxon is phylogenetically intermediate between the oldest basal tyrannosauroids and the latest Cretaceous forms. It had yet to develop the giant size and extensive cranial pneumaticity of T. rex and kin but does possess the highly derived brain and inner ear characteristic of the latest Cretaceous species. Tyrannosauroids apparently developed huge size rapidly during the latest Cretaceous, and their success in the top predator role may have been enabled by their brain and keen senses that first evolved at smaller body size. PMID:26976562

  13. To be seen or to hide: visual characteristics of body patterns for camouflage and communication in the Australian giant cuttlefish Sepia apama.

    PubMed

    Zylinski, S; How, M J; Osorio, D; Hanlon, R T; Marshall, N J

    2011-05-01

    It might seem obvious that a camouflaged animal must generally match its background whereas to be conspicuous an organism must differ from the background. However, the image parameters (or statistics) that evaluate the conspicuousness of patterns and textures are seldom well defined, and animal coloration patterns are rarely compared quantitatively with their respective backgrounds. Here we examine this issue in the Australian giant cuttlefish Sepia apama. We confine our analysis to the best-known and simplest image statistic, the correlation in intensity between neighboring pixels. Sepia apama can rapidly change their body patterns from assumed conspicuous signaling to assumed camouflage, thus providing an excellent and unique opportunity to investigate how such patterns differ in a single visual habitat. We describe the intensity variance and spatial frequency power spectra of these differing body patterns and compare these patterns with the backgrounds against which they are viewed. The measured image statistics of camouflaged animals closely resemble their backgrounds, while signaling animals differ significantly from their backgrounds. Our findings may provide the basis for a set of general rules for crypsis and signals. Furthermore, our methods may be widely applicable to the quantitative study of animal coloration. PMID:21508613

  14. Physical growth, sexual maturation, body image and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, M. L.; Allen, F. H.; Cepeda, N. J.; Yang, Y. M.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study assessed delays in physical growth and sexual maturation, self-esteem and body image in youth with homozygous sickle hemoglobin disease (HgbSS). METHOD: A consecutive sample of 30 subjects age 8 through 19 with homozygous sickle cell disease (hemoglobin SS) and a similar number of control subjects matched for age, race, gender and socioeconomic status and free of chronic illness were examined for height, weight and Tanner staging of sexual development. Subjects also completed the Body Cathexis Scale and Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale. Assessments were with paired samples t-tests. RESULTS: The subjects with sickle cell disease had significantly lower weights and were shorter than matched control subjects. Sexual development (physical) was also delayed in the sickle cell subjects. The study failed to find significant differences for either body image or self-esteem. CONCLUSIONS: The latency age and adolescent subjects with sickle cell disease had significant delays in physical (height, weight, secondary sexual characteristics) maturation. The study failed to find significant differences in either self-esteem or body image between the two groups. Theoretical constructs from the literature were presented which questioned the belief that these expected delays in physical growth and sexual maturation have an adverse effect upon self-esteem and body image. PMID:10800281

  15. Telomerase RNA Accumulates in Cajal Bodies in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yusheng; Tomlinson, Rebecca L.; Lukowiak, Andrew A.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA repeats at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. The RNA component of the enzyme (hTR) provides the template for telomere synthesis, which is catalyzed by telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Little is known regarding the subcellular localization of hTR and hTERT and the pathway by which telomerase is assembled. Here we report the first glimpse of the detailed subcellular localization of endogenous hTR in human cells, which we obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Our studies have revealed a distinctive hTR localization pattern in cancer cells. We have found that hTR accumulates within intranuclear foci called Cajal bodies in all typical tumor-derived cell lines examined (in which telomerase is active), but not in primary or ALT cells (where little or no hTERT is present). Accumulation of hTR in the Cajal bodies of primary cells is induced when hTERT is ectopically expressed. Moreover, we report that hTERT is also found in Cajal bodies. Our data suggest that Cajal bodies are involved in the assembly and/or function of human telomerase. PMID:14528011

  16. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    PubMed Central

    Beilby, Mary J.

    2015-01-01

    Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i) very large cell size, (ii) position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii) continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt sensitive C. australis succumbs to 50–100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells are discussed in

  17. The cell's view of animal body-plan evolution.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Deirdre C; Martindale, Mark Q; Srivastava, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    An adult animal's form is shaped by the collective behavior of cells during embryonic development. To understand the forces that drove the divergence of animal body-plans, evolutionary developmental biology has focused largely on studying genetic networks operating during development. However, it is less well understood how these networks modulate characteristics at the cellular level, such as the shape, polarity, or migration of cells. We organized the "Cell's view of animal body plan evolution" symposium for the 2014 The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting with the explicit goal of bringing together researchers studying the cell biology of embryonic development in diverse animal taxa. Using a broad range of established and emerging technologies, including live imaging, single-cell analysis, and mathematical modeling, symposium participants revealed mechanisms underlying cells' behavior, a few of which we highlight here. Shape, adhesion, and movements of cells can be modulated over the course of evolution to alter adult body-plans and a major theme explored during the symposium was the role of actomyosin in coordinating diverse behaviors of cells underlying morphogenesis in a myriad of contexts. Uncovering whether conserved or divergent genetic mechanisms guide the contractility of actomyosin in these systems will be crucial to understanding the evolution of the body-plans of animals from a cellular perspective. Many speakers presented research describing developmental phenomena in which cell division and tissue growth can control the form of the adult, and other presenters shared work on studying cell-fate specification, an important source of novelty in animal body-plans. Participants also presented studies of regeneration in annelids, flatworms, acoels, and cnidarians, and provided a unifying view of the regulation of cellular behavior during different life-history stages. Additionally, several presentations highlighted technological

  18. The cell's view of animal body-plan evolution.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Deirdre C; Martindale, Mark Q; Srivastava, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    An adult animal's form is shaped by the collective behavior of cells during embryonic development. To understand the forces that drove the divergence of animal body-plans, evolutionary developmental biology has focused largely on studying genetic networks operating during development. However, it is less well understood how these networks modulate characteristics at the cellular level, such as the shape, polarity, or migration of cells. We organized the "Cell's view of animal body plan evolution" symposium for the 2014 The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting with the explicit goal of bringing together researchers studying the cell biology of embryonic development in diverse animal taxa. Using a broad range of established and emerging technologies, including live imaging, single-cell analysis, and mathematical modeling, symposium participants revealed mechanisms underlying cells' behavior, a few of which we highlight here. Shape, adhesion, and movements of cells can be modulated over the course of evolution to alter adult body-plans and a major theme explored during the symposium was the role of actomyosin in coordinating diverse behaviors of cells underlying morphogenesis in a myriad of contexts. Uncovering whether conserved or divergent genetic mechanisms guide the contractility of actomyosin in these systems will be crucial to understanding the evolution of the body-plans of animals from a cellular perspective. Many speakers presented research describing developmental phenomena in which cell division and tissue growth can control the form of the adult, and other presenters shared work on studying cell-fate specification, an important source of novelty in animal body-plans. Participants also presented studies of regeneration in annelids, flatworms, acoels, and cnidarians, and provided a unifying view of the regulation of cellular behavior during different life-history stages. Additionally, several presentations highlighted technological

  19. Central retinal artery occlusion as an iatrogenic complication of treatment of central giant cell granuloma of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Gauri; Gupta, Swati; Bhushan, Urvashi; Raina, Usha Kaul

    2015-05-01

    Although intralesional steroid injection as a management option for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the mandible is considered safe, central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is a dreaded and previously unreported complication of this treatment modality. The present report discusses an iatrogenic case of CRAO that occurred during treatment of CGCG of the mandible. This complication occurred because of high injection pressure, which led to the opening of an anastomosis between the external and internal carotid arteries, leading to retrograde migration of steroid particles. This report also highlights the importance of being aware of such communications.

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Link, Thomas; Cho, Soo-Jin; Motamedi, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate. PMID:27630783

  1. Alternative surgical treatment for giant-cell reparative granuloma in the metacarpal, using phenol and ethanol adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Akio; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Shuichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2007-01-01

    Giant-cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) or a solid variant of an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an uncommon benign reactive lesion with a predilection for the small tubular bones of the hands and feet. Treatment usually involves wide resection or amputation because of unacceptable high recurrence rates after curettage. Adjuvant therapy usually is applied to reduce the recurrence of locally aggressive bone tumors. We report 2 cases of GCRG that were treated successfully with curettage, adjuvant phenol and ethanol, and autogenous bone grafting.

  2. Painless giant cell thyroiditis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration and associated with intense thyroidal uptake of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, L.R.; Moreno, A.J.; Pittman, D.L.; Jones, J.D.; Spicer, M.J.; Tracy, K.P.

    1986-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with fever, goiter, and no evidence of pain or tenderness in the thyroid. A diagnosis of silent thyroiditis was made after obtaining evidence of biochemical thyrotoxicosis, intense gallium-67 citrate thyroidal localization, and cytologic thyroiditis. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid revealed numerous giant cells in all areas of the thyroid, typical of subacute thyroiditis. This is believed to be the first time painless thyroiditis is reported with the classic cytologic feature of painful subacute thyroiditis.

  3. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface.

    PubMed

    Burke, Colin; Link, Thomas; O'Donnell, Richard J; Cho, Soo-Jin; Motamedi, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate. PMID:27630783

  4. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Documented Progression over 4 Years from Its Origin at the Metaphysis to the Articular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Link, Thomas; Cho, Soo-Jin; Motamedi, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate.

  5. Rare Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor in the Internal Auditory Canal: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Ajit S.; Shrivastava, Raj K.; Mannan, Abul; Kobets, Andrew; Manolidis, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a benign but locally aggressive bone tumor that usually involves the end of long bones. It is a relatively common neoplasm in patients, constituting 5 to 10% of all benign bone tumors. Approximately 2% of GCTs occur in the craniofacial skeleton with a predilection for the ethmoid, sphenoid, and temporal bones. The skull base location is unique and not commonly described. Hearing loss, headache, tinnitus, and subcutaneous masses are the most commonly reported symptoms in GCTs of the skull base. In this case report we present the first description of a GCT within the internal auditory canal causing cranial neuropathy and review the recent pertinent literature. PMID:26251814

  6. Intracellular pH of giant salivary gland cells of the leech Haementeria ghilianii: regulation and effects on secretion.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, W A; Munsch, T; Berry, M S

    1994-04-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) and membrane potential (Em) of giant salivary gland cells of the leech, Haementeria ghilianii, were measured with double-barrelled, neutral-carrier, pH-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. Em was -51 +/- 11.2 mV and pHi was 6.98 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- S.D., N = 41) in Hepes-buffered saline (nominally HCO3(-)-free; extracellular pH, pHe = 7.4). pHi was independent of Em. 3. Amiloride (2 mmol l-1) had no effect on resting pHi or on pHi recovery from an acid load (induced by the NH4+ pre-pulse technique). Removal of external Na+ produced a progressive acidification which was blocked by amiloride, and the drug also slowed the recovery of pHi on reintroduction of Na+. The results indicate the presence of an electroneutral Na+/H+ exchanger whose access to amiloride is competitively blocked by Na+. 4. In certain smaller cells of the gland, which probably form a separate population, removal of external Na+ did not affect pHi, and recovery from an acid load was blocked by amiloride. There may, therefore, be two types of Na+/H+ exchanger, differing in reversibility and sensitivity to amiloride. 5. Recovery of pHi from NH4(+)-induced acid loading was not affected by bicarbonate-buffered saline (2% CO2; 11 mmol l-1 HCO3-) or by addition of the anion-exchange blocker SITS (10(-4) mol l-1). This suggests that there is no significant contribution of a HCO3(-)-dependent transport mechanism to pHi regulation in the gland cells. 6. Removal of external Cl- slowly reduced pHi and there was a transient increase (overshoot) in pHi when Cl- was reintroduced. These effects of Cl- are probably explained by changes in the Na+ gradient. Intracellular Na+ and Cl- activities were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes. 7. Acidification with NH4+ was difficult, probably because of the cells' poor permeability to this ion. Attempts to introduce NH4+ via the Na+ pump or Na+/Cl- transporter were not successful. The H+/K+ ionophore nigericin (1 microgram ml-1), however, produced

  7. CD10 and CD138 can be expressed in giant cell tumor of bone: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Al-Abbadi, Mousa A; Al-Yousef, Mohammed J; Yousef, Mohammad M; Sheikh, Salwa S; Almasri, Nidal M; Amr, Samir S

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a primary bone neoplasm which is characterized by the presence of mononuclear cells (MCs) and osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Up to our knowledge, CD10 immunoreactivity in GCTB has not yet been studied, and only one study touched on CD138 immunoreactivity in GCTB. The objective of this study is to investigate the immunoreactivity of CD10 and CD138 in GCTB. We offer a discussion of our findings in the context of the differential diagnosis, particularly in small biopsy material. We retrieved and reviewed 15 well-documented cases of GCTB from January 2008 to December 2014. Well-controlled standard immunohistochemical satins were performed on these cases for CD10 and CD138 and few other selected antibodies. Immunoreactivity for CD10 was membranous and was found in 14 (93%) cases. This immunoreactivity was found only in the MCs, whereas the MNGC were all negative. CD138 showed variable positivity in 11 (73%) while 4 (37%) were completely negative. Similar to CD10, staining for CD138 was only seen in the MC; however, the immunoreactivity was predominantly concentrated in the peri-vascular areas. Most of GCTB cases can show variable immunoreactivity for CD10 and CD138. The aforementioned immune-expression raise the possibility of a role in the pathogenesis of GCTB. Paying attention to this immunoreactivity is recommended when considering the clinical and radiological differential diagnosis, especially in small biopsy specimens. PMID:27390668

  8. CD10 and CD138 can be expressed in giant cell tumor of bone: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abbadi, Mousa A.; Al-Yousef, Mohammed J.; Yousef, Mohammad M.; Sheikh, Salwa S.; Almasri, Nidal M.; Amr, Samir S.

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a primary bone neoplasm which is characterized by the presence of mononuclear cells (MCs) and osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Up to our knowledge, CD10 immunoreactivity in GCTB has not yet been studied, and only one study touched on CD138 immunoreactivity in GCTB. The objective of this study is to investigate the immunoreactivity of CD10 and CD138 in GCTB. We offer a discussion of our findings in the context of the differential diagnosis, particularly in small biopsy material. We retrieved and reviewed 15 well-documented cases of GCTB from January 2008 to December 2014. Well-controlled standard immunohistochemical satins were performed on these cases for CD10 and CD138 and few other selected antibodies. Immunoreactivity for CD10 was membranous and was found in 14 (93%) cases. This immunoreactivity was found only in the MCs, whereas the MNGC were all negative. CD138 showed variable positivity in 11 (73%) while 4 (37%) were completely negative. Similar to CD10, staining for CD138 was only seen in the MC; however, the immunoreactivity was predominantly concentrated in the peri-vascular areas. Most of GCTB cases can show variable immunoreactivity for CD10 and CD138. The aforementioned immune-expression raise the possibility of a role in the pathogenesis of GCTB. Paying attention to this immunoreactivity is recommended when considering the clinical and radiological differential diagnosis, especially in small biopsy specimens. PMID:27390668

  9. Hox proteins: sculpting body parts by activating localized cell death.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Claudio R

    2002-11-19

    Hox proteins shape animal structures by eliciting different developmental programs along the anteroposterior body axis. A recent study reveals that the Drosophila Hox protein Deformed directly activates the cell-death-promoting gene reaper to maintain the boundaries between distinct head segments.

  10. Different Scoring Methods of FDG PET/CT in Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Stellingwerff, Menno D.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Lensen, Karel-Jan D.F.; Rutgers, Abraham; Arends, Suzanne; van der Geest, Kornelis S.M.; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most frequent form of vasculitis in persons older than 50 years. Cranial and systemic large vessels can be involved. [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used to diagnose inflammation of the large arteries in GCA. Unfortunately, no consensus exists on the preferred scoring method. In the present study, we aim to define the optimal FDG PET/CT scoring method for GCA diagnosis using temporal artery biopsy and clinical diagnosis as the reference method. FDG PET/CT scans of GCA patients (12 glucocorticoid-naive, 6 on glucocorticoid treatment) and 3 control groups (inflammatory, atherosclerotic, and normal controls) were evaluated. We compared 2 qualitative visual methods (i.e. (1a) first impression and (1b) vascular uptake versus liver uptake) and 4 semiquantitative methods ((2a) SUVmax aorta, (2b) SUVmax aorta-to-liver ratio, (2c) SUVmax aorta-to-superior-caval-vein ratio, and (2d) SUVmax aorta-to-inferior-caval-vein ratio). FDG uptake pattern (diffuse or focal) and presence of arterial calcifications were also scored. Diagnostic accuracy of the visual method vascular versus liver uptake (1b) was highest when the cut-off point “vascular uptake higher than liver uptake” (sensitivity 83%, specificity 91%) was used. Sensitivity increased to 92% when patients on glucocorticoids were excluded from the analysis. Regarding the semiquantitative methods, the aorta-to-liver ratio (2b) with a cutoff of 1.03 had the highest diagnostic accuracy, with a sensitivity and specificity of 69% and 92%, respectively. Sensitivity increased to 90% when patients on glucocorticoids were excluded. The number of vascular segments with diffuse FDG uptake pattern was significantly higher in GCA patients without glucocorticoid use compared with all control patient groups. CRP was not significantly different between positive and negative FDG PET scans in the GCA group. Visual vascular

  11. Steroid-sparing effect and toxicity of dapsone treatment in giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Kim Heang; Dalmay, François; Gondran, Guillaume; Palat, Sylvain; Bezanahary, Holy; Cypierre, Anne; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Liozon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although a glucocorticoid (GC)-sparing strategy is needed for patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffering from refractory disease or serious treatment-related complications, evidence of efficacy in this setting of immunosuppressive drugs and biotherapies is lacking. Herein, we evaluated the GC-sparing effects and tolerability of addition of dapsone (DDS) to prednisone therapy in patients with GCA. We retrospectively assessed data on 18 GCA patients who received DDS as a first-line treatment (DDS-1 group) and 52 patients who received it as a second- or third-line treatment for refractory GCA, with or without excessive GC-related toxicity (DDS-2 group). Of these 70 patients, 63 belonged to an inception cohort of 478 patients, whereas the remaining 7 were referred to our department for resistant GCA. In all, 52 patients were assessable for DDS efficacy. The baseline characteristics of the DDS-1 patients were similar to those of 395 GCA patients (control group) who received prednisone alone. DDS-1 patients had a more sustained decrease in GC dose with a lower mean prednisone dose at 12 months, and they comprised higher proportions who achieved GC withdrawal within the first year, who stopped prednisone treatment, and who recovered from GCA (P < 0.001 for each variable). Patients in the DDS-2 group achieved a mean rate of prednisone reduction of 65% and a prednisone dose reduction of 16.9 ± 13.3 mg/d. The monthly decreases in the prednisone dose were 2.4 and 1.25 mg in DDS-1 and DDS-2 patients, respectively. DDS-induced side effects were recorded in 44 (64%) assessable patients. These side effects led to lowering of the DDS dose by 25 mg/d in 11 (16%) patients and permanent cessation of DDS in 14 patients (20%), due to allergic skin rash in 7, agranulocytosis in 2, icteric hepatitis in 2, and excessive hemolysis in 2 patients. DDS is a potent GC-sparing agent in GCA that should be evaluated in prospective studies. However, DDS use should

  12. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G; Johnson, Jay R; Miller, Federick W; Matteson, Eric L; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We used data from patients with GCA (1950–2004) and RA (1955–2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results The correlation of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0–1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5–7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4–5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8–11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4–5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. The link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25979866

  13. Do solar cycles influence giant cell arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis incidence?

    DOE PAGES

    Wing, Simon; Rider, Lisa G.; Johnson, Jay R.; Miller, Federick W.; Matteson, Eric L.; Crowson, C. S.; Gabriel, S. E.

    2015-05-15

    Our objective was to examine the influence of solar cycle and geomagnetic effects on the incidence of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: We used data from patients with GCA (1950-2004) and RA (1955-2007) obtained from population-based cohorts. Yearly trends in age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence were correlated with the F10.7 index (solar radiation at 10.7 cm wavelength, a proxy for the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation) and AL index (a proxy for the westward auroral electrojet and a measure of geomagnetic activity). Fourier analysis was performed on AL, F10.7, and GCA and RA incidence rates. Results: The correlationmore » of GCA incidence with AL is highly significant: GCA incidence peaks 0-1 year after the AL reaches its minimum (ie, auroral electrojet reaches a maximum). The correlation of RA incidence with AL is also highly significant. RA incidence rates are lowest 5-7 years after AL reaches maximum. AL, GCA and RA incidence power spectra are similar: they have a main peak (periodicity) at about 10 years and a minor peak at 4-5 years. However, the RA incidence power spectrum main peak is broader (8-11 years), which partly explains the lower correlation between RA onset and AL. The auroral electrojets may be linked to the decline of RA incidence more strongly than the onset of RA. The incidences of RA and GCA are aligned in geomagnetic latitude. Conclusions: AL and the incidences of GCA and RA all have a major periodicity of about 10 years and a secondary periodicity at 4-5 years. Geomagnetic activity may explain the temporal and spatial variations, including east-west skewness in geographic coordinates, in GCA and RA incidence, although the mechanism is unknown. Lastly, the link with solar, geospace and atmospheric parameters need to be investigated. These novel findings warrant examination in other populations and with other autoimmune diseases.« less

  14. Reminiscences of work with Alex Hope: the movement of water and ions in giant algal cells, 1963-1967.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter H

    2009-12-01

    This article, from the Tribute to Alex Hope Symposium at the 2008 Australian Society for Biophysics meeting, represents reminiscences of PhD studies done under my former supervisor, Professor Alex Hope. The studies demonstrated and quantified electroosmosis in giant algal cells of Chara and isolated segments of cell wall by measuring instantaneous current-induced volume flows. The studies also uncovered and modelled an unstirred-layer transport number effect that gave rise to an additional transiently increasing current-induced volume flow component, which could be mistaken for electroosmosis. In addition, action potential induced volume flows and pressure changes were measured in these cells and successfully modelled. An appreciation of the influence of Alex Hope and his laboratory environment, together with some of the further studies that resulted from this work, is also mentioned.

  15. Prognostic Impact of Reduced Connexin43 Expression and Gap Junction Coupling of Neoplastic Stromal Cells in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Peter; Maros, Mate Elod; Barna, Gabor; Antal, Imre; Papp, Gergo; Sapi, Zoltan; Athanasou, Nicholas Anthony; Benassi, Maria Serena; Picci, Pierro; Krenacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations of the GJA1 gene encoding the gap junction channel protein connexin43 (Cx43) cause bone malformations resulting in oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), while GJA1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop osteopenia. In this study we investigated Cx43 expression and channel functions in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), a locally aggressive osteolytic lesion with uncertain progression. Cx43 protein levels assessed by immunohistochemistry were correlated with GCTB cell types, clinico-radiological stages and progression free survival in tissue microarrays of 89 primary and 34 recurrent GCTB cases. Cx43 expression, phosphorylation, subcellular distribution and gap junction coupling was also investigated and compared between cultured neoplastic GCTB stromal cells and bone marow stromal cells or HDFa fibroblasts as a control. In GCTB tissues, most Cx43 was produced by CD163 negative neoplastic stromal cells and less by CD163 positive reactive monocytes/macrophages or by giant cells. Significantly less Cx43 was detected in α-smooth muscle actin positive than α-smooth muscle actin negative stromal cells and in osteoclast-rich tumor nests than in the adjacent reactive stroma. Progressively reduced Cx43 production in GCTB was significantly linked to advanced clinico-radiological stages and worse progression free survival. In neoplastic GCTB stromal cell cultures most Cx43 protein was localized in the paranuclear-Golgi region, while it was concentrated in the cell membranes both in bone marrow stromal cells and HDFa fibroblasts. In Western blots, alkaline phosphatase sensitive bands, linked to serine residues (Ser369, Ser372 or Ser373) detected in control cells, were missing in GCTB stromal cells. Defective cell membrane localization of Cx43 channels was in line with the significantly reduced transfer of the 622 Da fluorescing calcein dye between GCTB stromal cells. Our results show that significant downregulation of Cx43 expression and gap junction coupling in

  16. Introducing Micrometer-Sized Artificial Objects into Live Cells: A Method for Cell–Giant Unilamellar Vesicle Electrofusion

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akira C.; Ogura, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Kei; Murata, Satoshi; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a method for introducing large objects of up to a micrometer in diameter into cultured mammalian cells by electrofusion of giant unilamellar vesicles. We prepared GUVs containing various artificial objects using a water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion centrifugation method. GUVs and dispersed HeLa cells were exposed to an alternating current (AC) field to induce a linear cell–GUV alignment, and then a direct current (DC) pulse was applied to facilitate transient electrofusion. With uniformly sized fluorescent beads as size indexes, we successfully and efficiently introduced beads of 1 µm in diameter into living cells along with a plasmid mammalian expression vector. Our electrofusion did not affect cell viability. After the electrofusion, cells proliferated normally until confluence was reached, and the introduced fluorescent beads were inherited during cell division. Analysis by both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry supported these findings. As an alternative approach, we also introduced a designed nanostructure (DNA origami) into live cells. The results we report here represent a milestone for designing artificial symbiosis of functionally active objects (such as micro-machines) in living cells. Moreover, our technique can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cell manipulation. PMID:25229561

  17. Tales from supereruptions: Combining pumice and mineral textures with phase equilibria to constrain the evolution of giant silicic magma bodies in the crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, G. A. R.; Pamukcu, A. S.; Wright, K. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Miller, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    Supereruption deposits demonstrate that giant magma bodies sporadically exist within the Earth's crust. We rely on study of such deposits to better understand the underlying magma bodies and their eruptions. We are studying several deposits: Bishop Tuff (BT, CA USA), Peach Spring Tuff (PST, SW USA), and Oruanui Tuff (OT, NZ). We combine quantitative textural characterization in 3D via x-ray tomography (XRT), focusing particularly on CSDs of major and accessory minerals; characterization of mineral zoning, particularly of Ti and CL in quartz, including inferences from diffusion chronometry; documentation of glass inclusion textures in 3D via XRT, with implications to crystallization timescales; and phase equilibria modeling (rhyolite-MELTS), including glass (inclusion and matrix) composition geobarometry, to constrain crystallization conditions. CSDs ubiquitously record a growth-dominated regime, characterized by limited nucleation, consistent with pre-eruptive crystallization under low supersaturation. Phenocryst interiors are largely unzoned, consistent with phase equilibria predictions of nearly invariant, effectively isothermal crystallization. Glass compositions record storage over a large spread of depths (~125-250 MPa) for early and late-erupted BT, while the OT represents multiple magma batches evacuated from different depths. Diffusion chronometry and melt inclusion faceting suggest pre-eruptive crystallization over centennial timescales. CSDs and mineral textures also record syn-eruptive crystallization, which results in huge numbers of small crystals, revealing extensive nucleation prior to eruption. Crystal rims develop on pre-existing phenocrysts, and they can be obvious if compositionally distinct from interiors (BT and PST). In PST, evidence for rim crystallization from hotter magma is very strong. BT contrasts with PST in many ways; evidence for heating is ambiguous, and pumice properties are difficult to reconcile with magma mixing, while the

  18. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  19. Hyalinizing Spindle Cell Tumor with Giant Rosettes with Pulmonary Metastasis After a Long Hiatus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eundeok; Lee, Eunjung; Shin, Okran; Kang, Changsuk; Kim, Joon Mee; Chu, Young Chae

    2004-01-01

    "Hyalinizing spindle cell tumor with giant rosettes" (HSCTGR) is a recently described tumor, which is regarded as an unusual variant of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. Proof of a metastatic potential was lacking. The patient in the report was a 35-yr-old woman who showed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules with massive pleural effusion in the right side. She had a history of a mass excision in the right thigh 11 yrs ago at another hospital, which was reported as a "leiomyoma". Two years before this presentation, the patient received a routine chest radiograph which demonstrated bilateral multiple pulmonary nodules. A lobectomy of the left upper lung was performed. The histological findings revealed a well-circumscribed nodule that was characterized by a spindle-shaped fibrous to hyalinized stroma with criss-crossing short fascicles and giant collagen rosettes surrounded by a rim of spindle-shaped cells. Electron microscopy confirmed the fibroblastic nature of the tumor. This case, in addition to at least two other cases reported in the literature, demonstrates that the HSCTGR is a malignant neoplasm with the capacity to metastasize after a long hiatus. PMID:15308860

  20. Primary Urinary Bladder Angiosarcoma with Osteoclast-Like Multinucleated Giant Cells: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nawar, Nariman A.; Olsen, Jamie; Jelic, Tomislav M.; He, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Urinary bladder angiosarcoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: TURBT Specialty: Diagnostics, Laboratory Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Angiosarcoma is a fatal and aggressive mesenchymal tumor. It occurs in skin, breast, and parenchymal organs. It rarely arises primarily in the urinary bladder. Only 13 cases of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma have been reported in the English literature. Case Report: The patient was a 68-year-old man who presented to the Emergency Department with inability to void. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a urinary bladder mass. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Pathological examination results were consistent with angiosarcoma. In addition to the unusual location of this tumor, the pathology was different from the previously reported cases in that this case was rich with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells. Conclusions: The pathological diagnosis of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma is challenging. Histological patterns and immunophenotypes are variable. Here, we review all reported cases of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma, highlight the clinical and morphological features of this malignant neoplasm, and report a unique case of primary urinary bladder angiosarcoma with osteoclast-like multinucleated giant cells. PMID:26947436

  1. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and persistent hyperamylasemia as a presentation of pancreatic osteoclastic giant cell tumor: an unusual presentation of a rare tumor.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rampurwala, Murtuza; Rai, Mridula; Golioto, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of the pancreas are rare neoplasms divided into three forms: osteoclastic, pleomorphic, and mixed. We report an unusual case of a 62-year-old male presenting with recurrent acute pancreatitis and found to have a mass in the head of the pancreas on routine imaging. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a main pancreatic duct stricture, with brush cytology revealing the diagnosis of osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas. Whipple's procedure was successfully performed for resection of this tumor. and IAP.

  2. A case of osteoclast-like giant cell-rich epithelioid glioblastoma with BRAF V600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Funata, Nobuaki; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Yamada, Ryoji; Shinoura, Nobusada

    2016-01-01

    Epithelioid glioblastomas (E-GBMs) are rare, highly aggressive tumors consisting of closely packed tumor cells with smooth, round cell borders and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. They tend to affect younger patients compared with conventional GBM. BRAF V600E mutation is characteristically found in approximately 50% of all E-GBMs, compared with a low frequency of this mutation in conventional GBM. Here, we report an unusual case of glioma involving the right frontal lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus in an HIV-positive 30-year-old man on antiretroviral therapy. The lesion was composed of abundant discohesive, monotonous epithelioid cells with extensive necrosis, spindle and polyhedral cells, low-grade oligoastrocytoma-like areas, sarcomatous components, and numerous osteoclast-like giant cells (OLGCs) intermingled with epithelioid tumor cells. As the epithelioid cells accounted for more than one-third of the tumor, a pathological diagnosis of E-GBM was made. BRAF V600E mutation was detected in both oligoastrocytoma-like and epithelioid cell components. Similar to previously reported findings on E-GBM associated with low-grade glioma, this case suggested that low-grade astrocytic glioma with BRAF V600E mutation progressed to E-GBM. OLGCs are rarely observed in gliomas, and this is the first case report of E-GBM associated with abundant OLGC infiltration.

  3. Polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis in older patients: diagnosis and pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jean; Warrington, Kenneth J

    2011-08-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an inflammatory vasculopathy that involves large- and medium-sized arteries and can cause vision loss, stroke and aneurysms. GCA occurs in people aged >50 years and is more common in women. A higher incidence of the disease is observed in populations from Northern European countries. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a periarticular inflammatory process manifesting as pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulders and pelvic girdle. PMR shares the same pattern of age and sex distribution as GCA. The pathophysiology of PMR and GCA is not completely understood, but the two conditions may be related and often occur concurrently. A delay in the diagnosis should be avoided because of the risk of vascular ischaemic complications due to GCA. The diagnosis should be considered in patients aged >50 years presenting with symptoms such as new headache, visual disturbances, jaw claudication or symptoms of PMR. GCA can also present as a systemic inflammatory syndrome with fever of unknown origin. Marked elevation of acute-phase reactants, recognizable in higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, is often seen in both PMR and GCA. However, some patients can present with a normal ESR. Confirmation of the diagnosis of GCA by temporal artery biopsy is important because clinical findings and laboratory tests are not specific, and because a diagnosis of GCA commits patients to long-term treatment with corticosteroids. The role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of GCA remains unclear, but these modalities can be helpful in assessing the extent of vascular involvement, especially when extra-cranial disease is present. In PMR, subdeltoid and subacromial bursitis can be identified by imaging techniques, especially ultrasound or MRI. The clinical manifestations of GCA and PMR respond dramatically within 12-48 hours of starting corticosteroid treatment. The initial corticosteroid dosage commonly used in GCA is oral

  4. How did bacterial ancestors reproduce? Lessons from L-form cells and giant lipid vesicles: multiplication similarities between lipid vesicles and L-form bacteria.

    PubMed

    Briers, Yves; Walde, Peter; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J

    2012-12-01

    In possible scenarios on the origin of life, protocells represent the precursors of the first living cells. To study such hypothetical protocells, giant vesicles are being widely used as a simple model. Lipid vesicles can undergo complex morphological changes enabling self-reproduction such as growth, fission, and extra- and intravesicular budding. These properties of vesicular systems may in some way reflect the mechanism of reproduction used by protocells. Moreover, remarkable similarities exist between the morphological changes observed in giant vesicles and bacterial L-form cells, which represent bacteria that have lost their rigid cell wall, but retain the ability to reproduce. L-forms feature a dismantled cellular structure and are unable to carry out classical binary fission. We propose that the striking similarities in morphological transitions of L-forms and giant lipid vesicles may provide insights into primitive reproductive mechanisms and contribute to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of mechanisms of cell reproduction. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Synthesizing artificial cells from giant unilamellar vesicles: State-of-the art in the development of microfluidic technology Abstract. PMID:23108858

  5. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja M; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  6. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  7. Priming Silicic Giant Magma Bodies: Finding Evidence for Internal Forcing Versus External Triggering of Supereruptions by Phase Equilibria Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Kennedy, B.

    2015-12-01

    isochoric crystallization is a good proxy for the evolution of natural magma bodies, then external triggers are the ultimate cause for eruption of silicic magmas. Bishop compositions seem more prone to internal triggering than Mamaku compositions, particularly for isochoric conditions.

  8. Cell secretion from the adult lamprey supraneural body tissues possesses cytocidal activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Wang, Shiyue; Ba, Wei; Li, Qingwei

    2015-01-01

    The supraneural body was identified in the adult lamprey, and its secretions induced the death of a variety of tumor cells but had no effect on normal cells. The cell secretions from different lamprey tissues were separated, and these secretions killed human tumor cells to varying degrees. The cell secretions induced remarkable cell morphological alterations such as cell blebbing, and the plasma membrane was destroyed by the secretions. In addition, the secretions induced morphological alterations of the mitochondria, cytoskeletal structure, and endoplasmic reticulum, eventually leading to cell death. These observations suggest the presence of a novel protein in the lamprey and the possibility of new applications for the protein in the medical field.

  9. Osteoclastome-like giant cell thyroid carcinoma controlled by intensive radiation and adriamycin, in a patient with meningioma and multiple myeloma treated by radiation and cytoxan

    SciTech Connect

    Vizel-Schwartz, M.

    1981-01-01

    The eighth cases of osteoclastome-like giant cell carcinoma of the thyroid, and the first one to be treated with adriamycin in addition to surgery and radiation, is reported. This rare variant of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma appeared in a patient operated on for meningioma and treated for multiple myeloma with cranial radiation and chronic administration of cytoxan.

  10. Mutation Analysis of H3F3A and H3F3B as a Diagnostic Tool for Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cleven, Arjen H G; Höcker, Saskia; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge; Szuhai, Karoly; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-11-01

    Specific H3F3A driver mutations and IDH2 mutations were recently described in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) and H3F3B driver mutations in chondroblastoma; these may be helpful as a diagnostic tool for giant cell-containing tumors of the bone. Using Sanger sequencing, we determined the frequency of H3F3A, H3F3B, IDH1, and IDH2 mutations in GCTBs (n=60), chondroblastomas (n=12), and other giant cell-containing tumors (n=24), including aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, and telangiectatic osteosarcoma. To find an easy applicable marker for H3F3A mutation status, H3K36 trimethylation and ATRX expression were correlated with H3F3A mutations. In total, 69% of all GCTBs harbored an H3F3A (G34W/V) mutation compared with 0% of all other giant cell-containing tumors (P<0.001), whereas 70% of chondroblastomas showed an H3F3B (K36M) mutation compared with 0% of other giant cell-containing tumors (P<0.001). Diffuse H3K36 trimethylation positivity was more often seen in mutated H3F3A GCTBs compared with other giant cell-containing tumors (P=0.005). ATRX protein expression was not correlated with H3F3A mutation status. Hotspot mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 were absent. Our results show that H3F3A and H3F3B mutation analysis appears to be a highly specific, although less sensitive, diagnostic tool for the distinction of GCTB and chondroblastoma from other giant cell-containing tumors. Although H3K36 trimethylation and ATRX immunohistochemistry cannot be used as surrogate markers for H3F3A mutation status, mutations in H3F3A are associated with increased H3K36 trimethylation, suggesting that methylation at this residue may play a role in the etiology of the disease.

  11. Mutation Analysis of H3F3A and H3F3B as a Diagnostic Tool for Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cleven, Arjen H G; Höcker, Saskia; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge; Szuhai, Karoly; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-11-01

    Specific H3F3A driver mutations and IDH2 mutations were recently described in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) and H3F3B driver mutations in chondroblastoma; these may be helpful as a diagnostic tool for giant cell-containing tumors of the bone. Using Sanger sequencing, we determined the frequency of H3F3A, H3F3B, IDH1, and IDH2 mutations in GCTBs (n=60), chondroblastomas (n=12), and other giant cell-containing tumors (n=24), including aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, and telangiectatic osteosarcoma. To find an easy applicable marker for H3F3A mutation status, H3K36 trimethylation and ATRX expression were correlated with H3F3A mutations. In total, 69% of all GCTBs harbored an H3F3A (G34W/V) mutation compared with 0% of all other giant cell-containing tumors (P<0.001), whereas 70% of chondroblastomas showed an H3F3B (K36M) mutation compared with 0% of other giant cell-containing tumors (P<0.001). Diffuse H3K36 trimethylation positivity was more often seen in mutated H3F3A GCTBs compared with other giant cell-containing tumors (P=0.005). ATRX protein expression was not correlated with H3F3A mutation status. Hotspot mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 were absent. Our results show that H3F3A and H3F3B mutation analysis appears to be a highly specific, although less sensitive, diagnostic tool for the distinction of GCTB and chondroblastoma from other giant cell-containing tumors. Although H3K36 trimethylation and ATRX immunohistochemistry cannot be used as surrogate markers for H3F3A mutation status, mutations in H3F3A are associated with increased H3K36 trimethylation, suggesting that methylation at this residue may play a role in the etiology of the disease. PMID:26457357

  12. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Ana Belen Alvarez; Lucas, Michaela; Dilley, Rodney J; McLenachan, Samuel; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Requena, Jordi; Sal, Marti Farrera; Lucas, Andrew; Alvarez, Inaki; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Edel, Michael J

    2014-04-04

    Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids), bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye), cardiac muscle tissue (heart), primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth), and functional liver buds (liver). Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1) such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2) whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  13. Lethal Giant Larvae 1 Tumour Suppressor Activity Is Not Conserved in Models of Mammalian T and B Cell Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Edwin D.; Oliaro, Jane; Ramsbottom, Kelly M.; Ting, Stephen B.; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Harvey, Michael; Kinwell, Tanja; Ghysdael, Jacques; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Russell, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial and stem cells, lethal giant larvae (Lgl) is a potent tumour suppressor, a regulator of Notch signalling, and a mediator of cell fate via asymmetric cell division. Recent evidence suggests that the function of Lgl is conserved in mammalian haematopoietic stem cells and implies a contribution to haematological malignancies. To date, direct measurement of the effect of Lgl expression on malignancies of the haematopoietic lineage has not been tested. In Lgl1−/− mice, we analysed the development of haematopoietic malignancies either alone, or in the presence of common oncogenic lesions. We show that in the absence of Lgl1, production of mature white blood cell lineages and long-term survival of mice are not affected. Additionally, loss of Lgl1 does not alter leukaemia driven by constitutive Notch, c-Myc or Jak2 signalling. These results suggest that the role of Lgl1 in the haematopoietic lineage might be restricted to specific co-operating mutations and a limited number of cellular contexts. PMID:24475281

  14. Hemodynamic Transesophageal Echocardiography-Guided Venous-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in a Case of Giant Cell Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Robert A.; Menke, David M.; Olave, Maria C.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a rare and commonly fatal form of fulminant myocarditis. During the acute phase, while immunosuppressive therapy is initiated, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support is commonly used as a bridge to heart transplantation or recovery. Until recently, conventional transesophageal echocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were the tools available for hemodynamic assessment of patients on this form of mechanical circulatory support. Nevertheless, both techniques have their limitations. We present a case of a 54-year-old man diagnosed with GCM requiring VA-ECMO support that was monitored under a novel miniaturized transesophageal echocardiography (hTEE) probe recently approved for 72 hours of continuous hemodynamic monitoring. Our case highlights the value of this novel, flexible, and disposable device for hemodynamic monitoring, accurate therapy guidance, and potential VA-ECMO weaning process of patients with this form of severe myocarditis.

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  16. The treatment of giant cell tumors by curettage and filling with acrylic cement. Long-term functional results.

    PubMed

    Segura, J; Albareda, J; Bueno, A L; Nuez, A; Palanca, D; Seral, F

    1997-01-01

    Curettage and filling with acrylic cement in the treatment of para-articular giant cell tumor (GCT) has multiple advantages as compared to other methods; nonetheless, the possibility of progression in arthrosis is still a drawback. The literature does not report long-term functional results when this method was used. Four cases are presented with a mean long-term follow-up of 13.5 years (minimum 11, maximum 18). Clinical results, evaluated by the Enneking system (18), were excellent, and there were no radiological modifications, so that we believe that this is the method to choose for Campanacci stage I and II GCT (1), and in some stage III cases, as joint function is not compromised in time.

  17. Hemodynamic Transesophageal Echocardiography-Guided Venous-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in a Case of Giant Cell Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Robert A.; Menke, David M.; Olave, Maria C.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a rare and commonly fatal form of fulminant myocarditis. During the acute phase, while immunosuppressive therapy is initiated, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support is commonly used as a bridge to heart transplantation or recovery. Until recently, conventional transesophageal echocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were the tools available for hemodynamic assessment of patients on this form of mechanical circulatory support. Nevertheless, both techniques have their limitations. We present a case of a 54-year-old man diagnosed with GCM requiring VA-ECMO support that was monitored under a novel miniaturized transesophageal echocardiography (hTEE) probe recently approved for 72 hours of continuous hemodynamic monitoring. Our case highlights the value of this novel, flexible, and disposable device for hemodynamic monitoring, accurate therapy guidance, and potential VA-ECMO weaning process of patients with this form of severe myocarditis. PMID:27648312

  18. [A model of using magnetic resonance imaging in osteoarticular tumor lesion in case of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Sherman, L A

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with giant cell tumors (GCT) underwent a comprehensive radiation diagnosis involving X-ray study and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The obtained MR images indicated the high efficiency of this combination of radiation diagnostic techniques in solving the problems in the visualization of osteoarticular tumor lesions. GCT is characterized by well-known primary X-ray semiotics; MR images are also rather pathognomonic of these tumors and they illustrate the process of morphogenesis of these masses. MRI made it possible to solve the specific problems facing a physician (a radiation diagnostician), to determine the site, shape, sizes, volume, and local extent of a tumor, which permitted the planning of surgical treatment policy; to assess its results, to reveal possible inflammatory complications; and to visualize a local recurrence and on-going growth of a tumor, including the signs of GCT malignancy.

  19. Hemodynamic Transesophageal Echocardiography-Guided Venous-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in a Case of Giant Cell Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan G; Ratzlaff, Robert A; Menke, David M; Olave, Maria C; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Díaz-Gómez, José L

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a rare and commonly fatal form of fulminant myocarditis. During the acute phase, while immunosuppressive therapy is initiated, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support is commonly used as a bridge to heart transplantation or recovery. Until recently, conventional transesophageal echocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were the tools available for hemodynamic assessment of patients on this form of mechanical circulatory support. Nevertheless, both techniques have their limitations. We present a case of a 54-year-old man diagnosed with GCM requiring VA-ECMO support that was monitored under a novel miniaturized transesophageal echocardiography (hTEE) probe recently approved for 72 hours of continuous hemodynamic monitoring. Our case highlights the value of this novel, flexible, and disposable device for hemodynamic monitoring, accurate therapy guidance, and potential VA-ECMO weaning process of patients with this form of severe myocarditis. PMID:27648312

  20. Vascular solitary fibrous tumor with "floret" cells or giant cell angiofibroma? A lingual example highlighting the overlapping characteristics of these entities and positive immunoreaction for estrogen and progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Piperi, Evangelia; Rohrer, Michael D; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2009-05-01

    Recent literature suggests that giant cell angiofibroma (GCAF) is a variant of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) and not just a related lesion. Herein we present a case of apparent SFT with giant cells, including floret cells and focal pseudovascular areas, which are defining features of GCAF. The tumor occurred in the tongue of an 84-year-old female and depicted an encapsulated, patternless spindle cell proliferation in a fibromyxoid stroma with focal dense collagenous areas and scattered floret-type multinucleated giant cells seen primarily in the periphery, as well as pseudovascular spaces, numerous capillaries, and hemangiopericytomalike areas. Immunohistochemical investigation revealed positive staining for CD34 and positive immunoreaction for estrogen and progesterone receptors. We support the present notion that GCAF is a histologic subtype of SFT.

  1. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and the risk of subsequent aortic complications in giant-cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Liozon, Eric; Lambert, Marc; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Artigues, Nicolas; Geffray, Loïk; Boutemy, Jonathan; Ollivier, Yann; Maigné, Gwénola; Ly, Kim; Huglo, Damien; Hachulla, Eric; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Aouba, Achille; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies reported a 2- to 17-fold higher risk of aortic complications (dilation or dissection) in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We aimed to determine whether or not GCA patients with large-vessel involvement demonstrated by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) have a higher risk of aortic complications. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study between 1995 and 2014. Patients were included if they fulfilled at least 3 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with extratemporal biopsy-proven giant-cell vasculitis; they underwent at least 1 FDG-PET/CT scan at diagnosis or during follow-up; and the morphology of the aorta was assessed by medical imaging at diagnosis. Patients with an aortic complication at the time of diagnosis were excluded. Of the 130 patients included [85 women (65%), median age 70 (50–86)], GCA was biopsy proven in 77 (59%). FDG-PET/CT was performed at diagnosis in 63 (48%) patients and during the follow-up period in the 67 (52%) remaining patients. FDG-PET/CT was positive in 38/63 (60%) patients at diagnosis and in 31/67 (46%) patients when performed during follow-up (P = NS). One hundred four patients (80%) underwent at least 1 morphological assessment of the aorta during follow-up. Nine (9%) patients developed aortic complications (dilation in all and dissection in 1) at a median time of 33 (6–129) months after diagnosis. All of them displayed large-vessel inflammation on previous FDG-PET/CT. A positive FDG-PET/CT was significantly associated with a higher risk of aortic complications (P = 0.004). In our study, a positive FDG-PET/CT was associated with an increased risk of aortic complications at 5 years. PMID:27367985

  2. Giant vesicles: preparations and applications.

    PubMed

    Walde, Peter; Cosentino, Katia; Engel, Helen; Stano, Pasquale

    2010-05-01

    There is considerable interest in preparing cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles from natural or nonnatural amphiphiles because a giant vesicle membrane resembles the self-closed lipid matrix of the plasma membrane of all biological cells. Currently, giant vesicles are applied to investigate certain aspects of biomembranes. Examples include lateral lipid heterogeneities, membrane budding and fission, activities of reconstituted membrane proteins, or membrane permeabilization caused by added chemical compounds. One of the challenging applications of giant vesicles include gene expressions inside the vesicles with the ultimate goal of constructing a dynamic artificial cell-like system that is endowed with all those essential features of living cells that distinguish them from the nonliving form of matter. Although this goal still seems to be far away and currently difficult to reach, it is expected that progress in this and other fields of giant vesicle research strongly depend on whether reliable methods for the reproducible preparation of giant vesicles are available. The key concepts of currently known methods for preparing giant unilamellar vesicles are summarized, and advantages and disadvantages of the main methods are compared and critically discussed. PMID:20336703

  3. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  4. The riddle of multinucleated “floret-like” giant cells and their detection in an extensive gluteal neurofibroma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The neurofibromatoses are inherited tumor predisposition syndromes involving two major clinical phenotypes: neurofibromatosis type 1 (von Recklinghausen's disease) is linked to chromosome 17q, and tends to occur seven times more frequently than neurofibromatosis type 2. Neurofibromatosis type 1 entails a distinctive cutaneous manifestation prevailed upon by benign neurofibromas, which may vary in size, number and distribution. On the histological level, neurofibromas are composed of an admixture of neurilemmal cells, including Schwann cells, fibroblasts, and – to a lesser extent – perineurial cells. Case presentation The case of a 39-year-old Caucasian man with a voluminous recurrent neurofibroma of 27×15cm extending from the left gluteal region to thoraco-lumbar levels Th6 through L4 is reported. Within the soft tissue tumor a pseudocyst of 7.3×9.3cm was found preoperatively. Conclusion Histopathological study of the excised mass was conspicuous for revealing a large number of multinucleated floret-like giant cells within an otherwise classical soft tissue neurofibroma. Previous reports on neurofibromas with multinucleated floret-like giant cells are distinctly scant. Available evidence from the literature does not suggest any consistent correlation of multinucleated floret-like giant cells in neurofibromas with gender, age, traumatic antecedents, size of the lesion, recurrence, or malignant transformation. Furthermore, the presence of such cells may not be specific for neurofibromatosis type 1, as they occasionally are encountered in some unrelated mesenchymal neoplasms as well. PMID:23890233

  5. Appearance of differentiated cells derived from polar body nuclei in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Tsuguru; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2013-01-01

    In Bombyx mori, polar body nuclei are observed until 9 h after egg lying, however, the fate of polar body nuclei remains unclear. To examine the fate of polar body nuclei, we employed a mutation of serosal cell pigmentation, pink-eyed white egg (pe). The heterozygous pe/+ (pe) females produced black serosal cells in white eggs, while pe/pe females did not produce black serosal cells in white eggs. These results suggest that the appearance of black serosal cells in white eggs depends on the genotype (pe/+ (pe) ) of the mother. Because the polar body nuclei had + (pe) genes in the white eggs laid by a pe/+ (pe) female, polar body nuclei participate in development and differentiate into functional cell (serosal cells). Analyses of serosal cells pigmentation indicated that ~30% of the eggs contained polar-body-nucleus-derived cells. These results demonstrate that polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared at a high frequency under natural conditions. Approximately 80% of polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared near the anterior pole and the dorsal side, which is opposite to where embryogenesis occurs. The number of cells derived from the polar body nuclei was very low. Approximately 26% of these eggs contained only one black serosal cell. PCR-based analysis revealed that the polar-body-nucleus-derived cells disappeared in late embryonic stages (stage 25). Overall, polar-body-nuclei-derived cells were unlikely to contribute to embryos.

  6. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets.

  7. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets. PMID:25016314

  8. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  9. Circovirus inclusion bodies in intestinal muscle cells of a canary.

    PubMed

    Rampin, T; Manarolla, G; Pisoni, G; Recordati, C; Sironi, G

    2006-08-01

    Multiple cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in the intestinal smooth muscle cells of an adult canary from an aviary with a history of high mortality (50%) both in adult and young birds. Grossly, a mild enteritis was the only lesion appreciable. Smears of the proventricular contents contained a few megabacteria (Macrorhabdus ornithogaster). The intestinal inclusions were found in very high numbers in all parts of the tract examined. They appeared round to oval, amphophilic and hyaline in sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and magenta with Feulgen stain. Inclusions of the same type were occasionally detectable in the wall of a few splenic and pancreatic arteries. No inclusions or lesions were seen in the other organs examined. Transmission electron microscopy of the intestinal wall revealed circovirus-like particles either in paracrystalline arrays or loose arrangements, mostly within the cytoplasm of the intestinal muscule cells. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis confirmed infection with canary circovirus.

  10. Novel Cell Types, Neurosecretory Cells and Body Plan of the Early-Diverging Metazoan, Trichoplax adhaerens

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carolyn L.; Varoqueaux, Frédérique; Kittelmann, Maike; Azzam, Rita N.; Cooper, Benjamin; Winters, Christine A.; Eitel, Michael; Fasshauer, Dirk; Reese, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Trichoplax adhaerens is the best-known member of the Phylum Placozoa, one of the earliest-diverging metazoan phyla. It is a small disk-shaped animal that glides on surfaces in warm oceans to feed on algae. Prior anatomical studies of Trichoplax revealed that it has a simple three-layered organization with four somatic cell types. Results We reinvestigate the cellular organization of Trichoplax using advanced freezing and microscopy techniques to identify localize and count cells. Six somatic cell types are deployed in stereotyped positions. A thick ventral plate, comprising the majority of the cells, includes ciliated epithelial cells, newly identified lipophil cells packed with large lipid granules, and gland cells. Lipophils project deep into the interior where they alternate with regularly spaced fiber cells whose branches contact all other cell types, including cells of the dorsal and ventral epithelium. Crystal cells, each containing a birefringent crystal, are arrayed around the rim. Gland cells express several proteins typical of neurosecretory cells, and a subset of them, around the rim, also expresses an FMRFamide-like neuropeptide. Conclusions Structural analysis of Trichoplax with significantly improved techniques provides an advance in understanding its cell types and their distributions. We find two previously undetected cell types, lipohil and crystal cells, and an organized body plan in which different cell types are arranged in distinct patterns. The composition of gland cells suggests that they are neurosecretory cells and could control locomotor and feeding behavior. PMID:24954051

  11. Electron microscopy and computational studies of Ebh, a giant cell-wall-associated protein from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Sou; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Isao; Takei, Toshiaki; Yu, Jian; Kuroda, Makoto; Yao Min; Ohta, Toshiko; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2008-11-14

    Ebh, a giant protein found in staphylococci, contains several domains, including a large central region with 52 imperfect repeats of a domain composed of 126 amino acids. We used electron microscopy to observe the rod-like structure of a partial Ebh protein containing 10 repeating units. This is the first report of the direct observation of an Ebh structure containing a large number of repeating units, although structures containing one, two, or four repeating units have been reported. The observed structure of the partial Ebh protein was distorted and had a length of ca. 520 A and a width of ca. 21 A. The observed structures were consistent with those deduced from crystal structure analysis, suggesting that the Ebh domains are connected to form a rod-like structure. The crystal structure data revealed distorted, string-like features in the simulated structure of the whole-length Ebh protein. Superposition of fragments of the simulated whole-length structure of the Ebh protein onto each electron micrograph showed a high level of correlation between the observed and calculated structures. These results suggest that Ebh is composed of highly flexible filate molecules. The highly repetitive structure and the associated unique structural flexibility of Ebh support the proposed function of this protein, i.e. binding to sugars in the cell wall. This binding might result in intra-cell-wall cross-linking that contributes to the rigidity of bacterial cells.

  12. Hyperpolarizing photoreceptors in the eyes of the giant clam Tridacna: physiological evidence for both spiking and nonspiking cell types.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, L A

    1988-05-01

    Intracellular studies on photoreceptors in the eyes of the giant clam Tridacna give evidence for two types of light-sensitive cells, both of which are hyperpolarized by light. These cells are distinguished by the presence or absence of spikes and corresponding characteristics of the receptor potential. In non-spiking (NS) receptors, the average resting potential in the dark is low (-15 mV) and peak receptor potentials are large (to 100 mV) and adapt rapidly to light. Spiking (S) receptors have higher average resting potentials (-45 mV), but receptor potentials do not exceed 20 mV and also do not adapt to light. The spikes in S-receptors are small (3-8 mV), occur spontaneously at low levels of illumination and are inhibited by light. Bursts of spikes arise on the repolarizing off-component of the receptor potential. Light adaptation increases the excitability of S-receptors in terms of a higher frequency and shorter latency of the off response burst. The receptor potential in both cells is due to a light-activated increase in membrane conductance to potassium ions. Membrane conductance decreases in NS-receptors in relation to light adaptation. Unlike the scallop eye, no depolarizing photoreceptors are present.

  13. Spheroid body-forming cells in the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 possess cancer stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Ma, Lilin; Xu, Junfei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ruixin; Zhou, Youlang

    2013-02-01

    The cancer stem cell theory hypothesizes that cancer stem cells (CSCs), which possess self-renewal and other stem cell properties, are regarded as the cause of tumor formation, recurrence and metastasis. The isolation and identification of CSCs could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies specifically targeting CSCs. In this study, we enriched gastric cancer stem cells through spheroid body formation by cultivating the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 in defined serum-free medium. The stemness characteristics of spheroid body-forming cells, including self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance, tumorigenicity of the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were evaluated, and the expression levels of stemness genes and related proteins in the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were assessed. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining for the stem cell markers on spheroid body-forming cells was examined to evaluate the association between stemness factors (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog) and the proposed CSC marker CD44. Our data demonstrated that non-adherent spheroid body-forming cells from the gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 cultured in stem cell-conditioned medium possessed gastric CSC properties, such as persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, high tumorigenic capacity and overexpression of CSC-related genes and proteins (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44), compared with the parental cells. More importantly, CD44-positive cells co-expressing the pluripotency genes Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog may represent gastric CSCs. Further experiments using more refined selection criteria such as a combination of two or multiple markers would be useful to specifically identify and purify CSCs.

  14. Multinucleated giant cell cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as Mycobacterium bovis, induce a characteristic lesion known as a granulomas. Granulomas represent a specific host response to chronic antigenic stimuli, such as foreign bodies, certain bacterial components, or persistent pathoge...

  15. Increased TNF-α, IL-6 and decreased IL-1β immunohistochemical expression by the stromal spindle-shaped cells in the central giant cell granuloma of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Chrysomali, Evanthia; Stylogianni, Evangelia; Donta, Catherine; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: the exp ress ion of the osteoclastogenic cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were immunohistochemically evaluated in periph eral (PGCG) and central (CGCG) giant cell granulomas of the jaws in order to determine diff erences between these two lesions and between the two distinct tumor cell populations (multinucleated giant cells, MGCs and stromal sp indle-sh aped cells). Study Design: Paraffin-embedd ed tiss ue sections from 40 PGCG and 40 CGCG were immunohistochemically stained using antibodies against TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. The percentage of positively stained cells and the staining intensity were ass ess ed to provide a combined immunoreactivity score value. Results: TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were exp ress ed in all lesions. The CGCG compared to the PGCG sh owed significantly increased exp ress ion of TNF-α and IL-6 and decreased exp ress ion of IL-1β by the sp indle-sh aped cells and increased exp ress ion of IL-1β by the MGCs. The MGCs demonstrated in comparison to the stromal sp indlesh aped cells significantly increased exp ress ion of all three cytokines in both PGCG and CGCG. Conclusions: The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β seem to be involved in the growth process of PGCG and CGCG of the jaws. A poss ible alteration in the sy nthesis or/and activity of these cytokines by the stromal sp indle cells in the CGCGs may enhance osteolys is through the stimulation of osteoclast progenitor cells, given the fact that the intraoss eous lesions cause bone resorption. Key words: Giant cell granuloma, giant cell tumor, multinucleated giant cells, jaw, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1beta, immunohistochemistry. PMID:22157665

  16. Facile and efficient reprogramming of ciliary body epithelial cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Aiguo; Wu, Ming Jing; Nakanishi, Yuka; Chavala, Sai H

    2013-09-15

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive for cell replacement therapy, because they overcome ethical and immune rejection issues that are associated with embryonic stem cells. iPS cells have been derived from autonomous fibroblasts at low efficiency using multiple ectopic transcription factors. Recent evidence suggests that the epigenome of donor cell sources plays an important role in the reprogramming and differentiation characteristics of iPS cells. Thus, identification of somatic cell types that are easily accessible and are more amenable for cellular reprogramming is critical for regenerative medicine applications. Here, we identify ciliary body epithelial cells (CECs) as a new cell type for iPS cell generation that has higher reprogramming efficiency compared with fibroblasts. The ciliary body is composed of epithelial cells that are located in the anterior portion of the eye at the level of the lens and is readily surgically accessible. CECs also have a reduced reprogramming requirement, as we demonstrate that ectopic Sox2 and c-Myc are dispensable. Enhanced reprogramming efficiency may be due to increased basal levels of Sox2 in CECs. In addition, we are the first to report a cellular reprogramming haploinsufficiency observed when reprogramming with fewer factors (Oct4 and Klf4) in Sox2 hemizygous cells. Taken together, endogenous Sox2 levels are critical for the enhanced efficiency and reduced exogenous requirement that permit facile cellular reprogramming of CECs.

  17. Axoplasmic RNA species synthesized in the isolated squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Rapallino, M V; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    1988-07-01

    Isolated squid stellate nerves and giant fiber lobes were incubated for 8 hr in Millipore filtered sea water containing [3H]uridine. The electrophoretic patterns of radioactive RNA purified from the axoplasm of the giant axon and from the giant fiber lobe (cell bodies of the giant axon) demonstrated the presence of RNA species with mobilities corresponding to tRNA and rRNA. The presence of labeled rRNAs was confirmed by the behavior of the large rRNA component (31S) which, in the squid, readily dissociates into its two constituent moyeties (17S and 20S). Comparable results were obtained with the axonal sheath and the stellate nerve. In all the electrophoretic patterns, additional species of radioactive RNA migrated between the 4S and the 20S markers, i.e. with mobilities corresponding to presumptive mRNAs. Chromatographic analysis of the purified RNAs on oligo(dT)cellulose indicated the presence of labeled poly(A)+ RNA in all tissue samples. Radioactive poly(A)+ RNA represented approximately 1% of the total labeled RNA in the axoplasm, axonal sheath and stellate nerve, but more than 2% in the giant fiber lobe. The labeled poly(A)+ RNAs of the giant fibre lobe showed a prevalence of larger species in comparison to the axonal sheath and stellate nerve. In conclusion, the axoplasmic RNAs synthesized by the isolated squid giant axon appear to include all the major classes of axoplasmic RNAs, that is rRNA, tRNA and mRNA.

  18. Spin-Glass Behavior in a Giant Unit Cell Compound Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Xie, Weiwei; Gschneidner, Karl A; Miller, Gordon J; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2014-10-15

    In this paper we demonstrate evidence of a cluster spin glass in Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) (a compound with a giant cubic unit cell) via ac and dc magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic relaxation and heat capacity measurements. The results clearly show that Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) undergoes a spin glass phase transition at the freezing temperature, ~38 K. The good fit of the frequency dependence of the freezing temperature to the critical slowing down model and Vogel-Fulcher law strongly suggest the formation of cluster glass in the Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) system. The heat capacity data exhibit no evidence for long-range magnetic order, and yield a large value of Sommerfeld coefficient. The spin glass behavior of Tb117Fe52Ge113.8(1) may be understood by assuming the presence of competing interactions among multiple non-equivalent Tb sites present in the highly complex unit cell.

  19. Lipid body formation during maturation of human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Lappalainen, Jani; Käkelä, Reijo; Hattula, Katarina; Butcher, Sarah J; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2011-12-01

    Lipid droplets, also called lipid bodies (LB) in inflammatory cells, are important cytoplasmic organelles. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics and functions of LBs in human mast cells (MC). Here, we have analyzed the genesis and components of LBs during differentiation of human peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) progenitors into connective tissue-type MCs. In our serum-free culture system, the maturing MCs, derived from 18 different donors, invariably developed triacylglycerol (TG)-rich LBs. Not known heretofore, the MCs transcribe the genes for perilipins (PLIN)1-4, but not PLIN5, and PLIN2 and PLIN3 display different degrees of LB association. Upon MC activation and ensuing degranulation, the LBs were not cosecreted with the cytoplasmic secretory granules. Exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) enhanced LB genesis in Triacsin C-sensitive fashion, and it was found to be preferentially incorporated into the TGs of LBs. The large TG-associated pool of AA in LBs likely is a major precursor for eicosanoid production by MCs. In summary, we demonstrate that cultured human MCs derived from CD34(+) progenitors in peripheral blood provide a new tool to study regulatory mechanisms involving LB functions, with particular emphasis on AA metabolism, eicosanoid biosynthesis, and subsequent release of proinflammatory lipid mediators from these cells.

  20. Sphere formation permits Oct4 reprogramming of ciliary body epithelial cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Aiguo; Wu, Ming Jing; Chavala, Sai H

    2014-12-15

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined sets of transcription factors. We previously described reprogramming of monolayer-cultured adult mouse ciliary body epithelial (CE) cells by Oct4 and Klf4, but not with Oct4 alone. In this study, we report that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram CE cells to iPS cells through sphere formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sphere formation induces a partial reprogramming state characterized by expression of retinal progenitor markers, upregulation of reprogramming transcription factors, such as Sall4 and Nanog, demethylation in the promoter regions of pluripotency associated genes, and mesenchymal to epithelial transition. The Oct4-iPS cells maintained normal karyotypes, expressed markers for pluripotent stem cells, and were capable of differentiating into derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that sphere formation may render somatic cells more susceptible to reprogramming.

  1. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers. PMID:27390104

  2. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers.

  3. The epidemiological and clinical features of primary giant cell tumor around the knee: A report from the multicenter retrospective study in china

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fengsong; Hu, Yongcheng; Zhao, Liming; Zhang, Huilin; Yu, Xiuchun; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Zhaoming; Wu, Sujia; Guo, Shibing; Zhang, Guochuan; Wang, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to determine the demographic characteristics of giant cell tumor around the knee in China. Methods Between March 2000 and June 2014, patients with primary giant cell tumor around the knee were recruited from 6 institutions located in different regions of China, and were reviewed retrospectively the clinical features according to gender and age. Results 334 qualified patients were included in this study. The sex ratio was 1.14:1 (178/156), with mean ages of 36.9 years in men and 33.1 years in women, constituting a significant difference (P=0.007). The prevalence of pathological fracture was 32.9% overall (28.7% in men and 37.8% in women). The prevalence of simple fracture was significantly higher in women (26.3%) than in men (15.2%), P=0.042. Tumor location and staging did not differ significantly according to sex (P>0.05). However, comparing with >40 years old, those patients aged ≤40 were more likely to have a right knee tumor (56.7% vs. 44.7%, P=0.042), less likely to have Enneking stage 3 disease (18.6% vs. 35.0%, P=0.005), and less likely to have both soft-tissue extension and a mass (18.6% vs. 34.0%, P=0.009). Conclusions Giant cell tumor around the knee was more common in men than in women, although female patients were younger on average. Further, cases among patients ≤40 years old were observed to be milder than cases among older patients. The results suggest that efficient treatment and preservation of function should both be valued for young patients with giant cell tumor around the knee. PMID:26998425

  4. Total body irradiation selectively induces murine hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Schulte, Bradley A; LaRue, Amanda C; Ogawa, Makio; Zhou, Daohong

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and certain chemotherapeutic agents not only causes acute bone marrow (BM) suppression but also leads to long-term residual hematopoietic injury. This latter effect has been attributed to damage to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. Using a mouse model, we investigated whether IR induces senescence in HSCs, as induction of HSC senescence can lead to the defect in HSC self-renewal. It was found that exposure of C57BL/6 mice to a sublethal dose (6.5 Gy) of total body irradiation (TBI) resulted in a sustained quantitative and qualitative reduction of LKS+ HSCs. In addition, LKS+ HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited an increased expression of the 2 commonly used biomarkers of cellular senescence, p16(Ink4a) and SA-beta-gal. In contrast, no such changes were observed in irradiated LKS- hematopoietic progenitor cells. These results provide the first direct evidence demonstrating that IR exposure can selectively induce HSC senescence. Of interest, the induction of HSC senescence was associated with a prolonged elevation of p21(Cip1/Waf1), p19(Arf), and p16(Ink4a) mRNA expression, while the expression of p27(Kip1) and p18(Ink4c) mRNA was not increased following TBI. This suggests that p21(Cip1/Waf1), p19(Arf), and p16(Ink4a) may play an important role in IR-induced senescence in HSCs.

  5. [Incidental diagnosis of giant cell arteritis during a hybrid surgical approach in a patient with annuloaortic ectasia and an extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Eiji; Ohno, Nobuhisa; Hamuro, Mamoru; Yoshizawa, Kousuke; Imai, Kenta; Nagato, Hisao; Touma, Masanao; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of giant cell arteritis that was incidentally diagnosed during a hybrid( open surgical and endovascular) approach to an extensive thoracic aortic disease. A 78-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation and treatment of annuloaortic ectasia and an extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm. We performed aortic root replacement (Bentall procedure) and total aortic arch replacement using the elephant trunk technique under hypothermic circulatory arrest. Pathological examination of the aneurysmal wall revealed giant cell arteritis. He had no specific symptoms such as headache, jaw claudication, or vision loss. Because no findings except for a slightly elevated erythrocyte sediment rate were suggestive of active vasculitis, he was discharged from hospital without steroid therapy 6 weeks after open surgery. However, 4 weeks later he returned in hemorrhagic shock due to rupture of a residual descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. He underwent emergency endovascular repair but died intraoperatively. In conclusion, early second-stage procedure and postoperative steroid therapy may be useful in a patient with aortic aneurysm in giant cell arteritis undergoing a hybrid procedure.

  6. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Sandra M.; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de la Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose. L.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; García-Romero, Noemí; Luis, Jose; Cuñado, F.; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications. PMID:26477718

  7. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Sandra M.; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de La Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose. L.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; García-Romero, Noemí; Luis, Jose; Cuñado, F.; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications.

  8. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Sandra M; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de la Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose L; Rodríguez, María Josefa; García-Romero, Noemí; Cuñado, Jose Luis F; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-10-19

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications.

  9. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Sandra M; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de la Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose L; Rodríguez, María Josefa; García-Romero, Noemí; Cuñado, Jose Luis F; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications. PMID:26477718

  10. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and image analytic parameters characterizing the stromal component in primary and recurrent giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Charu Chandra; Safaya, Rajni; Kawatra Madan, Neha; Khan, Shah Alam; Iyer, Venkateswaran K

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign locally aggressive tumor whose biological behavior is unpredictable. Currently, there are no definitive clinical, histological, biochemical, or immunological parameters that can predict its behavior. This study was undertaken to examine whether delineation of reactive and neoplastic stromal component of GCT can help in this regard. 55 cases of GCT (30 primary, 25 recurrent) were subjected to histopathological grading, immunohistochemistry, and image analysis. Spindling of stroma was more frequent in recurrent GCT with 64% cases having more than 50% spindled stroma (p < 0.001). Number of mitosis/10 HPF and higher grade were more in recurrent GCT. Mean percentage positivity for CD68 (38.36%) and α1-ACT (70.86%) was higher in primary than recurrent GCT. PCNA and MiB-1 labeling indices were higher in recurrent (42.62% and 9.18%, respectively) than in primary group (24.75% and 7.7%, respectively). A single numerical parameter encompassing stromal cell population and its proliferation was derived as ratio of PCNA/CD68 and PCNA/α1-ACT. Both ratios were higher in recurrent (0.81 ± 0.38; 1.58 ± 1.50) than in primary GCT (0.58 ± 0.62; 0.34 ± 0.29) (p = 0.002; 0.01). On image analysis, parameters significantly different between the two groups were nuclear area and nuclear integrated optical density. It was thus concluded that recurrent GCT shows higher grade, increased mitosis, more spindling, fewer reactive components, and higher proliferation than primary GCT. Delineation of reactive component (α1-ACT positive) and proliferating component (PCNA positive cells) using immunohistochemistry with calculation of the PCNA/ACT ratio delivers more information than image analysis.

  11. Fungal Cell Gigantism during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 µm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with γ-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20–50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens. PMID:20585557

  12. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  13. Artificial finger joint replacement due to a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath with bone destruction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LU, HUI; SHEN, HUI; CHEN, QIANG; SHEN, XIANG-QIAN; WU, SHOU-CHENG

    2015-01-01

    The current study presents the case of a 25-year-old male who developed tumor recurrence of the proximal phalange of the ring finger on the right hand 4 years after partial tumor resection surgery. An X-ray of the right hand showed that the distal bone of the proximal phalange on the ring finger was destroyed. An artificial finger joint replacement was performed using a silicone joint for this unusual tumor recurrence. The pathological findings were indicative of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. As a result of surgery, the patient's proximal interphalangeal point motion recovered to the pre-operative level. The pre-operative and post-operative disabilities of the arm, at shoulder and hand and total activity measurement values were 1.67 and 3.33, and 255 and 243°, respectively. Complications such as tumor recurrence, joint dislocation and the requirement for prosthetic training were not observed during the 5-year follow-up period. PMID:26788157

  14. Venous Thromboembolism and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients with Giant Cell Arteritis: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S.; Makol, Ashima; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Saitta, Antonino; Salvarani, Carlo; Matteson, Eric L.; Warrington, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and cerebrovascular events in a community-based incidence cohort of patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to the general population. Methods A population-based inception cohort of patients with incident GCA between January 1, 1950 and December 31, 2009 in Olmsted County, Minnesota and a cohort of non-GCA subjects from the same population were assembled and followed until December 31, 2013. Confirmed VTE and cerebrovascular events were identified through direct medical record review. Results The study population included 244 patients with GCA with a mean ± SD age at diagnosis of 76.2 ± 8.2 years (79% women) and an average length of follow-up of 10.2 ± 6.8 years. Compared to non-GCA subjects of similar age and sex, patients diagnosed with GCA had a higher incidence (%) of amaurosis fugax (cumulative incidence ± SE: 2.1 ± 0.9 versus 0, respectively; p = 0.014) but similar rates of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and VTE. Among patients with GCA, neither baseline characteristics nor laboratory parameters at diagnosis reliably predicted risk of VTE or cerebrovascular events. Conclusion In this population-based study, the incidence of VTE, stroke and TIA was similar in patients with GCA compared to non-GCA subjects. PMID:26901431

  15. Inactivated autograft–prosthesis composite have a role for grade III giant cell tumor of bone around the knee

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumors (GCT) around the knee are common and pose a special problem of reconstruction after tumor excision, especially for grade III GCT. We questioned whether en bloc resection and reconstruction with alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite would provide (1) local control and long-term survival and (2) useful limb function in patients who had grade III GCT around the knee. Methods We retrospectively reviewed eight patients (5 males and 3 females) treated with this procedure with mean age of 31 years (range 20 to 43 years) from Jan 2007 to Oct 2008. 5 lesions were located in distal femur and 3 in proximal tibia. 4 patients were with primary tumor and the other 4 with recurrence. 2 patients showed pathological fracture. Results Mean Follow-up is 54 months ranging from 38 to 47 months. No recurrence, metastasis, prosthesis loosening were found. The mean healing time between autograft and host bone was 5.5 months. The mean MSTS score was 26.3 (88%) ranging from 25 to 29. The mean ISOLS composite graft score was 32.8 (88.5%) ranging from 28 to 35. Creeping substitution is possibly the main way in bony junction. The healing time in femoral lesion is faster than that in tibial lesion. Conclusions The technique of alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite could be able to achieve satisfactory oncological and functional outcomes in Grade III GCT. PMID:24209887

  16. Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporal Bone with Direct Invasion into the Middle Ear and Skull Base: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, Takashi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Ishii, Hisato; Kasai, Misato; Hayashi, Chieri; Arai, Hajime; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is classified as a benign bone tumor, and it is frequently identified at the epiphysis of long bones and relatively rare in the temporal bone. For orthopedists expert at recognizing bone and soft tissue tumors, the diagnosis of GCT is relatively easy; however, since head and neck surgeons experience few cases of GCT, it may be difficult to diagnose when it occurs in the temporal bone. A 32-year-old man complained of left hearing loss, aural fullness, and tinnitus. Examination of the ear revealed a bulging tumor. Audiologic examination demonstrated conductive hearing loss of the left ear. Computer tomograph of the temporal bone showed a soft-tissue-density specification indicating bone destruction at the left temporal bone. The tumor invaded the skull base. Imaging examinations using magnetic resonance imaging revealed a nonhomogenous isosignal intensity area on T1 at the left temporal bone. After intravenous gadolinium, the mass showed unequal enhancement. This patient subsequently underwent surgery to remove the lesion using transmastoid and middle fossa approach. Pathological examinations from specimens of the tumor revealed characteristic of GCT. No clinical or radiological evidence of tumor recurrence was detected for 4 years. PMID:22953120

  17. Molecular Profiling of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and the Osteoclastic Localization of Ligand for Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Teresa; Atkins, Gerald J.; Trivett, Melanie K.; Johnson, Sandra A.; Kansara, Maya; Schlicht, Stephen L.; Slavin, John L.; Simmons, Paul; Dickinson, Ian; Powell, Gerald; Choong, Peter F.M.; Holloway, Andrew J.; Thomas, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a generally benign, osteolytic neoplasm comprising stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. The osteoclastic cells, which cause bony destruction, are thought to be recruited from normal monocytic pre-osteoclasts by stromal cell expression of the ligand for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL). This model forms the foundation for clinical trials in GCTs of novel cancer therapeutics targeting RANKL. Using expression profiling, we identified both osteoblast and osteoclast signatures within GCTs, including key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and function such as RANKL, a C-type lectin, osteoprotegerin, and the wnt inhibitor SFRP4. After ex vivo generation of stromal- and osteoclast-enriched cultures, we unexpectedly found that RANKL mRNA and protein were more highly expressed in osteoclasts than in stromal cells, as determined by expression profiling, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The expression patterns of molecules implicated in signaling between stromal cells and monocytic osteoclast precursors were analyzed in both primary and fractionated GCTs. Finally, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, neither GCTs nor the derived stromal cells demonstrated significant genomic gains or losses. These data raise questions regarding the role of RANKL in GCTs that may be relevant to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. PMID:15972958

  18. Effects of gradient magnetic force and diamagnetic torque on formation of osteoclast-like giant cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ikehata, M.; Hirota, N.

    2009-03-01

    In bone tissue, two kinds of cells, osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC), contribute to remodeling of bone. In the present study, a co-culture system of bone-forming cell (OB) and -dissolving cell (OC) was incubated in static magnetic fields of horizontal 14 T and vertical gradient 10 T. Effect of two kinds of magnetic fields was an inhibition of OC formation. Three kinds of mechanisms, magnetic orientation of OB, diamagnetic torque force acting on OC, and possible reduction of earth's gravity were discussed.

  19. Simultaneous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Giant Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Involving Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. The concomitant occurrence of a renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma is extremely rare with only few cases being reported. Methods. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma involving small intestine. Surgical resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma and simultaneous right nephrectomy were performed. Results. Patient developed recurrent and metastatic disease and underwent debulking surgery following by chemotherapy. Despite aggressive behavior of the retroperitoneal sarcomas, patient is currently (7 years after simultaneous resection and nephrectomy) recurrence-free. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for both renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma. Debulking surgery and chemotherapy were helpful in our case. PMID:27595033

  20. Simultaneous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Giant Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Involving Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Reznichenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-01-01

    Background. The concomitant occurrence of a renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma is extremely rare with only few cases being reported. Methods. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma involving small intestine. Surgical resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma and simultaneous right nephrectomy were performed. Results. Patient developed recurrent and metastatic disease and underwent debulking surgery following by chemotherapy. Despite aggressive behavior of the retroperitoneal sarcomas, patient is currently (7 years after simultaneous resection and nephrectomy) recurrence-free. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for both renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma. Debulking surgery and chemotherapy were helpful in our case. PMID:27595033

  1. Baby STEPS: a giant leap for cell therapy in neonatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Borlongan, Cesar V; Weiss, Michael D

    2011-07-01

    We advance Baby STEPS or Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm in Stroke as a guide in facilitating the critical evaluation in the laboratory of the safety and efficacy of cell therapy for neonatal encephalopathy. The need to carefully consider the clinical relevance of the animal models in mimicking human neonatal brain injury, selection of the optimal stem cell donor, and the application of functional outcome assays in small and large animal models serve as the foundation for preclinical work and beginning to understand the mechanism of this cellular therapy. The preclinical studies will aid our formulation of a rigorous human clinical trial that encompasses not only efficacy testing but also monitoring of safety indices and demonstration of mechanisms of action. This schema forms the basis of Baby STEPS. Our goal is to resonate the urgent call to enhance the successful translation of cell therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  2. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  3. Cultured giant fiber lobe of squid expresses three distinct potassium channel activities in selective combinations.

    PubMed

    Griggs, W D; Hanyu, Y; Matsumoto, G

    1996-07-01

    Neurons from the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of squid Loligo bleekeri were dissociated and cultured. The ionic currents were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp methods. The sodium current and the noninactivating potassium current like those elicited by the giant axon were among the currents expressed in axonal bulbs and bulblike structures upon dissociation. Meanwhile axonless cell bodies did not elicit such currents. Axonless cell bodies and some bulblike structures elicited two kinds of inactivating potassium currents, the slow- and the fast-inactivating current, which differed in their inactivation kinetics and pharmacology. Within 24 hr of plating, the current composition remained the same. While the noninactivating current was not sensitive to 4-aminopyridine, the two inactivating currents were sensitive, the slow-inactivating current being more sensitive. Selective combinations of the sodium current and the three potassium currents expressed in different structures of the acutely dissociated GFL could have resulted from cellular control of synthesis and transportation of the channel proteins to the somatic and the axonal membrane. The sodium current and the noninactivating potassium current could be recorded from some axonless cell bodies maintained in culture for over three days, indicating that the separation of the giant axon from its somata could result in the transportation of the channels normally expressed on the giant axon membrane to the somatic membrane.

  4. Studies on the ingestion characteristics of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Dai, Xi-Lin; Jiang, Min; Zhu, Zheng-Guo; Yang, Ming-Hui; Liu, Xian-Zhong; Xu, Gui-Rong; Ding, Fu-Jiang

    2000-12-01

    The ingestion of giant freshwater prawn, Chinese prawn and giant tiger prawn had continuity and the ingestion high peak occurred at night. Light and temperature had significant effects on the daily ingestion rate (DIR) of giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Red light and blue light favorably induced favorable ingestion. In the adaptive range of temperature, the DIR increased with rising temperature and feeding frequency, but decreased with rising body weight.

  5. Our Bodies, Our Cells: Children's Activities in Body Systems. Children's Activity Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Marilyn

    The supplemental teaching resources provided in this book offer a variety of concrete, visual activities designed to help classroom and daycare center teachers introduce children to the human body and the way it is organized. An analogy comparing human body parts to house parts is used throughout the book to make lessons clear and age-appropriate.…

  6. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  7. Giant adrenal germ cell tumour in a 59-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Fang, Lu; Liu, Zhiqi; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Daming; Wang, Yi; Xie, Dongdong; Min, Jie; Ding, Demao; Zhang, Tao; Zou, Ci; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal germ cell tumour is very rare. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with right flank discomfort. The laboratory examinations were normal and the chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion. The abdominal CT scan revealed a large mass on the right adrenal gland. The patient underwent an adrenalectomy. Histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with mixed germ cell tumour. Three months later following the operation, the patient was admitted to our hospital again with chest tightness and shortness of breath. The chest CT showed right pleural effusion recurrence and enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes and right hilar lymph nodes. The patient had right supraclavicular lymphadenectasis on physical examination. Fine needle aspiration cytology from the supraclavicular lymph nodes showed groups of malignant tumour cells. The patient died within 6 months postoperatively. In this case, the lymph node pathway played an important role in the metastatic procedure.

  8. Encapsulation of Living Cells within Giant Phospholipid Liposomes Formed by the Inverse-Emulsion Technique.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Sampreeti; Cole, Christian M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2016-05-17

    Liposomes form spontaneously by the assimilation of phospholipids, the primary component of cell membranes. Due to their unique ability to form selectively permeable bilayers in situ, they are widely used as nanocarriers for drug and small-molecule delivery. However, there is a lack of straightforward methodologies to encapsulate living microorganisms. Here we demonstrate the successful encapsulation of whole cells in phospholipid vesicles by using the inverse-emulsion technique of generating unilamellar vesicles. This method of liposome preparation allows for a facile encapsulation of large biomaterials that previously was not easily attainable. Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we found that liposomes can protect the bacterium against external protease degradation and from harsh biological environments. Liposomes prepared by the inverse-emulsion method were also capable of encapsulating yeast and were found to be naturally susceptible to hydrolysis by enzymes such as phospholipases, thus highlighting their potential role as cell delivery carriers. PMID:26919463

  9. Giant photocurrent enhancement by transition metal doping in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, Gaurab; Pimachev, Artem K.; Yost, Andrew J.; Poudyal, Uma; Maloney, Scott; Wang, Wenyong; Chien, TeYu; Dahnovsky, Yuri; Tang, Jinke

    2016-09-01

    A huge enhancement in the incident photon-to-current efficiency of PbS quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells by manganese doping is observed. In the presence of Mn dopants with relatively small concentration (4 at. %), the photoelectric current increases by an average of 300% (up to 700%). This effect cannot be explained by the light absorption mechanism because both the experimental and theoretical absorption spectra demonstrate several times decreases in the absorption coefficient. To explain such dramatic increase in the photocurrent we propose the electron tunneling mechanism from the LUMO of the QD excited state to the Zn2SnO4 (ZTO) semiconductor photoanode. This change is due to the presence of the Mn instead of Pb atom at the QD/ZTO interface. The ab initio calculations confirm this mechanism. This work proposes an alternative route for a significant improvement of the efficiency for quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  10. [A case of giant bladder stone in a young man with neither lower urinary tract dysfunction nor foreign body in the bladder].

    PubMed

    Hori, Shunta; Momose, Hitoshi; Morizawa, Yosuke; Toyoshima, Yuta; Takada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Ken; Oyama, Nobuo

    2014-08-01

    A 38-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of lower urinary tract symptoms. He had undergone extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy to remove a right renal stone two times when he was 24 years old. Since examinations revealed right staghorn calculi and a giant bladder stone, vesicolithotomy was carried out. The removed stone measured 95 × 75 × 55 mm and weighed 250 g. We hypothesized that a fragment of the upper urinary tract stone had reached the bladder which could not be discharged spontaneously, and grew in the bladder. After the operation, uroflowmetry and voiding cystourethrography were performed and the results indicated no abnormalities in the lower urinary tract function.

  11. Molecular identification of SqKv1A. A candidate for the delayed rectifier K channel in squid giant axon

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the cDNA for a squid Kvl potassium channel (SqKv1A). SqKv1A mRNA is selectively expressed in giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons, the somata of the giant axons. Western blots detect two forms of SqKv1A in both GFL neuron and giant axon samples. Functional properties of SqKv1A currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes are very similar to macroscopic currents in GFL neurons and giant axons. Macroscopic K currents in GFL neuron cell bodies, giant axons, and in Xenopus oocytes expressing SqKv1A, activate rapidly and inactivate incompletely over a time course of several hundred ms. Oocytes injected with SqKv1A cRNA express channels of two conductance classes, estimated to be 13 and 20 pS in an internal solution containing 470 mM K. SqKv1A is thus a good candidate for the "20 pS" K channel that accounts for the majority of rapidly activating K conductance in both GFL neuron cell bodies and the giant axon. PMID:8882864

  12. Molecular identification of SqKv1A. A candidate for the delayed rectifier K channel in squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, J J; Vickery, R G; Gilly, W F

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned the cDNA for a squid Kvl potassium channel (SqKv1A). SqKv1A mRNA is selectively expressed in giant fiber lobe (GFL) neurons, the somata of the giant axons. Western blots detect two forms of SqKv1A in both GFL neuron and giant axon samples. Functional properties of SqKv1A currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes are very similar to macroscopic currents in GFL neurons and giant axons. Macroscopic K currents in GFL neuron cell bodies, giant axons, and in Xenopus oocytes expressing SqKv1A, activate rapidly and inactivate incompletely over a time course of several hundred ms. Oocytes injected with SqKv1A cRNA express channels of two conductance classes, estimated to be 13 and 20 pS in an internal solution containing 470 mM K. SqKv1A is thus a good candidate for the "20 pS" K channel that accounts for the majority of rapidly activating K conductance in both GFL neuron cell bodies and the giant axon.

  13. The Megavoltage Radiation Therapy in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Difficult Giant Cell Tumors of Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ruka, Wlodzimierz; Ptaszynski, Konrad; Bylina, Elzbieta

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcomes of radiotherapy, in terms of local control and treatment complications, of advanced or difficult giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) that could not be treated by surgery. Methods and Materials: Among 122 consecutive patients with confirmed GCTB from 1985 to 2007, 77 patients were treated by megavoltage radiotherapy because they were inappropriate candidates for surgery. We have performed analysis of all data in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) and treatment morbidity. Median follow-up time was 58 months. Results: In the irradiated group, maximal tumor size ranged from 5 to 18 cm (median, 8.5). Anatomic distribution was as follows: femur, 27 cases; tibia, 19; radial/ulnar bone, 12; sacrum, 9; pelvic bones, 5; other, 5. Twenty-one patients (27%) were referred for local recurrence after {>=}1 other treatment procedures. The radiation doses ranged from 26 to 89 Gy (median, 56; administered 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction with average total duration of treatment of 5-7 weeks); 8 patients (10%) received <50 Gy. All patients tolerated treatment well without acute or late complications. All patients except two are alive. Local control was achieved in 65 patients (84%; bone recalcification/restitution of joint functions), 12 patients showed signs of local progression, all within irradiated fields (9 were treated successfully with salvage surgery). Five- and 10-year local PFS were 83% and 73%, respectively. Three patients developed lungs metastases. Malignant transformation of GCTB occurred in two patients. Conclusions: GCTB can be safely and effectively treated with megavoltage radiotherapy with local control rate >80% at 5 years. Our study confirms that radiotherapy of GCTB offers an alternative to difficult or complex surgery and may be an option of choice in the treatment of inoperable patients.

  14. Clinical and color Doppler imaging features of one patient with occult giant cell arteritis presenting arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jianu, Dragoş Cătălin; Jianu, Silviana Nina; Petrica, Ligia; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Dan, Traian Flavius; Lăzureanu, Dorela CodruŢa; Munteanu, Mihnea

    2016-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathies (AIONs) represent a segmental infarction of the optic nerve head (ONH) supplied by the posterior ciliary arteries (PCAs). Blood supply blockage can occur with or without arterial inflammation. For this reason, there are two types of AIONs: non-arteritic (NA-AION), and arteritic (A-AION), the latter is almost invariably due to giant cell arteritis (GCA). GCA is a primary vasculitis that predominantly affects extracranial medium-sized arteries, particularly the branches of the external carotid arteries (including superficial temporal arteries - TAs). One patient with clinical suspicion of acute left AION was examined at admission following a complex protocol including color Doppler imaging (CDI) of orbital vessels, and color duplex sonography of the TAs and of the carotid arteries. She presented an equivocal combination of an abrupt, painless, and severe vision loss in the left eye, and an atypical diffuse hyperemic left optic disc edema. She had characteristic CDI features for GCA with eye involvement: high resistance index, with absent, or severe diminished blood flow velocities, especially end-diastolic velocities, in all orbital vessels, especially on the left side (A-AION). Typical sonographic feature in temporal arteritis as part of GCA was "dark halo" sign. On the other hand, she did not present classic clinical or systemic symptoms of GCA: temporal headache, tender TAs, malaise (occult GCA). The left TA biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of GCA. The ultrasound investigations enabled prompt differentiation between NA-AION and A-AION, the later requiring in her case immediate steroid treatment, to prevent further visual loss in the right eye. PMID:27516038

  15. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lohkamp, Laura-Nanna; Schinz, Maren; Gehlhaar, Claire; Guse, Katrin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Vajkoczy, Peter; Heppner, Frank L; Koch, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM) and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09). BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001). IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized. PMID:27253461

  16. MGMT Promoter Methylation and BRAF V600E Mutations Are Helpful Markers to Discriminate Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma from Giant Cell Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lohkamp, Laura-Nanna; Schinz, Maren; Gehlhaar, Claire; Guse, Katrin; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Vajkoczy, Peter; Heppner, Frank L.; Koch, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Glioblastoma (gcGBM) and Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) are rare astroglial tumors of the central nervous system. Although they share certain histomorphological and immunohistochemical features, they are characterized by different clinical behavior and prognosis. Nevertheless, few cases remain uncertain, as their histomorphological hallmarks and immunophenotypes do correspond to the typical pattern neither of gcGBM nor PXA. Therefore, in addition to the routinely used diagnostic histochemical and immunohistochemical markers like Gömöri, p53 and CD34, we analyzed if genetic variations like MGMT promoter methylation, mutations in the IDH1/2 genes, or BRAF mutations, which are actually used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive molecular markers in anaplastic glial tumors, could be helpful in the differential diagnostic of both tumor entities. We analyzed 34 gcGBM and 20 PXA for genetic variations in the above-named genes and found distinct distributions between both groups. MGMT promoter hypermethylation was observed in 3 out of 20 PXA compared to 14 out of 34 gcGBM (15% vs. 41.2%, p-value 0.09). BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 50% of the PXA but not in any of the gcGBM (50% vs. 0%, p-value < 0.001). IDH1 R132 and IDH R172 mutations were not present in any of the PXA and gcGBM cases. Our data indicate, that in addition to the histological and immunohistochemical evaluation, investigation of MGMT promoter methylation and in particular BRAF V600E mutations represent reliable additional tools to sustain differentiation of gcGBM from PXA on a molecular basis. Based on these data specific BRAF kinase inhibitors could represent a promising agent in the therapy of PXA and their use should be emphasized. PMID:27253461

  17. Human cells lacking coilin and Cajal bodies are proficient in telomerase assembly, trafficking and telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanlian; Deng, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Qian; Liu, Haiying; Songyang, Zhou; Ma, Wenbin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) localizes to Cajal bodies, and it has been proposed that Cajal bodies play a role in the assembly of telomerase holoenzyme and telomerase trafficking. Here, the role of Cajal bodies was examined in Human cells deficient of coilin (i.e. coilin-knockout (KO) cells), in which no Cajal bodies are detected. In coilin-KO cells, a normal level of telomerase activity is detected and interactions between core factors of holoenzyme are preserved, indicating that telomerase assembly occurs in the absence of Cajal bodies. Moreover, dispersed hTR aggregates and forms foci specifically during S and G2 phase in coilin-KO cells. Colocalization of these hTR foci with telomeres implies proper telomerase trafficking, independent of Cajal bodies. Therefore, telomerase adds similar numbers of TTAGGG repeats to telomeres in coilin-KO and controls cells. Overexpression of TPP1-OB-fold blocks cell cycle-dependent formation of hTR foci and inhibits telomere extension. These findings suggest that telomerase assembly, trafficking and extension occur with normal efficiency in Cajal bodies deficient human cells. Thus, Cajal bodies, as such, are not essential in these processes, although it remains possible that non-coilin components of Cajal bodies and/or telomere binding proteins (e.g. TPP1) do play roles in telomerase biogenesis and telomere homeostasis.

  18. Basal body structure and cell cycle-dependent biogenesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sue; Gull, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Basal bodies are microtubule-based organelles that assemble cilia and flagella, which are critical for motility and sensory functions in all major eukaryotic lineages. The core structure of the basal body is highly conserved, but there is variability in biogenesis and additional functions that are organism and cell type specific. Work carried out in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei has arguably produced one of the most detailed dissections of basal body structure and biogenesis within the context of the flagellar pocket and associated organelles. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the basic basal body structure in T. brucei along with the accessory structures and show how basal body movements during the basal body duplication cycle orchestrate cell and organelle morphogenesis. With this in-depth three-dimensional knowledge, identification of many basal body genes coupled with excellent genetic tools makes it an attractive model organism to study basal body biogenesis and maintenance. PMID:26862392

  19. Common variable immunodeficiency and inclusion body myositis: a distinct myopathy mediated by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Illa, I

    1995-06-01

    Inclusion body myositis developed in two men, 36 and 48 years old with long-standing common variable immunodeficiency. Immunophenotypic analysis of the endomysial cells showed an increased number of natural killer (NK) cells (defined as CD57+, CD56+, CD3-, CD8-, CD68-) accounting for 8.5 to 9.5% of the total cells, compared with a mean of 1% in sporadic inclusion body myositis. The remaining cells were CD8+, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells. NK cells were positive for intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 and invaded muscle fibers negative for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. In contrast to ubiquitous endomysial expression of MHC class I antigen in sporadic inclusion body myositis, the MHC class I in common variable immunodeficiency and inclusion body myositis was absent or weakly expressed in only some of the muscle fibers surrounded by CD8+ cells. Enteroviral or retroviral RNA sequences were not amplified. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved strength in 1 patient whose repeated muscle biopsy specimen showed normal NK cells. We conclude that inclusion body myositis can develop in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. Common variable immunodeficiency with inclusion body myositis is an immune myopathy mediated by NK cells in a non-MHC class I-restricted cytotoxicity, and by CD8+ cells in an MHC class I-restricted process. This is the first description of an inflammatory myopathy in which NK cells participate in the myocytotoxic process.

  20. Functional inclusion bodies produced in bacteria as naturally occurring nanopills for advanced cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Esther; Corchero, José L; Burgueño, Joan F; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Kosoy, Ana; Bosser, Ramon; Mendoza, Rosa; Martínez-Láinez, Joan Marc; Rinas, Ursula; Fernández, Ester; Ruiz-Avila, Luis; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Inclusion bodies (50-500 nm in diameter) produced in recombinant bacteria can be engineered to contain functional proteins with therapeutic potential. Upon exposure, these protein particles are efficiently internalized by mammalian cells and promote recovery from diverse stresses. Being fully biocompatible, inclusion bodies are a novel platform, as tailored nanopills, for sustained drug release in advanced cell therapies.

  1. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  2. Coordination of protrusion and translocation of the keratocyte involves rolling of the cell body

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the relationship between lamellipodium protrusion and forward translocation of the cell body in the rapidly moving keratocyte. It is first shown that the trailing, ellipsoidal cell body rotates during translocation. This was indicated by the rotation of the nucleus and the movement of cytoplasmic organelles, as well as of exogenously added beads used as markers. Activated or Con A-coated fluorescent beads that were overrun by cells were commonly endocytosed and rotated with the internal organelles. Alternatively, beads applied to the rear of the cell body via a micropipette adhered to the dorsal cell surface and also moved forward, indicating that both exterior and underlying cortical elements participated in rotation. Manipulation of keratocytes with microneedles demonstrated that pushing or restraining the cell body in the direction of locomotion, and squeezing it against the substrate, which temporarily increased the intracellular pressure, did not effect the rate of lamellipodium protrusion. Rotation and translocation of the cell body continued momentarily after arrest of lamellipodium protrusion by cytochalasin B, indicating that these processes were not directly dependent on actin polymerization. The cell body was commonly flanked by phase-dense "axles," extending from the cell body into the lamellipodium. Phalloidin staining showed these to be comprised of actin bundles that splayed forward into the flanks of the lamellipodium. Disruption of the bundles on one side of the nucleus by traumatic microinjection resulted in rapid retraction of the cell body in the opposite direction, indicating that the cell body was under lateral contractile stress. Myosin II, which colocalizes with the actin bundles, presumably provides the basis of tension generation across and traction of the cell body. We propose that the basis of coupling between lamellipodium protrusion and translocation of the cell body is a flow of actin filaments from the front

  3. Giant Septic Lymphadenitis with Marked Gas Formation Caused by Bacteroides fragilis in a Patient with Adult T-cell Leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tomoyose, Takeaki; Nakachi, Sawako; Nishi, Yukiko; Morichika, Kazuho; Tedokon, Iori; Tamaki, Keita; Shimabukuro, Natsuki; Hanashiro, Taeko; Samura, Hironori; Fukushima, Takuya; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) sometimes causes opportunistic infections. A 53-year-old woman with systemic lymphadenopathies was diagnosed with ATL by inguinal lymph node biopsies and underwent oral chemotherapy. Two months later, high grade fever, lower abdominal pain and lymphadenopathy recurred. Computed tomography revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy with marked gas formation in the pelvic lesion. Blood cultures were suggestive of septic lymphadenitis by Bacteroides fragilis (BF). This represents the first demonstration of giant lymphadenitis with gas formation caused by BF in a patient with ATL. Notably, septic lymphadenitis is pivotal in the differential diagnosis of systemic lymphadenopathy in ATL.

  4. The use of the color Doppler ultrasonography in the diagnosis and monitoring of an atypical case of giant-cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Martins, N; Polido-Pereira, J; Rodrigues, A M; Soares, F; Batista, P; Pereira da Silva, J A

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA) is a large vessels vasculitis that is typically characterised by headache, scalp tenderness, jaw claudication and visual disturbances. Temporal arteries color Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) is a sensitive and non-invasive image technique used in the diagnosis of this disease. This work highlights the importance of CDUS in the diagnostic workup of GCA and also demonstrates it´s usefullness in the evaluation and documentation of the response to corticosteroids therapy in an atypical case of ACG. PMID:27606478

  5. Triple bridge-to-transplant in a case of giant cell myocarditis complicated by human leukocyte antigen sensitization and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Soren; Arusoglu, Latif; Morshuis, Michiel; Minami, Kazutomo; Sarnowski, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; El-Banayosy, Aly

    2006-03-01

    Bridge-to-bridge experience has documented the feasibility of a switch from short-term to long-term mechanical circulatory support until heart transplant. We describe a case of irreversible cardiogenic shock due to giant cell myocarditis treated consecutively with extracorporal membrane oxygenation, bi-ventricular assist device, and total artificial heart. The postoperative course was complicated by human leukocyte antigen sensitization and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II. Our patient successfully underwent heart transplant after 10 months of support and was discharged in good condition. This case illustrates suitable device selection for myocarditis and represents two treatable immunological complications.

  6. Image-guided multilevel vertebral osteotomies for en bloc resection of giant cell tumor of the thoracic spine: case report and description of operative technique

    PubMed Central

    Smitherman, Sheila M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rao, Ganesh; Walsh, Garrett

    2010-01-01

    The use of frameless stereotactic navigation is gaining popularity in spinal surgery. Although initially used in the spine for placement of lumbar pedicle screws, this technology has expanded to facilitate placement of spinal instrumentation at virtually all spinal levels. While previous reports have described the utility of image guidance for placement of spinal instrumentation, its use in assisting with resection of complex spine tumors has not been extensively reported. Here we describe the use of frameless stereotaxy to guide a complex, four-level sagittal vertebral osteotomy for en bloc resection of a giant cell tumor involving the chest wall and thoracic spine. PMID:20069317

  7. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  8. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G₀/G₁ and G₂ phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  9. Retroviral Infection of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Embryoid Body Cells for Analysis of Hematopoietic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Lapid, Danica; Choi, Hyewon; Dahl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are an outstanding model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cellular differentiation. They are especially useful for investigating the development of early hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Gene expression in ESCs can be manipulated by several techniques that allow the role for individual molecules in development to be determined. One difficulty is that expression of specific genes often has different phenotypic effects dependent on their temporal expression. This problem can be circumvented by the generation of ESCs that inducibly express a gene of interest using technology such as the doxycycline-inducible transgene system. However, generation of these inducible cell lines is costly and time consuming. Described here is a method for disaggregating ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) into single cell suspensions, retrovirally infecting the cell suspensions, and then reforming the EBs by hanging drop. Downstream differentiation is then evaluated by flow cytometry. Using this protocol, it was demonstrated that exogenous expression of a microRNA gene at the beginning of ESC differentiation blocks HPC generation. However, when expressed in EB derived cells after nascent mesoderm is produced, the microRNA gene enhances hematopoietic differentiation. This method is useful for investigating the role of genes after specific germ layer tissue is derived. PMID:25350134

  10. Peroxidase-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells in multiple myeloma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; An, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Xue-Rui; Song, Jing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reports of clinical cases with Auer bodies in the plasma cells in multiple myeloma (MM) are rare; however, most of those reported contain peroxidase (POX)-negative Auer bodies rather than the POX-positive Auer bodies observed in myeloid progenitors, indicating differences in their chemical properties. Furthermore, the cases with POX-positive Auer bodies similar to those observed in myeloid cells are extremely rare in non-myeloid cells. Here, we report the clinical features, laboratory investigations, diagnosis and treatment of a case of MM with POX-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells and review related the literature to advance the prognostic evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of similar cases. PMID:26823884

  11. Coexpression of Galanin and Nestin in the Chemoreceptor Cells of the Human Carotid Body.

    PubMed

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Marconi, Guya D; Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Cataldi, Amelia; Di Giulio, Camillo; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body is a highly specialized chemoreceptive organ of neural crest origin whose role is to detect changes in arterial oxygen content. The sensory units are the chemoreceptor cells, which are neuronal-like cells, surrounded by sustentacular or glial-like cells. It is suggested that the carotid body contains self-renewing multipotent stem cells, which are putatively represented by glial-like sustentacular cells. The mechanisms of renewal of neuronal-like cells are unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated the expression of galanin, a peptide promoting neurogenesis, in chemoreceptor cells in the human CB. Thus, in the present study we seek to determine whether galanin expression in chemoreceptor cells could be matched with that of nestin, a peptide that is a marker of multipotent neural stem cells, or rather with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for glial cells. The latter would underscore the pluasibly essential role of sustentacular cells in the self-renewal capability of chemorecetors. We found that galanin expression is matched with nestin in chemoreceptor cells of the human carotid body, but not with that of GFAP. Thus, galanin expression in chemoreceptor cells could provide a signal for neurogenesis and chemoreceptor cell differentiation in the carotid body.

  12. Porous electronic current collector bodies for electrochemical cell configurations

    DOEpatents

    Pollack, William; Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    A high-temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell configuration is made comprising a plurality of elongated electrochemical cells 1, having inner electrodes 3, outer electrodes 6 and solid electrolyte 4 therebetween, the cells being electronically connected in series and parallel by flexible, porous, fibrous strips 7, where the strips contain flexible, electronically conductive fibers bonded together and coated with a refractory oxide, and where the oxide coating is effective to prevent additional bonding of fibers during electrochemical cell operation at high temperatures.

  13. Epidemiology of biopsy proven giant cell arteritis in northwestern Spain: trend over an 18 year period

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gay, M; Garcia-Porrua, C; Rivas, M; Rodriguez-Ledo, P; Llorca, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—In Europe giant cell arteritis (GCA) is more common in Scandinavian countries than in southern regions. Epidemiological studies on GCA in other more distant countries have indicated a progressive increase in incidence. A regular cyclical pattern in incidence of GCA over 20 years has been reported in Olmsted County (Minnesota, USA). In contrast, no cyclical fluctuation has been recently reported in Sweden. To investigate further the epidemiology of GCA in southern Europe the trend in incidence and fluctuations of this vasculitis over 18 years in the Lugo region of northwestern Spain were examined.
METHODS—A retrospective study of biopsy proven GCA diagnosed between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 1998 at a single hospital for a well defined population of almost 250 000 people. Annual incidence was calculated for the whole group of patients and for men and women separately. Monthly variations, annual peaks of incidence, and trend in the incidence of biopsy proven GCA with and without polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) were also examined.
RESULTS—One hundred and sixty one Lugo residents were diagnosed with biopsy proven GCA between 1981 and 1998. The average annual incidence for the population aged 50 and older was 10.24/100 000 (men 11.00/100 000, women 9.57/100 000). A progressive increase in the incidence in both men and women was seen. In men there was an annual increase of 8% (95% CI 4% to 13%; p<0.0001). In women the annual increase was 11% (95% CI 5% to 17%; p<0.0001). The overall annual increase for men and women was 10% (95% CI 6% to 14%; p<0.0001). No seasonal pattern or peaks in the incidence were seen. During the period 1981-94 GCA was more common in men than in women. In contrast, during the last years of study the increase in incidence was higher in women. In women the annual ratio of incidence of GCA with PMR/incidence of GCA without PMR was generally higher than 1. However, in men the annual ratio was initially 1

  14. Description and Validation of Histological Patterns and Proposal of a Dynamic Model of Inflammatory Infiltration in Giant-cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Murgia, Giuseppe; Villar, Irama; Campo, Elías; Mackie, Sarah L; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Morgan, Ann W; Font, Carme; Prieto-González, Sergio; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Grau, Josep M; Cid, Maria C

    2016-02-01

    The extent of inflammatory infiltrates in arteries from patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA) have been described using different terms and definitions. Studies investigating the relationship between GCA histological features and clinical manifestations have produced controversial results. The aims of this study were to characterize and validate histological patterns in temporal artery biopsies (TABs) from GCA patients, to explore additional histological features, including the coexistence of different patterns, and also to investigate the relationship of the inflammatory patterns with clinical and laboratory features.We performed histological examination of TAB from patients with GCA consecutively diagnosed between 1992 and 2012. Patterns of inflammation were defined according to the extent and distribution of inflammatory infiltrates within the artery. Clinical and laboratory variables were recorded. Two external investigators underwent a focused, one-day training session and then independently scored 77 cases. Quadratic-weighted kappa was calculated.TAB from 285 patients (200 female/85 male) were evaluated. Four histological inflammatory patterns were distinguished: 1 - adventitial (n = 16); 2 - adventitial invasive: adventitial involvement with some extension to the muscular layer (n = 21); 3 - concentric bilayer: adventitial and intimal involvement with media layer preservation (n = 52); and 4 - panarteritic (n = 196). Skip lesions were observed in 10% and coexistence of various patterns in 43%. Raw agreement of each external scorer with the gold-standard was 82% and 77% (55% and 46% agreement expected from chance); kappa = 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-0.95) and 0.79 (95% CI 0.68-0.91). Although abnormalities on temporal artery palpation and the presence of jaw claudication and scalp tenderness tended to occur more frequently in patients with arteries depicting more extensive inflammation, no statistically significant

  15. Description and Validation of Histological Patterns and Proposal of a Dynamic Model of Inflammatory Infiltration in Giant-cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Murgia, Giuseppe; Villar, Irama; Campo, Elías; Mackie, Sarah L.; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Hensor, Elizabeth M.A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Font, Carme; Prieto-González, Sergio; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Grau, Josep M.; Cid, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The extent of inflammatory infiltrates in arteries from patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA) have been described using different terms and definitions. Studies investigating the relationship between GCA histological features and clinical manifestations have produced controversial results. The aims of this study were to characterize and validate histological patterns in temporal artery biopsies (TABs) from GCA patients, to explore additional histological features, including the coexistence of different patterns, and also to investigate the relationship of the inflammatory patterns with clinical and laboratory features. We performed histological examination of TAB from patients with GCA consecutively diagnosed between 1992 and 2012. Patterns of inflammation were defined according to the extent and distribution of inflammatory infiltrates within the artery. Clinical and laboratory variables were recorded. Two external investigators underwent a focused, one-day training session and then independently scored 77 cases. Quadratic-weighted kappa was calculated. TAB from 285 patients (200 female/85 male) were evaluated. Four histological inflammatory patterns were distinguished: 1 – adventitial (n = 16); 2 – adventitial invasive: adventitial involvement with some extension to the muscular layer (n = 21); 3 – concentric bilayer: adventitial and intimal involvement with media layer preservation (n = 52); and 4 – panarteritic (n = 196). Skip lesions were observed in 10% and coexistence of various patterns in 43%. Raw agreement of each external scorer with the gold-standard was 82% and 77% (55% and 46% agreement expected from chance); kappa = 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.95) and 0.79 (95% CI 0.68–0.91). Although abnormalities on temporal artery palpation and the presence of jaw claudication and scalp tenderness tended to occur more frequently in patients with arteries depicting more extensive inflammation, no

  16. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  17. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells.

  18. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells. PMID:25305245

  19. Design for manufacturability evaluation: Composite NIF Pockel Cell body

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, W.A.; Spellman, G.P.

    1994-04-01

    A survey of composite materials and processes for the NIF Optical Switch Body is described. Mechanical and physical criterion set upon the part are used as guidelines for the selection of materials and processes for manufacturing. Benefits, costs, and risks associated with selected processes, as well as a recommendation for prototype fabrication is presented.

  20. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells combats the foreign body response to cell-laden synthetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Swartzlander, Mark D; Blakney, Anna K; Amer, Luke D; Hankenson, Kurt D; Kyriakides, Themis R; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-02-01

    The implantation of non-biological materials, including scaffolds for tissue engineering, ubiquitously leads to a foreign body response (FBR). We recently reported that this response negatively impacts fibroblasts encapsulated within a synthetic hydrogel and in turn leads to a more severe FBR, suggesting a cross-talk between encapsulated cells and inflammatory cells. Given the promise of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in tissue engineering and recent evidence of their immunomodulatory properties, we hypothesized that MSCs encapsulated within poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels will attenuate the FBR. In vitro, murine MSCs encapsulated within PEG hydrogels attenuated classically activated primary murine macrophages by reducing gene expression and protein secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, most notably tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a COX2 inhibitor, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was identified as a mediator of MSC immunomodulation of macrophages. In vivo, hydrogels laden with MSCs, osteogenically differentiating MSCs, or no cells were implanted subcutaneously into C57BL/6 mice for 28 days to assess the impact of MSCs on the fibrotic response of the FBR. The presence of encapsulated MSCs reduced fibrous capsule thickness compared to acellular hydrogels, but this effect diminished with osteogenic differentiation. The use of MSCs prior to differentiation in tissue engineering may therefore serve as a dynamic approach, through continuous cross-talk between MSCs and the inflammatory cells, to modulate macrophage activation and attenuate the FBR to implanted synthetic scaffolds thus improving the long-term tissue engineering outcome.

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  2. Eosinophilic bodies in pyloric and Brunner's gland cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, C A; Hirota, T; Itabashi, M; Jacobsson, B; Lignelid, H

    1992-01-01

    A previously unreported cell phenotype occurred in the pyloric and Brunner glands in two gastrectomy specimens. The cells were characterised by homogeneous, eosinophilic material in the cytoplasm. The eosinophilic material had an abnormally strong reactivity for Cystatin C, a protein found recently in the normal secretion of pyloric and Brunner's gland cells. The reason for the apparent cytoplasmic accumulation of cystatin C in the two patients described remains unclear. Images PMID:1479043

  3. Lipid metabolism in various regions of squid giant nerve fiber.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Yamaguchi, H; Kishimoto, Y; Gould, R M

    1987-10-31

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the incorporation of radioactivity from various precursors into lipids of different regions of squid giant nerve fiber systems including axoplasm, axon sheath, giant fiber lobes which contain stellate ganglion cell bodies, and the remaining ganglion including giant synapses. To identify the labeled lipids, stellate ganglia including giant fiber lobes and the remaining tissue were first incubated separately with [14C]glucose, [32P]phosphate, [14C]serine, [14C]acetate and [3H]myristate. The radioactivity from glucose, after conversion to glycerol and fatty acids, was incorporated into most lipids, including triacylglycerol, free fatty acids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin and ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphanate [corrected]. The radioactivity from serine was largely incorporated into phosphatidylserine and, to a lesser extent, into other phospholipids, mainly as the base component. The sphingoid bases of ceramide and sphingomyelin were also significantly labeled. Saturated and monounsaturated and, to a lesser extent, polyunsaturated fatty acids of these lipids were synthesized from acetate, glucose and myristate. Among the major lipids, cholesterol was not labeled by any of the radioactive compounds used. Ganglion residues incorporated the most radioactivity in total lipids from either [14C]glucose or [14C]serine, followed by giant fiber lobes and then sheath. Axoplasm incorporated the least. Among various lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine with shorter saturated fatty acids and phosphatidylglycerol contained the most radioactivity from glucose in all regions. Axoplasm was characterized by a higher proportion of glucose radioactivity in ceramide, sphingomyelin and phosphatidylglycerol. Axoplasm and sheath contained a higher proportion of serine radioactivity than did the other two regions in ceramide. Essentially no

  4. Release of chemical transmitters from cell bodies and dendrites of nerve cells

    PubMed Central

    De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Nicholls, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Papers in this issue concern extrasynaptic transmission, namely release of signalling molecules by exocytosis or diffusion from neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, axons and glia. Problems discussed concern the molecules, their secretion and importance for normal function and disease. Molecules secreted extrasynaptically include transmitters, peptides, hormones and nitric oxide. For extrasynaptic secretion, trains of action potentials are required, and the time course of release is slower than at synapses. Questions arise concerning the mechanism of extrasynaptic secretion: how does it differ from the release observed at synaptic terminals and gland cells? What kinds of vesicles take part? Is release accomplished through calcium entry, SNAP and SNARE proteins? A clear difference is in the role of molecules released synaptically and extrasynaptically. After extrasynaptic release, molecules reach distant as well as nearby cells, and thereby produce long-lasting changes over large volumes of brain. Such changes can affect circuits for motor performance and mood states. An example with clinical relevance is dyskinesia of patients treated with l-DOPA for Parkinson's disease. Extrasynaptically released transmitters also evoke responses in glial cells, which in turn release molecules that cause local vasodilatation and enhanced circulation in regions of the brain that are active. PMID:26009760

  5. Undifferentiated Carcinoma With Osteoclastic Giant Cells of the Pancreas: Clinicopathologic Analysis of 38 Cases Highlights a More Protracted Clinical Course Than Currently Appreciated.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takashi; Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Jang, Kee-Taek; Bedolla, Gabriela; Bagci, Pelin; Mittal, Pardeep; Memis, Bahar; Katabi, Nora; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Sarmiento, Juan M; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Klimstra, David S; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-09-01

    Undifferentiated carcinomas with osteoclastic giant cells of the pancreas (OGC) are rare tumors. The current impression in the literature is that they are highly aggressive tumors similar in prognosis to ductal adenocarcinomas. In this study, the clinicopathologic characteristics of 38 resected OGCs were investigated and contrasted with 725 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas without osteoclastic cells (PDCs). The frequency among systematically reviewed pancreatic cancers was 1.4%. OGCs showed a slight female predominance (62.9%, vs. 51.4% in PDCs). The mean age was 57.9 years (vs. 65.0). The mean size of invasive cancer was 5.3 cm (vs. 3.2). They were characterized by nodular, pushing-border growth, and 8 arose in tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms (4 in mucinous cystic neoplasms, 4 in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms type lesions), and 23 (61%) also showed prominent intraductal/intracystic growth. Twenty-nine (76%) had an invasive ductal/tubular adenocarcinoma component. Osteoid was seen in 12. Despite their larger size, perineural invasion and nodal metastasis were uncommon (31.6% and 22.6%, vs. 85.5% and 64.0%, respectively). Immunohistochemistry performed on 24 cases revealed that osteoclastic cells expressed the histiocytic marker CD68, and background spindle cells and pleomorphic/giant carcinoma cells often showed p53 and often lacked cytokeratin. Survival of OGCs was significantly better than that of PDCs (5 yr, 59.1% vs. 15.7%, respectively, P=0.0009). In conclusion, pancreatic OGCs present with larger tumor size and in slightly younger patients than PDC, 21% arise in mucinous cystic neoplasms/intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and 61% show intraductal/intracystic polypoid growth. OGCs have a significantly better prognosis than is currently believed in the literature. PMID:27508975

  6. Selective Expression of Galanin in Neuronal-Like Cells of the Human Carotid Body.

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Camillo; Marconi, Guya Diletta; Zara, Susi; Di Tano, Andrea; Porzionato, Andrea; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Cataldi, Amelia; Mazzatenta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The carotid body is a neural-crest-derived organ devoted to respiratory homeostasis through sensing changes in blood oxygen levels. The sensory units are the glomeruli composed of clusters of neuronal-like (type I) cells surrounded by glial-like (type II) cells. During chronic hypoxia, the carotid body shows growth, with increasing neuronal-like cell numbers. We are interested in the signals involved in the mechanisms that underlie such response, because they are not well understood and described. Considering that, in literature, galanin is involved in neurotrophic or neuroprotective role in cell proliferation and is expressed in animal carotid body, we investigated its expression in human. Here, we have shown the expression and localisation of galanin in the human carotid body.

  7. Establishment of a new cell line from the heart of giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus (Bloch), and its application in toxicology and virus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Guo, C Y; Huang, Y H; Wei, S N; Ouyang, Z L; Yan, Y; Huang, X H; Qin, Q W

    2015-02-01

    A new marine fish cell line, derived from the heart of giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus (Bloch), was established and characterized. The cell line was designated as ELGH and subcultured with more than 60 passages. The ELGH cells were mainly composed of fibroblast-like cells and multiplied well in Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) at 28 °C. Chromosome analysis indicated that the modal chromosome number was 48. The fluorescent signals were detected in ELGH when transfected with green fluorescent protein reporter plasmids. The 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50 ) of the extracellular products (ECPs) from Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio alginolyticus E333 on ELGH cells was 60.02 and 12.49 μg mL(-1), respectively. Moreover, the ELGH cells showed susceptibility to Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), but not to soft-shelled turtle iridovirus (STIV), red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) and spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV), which was demonstrated by the presence of a severe cytopathic effect (CPE) and increased viral titres. In addition, electron microscopy observation showed that abundant virus particles were present in the infected cells. Taken together, our data above provided the potential utility of ELGH cells for transgenic and genetic manipulation, as well as cytotoxicity testing and virus pathogenesis.

  8. Body Management: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Control the Internal Regenerator

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary It has been assumed that adult tissues cannot regenerate themselves. With the current understanding that every adult tissue has its own intrinsic progenitor or stem cell, it is now clear that almost all tissues have regenerative potential partially related to their innate turnover dynamics. Moreover, it appears that a separate class of local cells originating as perivascular cells appears to provide regulatory oversight for localized tissue regeneration. The management of this regeneration oversight has a profound influence on the use of specific cells for cell therapies as a health care delivery tool set. The multipotent mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), now renamed the medicinal signaling cell, predominantly arises from pericytes released from broken and inflamed blood vessels and appears to function as both an immunomodulatory and a regeneration mediator. MSCs are being tested for their management capabilities to produce therapeutic outcomes in more than 480 clinical trials for a wide range of clinical conditions. Local MSCs function by managing the body’s primary repair and regeneration activities. Supplemental MSCs can be provided from either endogenous or exogenous sources of either allogeneic or autologous origin. This MSC-based therapy has the potential to change how health care is delivered. These medicinal cells are capable of sensing their surroundings. Also, by using its complex signaling circuitry, these cells organize site-specific regenerative responses as if these therapeutic cells were well-programmed modern computers. Given these facts, it appears that we are entering a new age of cellular medicine. Significance This report is a perspective from an active scientist and an active entrepreneur and commercial leader. It is neither a comprehensive review nor a narrowly focused treatise. The broad themes and the analogy to the working component of a computer and that of a cell are meant to draw several important scientific principles and health

  9. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  10. Immunoperoxidase localisation of human placental lactogen: a marker for the placental origin of the giant cells in 'syncytial endometritis' of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Heyderman, E; Gibbons, A R; Rosen, S W

    1981-01-01

    One hundred endometrial biopsies of various histological patterns, and material from 10 tubal pregnancies together with their associated uterine decidua, were examined for the presence of human placental lactogen using affinity-purified first and second antibodies and an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Positive cells in endometrial curettings were seen only in association with an intrauterine pregnancy and morphologically resembled syncytiotrophoblast. Decidua associated with tubal pregnancy, pseudodecidua in progestogen-treated patients, and proliferative, secretory, and basal endometria were all negative. An immunoperoxidase stain for human placental lactogen is a useful marker for intrauterine pregnancy and supports the placental origin of the syncytial giant cells in so-called 'syncytial endometritis'. The technique is of potential value in those endometrial biopsies where pregnancy is suspected but no villi are seen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7014653

  11. Heterotopic synaptic bodies in the auditory hair cells of adult lizards.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Beck, J

    1987-07-01

    The auditory hair cells of adults of eight species of lizards (three gekkonids: Coleonyx variegatus, Gekko gecko, and Cosymbotus platyurus; two teiids: Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus tigris; one anguid: Celestus costatus; one lacertid: Podarcis (Lacerta) sicula; and one iguanid: Crotaphytus wislizeni) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Heterotopic synaptic bodies were found in some of the auditory hair cells of all of the above species, occurring frequently in the gekkonids but infrequently in other species. The groups of heterotopic synaptic bodies occurred mainly in the infranuclear cytoplasm between the hair cell nucleus and the hair cell plasma membrane. The groups of synaptic bodies that were close to the hair cell nucleus were usually associated with specialized arrays of rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The numbers of heterotopic synaptic bodies were greatest in the gekkonid species and were especially large in Coleonyx variegatus, where an average of 36.8 synaptic bodies occur in one group. The functional significance of the presence of heterotopic synaptic bodies in the auditory hair cells of adults animals is not known. PMID:2820267

  12. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... pigmented nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... baby grows in the womb. In some families bathing trunk nevi may be inherited. The condition may ...

  13. Revised Estimates for the Number of Human and Bacteria Cells in the Body

    PubMed Central

    Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Reported values in the literature on the number of cells in the body differ by orders of magnitude and are very seldom supported by any measurements or calculations. Here, we integrate the most up-to-date information on the number of human and bacterial cells in the body. We estimate the total number of bacteria in the 70 kg "reference man" to be 3.8·1013. For human cells, we identify the dominant role of the hematopoietic lineage to the total count (≈90%) and revise past estimates to 3.0·1013 human cells. Our analysis also updates the widely-cited 10:1 ratio, showing that the number of bacteria in the body is actually of the same order as the number of human cells, and their total mass is about 0.2 kg. PMID:27541692

  14. Cell-body rocking is a dominant mechanism for flagellar synchronization in a swimming alga

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Veikko F.; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas swims with two flagella that can synchronize their beat. Synchronized beating is required to swim both fast and straight. A long-standing hypothesis proposes that synchronization of flagella results from hydrodynamic coupling, but the details are not understood. Here, we present realistic hydrodynamic computations and high-speed tracking experiments of swimming cells that show how a perturbation from the synchronized state causes rotational motion of the cell body. This rotation feeds back on the flagellar dynamics via hydrodynamic friction forces and rapidly restores the synchronized state in our theory. We calculate that this “cell-body rocking” provides the dominant contribution to synchronization in swimming cells, whereas direct hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella contribute negligibly. We experimentally confirmed the two-way coupling between flagellar beating and cell-body rocking predicted by our theory. PMID:24145440

  15. Revised Estimates for the Number of Human and Bacteria Cells in the Body.

    PubMed

    Sender, Ron; Fuchs, Shai; Milo, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Reported values in the literature on the number of cells in the body differ by orders of magnitude and are very seldom supported by any measurements or calculations. Here, we integrate the most up-to-date information on the number of human and bacterial cells in the body. We estimate the total number of bacteria in the 70 kg "reference man" to be 3.8·1013. For human cells, we identify the dominant role of the hematopoietic lineage to the total count (≈90%) and revise past estimates to 3.0·1013 human cells. Our analysis also updates the widely-cited 10:1 ratio, showing that the number of bacteria in the body is actually of the same order as the number of human cells, and their total mass is about 0.2 kg.

  16. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Embryoid Body-Explant Outgrowth Cultivation from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in an Automated Closed Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tone, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Saeko; Akiyama, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Akira; Ichimura, Masaki; Nakatani, Masaru; Kiyono, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Automation of cell culture would facilitate stable cell expansion with consistent quality. In the present study, feasibility of an automated closed-cell culture system “P 4C S” for an embryoid body- (EB-) explant outgrowth culture was investigated as a model case for explant culture. After placing the induced pluripotent stem cell- (iPSC-) derived EBs into the system, the EBs successfully adhered to the culture surface and the cell outgrowth was clearly observed surrounding the adherent EBs. After confirming the outgrowth, we carried out subculture manipulation, in which the detached cells were simply dispersed by shaking the culture flask, leading to uniform cell distribution. This enabled continuous stable cell expansion, resulting in a cell yield of 3.1 × 107. There was no evidence of bacterial contamination throughout the cell culture experiments. We herewith developed the automated cultivation platform for EB-explant outgrowth cells.

  19. Embryoid Body-Explant Outgrowth Cultivation from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in an Automated Closed Platform.

    PubMed

    Tone, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Saeko; Akiyama, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Akira; Ichimura, Masaki; Nakatani, Masaru; Kiyono, Tohru; Toyoda, Masashi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Automation of cell culture would facilitate stable cell expansion with consistent quality. In the present study, feasibility of an automated closed-cell culture system "P 4C S" for an embryoid body- (EB-) explant outgrowth culture was investigated as a model case for explant culture. After placing the induced pluripotent stem cell- (iPSC-) derived EBs into the system, the EBs successfully adhered to the culture surface and the cell outgrowth was clearly observed surrounding the adherent EBs. After confirming the outgrowth, we carried out subculture manipulation, in which the detached cells were simply dispersed by shaking the culture flask, leading to uniform cell distribution. This enabled continuous stable cell expansion, resulting in a cell yield of 3.1 × 10(7). There was no evidence of bacterial contamination throughout the cell culture experiments. We herewith developed the automated cultivation platform for EB-explant outgrowth cells. PMID:27648449

  20. Embryoid Body-Explant Outgrowth Cultivation from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in an Automated Closed Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tone, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Saeko; Akiyama, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Akira; Ichimura, Masaki; Nakatani, Masaru; Kiyono, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Automation of cell culture would facilitate stable cell expansion with consistent quality. In the present study, feasibility of an automated closed-cell culture system “P 4C S” for an embryoid body- (EB-) explant outgrowth culture was investigated as a model case for explant culture. After placing the induced pluripotent stem cell- (iPSC-) derived EBs into the system, the EBs successfully adhered to the culture surface and the cell outgrowth was clearly observed surrounding the adherent EBs. After confirming the outgrowth, we carried out subculture manipulation, in which the detached cells were simply dispersed by shaking the culture flask, leading to uniform cell distribution. This enabled continuous stable cell expansion, resulting in a cell yield of 3.1 × 107. There was no evidence of bacterial contamination throughout the cell culture experiments. We herewith developed the automated cultivation platform for EB-explant outgrowth cells. PMID:27648449

  1. Wear Particles Derived from Metal Hip Implants Induce the Generation of Multinucleated Giant Cells in a 3-Dimensional Peripheral Tissue-Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debargh K.; Potnis, Pushya A.; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1–5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which

  2. Mechanics of swimming of multi-body bacterial swarmers using non-labeled cell tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuyal, Kiran; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the survival strategy of bacterial swarmers and the mechanical advantages offered by the linear chain (head-tail) attachment of the multiple bacterial bodies in an individual swarmer cell at low Reynolds number, a non-labeled cell tracking algorithm was used to quantify the mechanics of multi-body flagellated bacteria, Serratia marcescens, swimming in a motility buffer that originally exhibited the swarming motility. Swarming is a type of bacterial motility that is characterized by the collective coordinated motion of differentiated swarmer cells on a two-dimensional surface such as agar. In this study, the bacterial swarmers with multiple cell bodies (2, 3, and 4) were extracted from the swarm plate, and then tracked individually after resuspending in the motility medium. Their motion was investigated and compared with individual undifferentiated swimming bacterial cells. The swarmers when released into the motility buffer swam actively without tumbles. Their speeds, orientations, and the diffusive properties were studied by tracking the individual cell trajectories over a short distance in two-dimensional field when the cells are swimming at a constant depth in a bulk aqueous environment. At short time scales, the ballistic trajectory was dominant for both multi-body swarmers and undifferentiated cells.

  3. Regional signals in the planarian body guide stem cell fate in the presence of genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Peiris, T Harshani; Ramirez, Daniel; Barghouth, Paul G; Ofoha, Udokanma; Davidian, Devon; Weckerle, Frank; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2016-05-15

    Cellular fate decisions are influenced by their topographical location in the adult body. For instance, tissue repair and neoplastic growth are greater in anterior than in posterior regions of adult animals. However, the molecular underpinnings of these regional differences are unknown. We identified a regional switch in the adult planarian body upon systemic disruption of homologous recombination with RNA-interference of Rad51 Rad51 knockdown increases DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) throughout the body, but stem cells react differently depending on their location along the anteroposterior axis. In the presence of extensive DSBs, cells in the anterior part of the body resist death, whereas cells in the posterior region undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that proliferation of cells with DNA damage is induced in the presence of brain tissue and that the retinoblastoma pathway enables overproliferation of cells with DSBs while attending to the demands of tissue growth and repair. Our results implicate both autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms as key mediators of regional cell behavior and cellular transformation in the adult body. PMID:27013241

  4. Sterile inflammation of endothelial cell-derived apoptotic bodies is mediated by interleukin-1α

    PubMed Central

    Berda-Haddad, Yaël; Robert, Stéphane; Salers, Paul; Zekraoui, Leila; Farnarier, Catherine; Dinarello, Charles A.; Dignat-George, Françoise; Kaplanski, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Sterile inflammation resulting from cell death is due to the release of cell contents normally inactive and sequestered within the cell; fragments of cell membranes from dying cells also contribute to sterile inflammation. Endothelial cells undergoing stress-induced apoptosis release membrane microparticles, which become vehicles for proinflammatory signals. Here, we show that stress-activated endothelial cells release two distinct populations of particles: One population consists of membrane microparticles (<1 μm, annexin V positive without DNA and no histones) and another larger (1–3 μm) apoptotic body-like particles containing nuclear fragments and histones, representing apoptotic bodies. Contrary to present concepts, endothelial microparticles do not contain IL-1α and do not induce neutrophilic chemokines in vitro. In contrast, the large apoptotic bodies contain the full-length IL-1α precursor and the processed mature form. In vitro, these apoptotic bodies induce monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 chemokine secretion in an IL-1α–dependent but IL-1β–independent fashion. Injection of these apoptotic bodies into the peritoneal cavity of mice induces elevated serum neutrophil-inducing chemokines, which was prevented by cotreatment with the IL-1 receptor antagonist. Consistently, injection of these large apoptotic bodies into the peritoneal cavity induced a neutrophilic infiltration that was prevented by IL-1 blockade. Although apoptosis is ordinarily considered noninflammatory, these data demonstrate that nonphagocytosed endothelial apoptotic bodies are inflammatory, providing a vehicle for IL-1α and, therefore, constitute a unique mechanism for sterile inflammation. PMID:22143786

  5. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    PubMed Central

    Teli, Bhavuray; Thrishuli, P. B.; Santhosh, R.; Amar, D. N.; Rajpurohit, Shravan

    2015-01-01

    Adnexal tumors like giant solitary trichoepitheliomas are uncommon to most of us to permit a ready familiarity with them. Information regarding the genesis, clinical profile, behavior, and management options for this tumor is limited. There are 18 cases reported in the world literature till date. This review attempts to provide insight to this rare tumor. Our search included indexed literature from Pubmed, Directory of Open Access Journals, Health Inter Network Access to Research Initiative and Google databases in addition to standard dermatology texts. Giant solitary trichoepithelioma is a rare trichogenic tumor with potential for local recurrence. It has predilection for the older age, but may present at any age including at birth. It has close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically, and histologically. CD10, CD 34, PHLDA1 but not p75NTR are useful adjunct markers. Surgical excision is the standard treatment. Recurrence and possible transformation into BCC cautions follow up at regular intervals. PMID:25839021

  6. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  7. PRMT5 and the role of symmetrical dimethylarginine in chromatoid bodies of planarian stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rouhana, Labib; Vieira, Ana P.; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2012-01-01

    Planarian flatworms contain a population of adult stem cells (neoblasts) that proliferate and generate cells of all tissues during growth, regeneration and tissue homeostasis. A characteristic feature of neoblasts is the presence of chromatoid bodies, large cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules morphologically similar to structures present in the germline of many organisms. This study aims to reveal the function, and identify additional components, of planarian chromatoid bodies. We uncover the presence of symmetrical dimethylarginine (sDMA) on chromatoid body components and identify the ortholog of protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 as the enzyme responsible for sDMA modification in these proteins. RNA interference-mediated depletion of planarian PRMT5 results in defects in homeostasis and regeneration, reduced animal size, reduced number of neoblasts, fewer chromatoid bodies and increased levels of transposon and repetitive-element transcripts. Our results suggest that PIWI family member SMEDWI-3 is one sDMA-containing chromatoid body protein for which methylation depends on PRMT5. Additionally, we discover an RNA localized to chromatoid bodies, germinal histone H4. Our results reveal new components of chromatoid bodies and their function in planarian stem cells, and also support emerging studies indicative of sDMA function in stabilization of RNP granules and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway. PMID:22318224

  8. The rise of ocean giants: maximum body size in Cenozoic marine mammals as an indicator for productivity in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Pyenson, Nicholas D; Vermeij, Geerat J

    2016-07-01

    Large consumers have ecological influence disproportionate to their abundance, although this influence in food webs depends directly on productivity. Evolutionary patterns at geologic timescales inform expectations about the relationship between consumers and productivity, but it is very difficult to track productivity through time with direct, quantitative measures. Based on previous work that used the maximum body size of Cenozoic marine invertebrate assemblages as a proxy for benthic productivity, we investigated how the maximum body size of Cenozoic marine mammals, in two feeding guilds, evolved over comparable temporal and geographical scales. First, maximal size in marine herbivores remains mostly stable and occupied by two different groups (desmostylians and sirenians) over separate timeframes in the North Pacific Ocean, while sirenians exclusively dominated this ecological mode in the North Atlantic. Second, mysticete whales, which are the largest Cenozoic consumers in the filter-feeding guild, remained in the same size range until a Mio-Pliocene onset of cetacean gigantism. Both vertebrate guilds achieved very large size only recently, suggesting that different trophic mechanisms promoting gigantism in the oceans have operated in the Cenozoic than in previous eras. PMID:27381883

  9. The rise of ocean giants: maximum body size in Cenozoic marine mammals as an indicator for productivity in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2016-01-01

    Large consumers have ecological influence disproportionate to their abundance, although this influence in food webs depends directly on productivity. Evolutionary patterns at geologic timescales inform expectations about the relationship between consumers and productivity, but it is very difficult to track productivity through time with direct, quantitative measures. Based on previous work that used the maximum body size of Cenozoic marine invertebrate assemblages as a proxy for benthic productivity, we investigated how the maximum body size of Cenozoic marine mammals, in two feeding guilds, evolved over comparable temporal and geographical scales. First, maximal size in marine herbivores remains mostly stable and occupied by two different groups (desmostylians and sirenians) over separate timeframes in the North Pacific Ocean, while sirenians exclusively dominated this ecological mode in the North Atlantic. Second, mysticete whales, which are the largest Cenozoic consumers in the filter-feeding guild, remained in the same size range until a Mio-Pliocene onset of cetacean gigantism. Both vertebrate guilds achieved very large size only recently, suggesting that different trophic mechanisms promoting gigantism in the oceans have operated in the Cenozoic than in previous eras. PMID:27381883

  10. The rise of ocean giants: maximum body size in Cenozoic marine mammals as an indicator for productivity in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Pyenson, Nicholas D; Vermeij, Geerat J

    2016-07-01

    Large consumers have ecological influence disproportionate to their abundance, although this influence in food webs depends directly on productivity. Evolutionary patterns at geologic timescales inform expectations about the relationship between consumers and productivity, but it is very difficult to track productivity through time with direct, quantitative measures. Based on previous work that used the maximum body size of Cenozoic marine invertebrate assemblages as a proxy for benthic productivity, we investigated how the maximum body size of Cenozoic marine mammals, in two feeding guilds, evolved over comparable temporal and geographical scales. First, maximal size in marine herbivores remains mostly stable and occupied by two different groups (desmostylians and sirenians) over separate timeframes in the North Pacific Ocean, while sirenians exclusively dominated this ecological mode in the North Atlantic. Second, mysticete whales, which are the largest Cenozoic consumers in the filter-feeding guild, remained in the same size range until a Mio-Pliocene onset of cetacean gigantism. Both vertebrate guilds achieved very large size only recently, suggesting that different trophic mechanisms promoting gigantism in the oceans have operated in the Cenozoic than in previous eras.

  11. Chlamydia trachomatis elementary bodies possess proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wenman, W.M.; Meuser, R.U.

    1986-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis proteins were electrophoresed and then transferred to nitrocellulose paper to detect chlamydial proteins which bind to eucaryotic cell membranes. Resolved polypeptides of C. trachomatis serovars J and L/sub 2/ were reacted with iodinated HeLa cell membranes and autoradiographed. Infectious elementary bodies of both serovars possess 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins which bind to HeLa cells. In contrast, noninfectious reticulate bodies do not possess eucaryotic cell-binding proteins. Both proteins are antigenic when reacted with hyperimmune rabbit antisera in immunoblots and antisera raised against the 31,000- and 18,000-dalton proteins are inhibitory to chlamydia-host cell association. In addition, these antisera exhibit neutralizing activity. These data suggest that these putative chlamydial adhesions play a key role in the early steps of chlamydia-host cell interaction and that antibody directed against them may be protective.

  12. What role for radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in the monitoring of an unusual bone giant cell tumor: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oueriagli, Salah Nabih; Ghfir, Imad; Guerrouj, Hassna El; Raïs, Nouzha Ben

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 24 years old female patient, followed since ten years ago for bone giant cell tumor (GCT) of the right knee, which was complicated by pulmonary metastases. Surgical treatment and pulmonary metastasectomies have not allowed definitive cure of this disease with the appearance of metachronous bone lesions after eight years of evolution. The literature review confirms the originality of this observation: the age of the patient, the initial and metastasis locations and the occurrence of lung metastases with unfavorable prognosis. Through this clinical case, the authors highlight the role of radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in detecting synchronous or metachronous bone lesions, and in monitoring of these locations under medical treatment. PMID:27186440

  13. Uterine leiomyosarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells associated with high expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Mika; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Yoneyama, Koichi; Kuwahara, Naomi; Wakamatsu, Kyoko; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Kunugi, Shinobu; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of osteoclast-like giant cells (OLGCs) in uterine leiomyosarcomas (LMSs) is a rare phenomenon. The nature of OLGCs and the significance of their accumulation in these tumors are poorly understood. Recent studies revealed that the formation of osteoclasts requires a specific cytokine, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), in bone. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL in 2 cases of uterine LMS with OLGCs by means of immunohistochemistry and compared the extent of RANKL expression with that in conventional uterine LMSs and leiomyomas by using real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our cases of uterine LMS with OLGCs showed markedly high expression of RANKL messenger RNA with clear RANKL immunoreactivity compared with messenger RNA expression and immunoreactivity of conventional uterine LMSs and leiomyomas. These findings suggest that the tumors producing RANKL may account for accumulation of OLGCs in tumor tissue because of RANKL-related osteoclastogenesis.

  14. Spontaneous Resolution of a Central Giant Cell Granuloma in a Child After an Incisional Biopsy: A Five-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ademir; Segato, André V K; Couto, Soraya A B; Rodrigues Johann, Aline Cristina Batista; Friedlander, Arthur H; Couto Souza, Paulo H

    2016-01-01

    A central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is typically regarded as a benign lesion with osteoclastic activity. Treatment often involves surgical procedures that may cause deformities; however, minimally invasive approaches have been suggested for treating pediatric patients. We report a case of CGCG of the mandible in a 13-year-old boy who presented with a well-defined radiolucent area in the anterior mandible that was initially detected in a radiographic examination for orthodontic purposes. An incisional biopsy was performed and diagnosed histologically as a CGCG. The patient underwent clinical and radiographic follow-up only after the biopsy, eventually showing signs of bone healing. Five years later, complete resolution of the lesion was observed radiographically. Considering this optimal outcome, similar cases of CGCG should be carefully analyzed for appropriateness of this conservative approach. PMID:27620523

  15. What role for radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in the monitoring of an unusual bone giant cell tumor: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Oueriagli, Salah Nabih; Ghfir, Imad; Guerrouj, Hassna El; Raïs, Nouzha Ben

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of 24 years old female patient, followed since ten years ago for bone giant cell tumor (GCT) of the right knee, which was complicated by pulmonary metastases. Surgical treatment and pulmonary metastasectomies have not allowed definitive cure of this disease with the appearance of metachronous bone lesions after eight years of evolution. The literature review confirms the originality of this observation: the age of the patient, the initial and metastasis locations and the occurrence of lung metastases with unfavorable prognosis. Through this clinical case, the authors highlight the role of radiobiphosphonates bone scintigraphy in detecting synchronous or metachronous bone lesions, and in monitoring of these locations under medical treatment. PMID:27186440

  16. Neurological Recovery in Two Patients with Cauda Equina Syndrome Secondary to L5 Lumbar Spine Giant Cell Tumour after Treatment with Denosumab without Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Simret Singh; Kwan, Angel Khor Nee; Chiu, Chee Kidd; Kwan, Mun Keong

    2016-01-01

    We report two patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) secondary to L5 giant cell tumour (GCT) who achieved good neurological recovery after treatment with denosumab without surgery. The first patient was a 26-year-old man with L5 GCT causing CES who regained bowel and urinary control, muscle power improvement from grade 2 to grade 4 and Oswestry disability index (ODI) improvement from 48 to 23 after denosumab treatment. The second patient was a 25-year-old woman with L5 GCT causing CES who regained bowel and urinary control, muscle power improvement from grade 0 to grade 4 and ODI improvement from 42 to 20 after denosumab treatment. The usage of denosumab in the treatment of patients with CES due to GCT allows potential neurological recovery without any surgical intervention. If surgery is not contraindicated, more time is obtained to prepare the patient preoperatively to attain safer surgery and to achieve complete tumour clearance. PMID:27790326

  17. Ecological correlates of body size in relation to cell size and cell number: patterns in flies, fish, fruits and foliage.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Jeff

    2007-05-01

    Body size is important to most aspects of biology and is also one of the most labile traits. Despite its importance we know remarkably little about the proximate (developmental) factors that determine body size under different circumstances. Here, I review what is known about how cell size and number contribute to phenetic and genetic variation in body size in Drosophila melanogaster, several fish, and fruits and leaves of some angiosperms. Variation in resources influences size primarily through changes in cell number while temperature acts